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Sample records for powdered milk protein

  1. Evaluation of milk powder quality by protein oxidative modifications.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Dana; Radici, Paola M; Vergara-Roig, Víctor A; Bosio, Noelia S; Pesce, Silvia F; Pecora, Rolando P; Romano, José C P; Kivatinitz, Silvia C

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present research was to evaluate commercially available milk powders according to their protein oxidative modifications and antioxidant capacity, and to evaluate if these characteristics are related to physical quality parameters such as dispersibility or stability during storage. Fifteen commercially processed spray-dried milk powders were evaluated: 6 whole milk powders (WMP), 4 skim milk powders (SMP), and 5 infant formula powders (IFP). Protein oxidative status was measured as protein carbonyl (PC) content, dityrosine content, and extent of protein polymerization. The level of PC was slightly lower in SMP than in WMP, whereas IFP had more than twice as much PC as WMP (2.8 ± 0.4, 2.1 ± 0.2, and 6.5 ± 1.3 nmol/mg of protein for WMP, SMP, and IFP, respectively). No differences were detected in dityrosine accumulation. Although all the possible pairs of parameters were tested for correlations, we found that 4 parameters were linked: PC, whey content, protein aggregate level, and dispersibility. After 9 mo of storage at -20°C or room temperature, all milk samples were analyzed to evaluate changes in protein oxidative status (PC, dityrosine, and protein integrity) and related parameters. Compared with the initial condition, PC increased in all tested samples after 9 mo of storage at -20°C or at room temperature. Stored milk powders had increased PC and decreased dispersibility compared with prestorage levels. Our results highlight the importance of protein oxidative status in milk powder and its relationship to other related quality parameters, such as protein integrity and dispersibility. Our findings suggest that the understanding of such relationships could help in developing quality differentiation for different types of milk powders in the product market.

  2. Manufacture of nonfat yogurt from a high milk protein powder.

    PubMed

    Mistry, V V; Hassan, H N

    1992-04-01

    Nonfat yogurts were manufactured from skim milk fortified with a new high milk protein powder. The powder, containing approximately 84% milk protein, was added to skim milk to obtain 5.2 to 11.3% total protein, 11.1 to 15% total solids, and 1.6 to 7.9% lactose in the yogurt mix. Mixes were homogenized, pasteurized at 90 degrees C for 10 min, and fermented with a yogurt culture at 42 degrees C to pH 4.6. Controls were made from the same skim milk fortified with NDM to approximately 14% total solids. Yogurts made with the protein powder and containing 5.6% protein were similar in firmness to the control and had good flavor when fresh and after 2 wk of storage. Yogurts with more than 5.6% protein were too firm and had an astringent flavor. Acetaldehyde content of all yogurts was comparable with that of the control, and fat content ranged from .18 to .33%. As the protein content of yogurts increased, the porosity of yogurts, as seen by scanning electron microscopy, decreased. Good quality nonfat yogurts can be produced by supplementing skim milk with a high milk protein powder up to 5.6% protein. The added protein assists in providing a firm body and minimal whey separation without the use of stabilizers.

  3. Heat stability of reconstituted, protein-standardized skim milk powders.

    PubMed

    Sikand, V; Tong, P S; Walker, J

    2010-12-01

    We determined the effects of standardization material, protein content, and pH on the heat stability of reconstituted milk made from low-heat (LH) and medium-heat (MH) nonfat dry milk (NDM). Low-heat and MH NDM were standardized downward from 35.5% to 34, 32, and 30% protein by adding either edible lactose powder (ELP) or permeate powder (PP) from skim milk ultrafiltration. These powders were called standardized skim milk powders (SSMP). The LH and MH NDM and SSMP were reconstituted to 9% total solids. Furthermore, subsamples of reconstituted NDM and SSMP samples were set aside to measure heat stability at native (unadjusted) pH, and the rest were adjusted to pH 6.3 to 7.0. Heat stability is defined as heat coagulation time at 140°C of the reconstituted LH or MH NDM and SSMP samples. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times at unadjusted pH values and 2 times at adjusted pH values. At an unadjusted pH, powder type, standardization material, and protein content influenced the heat stability of the samples. Heat stability for reconstituted LH NDM and SSMP was higher than reconstituted MH NDM and SSMP. Generally, decreased heat stability was observed in reconstituted LH or MH SSMP as protein content was decreased by standardization. However, adding ELP to MH SSMP did not significantly change its heat stability. When pH was adjusted to values between 6.3 and 7.0, powder type, standardization material, and pH had a significant effect on heat stability, whereas protein content did not. Maximum heat stability was noted at pH 6.7 for both reconstituted LH NDM and SSMP samples, and at pH 6.6 for both reconstituted MH NDM and SSMP samples. Furthermore, for samples with adjusted pH, higher heat stability was observed for reconstituted LH SSMP containing PP compared with reconstituted milk from LH SSMP containing ELP. However, no statistical difference was observed in the heat stability of reconstituted milk from MH NDM and MH SSMP samples. We conclude that powder type

  4. Rapid turbidimetric detection of milk powder adulteration with plant proteins.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Peter F; Farris, Samantha M; Mossoba, Magdi M

    2014-02-19

    Development of assays to screen milk for economically motivated adulteration with foreign proteins has been stalled since 2008 due to strong international reactions to the melamine poisoning incident in China and the surveillance emphasis placed on low molecular weight nitrogen-rich adulterants. New screening assays are still needed to detect high molecular weight foreign protein adulterants and characterize this understudied potential risk. A rapid turbidimetric method was developed to screen milk powder for adulteration with insoluble plant proteins. Milk powder samples spiked with 0.03-3% by weight of soy, pea, rice, and wheat protein isolates were extracted in 96-well plates, and resuspended pellet solution absorbance was measured. Limits of detection ranged from 100 to 200 μg, or 0.1-0.2% of the sample weight, and adulterant pellets were visually apparent even at ∼0.1%. Extraction recoveries ranged from 25 to 100%. Assay sensitivity and simplicity indicate that it would be ideally suitable to rapidly screen milk samples in resource poor environments where adulteration with plant protein is suspected.

  5. Differences of protein fractions among fresh, frozen and powdered donkey milk.

    PubMed

    Polidori, Paolo; Vincenzetti, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Recently donkey milk has been the focus of several studies because of its special nutritional properties and composition, which is very close to human milk. When a mother cannot breastfeed, or chooses not to breastfeed, the use of a milk substitute must provide the best option to meet the nutritional and health needs of the infant. Donkey milk has been widely used in the past to replace human milk, because chemical composition and protein content are close to that of human milk, and also because the allergenicity of donkey milk is low. The recent studies of the paediatric scientists have demonstrated that infant formulae, which are based on dairy cows milk, are less adapted than donkey milk. In fact, donkey's milk digestibility is higher than cows' milk and similar to human milk, because of the high whey proteins content and the few casein content. Since donkey milk supply is related to its seasonal availability during the year, in this study were evaluated the effects of a specific technological treatment (spray-dryer) and a particular storage temperature (-20 degrees C) on the protein fractions of donkey milk. The results obtained in fresh, frozen and powdered donkey milk showed different values in total proteins, caseins, whey proteins and lysozyme content. The article presents some promising patents on protein fractions among fresh, frozen and powdered donkey milk.

  6. NIRS and MIRS technique for the determination of protein and fat content in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Feng, Shuijuan; He, Chao; He, Yong

    2008-03-01

    It is very important to detect the protein and fat content in milk powder fast and non-destructively. Near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared(MIR) spectroscopy techniques have been compared and evaluated for the determination of the protein and fat content in milk powder with the use of Least-squares support vector machines (LS-SVM). LS-SVM models have been developed by using both NIR and MIR spectra. Both methods have shown good correlations between infrared transmission values and two nutrition contents. MIRS provided better prediction performance over NIRS. It is concluded that infrared spectroscopy technique can quantify of the protein and fat content in milk powder fast and nondestructively. The process is simple and easy to operate than chemistry methods. The results can be beneficial for designing a simple and non-destructive instrument with MIRS or NIRS spectral sensor for the determination of the protein fat content in milk powder.

  7. How surface composition of high milk proteins powders is influenced by spray-drying temperature.

    PubMed

    Gaiani, C; Morand, M; Sanchez, C; Tehrany, E Arab; Jacquot, M; Schuck, P; Jeantet, R; Scher, J

    2010-01-01

    High milk proteins powders are common ingredients in many food products. The surface composition of these powders is expected to play an essential role during their storage, handling and/or final application. Therefore, an eventual control of the surface composition by modifying the spray-drying temperature could be very useful in the improvement of powder quality and the development of new applications. For this purpose, the influence of five spray-drying temperatures upon the surface composition of the powders was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The major milk proteins were studied: native micellar casein and native whey, both more or less enriched in lactose. The results show a surface enrichment in lipids for all the powders and in proteins for many powders. Whatever the drying temperature, lipids and proteins are preferentially located near the surface whereas lactose is found in the core. This surface enrichment is also highly affected by the spray-drying temperature. More lipids, more proteins and less lactose are systematically observed at the surface of powders spray-dried at lower outlet air temperatures. The nature of proteins is also found essential; surface enrichment in lipids being much stronger for whey proteins containing powders than for casein containing powders. Additionally, we found a direct correlation between the lipids surface concentration and the wetting ability for the 25 powders studied.

  8. Modified water solubility of milk protein concentrate powders through the application of static high pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Udabage, Punsandani; Puvanenthiran, Amirtha; Yoo, Jin Ah; Versteeg, Cornelis; Augustin, Mary Ann

    2012-02-01

    The effects of high pressure (HP) treatment (100-400 MPa at 10-60 °C) on the solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powders were tested. The solubility, measured at 20 °C, of fresh MPC powders made with no HP treatment was 66%. It decreased by 10% when stored for 6 weeks at ambient temperature (~20 °C) and continued to decrease to less than 50% of its initial solubility after 12 months of storage. Of the combinations of pressure and heat used, a pressure of 200 MPa at 40 °C applied to the concentrate before spray drying was found to be the most beneficial for improved solubility of MPC powders. This combination of pressure/heat improved the initial cold water solubility to 85%. The solubility was maintained at this level after 6 weeks storage at ambient temperature and 85% of the initial solubility was preserved after 12 months. The improved solubility of MPC powders on manufacture and on storage are attributed to an altered surface composition arising from an increased concentration of non-micellar casein in the milk due to HP treatment prior to drying. The improved solubility of high protein powders (95% protein) made from blends of sodium caseinate and whey protein isolate compared with MPC powders (~85% protein) made from ultrafiltered/diafiltered milk confirmed the detrimental role of micellar casein on solubility. The results suggest that increasing the non-micellar casein content by HP treatment of milk or use of blends of sodium caseinate and whey proteins are strategies that may be used to obtain high protein milk powders with enhanced solubility.

  9. Maillard reaction and protein cross-linking in relation to the solubility of milk powders.

    PubMed

    Le, Thao T; Bhandari, Bhesh; Holland, John W; Deeth, Hilton C

    2011-12-14

    Protein changes in relation to solubility, Maillard reaction (MR), and protein cross-linking in whole milk powder (WMP), skim milk powder (SMP), and whey protein concentrate (WPC) stored at different relative humidities (RHs) were investigated by chemical and electrophoretic methods. WMP and SMP reached minimum solubility rapidly, while WPC showed no change in solubility. The loss of solubility corresponded with development of high-molecular-weight protein complexes observed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. The maximal MR rate occurred at 66% RH for WMP and SMP (high lactose/protein ratios) and 84% RH for WPC (low lactose/protein ratios) based on the furosine and hydroxymethylfurfural contents. However, browning was greatest at 84% RH in all powders. The minimum solubility corresponded with the casein and fat contents. The retention of solubility and minimal protein cross-linking of WPC compared to casein-containing powders suggest that the casein content and cross-linking strongly influence the decrease in the solubility of milk powder.

  10. Effects of heating on the secondary structure of proteins in milk powders using mid-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ye, M P; Zhou, R; Shi, Y R; Chen, H C; Du, Y

    2017-01-01

    Milk powder is an important source of protein for adults and children. Protein is very sensitive to heat, which may influence people's usage of nutrients in milk powder. In this study, we describe the temperature-induced secondary structure of protein in milk powders. In this study, whole milk powder containing 24% protein and infant formula containing 11% protein were heated from 25 to 100°C. Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectra in the mid-infrared range 400-4,000cm(-1) were used to evaluate the heat effect on the secondary structure of protein in these 2 milk powders. The spectral changes as a function of temperature were maintained by difference spectra, second-derivative spectra and Gauss curve-fitted spectra. The secondary structures of protein in the whole milk powder began to change at 70°C and in the infant formula at 50°C. The β-sheet and β-turn structures in the whole milk powder both decreased in the range of 70 to 85°C, whereas α-helix structures increased. The loss of β-sheet and β-turn may contribute to the formation of α-helix in the whole milk powder. In infant formula powder, the β-sheet structure showed a decrease and then increase, whereas the β-turn structure showed an increase and then decrease in the range of 50 to 75°C, and no change was found for α-helix structures. This implies that heating may induce the transformation from β-sheet to β-turn. Overall, whole milk powder had better temperature stability than infant formula powder, probably because of the lower content of lipid in the former than in the latter. These results help us understand the thermal stability of protein in milk powder. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High shear treatment of concentrates and drying conditions influence the solubility of milk protein concentrate powders.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Mary Ann; Sanguansri, Peerasak; Williams, Roderick; Andrews, Helen

    2012-11-01

    The solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powders was influenced by the method used for preparing the concentrate, drying conditions, and the type of dryer used. Increasing total solids of the ultrafiltered concentrates (23% total solids, TS) by diafiltration to 25% TS or evaporation to 31% TS decreased the solubility of MPC powders (80-83% protein, w/w dry basis), with ultrafiltration followed by evaporation to higher total solids having the greater detrimental effect on solubility. High shear treatment (homogenisation at 350/100 bar, microfluidisation at 800 bar or ultrasonication at 24 kHz, 600 watts) of ultrafiltered and diafiltered milk protein concentrates prior to spray drying increased the nitrogen solubility of MPC powders (82% protein, w/w dry basis). Of the treatments applied, microfluidisation was the most effective for increasing nitrogen solubility of MPC powders after manufacture and during storage. Manufacture of MPC powders (91% protein, w/w dry basis) prepared on two different pilot-scale dryers (single stage or two stage) from milk protein concentrates (20% TS) resulted in powders with different nitrogen solubility and an altered response to the effects of microfluidisation. Microfluidisation (400, 800 and 1200 bar) of the concentrate prior to drying resulted in increased long term solubility of MPC powders that were prepared on a single stage dryer but not those produced on a two stage spray dryer. This work demonstrates that microfluidisation can be used as a physical intervention for improving MPC powder solubility. Interactions between the method of preparation and treatment of concentrate prior to drying, the drying conditions and dryer type all influence MPC solubility characteristics.

  12. The Measurement of Protein in Powdered Milk Products and Infant Formulas: A Review and Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Elgar, Dave; Evers, Jaap M; Holroyd, Stephen E; Johnson, Richard; Rowan, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are a key nutritional component of both powdered milk and infant formula types of product, and reliable methods for their determination are important for manufacturing and international trade. In this review, we distinguish between methods used for determining protein quality for nutrition purposes and those used for determining chemically defined protein. The former methods cover the ability of a dietary protein source to meet human nutritional requirements for the indispensable amino acids. The latter are chemical methods for the determination of total protein and can be divided into three broad types: total nitrogen determination, direct protein determination, and indirect protein determination. Current techniques and recent developments in each are reviewed.

  13. Composition of the non-protein nitrogen fraction of goat whole milk powder and goat milk-based infant and follow-on formulae.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Colin G; Mclaren, Robert D; Frost, Deborah; Agnew, Michael; Lowry, Dianne J

    2008-03-01

    The non-protein nitrogen fraction of goat whole milk powder and of infant and follow-on formulae made from goat milk was characterized and compared with cow milk powder and formulae. Goat milk infant formula contained 10% non-protein nitrogen, expressed as a proportion of total nitrogen, compared with 7.1% for cow milk formula. Goat follow-on formula contained 9.3% and cow 7.4% non-protein nitrogen. Urea, at 30%, was quantitatively the most abundant component of the non-protein nitrogen fraction of goat milk and formulae, followed by free amino acids at 7%. Taurine, glycine and glutamic acid were the most abundant free amino acids in goat milk powders. Goat milk infant formula contained 4 mg/100 ml total nucleotide monophosphates, all derived from the goat milk itself. Goat milk has a very different profile of the non-protein nitrogen fraction to cow milk, with several constituents such as nucleotides at concentrations approaching those in human breast milk.

  14. Dissemination of Cronobacter spp. (Enterobacter sakazakii) in a Powdered Milk Protein Manufacturing Facility▿

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, N.; Healy, B.; Meade, J.; Whyte, P.; Wall, P. G.; Fanning, S.

    2008-01-01

    The microbial contamination of air filters and possible links to contaminated product in a powdered milk protein-processing facility were investigated. Over a 10-month period, seven air filters, the environment, and powdered product were analyzed for the presence of Cronobacter spp. The effects of air filter installation, maintenance, and subsequent dissemination of Cronobacter were investigated. A total of 30 isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). PFGE revealed the presence of three clonal populations distributed throughout the manufacturing site. This study highlights the need for proper installation of air filters to limit the dissemination of microorganisms into processing sites. PMID:18641152

  15. Fast and selective determination of total protein in milk powder via titration of moving reaction boundary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cheng-ye; Wang, Hou-yu; Liu, Xiao-ping; Fan, Liu-yin; Zhang, Lei; Cao, Cheng-xi

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, moving reaction boundary titration (MRBT) was developed for rapid and accurate quantification of total protein in infant milk powder, from the concept of moving reaction boundary (MRB) electrophoresis. In the method, the MRB was formed by the hydroxide ions and the acidic residues of milk proteins immobilized via cross-linked polyacrylamide gel (PAG), an acid-base indicator was used to denote the boundary motion. As a proof of concept, we chose five brands of infant milk powders to study the feasibility of MRBT method. The calibration curve of MRB velocity versus logarithmic total protein content of infant milk powder sample was established based on the visual signal of MRB motion as a function of logarithmic milk protein content. Weak influence of nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) reagents (e.g., melamine and urea) on MRBT method was observed, due to the fact that MRB was formed with hydroxide ions and the acidic residues of captured milk proteins, rather than the alkaline residues or the NPN reagents added. The total protein contents in infant milk powder samples detected via the MRBT method were in good agreement with those achieved by the classic Kjeldahl method. In addition, the developed method had much faster measuring speed compared with the Kjeldahl method.

  16. Immunodetection of added glycomacropeptide in milk formulas and milk powders.

    PubMed

    Oancea, Simona; Stoia, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed the detection of fraudulent manipulation of milk powder with a low cost component--whey powder, by applying the immunochromatographic assay to identify glycomacropeptide. Five commercial milk powder samples of various brands from the national market were analyzed: lactose enriched milk powder type 26, two whole milk powders, vitamin enriched milk powder and full cream milk powder. Our results showed additional whey (1-2%) in 60% of the selected samples after casein removal by precipitation with 20% trichloracetic acid. Another investigated sample--the enriched UHT milk for children aged 4-12 years--proved addition of whey. Other two commercial toddler formula milk powder samples of different brands were used for comparison for the presence of glycomacropeptide. The first sample which was regularly labeled as containing whey protein concentrate was found positive for glycomacropeptide in accordance with the label information, while the second one not containing whey proteins as specified by the product label, was found negative for glycomacropeptide, these two samples being in accordance with the actual legislation.

  17. Protein conformational modifications and kinetics of water-protein interactions in milk protein concentrate powder upon aging: effect on solubility.

    PubMed

    Haque, Enamul; Bhandari, Bhesh R; Gidley, Michael J; Deeth, Hilton C; Møller, Sandie M; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2010-07-14

    Protein conformational modifications and water-protein interactions are two major factors believed to induce instability of protein and eventually affect the solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powder. To test these hypotheses, MPC was stored at different water activities (a(w) 0.0-0.85) and temperatures (25 and 45 degrees C) for up to 12 weeks. Samples were examined periodically to determine solubility, change in protein conformation by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA), and water status (interaction of water with the protein molecule/surface) by measuring the transverse relaxation time (T(2)) with proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR). The solubility of MPC decreased significantly with aging, and this process was enhanced by increasing water activity (a(w)) and storage temperature. Minor changes in protein secondary structure were observed with FTIR, which indicated some degree of unfolding of protein molecules. PCA of the FTIR data was able to discriminate samples according to moisture content and storage period. Partial least-squares (PLS) analysis showed some correlation between FTIR spectral feature and solubility. The NMR T(2) results indicated the presence of three distinct populations of water molecules, and the proton signal intensity and T(2) values of proton fractions varied with storage conditions (humidity, temperature) and aging. Results suggest that protein/protein interactions may be initiated by unfolding of protein molecules that eventually affects solubility.

  18. Effects of milk powders in milk chocolate.

    PubMed

    Liang, B; Hartel, R W

    2004-01-01

    The physical characteristics of milk powders used in chocolate can have significant impact on the processing conditions needed to make that chocolate and the physical and organoleptic properties of the finished product. Four milk powders with different particle characteristics (size, shape, density) and "free" milk fat levels (easily extracted with organic solvent) were evaluated for their effect on the processing conditions and characteristics of chocolates in which they were used. Many aspects of chocolate manufacture and storage (tempering conditions, melt rheology, hardness, bloom stability) were dependent on the level of free milk fat in the milk powder. However, particle characteristics of the milk powder also influenced the physical and sensory properties of the final products.

  19. Investigation of the microstructure of milk protein concentrate powders during rehydration: alterations during storage.

    PubMed

    Mimouni, A; Deeth, H C; Whittaker, A K; Gidley, M J; Bhandari, B R

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this work was to use scanning electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure of rehydrated milk protein concentrate powder (MPC) particles. A sample preparation method for scanning electron microscopy analysis of rehydrated MPC particles is described and used to characterize the time course of dissolution and the effects of prior storage on the dissolution process. The results show that a combination of different types of interactions (e.g., bridges, direct contact) between casein micelles results in a porous, gel-like structure that restrains the dispersion of individual micelles into the surrounding liquid phase without preventing water penetration and solubilization of nonmicellar components. During storage of the powder, increased interactions occur between and within micelles, leading to compaction of micelles and the formation of a monolayer skin of casein micelles packed close together, the combination of which are proposed to be responsible for the slow dissolution of stored MPC powders. Copyright 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nontargeted detection of adulteration of skim milk powder with foreign proteins using UHPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Joseph E; Moore, Jeffrey C; Harnly, James M

    2014-06-04

    Chromatographic profiles of skim milk powder (SMP) and mixtures of SMP with soy (SPI), pea (PPI), brown rice (BRP), and hydrolyzed wheat protein (HWPI) isolates were obtained by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with 215 nm detection. Two data analysis approaches were compared for their utility to classify samples as authentic or adulterated. The t test approach evaluated data points exceeding the 99% confidence limit of the mean authentic SMP chromatogram and used data points from the entire chromatogram. The other approach used the multivariate Q statistic from a SIMCA model of authentic samples to determine adulteration and used a selected retention window to obtain best classifications. Q-Statistic and t test correctly classified adulteration of SMP with SPI at the 1% and 3% levels, respectively, while minimizing false classifications of authentic SMP. Detection of SMP adulterated with PPI, BRP, and HWPI was possible at higher adulteration levels.

  1. Raman spectroscopic quantification of milk powder constituents.

    PubMed

    McGoverin, C M; Clark, A S S; Holroyd, S E; Gordon, K C

    2010-07-12

    Raman spectroscopy has significant potential for the quantification of food products. Milk powder is an important foodstuff and ingredient that is produced on large scale (over 20 million tonnes per annum). Raman spectroscopy, unlike near- and mid-infrared spectroscopies, has not been used extensively to quantify milk powder constituents. The effect of sample presentation on spectroscopic calibrations of protein and fat for 136 New Zealand milk powders was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Prediction models were produced to quantify a protein concentration range of 32.19-37.65% w/w for skim milk powder, and a protein concentration range of 23.34-25.02% w/w and a fat concentration range of 26.26-29.68% w/w for whole milk powder (where ratios of prediction to deviation exceeded 2.6 with one exception). The resultant calibrations were not influenced by sample orientation; the sample temperature during data collection did affect the calibrations. Calcium fortification in the form of calcium carbonate was identified within a sub-set of samples, reinforcing the efficacy of Raman spectroscopy for identifying both crystalline and non-crystalline constituents within milk powder.

  2. Kinetics of enthalpy relaxation of milk protein concentrate powder upon ageing and its effect on solubility.

    PubMed

    Haque, Enamul; Whittaker, Andrew K; Gidley, Michael J; Deeth, Hilton C; Fibrianto, Kiki; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2012-10-01

    Kinetics of enthalpy relaxation of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powder upon short-term (up to 67 h) storage at 25 °C and aw 0.85, and long-term (up to 48 days) storage at 25 °C and a range of aw values (0-0.85) were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The short-term study showed a rapid recovery of enthalpy for the first 48 h, followed by a slower steady increase with time. The non-exponential β parameter was calculated using the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function and found to be 0.39. Long-term storage showed that enthalpy relaxation depends on both storage period and water activity. The enthalpy value was much less for lower moisture content (mc) (aw ≤ 0.23, mc ≤ 5.5%) than for higher mc (aw ≥ 0.45, mc ≥ 8%) samples for a particular storage period. The results suggest that the presence of more water molecules, in close proximity to the protein surface facilitates kinetic unfreezing and subsequent motion of molecular segments of protein molecules towards thermodynamic equilibrium. Although de-ageing of stored samples did not reverse storage-induced solubility losses, the timescale of enthalpy relaxation was similar to that of solubility loss. It is suggested that enthalpy relaxation within stored samples allows structural rearrangements that are responsible for subsequent solubility decreases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Safety evaluation of a milk-based protein powder produced by a novel manufacturing technique.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, A; Matulka, R; Comstock, B

    2017-05-01

    TruActive™ NF is a novel, fat-free, milk-based protein powder to be added to food to increase protein content and is manufactured using non-thermal treatment to reduce potential pathogens most relevant to protecting public health. TruActive™ NF was evaluated for potential pathogens of concern to public health regulators; none were detected. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of TruActive™ NF at a 90(th) percentile consumption for the powder in nutritional beverages and bars is 14,700 mg/day. In vitro genotoxicity testing revealed that concentrations of TruActive™ NF up to 5000 μg/plate did not induce point mutations in selected strains. Oral administration of TruActive™ NF to male Sprague-Dawley rats in an in vivo mammalian chromosomal aberration assay did not induce chromosomal aberrations or significantly affect mitosis in bone marrow cells at 2000 mg/kg. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered TruActive™ NF at concentrations of 7.5%, 15%, and 30% of the diet during a 28-day subacute dietary study followed by a 14-day recovery period. Some parameters were altered at the 30% diet concentration. The No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) in the 28-day dietary study was at 15% of the diet (11,812 mg/kg bw/day for male rats and 11,521 mg/kg bw/day for female rats). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Improving the prediction model of protein in milk powder using GA-PLS combined with PC-ANN arithmetic].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Wang, Jia-Hua; Han, Dong-Hai

    2009-07-01

    The present paper presents a new NIR analysis method with partial least square regression (PLS) and artificial neural network (ANN) to improve the prediction precision of the protein model for milk powder. First, an efficient method named region selecting by genetic algorithms (RS-GA) was used to select the calibration region, and then the GA-PLS model was made to predict the linear part of the protein content in milk powder. And then in the region selected by RS-GA method, principal component analysis (PCA) was calculated. The principal components were taken as the input of ANN model. The remnant values by subtracting the standard values and the GA-PLS validation values were regarded as the output of ANN. The ANN model was made to predict the nonlinear part of the protein content. The final result of the model was the addition of the two model's validation values, and the root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) was used to estimate the mixed model. A full region PLS model (Fr-PLS) was also made, and the RMSEP of the Fr-PLS, GA-PLS and GA-PLS+PC-ANN model was 0.511, 0.440 and 0.235, respectively. The results show that the prediction precision of the protein model for milk powder was largely improved when adding the nonlinear port in the NIR model, and this method can also be used for other complex material to improve the prediction precision.

  5. Particle Size of Milk Protein Concentrate Powder Affects the Texture of High-Protein Nutrition Bars During Storage.

    PubMed

    Banach, J C; Clark, S; Lamsal, B P

    2017-03-07

    Milk protein concentrate powder with 85% protein (MPC85) was jet-milled to give 2 particle size distributions (that is, JM-Coarse and JM-Fine) or freeze-dried (FD), in order to improve the functional properties of MPC85 for use in high-protein nutrition (HPN) bars. Volume-weighted mean diameter decreased from 86 μm to 49, 22, and 8 μm in FD, JM-Coarse, and JM-Fine, respectively (P < 0.05). The MPC85 powders modified by jet-milling and freeze-drying were significantly denser than the control MPC85 (P < 0.05). Volume of occluded air in the modified powders decreased (P < 0.05) by an order of magnitude, yet only FD possessed a lower volume of interstitial air (P < 0.05). Particle size reduction and freeze-drying MPC85 decreased its water holding capacity and improved its dispersibility by at least 20%. Contact angle measurements showed that these modifications increased initial hydrophobicity and did not improve wettability. HPN bars made from JM-Fine or FD were firmer by 40 or 17 N, respectively, than the control on day 0 (P < 0.05). HPN bar maximum compressive force increased by 38%, 33%, and 242% after 42 d at 32 °C when formulated with JM-Fine, FD, or control MPC85, respectively. HPN bars prepared with JM-Fine were less crumbly than those formulated with control or FD MPC85. Physically altering the particle structure of MPC85 improved its ability to plasticize within HPN bars and this improved their cohesiveness and textural stability.

  6. [Application of infrared spectroscopy technique to protein content fast measurement in milk powder based on support vector machines].

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Cao, Fang; Feng, Shui-Juan; He, Yong

    2008-05-01

    In the present study, the JASCO Model FTIR-4 000 fourier transform infrared spectrometer (Japan) was used, with a valid range of 7 800-350 cm(-1). Seven brands of milk powder were bought in a local supermarket. Milk powder was compressed into a uniform tablet with a diameter of 5 mm and a thickness of 2 mm, and then scanned by the spectrometer. Each sample was scanned 40 times and the data were averaged. About 60 samples were measured for each brand, and data for 409 samples were obtained. NIRS analysis was based on the range of 4 000 to 6 666 cm(-1), while MIRS analysis was between 400 and 4 000 cm(-1). The protein content was determined by kjeldahl method and the factor 6.38 was used to convert the nitrogen values to protein. The protein content value is the weight of protein per 100 g of milk powder. The NIR data of the milk powder exhibited slight differences. Univariate analysis was not really appropriate for analyzing the data sets. From NIRS region, it could be observed that the trend of different curves is similar. The one around 4 312 cm(-1) embodies the vibration of protein. From MIRS region, it could be determined that there are many differences between transmission value curves. Two troughs around 1 545 and 1 656 cm(-1) stand for the vibration of amide I and II bands of protein. The smoothing way of Savitzky-Golay with 3 segments and zero polynomials and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were applied for denoising. First 8 important principle components (PCs), which were obtained from principle component analysis (PCA), were the optimal input feature subset. Least-squares support vector machines was applied to build the protein prediction model based on infrared spectral transmission value. The prediction result was better than that of traditional PLS regression model as the determination coefficient for prediction (R(p)2) is 0.951 7 and root mean square error for prediction (RMSEP) is 0.520 201. These indicate that LS-SVM is a powerful tool for

  7. Characterization of high-milk-protein powders upon rehydration under various salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Gaiani, C; Aberkane, L; Scher, J

    2011-01-01

    Rehydration of native micellar casein and native whey isolate protein powders was followed in different ionic environments. Solutions of NaCl and CaCl2 in the concentration range of 0 to 12% (wt%) were used as rehydration media. The rehydration profiles obtained were interpreted in terms of wetting, swelling, and dispersion stages by using a turbidity method. Two behaviors were observed depending on the salt concentration. For native micellar casein powder, a significant change was observed between 3 and 6% NaCl and between 0.75 and 1.5% CaCl2. The first behavior (low salt concentration) presents a typical rehydration profile: quick wetting, swelling, and long dispersion stage. The dispersion stage of the second behavior (high salt concentration) was significantly shortened, indicating a strong modification of the protein backbone. The rehydration of whey protein powder was less influenced by salts. At low salt concentrations, a typical profile for whey powders was observed: wetting with lump formation and no swelling followed by a quick dispersion. At high CaCl2 concentrations, no turbidity stabilization was observed, indicating a possible protein unfolding and denaturation. Additionally, the changes in secondary structures of the 2 proteins upon salt increase were followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and confirmed the different profiles observed. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Estimation of whey protein in casein coprecipitate and milk powder by high-performance liquid chromatography quantification of cysteine.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Nicolai Z

    2006-06-14

    An analytical high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence method for indirect measuring of whey protein in casein coprecipitate and milk powder was developed. Samples were hydrolyzed with HCl, and cysteyl residues were derivatized with 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid and 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate. The cysteine content was used to calculate the percentage of whey protein in commercial samples with use of European Union Regulation cysteine reference values in both casein and whey protein. Method validation studies were performed for caseinates and milk powder, and results indicate that the present HPLC approach can be applied as a fast method with a standard deviation of repeatability between 3.3 and 9.5%. Applicability was studied by analysis of 40 commercial caseinate samples, and all complied to European legislation with a content of whey protein not exceeding 5%. Finally, an approach used to estimate the cysteine amount in pure casein by comparison of calculated and experimental values questions the generally accepted cysteine reference value in casein, which is most likely an overestimation.

  9. Short communication: Proteins in heat-processed skim milk powder have no positive effects on bone loss of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Du, M; Kong, Y; Wang, C; Gao, H; Han, X; Yi, H; Zhang, L

    2011-06-01

    Milk has positive effects on bone growth. However, the effect of skim milk powder (SMP) on bone properties has not been reported. This study investigated the effect of SMP on bone loss in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Forty female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized and another 10 rats received a sham operation. The OVX rats were randomly separated into 4 groups: OVX control, OVX SMP1 (SMP at 0.04 g/d), OVX SMP2 (SMP at 0.20 g/d), and OVX SMP3 (SMP at 0.40 g/d). Skim milk powder was supplied in the rat diet for 12 wk, and the rats were gavaged once per day. The effects of SMP on calcium content and bone mineral density of femur were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, respectively. Compared with the control, SMP at all dose levels tested had no particular effect on weight:length, calcium content, or bone mineral density of femurs. It was demonstrated that SMP (0.04 to 0.40 g/d) had no positive effect on bone loss in OVX rats, probably because the heat treatment used during SMP processing caused a loss of biological activity in the protein.

  10. Milk powders ageing: effect on physical and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marie E C; Scher, Joël; Desobry-Banon, Sylvie; Desobry, Stéphane

    2004-01-01

    Milk powders are now considered as food ingredients, mainly because of the functional properties of milk proteins. During the storage of milk powders, many physicochemical damages, mainly dependent on lactose glass transition occur. They have important consequences on physical (flowability) and functional properties (solubility, emulsifying, and foaming properties) of milk powders. First, lactose crystallization modifies the microstructure and chemical composition of the surface of powder particles. Thus, milk powders flowability is decreased. Since the structure of milk proteins is destabilized, its solubility is damaged. Moreover, particle collapse and caking occur and mainly decrease the physical properties of milk powders (density and flowability). The mechanical stresses involved may also enhance proteins unfolding, which is detrimental to solubility. Finally, molecular mobility is favored upon ageing, and both chemical (Maillard reaction) and enzymatic reactions occur. Maillard reaction and oxidation enhance protein interactions and aggregations, which mainly lessen milk powders solubility. Maillard reaction also decreases emulsifying and foaming properties. Storage temperature and relative humidity have been considered as the predominant factors involved, but time, milk components, and their physical state also have been implied.

  11. Determination of immunoglobulin G in bovine colostrum and milk powders, and in dietary supplements of bovine origin by protein G affinity liquid chromatography: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Grant; Otter, Don; Arnold, K; Austad, J; Christiansen, S; Ferreira, I; Irvine, F; Marsh, C; Massom, L R; Otter, D; Pearce, K; Stevens, J; Szpylka, J; Vyas, P; Woollard, D; Wu, C

    2010-01-01

    An AOAC collaborative study was conducted to evaluate an affinity LC procedure for measuring immunoglobulin G (IgG) in selected dairy powders. The powders were extracted with 0.15 M sodium chloride solution and the pH was adjusted to 4.6 to precipitate caseins, which would otherwise lead to an overestimation of IgG. The analyte was then bound to a commercially available Protein G affinity cartridge and selectively eluted with a glycine buffer at pH 2.5. Detection was at 280 nm and quantification was made against a calibration curve prepared from bovine serum IgG. The samples analyzed included the likely matrixes for which this assay will find commercial use, namely, high- and low-protein-content colostrum powders, tablets containing colostrum powder, and some IgG-containing dairy powders; milk protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, and skim milk powder. Eleven laboratories provided data for the study and assayed blind duplicates of six materials. The repeatability RSD values ranged from 2.1 to 4.2% and the reproducibility RSD values ranged from 6.4 to 18.5%. The Protein G method with casein removal has adequate reproducibility for measuring IgG in colostrum-derived powders that are traded on the basis of IgG content as a colostral marker.

  12. A non-targeted UHPLC-UV methid with classical and multi-variate data analysis to detect adulteration of skim milk powder with foreign proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ultra-High performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with single wavelength (215 nm) detection was used to obtain chromatographic profiles of authentic skim milk powder (SMP) and synthetic mixtures of SMP with variable amounts of soy (SPI), pea (PPI), brown rice (BRP), and hydrolyzed wheat protein (...

  13. Rennet-induced aggregation and curd formation from skimmed milk powders prepared under different sterilizing conditions.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuka; Matsumiya, Kentaro; Kubouchi, Hiroaki; Noda, Masayuki; Nishimura, Kimio; Matsumura, Yasuki

    2009-09-01

    Heat treatment during the production of skimmed milk powder causes denaturation of proteins, thereby affecting the physicochemical properties of the skimmed milk powder. To understand the effects of heat treatment on the sensitivity of the casein micelles in skimmed milk powders, low heating type (L), normal heating type (N), high heating type (H), and super-high heating type (SH), to reaction with rennet, rennet-induced curd formation was investigated. A well-developed network structure with wide spaces was observed only in the curd derived from the solution of type L skimmed milk powder. SDS-PAGE suggested that there was no difference in the amount of glycomacropeptide generated from kappa-casein in the four types of skimmed milk powder, but casein micelles in the solution of type L skimmed milk powder formed aggregates most effectively. These results are discussed with respect to the thermal denaturation of proteins in skimmed milk powder.

  14. The decontamination of industrial casein and milk powder by irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żegota, H.; Małolepszy, B.

    2008-09-01

    The efficacy of gamma radiation decontamination of industrial casein, a milk protein utilized as a component of many food and non-food products has been studied. Low-fat milk powder was also included with a purpose to study the microflora survival in protein-rich materials. Microbial analysis of the samples prior to irradiation showed that the initial total viable count was higher than 6.0 log cfu g -1 in both casein and milk powders. The contamination of casein with moulds and yeasts was found to be equal to 3.56 log cfu g -1. The counts of coliforms have not exceeded the value of 2.48 log cfu g -1. Radiation processing of casein and milk powder has substantially reduced the microbial population of all samples. The dose of 5 kGy was sufficient to reduce the total microflora and coliforms counts to the level permitted for food products. Survivals of microorganisms were analyzed by the generalized exponential equation, SF =exp[ -D/ Do) α]. Values of an exponent, α, standing for the dispersion parameter, were equal to 0.65 and 0.70 for microorganisms contaminating casein and milk powders, respectively. The numerical value of the dispersion parameter α<1 indicates the concave dependence of a logarithm of surviving fraction versus radiation dose. No difference in microflora survival in irradiated samples tested immediately and in samples stored for 1-month after irradiation has been noticed.

  15. Detection of milk powder and caseinates in Halloumi cheese.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, L; Cattaneo, S; Masotti, F; Psathas, G

    2010-08-01

    Halloumi cheese is traditionally manufactured from fresh milk. Nevertheless, dried dairy ingredients are sometimes illegally added to increase cheese yield. Lysinoalanine and furosine are newly formed molecules generated by heating and drying milk protein components. The levels of these molecular markers in the finished Halloumi have been investigated to verify their suitability to reveal the addition of skim milk powder and calcium caseinate to cheese milk. Because of the severe heating conditions applied in curd cooking, genuine Halloumi cheeses (n=35), representative of the Cyprus production, were characterized by levels of lysinoalanine (mean value=8.1 mg/100g of protein) and furosine (mean value=123 mg/100g of protein) unusual for natural cheeses. Despite the variability of the values, a good correlation between the 2 parameters (R=0.975) has been found in all cheeses, considering both the fresh and mature cheeses as well as those obtained from curd submitted to a prolonged cooking following a traditional practice adopted by a very small number of manufacturers. Experimental cheeses made by adding as low as 5% of skim milk powder, or calcium caseinate, or both, to cheese milk fell outside the prediction limits at +/-2 standard deviation of the above-reported correlation regardless of curd cooking conditions or ripening length. This correlation may be adopted as a reliable index of Halloumi cheese genuineness.

  16. Solubility of commercial milk protein concentrates and milk protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Sikand, V; Tong, P S; Roy, S; Rodriguez-Saona, L E; Murray, B A

    2011-12-01

    High-protein milk protein concentrate (MPC) and milk protein isolate (MPI) powders may have lower solubility than low-protein MPC powders, but information is limited on MPC solubility. Our objectives in this study were to (1) characterize the solubility of commercially available powder types with differing protein contents such as MPC40, MPC80, and MPI obtained from various manufacturers (sources), and (2) determine if such differences could be associated with differences in mineral, protein composition, and conformational changes of the powders. To examine possible predictors of solubility as measured by percent suspension stability (%SS), mineral analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and quantitative protein analysis by HPLC was performed. After accounting for overall differences between powder types, %SS was found to be strongly associated with the calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and sodium content of the powders. The FTIR score plots were in agreement with %SS results. A principal component analysis of FTIR spectra clustered the highly soluble MPC40 separately from the rest of samples. Furthermore, 2 highly soluble MPI samples were clustered separately from the rest of the MPC80 and MPI samples. We found that the 900 to 1,200 cm⁻¹ region exhibited the highest discriminating power, with dominant bands at 1,173 and 968 cm⁻¹, associated with phosphate vibrations. The 2 highly soluble MPI powders were observed to have lower κ-casein and α-(S1)-casein contents and slightly higher whey protein contents than the other powders. The differences in the solubility of MPC and MPI were associated with a difference in mineral composition, which may be attributed to differences in processing conditions. Additional studies on the role of minerals composition on MPC80 solubility are warranted. Such a study would provide a greater understanding of factors associated with differences in solubility and can provide insight on methods to improve

  17. [Making tablets of powdered milk and the physical properties].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mitsuho; Otsubo, Kazumitsu; Nakane, Shota; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    Compressed baby milk powder has proven to be very convenient for parents due to the ease with which it can be handled, and the fact that use of a measuring scoop is not necessary. The purpose of this study was to develop a compressed baby milk powder and analyze the resulting physical properties. The basic production process consisted of the following steps: 1) molding milk powder by low compression pressure, 2) humidification at 25°C·97%RH and 3) drying with use of a desiccant. No chemical additives were used for solidification; therefore the chemical composition of the compressed milk powder is identical to the base milk powder. The important properties of the compressed milk powder are both ready solubility and the strength of the solid. The compressed milk powder obtained at low pressure was too brittle for practical use, but the strength was increased by humidification followed by drying. During the humidification process, the powder particles located close to the surface of the compressed milk powder partially dissolve resulting in bridging structures between the particles, leading to an increase in strength. Both specific surface area and the volume ratio of the compressed milk powder decreased. Testing showed that caking between the particles occurred following humidification, and that the volume of caking affected the ease with which the compressed milk powder dissolves in water.

  18. Effects of milk somatic cell counts on some physicochemical and functional characteristics of skim and whole milk powders.

    PubMed

    Sert, Durmuş; Mercan, Emin; Aydemir, Serdar; Civelek, Mustafa

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of milk somatic cell count (SCC) levels on spray-dried milk powders. For this reason, 3 cow milks with different SCC (<300,000, 300,000-700,000, >700,000 SCC/mL) were processed into skim (SMP) and whole milk powder (WMP). The effect of SCC on the physicochemical and functional characteristics of the milk powders and textural properties of set-type yogurts produced from reconstituted milk powders with different SCC was evaluated. A crucial difference was noted between milk powders depending on different SCC. Protein values and ash content of powder samples decreased correlatively with increasing SCC. The hydroxymethylfurfural content of SMP was higher than WMP. We noted an increase in hydroxymethylfurfural content of both SMP and WMP depending on elevated SCC. Solubility index of SMP and WMP was 1.280 to 1.632 and 0.940 to 1.208mL, respectively; with increasing SCC, solubility index was affected adversely. The highest foam stability was determined in SMP containing >700,000 SCC. Bulk density of SMP and WMP was between 0.682 and 0.708 and 0.660 to 0.685g/cm(3), respectively. An increase was observed in scorched particle of both SMP and WMP depending on increasing SCC. We found significant differences in particle size distribution of milk powders produced from milk with SCC at different levels. Although WMP had more uniform and big particle structure, SMP had more specific area. A negative correlation was noted between yogurt texture and SCC. Results indicate that milk SCC has negative influences on milk powder quality. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Time resolved fluorescence of cow and goat milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandao, Mariana P.; de Carvalho dos Anjos, Virgílio; Bell., Maria José V.

    2017-01-01

    Milk powder is an international dairy commodity. Goat and cow milk powders are significant sources of nutrients and the investigation of the authenticity and classification of milk powder is particularly important. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to distinguish chemical composition and structure modifications could assist develop a portable and non-destructive methodology to perform milk powder classification and determine composition. This study goal is to differentiate milk powder samples from cows and goats using fluorescence lifetimes. The samples were excited at 315 nm and the fluorescence intensity decay registered at 468 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes of 1.5 ± 0.3, 6.4 ± 0.4 and 18.7 ± 2.5 ns for goat milk powder; and 1.7 ± 0.3, 6.9 ± 0.2 and 29.9 ± 1.6 ns for cow's milk powder. We discriminate goat and cow powder milk by analysis of variance using Fisher's method. In addition, we employed quadratic discriminant analysis to differentiate the milk samples with accuracy of 100%. Our results suggest that time-resolved fluorescence can provide a new method to the analysis of powder milk and its composition.

  20. Use of fluorometry for determination of skim milk powder adulteration in fresh milk*

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Rong-fa; Liu, Dong-hong; Ye, Xing-qian; Yang, Kai

    2005-01-01

    A FAST (fluorescence of advanced Maillard products and Soluble Tryptophan) method for identification of reconstituted milk made from skim milk powder in the fresh milk was developed. Considering milk and skim milk powders variations from different seasons and countries, milk was collected from different dairy farms in different seasons and skim milk powders were collected from different countries to measure the Tryptophan (Trp), advanced Maillard products (AMP) fluorescence values. The results showed that there were differences (P<0.01) between raw and reconstituted milk. The plot of values in each mixed level of raw and reconstituted milk had a correlation coefficient >0.97. The FAST method is a simple, rapid, low-cost and sensitive method enabling the detection of 5% reconstituted milk in fresh milk. The measurement of the Trp, AMP fluorescence values and calculation of the FAST index is a suitable method for large-scale monitoring of fresh milk samples. PMID:16252345

  1. Use of fluorometry for determination of skim milk powder adulteration in fresh milk.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rong-fa; Liu, Dong-hong; Ye, Xing-qian; Yang, Kai

    2005-11-01

    A FAST (fluorescence of advanced Maillard products and Soluble Tryptophan) method for identification of reconstituted milk made from skim milk powder in the fresh milk was developed. Considering milk and skim milk powders variations from different seasons and countries, milk was collected from different dairy farms in different seasons and skim milk powders were collected from different countries to measure the Tryptophan (Trp), advanced Maillard products (AMP) fluorescence values. The results showed that there were differences (P<0.01) between raw and reconstituted milk. The plot of values in each mixed level of raw and reconstituted milk had a correlation coefficient >0.97. The FAST method is a simple, rapid, low-cost and sensitive method enabling the detection of 5% reconstituted milk in fresh milk. The measurement of the Trp, AMP fluorescence values and calculation of the FAST index is a suitable method for large-scale monitoring of fresh milk samples.

  2. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    PubMed

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy.

  3. [Study on quality detection of milk powder based on near infrared spectroscopy (NIR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-Zhu; Wang, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Chao; Xu, Yun

    2007-09-01

    The traditional NIR model was usually built according to various parameters of an individual type of milk powder so that it's really time-consuming. To simplify the application of NIR in real-time quality detection of milk powder, it was proposed in the present paper to build NIR models for a sample set composed of different types of milk powder. With 70 samples provided by one manufacturer, 6 NIR models including acidity, fat, lactose, sucrose, protein and ash, were built by optimizing algorithms. The results indicated that these NIR models except the acidity model have good stability and high prediction ability (RSD<10%, RPD>3).

  4. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method extension to quantify simultaneously melamine and cyanuric acid in egg powder and soy protein in addition to milk products.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Mondal, Ana Mary; Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Konings, Erik; Acheson-Shalom, Ruth; Delatour, Thierry

    2010-11-24

    As a consequence of the adulteration of infant formulas and milk powders with melamine (MEL) in China in 2008, much attention has been devoted to the analysis of MEL [and cyanuric acid (CA)] in dairy products. Several methods based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or Raman spectroscopy have been described in the literature. However, no method is available for the simultaneous determination of MEL and CA in other raw materials, which are considered as high-risk materials for economically motivated adulteration. The present paper reports the results of an interlaboratory-based performance evaluation conducted with seven laboratories worldwide. The purpose was to demonstrate the ability of a cleanup-free LC-MS/MS method, originally developed for cow's milk and milk-powdered infant formula, to quantify MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg for MEL in egg powder and soy protein, respectively. For CA, LOD and LOQ were 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg in egg powder and 1.0 and 1.50 mg/kg in soy protein, respectively. Recoveries ranged within a 97-113% range for both MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Reproducibility values (RSD(R)) from seven laboratories were within a 5.4-11.7% range for both analytes in the considered matrices. Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values between 0.4 and 0.7 indicate acceptable among-laboratory precision for the method described.

  5. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  6. Prion protein in milk.

    PubMed

    Franscini, Nicola; El Gedaily, Ahmed; Matthey, Ulrich; Franitza, Susanne; Sy, Man-Sun; Bürkle, Alexander; Groschup, Martin; Braun, Ueli; Zahn, Ralph

    2006-12-20

    Prions are known to cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) after accumulation in the central nervous system. There is increasing evidence that prions are also present in body fluids and that prion infection by blood transmission is possible. The low concentration of the proteinaceous agent in body fluids and its long incubation time complicate epidemiologic analysis and estimation of spreading and thus the risk of human infection. This situation is particularly unsatisfactory for food and pharmaceutical industries, given the lack of sensitive tools for monitoring the infectious agent. We have developed an adsorption matrix, Alicon PrioTrap, which binds with high affinity and specificity to prion proteins. Thus we were able to identify prion protein (PrP(C))--the precursor of prions (PrP(Sc))--in milk from humans, cows, sheep, and goats. The absolute amount of PrP(C) differs between the species (from microg/l range in sheep to ng/l range in human milk). PrP(C) is also found in homogenised and pasteurised off-the-shelf milk, and even ultrahigh temperature treatment only partially diminishes endogenous PrP(C) concentration. In view of a recent study showing evidence of prion replication occurring in the mammary gland of scrapie infected sheep suffering from mastitis, the appearance of PrP(C) in milk implies the possibility that milk of TSE-infected animals serves as source for PrP(Sc).

  7. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    PubMed

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants.

  8. Modification of the analysis of parathyroid hormone-related protein in milk and concentrations of this protein in commercial milk and milk products in Japan.

    PubMed

    Onda, K; Yamaguchi, M; Ohashi, M; Sato, R; Ochiai, H; Iriki, T; Wada, Y

    2010-05-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), which causes hypercalcemia associated with malignant tumors, is known to be present in milk. Gene expression of PTHrP in the mammary gland increases markedly during parturition and with the onset of lactation. Even when circulating PTHrP levels are extremely low or below the detection limit, milk PTHrP levels are remarkably high. Parathyroid hormone-related protein derived from the mammary gland is assumed to play a role in maintaining the maternal calcium homeostasis and calcium transport from blood to milk. In previous studies that determined the PTHrP concentrations in milk, the pretreatments and diluent composition were not standardized. Here, we investigated the effect of various pretreatment procedures and diluent constitutions and the consequent PTHrP concentrations in commercial milk and milk products in Japan. Significant differences were found in PTHrP concentrations in raw milk samples subjected to different combinations of pretreatments (mixing, centrifugation, acidification, and heating) and diluents (0pM standard solution of PTHrP, plasma treated with protease inhibitors, and original diluent). We measured the PTHrP concentrations in normal liquid milk, processed milk, milk drinks, formulated milk powders, and skim milk powder by using the appropriate combination of pretreatment (acidification) and diluent (plasma treated with protease inhibitors). The PTHrP concentration in normal liquid milk, processed milk, and skim milk powder was as high as that in raw milk (>5nM), whereas that in milk drinks differed considerably. The PTHrP concentration in infant formulas (<2nM) was lower than that in the other milk products. These results indicate that a certain amount of PTHrP is ingested when milk and milk products are consumed.

  9. Melamine milk powder and infant formula sold in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Schoder, Dagmar

    2010-09-01

    This is the first study proving the existence of melamine in milk powder and infant formula exported to the African market. A total of 49 milk powder batches were collected in Dar-es-Salaam (Tanzania, East Africa), the center of international trade in East Africa, which serves as a commercial bottleneck and shipment hub for sub-Saharan, Central, and East Africa. Two categories of samples were collected between October and December 2008, immediately after the melamine contamination of Chinese products became public: (i) market brands of all international companies supplying the East African market and (ii) illegally sold products from informal channels. Melamine concentration was determined with the AgraQuant Melamine Sensitive Assay. Despite the national import prohibition of Chinese milk products and unlabeled milk powder in Tanzania, 11% (22 of 200) of inspected microretailers sold milk powder on the local black market. Manufacturers could be identified for only 55% (27) of the 49 investigated batches. Six percent (3 of 49) of all samples and 11% (3 of 27) of all international brand name products tested revealed melamine concentrations up to 5.5 mg/kg of milk powder. This amount represents about twice the tolerable daily intake as suggested by the U.S Food and Drug Administration. Based on our study, we can assume that the number of affected children in Africa is substantial.

  10. The use of whey or skimmed milk powder in fortified blended foods for vulnerable groups.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Camilla; Andersen, Gregers S; Jacobsen, Stine; Mølgaard, Christian; Friis, Henrik; Sangild, Per T; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2008-01-01

    Fortified blended foods (FBF), especially corn soy blend, are used as food aid for millions of people worldwide, especially malnourished individuals and vulnerable groups. There are only a few studies evaluating the effect of FBF on health outcomes, and the potential negative effect of antinutrients has not been examined. Different lines of evidence suggest that dairy proteins have beneficial effects on vulnerable groups. Here we review the evidence on the effects of adding whey or skimmed milk powder to FBF used for malnourished infants and young children or people living with HIV or AIDS. Adding whey or skimmed milk powder to FBF improves the protein quality, allowing a reduction in total amount of protein, which could have potential metabolic advantages. It also allows for a reduced content of soy and cereal and thereby a reduction of potential antinutrients. It is possible that adding milk could improve weight gain, linear growth, and recovery from malnutrition, but this needs to be confirmed. Bioactive factors in whey might have beneficial effects on the immune system and muscle synthesis, but evidence from vulnerable groups is lacking. Milk proteins will improve flavor, which is important for acceptability in vulnerable groups. The most important disadvantage is a considerable increase in price. Adding 10-15% milk powder would double the price, which means that such a product should be used only in well-defined vulnerable groups with special needs. The potential beneficial effects of adding milk protein and lack of evidence in vulnerable groups call for randomized intervention studies.

  11. Protein composition of rhesus monkey milk: comparison to human milk.

    PubMed

    Kunz, C; Lönnerdal, B

    1993-04-01

    1. Proteins in human milk and Rhesus monkey milk have been compared by FPLC gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography, SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, nitrogen and protein determination. 2. Mature Rhesus milk is higher in protein concentration (15-20 mg/ml) than human milk (8-9 mg/ml). 3. Non-Protein nitrogen is 6-13% in Rhesus milk but 25-30% in human milk. 4. Secretory IgA, lactoferrin, serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin and lysozyme are present in Rhesus milk, but at a lower concentration than in human milk. 5. The casein subunit pattern is more complex in Rhesus milk compared to human milk. 6. The ratio of whey proteins to casein is similar in both milks (approximately 60/40). 7. A protein with a M(r) of 21,600 is a major component in monkey whey but is not found in human milk.

  12. [Surveillance of perchlorate level in wine, seafood, polished rice, milk, powdered milk and yogurt].

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Takahiro; Matsuda, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate, which may be naturally occurring or artificial in origin, inhibits iodide uptake into the thyroid gland and disturbs thyroid function. In order to investigate perchlorate contamination in foods in Japan, perchlorate levels in 28 wine samples, 20 seafood samples, 10 polished rice samples, 30 milk (include whole milk, composition modified milk, low fat milk, processed milk, milk drink) samples, 10 powdered milk samples and 10 yogurt samples were measured. Perchlorate was found in all wine, milk, powdered milk and yogurt samples tested. Perchlorate levels ranged from 0.2 ng/g to 103 ng/g in wine samples, from 2 ng/g to 11 ng/g in milk samples, from 3 ng/g to 35 ng/g in powdered milk samples, and from 2 ng/g to 11 ng/g in yogurt samples. Perchlorate levels in the seafood samples were under the LOQ (0.8 ng/g) in 8 samples and ranged from 0.8 ng/g to 72 ng/g in 12 samples. In all polished rice samples, perchlorate level was under the LOQ (1.0 ng/g).

  13. Determination of fluoride concentration in powdered milk in Iran 2010.

    PubMed

    Hossein Mahvi, Amir; Ghanbarian, Maryam; Ghanbarian, Marjan; Khosravi, Ahmad; Ghanbarian, Masoud

    2012-04-01

    High concentrations of fluoride (F) in powdered milk (formula milk) can have adverse health effects on the body. The F concentration in powdered milk was analysed in Iran in 2010. A total of twelve commercial brands of highly consumed powdered milk were selected to analyse the F content through the standard F ion-selective electrode method. From each brand, three samples with different production dates were selected. The means and standard deviation for F concentration in all the samples was 1·73 (sd 0·3) μg F/g. The minimum and maximum F content in powdered milk brands Humana2 and Humana3 was 1·32 (sd 0·1) and 2·36 (sd 0·3) μg F/g, respectively. The study revealed that there was no significant difference in F concentration in the samples that belonged to various dates. Humana3 had a high F concentration (with an average of 2·36 (sd 0·3) μg F/g), which can be a risk factor for increased dental fluorosis, especially when being prepared using water with a high content of F.

  14. Terahertz spectral detection of potassium sorbate in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengpeng; Zhang, Yuan; Ge, Hongyi

    2017-02-01

    The spectral characteristics of potassium sorbate in milk powder in the range of 0.2 2.0 THz have been measured with THz time-domain spectroscopy(THz-TDS). Its absorption and refraction spectra are obtained at room temperature in the nitrogen atmosphere. The results showed that potassium sorbate at 0.98 THz obvious characteristic absorption peak. The simple linear regression(SLR) model was taken to analyze the content of potassium sorbate in milk powder. The results showed that the absorption coefficient increases as the mixture potassium sorbate increases. The research is important to food quality and safety testing.

  15. Raman-spectroscopy-based chemical contaminant detection in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S.

    2015-05-01

    Addition of edible and inedible chemical contaminants in food powders for purposes of economic benefit has become a recurring trend. In recent years, severe health issues have been reported due to consumption of food powders contaminated with chemical substances. This study examines the effect of spatial resolution used during spectral collection to select the optimal spatial resolution for detecting melamine in milk powder. Sample depth of 2mm, laser intensity of 200mw, and exposure time of 0.1s were previously determined as optimal experimental parameters for Raman imaging. Spatial resolution of 0.25mm was determined as the optimal resolution for acquiring spectral signal of melamine particles from a milk-melamine mixture sample. Using the optimal resolution of 0.25mm, sample depth of 2mm and laser intensity of 200mw obtained from previous study, spectral signal from 5 different concentration of milk-melamine mixture (1%, 0.5%, 0.1%, 0.05%, and 0.025%) were acquired to study the relationship between number of detected melamine pixels and corresponding sample concentration. The result shows that melamine concentration has a linear relation with detected number of melamine pixels with correlation coefficient of 0.99. It can be concluded that the quantitative analysis of powder mixture is dependent on many factors including physical characteristics of mixture, experimental parameters, and sample depth. The results obtained in this study are promising. We plan to apply the result obtained from this study to develop quantitative detection model for rapid screening of melamine in milk powder. This methodology can also be used for detection of other chemical contaminants in milk powders.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in milk powders marketed in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    García Londoño, Víctor Alonso; Reynoso, Cora Marcela; Resnik, Silvia

    2017-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) occurrence in forty-four samples of milk powder, marketed in Uruguay, was determined. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was applied with fluorescence detector (FLD) and UV-VIS diodes array detector (DAD). Milk powder was fortified with PAHs at three levels producing average recovery higher than 78.6% for all levels. The highest concentration of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) was 2.85 μg kg(-1) in milk powder. Contamination of samples expressed as the sum of 16 analysed PAHs varied between 5.77 and 427.28 μg kg(-1) and as PAH4 (BaP, chrysene, benzo(a)anthracene and benzo(b)fluoranthene) was between below LOD and 11.54 μg kg(-1). Only one sample exceeded the maximum limit for BaP, but 84% of the commercial milk powders did not comply with the European Union maximum limit for PAH4.

  17. Technological aspects of lactose-hydrolyzed milk powder.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jansen Kelis Ferreira; Stephani, Rodrigo; Tavares, Guilherme M; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Costa, Renata Golin Bueno; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Rocha; Almeida, Mariana Ramos; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Schuck, Pierre; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler

    2017-11-01

    Few reports describe the effect of lactose hydrolysis on the properties of milk powder during production and storage. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of five different levels of enzymatic lactose hydrolysis during the production and storage of milk powder. As the lactose hydrolysis rate increased, adhesion to the drying chamber also increased, due to higher levels of particle agglomeration. Additionally, more brown powder was obtained when the lactose hydrolysis rate was increased, which in turn negatively affected rehydration ability. Using Raman spectroscopy, crystallization of the lactose residues in various samples was assessed over 6weeks of accelerated aging at a room temperature environment with 75.5% of air moisture. Products with 25% or greater lactose hydrolysis showed no signs of crystallization, in contrast to the non-hydrolyzed sample. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Physicochemical and sensory characteristics of fat-free goat milk yogurt with added stabilizers and skim milk powder fortification.

    PubMed

    Bruzantin, F P; Daniel, J L P; da Silva, P P M; Spoto, M H F

    2016-05-01

    Goat milk yogurt has a less consistent coagulum compared with cow milk yogurt; furthermore, the presence of goat milk in foodstuffs imparts a characteristic flavor that can restrict its acceptance by consumers. This study aimed to assess and compare the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of fat-free goat milk yogurts with added stabilizers or bovine skim milk powder to improve the final product. Four treatment additions were evaluated: (1) a mixture of 0.1% (wt/vol) carrageenan and 0.1% (wt/vol) pectin (treatment CR); (2) 0.5% (wt/vol) pectin (treatment PE); (3) 4.65% (wt/vol) bovine skim milk powder (treatment BM); and (4) control (no stabilizer; treatment CT). The physicochemical parameters were investigated at on d 1 and 5 of storage. The BM treatment presented higher pH and titratable acidity values, resulting in a buffering capacity effect. The total crude protein (CP) and solids-not-fat (SNF) contents were also higher in BM compared with the other evaluated treatments because of the addition of bovine skim milk powder. We detected a reduction in pH values for all treatments. Lower SNF contents were present in the CR and CT treatments, which might be related to a syneresis process during storage; moreover, an increase in total CP was observed for all treatments due to the proteolytic action of the starter culture. Sensory attributes, including appearance (color, consistency, and presence of lumps), texture (consistency, viscosity, and presence of lumps), flavor (bitter, sweet, and characteristic of commercial plain nonfat yogurt), and overall impression were evaluated by quantitative descriptive analysis. The addition of 0.5% (wt/vol) of pectin (PE treatment) strengthened the curd; however, the visual and oral presence of lumps and a higher bitterness score were noted by trained panelists, which resulted in the lowest overall impression score for the PE treatment. In several sensory attributes, the CR treatment was considered similar to the control

  19. Rapid detection of whey in milk powder samples by spectrophotometric and multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Bruna Mara Aparecida; de Carvalho, Lorendane Millena; dos Reis Coimbra, Jane Sélia; Minim, Luis Antônio; de Souza Barcellos, Edilton; da Silva Júnior, Willer Ferreira; Detmann, Edenio; de Carvalho, Gleidson Giordano Pinto

    2015-05-01

    A rapid method for the detection and quantification of the adulteration of milk powder by the addition of whey was assessed by measuring glycomacropeptide protein using mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIR). Fluid milk samples were dried and then spiked with different concentrations of GMP and whey. Calibration models were developed using multivariate techniques, from spectral data. For the principal component analysis and discriminant analysis, excellent percentages of correct classification were achieved in accordance with the increase in the proportion of whey samples. For partial least squares regression analysis, the correlation coefficient (r) and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) in the best model were 0.9885 and 1.17, respectively. The rapid analysis, low cost monitoring and high throughput number of samples tested per unit time indicate that MIR spectroscopy may hold potential as a rapid and reliable method for detecting milk powder frauds using cheese whey.

  20. Short-wave near-infrared spectroscopy of milk powder for brand identification and component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; Feng, S; He, Y

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the present paper was to provide new insight into the short-wave near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic analysis of milk powder. Near-infrared spectra in the 800- to 1,025-nm region of 350 samples were analyzed to determine the brands and quality of milk powders. Brand identification was done by a least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) model coupled with fast fixed-point independent component analysis (ICA). The correct answer rate of the ICA-LS-SVM model reached as high as 98%, which was better than that of the LS-SVM (95%). Contents of fat, protein, and carbohydrate were determined by the LS-SVM and ICA-LS-SVM models. Both processes offered good determination performance for analyzing the main components in milk powder based on short-wave NIR spectra. The coefficients of determination for prediction and root mean square error of prediction of ICA-LS-SVM were 0.983, 0.231, and 0.982, and 0.161, 0.980, and 0.410, respectively, for the 3 components. However, there were less than 10 input variables in the ICA-LS-SVM model compared with 225 in the LS-SVM model. Thus, the processing time was much shorter and the model was simpler. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the short-wave NIR region is promising for fast and reliable determination of the brand and main components in milk powder.

  1. Role of milk protein-based products in some quality attributes of goat milk yogurt.

    PubMed

    Gursel, A; Gursoy, A; Anli, E A K; Budak, S O; Aydemir, S; Durlu-Ozkaya, F

    2016-04-01

    Goat milk yogurts were manufactured with the fortification of 2% (wt/vol) skim goat milk powder (SGMP), sodium caseinate (NaCn), whey protein concentrate (WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), or yogurt texture improver (YTI). Yogurts were characterized based on compositional, microbiological, and textural properties; volatile flavor components (with gas chromatography); and sensory analyses during storage (21d at 5 °C). Compared with goat milk yogurt made by using SGMP, the other goat milk yogurt variants had higher protein content and lower acidity values. Goat milk yogurts with NaCn and WPC, in particular, had better physical characteristics. Using WPI caused the hardest structure in yogurt, leading to higher syneresis values. Acetaldehyde and ethanol formation increased with the incorporation of WPI, WPC, or YTI to yogurt milk. The tyrosine value especially was higher in the samples with NaCn and YTI than in the samples with WPC and WPI. Counts of Streptococcus thermophilus were higher than the counts of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, possibly due to a stimulatory effect of milk protein-based ingredients other than SGMP on the growth of S. thermophilus. Yogurt with NaCn was the best accepted among the yogurts. For the parameters used, milk protein-based products such as NaCn or WPC have promising features as suitable ingredients for goat milk yogurt manufacture.

  2. [Detection of Adulteration in Milk Powder with Starch Near Infrared].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning-ning; Shen, Bing-hui; Guan, Jian-jun; Zhao, Zhong-rui; Zhu, Ye-wei; Zhang, Lu-da; Yan, Yan-lu; Zheng, Yu-yan; Dong, Cheng-yu; Kang, Ding-ming

    2015-08-01

    Three China trademarks of milk powder called Mengniu, Yili, Wandashan were taken as testing samples. Each of them mixed varied amount of starch in different gradient, which were consisted of 32 adulterated milk powder samples mixed with starch, was taken as standard samples for constructing predicted model. To those 32 samples, the reflecting spectrum characteristics in middle wave of near infrared spectrum with Near Infrared Spectrum Analyzer (Micro NIR 1700) produced by JDSU Ltd. USA were collected for five repeats in five different days. The time span was nearly two months. Firstly, we build the model used the reflecting spectrum characteristics of those samples with biomimetic pattern recognition (BPR) arithmetic to do the qualitative analysis. The analysis included the reliability of testing result and stability of the model. When we took ninety percent as the evaluation threshold of testing result of CAR (Correct Acceptance Rate) and CRR (Correct Rejection Rate), the lowest starch content of adulterate milk powder in all tested samples which the tested result were bigger than that abovementioned threshold was designated CAR threshold (CAR-T) and CRR threshold (CRR-T). CAR means the correct rate of accepting a sample which is belong to itself, CRR means correct rate of refusing to accept a sample which is not belong to itself. The results were shown that, when we constructed a model based on the near infrared spectrum data from each of three China trademark milk powders, respectively, if we constructed a model with infrared spectrum data tested in a same day, both the CAR-T and CRR-T of adulterate starch content of a sample can reach 0.1% in predicting the remainder infrared spectrum data tested within a same day. The three China trademarks of milk powder had the same result. In addition, when we ignored the trademarks, put the spectrum data of adulterate milk powder samples mixed with the same content of starch of three China trademarks milk powder together

  3. Targeted Multiresidue Analysis of Veterinary Drugs in Milk-Based Powders Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, James B; Simon, Kelli A; Wong, Jon W

    2017-08-30

    An analytical method was developed and validated for the determination of 40 veterinary drugs in various milk-based powders. The method involves acetonitrile/water extraction, solid-phase filtration for lipid removal in fat-containing matrices, and analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limits of quantitation (LOQ) ranged from 0.02 to 82 ng/g. Acceptable recoveries (70-120%, RSD < 20%) were reached for 40 of 52 target compounds at three fortification levels in nonfat milk powder. Similar results were obtained for whole milk powder, milk protein concentrate, whey protein concentrate, and whey protein isolate. This new method will allow for better monitoring of a wide range of veterinary drugs in milk-based powders.

  4. Spore populations among bulk tank raw milk and dairy powders are significantly different.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel A; Kent, David J; Watterson, Matthew J; Boor, Kathryn J; Martin, Nicole H; Wiedmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    To accommodate stringent spore limits mandated for the export of dairy powders, a more thorough understanding of the spore species present will be necessary to develop prospective strategies to identify and reduce sources (i.e., raw materials or in-plant) of contamination. We characterized 1,523 spore isolates obtained from bulk tank raw milk (n=33 farms) and samples collected from 4 different dairy powder-processing plants producing acid whey, nonfat dry milk, sweet whey, or whey protein concentrate 80. The spores isolated comprised 12 genera, at least 44 species, and 216 rpoB allelic types. Bacillus and Geobacillus represented the most commonly isolated spore genera (approximately 68.9 and 12.1%, respectively, of all spore isolates). Whereas Bacillus licheniformis was isolated from samples collected from all plants and farms, Geobacillus spp. were isolated from samples from 3 out of 4 plants and just 1 out of 33 farms. We found significant differences between the spore population isolated from bulk tank raw milk and those isolated from dairy powder plant samples, except samples from the plant producing acid whey. A comparison of spore species isolated from raw materials and finished powders showed that although certain species, such as B. licheniformis, were found in both raw and finished product samples, other species, such as Geobacillus spp. and Anoxybacillus spp., were more frequently isolated from finished powders. Importantly, we found that 8 out of 12 genera were isolated from at least 2 different spore count methods, suggesting that some spore count methods may provide redundant information if used in parallel. Together, our results suggest that (1) Bacillus and Geobacillus are the predominant spore contaminants in a variety of dairy powders, implying that future research efforts targeted at elucidating approaches to reduce levels of spores in dairy powders should focus on controlling levels of spore isolates from these genera; and (2) the spore

  5. CCQM-K103 key comparison melanine in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiuqin; Zhang, Qinghe; Li, Hongmei; Li, Mengwan; Wong, Siu-kay; Lee, Foo-Wing; Kakoulides, Elias; Naujaus, Evaldas; Fernandes-Whaley, Maria; Prevoo-Franzsen, Des; Quinn, Laura; Pookrod, Preeyaporn; Konopelko, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    Under the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM), a key comparison, CCQM-K103, was coordinated by the National Institute of Metrology (NIM) and Government Laboratory, Hong Kong, China (GLHK). The comparison was designed to demonstrate NMIs/DIs ability to analyze traces of melamine in milk and milk powder at concentration levels resulting from requirements for food safety. Seven NMIs or DIs participated in the comparison. Final reference value (KCRV) is 0.286 mg/kg, with standard uncertainty of the median as 0.011 mg/kg (3.8 %). The k-factor for the estimation of the expanded uncertainty was chosen as k = 2.57 ( t (0.05;5) ), thus the expanded uncertainty is 0.028 mg/kg (9.8%). The degrees of equivalence with melamine in milk powder KCRV for each participant were reported. The measurement results and degrees of equivalence should be indicative of the performance of a laboratory's measurement capability for IDMS in determining mass fractions in the range from 0.1 to 5.0 mg/kg of analytes with low molar mass (range 50-300 Da) with high polarity (pKow > -2.0) in milk and milk products. Extension to other analytes and matrices should be applied with care since there is a close linkage to other relevant parameters as e.g. sample preparation procedures (liquid/liquid extraction, SPE clean-up) and analytical separation techniques (e.g., GC-MS, LC-MS/MS etc). Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Description and validation of a rapid (1 h) flow cytometry test for enumerating thermophilic bacteria in milk powders.

    PubMed

    Flint, S; Walker, K; Waters, B; Crawford, R

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a rapid assay for enumerating thermophilic bacteria in milk powder. The BactiFlow flow cytometer was used to count bacteria based on esterase activity in viable bacterial cells. A protocol for total viable bacteria was modified by heat-treating the sample to selectively label thermophilic bacteria. Samples of milk powder dissolved in 0.1% peptone were treated with 0.8% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to reduce background interference because of denatured milk proteins. Either thermophilic bacteria were added to the dissolved milk powder or milk powder solutions were incubated at 55 degrees C for 2-3 h to enrich the natural thermophile population for testing. Results from the BactiFlow were compared with traditional plate count results. Thermophilic bacteria in milk powder can be enumerated within 1 h using the BactiFlow flow cytometer. Microbiological test results obtained within 1 h can potentially be used to monitor manufacturing processes, effectively trace problems and provide confidence in the manufacture of product.

  7. Effect of sucrose on physical properties of spray-dried whole milk powder.

    PubMed

    Ma, U V Lay; Ziegler, G R; Floros, J D

    2008-11-01

    Spray-dried whole milk powders were prepared from whole condensed milk with various sucrose concentrations (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10% w/w), and their glass transition temperature and some physical properties of importance in chocolate manufacture were evaluated. In milk powder samples, the glass transition temperature and free-fat content decreased in a nonlinear manner with sucrose addition. Moreover, increasing sucrose concentration reduced the formation of dents on the particle surface. Addition of sucrose in whole condensed milk increased linearly the apparent particle density and in a nonlinear manner the particle size of spray-dried milk powders. The particle size volume distribution of milk powders with the highest sucrose concentration differed from the log-normal distribution of the other samples due to the formation of large agglomerates. Neither vacuole volume, nor the amorphous state of milk powders was affected by sucrose addition.

  8. Environmental impacts of milk powder and butter manufactured in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, William; Goggins, Jamie; Clifford, Eoghan; Zhan, Xinmin

    2017-02-01

    The abolition of the milk quota system that was in place in Europe was abolished in 2015, which instigated an immediate increase in milk production in many European countries. This increase will aid in addressing the world's ever growing demand for food, but will incur increased stresses on the environmental impact and sustainability of the dairy industry. In this study, an environmental life cycle assessment was performed in order to estimate the environmental impacts associated with the manufacture of milk powder and butter in the Republic of Ireland. A farm gate to processing factory gate analysis, which includes raw milk transportation, processing into each product and packaging, is assessed in this study. Operational data was obtained from 5 dairy processing factories that produce milk powder (4 of which also produce butter). Results for each environmental impact category are presented per kilogram of product. Energy consumption (raw milk transportation and on-site electrical and thermal energy usage) contributes, on average, 89% and 78% of the total global warming potential, for milk powder and butter respectively, for the life cycle stages assessed. Similarly, energy consumption contributes, on average, 86% and 96% of the total terrestrial acidification potential for milk powder and butter respectively, for these life cycle stages. Emissions associated with wastewater treatment contribute approximately 10% and 40% to the total freshwater eutrophication potential and marine eutrophication potential, respectively, for both milk powder and butter production. In addition, packaging materials also has a significant contribution to these environmental impact categories for butter production. Results were also presented for three milk powder products being manufactured by the factories surveyed: skim milk powder, whole milk powder and full fat milk powder. The analysis presented in this paper helps to identify opportunities to reduce the environmental impacts

  9. [Studies on the brand traceability of milk powder based on NIR spectroscopy technology].

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiao; Gu, Fang-Qing; Liu, Jing; Yang, Yong-Jian

    2013-10-01

    Brand traceability of several different kinds of milk powder was studied by combining near infrared spectroscopy diffuse reflectance mode with soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) in the present paper. The near infrared spectrum of 138 samples, including 54 Guangming milk powder samples, 43 Netherlands samples, and 33 Nestle samples and 8 Yili samples, were collected. After pretreatment of full spectrum data variables in training set, principal component analysis was performed, and the contribution rate of the cumulative variance of the first three principal components was about 99.07%. Milk powder principal component regression model based on SIMCA was established, and used to classify the milk powder samples in prediction sets. The results showed that the recognition rate of Guangming milk powder, Netherlands milk powder and Nestle milk powder was 78%, 75% and 100%, the rejection rate was 100%, 87%, and 88%, respectively. Therefore, the near infrared spectroscopy combined with SIMCA model can classify milk powder with high accuracy, and is a promising identification method of milk powder variety.

  10. Antihypertensive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jäkälä, Pauliina; Vapaatalo, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    Dietary proteins possess a wide range of nutritional and functional properties. They are used as a source of energy and amino acids, which are needed for growth and development. Many dietary proteins, especially milk proteins, contain physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein sequence. These peptides may be released during gastrointestinal digestion or food processing and once liberated, cause different physiological functions. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are shown to have antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidative and mineral-binding properties. During the fermentation of milk with certain lactobacilli, two interesting tripeptides Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro are released from casein to the final product. These lactotripeptides have attenuated the development of hypertension in several animal models and lowered blood pressure in clinical studies. They inhibit ACE in vitro at micromolar concentrations, protect endothelial function in vitro and reduce arterial stiffness in humans. Thus, milk as a traditional food product can after certain processing serve as a functional food and carry specific health-promoting effects, providing an option to control blood pressure. PMID:27713251

  11. Rheological properties of rennet gels containing milk protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, M A; Hill, A R; Corredig, M

    2008-03-01

    Different milk protein concentrates (MPC), with protein concentrations of 56, 70, and 90%, were dispersed in water under different treatments (hydration, shear, heat, and overnight storage at 4 degrees C), as well as in a combination of all the treatments in a factorial design. The particle size distribution of the dispersions was then measured to determine the optimal conditions for the dispersion. Heating at 60 degrees C for 30 min with 5 min of shear was chosen as the best condition to dissolve MPC powders. The samples were also characterized for composition, presence of protein aggregates, and ratio of calcium to protein. The total calcium present in MPC increased with increasing concentration of protein; however, the total calcium-to-protein ratio was lower in MPC90 than in MPC56 and MPC70. The level of whey protein denaturation, the presence of kappa-casein-whey protein aggregates in the supernatant after centrifugation, and the amount of caseins dissociated from the micelle increased as the protein concentration in the powder increased. The total amount of casein macropeptide released was lower in samples from powders with a higher protein concentration than for MPC56 or the skim milk control. The gelation behavior of reconstituted MPC was tested in systems dispersed in water (5% protein) as well as in systems dispersed in skim milk (6% protein). The gelation time of MPC dispersions was considerably lower and the gel modulus was higher than those of reconstituted skim milk with the same protein concentration. When MPC dispersions were dialyzed against skim milk, a significant decrease in the gelation time and modulus were shown, with a complete loss of gelling functionality in MPC90 dispersed in water. This demonstrated that the ionic equilibrium was key to the functionality of MPC.

  12. Radiation dose to Malaysian infants from natural radionuclides via consumption of powdered milk

    SciTech Connect

    Uwatse, Onosohwo Bemigho; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.

    2015-04-24

    Milk is the basic food stuff for the infants because they generally consume more milk on a daily basis as its minerals and proteins are essential for their growth and development, therefore, it is very important to assess the natural radioactivity levels and the associated dose in the widely consumed powered infant’s milk. As a result, 14 brands of infant’s powdered milk were collected from different supermarkets around Selangor, Malaysia and analysed for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K activities. The obtained mean activity of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K are 3.05±1.84, 2.55±2.48 and 99.1±69.5 Bqkg{sup −1}, respectively. Among the analysed milk samples, the brand from Philippines (Lactogen) showed low level of radioactivity while Singaporean brand (S26 SMA Gold) showed the highest. The estimated mean annual effective doses due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides in the sampled milk are 635 and 111 µSv for infant ≤ 1y and infant 1-2y, respectively. The obtained dose value does not yet pose any significant radiological hazards to the population under investigation comparing with the 1.0 mSvy{sup −1} recommended by ICRP for all ages.

  13. Radiation dose to Malaysian infants from natural radionuclides via consumption of powdered milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uwatse, Onosohwo Bemigho; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.

    2015-04-01

    Milk is the basic food stuff for the infants because they generally consume more milk on a daily basis as its minerals and proteins are essential for their growth and development, therefore, it is very important to assess the natural radioactivity levels and the associated dose in the widely consumed powered infant's milk. As a result, 14 brands of infant's powdered milk were collected from different supermarkets around Selangor, Malaysia and analysed for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K activities. The obtained mean activity of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K are 3.05±1.84, 2.55±2.48 and 99.1±69.5 Bqkg-1, respectively. Among the analysed milk samples, the brand from Philippines (Lactogen) showed low level of radioactivity while Singaporean brand (S26 SMA Gold) showed the highest. The estimated mean annual effective doses due to the ingestion of natural radionuclides in the sampled milk are 635 and 111 µSv for infant ≤ 1y and infant 1-2y, respectively. The obtained dose value does not yet pose any significant radiological hazards to the population under investigation comparing with the 1.0 mSvy-1 recommended by ICRP for all ages.

  14. Galactooligosaccharide and Sialyllactose Content in Commercial Lactose Powders from Goat and Cow Milk.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Hee; Yun, Sung-Seob; Oh, Chang-Hwan; Yoon, Sung-Sik

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used infant formulas contain lactose originating from cow milk. Goat milk has recently been claimed to be nutritionally more effective for infants than other milks. In baby foods, much emphasis is placed on the concentrations of intestinal microflora-promoting oligosaccharides, which are generally transferred into lactose from milk during crystallization process. Here we show that higher level of free sialic acid is present in goat lactose powder compared to cow lactose powder. Without proteinase K treatment, the amount of 3-sialyllactose and 6-sialyllactose were similar in goat and cow lactose powders. However, after proteolysis, 6-sialyllactose was present at higher levels in goat than in cow lactose powder. Galactooligosaccharides, a group of prebiotics, are present in milk in the form of glycoproteins. Galactooligosaccharide content was also higher in goat lactose powder than in cow lactose powder.

  15. Galactooligosaccharide and Sialyllactose Content in Commercial Lactose Powders from Goat and Cow Milk

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung-Seob; Oh, Chang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used infant formulas contain lactose originating from cow milk. Goat milk has recently been claimed to be nutritionally more effective for infants than other milks. In baby foods, much emphasis is placed on the concentrations of intestinal microflora-promoting oligosaccharides, which are generally transferred into lactose from milk during crystallization process. Here we show that higher level of free sialic acid is present in goat lactose powder compared to cow lactose powder. Without proteinase K treatment, the amount of 3-sialyllactose and 6-sialyllactose were similar in goat and cow lactose powders. However, after proteolysis, 6-sialyllactose was present at higher levels in goat than in cow lactose powder. Galactooligosaccharides, a group of prebiotics, are present in milk in the form of glycoproteins. Galactooligosaccharide content was also higher in goat lactose powder than in cow lactose powder. PMID:26761881

  16. Survival of Salmonella eastbourne and Salmonella typhimurium in milk chocolate prepared with artificially contaminated milk powder

    PubMed Central

    Tamminga, S. K.; Beumer, R. R.; Kampelmacher, E. H.; van Leusden, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    Milk chocolate mass containing salmonellas was prepared by mixing artificially contaminated milk powder with the other ingredients at a temperature of about 40 °C. From this mass bars were made. Two series were prepared, with S. eastbourne and S. typhimurium respectively. The number of surviving salmonellas was counted after various periods of storage, up to 19 months. S. eastbourne was reduced in numbers during 19 months from an initial count of ca. 3 × 104 to ca. 3 × 102 per 100 g of chocolate. S. typhimurium died off more rapidly, and was not detectable in about 55 g after 15 months, in spite of an initial count of ca. 105 per 100 g. In these experiments the salmonellas in the milk powder had had to survive the spraying procedure and the adverse conditions in the dried powder. This may be the reason why S. eastbourne showed a distinctly better survival on storage than the same serotype showed in previous experiments in which the organism was added as a broth culture to the chocolate mix. With S. typhimurium, however, such a difference was hardly detectable. Possible explanations of these results are discussed. PMID:336788

  17. A high calcium, skim milk powder diet results in a lower fat mass in male, energy-restricted, obese rats more than a low calcium, casein, or soy protein diet.

    PubMed

    Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A

    2010-07-01

    The combination of dairy protein and dietary calcium (Ca) may enhance weight loss more effectively than either compound alone. Our purpose in this study was to determine the effect of various protein sources [skim milk powder (SMP), whey, casein, and soy protein isolate (SPI)] and 2 levels of Ca [low, 0.67% Ca (LC) or high, 2.4% Ca (HC)] on weight loss. Sixty-four 12-wk-old Sprague-Dawley, diet-induced obese rats were assigned to 1 of 8 energy-restricted (ER) diets for 4 wk with 1 of the 4 protein sources and either LC or HC concentrations. Rats were ER to 70% of the ad libitum food and energy intake of a reference group (n = 8) fed the AIN-93M diet. The interaction between dietary protein and Ca affected final body weight and fat mass (FM) (P < 0.05). FM was less in rats fed SMP-HC than in those fed casein-LC or SPI-LC. Lean body mass was greater in rats fed SMP than in those fed whey. Rats fed HC diets had a lower plasma glucagon area under the curve (AUC) than those fed LC diets. The blood glucose AUC, homeostatic model of insulin resistance, and the expression of certain hepatic genes involved in energy metabolism were affected by protein and Ca. These data suggest that consuming a diet containing SMP and HC is associated with a lower FM in obese, male, ER rats than in diets containing casein or SPI and LC; however, the role of SMP and Ca in glucose homeostasis remains to be determined.

  18. [Determination of melamine in milk and milk powder by high performance capillary electrophoresis].

    PubMed

    Rao, Qinxiong; Tong, Jing; Guo, Ping; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiaowei; Ding, Shuangyang

    2008-11-01

    A high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) method has been established for the separation of melamine in milk and milk powder. The separation was carried out on a fused-silica uncoated capillary column (58.5 cm x 75 microm). The sample was injected by hydrodynamic injection (3.5 kPa (35 mbar) x 8 s) at a temperature of 25 degrees C. The analysis was completed in about 6 min in 40 mmol/L Na2HPO4-20 mmol/L citric acid buffer (pH 2.6) at 25 kV of separation voltage and 232 nm of detection wavelength. The linear range of melamine was 1 - 100 mg/kg, and the correlation coefficient was higher than 0. 997. The limits of quantification (LOQs) in milk and milk powder were 0.5 mg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg, respectively. The average recoveries were in the range of 72.2% -97.3% in the spiked range of the concentration of LOQs and 50 mg/kg, and the relative standard deviations were between 2.1% and 3.9%.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pesticides in milk powder.

    PubMed

    Dobrinas, Simona; Soceanu, Alina; Popescu, Viorica; Coatu, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    This Research Communication reports analysis of 37 compounds comprising polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPS and OPPS) in milk powder (one brand each of commercial infant formulae, follow-on formulae and baby formulae purchased from a local supermarket in Romania). The selected analytes were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), gas chromatography with electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and gas chromatography with thermionic sensitive detection (GC-TSD). The estimated limits of detection for most target analytes were in the μg/kg level (range 0·001-0·320 µg/kg). The purpose of the study was to determine the selected analytes, to assess the exposure of babies and infants and to produce data for comparison with tolerable limits according to the European Union Regulations. In most of the samples the organochlorine pesticides values were under the limit of detection. Exceptions were heptachlor epoxide and endosulfan sulphate, the last of which was found in all analysed samples at low concentrations. We also found detectable levels of ethoprophos, parathion-methyl, chlorpyrifos, prothiofos, guthion, disulfoton and fenchlorphos in most of the analysed samples. Benzo[a]pyrene, which is used as an indicator for the presence of PAHs, was not detected in selected samples. The low level of exposure to contaminants indicates that there are no health risks for the infants and babies that consume this brand of milk powder formulae.

  20. Application of a dye-binding method for the determination of available lysine in skim milk powders.

    PubMed

    Aalaei, Kataneh; Rayner, Marilyn; Tareke, Eden; Sjöholm, Ingegerd

    2016-04-01

    A dye-binding method using Acid Orange 12 was investigated regarding its suitability for the quantification of available lysine, as a means of monitoring the Maillard reaction in skim milk powders. The method was evaluated by analyzing a wide range of milk powders produced by three different drying methods and stored under various conditions. A pilot-scale freeze-dryer, spray-dryer and drum-dryer were used to produce skim milk powders and the samples were stored at two temperatures (20 °C and 30 °C) and two relative humidities (33% and 52%) under strictly controlled conditions. Moreover to validate the method, two protein isolates; bovine serum albumin and casein were investigated for their available lysine content. The results demonstrate the suitability of this method for measuring the available lysine in skim milk powders with good precision and high reproducibility. The relative standard deviations obtained from the 125 freeze-dried powders were 1.8%, and those from the 100 drum-dried samples were all 1.9%. The highest variation was found for the spray-dried powders, which showed relative standard deviations between 0.9% and 6.7%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Penetration Depth Measurement of Near-Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging Light for Milk Powder

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Mo, Changyeun; Esquerre, Carlos; Delwiche, Stephen; Zhu, Qibing

    2016-01-01

    The increasingly common application of the near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique to the analysis of food powders has led to the need for optical characterization of samples. This study was aimed at exploring the feasibility of quantifying penetration depth of NIR hyperspectral imaging light for milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR reflectance images were collected for eight different milk powder products that included five brands of non-fat milk powder and three brands of whole milk powder. For each milk powder, five different powder depths ranging from 1 mm–5 mm were prepared on the top of a base layer of melamine, to test spectral-based detection of the melamine through the milk. A relationship was established between the NIR reflectance spectra (937.5–1653.7 nm) and the penetration depth was investigated by means of the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) technique to classify pixels as being milk-only or a mixture of milk and melamine. With increasing milk depth, classification model accuracy was gradually decreased. The results from the 1-mm, 2-mm and 3-mm models showed that the average classification accuracy of the validation set for milk-melamine samples was reduced from 99.86% down to 94.93% as the milk depth increased from 1 mm–3 mm. As the milk depth increased to 4 mm and 5 mm, model performance deteriorated further to accuracies as low as 81.83% and 58.26%, respectively. The results suggest that a 2-mm sample depth is recommended for the screening/evaluation of milk powders using an online NIR hyperspectral imaging system similar to that used in this study. PMID:27023555

  2. Production of coconut protein powder from coconut wet processing waste and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Naik, Aduja; Raghavendra, S N; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2012-07-01

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO) has been gaining popularity in recent times. During its production, byproducts such as coconut skim milk and insoluble protein are obtained which are underutilized or thrown away to the environment at present. This study deals with utilization of these byproducts to obtain a value-added product, namely, coconut protein powder. When coconut milk was subjected to centrifugation, three phases, namely, fat phase (coconut cream), aqueous phase (coconut skim milk), and solid phase (insoluble protein) were obtained. The coconut skim milk and insoluble protein were mixed and homogenized before spray drying to obtain a dehydrated protein powder. The proximate analysis of the powder showed high protein content (33 % w/w) and low fat content (3 % w/w). Protein solubility was studied as a function of pH and ionic content of solvent. Functional properties such as water hydration capacity, fat absorption capacity, emulsifying properties, wettability, and dispersibility of coconut protein powder were evaluated along with morphological characterization, polyphenol content, and color analysis. Coconut protein powder has shown to have good emulsifying properties and hence has potential to find applications in emulsified foods. Sensory analysis showed high overall quality of the product, indicating that coconut protein powder could be a useful food ingredient.

  3. Raman spectral imaging technique on detection of melamine in skim milk powder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A point-scan Raman spectral imaging system was used for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial resoluti...

  4. Development of a Raman chemical imaging detection method for authenticating skim milk powder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This research demonstrated that Raman chemical imaging coupled with a simple image classification algorithm can be used to detect multiple chemical adulterants in skim milk powder. Ammonium sulfate, dicyandiamide, melamine, and urea were mixed into the milk powder as chemical adulterants in the conc...

  5. Raman spectral imaging for quantitative contaminant evaluation in skim milk powder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study uses a point-scan Raman spectral imaging system for quantitative detection of melamine in milk powder. A sample depth of 2 mm and corresponding laser intensity of 200 mW were selected after evaluating the penetration of a 785 nm laser through milk powder. Horizontal and vertical spatial r...

  6. Storage study and quality evaluation of coconut protein powder.

    PubMed

    Naik, Aduja; Prakash, Maya; R, Ravi; Raghavarao, Ksms

    2013-11-01

    Coconut skim milk and insoluble protein are 2 major byproducts in the production of virgin coconut oil. Coconut skim milk was homogenized along with insoluble protein and spray dried to obtain a value-added product, namely, coconut protein powder (CPP). This study deals with the storage study of CPP under different conditions (refrigerated [control], ambient and accelerated). CPP samples were withdrawn periodically at designated intervals of 15 d for accelerated and control, and 30 d for ambient condition. CPP stored at different conditions exhibited marginal moisture uptake (by 0.74 % w/w for control, 0.76 % w/w for ambient, and 1.26 % w/w for accelerated condition) and as a result, had very little effect on the functional properties of the powder. Withdrawn CPP was tested for sensory quality aspects and subjected to instrumental analysis as well. Withdrawn CPP was incorporated as a milk substitute in dessert (Kheer). Quantitative descriptive analysis of the powder and product (Kheer) showed no significant difference in attributes of CPP during the storage period of 2 mo. Electronic nose analysis revealed that CPP samples were not much different with respect to aroma pattern matching, respectively.

  7. Differentiating Milk and Non-milk Proteins by UPLC Amino Acid Fingerprints Combined with Chemometric Data Analysis Techniques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weiying; Lv, Xiaxia; Gao, Boyan; Shi, Haiming; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2015-04-22

    Amino acid fingerprinting combined with chemometric data analysis was used to differentiate milk and non-milk proteins in this study. Microwave-assisted hydrolysis and ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) were used to obtain the amino acid fingerprints. Both univariate and multivariate chemometrics methods were applied for differentiation. The confidence boundary of amino acid concentration, principal component analysis (PCA), and partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) of the amino acid fingerprints demonstrated that there were significant differences between milk proteins and inexpensive non-milk protein powders from other biological sources including whey, peanut, corn, soy, fish, egg yolk, beef extract, collagen, and cattle bone. The results indicate that the amino acid compositions with the chemometric techniques could be applied for the detection of potential protein adulterants in milk.

  8. [Determination of melamine in milk powder and milk by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    He, Qiaosang; Liu, Minfang; Huang, Liying; Yang, Yuanyuan; Liao, Shangfu

    2008-11-01

    The analytical method of melamine in milk and milk powder by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was established. The sample was purified by a cation exchange solid-phase extraction column, separated on a Diamonsil C18 column (4.6 mm x 200 mm, 5 microm) with acetonitrile-0.01 mol/L sodium heptanesulfonate (pH 3.3) (10:90, v/v) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and determined by a photodiode array detector. A linear calibration curve was obtained in the concentration range of 1 - 500 mg/L. The qualification limit was 0.2 mg/kg, and the quantification limit was 1 mg/kg. The recovery was 81.4% -83.7%.

  9. Cancer excess after arsenic exposure from contaminated milk powder.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki; Grandjean, Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Long-term exposure to inorganic arsenic is related to increased risk of cancer in the lung, skin, bladder, and, possibly, other sites. However, little is known about the consequences of developmental exposures in regard to cancer risk. During early summer in 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of infants occurred in the western part of Japan because of contaminated milk powder. Okayama Prefecture was most severely affected. We examined whether the affected birth cohorts in this prefecture experienced increased cancer mortality. We targeted subjects who were born from September 1950 to August 1960 and died in Okayama Prefecture between January 1969 and March 2008 due to malignant neoplasm (N = 3,141). We then compared cancer mortality (total, liver, pancreatic, lung, bladder/kidney, and hematopoietic cancers) between cohorts born before the milk poisoning (exposed group) and cohorts born after the poisoning (nonexposed group). We estimated mortality ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Total and liver cancers were elevated in the cohort up to 1 year of age at time of the poisoning. In addition, pancreatic and hematopoietic cancers were elevated in the cohorts up to 5 years of age, and mortality ratios were approximately twice those of the nonexposed group. Increased risk of lung and bladder/kidney cancers was not apparent. Although dilution is present in these cohort-based data, our study highlights the notion that developmental arsenic exposure may lead to a different pattern of cancer, including increases in pancreatic and hematopoietic cancer, as compared with adult or lifetime exposures to inorganic arsenic.

  10. Isolation and identification of Staphylococcus sp. in powdered infant milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palilu, Prayolga Toban; Budiarso, Tri Yahya

    2017-05-01

    Staphylococcus sp. is one of the most dangerous bacteria that could cause food poisoning. It is a pathogenic bacterium which is able to produce enterotoxin in foods. Milk is an ideal growth medium for Staphylococcus sp., that may cause problem if it is to be consumed, especially by infant. It is the objective of this research to detect the presence of Staphylococcus sp. in powdered infant milk. As many as 14 samples obtained from market were used as samples for bacterial isolation. The isolation were done by employing enrichment step on BHI-broth, continued with Baird-Parker Agar which will produce a typical colony. It is then picked and grown on Mannitol Salt Agar, and gram staining, coagulase assay, and fermentation tests. The confirmation step was done by using API-Staph which gives the identification of Staphylococcus hemoliticus, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, with a percentage of identity ranging from 65.9-97.7%. Two isolates with the highest identification similarity values were then picked for molecular detection. A PCR primer pair targeting gene coding for enterotoxin A was used, and it gives positive result for the two isolates being tested. It is then concluded that the two isolates belong to Staphylococcus sp., and further research need to be done to correctly identify these isolates.

  11. Changes in the physical properties, solubility, and heat stability of milk protein concentrates prepared from partially acidified milk.

    PubMed

    Eshpari, H; Tong, P S; Corredig, M

    2014-12-01

    A limiting factor in using milk protein concentrates (MPC) as a high-quality protein source for different food applications is their poor reconstitutability. Solubilization of colloidal calcium phosphate (CCP) from casein micelles during membrane filtration (e.g., through acidification) may affect the structural organization of these protein particles and consequently the rehydration and functional properties of the resulting MPC powder. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of acidification of milk by glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) before ultrafiltration (UF) on the composition, physical properties, solubility, and thermal stability (after reconstitution) of MPC powders. The MPC samples were manufactured in duplicate, either by UF (65% protein, MPC65) or by UF followed by diafiltration (80% protein, MPC80), using pasteurized skim milk, at either the native milk pH (~pH 6.6) or at pH 6.0 after addition of GDL, followed by spray drying. Samples of different treatments were reconstituted at 5% (wt/wt) protein to compare their solubility and thermal stability. Powders were tested in duplicate for basic composition, calcium content, reconstitutability, particle size, particle density, and microstructure. Acidification of milk did not have any significant effect on the proximate composition, particle size, particle density, or surface morphology of the MPC powders; however, the total calcium content of MPC80 decreased significantly with acidification (from 1.84 ± 0.03 to 1.59 ± 0.03 g/100 g of powder). Calcium-depleted MPC80 powders were also more soluble than the control powders. Diafiltered dispersions were significantly less heat stable (at 120°C) than UF samples when dissolved at 5% solids. The present work contributes to a better understanding of the differences in MPC commonly observed during processing.

  12. Identification of additive components in powdered milk by NIR imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Min, Shungeng; Duan, Jia; Wu, Lijun; Li, Qianqian

    2014-02-15

    The express assay of excessive additives in powdered milk is of vital necessity, especially during industrial production. Near-infrared microscopy provides chemical information on the spatial distribution and cluster side of components in milk-based products when materials are mixed together. Distributions of two additive components and one banned chemical in powdered milk were simulated in this study. The distribution of inorganic additive ZnSO4 was identified using the relationship imaging mode. The distribution image of lactose was obtained by assigning the wavenumber region and by using principal component analysis coupled with correlation coefficient imaging. In addition, classical least square regression was employed to quantify the banned additive, melamine, in the powdered milk. Lastly, the detection limit of melamine in powdered milk was determined using the relationship imaging mode. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigation of NIR hyperspectral imaging for discriminating melamine in milk powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaping; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Lim, Jongguk; Lee, Hoyoung; Ying, Yibin

    2013-05-01

    Melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine) contamination of food has become an urgent and broadly recognized issue for which rapid and accurate identification methods are needed by the food industry. In this study, the feasibility and effectiveness of near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging was investigated for detecting melamine in milk powder. Hyperspectral NIR images (144 bands spanning from 990 to 1700 nm) were acquired for Petri dishes containing samples of milk powder mixed with melamine at various concentrations (0.02% to 1%). Spectral bands that showed the most significant differences between pure milk and pure melamine were selected, and two-band difference analysis was applied to the spectrum of each pixel in the sample images to identify melamine particles in milk powders. The resultant images effectively allowed visualization of melamine particle distributions in the samples. The study demonstrated that NIR hyperspectral imaging techniques can qualitatively and quantitatively identify melamine adulteration in milk powders.

  14. [Effect of crystalline metastasis of lactose on hardness of compressed baby milk powder].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mitsuho; Otsubo, Kazumitsu; Ohara, Mika; Omae, Rika; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the crystalline metastasis of lactose, which is a main component baby milk powder, and the hardness of baby milk powder compressed by humidification followed by drying. Because baby milk powder is manufactured using a spray dryer, lactose in compressed baby milk powder exists in an amorphous (solid dispersion) form. X-ray diffraction measurement showed that this amorphous lactose metastasized to β-form crystalline lactose, and thereafter metastasized to the α-form during the humidification-drying process. As a result of this crystalline metastasis, the hardness of the compressed baby milk powder increased, and then decreased. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed bridging structures between the particles increased and then decreased during the humidification-drying process. This showed that bridging structures between the particles produced by crystalline metastasis of lactose as a result of the humidification-drying process, which leads to an increase in the hardness of the compressed baby milk powder. These results show that the necessary degree of hardness of the porous compressed baby milk powder (necessary for packaging and transportation) resulted from the humidification-drying process.

  15. Determination of whey adulteration in milk powder by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Gonca; Sezer, Banu; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Berberoglu, Halil; Topcu, Ali; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2016-12-01

    A rapid and in situ method has been developed to detect and quantify adulterated milk powder through adding whey powder by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The methodology is based on elemental composition differences between milk and whey products. Milk powder, sweet and acid whey powders were produced as standard samples, and milk powder was adulterated with whey powders. Based on LIBS spectra of standard samples and commercial products, species was identified using principle component analysis (PCA) method, and discrimination rate of milk and whey powders was found as 80.5%. Calibration curves were obtained with partial least squares regression (PLS). Correlation coefficient (R(2)) and limit of detection (LOD) values were 0.981 and 1.55% for adulteration with sweet whey powder, and 0.985 and 0.55% for adulteration with acid whey powder, respectively. The results were found to be consistent with the data from inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative identification of adulteration of milk powder using DNA extracted with a novel method.

    PubMed

    Liao, J; Liu, Y F; Ku, T; Liu, M H; Huang, Y

    2017-03-01

    The extraction of high-quality DNA from processed dairy products is often the crucial step in an authentication process by PCR-based methods. In this study, we optimized a novel DNA extraction method for milk powder and used the extracted DNA for identification of milk powder based on PCR analysis. The DNA quality was assessed by amplifying target sequences from mitochondrial genes, as well as by monitoring the yield, purity, and integrity of the extracted DNA. In addition, a laboratory adulteration model of milk powder was detected by PCR-based methods (PCR and real-time PCR) using primers targeting the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. Results showed that a sufficient amount and quality of DNA could be isolated from milk powder with this method. Both PCR and real-time PCR detection of cow milk compositions in goat milk powder further confirmed the DNA extracted with this extraction method could be widely used in addressing milk powder adulterant by a PCR-based method. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Health-Related Aspects of Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Davoodi, Seyed Hossein; Shahbazi, Roghiyeh; Esmaeili, Saeideh; Sohrabvandi, Sara; Mortazavian, AmirMohamamd; Jazayeri, Sahar; Taslimi, Aghdas

    2016-01-01

    Milk is an important component of a balanced diet and contains numerous valuable constituents. Considerable acclaimed health benefits of milk are related to its proteins, not only for their nutritive value but also for their biological properties. Scientific evidence suggests that anticarcinogenic activities, antihypertensive properties, immune system modulation, and other metabolic features of milk, are affiliated with its proteins (intact proteins or its derivatives). In this article, the main health-related aspects of milk proteins, such as anticarcinogenic, immunomodulatory, antimicrobial, anticariogenic, antihypertensive, and hypocholesterolemic effects are reviewed. Collectively, the findings indicate the effectiveness of milk proteins on reduction of risk factors for cancer, cardiovascular diseases and overall improvement of health aspects. PMID:27980594

  18. Powder infant formula milk contaminated with Enterobacter sakazakii.

    PubMed

    Oonaka, Kenji; Furuhata, Katsunori; Hara, Motonobu; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2010-03-01

    To clarify the route and source of Enterobacter sakazakii infection in a basic study, we analyzed powder infant formula milk (PIF), which may be an important source of infantile infection, regarding contamination with Enterobacteriaceae including this type of bacteria, and conducted drug sensitivity tests with various antimicrobial agents. Enterobacteriaceae was isolated 36 (24.2%) of 149 PIF samples. These comprised of 12 (19.7%) of 61 domestically produced samples and 24 (27.3%) of 88 imported samples. E. sakazakii was isolated in 9 (6.6%) of the 149 PIF samples. These comprised 4 (6.6%) of 61 domestically produced samples and 5 (5.7%) of 88 imported samples. In 8 of the 9 samples in which E. sakazakii was isolated, the bacterial levels were estimated to be 0.36 MPN/100 g. However, one imported sample showed a bacterial level of 0.91 MPN/100 g. In the drug sensitivity tests of E. sakazakii isolated from PIF, we compared the MIC(90) values. E. sakazakii was highly sensitive to 9 agents: cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefoperazone, ceftazidime, cefpirome, cefozopran, gentamicin, meropenem, and ciprofloxacin, and moderately sensitive to 5 agents: piperacillin, erythromycin, minocycline, chloramphenicol, and rifampicin. However, it was resistant to 2 agents, ampicillin and lincomycin.

  19. [Effect of zinc-intensified milk powder on hematopoiesis in mice].

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Li, S; Yuan, Y

    1999-12-01

    To observe the effect of Zn-intensified milk powder and zinc on hematopoiesis in mice. Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 9 each) (control group; milk powder group; equal zinc group; high zinc group) and fed on experimental diet for 24 weeks. 1. In high zinc group: the mice hemoglobin (Hb) declined (P < 0.05) after 12 wk of supplementation and were significantly lower (P < 0.01) than those in control group at 16 wk. At 24 wk, the mice showed lower Hb, red blood cell(RBC), hematocrit (HCT), and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) compared with control group (P < 0.05). Bone marrow aspirates revealed erythroid hyperplasia. Zinc concentrations in serum, liver and kidney were higher (P < 0.01) and copper was lower than that of control group(P < 0.01). 2. At 16 wk, no change occurred in milk powder group and equal zinc group. At 24 wk, parameters changed in milk powder group similar to those in high zinc group, and in equal zinc group liver and kidney copper was lower than that in control group (P < 0.05). Ingestion of over-dosed zinc could induce anemia. Generally, intake of Zn-intensified milk powder is safe, but long-term intake of the milk powder may interfere with hematopoiesis.

  20. Detection and quantification of adulterants in milk powder using high-throughput Raman chemical imaging technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Milk is a vulnerable target for economically motivated adulteration. In this study, a line-scan high-throughput Raman imaging system was used to authenticate milk powder. A 5 W 785 nm line laser (240 mm long and 1 mm wide) was used as a Raman excitation source. The system was used to acquire hypersp...

  1. Detecting adulterants in milk powder using high-throughput Raman chemical imaging

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study used a line-scan high-throughput Raman imaging system to authenticate milk powder. A 5 W 785 nm line laser (240 mm long and 1 mm wide) was used as a Raman excitation source. The system was used to acquire hyperspectral Raman images in a wavenumber range of 103–2881 cm-1 from the skim milk...

  2. Short communication: Rapid antibiotic screening tests detect antibiotic residues in powdered milk products.

    PubMed

    Kneebone, J; Tsang, P C W; Townson, D H

    2010-09-01

    Rapid antibiotic screening tests are widely used in the dairy industry to monitor milk for the presence of antibiotic residues above regulated levels. Given the persistent concern over contamination of milk products with antibiotic residues, we investigated the utility of IDEXX Snap test devices (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, ME) as tools for detecting antibiotic residues in powdered milk products. Five powdered milk products were reconstituted according to manufacturer specification with distilled water: Carnation (Nestlé USA Inc., Solon, OH), Nido youth and Nido adult (Nestlé Mexico Inc., Mexico City, Mexico), ELK (Campina, Eindhoven, the Netherlands), and Regilait (Saint-Martin-Belle-Roche, France). Positive samples were generated by spiking reconstituted milk with penicillin G, cephapirin, or tetracycline to either the European Union-regulated maximum residue limit or the FDA-regulated safe/tolerance level, whichever was lower. Control, unspiked negative milk samples and positive samples were tested with appropriate IDEXX Snap test kits (penicillin G and cephapirin with New Beta-Lactam, tetracycline with New Tetracycline). All samples yielded definitive results consistent with expectations, and there were no instances of false-positive or false-negative readings. These results suggest that both the New Beta-Lactam and New Tetracycline IDEXX Snap test kits effectively detect antibiotic residues in commercially available powdered milk samples and are useful tools for monitoring antibiotic residues in reconstituted powdered milk products. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of melamine in milk powder, milk and fish feed by capillary electrophoresis: a good alternative to HPLC.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yingying; Liu, Huitao; Han, Ping; Gao, Yuan; Luan, Feng; Li, Xiuyong

    2010-10-01

    Since September 2008, an increased incidence of kidney stones and renal failure in infants, associated with the ingestion of infant formula contaminated with melamine has been reported in China. Furthermore, melamine was not only found in many protein-based food commodities, but also in the feeds for cattle and poultry. So it is necessary to develop a suitable method to determine melamine. A capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method for analysis of melamine was developed by use of running electrolyte containing 35 mmol L(-1) sodium dihydrogen phosphate at pH 3.5, with UV detection at 210 nm. Regression equation revealed linear relationships (r = 0.9999) between the peak-area and the content of melamine from 0.8 to 80 µg mL(-1). The detection limit was 0.08 µg mL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of melamine in milk powder, milk and fish feed, with the recoveries from 94.5% to 103.7%. The performance of the CZE method evaluated in terms of precision, limits of detection, accuracy and quantification were comparable and in good agreement with those obtained by the HPLC method, with the advantage of shorter analysis time and lower cost. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Detection of melamine in milk powders using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging combined with regression coefficient of partial least square regression model.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jongguk; Kim, Giyoung; Mo, Changyeun; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Fu, Xiaping; Baek, Insuck; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2016-05-01

    Illegal use of nitrogen-rich melamine (C3H6N6) to boost perceived protein content of food products such as milk, infant formula, frozen yogurt, pet food, biscuits, and coffee drinks has caused serious food safety problems. Conventional methods to detect melamine in foods, such as Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), are sensitive but they are time-consuming, expensive, and labor-intensive. In this research, near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique combined with regression coefficient of partial least squares regression (PLSR) model was used to detect melamine particles in milk powders easily and quickly. NIR hyperspectral reflectance imaging data in the spectral range of 990-1700nm were acquired from melamine-milk powder mixture samples prepared at various concentrations ranging from 0.02% to 1%. PLSR models were developed to correlate the spectral data (independent variables) with melamine concentration (dependent variables) in melamine-milk powder mixture samples. PLSR models applying various pretreatment methods were used to reconstruct the two-dimensional PLS images. PLS images were converted to the binary images to detect the suspected melamine pixels in milk powder. As the melamine concentration was increased, the numbers of suspected melamine pixels of binary images were also increased. These results suggested that NIR hyperspectral imaging technique and the PLSR model can be regarded as an effective tool to detect melamine particles in milk powders.

  5. Absorption and Bioavailability of Nano-Size Reduced Calcium Citrate Fortified Milk Powder in Ovariectomized and Ovariectomized-Osteoporosis Rats.

    PubMed

    Erfanian, Arezoo; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Rasti, Babak; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Bin Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Abd Manap, Mohd Yazid

    2015-06-24

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fortification and nano-size reduction on calcium absorption and bioavailability of milk powder formula in sham, ovariectomized, and ovariectomized-osteoporosis rats as a menopause and menopause-osteoporosis model. Skim milk powder and skim milk powder fortified with calcium citrate and the suitable doses of inulin, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and vitamins D3, K1, and B6 were formulated based on the North American and Western European recommended dietary allowances. Optimization on cycle and pressure of high-pressure homogenizer was done to produce nano-fortified milk powder. In vivo study demonstrated that fortification and calcium citrate nano-fortified milk powder increased absorption and bioavailability of calcium, as well as bone stiffness and bone strength in sham, ovariectomized, and ovariectomized-osteoporosis rats. This study successfully developed an effective fortified milk powder for food application.

  6. Effects of the Adulteration Technique on the Near-Infrared Detection of Melamine in Milk Powder.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Peter F; Bergana, Marti Mamula; Yakes, Betsy Jean; Xie, Zhuohong; Zbylut, Steven; Downey, Gerard; Mossoba, Magdi; Jablonski, Joseph; Magaletta, Robert; Holroyd, Stephen E; Buehler, Martin; Qin, Jianwei; Hurst, William; LaPointe, Joseph H; Roberts, Dean; Zrybko, Carol; Mackey, Andrew; Holton, Jason D; Israelson, Greg A; Payne, Anitra; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Moore, Jeffrey C

    2017-07-19

    The United States Pharmacopeial Convention has led an international collaborative project to develop a toolbox of screening methods and reference standards for the detection of milk powder adulteration. During the development of adulterated milk powder reference standards, blending methods used to combine melamine and milk had unanticipated strong effects on the near-infrared (NIR) spectrum of melamine. The prominent absorbance band at 1468 nm of melamine was retained when it was dry-blended with skim milk powder but disappeared in wet-blended mixtures, where spray-dried milk powder samples were prepared from solution. Analyses using polarized light microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mass spectrometry indicated that wet blending promoted reversible and early Maillard reactions with lactose that are responsible for differences in melamine NIR spectra between wet- and dry-blended samples. Targeted detection estimates based solely on dry-blended reference standards are likely to overestimate NIR detection capabilities in wet-blended samples as a result of previously overlooked matrix effects arising from changes in melamine hydrogen-bonding status, covalent complexation with lactose, and the lower but more homogeneous melamine local concentration distribution produced in wet-blended samples. Techniques used to incorporate potential adulterants can determine the suitability of milk reference standards for use with rapid detection methods.

  7. Comparative study of particle structure evolution during water sorption: skim and whole milk powders.

    PubMed

    Murrieta-Pazos, I; Gaiani, C; Galet, L; Cuq, B; Desobry, S; Scher, J

    2011-10-01

    Surface composition of dairy powders influences significantly a quantity of functional properties such as rehydration, caking, agglomeration. Nevertheless, the kinetic of water uptake by the powders was never directly related to the structure and the composition of the surface. In this work, the effect of relative humidity on the structural reorganization of two types of dairy powder was studied. The water-powder interaction for industrial whole milk powder, and skim milk powder was studied using dynamic vapor sorption. The water sorption isotherms were fitted with a Brunner-Emmet-Teller model and each stage of the sorption curve was analyzed with a Fickian diffusion. The water content in the monolayer predicted for each powder and the moisture diffusivity calculated were discussed and compared. Concurrently, powders microstructure and powders surface under variable relative humidity were assessed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray and atomic force microscopy. A correlation between the data obtained from the sorption isotherms and the modifications of structure allowed us to conclude that powder microstructure and chemical state of the components could play an important role in determining the water diffusivity.

  8. Simultaneous determination of urea and melamine in milk powder by nonlinear chemical fingerprint technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongjie; Dong, Wenbin; Bao, Hongliang; Fang, Yue; Fan, Cheng

    2017-04-15

    This paper proposed a nonlinear chemical fingerprint method for simultaneous determination of urea and melamine in milk powder using "H(+)+Ce(4+)+BrO3(-)+malonic acid" as reaction system. A multiple linear relationship was obtained between the adulterants content in milk powder and inductive time of corresponding mixed milk powder. System analysis model established with classical least squares (CLS) method was then used to calculate the content of urea and melamine in milk powder. The method was successfully applied to milk powder samples and had good recoveries in the range of 99.17-100.25%, with the relative standard deviation (RSD) in the range of 0.60-4.12%. The limits of detection for urea and melamine were 0.33μg·g(-1) and 0.05μg·g(-1), respectively. The limits of quantification were 1.11μg·g(-1) and 0.18μg·g(-1), respectively. The results indicated that the new method was feasible and had the advantages of low cost, simple operation and without pretreatment of samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An extensive outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning due to low-fat milk in Japan: estimation of enterotoxin A in the incriminated milk and powdered skim milk.

    PubMed Central

    Asao, T.; Kumeda, Y.; Kawai, T.; Shibata, T.; Oda, H.; Haruki, K.; Nakazawa, H.; Kozaki, S.

    2003-01-01

    An extensive outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning occurred in Kansai district in Japan. As many as 13,420 cases frequently ingested dairy products manufactured by a factory in Osaka City. The main ingredient of these dairy products was powdered skim milk manufactured by a factory in Hokkaido. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) (< or = 0.38 ng/ml) was detected in low-fat milk and approx. 3.7 ng/g in powdered skim milk. The total intake of SEA per capita was estimated mostly at approx. 20-100 ng. The assumed attack rate was considerably lower than those reported in previous outbreaks. SEA exposed at least twice to pasteurization at 130 degrees C for 4 or 2 s retained both immunological and biological activities, although it had been partially inactivated. The present outbreak was unusual in that the thermal processes had destroyed staphylococci in milk but SEA had retained enough activity to cause intoxication. PMID:12613743

  10. Effect of milk pretreatment on the whey composition and whey powder functionality.

    PubMed

    Outinen, M; Rantamäki, P; Heino, A

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cheese production processes may have a significant effect on subsequent whey composition and functionality. To control these changes is important since whey is commonly processed into ingredients used in numerous applications in the food industry. In this study, the characteristics of 4 demineralized whey powders (DWPs) were studied. DWPs were produced from partially high-temperature heat-treated (HH), ultrafiltered (UF), or ultrafiltered high-temperature heat-treated (UFHH) milk. DWP produced from pasteurized milk was used as a reference (REF). All experiments were carried out on industrial scale. The quantity of nonprotein nitrogen (NPN) in total protein (TP) was elevated by HH, and reduced by UF treatment. Whey protein content of whey was significantly elevated by UF, but reduced when HH treatment was applied. The volume and total solids of UFHH whey were significantly reduced compared to REF and HH wheys, but the chemical composition was comparable. There were no significant differences in the degree of denaturation, viscosity, water-binding capacity, emulsifying capacity, or emulsion stability of the DWPs, but heat stability was significantly elevated by UF treatment.

  11. [Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins].

    PubMed

    Torres-Llanez, María de Jesús; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; González-Córdova, Aaron Fernando

    2005-06-01

    Milk proteins are known for having a wide range of nutritional, functional and biological properties that make them important ingredients in functional or health promoting foods. These properties are partly attributed to bioactive peptides coded in the different milk proteins. Bioactive peptides are inactive within the protein sequence but may be released by the action of native proteolitic enzymes from milk, enzymes from lactic acid bacteria or from exogenous sources or may be produced during gastrointestinal digestion or processing of foods. Peptides derived from caseins and whey proteins were shown to present several bioactive properties such as opioid, antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunodulatory, mineral carrier and antithrombotic. This overview presents a perspective of the importance of dairy proteins in the production of bioactive peptides and their biological activities, as well as the main analytical tecniques that have been used for the isolation and identification of these peptides.

  12. Raman-spectroscopy-based chemical contaminant detection in milk powder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Addition of edible and inedible chemical contaminants in food powders for purposes of economic benefit has become a recurring trend. In recent years, severe health issues have been reported due to consumption of food powders contaminated with chemical substances. This study examines the effect of sp...

  13. Surface energy analysis (SEA) and rheology of powder milk dairy products.

    PubMed

    Lapčík, Lubomír; Lapčíková, Barbora; Otyepková, Eva; Otyepka, Michal; Vlček, Jakub; Buňka, František; Salek, Richardos Nikolaos

    2015-05-01

    Results of inverse gas chromatography adsorption/desorption experiments using selected probes on skimmed milk, whey and demineralised whey powder materials are presented. The dispersive component of surface energy was found to be dominant, indicating a low polarity character. Surface energy profiles of demineralised whey and skimmed milk showed a characteristic steep exponential decrease from approximately 170 mJ/m(2) to 60 mJ/m(2) and 140 mJ/m(2) to 45 mJ/m(2), respectively, whereas whey powder exhibited a constant (non-exponential) surface energy at approximately 45 mJ/m(2). The dispersive surface energy of demineralised whey and skimmed milk powder showed a broad distribution ranging from 40 mJ/m(2) to 120 mJ/m(2) and 175 mJ/m(2), respectively. In contrast, the dispersive surface energy distribution for whey was very narrow, ranging from only 42.8 mJ/m(2) to 45 mJ/m(2). The determined yield locus and Mohr's circles indicated that demineralised whey exhibited free flowing powder characteristics, whereas skimmed milk and whey exhibited cohesive powder flow behaviour.

  14. Voltamperometric Discrimination of Urea and Melamine Adulterated Skimmed Milk Powder

    PubMed Central

    Hilding-Ohlsson, Astrid; Fauerbach, Jonathan A.; Sacco, Natalia J.; Bonetto, M. Celina; Cortón, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen compounds like urea and melamine are known to be commonly used for milk adulteration resulting in undesired intoxication; a well-known example is the Chinese episode occurred in 2008. The development of a rapid, reliable and economic test is of relevance in order to improve adulterated milk identification. Cyclic voltammetry studies using an Au working electrode were performed on adulterated and non-adulterated milk samples from different independent manufacturers. Voltammetric data and their first derivative were subjected to functional principal component analysis (f-PCA) and correctly classified by the KNN classifier. The adulterated and non-adulterated milk samples showed significant differences. Best results of prediction were obtained with first derivative data. Detection limits in milk samples adulterated with 1% of its total nitrogen derived from melamine or urea were as low as 85.0 mg·L−1 and 121.4 mg·L−1, respectively. We present this method as a fast and robust screening method for milk adulteration analysis and prevention of food intoxication. PMID:23112709

  15. Roles of water and solids composition in the control of glass transition and stickiness of milk powders.

    PubMed

    Silalai, Nattiga; Roos, Yrjö H

    2010-06-01

    Plasticization and glass transition of amorphous components in food powders often result in stickiness and caking. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of milk powders was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and a viscometer method was used to determine sticky-point temperatures. Water sorption isotherms were established for varying solids compositions. Lactose contents were analyzed by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAE-PAD) and proteins were identified using SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis. Solids composition and water affected both the T(g) and stickiness behavior. Stickiness was governed by carbohydrates and water plasticization. At low protein contents, precrystallization of lactose decreased the sticky point temperature, but increasing protein content in all milk powders decreased stickiness at all water activities. The results showed that glass transition can be used to describe time-dependent stickiness and crystallization phenomena, and it can be used as a parameter to control and reduce stickiness of dairy solids with various compositions.

  16. Milk secretion: The role of SNARE proteins.

    PubMed

    Truchet, Sandrine; Chat, Sophie; Ollivier-Bousquet, Michèle

    2014-03-01

    During lactation, polarized mammary epithelial secretory cells (MESCs) secrete huge quantities of the nutrient molecules that make up milk, i.e. proteins, fat globules and soluble components such as lactose and minerals. Some of these nutrients are only produced by the MESCs themselves, while others are to a great extent transferred from the blood. MESCs can thus be seen as a crossroads for both the uptake and the secretion with cross-talks between intracellular compartments that enable spatial and temporal coordination of the secretion of the milk constituents. Although the physiology of lactation is well understood, the molecular mechanisms underlying the secretion of milk components remain incompletely characterized. Major milk proteins, namely caseins, are secreted by exocytosis, while the milk fat globules are released by budding, being enwrapped by the apical plasma membrane. Prolactin, which stimulates the transcription of casein genes, also induces the production of arachidonic acid, leading to accelerated casein transport and/or secretion. Because of their ability to form complexes that bridge two membranes and promote their fusion, SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptor) proteins are involved in almost all intracellular trafficking steps and exocytosis. As SNAREs can bind arachidonic acid, they could be the effectors of the secretagogue effect of prolactin in MESCs. Indeed, some SNAREs have been observed between secretory vesicles and lipid droplets suggesting that these proteins could not only orchestrate the intracellular trafficking of milk components but also act as key regulators for both the coupling and coordination of milk product secretion in response to hormones.

  17. Reduction in heat-induced gastrointestinal hyperpermeability in rats by bovine colostrum and goat milk powders.

    PubMed

    Prosser, C; Stelwagen, K; Cummins, R; Guerin, P; Gill, N; Milne, C

    2004-02-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three dietary groups [standard diet (Cont; n = 8), standard diet plus bovine colostrum powder (BColost 1.7 g/kg; n = 8), or goat milk powder (GMilk 1.7 g/kg; n = 8)] to determine the ability of these supplements to reduce gastrointestinal hyperpermeability induced by heat. Raising core body temperature of rats to 41.5 degrees C increased transfer of (51)Cr-EDTA from gut into blood 34-fold relative to the ambient temperature value (P < 0.05) in the Cont group of rats, indicative of increased gastrointestinal permeability. Significantly less (P < 0.01) (51)Cr-EDTA was transferred into the blood of rats in either the BColost (27% of Cont) or GMilk group (10% of Cont) after heating, showing that prior supplementation with either bovine colostrum or goat milk powder significantly reduced the impact of heat stress on gastrointestinal permeability. The changes in the BColost group were not significantly different than those of the GMilk group. The potential mechanism of the protective effect of bovine colostrum and goat milk powders may involve modulation of tight junction permeability, because both powders were able to maintain transepithelial resistance in Madin Darby canine kidney cells challenged with EGTA compared with cells maintained in media only. The results show that bovine colostrum powder can partially alleviate the effects of hyperthermia on gastrointestinal permeability in the intact animal. Moreover, goat milk powder was equally as effective as bovine colostrum powder, and both may be of benefit in other situations where gastrointestinal barrier function is compromised.

  18. ALMOND MILK: A POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC WEAPON AGAINST COW’S MILK PROTEIN ALLERGY.

    PubMed

    Cuppari, C; Manti, S; Salpietro, A; Dugo, G; Gitto, E; Arrigo, T; Sturiale, M; Salpietro, C

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is defined as an adverse health effect arising from a specific immune response that occurs reproducibly following exposure to a given food. Cow’s milk protein allergy results from an immunological reaction to one or more milk proteins. The principle key in the treatment of cow’s milk protein allergy is the dietary elimination of cow’s milk protein. Although hydrolyzed and elemental formulas are appropriate replacements, other milk products, including almond milk adequately integrated, could be administered. Here, in the light of encouraging results from our study, we focused on the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of almond milk and we also believe that almond milk might be considered as a potential alternative in cow’s milk protein allergy treatment.

  19. Benefits of milk powder supplementation on bone accretion in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Lau, E M C; Lynn, H; Chan, Y H; Lau, W; Woo, J

    2004-08-01

    Low dietary calcium intake has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for hip and vertebral fractures in studies conducted among Hong Kong Chinese. Few studies have demonstrated the effect of milk supplementation in bone accretion in Chinese children. The aim was to examine the effects of milk powder supplementation in enhancing bone accretion in Chinese children. Three hundred and forty-four children, aged 9-10 years old, were randomized to receive milk powder equivalent to 1300 mg and 650 mg calcium, and to a control group, respectively. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the proximal femur, lumbar spine and total body were measured at 6 months, 12 months and 18 months. The treatment effects were modeled using linear mixed effect models and compared using linear contrast F-tests, by intention-to-treat. Subjects randomized to milk powder equivalent to 1300 mg calcium had significantly higher increase in BMD at both the total hip (7.4 +/- 0.4% in treatment group versus 6.3 +/- 0.4% in the control) and the spine (8.4 +/- 0.5% in the treatment group versus 7.0 +/- 0.5% in the control group). Subjects randomized to milk powder equivalent to 650 mg calcium had smaller increases in BMD at the total hip and spine, although the increase in BMD at the total body was significantly higher (3.1 +/- 0.3% in treatment group versus 2.4 +/- 0.2% in controls). It is concluded that supplementing the diet of Chinese children with milk powder was effective in enhancing bone accretion.

  20. Physicochemical properties of skim milk powders prepared with the addition of mineral chelators.

    PubMed

    Sikand, V; Tong, P S; Vink, Sean; Roy, Soma

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of mineral chelator addition during skim milk powder (SMP) manufacture on the solubility, turbidity, soluble protein, and heat stability (HS). Three chelators (sodium citrate dihydrate, sodium polyphosphate, and disodium EDTA) at 3 different concentrations (5, 15, and 25mM) were added to skim milk concentrate (30% total solids), and the pH was adjusted to 6.65 before spray drying to produce SMP. Spray-dried SMP samples were tested for solubility index (SI). Additionally, samples were reconstituted to contain 9% total solids, adjusted to pH 7.0, and tested for turbidity, protein content from supernatants of ultracentrifuged samples, and HS. Lower SI values were observed for samples treated with 5mM disodium EDTA and sodium polyphosphate than control samples or samples with 5mM sodium citrate dihydrate. Furthermore, lower SI values were observed with an increased level of chelating agents regardless of chelator type. A decreased turbidity value was found with increasing levels of mineral chelating salt treatment. Low turbidity with increasing levels of added chelators may be associated with the dissociation of caseins from micelles. Furthermore, higher protein content was observed in supernatants of ultracentrifuged samples treated with increased level of chelators as compared with the control sample. Higher HS was observed in samples treated with 5mM compared with samples treated with 25mM mineral chelator. The results suggest improved solubility and HS upon addition of mineral chelators to SMP during its manufacture. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nitrogen and protein components of human milk.

    PubMed

    Hambraeus, L; Lönnerdal, B; Forsum, E; Gebre-Medhin, M

    1978-09-01

    The true protein content of human milk is 0.9%, in well-nourished as well as malnourished mothers. Casein constitutes only about 20% of the protein nitrogen in human milk. The remaining 80% is derived from the whey proteins, the three dominant components being alpha-lactalbumin, lactoferrin and secretory IgA. alpha-lactalbumin is a subunit of lactose synthetase. Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein which plays a role in the defence against gastro-intestinal infections and is probably also involved in iron transport in the gut. Secretory IgA is comparatively stable at low pH; it is resistant to proteolytic enzymes and plays an essential role in the immunological defence against gastro-intestinal infections. Lysozyme is a minor component of the whey proteins and represents an active enzyme with a bactericidal effect. The nutritional and immunological significance of the marked differences with respect to the nitrogen and protein compositions of human milk and cow's milk should not be underestimated, but need further elucidation.

  2. The effect of addition of selected milk protein preparations on the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus and physicochemical properties of fermented milk.

    PubMed

    Gustaw, Waldemar; Kozioł, Justyna; Radzki, Wojciech; Skrzypczak, Katarzyna; Michalak-Majewska, Monika; Sołowiej, Bartosz; Sławińska, Aneta; Jabłońska-Ryś, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The intake of fermented milk products, especially yoghurts, has been systematically increasing for a few decades. The purpose of this work was to obtain milk products fermented with a mix of bacterial cultures (yoghurt bacteria and Lactobacillus acidophillus LA-5) and enriched with selected milk protein preparations. Secondly, the aim of the work was to determine physiochemical and rheological properties of the obtained products. The following additives were applied in the experiment: whey protein concentrate (WPC 65), whey protein isolate (WPI), demineralised whey powder (SPD), caseinoglycomacropeptide (CGMP), α-lactalbumin (α-la), sodium caseinate (KNa) and calcium caseinate (KCa). Milk was fermented using probiotic strain Lactobacillus acidophillus LA-5 and a typical yoghurt culture. The products were analysed in terms of the survivability of bacterial cells during refrigerated storage, rheological properties and syneresis. Fermented milk products were obtained using blends of bacterial strains: ST-B01:Lb-12 (1:1), ST-B01:Lb-12:LA-5 (1:1:2). Milk beverages fermented with typical yoghurt bacteria and LA-5 strain showed intensive syneresis. The addition of LA-5 strain caused formation of harder acid gels, comparing to typical yoghurts. Milk products which were prepared from skimmed milk possessed higher values of hardness and consistency coefficient. The increase of concentrations of milk preparations (except of WPI) did not cause significant differences in the hardness of acidic gels obtained by fermentation of mixed culture with a probiotic strain. The applied preparations improved physiochemical properties of the milk beverages which were prepared with a probiotic strain. The increase of protein milk preparations concentration resulted in a gradual decrease of the secreted whey. Among the products that were made of full milk powder and were subjected to three weeks of refrigerated storage the highest survivability of Lb. acidophilus LA-5 was noticed in the

  3. Novel Approaches to Improve the Intrinsic Microbiological Safety of Powdered Infant Milk Formula

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Robert M.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Hill, Colin; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is recognised as the best form of nutrition for infants. However; in instances where breast-feeding is not possible, unsuitable or inadequate, infant milk formulae are used as breast milk substitutes. These formulae are designed to provide infants with optimum nutrition for normal growth and development and are available in either powdered or liquid forms. Powdered infant formula is widely used for convenience and economic reasons. However; current manufacturing processes are not capable of producing a sterile powdered infant formula. Due to their immature immune systems and permeable gastro-intestinal tracts, infants can be more susceptible to infection via foodborne pathogenic bacteria than other age-groups. Consumption of powdered infant formula contaminated by pathogenic microbes can be a cause of serious illness. In this review paper, we discuss the current manufacturing practices present in the infant formula industry, the pathogens of greatest concern, Cronobacter and Salmonella and methods of improving the intrinsic safety of powdered infant formula via the addition of antimicrobials such as: bioactive peptides; organic acids; probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:25685987

  4. Novel approaches to improve the intrinsic microbiological safety of powdered infant milk formula.

    PubMed

    Kent, Robert M; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Hill, Colin; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2015-02-12

    Human milk is recognised as the best form of nutrition for infants. However; in instances where breast-feeding is not possible, unsuitable or inadequate, infant milk formulae are used as breast milk substitutes. These formulae are designed to provide infants with optimum nutrition for normal growth and development and are available in either powdered or liquid forms. Powdered infant formula is widely used for convenience and economic reasons. However; current manufacturing processes are not capable of producing a sterile powdered infant formula. Due to their immature immune systems and permeable gastro-intestinal tracts, infants can be more susceptible to infection via foodborne pathogenic bacteria than other age-groups. Consumption of powdered infant formula contaminated by pathogenic microbes can be a cause of serious illness. In this review paper, we discuss the current manufacturing practices present in the infant formula industry, the pathogens of greatest concern, Cronobacter and Salmonella and methods of improving the intrinsic safety of powdered infant formula via the addition of antimicrobials such as: bioactive peptides; organic acids; probiotics and prebiotics.

  5. Proteins of human milk. I. Identification of major components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.G.; Powers, M.T.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1982-04-01

    Traditionally, human milk proteins are identified largely by reference to bovine milk. Hence, to identify the major proteins in human milk, we subjected human and bovine milk, in parallel, to high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis. Isoelectric precipitation at pH 4.6 was our criterion for distinguishing whey proteins from those of the casein complex. The ..cap alpha..- and..beta..-caseins were identified on the basis of relative abundance, relative molecular mass, and relative isoelectric points. No protein disappeared from ISO-DALT patterns of human milk after rennin treatment, and no new protein comparable to bovine para K-casein appeared in the BASO-DALT patterns; this suggests that K-casein is absent from human milk. The proteins identified in human milk patterns include the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. casein families, lactalbumin, albumin, transferrin, IgA, and lactoferrin. Numerous additional proteins seen in patterns for human milk remain to be identified.

  6. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    DOEpatents

    Casperson, Gerald F.; Schmidhauser, Christian T.; Bissell, Mina J.

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  7. Transcriptional enhancer from milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Casperson, G.F.; Schmidhauser, C.T.; Bissell, M.J.

    1999-12-21

    The invention relates to novel enhancer nucleotide sequences which stimulate transcription of heterologous DNA in cells in culture. The enhancers are derived from major milk protein genes by the process of deletion mapping and functional analysis. The invention also relates to expression vectors containing the novel enhancers.

  8. Determination of bovine immunoglobulin G in bovine colostrum powders, bovine milk powders, and dietary supplements containing bovine colostrum products by an automated direct immunoassay with optical biosensor: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Gapper, Leyton

    2013-01-01

    Nine laboratories participated in an AOAC collaborative study to determine bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in selected dairy powders and dietary supplements by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methodology. Each sample matrix was dissolved in buffer and suitably diluted to fit within the standard curve. The sample extract was injected over a surface functionalized with affinity-purified, polyclonal goat anti-bovine IgG (H+L) antibody; IgG was then detected. SPR detection was used for the direct immunoassay and quantification was made against a calibration curve prepared from bovine serum IgG. Between each standard and sample, the surface was regenerated using 10 mM glycine at pH 1.5. The samples analyzed included the likely matrixes for which the assay would find commercial use, namely, high- and low-protein-content colostrum powders, tablets containing colostrum powder, infant formula containing colostrum powder, and some IgG-containing dairy powders, i.e., milk protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, and skim milk powder. Each laboratory provided data for the study and assayed blind duplicates of seven materials. Due to gross outliers in the majority of results from one laboratory, the data from eight laboratories were used for the statistical analysis. The repeatability RSD (RSDr) values ranged from 3.2 to 7.3%, and the reproducibility RSDR values from 13.0 to 22.6%.

  9. Zinc Absorption from Fortified Milk Powder in Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Rosa O; Hambidge, Michael; Baker, Mark; Salgado, Sergio A; Ruiz, Joaquín; García, Hugo S; Calderón de la Barca, Ana M

    2015-11-01

    Zinc (Zn) is essential for development, growth, and reproduction. The Mexican government subsidizes micronutrient-fortified milk for risk groups, with positive effect on the targeted groups' plasma Zn level, inferring a good absorption is achieved although it has not being measured. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of micronutrient-fortified milk intake during 27 days on Zn absorption in adolescent girls from northwest Mexico. Therefore, Zn absorption was evaluated in 14 healthy adolescent girls (14.1 years old) with adequate plasma Zn levels, before and after 27 days of fortified Zn milk intake. Fractional Zn absorption (FZA) was calculated from urinary ratios of stable isotopic Zn tracers administered orally and intravenously on days 0 and 27, and total absorbed Zn (TZA) was calculated. At the beginning, Zn intake was 6.8 ± 0.85 mg/d (mean ± SE), and 50 % of the adolescent girls did not achieve their requirement (7.3 mg/d). Additionally, FZA was negatively correlated with Zn intake (r =-0.61, p = 0.02), while TZA (1.06 mg/d) was insufficient to cover the physiologic requirements of adolescent girls (3.02 mg/d). At the end of the intervention, all the girls reached the Zn intake recommendation and TZA, 3.09 mg/d, which was enough to meet the physiological requirement for 57 % of the adolescent girls. Therefore, the low Zn intake and the Zn status of adolescent girls were positively impacted by Zn-fortified milk intake and its good absorption rate.

  10. Use of Donkey Milk in Children with Cow’s Milk Protein Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Polidori, Paolo; Vincenzetti, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Human breast milk is the best nutritional support that insures the right development and influences the immune status of the newborn infant. However, when it is not possible to breast feed, it may be necessary to use commercial infant formulas that mimic, where possible, the levels and types of nutrients present in human milk. Despite this, some formula-fed infant develops allergy and/or atopic disease compared to breast-fed infants. Cow’s milk allergy can be divided into immunoglobulin IgE mediated food allergy and non-IgE-mediated food allergy. Most infants with cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) develop symptoms before 1 month of age, often within 1 week after introduction of cow’s milk-based formula. Donkey milk may be considered a good substitute for cow’s milk in feeding children with CMPA since its composition is very similar to human milk. Donkey milk total protein content is low (1.5–1.8 g/100 g), very close to human milk. A thorough analysis of the donkey milk protein profile has been performed in this study; the interest was focused on the milk proteins considered safe for the prevention and treatment of various disorders in humans. The content of lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase and lysozyme, peptides with antimicrobial activity, able to stimulate the development of the neonatal intestine, was determined. Donkey milk is characterized by a low casein content, with values very close to human milk; the total whey protein content in donkey milk ranges between 0.49 and 0.80 g/100 g, very close to human milk (0.68–0.83 g/100 g). Among whey proteins, α-lactalbumin average concentration in donkey milk is 1.8 mg/mL. The results of this study confirmed the possibility of using donkey milk in feeding children with CMPA. PMID:28239105

  11. Use of Donkey Milk in Children with Cow's Milk Protein Allergy.

    PubMed

    Polidori, Paolo; Vincenzetti, Silvia

    2013-05-06

    Human breast milk is the best nutritional support that insures the right development and influences the immune status of the newborn infant. However, when it is not possible to breast feed, it may be necessary to use commercial infant formulas that mimic, where possible, the levels and types of nutrients present in human milk. Despite this, some formula-fed infant develops allergy and/or atopic disease compared to breast-fed infants. Cow's milk allergy can be divided into immunoglobulin IgE mediated food allergy and non-IgE-mediated food allergy. Most infants with cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) develop symptoms before 1 month of age, often within 1 week after introduction of cow's milk-based formula. Donkey milk may be considered a good substitute for cow's milk in feeding children with CMPA since its composition is very similar to human milk. Donkey milk total protein content is low (1.5-1.8 g/100 g), very close to human milk. A thorough analysis of the donkey milk protein profile has been performed in this study; the interest was focused on the milk proteins considered safe for the prevention and treatment of various disorders in humans. The content of lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase and lysozyme, peptides with antimicrobial activity, able to stimulate the development of the neonatal intestine, was determined. Donkey milk is characterized by a low casein content, with values very close to human milk; the total whey protein content in donkey milk ranges between 0.49 and 0.80 g/100 g, very close to human milk (0.68-0.83 g/100 g). Among whey proteins, α-lactalbumin average concentration in donkey milk is 1.8 mg/mL. The results of this study confirmed the possibility of using donkey milk in feeding children with CMPA.

  12. Mild protein hydrolysation of lactose-free milk further reduces milk-related gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Turpeinen, Anu; Kautiainen, Hanna; Tikkanen, Marja-Leena; Sibakov, Timo; Tossavainen, Olli; Myllyluoma, Eveliina

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms associated with milk are common. Besides lactose, milk proteins may cause symptoms in sensitive individuals. We have developed a method for mild enzymatic hydrolysation of milk proteins and studied the effects of hydrolysed milk on gastrointestinal symptoms in adults with a self-diagnosed sensitive stomach. In a double blind, randomised placebo-controlled study, 97 subjects consumed protein-hydrolysed lactose-free milk or commercially available lactose-free milk for 10 d. Frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms during the study period was reported and a symptom score was calculated. Rumbling and flatulence decreased significantly in the hydrolysed milk group (P < 0·05). Also, the total symptom score was lower in subjects who consumed hydrolysed milk (P < 0·05). No difference between groups was seen in abdominal pain (P = 0·47) or bloating (P = 0·076). The results suggest that mild enzymatic protein hydrolysation may decrease gastrointestinal symptoms in adults with a sensitive stomach.

  13. The effect of milk protein on the bioavailability of cocoa polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Keogh, J B; McInerney, J; Clifton, P M

    2007-04-01

    In order to determine whether milk proteins interact with cocoa polyphenols to modulate the uptake and concentration of polyphenols in plasma, 24 middle-aged men and women consumed 2 g of chocolate polyphenols, plus sugar and cocoa butter in 200 mL water, on 2 occasions. On 1 occasion, the chocolate mix contained 2.45 g of milk proteins. Blood samples were taken fasting and at regular intervals for 8 h. Catechin and epicatechins levels were measured in these samples and no differences were seen in average concentrations between the 2 treatments. Milk protein caused a slight increase in concentration at the early time points and a decrease at the later time points. In conclusion, milk powder did not influence the average concentration of polyphenols. While it slightly accelerated absorption, this is of no physiological significance.

  14. A novel preparation of milk protein/polyethylene terephthalate fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J. F.; Zheng, D. D.; Zhong, L.; Zhang, F. X.; Zhang, G. X.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, -NH2 groups were introduced to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers by nitration and reduction method, and then milk protein was grafted on the nitrated and reduced PET (NR PET) fibers by sucrose glycidyl ether crosslinking agent. FTIR suggested the milk protein was successfully grafted on PET fiber surface. SEM images showed a layer of substance covered on the PET fiber surface. DSC demonstrated an excellent thermal stability of milk protein/PET fiber. The moisture regain was improved by milk protein/PET fiber. Moreover, the crease recovery angle and stiffness were retained by the milk protein/PET fabric.

  15. [Simultaneous determination of penicillin and their major enzymatic metabolites in milk and milk powder by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Ai, Lianfeng; Guo, Chunhai; Ma, Yusong; Dou, Caiyun

    2013-10-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/ MS) method has been developed for the determination of eight compounds in milk and milk powder. They are four penicillins (penicillin G, penicillin V, amoxicillin and ampicillin) and four major beta-lactamase enzymatic metabolites of them (penilloic acid G, penilloic acid V, amoxiilloic acid and ampilloic acid). The compounds were extracted from the samples with acetonitrile and water, cleaned-up by HLB solid-phase extraction cartridges, and then detected by HPLC-MS/MS and quantified by external standard method. The linearities were satisfactory with the correlation coefficients > 0.99 at the mass concentrations ranging from 4 microg/L to 200 microg/L for penicillins and from 10 microg/L to 500 microg/L for enzymatic metabolites. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification were 5-50 microg/kg (S/N > or = 3) and 8-100 microg/kg (S/N > or = 10), respectively. The average recoveries of the eight compounds were 83.48%-96.97% in milk and 82.70%-95.14% in milk powder. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) in milk and milk powder were 3.86%-10.87% and 3.02%-9.81%, respectively. In conclusion, the established method is convenient, accurate and sensitive so that it can be applied to the determination of penicillin residues and enzymatic metabolites in milk and milk powder.

  16. Long-term consequences of arsenic poisoning during infancy due to contaminated milk powder

    PubMed Central

    Dakeishi, Miwako; Murata, Katsuyuki; Grandjean, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. The main source of exposure is drinking water contaminated by natural geological sources. Current risk assessment is based on the recognized carcinogenicity of arsenic, but neurotoxic risks have been overlooked. In 1955, an outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred among Japanese infants, with more than 100 deaths. The source was contaminated milk powder produced by the Morinaga company. Detailed accounts of the Morinaga dried milk poisoning were published in Japanese only, and an overview of this poisoning incident and its long-term consequences is therefore presented. From analyses available, the arsenic concentration in milk made from the Morinaga milk powder is calculated to be about 4–7 mg/L, corresponding to daily doses slightly above 500 μg/kg body weight. Lower exposures would result from using diluted milk. Clinical poisoning cases occurred after a few weeks of exposure, with a total dose of about 60 mg. This experience provides clear-cut evidence for hazard assessment of the developmental neurotoxicity. At the present time, more than 600 surviving victims, now in their 50s, have been reported to suffer from severe sequelae, such as mental retardation, neurological diseases, and other disabilities. Along with more recent epidemiological studies of children with environmental arsenic exposures, the data amply demonstrate the need to consider neurotoxicity as a key concern in risk assessment of inorganic arsenic exposure. PMID:17076881

  17. Long-term consequences of arsenic poisoning during infancy due to contaminated milk powder.

    PubMed

    Dakeishi, Miwako; Murata, Katsuyuki; Grandjean, Philippe

    2006-10-31

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. The main source of exposure is drinking water contaminated by natural geological sources. Current risk assessment is based on the recognized carcinogenicity of arsenic, but neurotoxic risks have been overlooked. In 1955, an outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred among Japanese infants, with more than 100 deaths. The source was contaminated milk powder produced by the Morinaga company. Detailed accounts of the Morinaga dried milk poisoning were published in Japanese only, and an overview of this poisoning incident and its long-term consequences is therefore presented. From analyses available, the arsenic concentration in milk made from the Morinaga milk powder is calculated to be about 4-7 mg/L, corresponding to daily doses slightly above 500 microg/kg body weight. Lower exposures would result from using diluted milk. Clinical poisoning cases occurred after a few weeks of exposure, with a total dose of about 60 mg. This experience provides clear-cut evidence for hazard assessment of the developmental neurotoxicity. At the present time, more than 600 surviving victims, now in their 50s, have been reported to suffer from severe sequelae, such as mental retardation, neurological diseases, and other disabilities. Along with more recent epidemiological studies of children with environmental arsenic exposures, the data amply demonstrate the need to consider neurotoxicity as a key concern in risk assessment of inorganic arsenic exposure.

  18. Milk protein concentrations in galactorrhoeic mammary secretions.

    PubMed

    Yap, P L; Pryde, E A; McClelland, D B

    1980-02-01

    Milk protein concentrations were determined either by double antibody radioimmunoassay (IgA) or single radial immunodiffusion (IgG, lactoferrin, lysozyme and albumin) in the mammayr secretions of one nulliparous and three parous female patients with galactorrhoea due to hyperprolactinaemia. Concentrations of all the proteins studied were found to be similar to the concentrations observed in post-partum colostrum. In particular, secretory IgA was the only form of IgA detected in galactorrhoeic secretions. It is suggested that hyperprolactinaemia alone can result in increased mammary synthesis of the milk proteins since the steroid changes associated with a full-term pregnancy and delivery of the placenta did not immediately precede the galactorrhoea in three of the four patients studied.

  19. Exposure Assessment of Infants to Aflatoxin M1 through Consumption of Breast Milk and Infant Powdered Milk in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Angélica T.; Takabayashi-Yamashita, Cássia R.; Ono, Elisabete Y. S.; Bagatin, Artur K.; Rigobello, Fabiana F.; Kawamura, Osamu; Hirooka, Elisa Y.; Itano, Eiko N.

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is an important biomarker that can be used to evaluate aflatoxin exposure in both humans and animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exposure degree of infants to AFM1 through consumption of breast milk and infant powdered milk in Brazil. For this purpose, the estimated daily intake (EDI) for infants was calculated based on the AFM1 levels analyzed in 94 breast milk (BM) samples collected in Southern Brazil, and 16 infant powdered milk (IPM) samples commonly commercialized in Brazil. AFM1 was detected in 5.3% (n = 5) and 43.8% (n = 7) of BM and IPM samples, with mean levels of 0.003 ng/g and 0.011 ng/g, respectively. All the IPM samples showed AFM1 levels lower than those established by the Brazilian guidelines (5 ng/g), and in most of the samples (81.25%) levels were below the maximum limit tolerated by the European Commission (0.025 ng/g). The EDI of AFM1 for infants aged zero to 12 months old showed values from 0.018 to 0.069 ng/kg body weight/day for BM, and 0.078 to 0.306 ng/kg body weight/day for IPM. Hazard index (HI) values for BM and IPM were less than one, except for IPM intended for infants up to one month. In conclusion, the exposure of infants to AFM1 was low, but continuous monitoring of mycotoxin levels is essential to minimize infant health risk. PMID:27589799

  20. Exposure Assessment of Infants to Aflatoxin M₁ through Consumption of Breast Milk and Infant Powdered Milk in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Angélica T; Takabayashi-Yamashita, Cássia R; Ono, Elisabete Y S; Bagatin, Artur K; Rigobello, Fabiana F; Kawamura, Osamu; Hirooka, Elisa Y; Itano, Eiko N

    2016-08-31

    Aflatoxin M₁ (AFM₁) is an important biomarker that can be used to evaluate aflatoxin exposure in both humans and animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exposure degree of infants to AFM₁ through consumption of breast milk and infant powdered milk in Brazil. For this purpose, the estimated daily intake (EDI) for infants was calculated based on the AFM₁ levels analyzed in 94 breast milk (BM) samples collected in Southern Brazil, and 16 infant powdered milk (IPM) samples commonly commercialized in Brazil. AFM₁ was detected in 5.3% (n = 5) and 43.8% (n = 7) of BM and IPM samples, with mean levels of 0.003 ng/g and 0.011 ng/g, respectively. All the IPM samples showed AFM₁ levels lower than those established by the Brazilian guidelines (5 ng/g), and in most of the samples (81.25%) levels were below the maximum limit tolerated by the European Commission (0.025 ng/g). The EDI of AFM₁ for infants aged zero to 12 months old showed values from 0.018 to 0.069 ng/kg body weight/day for BM, and 0.078 to 0.306 ng/kg body weight/day for IPM. Hazard index (HI) values for BM and IPM were less than one, except for IPM intended for infants up to one month. In conclusion, the exposure of infants to AFM₁ was low, but continuous monitoring of mycotoxin levels is essential to minimize infant health risk.

  1. Commercial Milk Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Kit Reactivities to Purified Milk Proteins and Milk-Derived Ingredients.

    PubMed

    Ivens, Katherine O; Baumert, Joseph L; Taylor, Steve L

    2016-07-01

    Numerous commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits exist to quantitatively detect bovine milk residues in foods. Milk contains many proteins that can serve as ELISA targets including caseins (α-, β-, or κ-casein) and whey proteins (α-lactalbumin or β-lactoglobulin). Nine commercially-available milk ELISA kits were selected to compare the specificity and sensitivity with 5 purified milk proteins and 3 milk-derived ingredients. All of the milk kits were capable of quantifying nonfat dry milk (NFDM), but did not necessarily detect all individual protein fractions. While milk-derived ingredients were detected by the kits, their quantitation may be inaccurate due to the use of different calibrators, reference materials, and antibodies in kit development. The establishment of a standard reference material for the calibration of milk ELISA kits is increasingly important. The appropriate selection and understanding of milk ELISA kits for food analysis is critical to accurate quantification of milk residues and informed risk management decisions.

  2. Comparison of three immunosensor methods (surface plasmon resonance, screen-printed and classical amperometric immunosensors) for immunoglobulin G determination in human serum and animal or powdered milks.

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Mauro; Martini, Elisabetta; Campanella, Luigi; Favero, Gabriele; Carlucci, Luciano; Mazzei, Franco

    2013-01-25

    Within the framework of research carried out by our team aimed at developing new immunological methods to determine proteins such as immunoglobulins G in different biological matrixes, for instance, serum and milk, tests were performed on several immunosensors based on different transducer types, i.e. amperometric (classical or screen-printed) electrodes for hydrogen peroxide. Lastly the feasibility of constructing immunosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was investigated. "Competitive" immunological procedures were used in the first two cases. Conversely, the surface plasmon resonance transduction technique allowed a "direct" measurement. Applications were performed on human serum, powdered milks for babies and particularly on several animal milks, in the case of buffalo milk seeking a routine control method to identify possible inflammatory affections in the animals.

  3. Donkey milk-based formula: A substitute for patients with cow’s milk protein allergy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cow’s milk protein allergy affects 2-7% of children using cow’s milk formulae. Fifty to eighty percent of them develop allergy to other food items and substitutes. On the search for a safe and affordable substitute, we reviewed the composition of milks of the domestic mammals in close contact with man. Milk constituents studied included fat, protein, lactose, minerals, water, pH, specific gravity and caloric value. Compared to others, donkey milk was found to be closest to breast milk when the amount of 16ml of sunflower is added to one liter of this milk. To our knowledge, no allergy to donkey milk has been reported yet. PMID:27493315

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in milk powders marketed in Argentina and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Garcia Londoño, Victor A; Garcia, Laura P; Scussel, Vildes M; Resnik, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in milk powder samples commercialised in Argentina and Brazil during 2012. Thirty-one samples were available from the retail market. An HPLC method for the determination of PAHs was applied involving a clean-up step with silica cartridges. Recoveries were greater than 79% for all PAHs analysed. Reproducible determination with adequate detection and quantification limits (LOD and LOQ) were attained by HPLC with fluorescence detection for 14 PAHs. Acenaphthylene was determined with a UV-VIS detector. There is no significant difference in any PAHs or in the sum of them between the Argentinean and Brazilian samples. Therefore, the samples were evaluated together. The highest concentration of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) detected was 0.57 µg kg⁻¹ in milk powder. Contamination of samples expressed as the sum of 15 analysed PAHs varied between 11.8 and 78.4 µg kg⁻¹ and as PAH4 (BaP, chrysene, benzo(a)anthracene and benzo(b)fluoranthene) was between 0.02 and 10.16 µg kg⁻¹. The correlation coefficient for PAH2 (BaP and chrysene) and PAH4 groups was 0.95, for PAH2 and PAH8 it was 0.71, and for PAH4 and PAH8 it was 0.83. All the samples were below the regulatory limit for BaP, but 65% of commercial milk powders do not comply with the European Union limit for PAH4. This is the first report of PAH contamination in powder milk from Argentina and Brazil.

  5. Binding and measuring natural rubber latex proteins on glove powder.

    PubMed

    Tomazic-Jezic, Vesna J; Lucas, Anne D; Sanchez, Beatriz A

    2004-01-01

    Cornstarch used as a donning powder on natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves adsorbs NRL proteins. During glove use, powder-carried proteins can be aerosolized and can cause allergic reactions in NRL sensitized individuals. The amount of NRL proteins bound to glove powder and its relative relationship to the total amount of proteins on the glove has not been studied, due to the difficulty in measuring proteins on powder. Using the ELISA inhibition assay for NRL proteins [Standard test method for the immunological measurement of antigenic protein in natural rubber and its products. In: The Annual Book of ASTM Standards; ASTM: West Conshohocken, PA, 2000; ASTM D 64-0] we have investigated possible protocol modifications in order to include measurement of proteins bound to glove powder, as well as the water-extractable glove proteins. Possible interference of the starch itself was evaluated by adding clean cornstarch to the assay. No significant interference was observed with powder concentrations below 5 mg/mL. We analyzed 19 extracts of powdered surgical and examination gloves before and after removal of the particulate component. Comparison of NRL glove extracts with, and without, the cornstarch powder fraction indicated significant variations in the ratios of powder-bound protein and corresponding water-extractable protein. The ratios did not appear to correlate with either the total protein on the glove, the glove weight, or the total amount of powder on the glove. However, when virgin glove powders were exposed to NRL proteins, binding was proportional to the protein concentration in the suspension. Temperature in the range from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C, did not affect binding intensity, while a higher pH resulted in a higher level of protein associated with, or bound to, the starch. The major differences in the propensity for NRL protein binding were observed among different glove powders. The data indicate that the amount of protein that binds to glove powder

  6. Direct determination of moisture in powder milk using near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, R; Singh, Parul; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2006-01-01

    Moisture content in commercially available milk powder was investigated using near infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with an Indian low-cost dispersive NIR spectrophotometer. Different packets of milk powder of the same batch were procured from the market. Forty-five samples with moisture range 4-10% were prepared in the laboratory. Spectra of the samples were collected in the wavelength region 800-2500 nm. Moisture values of all the samples were simultaneously determined by Karl Fischer (KF) titration. These KF values were used as reference for developing calibration model using partial least squares regression (PLSR) method. The calibration and validation statistics are R cal2:0.9942, RMSEC:0.1040, and R val2:0.9822, RMSEV:0.1730. Five samples of unknown moisture contents were taken for NIR prediction using developed calibration model. The agreement between NIR predicted results and those of Karl Fischer values is appreciable. The result shows that the instrument can be successfully used for the determination of moisture content in milk powder.

  7. Detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in milk powders by cross-priming amplification combined with immunoblotting analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongwei; Feng, Shaolong; Zhao, Yulong; Wang, Shuo; Lu, Xiaonan

    2015-12-02

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is frequently isolated from a wide variety of foods and can cause human yersiniosis. Biochemical and culture-based assays are common detection methods, but require a long incubation time and easily misidentify Y. enterocolitica as other non-pathogenic Yersinia species. Alternatively, cross-priming amplification (CPA) under isothermal conditions combined with immunoblotting analysis enables a more sensitive detection in a relatively short time period. A set of specific displacement primers, cross primers and testing primers was designed on the basis of six specific sequences in Y. enterocolitica 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer. Under isothermal condition, amplification and hybridization were conducted simultaneously at 63°C for 60 min. The specificity of CPA was tested for 96 different bacterial strains and 165 commercial milk powder samples. Two red lines were developed on BioHelix Express strip for all of the Y. enterocolitica strains, and one red line was shown for non-Y. enterocolitica strains. The limit of detection of CPA was 10(0)fg for genomic DNA (1000 times more sensitive than PCR assay), 10(1) CFU/ml for pure bacterial culture, and 10(0) CFU per 100 g milk powder with pre-enrichment at 37°C for 24 h. CPA combined with immunoblotting analysis can achieve highly specific and sensitive detection of Y. enterocolitica in milk powder in 90 min after pre-enrichment.

  8. Irradiation dose detection of irradiated milk powder using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Kong, W W; Zhang, C; Liu, F; Gong, A P; He, Y

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the possibility of applying visible and near-infrared spectroscopy to the quantitative detection of irradiation dose of irradiated milk powder. A total of 150 samples were used: 100 for the calibration set and 50 for the validation set. The samples were irradiated at 5 different dose levels in the dose range 0 to 6.0 kGy. Six different pretreatment methods were compared. The prediction results of full spectra given by linear and nonlinear calibration methods suggested that Savitzky-Golay smoothing and first derivative were suitable pretreatment methods in this study. Regression coefficient analysis was applied to select effective wavelengths (EW). Less than 10 EW were selected and they were useful for portable detection instrument or sensor development. Partial least squares, extreme learning machine, and least squares support vector machine were used. The best prediction performance was achieved by the EW-extreme learning machine model with first-derivative spectra, and correlation coefficients=0.97 and root mean square error of prediction=0.844. This study provided a new approach for the fast detection of irradiation dose of milk powder. The results could be helpful for quality detection and safety monitoring of milk powder.

  9. Development of a method to study the migration of six photoinitiators into powdered milk.

    PubMed

    Sanches-Silva, Ana; Pastorelli, Sarah; Cruz, José M; Simoneau, Catherine; Castanheira, Isabel; Paseiro-Losada, Perfecto

    2008-04-23

    The aim of the present work was to develop a rapid multimethod for the analysis of six photoinitiators (PIs) in powdered milk and to study the migration of these PIs from LDPE packaging into powdered milk. The optimized HPLC-DAD method showed high correlation coefficients (>0.9999) over a concentration range of 0.1-10.9 mg/L. The kinetics of migration of the photoinitiators from LDPE packaging into powdered milk were determined at different temperatures. The key parameters of migration phenomena (diffusion and partition coefficients) were determined. The diffusion coefficients at 5 degrees C ranged between 8.4 x 10(-12) (for ITX) and 5.1 x 10(-10) (for benzophenone) and those at 40 degrees C between 5.9 x 10(-10) (for ITX) and 6.1 x 10(-9) (for Irgacure 184). The diffusion coefficients of the six model migrants under study increased with temperature and showed a good Arrhenius relationship between 5 and 40 degrees C.

  10. Feasibility of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy to detect tetracyclines hydrochloride in infant milk powder.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jianyuan; Xie, Lijuan; Ying, Yibin

    2014-12-02

    We report the use of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) to detect tetracyclines hydrochloride (TCsH) in infant milk powder for the first time. Four kinds of TCsH exhibited their unique spectral features in the region of 0.3-1.8 THz. The main spectral features of these TCsH were still detectable when mixed with infant milk powder with concentrations at 1%-50%, even in the ternary mixtures. The results from chemometrics analysis showed that qualitative and quantitative detection of TCsH in infant milk powder could be successfully achieved. The residual predictive deviation (RPD) values of all these TCsH models were all higher than 2, indicating these models were considered good and could be used in screening purposes. The RPD values of TCH, DTCH, and CTCH models were higher than 3, which were considered excellent for prediction purposes. These preliminary results indicated that THz-TDS combined with chemometrics analysis was suitable for detecting the presence of TCsH residues in a food matrix.

  11. Impact of the Skim Milk Powder Manufacturing Process on the Flavor of Model White Chocolate.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ashleigh; Grandison, Alistair S; Ryan, Angela; Festring, Daniel; Methven, Lisa; Parker, Jane K

    2017-02-15

    Milk powder is an important ingredient in the confectionery industry, but its variable nature has consequences for the quality of the final confectionary product. This paper demonstrates that skim milk powders (SMP) produced using different (but typical) manufacturing processes, when used as ingredients in the manufacture of model white chocolates, had a significant impact on the sensory and volatile profiles of the chocolate. SMP was produced from raw bovine milk using either low or high heat treatment, and a model white chocolate was prepared from each SMP. A directional discrimination test with naïve panelists showed that the chocolate prepared from the high heat SMP had more caramel/fudge character (p < 0.0001), and sensory profiling with an expert panel showed an increase in both fudge (p < 0.05) and condensed milk (p < 0.05) flavor. Gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry and GC-olfactometry of both the SMPs and the model chocolates showed a concomitant increase in Maillard-derived volatiles which are likely to account for this change in flavor.

  12. Reconstituted yogurt from yogurt cultured milk powder mix has better overall characteristics than reconstituted yogurt from commercial yogurt powder.

    PubMed

    Song, Lijie; Aryana, Kayanush J

    2014-10-01

    For manufacture of commercial yogurt powder, yogurt has to go through a drying process, which substantially lowers the yogurt culture counts, so the potential health benefits of the yogurt culture bacteria are reduced. Also, upon reconstitution, commercial yogurt powder does not taste like yogurt and has an off-flavor. The objective was to study the microbial, physicochemical, and sensory characteristics of reconstituted yogurt from yogurt cultured milk powder (YCMP) mix and reconstituted yogurt from commercial yogurt powder (CYP). The CYP reconstituted yogurt was the control and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt was the treatment. Microbial and physicochemical characteristics of the CYP reconstituted yogurt and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt were analyzed daily for the first week and then weekly for a period of 8 wk. Sensory consumer testing of CYP reconstituted yogurt and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt was conducted with 100 consumers. At 56 d, YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt had 5 log cfu/mL higher counts of Streptococcus thermophilus than the control (CYP reconstituted yogurt). Also, Lactobacillus bulgaricus counts of YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt were 6.55 log cfu/mL at 28 d and were 5.35 log cfu/mL at 56 d, whereas the CYP reconstituted yogurt from 28 d onwards had a count of <10 cfu/mL. The YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt also had significantly higher apparent viscosity and sensory scores for appearance, color, aroma, taste, thickness, overall liking, consumer acceptability, and purchase intent than CYP reconstituted yogurt. Overall, YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt had more desirable characteristics than CYP reconstituted yogurt. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Short communication: The water footprint of dairy products: case study involving skim milk powder.

    PubMed

    Ridoutt, B G; Williams, S R O; Baud, S; Fraval, S; Marks, N

    2010-11-01

    In the context of global water scarcity and food security concerns, water footprints are emerging as an important sustainability indicator in the agriculture and food sectors. Using a recently developed life cycle assessment-based methodology that takes into account local water stress where operations occur, the normalized water footprints of milk products from South Gippsland, one of Australia's major dairy regions, were 14.4 L/kg of total milk solids in whole milk (at farm gate) and 15.8 L/kg of total milk solids in skim milk powder (delivered to export destination). These results demonstrate that dairy products can be produced with minimal potential to contribute to freshwater scarcity. However, not all dairy production systems are alike and the variability in water footprints between systems and products should be explored to obtain strategic insights that will enable the dairy sector to minimize its burden on freshwater systems from consumptive water use. Copyright © 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationships between milk protein composition, milk protein variants, and cow fertility traits in Dutch Holstein-Friesian cattle.

    PubMed

    Demeter, R M; Markiewicz, K; van Arendonk, J A M; Bovenhuis, H

    2010-11-01

    Selective breeding can change milk protein composition to improve the manufacturing properties of milk. However, the effects of such breeding strategies on other economically important traits should be investigated before implementation. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between cow fertility traits and (1) milk protein composition and (2) milk protein variants (β-lactoglobulin, β-casein, κ-casein, and β-κ-casein) in commercial Dutch Holstein-Friesian cattle. Data on 1,644 first-lactation cows were analyzed by fitting linear mixed models. Greater relative concentration of α(S1)-casein within total milk protein had a positive phenotypic relationship with nonreturn rates and calving rate after first insemination. Furthermore, results showed virtually no significant relationship between cow fertility and concentration of other milk proteins or milk protein variants. Results of this study can be used to assess the correlated effects of breeding for improved milk protein composition on reproduction, thereby allowing for better evaluation of breeding programs before implementation. Our findings suggest that selecting cows based on milk protein composition or milk protein variants for improved manufacturing properties would have no negative influence on reproductive performance. Copyright © 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative multiresidue analysis of antibiotics in milk and milk powder by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, He; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Jiang, Jindou; Tao, Dali; Zheng, Nan

    2016-10-15

    A simple and fast multiresidue extraction and purification method was developed for the determination of 61 veterinary drugs, belonging to seven classes, in milk and milk powder. The extraction depends on the acetonitrile solvent, followed by a single step to remove lipids with fatty acid chains using a new reversed phase SPE without traditional pre-equilibration and washing steps before eluting SPE. The purifying lipid effect of the present preparation method was evaluated by comparing the response changes of ion peak areas of the milk endogenous metabolites before and after SPE treatment using ultra-fast LC coupled to tandem quadrupole and TOF MS. Subsequently, UPLC coupled to tandem quadrupole MS was performed for the quantitative analysis of milk and milk powder samples spiked with 61 veterinary drugs, including β-lactam, macrolide, amide alcohol, forest amine, sulfanilamide, tetracyclines, and quinolones antibiotics. This method is very simple, fast, sensitive, and selective, and allows the good recoveries of all compounds, with a recovery range of 61.5-118.6%, and coefficients of variation of less than 11.6%. The 61 compounds behave in the dynamic range 0.01-200μgkg(-1), with correlation coefficient >0.99. The limits of quantification for the analytes are in the range 0.01-5.18μgkg(-1). Finally, this method has been successfully applied to the screening of veterinary drugs in 50 commercial bovine milk and milk powder samples, and ceftiofur and ciprofloxacin were detected in some brand samples.

  16. Rapid screening for detection and differentiation of detergent powder adulteration in infant milk formula by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Tay, Manjun; Fang, Guihua; Chia, Poh Ling; Li, Sam Fong Yau

    2013-10-10

    Reports of infant milk formula adulteration by detergent powders as economic frauds and poisoning incidents are common as detergents are readily available and are inexpensive household items. Liquid chromatography (LC)-Qtrap and LC-hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) in combination with chemometrics were effectively employed to detect the presence of detergent powder adulterated in infant milk formula. Partial least square analysis (PLS) regression was also utilized to quantify the amount of detergent powder in adulterated infant milk formula without the need to purchase any standards. Dodecylbenzenesulfonate (C12-LAS) was identified and verified as the marker which existed in detergent powder using LC-QTOF-MS. The amount of C12-LAS present in the admixture was successfully quantified through standard addition method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of powdered infant formula milk as chelating agent for copper under simulated gastric conditions of a baby's stomach.

    PubMed

    Arancibia, Verónica; Peña, Claudia; Segura, Rodrigo

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the complexing capacity of four types of powdered commercial milks with copper(II) using square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry. Two were types of cow milk adapted for babies under one year (A and B), one was soymilk (C) and the other was normal milk (D). Milk solutions were prepared following the instructions shown on the milk container, and they were mixed with a pepsin solution simulating a baby's stomach conditions (pepsin and salts concentration, pH and temperature). Complexing capacity was determined by titrating milk samples with aliquots of a standard copper solution until the peak current due to solvated or free copper ions was increasing. Assuming a 1:1 copper-milk complex, the apparent stability constant was found using the pseudopolarogram method. The log K'(Cu-milk) values were 4.9, 5.0, 3.0 and 5.1 for A, B, C and D types of milk, respectively. Voltammograms of the milk solution as a function of copper added show that the binding properties of the four types of powdered milk studied were different and that saturation of the four types, occurs at different copper concentrations. Concentrations obtained were: 4.9, 5.8, 1.1 and 10.1 mM for A, B, C and D types, respectively. The best complexing agent was the solution prepared with powdered milk D and the worst was that of C. This is important for the bioavailability of this element as a micronutrient.

  18. [Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes].

    PubMed

    Lis, Jolanta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-05-31

    Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements) which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  19. Composition and Variation of Macronutrients, Immune Proteins, and Human Milk Oligosaccharides in Human Milk From Nonprofit and Commercial Milk Banks.

    PubMed

    Meredith-Dennis, Laura; Xu, Gege; Goonatilleke, Elisha; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Underwood, Mark A; Smilowitz, Jennifer T

    2017-06-01

    When human milk is unavailable, banked milk is recommended for feeding premature infants. Milk banks use processes to eliminate pathogens; however, variability among methods exists. Research aim: The aim of this study was to compare the macronutrient (protein, carbohydrate, fat, energy), immune-protective protein, and human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) content of human milk from three independent milk banks that use pasteurization (Holder vs. vat techniques) or retort sterilization. Randomly acquired human milk samples from three different milk banks ( n = 3 from each bank) were analyzed for macronutrient concentrations using a Fourier transform mid-infrared spectroscopy human milk analyzer. The concentrations of IgA, IgM, IgG, lactoferrin, lysozyme, α-lactalbumin, α antitrypsin, casein, and HMO were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The concentrations of protein and fat were significantly ( p < .05) less in the retort sterilized compared with the Holder and vat pasteurized samples, respectively. The concentrations of all immune-modulating proteins were significantly ( p < .05) less in the retort sterilized samples compared with vat and/or Holder pasteurized samples. The total HMO concentration and HMOs containing fucose, sialic acid, and nonfucosylated neutral sugars were significantly ( p < .05) less in retort sterilized compared with Holder pasteurized samples. Random milk samples that had undergone retort sterilization had significantly less immune-protective proteins and total and specific HMOs compared with samples that had undergone Holder and vat pasteurization. These data suggest that further analysis of the effect of retort sterilization on human milk components is needed prior to widespread adoption of this process.

  20. Effect of protein degradability on milk production of dairy ewes.

    PubMed

    Mikolayunas-Sandrock, C; Armentano, L E; Thomas, D L; Berger, Y M

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the effect of protein degradability of dairy sheep diets on milk yield and protein utilization across 2 levels of milk production. Three diets were formulated to provide similar energy concentrations and varying concentrations of rumen-degradable protein (RDP) and rumen-undegradable protein (RUP): 12% RDP and 4% RUP (12-4) included basal levels of RDP and RUP, 12% RDP and 6% RUP (12-6) included additional RUP, and 14% RDP and 4% RUP (14-4) included additional RDP. Diets were composed of alfalfa-timothy cubes, whole and ground corn, whole oats, dehulled soybean meal, and expeller soybean meal (SoyPlus, West Central, Ralston, IA). Estimates of RDP and RUP were based on the Small Ruminant Nutrition System model (2008) and feed and orts were analyzed for Cornell N fractions. Eighteen multiparous dairy ewes in midlactation were divided by milk yield (low and high) into 2 blocks of 9 ewes each and were randomly assigned within block (low and high) to 3 pens of 3 ewes each. Dietary treatments were arranged in a 3 x 3 Latin square within each block and applied to pens for 14-d periods. We hypothesized that pens consuming high-RUP diets (12-6) would produce more milk and milk protein than the basal diet (12-4) and pens consuming high-RDP diets (14-4) would not produce more milk than the basal diet (12-4). Ewes in the high-milk-yield square consumed more dry matter and produced more milk, milk fat, and milk protein than ewes in the low-milk-yield square. There was no effect of dietary treatment on dry matter intake. Across both levels of milk production, the 12-6 diet increased milk yield by 14%, increased milk fat yield by 14%, and increased milk protein yield by 13% compared with the 14-4 and 12-4 diets. Gross N efficiency (milk protein N/intake protein N) was 11 and 15% greater in the 12-6 and 12-4 diets, respectively, compared with the 14-4 diet. Milk urea N concentration was greater in the 12-6 diet and tended to be

  1. [Rapid analysis of melamine in milk and milk powder using QuEChERS approach coupled with weak cation exchange chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Guo, Zhimou; Shen, Aijin; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao

    2011-07-01

    A simple, rapid method for the determination of melamine in milk and milk powder was developed using QuEChERS approach coupled with weak cation exchange chromatography (WCX). The samples were extracted and cleaned-up by medicinal alcohol and lipid adsorbent (LAS) simultaneously, then centrifuged and filtered for high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis. The separation was performed on a WCX column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) with 2 mmol/L KH2 PO4 (pH 3.8) as mobile phase. The flow rate was 1.5 mL/min and the detection wavelength was 208 nm. The injection volume was 20 microL and the column temperature was 30 degrees C. Under the optimized conditions, good linearity was obtained in the range of 0.02-20 mg/L with a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999 9. For samples spiked with melamine standard in the range of 1-50 mg/kg, the average recoveries of standard in the milk and milk powder were 98.9%-105.2% and 86.4%-102.9%, respectively. The relative standard deviations were 0.9%-3.4% and 1.5%-6.7%, respectively. The limits of detection (LOD, S/N > or = 3) were 0.05 mg/kg (milk) and 0.1 mg/kg (milk powder). The present method is green due to not use of the toxic organic solvents.

  2. Wide Range of Biotin (Vitamin H) Content in Foodstuffs and Powdered Milks as Assessed by High-performance Affinity Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kou; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Abe, Kiyomi; Hirano, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Kazuyuki; Ogata, Tsutomu; Horikawa, Reiko; Nagamine, Takeaki

    2009-01-01

    The biotin (vitamin H) contents of various foodstuffs were determined by using a newly developed high-performance affinity chromatography with a trypsin-treated avidin-bound column. Biotin was derivatized with 9-anthryldiazomethane (ADAM) to fluorescent biotin-ADAM ester. A wide range of biotin contents were found in various foodstuffs depending upon the species (strain), season, organ (of plants and animals), geography, freshness, preparation method and storage method. Among the foodstuffs and fermented foods tested, it was found that wide distributions of biotin content were observed in powdered milk, natto, sake (rice wine), beer, edible oil and sea weed. Since powdered milk is important for child health and development, 14 kinds of powdered and special milks for use in children's diseases were intensively measured. We found that several special milk powders for children with allergies contained low levels of free biotin. Use of these powdered milks caused skin diseases and alopecia in some patients possessing thermolabile serum biotinidase, and administration of free biotin improved their symptoms dramatically. Therefore, it is essential to estimate the total and free biotin contents on each foodstuff in order to improve effective biotin intake and support better health and quality of life for people.

  3. Green synthesized gold nanoparticles decorated graphene oxide for sensitive determination of chloramphenicol in milk, powdered milk, honey and eye drops.

    PubMed

    Karthik, R; Govindasamy, Mani; Chen, Shen-Ming; Mani, Veerappan; Lou, Bih-Show; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Hou, Yu-Shen; Elangovan, A

    2016-08-01

    A simple and rapid green synthesis using Bischofia javanica Blume leaves as reducing agent was developed for the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). AuNPs decorated graphene oxide (AuNPs/GO) was prepared and employed for the sensitive amperometric determination of chloramphenicol. The green biosynthesis requires less than 40s to reduce gold salts to AuNPs. The formations of AuNPs and AuNPs/GO were evaluated by scanning electron and atomic force microscopies, UV-Visible and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction studies, and electrochemical methods. AuNPs/GO composite film modified electrode was fabricated and shown excellent electrocatalytic ability towards chloramphenicol. Under optimal conditions, the amperometric sensing platform has delivered wide linear range of 1.5-2.95μM, low detection limit of 0.25μM and high sensitivity of 3.81μAμM(-1)cm(-2). The developed sensor exhibited good repeatability and reproducibility, anti-interference ability and long-term storage stability. Practical feasibility of the sensor has been demonstrated in food samples (milk, powdered milk and honey) and pharmaceutical sample (eye drops). The green synthesized AuNPs/GO composite has great potential for analysis of food samples in food safety measures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Short-term effects of milking frequency on milk yield, milk composition, somatic cell count and milk protein profile in dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Torres, Alexandr; Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo-Enrique; Morales-delaNuez, Antonio; Sánchez-Macías, Davinia; Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Castro, Noemi; Capote, Juan; Argüello, Anastasio

    2014-08-01

    Goats in Canary Islands are milked once a day by tradition, but in most countries with high technology on farms, goats are milked twice a day, which is known to improve milk yield. Therefore it is important to know whether the increase of milking frequency can improve the production without impairing milk quality. The objective of this study was to investigate the short term effects of three milking frequencies on milk yield, milk composition, somatic cell count (SCC) and milk protein profile in dairy goats traditionally milked once a day. Twelve Majorera goats in early lactation (48±4 d in milk) were used. During a 5-week period, goats were milked once a day (X1) in weeks 1 and 5, twice a day (X2) in weeks 2 and 4, and three times a day (X3) in week 3. Milk recording and sampling were done on the last day of each experimental week. Milk yield increased by 26% from X1 to X2. No differences were obtained when goats were switched from X2 to X3, and from X3 to X2. The goats recovered the production level when they returned to X1. Different patterns of changes in the milk constituents due to the milking frequency effect were observed. Fat percentage increased when switched from X1 to X2, then decreased from X2 to X3, and from X3 to X2, whereas it did not show significant differences from X2 to X1. Milking frequency did not affect the protein and lactose percentages. SCC values were unaffected when goats were milked X1, X2 and X3, but then they increased slightly when milking frequency was returned to X2 and X1. Finally, quantitative analysis showed an increase in intensities of milk protein bands from X1 to X2, but the intensities of casein bands (α(S1)-CN, α(S2)-CN, β-CN, κ-CN) and major whey proteins (α-La, β-Lg) decreased from X2 to X3.

  5. Physical properties of ice cream containing milk protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, V B; Wolters, C L; Vodovotz, Y; Ji, T

    2005-03-01

    Two milk protein concentrates (MPC, 56 and 85%) were studied as substitutes for 20 and 50% of the protein content in ice cream mix. The basic mix formula had 12% fat, 11% nonfat milk solids, 15% sweetener, and 0.3% stabilizer/emulsifier blend. Protein levels remained constant, and total solids were compensated for in MPC mixes by the addition of polydextrose. Physical properties investigated included apparent viscosity, fat globule size, melting rate, shape retention, and freezing behavior using differential scanning calorimetry. Milk protein concentrate formulations had higher mix viscosity, larger amount of fat destabilization, narrower ice melting curves, and greater shape retention compared with the control. Milk protein concentrates did not offer significant modifications of ice cream physical properties on a constant protein basis when substituted for up to 50% of the protein supplied by nonfat dry milk. Milk protein concentrates may offer ice cream manufacturers an alternative source of milk solids non-fat, especially in mixes reduced in lactose or fat, where higher milk solids nonfat are needed to compensate other losses of total solids.

  6. Simultaneous determination of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in milk, fresh milk and milk powder by LC-MS/MS utilising online turbulent flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Sufang; Li, Qiang; Sun, Lei; Du, Yanshan; Xia, Jing; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A novel, fully automated method based on dual-column switching using online turbulent flow chromatography followed by LC-MS/MS was developed for the determination of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in milk, fresh milk and milk powder samples. After ultrasound-assisted extraction, samples were directly injected into the chromatographic system and the analytes were concentrated on the clean-up loading column. Through purge switch, analytes were transferred to the analytical column for subsequent detection by mass spectrometry. Different types of TurboFlow(TM) columns, transfer flow rates and transfer times were optimised. Method limits of detection obtained for AFB1 and AFM1 were 0.05 μg kg(-1), and limits of quantification were 0.1 μg kg(-1). Recoveries of aflatoxin B1 and M1 were in range of 81.1-102.1% for all samples. Matrix effects of aflatoxin B1 and M1 were in range of 63.1-94.3%. The developed method was successfully used for the analysis of aflatoxin B1 and M1 in real samples.

  7. Detection of cow's milk proteins and minor components in human milk using proteomics techniques.

    PubMed

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Varalda, A; Peila, C; Fabris, C; Conti, A; Bertino, E

    2012-10-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are the best characterized food allergens. The aim of this study was to investigate cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, and other minor protein components by proteomics techniques, more sensitive than other techniques used in the past. Sixty-two term and 11 preterm colostrum samples were collected, subjected to a treatment able to increase the concentration of the most diluted proteins and simultaneously to reduce the concentration of the proteins present at high concentration (Proteominer Treatment), and subsequently subjected to the steps of proteomic techniques. The most relevant finding in this study was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in human colostrum, then bovine alpha-1-casein could be considered the cow's milk allergen that is readily secreted in human milk and could be a cause of sensitization to cow's milk in exclusively breastfed predisposed infants. Another interesting result was the detection, at very low concentrations, of proteins previously not described in human milk (galectin-7, the different isoforms of the 14-3-3 protein and the serum amyloid P-component), probably involved in the regulation of the normal cell growth, in the pro-apoptotic function and in the regulation of tissue homeostasis. Further investigations are needed to understand if these families of proteins have specific biological activity in human milk.

  8. Mass spectrometric analysis of free fatty acids in infant milk powders by frozen pretreatment coupled with isotope-labeling derivatization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianxiao; Leng, Jiapeng; Peng, Yaoshan; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Yinlong

    2016-03-01

    In combination with frozen pretreatment and carboxyl group derivatization, a novel workflow was developed for the determination of free fatty acids in milk powder. The workflow showed a significantly enhanced performance for comprehensive free fatty acid analysis owing to a highly efficient frozen extraction method. In addition, the advantages of the workflow also involved high sensitivity and great tolerance to a complex matrix. Characteristic fragment ions of derivatization reagents also provide clear evidence for the qualitative analysis of free fatty acids. Fourteen types of free fatty acids in a number of domestic and overseas infant milk powders have been successfully detected. The content of free fatty acids in the different samples was different, which probably indicates the diverse quality of infant milk powder. The workflow is expected to be a pragmatic tool for the analysis of free fatty acids in intricate matrices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Characterization of lactosylated proteins of infant formula powders using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marvin, Laure F; Parisod, Véronique; Fay, Laurent B; Guy, Philippe A

    2002-08-01

    Infant formula powders were analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) to assess the whey proteins quality, which may be altered by the heat treatment used during the processing conditions. Lactosylation was found to be the major chemical modification occurring in whey proteins. In parallel, a two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis was performed on the milk sample and the entire protein patterns were analyzed by nano-ESI-MS after cutting the different gel spots and in-gel trypsin digestion. A highly selective and specific tandem MS technique has been developed to characterize and localize up to ten lactosylation sites in beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) and alpha(S2)-casein. alpha-Lactalbumin (alpha-La), with five lactosylated peptides, was found to be an interesting protein marker in the milk powder sample to detect chemical modification induced by the processing/storage conditions.

  10. [A CASE OF ANAPHYLAXIS IN THE PEDIATRIC PATIENT WITH MILK ALLERGY DUE TO TRACES OF MILK PROTEIN IN THE LACTOSE USED AS AN EXCIPIENT OF INAVIR INHALATION].

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Miki; Kanemitsu, Yoshitomi; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Morikawa, Akimasa; Tomioka, Yoshihisa

    2016-05-01

    The patient was a 6-year-old female with milk allergy and persistent asthma. She experienced anaphylactic reactions just after the inhalation of Inavir (Laninamivir Octanoate Hydrate) to treat flu infection. A skin-prick test showed positive reactions for Inavir inhaler powder and lactose used as an excipient but negative for Laninamivir. Same results were obtained in a drug-stimulated basophil activation test. The lactose excipient in Inavir inhaler powder was supposed to contain milk proteins, which caused anaphylactic reactions. To test this possibility, we examined the contamination of allergic milk proteins in the lactose excipient and found the smear band by silver staining, which was identified as β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) by Western blotting using specific monoclonal antibody and patient's sera. The β-LG in Inavir was supposed to be glycosylated with lactose because the molecular weight was slightly higher than β-LG standard reference as seen in mobility. In fact, the incubation with lactose in vitro tended to increase molecular weight. Following these results, we herein report that the trace amounts of β-LG contaminated in the lactose excipient of Inavir could cause immediate allergic reactions. The risk that the lactose-containing dry powder inhalers cause allergic reactions for patients with cow's milk allergy need to be reminded. In particular, the use for flu patients should be paid careful attention because of increased airway hypersensitivity in those patients.

  11. Detection and quantification of adulterants in milk powder using a high-throughput Raman chemical imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Dhakal, Sagar; Lee, Hoonsoo; Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Mo, Changyeun

    2017-02-01

    Milk is a vulnerable target for economically motivated adulteration. In this study, a line-scan high-throughput Raman imaging system was used to authenticate milk powder. A 5 W 785 nm line laser (240 mm long and 1 mm wide) was used as a Raman excitation source. The system was used to acquire hyperspectral Raman images in a wave number range of 103-2881 cm(-)(1) from the skimmed milk powder mixed with two nitrogen-rich adulterants (i.e., melamine and urea) at eight concentrations (w/w) from 50 to 10,000 ppm. The powdered samples were put in sample holders with a surface area of 150 ×100 mm and a depth of 2 mm for push-broom image acquisition. Varying fluorescence signals from the milk powder were removed using a correction method based on adaptive iteratively reweighted penalised least squares. Image classifications were conducted using a simple thresholding method applied to single-band fluorescence-corrected images at unique Raman peaks selected for melamine (673 cm(-)(1)) and urea (1009 cm(-)(1)). Chemical images were generated by combining individual binary images of melamine and urea to visualise identification, spatial distribution and morphological features of the two adulterant particles in the milk powder. Limits of detection for both melamine and urea were estimated in the order of 50 ppm. High correlations were found between pixel concentrations (i.e., percentages of the adulterant pixels in the chemical images) and mass concentrations of melamine and urea, demonstrating the potential of the high-throughput Raman chemical imaging method for the detection and quantification of adulterants in the milk powder.

  12. Determination of cyanuric acid in milk powder by anion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Hou, Shengjie; Ding, Mingyu; Zhang, Jinghua

    2010-01-01

    An anion-exchange chromatographic method has been developed for simultaneous analysis of cyanuric acid (CA) and five inorganic anions (F(-), Cl(-), NO(3)(-), HPO(4)(2-) and SO(4)(2-)) in milk powder. The separation was achieved within 15 min on an anion-exchange column with simple elution of Na(2)CO(3)/NaHCO(3) buffer as mobile phase. Furthermore, the effect of the total concentration of Na(2)CO(3)/NaHCO(3) buffer on the retention of five inorganic anions was more obvious than that on CA retention, which indicated that CA retention on anion-exchange column depends not only on anion-exchange interaction but also on hydrophobic interactions between CA and anion-exchange column. The linear range of the calibration curve for CA was 0.1-100 mg L(-1). The detection limit calculated at S/N = 3 was 0.083 mg L(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of CA in milk powder.

  13. [Determination of nucleotides in infant formula milk powder by ion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Ye, Mingli; Pan, Guangwen; Hu, Zhongyang; Wang, Qiong

    2010-09-01

    A method was developed for the determination of nucleotides in infant formula milk powder by ion chromatography (IC). The separation was performed on an IonPac AS16 column with KOH solution as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and 25 degrees C. The detection wavelength was set at 260 nm and the sample injection volume was 25 microL. There were good linear relationships between the mass concentrations and the peak areas of cytidine monophosphate (CMP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP), uridine monophosphate (UMP), inosine monophosphate (IMP) and guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the ranges of 0.09-50, 0.06-50, 0.06-50, 0.09-50, 0.06-50 mg/L, respectively. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) of CMP, AMP, UMP, IMP and GMP were 0.03, 0.02, 0.02, 0.03 and 0.02 mg/L, respectively. The method has been applied for the determination of the five nucleotides in infant formula milk powder with the recoveries of 92.5%-102.4%. This method is rapid, simple and suitable for the determination of real samples.

  14. [Determination of lutein in infant formula milk powder using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Junrong; Zhang, Li; Feng, Feng; Ling, Yun; Chu, Xiaogang; Li, Hongliang

    2013-12-01

    An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (U-HPLC) method for the determination of lutein in the infant formula milk powder was developed. The sample was extracted with acetone and defatted using freezing centrifugation method. The U-HPLC separation was achieved using a YMC Carotenoid C30 column (150 mm x 4.6 mm, 3 microm) with the mixture of methanol/methyl tert-butyl ether (70: 30, v/v) as the mobile phase under isocratic elution. The flow rate was 0.5 mL/min and the column oven temperature was 25 degrees C. The injection volume was 5 microL. It was detected on a photodiode array detector at a wavelength of 445 nm. The results showed that the linear range was 20-500 microg/L (r = 0.9999), and the limit of quantification was 20 microg/L. The mean recoveries of lutein varied from 97.9% to 104.4% spiked at 50, 250 and 2,000 microg/kg. The established method is simple, accurate and sensitive for the rapid determination of lutein in infant formula milk powder.

  15. Production and characterization of spray-dried theophylline powders prepared from fresh milk for potential use in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, João P; Fernandes, Tânia A P; Nese, Carlotta; Fernandes, Ana I; Pinto, João F

    2017-05-01

    This work evaluates the potential of using fresh milk to deliver theophylline to children. Theophylline-fresh milk systems were prepared using different solids ratios (0 : 1-1 : 0) and three fat contents in commercial milks (low, medium and high), which were spray-dried at different inlet air temperatures (Tinlet - 105, 130 and 150 °C). The process was evaluated for yield and the resulting powders for moisture content (MC), particle size and shape, density and wettability. Theophylline-milk potential interactions (differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and FT-IR) and chemical (theophylline content) and microbiological stability of powders (shelf and in-use) were also evaluated. The production yield (13.6-76.0%), MC (0.0-10.3%) and contact angles in water (77.29-93.51°) were significantly (P < 0.05) affected by Tinlet , but no differences were found concerning the mean particle size (3.0-4.3 μm) of the different powders. The milk fat content significantly (P < 0.05) impacted on the density (1.244-1.552 g/cm(3) ). Theophylline content remained stable after 6 months of storage, before extemporaneous reconstitution. After reconstitution in water, low-fat milk samples (stored at 4 °C) met the microbial pharmacopoeia criteria for up to 7 days. No theophylline-milk components interaction was observed. Spray-dried milk-composed powders may be used as vehicles for theophylline delivery in paediatrics following further characterization and in-vivo evaluation. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Iron-lactoferrin complex reduces iron-catalyzed off-flavor formation in powdered milk with added fish oil.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroshi M; Shiota, Makoto; Ueda, Noriko; Isogai, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2012-08-01

    The iron-lactoferrin complex (FeLf) is useful for dietary iron supplementation. However, the effects of FeLf on iron-catalyzed off-flavors in lipid-containing food products have not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of FeLf on off-flavors development during the production and storage of powdered milk with added fish oil. Powdered milk samples were formulated with FeLf or iron (II) sulfate, then stored at 37 °C for 5 mo. A sensory evaluation revealed that FeLf delayed the development of oxidized flavor and reduced metallic taste in the powdered milk compared with iron (II) sulfate. Headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that oxidized volatile compounds, such as pentanal, hexanal, heptanal, octanal, 1-penten-3-one, (Z)-4-heptenal, (E, E)-2,4-heptadienal, and (E)-2-octenal, were less developed in the powdered milk containing FeLf than in that containing iron (II) sulfate. Iron and lactoferrin (Lf) were retained in the high-molecular-weight (>10000 Da) fraction of the reconstituted FeLf-containing powdered milk after its manufacture and storage, whereas the antigenicity of Lf was lost after ultrahigh-temperature processing at 120 °C for 5 s. These results suggest that FeLf reduces the iron-catalyzed off-flavors that develop during the production and storage of powdered milk. The stable iron-holding property of FeLf contributes to the inhibition of oxidized and metallic volatile formation, although the loss of Lf antigenicity did not affect the stability of FeLf and the iron-catalyzed formation of off-flavors in the powdered milk. Consequently, FeLf is a suitable candidate for the simultaneous supplementation of a single food with iron and fish oil. The supplementation of food products with iron and fish oil is a useful approach to redressing their inadequate intake in many populations. The iron-lactoferrin complex can protect food products against the off-flavors caused by iron-catalyzed lipid oxidation. Our results

  17. Liposomal dry powders as aerosols for pulmonary delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dongmei; Hickey, Anthony J

    2005-12-21

    The purpose of this research was to develop liposomal dry powder aerosols for protein delivery. The delivery of stable protein formulations is essential for protein subunit vaccine delivery, which requires local delivery to macrophages in the lungs. Beta-glucuronidase (GUS) was used as a model protein to evaluate dry powder liposomes as inhaled delivery vehicles. Dimyristoyl phosphatylcholine:cholesterol (7:3) was selected as the liposome composition. The lyophilization of liposomes, micronization of the powders, aerosolization using a dry powder inhaler (DPI), and in vitro aerodynamic fine particle fraction upon collection in a twin-stage liquid impinger were evaluated. After lyophilization and jet-milling, the total amount of GUS and its activity, representing encapsulation efficiency and stability, were evaluated. The GUS amount and activity were measured and compared with freshly-prepared liposomes in the presence of mannitol, 43% of initial GUS amount, 29% of GUS activity after lyophilization and 36% of GUS amount, 22% of activity after micronization were obtained. Emitted doses from dry powder inhaler were 53%, 58%, 66%, and 73% for liposome powder:mannitol carrier ratios of 1:0, 1:4, 1:9, and 1:19. Fifteen percent of the liposome particles were less than 6.4 mum in aerodynamic diameter. The results demonstrate that milled liposome powders containing protein molecules can be aerosolized effectively at a fixed flow rate. Influences of different cryoprotectants on lyophilization of protein liposome formulations are reported. The feasibility of using liposomal dry powder aerosols for protein delivery has been demonstrated but further optimization is required in the context of specific therapeutic proteins.

  18. Comparison of a Powdered, Acidified Liquid, and Non-Acidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Thoene, Melissa; Lyden, Elizabeth; Weishaar, Kara; Elliott, Elizabeth; Wu, Ruomei; White, Katelyn; Timm, Hayley; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-01-01

    We previously compared infant outcomes between a powdered human milk fortifier (P-HMF) vs. acidified liquid HMF (AL-HMF). A non-acidified liquid HMF (NAL-HMF) is now commercially available. The purpose of this study is to compare growth and outcomes of premature infants receiving P-HMF, AL-HMF or NAL-HMF. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved retrospective chart review compared infant outcomes (born < 2000 g) who received one of three HMF. Growth, enteral nutrition, laboratory and demographic data were compared. 120 infants were included (P-HMF = 46, AL-HMF = 23, NAL-HMF = 51). AL-HMF infants grew slower in g/day (median 23.66 vs. P-HMF 31.27, NAL-HMF 31.74 (p < 0.05)) and in g/kg/day, median 10.59 vs. 15.37, 14.03 (p < 0.0001). AL-HMF vs. NAL-HMF infants were smaller at 36 weeks gestational age (median 2046 vs. 2404 g, p < 0.05). However AL-HMF infants received more daily calories (p = 0.21) and protein (p < 0.0001), mean 129 cal/kg, 4.2 g protein/kg vs. P-HMF 117 cal/kg, 3.7 g protein/kg , NAL-HMF 120 cal/kg, 4.0 g protein/kg. AL-HMF infants exhibited lower carbon dioxide levels after day of life 14 and 30 (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0038). Three AL-HMF infants (13%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) vs. no infants in the remaining groups (p = 0.0056). A NAL-HMF is the most optimal choice for premature human milk-fed infants in a high acuity neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). PMID:27472359

  19. Comparison of a Powdered, Acidified Liquid, and Non-Acidified Liquid Human Milk Fortifier on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Thoene, Melissa; Lyden, Elizabeth; Weishaar, Kara; Elliott, Elizabeth; Wu, Ruomei; White, Katelyn; Timm, Hayley; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2016-07-26

    We previously compared infant outcomes between a powdered human milk fortifier (P-HMF) vs. acidified liquid HMF (AL-HMF). A non-acidified liquid HMF (NAL-HMF) is now commercially available. The purpose of this study is to compare growth and outcomes of premature infants receiving P-HMF, AL-HMF or NAL-HMF. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved retrospective chart review compared infant outcomes (born < 2000 g) who received one of three HMF. Growth, enteral nutrition, laboratory and demographic data were compared. 120 infants were included (P-HMF = 46, AL-HMF = 23, NAL-HMF = 51). AL-HMF infants grew slower in g/day (median 23.66 vs. P-HMF 31.27, NAL-HMF 31.74 (p < 0.05)) and in g/kg/day, median 10.59 vs. 15.37, 14.03 (p < 0.0001). AL-HMF vs. NAL-HMF infants were smaller at 36 weeks gestational age (median 2046 vs. 2404 g, p < 0.05). However AL-HMF infants received more daily calories (p = 0.21) and protein (p < 0.0001), mean 129 cal/kg, 4.2 g protein/kg vs. P-HMF 117 cal/kg, 3.7 g protein/kg , NAL-HMF 120 cal/kg, 4.0 g protein/kg. AL-HMF infants exhibited lower carbon dioxide levels after day of life 14 and 30 (p < 0.0001, p = 0.0038). Three AL-HMF infants (13%) developed necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) vs. no infants in the remaining groups (p = 0.0056). A NAL-HMF is the most optimal choice for premature human milk-fed infants in a high acuity neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  20. Using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy to Probe the Milk Fat Globule Membrane and Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallier, Sophie; Gragson, Derek; JiméNez-Flores, Rafael; Everett, David

    2010-01-01

    The bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) is an important, biologically relevant membrane due to its functional and health properties. Its composition has been thoroughly studied but its structure, especially the lateral organization of its components, still remains unclear. We have used confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate the surface structure of the MFGM in globules with different degree of processing using two types of fluorescently-labeled phospholipid probes and a protein dye. Using this technique, we have observed heterogeneities in the distribution of MFGM lipids and proteins relating to the processing and size of the globules. The effect of pre-treating the milk (centrifugation, pasteurization-homogenization and churning) was studied by double-staining the surface of the milk fat globules, followed by observation using CLSM, and by determining the phospholipid profile of raw milk, raw cream, processed milk and buttermilk powder. Our findings agree with other techniques by showing that the composition of the MFGM changes with processing through the loss of phospholipids and the adsorption of caseins and whey proteins onto the surface. PMID:20218614

  1. [Determination of dicyandiamide, melamine and cyanuric acid in milk and milk powder by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yun, Huan; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Jianhui; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xin

    2013-05-01

    A method for the determination of dicyandiamide (DCD), melamine (MEL) and cyanuric acid (CY) in milk and milk powder has been developed by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). After extracted by 5% (mass fraction) trichloroacetic acid, the samples were loaded onto an Acquity UPLC HSS T3 column (50 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.8 microm) and separated using acetonitrile and ammonium acetate as mobile phases in a gradient elution mode. The electrospray was operated in the positive mode and negative mode, and monitored by the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curves showed a good linearity in the range of 5.0 - 200.0 microg/L, and the correlation coefficients (r) were not less than 0.995. When the spiked levels were 0.02, 0.10 and 0.20 mg/kg, the recoveries of DCD, MEL and CY in milk ranged from 60.0%. to 105.8%, with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 4.2% - 13.6%; while the spiked levels were 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 mg/kg in milk powder, the recoveries ranged from 78.0% to 115.0% with the RSDs of 2.7% - 7.5%. The limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) were 0.02 mg/kg for milk samples and 0.05 mg/kg for milk powder samples. The results indicate that the method is simple, rapid, sensitive and suitable for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of DCD, MEL and CY in milk and dairy product samples.

  2. Bioactive proteins in human milk: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2010-02-01

    Human milk contains a multitude of bioactive proteins, with very diverse functions. Some of these proteins are involved in the synthesis and expression of milk, but the majority appears to have evolved to provide physiological activities in the breast-fed infant. These activities are exerted by a wide variety of mechanisms and have largely been unraveled by in vitro studies. To be active in the gastrointestinal tract, these proteins must be able to resist proteolytic degradation, at least for some time. We have evaluated the human milk proteins lactoferrin, haptocorrin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, and transforming growth factor -beta in an in vitro digestion model, mimicking the conditions of the infant gastrointestinal milieu. These bioactive proteins are resistant against proteolysis and can remain intact or as larger fragments through passage of the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro digestibility assays can be helpful to assess which human milk proteins can resist proteolysis and to what extent.

  3. Quantitative analysis of cow whole milk and whey powder adulteration percentage in goat and sheep milk products by isotopic dilution-ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xing; Zhang, Jingshun; Lai, Shiyun; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Yirong; Mo, Weimin; Ren, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a method for quantification of cow's whey and whole milk powder in goat or sheep milk products including infant formula. A ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method was established for simultaneous quantification of four caseins and two major whey proteins by detecting their signature peptides, which were able to act as markers for differentiating goat or sheep from cow whey and whole milk powder in infant formulas. The signature peptides were screened based on the computational prediction by Biolynx software, and confirmed by database searching after analysis of liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (LC-Q-TOF-MS). The isotopic-labeled signature peptide was used as internal standard to compensate the matrix effect. The limits of quantification were 0.01-0.05 g/100 g for target proteins. The observed recovery rates ranged from 82.3 to 116.6 % and the reproducibility was excellent (RSD <12 %) at different spiking levels. The RSDs of intra- and inter-day precision were 2.8-6.2 and 3.3-9.8 %, respectively. The multiple reaction monitoring method was successfully applied to milk powder with different composition, showing high specificity and accuracy in detection of species involved. The calculating formula was designed to assess the composition of adulteration in the actual detection of infant formulas. These results highlight applicability of this method for the detection of infant formulas with complicated matrix.

  4. Analysis of crystallized lactose in milk powder by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy combined with two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yu; Zhou, Qun; Zhang, Yan-ling; Chen, Jian-bo; Sun, Su-qin; Noda, Isao

    2010-06-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is used in combination with two-dimensional (2D) correlation IR spectroscopy to conduct rapid non-destructive quantitative research in milk powder without additional separation steps. The experiments conducted in both FT-IR and 2D FT-IR spectra suggest that characteristic spectroscopic features of milk powder containing different carbohydrate can be detected, and then determine the type of carbohydrate. To predict the approximate content of lactose while the carbohydrate is lactose, different amount of crystallized lactose has been added to the reference milk powder. The correlation coefficient could be used to determine the content of crystallized lactose in milk powder. The method provides a rapid and convenient means for assessing the quality of milk powder.

  5. Effect of precipitation, geographical location and biosynthesis on New Zealand milk powder bulk and fatty acids D/H ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, R.; Emad Ehtesham, R.; Van Hale, R.; Hayman, A.; Baisden, T.

    2012-04-01

    D/H ratio measurements provide useful information for the investigation of biogeochemical influences on natural and agricultural produce, particularly with application to food traceability and authentication. Numerous studies have shown that variation of a product's D/H ratio is influenced by both environmental factors and biological processes. This study investigates the D/H ratio of New Zealand milk powder and individual fatty acids, and causal determinants of isotopic variation. One of the key environmental factors is precipitation, and the D/H ratio "isoscaping" of NZ has been undertaken. New Zealand provides a unique geography for these kinds of study in terms of proximity to the ocean and natural geographical variability from sea level to elevations as high as 3700 m. Milk powder samples were collected from different geographical regions from milk processing units, which were supplied by producers in the immediate region. H/D ratios of bulk milk powder and of individual fatty acids were determined. Initial comparison of the precipitation and milk powder bulk D/H data show a very good differentiation from north to southernmost parts of New Zealand and a relation between rain and milk bulk D/H abundance ratio. Almost 98% of milk FAs are in the form of triglycerides that have been extracted and hydrolysed to free FAs. Free FAs were esterified and analyzed with GC-IRMS. Individual FAs show variation in D/H ratio, and all values are depleted relative to the precipitation data. The difference in D/H ratio amongst individual FAs reflects the geographical environment and biological processes i.e. micro-organisms activity in the rumen of the cow. Short chain FAs (less than 8 carbons), particularly C4 (Butyric acid), appear to be key determinants. The variation in the data can be rationalized using statistical multivariate analysis.

  6. Trace elements and their distribution in protein fractions of camel milk in comparison to other commonly consumed milks.

    PubMed

    Al-Awadi, F M; Srikumar, T S

    2001-08-01

    Studies on camels' milk, whether with respect to concentration or bioavailability of trace elements from this milk, are limited and warrant further investigation. The object of this study was to analyse the concentration and distribution of zinc, copper, selenium, manganese and iron in camel milk compared to those in human milk, cows' milk and infant formula under similar experimental conditions. Camels' milk and cows' milk were collected from local farms, human milk samples were obtained from healthy donors in Kuwait and infant formula was purchased locally. Milk fractionation was performed by ultra-centrifugation and gelcolumn chromatography. The concentration of trace elements was analysed by atomic absorption spectrometry and that of protein was determined spectrophotometrically. The concentration of manganese and iron in camels' milk was remarkably higher (7-20-fold and 4-10-fold, respectively) than in human milk, cows' milk and infant formula. The zinc content of camels' milk was higher than that of human milk but slightly lower than in cows' milk and infant formula. The concentration of copper in camels' milk was similar to that of cows' milk but lower than in human milk and infant formula. The selenium content of camels' milk was comparable to those of other types of milk, Approximately 50-80% of zinc, copper and manganese in camels' milk were associated with the casein fraction, similar to that of cows' milk, The majority of selenium and iron in camels' milk was in association with the low molecular weight fraction, It is recommended that camels' milk be considered as a potential source of manganese, selenium and iron, perhaps not only for infants, but also for other groups suspected of mild deficiency of these elements. Further investigations are required to confirm this proposal.

  7. Relationships between milks differentiated on native milk fat globule characteristics and fat, protein and calcium compositions.

    PubMed

    Couvreur, S; Hurtaud, C

    2017-03-01

    Many studies have shown that milk fat globule (MFG) diameter varies in dairy cows in relation to diet and/or breed. However, the mechanisms governing the size of the fat globules remain hypothetical. Our objective was to determine the variable biochemical characteristics (fat, protein, fatty acids (FA), casein and calcium (Ca) contents) between individual milk which differed in both MFG diameter and membrane content, in order to speculate about the links between milk synthesis and MFG secretion. With this aim, we built five databases of individual milk samples from 21 experiments performed between 2003 and 2011. Three of them grouped data from trials dealing with breed/diet effects and included information about: (i) MFG size/membrane, fat and protein contents (n=982), (ii) previous parameters plus FA profile (n=529) and (iii) previous parameters plus true protein composition and calcium contents (n=101). A hierarchical clustering analysis performed on these three databases yielded four groups differing in the MFG characteristics. We observed significant differences among groups for the following parameters: (i) fat content and fat : protein ratio; (ii) de novo and polyunsaturated FA contents; (iii) Ca contents. These relationships could result from potential process regulating the synthesis and secretion of MFG: (i) the apical membrane turnover for MFG secretion and (ii) cytoplasmic lipid droplet formation in the lactocyte during its migration from the basal to the apical pole. The two other databases grouped data from trials dealing with milking frequency (n=211), milking kinetics and milk type (residual v. cisternal) (n=224). They were used to study the relationships between the size of the MFG and milk composition for high native fat contents (from 60 up to 100 g/kg in residual milks). We observed curvilinear relationships between the size of the MFG and fat content, as well as with the fat : protein ratio. This result suggests that MFG diameter reaches a

  8. Following the digestion of milk proteins from mother to baby.

    PubMed

    Holton, Thérèse A; Vijayakumar, Vaishnavi; Dallas, David C; Guerrero, Andrés; Borghese, Robyn A; Lebrilla, Carlito B; German, J Bruce; Barile, Daniela; Underwood, Mark A; Shields, Denis C; Khaldi, Nora

    2014-12-05

    Little is known about the digestive process in infants. In particular, the chronological activity of enzymes across the course of digestion in the infant remains largely unknown. To create a temporal picture of how milk proteins are digested, enzyme activity was compared between intact human milk samples from three mothers and the gastric samples from each of their 4-12 day postpartum infants, 2 h after breast milk ingestion. The activities of 7 distinct enzymes are predicted in the infant stomach based on their observed cleavage pattern in peptidomics data. We found that the same patterns of cleavage were evident in both intact human milk and gastric milk samples, demonstrating that the enzyme activities that begin in milk persist in the infant stomach. However, the extent of enzyme activity is found to vary greatly between the intact milk and gastric samples. Overall, we observe that milk-specific proteins are cleaved at higher levels in the stomach compared to human milk. Notably, the enzymes we predict here only explain 78% of the cleavages uniquely observed in the gastric samples, highlighting that further investigation of the specific enzyme activities associated with digestion in infants is warranted.

  9. Following the Digestion of Milk Proteins from Mother to Baby

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the digestive process in infants. In particular, the chronological activity of enzymes across the course of digestion in the infant remains largely unknown. To create a temporal picture of how milk proteins are digested, enzyme activity was compared between intact human milk samples from three mothers and the gastric samples from each of their 4–12 day postpartum infants, 2 h after breast milk ingestion. The activities of 7 distinct enzymes are predicted in the infant stomach based on their observed cleavage pattern in peptidomics data. We found that the same patterns of cleavage were evident in both intact human milk and gastric milk samples, demonstrating that the enzyme activities that begin in milk persist in the infant stomach. However, the extent of enzyme activity is found to vary greatly between the intact milk and gastric samples. Overall, we observe that milk-specific proteins are cleaved at higher levels in the stomach compared to human milk. Notably, the enzymes we predict here only explain 78% of the cleavages uniquely observed in the gastric samples, highlighting that further investigation of the specific enzyme activities associated with digestion in infants is warranted. PMID:25385259

  10. Milk proteins interact with goat Binder of SPerm (BSP) proteins and decrease their binding to sperm.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Erika Bezerra; van Tilburg, Mauricio; Plante, Geneviève; de Oliveira, Rodrigo V; Moura, Arlindo A; Manjunath, Puttaswamy

    2016-11-01

    Seminal plasma Binder of SPerm (BSP) proteins bind to sperm at ejaculation and promote capacitation. When in excess, however, BSP proteins damage the sperm membrane. It has been suggested that milk components of semen extenders associate with BSP proteins, potentially protecting sperm. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate if milk proteins interact with BSP proteins and reduce BSP binding to goat sperm. Using gel filtration chromatography, milk was incubated with goat seminal plasma proteins and loaded onto columns with and without calcium. Milk was also fractionated into parts containing mostly whey proteins or mostly caseins, incubated with seminal plasma proteins and subjected to gel filtration. Eluted fractions were evaluated by immunoblot using anti-goat BSP antibodies, confirming milk protein-BSP protein interactions. As determined by ELISA, milk proteins coated on polystyrene wells bound to increasing of goat BSP proteins. Far-western dot blots confirmed that BSP proteins bound to caseins and β-lactoglobulin in a concentration-dependent manner. Then, cauda epididymal sperm from five goats was incubated with seminal plasma; seminal plasma followed by milk; and milk followed by seminal plasma. Sperm membrane proteins were extracted and evaluated by immunoblotting. The pattern of BSP binding to sperm membrane proteins was reduced by 59.3 % when epididymal sperm were incubated with seminal plasma and then with skimmed milk (p < 0.05). When epididymal sperm were treated with milk followed by seminal plasma, coating of sperm with BSP proteins was not significantly reduced (57.6 %; p > 0.05). In conclusion, goat BSP proteins have an affinity for caseins and whey proteins. Milk reduces BSP binding to goat sperm, depending whether or not sperm had been previously exposed to seminal plasma. Such events may explain the protective effect of milk during goat sperm preservation.

  11. Exploring authentic skim milk powder variance for the development of nontargeted adulterant detection methods using NIR spectroscopy and chemometrics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multinational collaborative team led by the US Pharmacopeial Convention is currently investigating the potential of NIR spectroscopy for nontargeted detection of adulterants in skim milk powder. The development of a compendial method is challenged by the range of authentic or nonadulterated skim m...

  12. Protein carbonylation sites in bovine raw milk and processed milk products.

    PubMed

    Milkovska-Stamenova, Sanja; Mnatsakanyan, Ruzanna; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2017-08-15

    During thermal treatment of milk, proteins are oxidized, which may reduce the nutritional value of milk, abolish protein functions supporting human health, especially important for newborns, and yield potentially harmful products. The side chains of several amino acids can be oxidized to reactive carbonyls, which are often used to monitor oxidative stress in organisms. Here we mapped protein carbonylation sites in raw milk and different brands of pasteurized, ultra high temperature (UHT) treated milk, and infant formulas (IFs) after digesting the precipitated proteins with trypsin. Reactive carbonyls were derivatized with O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl)hydroxylamine to enrich the modified peptides by avidin-biotin affinity chromatography and analyze them by nanoRP-UPLC-ESI-MS. Overall, 53 unique carbonylated peptides (37 carbonylation sites, 15 proteins) were identified. Most carbonyls were derived from dicarbonyls (mainly glyoxal). The number of carbonylation sites increased with the harsher processing from raw milk (4) to pasteurized (16) and UHT milk (16) and to IF (24). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Quantitative determination of the protein content of milk by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. 3. The protein content of whole milk].

    PubMed

    Reichardt, W; Schüler, E

    1987-01-01

    It is possible to determine the protein content of unskimmed milk after dilution with a detergent solution by measuring of absorbance at 210 and 220 nm. If milk samples are not elder than 36 h the difference A210-A220 shows a high correlation to the values of Kjeldahl nitrogen analysis (r = 0.97). Similar coincidence was found to the values of absorbance measurements in skimmed milk (A210: r = 0.98; A235-A280: r = 0.96). With decreasing age of unskimmed milk samples the coincidence diminished. Absorbance data measured at 210, 215, 220, 225, 235 and 280 nm as well as the differences A215-A225 and A235-A280 do not much agree with analogous results from skimmed milk. Elderly creamed milk samples allow the determination of protein content from milk plasma. It could be proved by Kjeldahl nitrogen analysis, that differences in the nitrogen content of unskimmed and skimmed milk depend on the nitrogen-loss during centrifugation, on the protein content and the protein-fat-ratio.

  14. [Determination of nicotinamide in formula milk powder using liquid chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Liu, Jun

    2007-11-01

    It is important to determine trace compounds in complex matrices. Internal standards are often introduced to circumvent loss of analytes during the preparation to achieve accurate measurement. Isotope internal standards are better than other types of internal standards, due to its high similarity to analyte in chemical properties. By introducing isotope-labeled nicotinamide, as an internal standard, a method for determining nicotinamide in formula milk powder by liquid chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (LC-IDMS) was developed with a relative standard deviation of 0.94%. The results suggested that the developed LC-IDMS method has high accuracy, high specificity, high repeatability, and is suitable for the determination of vitamins in complex matrices. This method was used to perform international comparison for CCQM-P78, and the result was consistent with that of international laboratories.

  15. Host-defence-related proteins in cows' milk.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T T; Smolenski, G A; Harris, D P; Gupta, S K; Haigh, B J; Broadhurst, M K; Molenaar, A J; Stelwagen, K

    2012-03-01

    Milk is a source of bioactive molecules with wide-ranging functions. Among these, the immune properties have been the best characterised. In recent years, it has become apparent that besides the immunoglobulins, milk also contains a range of minor immune-related proteins that collectively form a significant first line of defence against pathogens, acting both within the mammary gland itself as well as in the digestive tract of the suckling neonate. We have used proteomics technologies to characterise the repertoire of host-defence-related milk proteins in detail, revealing more than 100 distinct gene products in milk, of which at least 15 are known host-defence-related proteins. Those having intrinsic antimicrobial activity likely function as effector proteins of the local mucosal immune defence (e.g. defensins, cathelicidins and the calgranulins). Here, we focus on the activities and biological roles of the cathelicidins and mammary serum amyloid A. The function of the immune-related milk proteins that do not have intrinsic antimicrobial activity is also discussed, notably lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, RNase4, RNase5/angiogenin and cartilage-glycoprotein 39 kDa. Evidence is shown that at least some of these facilitate recognition of microbes, resulting in the activation of innate immune signalling pathways in cells associated with the mammary and/or gut mucosal surface. Finally, the contribution of the bacteria in milk to its functionality is discussed. These investigations are elucidating how an effective first line of defence is achieved in the bovine mammary gland and how milk contributes to optimal digestive function in the suckling calf. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the health benefits of milk, as well as to the development of high-value ingredients from milk.

  16. The effect of spray-drying parameters on the flavor of nonfat dry milk and milk protein concentrate 70.

    PubMed

    Park, Curtis W; Stout, Mark A; Drake, MaryAnne

    2016-12-01

    Unit operations during production influence the sensory properties of nonfat dry milk (NFDM) and milk protein concentrate (MPC). Off-flavors in dried dairy ingredients decrease consumer acceptance of ingredient applications. Previous work has shown that spray-drying parameters affect physical and sensory properties of whole milk powder and whey protein concentrate. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of inlet temperature and feed solids concentration on the flavor of NFDM and MPC 70% (MPC70). Condensed skim milk (50% solids) and condensed liquid MPC70 (32% solids) were produced using pilot-scale dairy processing equipment. The condensed products were then spray dried at either 160, 210, or 260°C inlet temperature and 30, 40, or 50% total solids for NFDM and 12, 22, or 32% for MPC70 in a randomized order. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times. Flavor of the NFDM and MPC70 was evaluated by sensory and instrumental volatile compound analyses. Surface free fat, particle size, and furosine were also analyzed. Both main effects (30, 40, and 50% solids and 160, 210, and 260°C inlet temperature) and interactions between solids concentration and inlet temperature were investigated. Interactions were not significant. In general, results were consistent for NFDM and MPC70. Increasing inlet temperature and feed solids concentration increased sweet aromatic flavor and decreased cardboard flavor and associated lipid oxidation products. Increases in furosine with increased inlet temperature and solids concentration indicated increased Maillard reactions during drying. Particle size increased and surface free fat decreased with increasing inlet temperature and solids concentration. These results demonstrate that increasing inlet temperatures and solids concentration during spray drying decrease off-flavor intensities in NFDM and MPC70 even though the heat treatment is greater compared with low temperature and low solids.

  17. The binding of drugs to major human milk whey proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, H C; Begg, E J

    1988-01-01

    The binding of nine drugs of diverse physicochemical characteristics to major human milk whey proteins is reported. This group included acids, bases and neutral drugs. No drug bound to alpha-lactalbumin, which is the protein present in greatest concentrations in mature milk. Four drugs, diclofenac, phenytoin, prednisolone and warfarin, bound to albumin but to a much lesser extent than in plasma, consistent with quantitatively less albumin in milk. None of the basic drugs studied bound to albumin. Five drugs, atenolol, diclofenac, prednisolone, propranolol and warfarin, bound to lactoferrin though the extent was minimal except for diclofenac. This group included acids, bases and neutral drugs. PMID:3203054

  18. Comparison of composition, sensory, and volatile components of thirty-four percent whey protein and milk serum protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Evans, J; Zulewska, J; Newbold, M; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2009-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify and compare the composition, flavor, and volatile components of serum protein concentrate (SPC) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) containing about 34% protein made from the same milk to each other and to commercial 34% WPC from 6 different factories. The SPC and WPC were manufactured in triplicate with each pair of serum and traditional whey protein manufactured from the same lot of milk. At each replication, SPC and WPC were spray dried (SD) and freeze dried (FD) to determine the effect of the heat used in spray drying on sensory properties. A trained sensory panel documented the sensory profiles of rehydrated SD or FD powders. Volatile components were extracted by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and solvent extraction followed by solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry. Whey protein concentrates had higher fat content, calcium, and glycomacropeptide content than SPC. Color differences (Hunter L, a, b) were not evident between SPC and WPC powders, but when rehydrated, SPC solutions were clear, whereas WPC solutions were cloudy. No consistent differences were documented in sensory profiles of SD and FD SPC and WPC. The SD WPC had low but distinct buttery (diacetyl) and cardboard flavors, whereas the SD SPC did not. Sensory profiles of both rehydrated SD products were bland and lower in overall aroma and cardboard flavor compared with the commercial WPC. Twenty-nine aroma impact compounds were identified in the SPC and WPC. Lipid and protein oxidation products were present in both products. The SPC and WPC manufactured in this study had lower total volatiles and lower concentrations of many lipid oxidation compounds when compared with commercial WPC. Our results suggest that when SPC and WPC are manufactured under controlled conditions in a similar manner from the same milk using the same ultrafiltration equipment, there are few sensory

  19. Sensitization to cow's milk protein in a dairy worker.

    PubMed

    Quirantes Sierra, B; Lara Jiménez, A; Skodova, M

    2017-09-02

    Repeated skin exposure and inhalation of milk proteins may lead to IgE-mediated sensitization, normally manifested at the site of contact. Although this is a phenomenon predominantly found in children, it has also been observed in adults. To describe a case of a worker who, after being exposed to milk proteins for many years, eventually experienced episodes of anaphylaxis. A 62-year-old worker experienced severe episodes of anaphylaxis following the intake of dairy products. He had worked in the dairy industry for 17 years, where he was exposed to dried milk every day. This case report illustrates how continued exposure to milk proteins, either by skin contact or inhalation, may lead to sensitization which could result in severe manifestations of anaphylaxis.

  20. Hydrolysis by Alcalase Improves Hypoallergenic Properties of Goat Milk Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung-Seob; Lee, Won-Jae; Kim, Jin-Wook; Ha, Ho-Kyung; Yoo, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Goat milk is highly nutritious and is consumed in many countries, but the development of functional foods from goat milk has been slow compared to that for other types of milk. The aim of this study was to develop a goat milk protein hydrolysate (GMPH) with enhanced digestibility and better hypoallergenic properties in comparison with other protein sources such as ovalbumin and soy protein. Goat milk protein was digested with four commercial food-grade proteases (separately) under various conditions to achieve the best hydrolysis of αs -casein and β-lactoglobulin. It was shown that treatment with alcalase (0.4%, 60℃ for 30 min) effectively degraded these two proteins, as determined by SDS-PAGE, measurement of nonprotein nitrogen content, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Hydrolysis with alcalase resulted in a significant decrease in β-lactoglobulin concentration (almost to nil) and a ~40% reduction in the level of αs-casein. Quantification of histamine and TNF-α released from HMC-1 cells (human mast cell line) showed that the GMPH did not induce an allergic response when compared to the control. Hence, the GMPH may be useful for development of novel foods for infants, the elderly, and convalescent patients, to replace cow milk. PMID:27621693

  1. [Determination of fructo-oligosaccharides in milk powder by high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/electrostatic field orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Ding, Tao; Xu, Suli; Wu, Bin; Shen, Chongyu; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yan; Fei, Xiaoqing

    2015-10-01

    A method of high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/electrostatic field Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q/Orbitrap MS) was developed to determine fructo-oligosaccharides in milk powder. The milk powder samples were dissolved in deionized water. Subsequently, an aqueous solution of zinc acetate was used to precipitate protein. After centrifugation, the final aqueous solution was filtered by a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane with pore size of 0.22 μm. The analytes were separated on a Carbohydrate column (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 2.6 μm) through gradient elution with the combination of acetonitrile and 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution. The target-MS/MS templates were performed at isolation window of m/z 4.0 and collision energy of 30 eV in positive mode to extract the accurate product ion mass of analytes. Under the optimal condition, 1-kestose (GF2), nystose (GF3) and 1-F-β-fructofuranosyl nystose (GF4) were well separated and the accuracy of extracted mass routinely detected was below 5 x 10(-6) (5 ppm). The whole analysis time is only ten minutes. The detection limits for GF2 and GF3 were 100 μg/kg, and the detection limit for GF4 was 55 μg/kg. Good linearities were obtained in their respective linear ranges with correlation coefficients higher than 0.998. The average recoveries at three spiked levels (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) were in the range of 75.8%-107.3% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 1.6% - 8.3%. The proposed method is simple, sensitive, fast and only in need of precipitation of proteins. The interference of matrix can be eliminated through the selection of product ion. The results were convenient and reliable and thus can be used in the large batch determination of any milk powder.

  2. Rapid resolution of milk protein intolerance in infancy.

    PubMed

    Lazare, Farrah B; Brand, Donald A; Marciano, Tuvia A; Daum, Fredric

    2014-08-01

    Infants with milk protein intolerance are usually switched to a casein hydrolysate or amino acid-based formula, which they continue to receive until 1 year of age, when they are rechallenged with a cow's-milk or soy protein formula. To investigate whether some of these infants actually become tolerant sooner, this study gathered preliminary data for establishing an empirical timetable for the resolution of milk protein intolerance. This prospective, longitudinal cohort study enrolled infants <4 months of age receiving either breast milk or a cow's-milk or casein hydrolysate formula who presented to a pediatric subspecialty practice during an 18-month period and had a positive stool guaiac test. After having been successfully switched to a casein hydrolysate or amino acid formula, infants who had guaiac-negative stools for at least 2 consecutive months were rechallenged with the formula that had necessitated the most recent switch. Of the 25 patients enrolled in the study, 16 completed the food challenge and data collection protocol. Negative stool guaiac tests following rechallenge indicated resolution of milk protein intolerance by the time subjects reached an average age of 6.7 ± 1.0 months (mean ± standard deviation). By the age of 7 months, milk protein intolerance was resolved in 12 of the 16 infants, the remainder having resolved by 10 months. It may be reasonable to treat infants with milk protein intolerance for 2 to 3 months with a hypoallergenic formula, then rechallenge them at 6 months of age, usually without causing recurrence of the hematochezia. Rechallenging before 12 months old could result in cost savings to families and insurers.

  3. Apoptosis induced by a human milk protein.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, A; Zhivotovsky, B; Orrenius, S; Sabharwal, H; Svanborg, C

    1995-08-15

    To the breast-fed infant, human milk is more than a source of nutrients; it furnishes a wide array of molecules that restrict microbes, such as antibodies, bactericidins, and inhibitors of bacterial adherence. However, it has rarely been considered that human milk may also contain substances bioactive toward host cells. While investigating the effect of human milk on bacterial adherence to a human lung cancer cell line, we were surprised to discover that the milk killed the cells. Analysis of this effect revealed that a component of milk in a particular physical state--multimeric alpha-lact-albumin--is a potent Ca(2+)-elevating and apoptosis-inducing agent with broad, yet selective, cytotoxic activity. Multimeric alpha-lactalbumin killed all transformed, embryonic, and lymphoid cells tested but spared mature epithelial elements. These findings raise the possibility that milk contributes to mucosal immunity not only by furnishing antimicrobial molecules but also by policing the function of lymphocytes and epithelium. Finally, analysis of the mechanism by which multimeric alpha-lactalbumin induces apoptosis in transformed epithelial cells could lead to the design of antitumor agents.

  4. Soy- and rice-based processed complementary food increases nutrient intakes in infants and is equally acceptable with or without added milk powder.

    PubMed

    Paul, Keriann H; Dickin, Katherine L; Ali, Nadra S; Monterrosa, Eva C; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2008-10-01

    Processed complementary foods (PCF) might mitigate several complementary feeding barriers in developing countries. Efficacy trials, however, have not shown substantial improvements in child growth, possibly due to inadequate formative research to assess acceptability and identify pitfalls. Milk powder might improve palatability of PCF but incurs a higher cost. We compared the acceptability of an instant soy-rice PCF without (SR) and with (SRM) milk powder. Best practices for formative evaluation of PCF are not established. We therefore compared findings from randomized trials of SR vs. SRM in 1-d sensory tests (n = 71 mother-infant dyads) vs. Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs), a 2-wk in-home mixed methods evaluation (n = 54 dyads). TIPs included interviews, disappearance rates, observations, and 24-h dietary recalls to assess acceptance, consumption of the 50 g/d ration, and impact on diet. Although mothers preferred SRM to SR in the sensory tests, children in the TIPs consumed >50 g/d of SR (87 +/- 9 g/d) and SRM (89 +/- 8 g/d) with no difference between the foods (P = 0.55). Despite some replacement of family food, energy (574 kJ/d; P < 0.001) and protein (19 g protein/d; P < 0.001) increased in both groups. Mothers' preferences for milk, more sugar in SR, and preparation with hot water were concerns raised in the sensory tests that proved insignificant in TIPs. However, TIPs uncovered new concerns of overconsumption and food safety. We found milk did not improve the acceptability of the soy-rice PCF and recommend TIPs as a useful tool for formative research of PCF interventions.

  5. Correlation between skin prick test using commercial extract of cow's milk protein and fresh milk and food challenges.

    PubMed

    Calvani, Mauro; Mauro, Calvani; Alessandri, Claudia; Claudia, Alessandri; Frediani, Tullio; Tullio, Frediani; Lucarelli, Sandra; Sandra, Lucarelli; Miceli Sopo, Stefano; Stefano, Miceli Sopo; Panetta, Valentina; Valentina, Panetta; Zappalã, Daniela; Daniela, Zappala'; Zicari, Anna Maria; Maria, Zicari Anna

    2007-11-01

    The skin prick test (SPT) is regarded as an important diagnostic measure in the diagnostic work-up of cow's milk protein allergy. It is not known whether commercial extracts have any advantage over fresh milk. The aims of the study were to (i) compare the diagnostic capacity of SPTs for the three main cow's milk proteins (alpha-lactalbumin, casein and beta-lactoglobulin) with fresh milk and (ii) determine a cut-off that discriminates between allergic and tolerant children in a controlled food challenge. A study was carried out on 104 children consecutively attending two paediatric allergy clinics for suspected cow's milk allergy. A clinical history, SPTs with fresh cow's milk and commercial extracts of its three main proteins and a challenge test were performed on all the children. A study of the validity of the prick test was also performed by taking different cut-off points for fresh milk and its proteins. Twenty-eight of 104 challenge tests (26.9%) were positive. At a cut-off point of 3 mm, fresh milk showed the greatest negative predictive value (98%), whereas casein showed the greatest positive predictive value (PPV, 85%). Calculation of 95% predicted probabilities using logistic regression revealed predictive decision points of 12 mm for lactalbumin, 9 mm for casein, 10 mm for beta-lactoglobulin and 15 mm for fresh cow's milk. We found that the greater the number of positive SPTs for milk proteins, the more likely the positive response to challenge. Having a positive SPT for all three milk proteins had PPV of 92.3% and would seem more clinically useful than any cut-off. Both fresh milk and cow's milk extract of the three main proteins could be useful in the diagnostic work-up of cow's milk allergy. Finding positivity to all three cow's milk proteins seems to be a simpler and more useful way of avoiding oral food challenges.

  6. Direct determination of copper and iodine in milk and milk powder in alkaline solution by flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stürup, S; Büchert, A

    1996-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (FI-ICP-MS) method for the determination of copper and iodine in milk and milk powder has been described. The sample preparation is based simply on the dilution of the sample by an alkaline solution containing 0.05 mol/l potassium hydroxide and 0.07 mol/l tetramethylammonium hydroxide. Possible matrix interferences on the determination of copper were alleviated by the use of standard addition calibration. Detection limits (3s) were 0.94 microg l(-1) and 0.45 microg l(-1) for copper and iodine, respectively. Four different certified milk powder reference materials were analysed and the concentrations found were in a good agreement with the certified values indicating that the method is unbiased. Due to the simplicity of the method a high sample throughput is possible, approximately 90 samples can be analysed in one day. More than 100 samples of Danish raw milk were analysed and median values of 0.050 mg kg(-1) of Cu and 0.084 mg kg(-1) of I were found.

  7. COMPARISON OF CHILDREN'S FOLLOW-ON INSTANT POWDERED COW'S MILK FORMULA, BUFFALO MILK FORMULA AND CHICKEN-BASED FORMULA ON ENAMEL MICROHARDNESS OF BOVINE TEETH IN VITRO.

    PubMed

    Vongsavan, Kadkao; Rirattanapong, Praphasri; Surarit, Rudee

    2016-03-01

    Dental caries are a major public health problem worldwide. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of children's follow-on instant powdered cow's milk formula, buffalo milk formula and a chicken-based formula on microhardness of bovine enamel with artificial caries-like lesions. Forty bovine teeth were each placed in acrylic blocks and the enamel surfaces were polished to create flat 5 x 5 millimeter surfaces. The teeth surfaces were then demineralized using 0.1M lactic acid (pH 4.5) to achieve an enamel microhardness of 35-65 Vickers Hardness Numbers (VHN). All specimens were then randomly allocated into one of 4 groups (n=10/group). For remineralization, each group was soaked in a different kind of milk formula for 2 hours at 37°C except group 1 which was a negative control (artificial saliva) group. Group 2 was soaked in Murrah™ buffalo milk formula (a positive control ), group 3 in S-26-Promil-Gold™ (cow's milk formula) and group 4 in a chicken-based formula (Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University). The microhardness of the specimens was then measured again. Data were analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and paired t-test with a 95% confidence interval. After exposure to the formula, the mean VHN for each study group was significantly higher (paired t-test, p < 0.05) except for group 1 (p = 0.345). The mean VHN for the the Murrah™ buffalo milk formula, the chicken-based formula and the S-26-Promil-Gold™ formula group were not significantly different from each other (one-way ANOVA, p > 0.05). In conclusion, S-26-Promil-Gold™ follow-on cow milk formula, Murrah™ buffalo milk formula and the chicken-based formula all increased bovine enamel microhardness after soaking for 2 hours.

  8. Effects of partially replacing skimmed milk powder with dairy ingredients on rheology, sensory profiling, and microstructure of probiotic stirred-type yogurt during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Marafon, A P; Sumi, A; Granato, D; Alcântara, M R; Tamime, A Y; Nogueira de Oliveira, M

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the quality of stirred-type skim milk probiotic yogurt fortified by partially replacing skim milk powder (SMP) with whey protein concentrate (WPC) and sodium caseinate (Na-CN) during cold storage for 28 d compared with nonfortified yogurt. The rheological properties (as measured using dynamic oscillation) and sensory profiles of probiotic yogurts were greatly enhanced when SMP (i.e., 45%) was replaced with WPC and Na-CN. Higher values of mechanical parameters related to storage and loss modulus and consistent microstructure were found in the fortified yogurts. The acidification profile was not affected by supplementation of the solids in the milk base, and the viable counts of probiotic microbiota were high and satisfactory. These positive characteristics of probiotic yogurts were maintained until the end of the storage period. The microstructure of the fortified yogurt showed some differences compared with the nonfortified product, which were due to changes in chemical composition of the milk base in addition to the colloidal characteristics of the product.

  9. Comparison of composition and sensory properties of 80% whey protein and milk serum protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Evans, J; Zulewska, J; Newbold, M; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2010-05-01

    Milk serum protein concentrates (SPC) are proteins found in cheese whey that are removed directly from milk. Because SPC are not exposed to the cheese-making process, enzymatic or chemical reactions that can lead to off-flavors are reduced. The objectives of this study were to identify and compare the composition, flavor, and volatile components of 80% protein SPC and whey protein concentrates (WPC). Each pair of 80% SPC and WPC was manufactured from the same lot of milk and this was replicated 3 times. At each replication, spray-dried product from each protein source was collected. Commercial 80% WPC were also collected from several manufacturers for sensory and volatile analyses. A trained sensory panel documented the sensory profiles of the rehydrated powders. Volatile components were extracted by solid-phase microextraction and solvent extraction followed by solvent-assisted flavor evaporation with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry. Consumer acceptance testing of acidified 6% protein beverages made with 80% SPC and WPC produced in the pilot plant and with WPC from commercial sources was conducted. The SPC was lower in fat and had a higher pH than the WPC produced in the pilot plant or commercial WPC. Few sensory differences were found between the rehydrated SPC and WPC manufactured in this study, but their flavor profiles were distinct from the flavor of rehydrated commercial WPC. The pilot-plant WPC had higher concentrations of lipid oxidation products compared with SPC, which may be related to the higher fat content of WPC. There was a large difference in appearance between 80% SPC and WPC: solutions of SPC were clear and those of WPC were opaque. Concentrations of lipid oxidation products in commercial WPC were generally higher than those in pilot-plant SPC or WPC. Sensory profiles of the peach-flavored protein beverage included cereal, free fatty acid, and soapy flavors and bitter taste in beverages made from pilot

  10. Characterising variances of milk powder and instrumentation for the development of a non-targeted, Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics detection method for the evaluation of authenticity

    PubMed Central

    Karunathilaka, Sanjeewa R.; Farris, Samantha; Mossoba, Magdi M.; Moore, Jeffrey C.; Yakes, Betsy Jean

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to develop rapid tools to screen milk products for economically motivated adulteration. An understanding of the physiochemical variability within skim milk powder (SMP) and non-fat dry milk (NFDM) is the key to establishing the natural differences of these commodities prior to the development of non-targeted detection methods. This study explored the sources of variance in 71 commercial SMP and NFDM samples using Raman spectroscopy and principal component analysis (PCA) and characterised the largest number of commercial milk powders acquired from a broad number of international manufacturers. Spectral pre-processing using a gap-segment derivative transformation (gap size = 5, segment width = 9, fourth derivative) in combination with sample normalisation was necessary to reduce the fluorescence background of the milk powder samples. PC scores plots revealed no clear trends for various parameters, including day of analysis, powder type, supplier and processing temperatures, while the largest variance was due to irreproducibility in sample positioning. Significant chemical sources of variances were explained by using the spectral features in the PC loadings plots where four samples from the same manufacturer were determined to likely contain an additional component or lactose anomers, and one additional sample was identified as an outlier and likely containing an adulterant or differing quality components. The variance study discussed herein with this large, diverse set of milk powders holds promise for future use as a non-targeted screening method that could be applied to commercial milk powders. PMID:27167451

  11. Human milk proteins: an interactomics and updated functional overview.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Scaloni, Andrea; Zolla, Lello

    2010-07-02

    Milk and milk fractions are characterized by a wide array of proteins, whose concentration spans across several orders of magnitude. By exploiting a combined approach based on functional gene ontology enrichment (FatiGO/Babelomics), hierarchical clustering, and pathway and network analyses, we merged data from literature dealing with protein-oriented studies on human milk. A total of 285 entries defined a nonredundant list upon comparison with the Ingenuity Knowledge Base from the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Results were compared with an inventory of bovine milk proteins gathered from dedicated proteomic studies. A protein core of 106 proteins was found, with most of the entries associated to three main biological functions, namely nutrient transport/lipid metabolism, concretization of the immune system response and cellular proliferation processes. Our analyses confirm and emphasize that the biological role of the human milk proteins is not only limited to the provision of external nutrients and defense molecules against pathogens to the suckling but also to the direct stimulation of the growth of neonate tissues/organs and to the development of a proper independent immune system, both through the induction of a number of molecular cascades associated with cell proliferation/differentiation. The latter aspects were previously investigated by single-molecule dedicated studies, missing the holistic view that results from our analysis.

  12. Biofunctional peptides from milk proteins: mineral binding and cytomodulatory effects.

    PubMed

    Meisel, H; FitzGerald, R J

    2003-01-01

    The protein fraction of milk contains many valuable components and biologically active substances. Moreover, milk proteins are precursors of many different biologically active peptides which are inactive within the sequence of the precursor protein but can be released by enzymatic proteolysis. Many milk protein-derived peptides, such as caseinophosphopeptides, reveal multi-functional bioactivities. Caseinophosphopeptides can form soluble organophosphate salts and may function as carriers for different minerals, especially calcium. Furthermore, they have been shown to exert cytomodulatory effects. Cytomodulatory peptides inhibit cancer cell growth or they stimulate the activity of immunocompetent cells and neonatal intestinal cells, respectively. Several bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins are potential modulators of various regulatory processes in the body and thus may exert beneficial physiological effects. Caseinophosphopeptides are already produced on an industrial-scale and as a consequence these peptides have been considered for application as ingredients in both 'functional foods' and pharmaceutical preparations. Although the physiological significance as exogenous regulatory substances is not yet fully understood, both mineral binding and cytomodulatory peptides derived from bovine milk proteins are claimed to be health enhancing components that can be used to reduce the risk of disease or to enhance a certain physiological function.

  13. Specific antibodies to cow's milk proteins in infants: effect of early feeding and diagnosis of cow's milk allergy.

    PubMed

    Savilahti, Emma Merike; Saarinen, Kristiina Mertta; Savilahti, Erkki

    2010-12-01

    To investigate whether specific IgA, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 responses to cow's milk proteins differ between infants with cow's milk allergy and infants with cow's milk related symptoms (control subjects), and whether early feeding affects these responses as well as specific IgE. A cohort of 6,209 healthy, full-term infants in a double-blind randomized trial received, as supplementary feeding at maternity hospitals (mean duration 4 days), either cow's milk formula, extensively hydrolyzed whey formula or donor breast milk. Infants who developed cow's milk associated symptoms (n = 223) underwent an open oral cow's milk challenge (mean age 7 months), which confirmed cow's milk allergy in 111 and was negative in 112. We measured in sera cow's milk specific IgE levels with UniCAP (Phadia, Uppsala, Sweden), and β-lactoglobulin and α-casein specific IgA, IgG1, IgG4 and IgG levels with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Infants with IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy had lower β-lactoglobulin and α-casein specific IgG1, IgG4 and IgG levels (p < 0.05) than infants with non-IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy or control subjects. Within the group of infants with cow's milk allergy, exposure to cow's milk during the first few days after birth led to higher β-lactoglobulin and α-casein specific IgG4 levels (p < 0.005) compared to infants fed with either breast milk or extensively hydrolyzed formula. Subdued IgG class responses to cow's milk proteins characterized IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy. In infants who developed cow's milk allergy early exposure to cow's milk resulted in a heightened specific IgG4 response.

  14. Rapid screening of mycotoxins in liquid milk and milk powder by automated size-exclusion SPE-UPLC-MS/MS and quantification of matrix effects over the whole chromatographic run.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiupin; Li, Peiwu

    2015-04-15

    An automated, size-exclusion solid phase extraction (SPE)-UPLC-MS/MS protocol without pre-treatment of samples was developed to screen for four mycotoxins (OTA, ZEN, AFB1, and AFM1) in liquid milk and milk powder. Firstly, a mixed macropore-silica gel cartridge was established as a size-exclusion SPE column. The proposed methodology could be a candidate in green analytical chemistry because it saves on manpower and organic solvent. Permanent post-column infusion of mycotoxin standards was used to quantify matrix effects throughout the chromatographic run. Matrix-matched calibration could effectively compensate for matrix effects, which may be caused by liquid milk or milk powder matrix. Recovery of the four mycotoxins in fortified liquid milk was in the range 89-120% and RSD 2-9%. The LOD for the four mycotoxins in liquid milk and milk powder were 0.05-2 ng L(-1) and 0.25-10 ng kg(-1), respectively. The LOQ for the four mycotoxins in liquid milk and milk powder were 0.1-5 ng L(-1) and 0.5-25 ng kg(-1), respectively.

  15. Lateral flow test strip based on colloidal selenium immunoassay for rapid detection of melamine in milk, milk powder, and animal feed.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhizeng; Zhi, Dejuan; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Xin; Ru, Yi; Li, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    Although high melamine (MEL) intake has been proven to cause serious health problems, MEL is sometimes illegally added to milk products and animal feed, arousing serious food safety concerns. A satisfactory method of detecting MEL in onsite or in-home testing is in urgent need of development. This work aimed to explore a rapid, convenient, and cost-effective method of identifying MEL in milk products or other food by colloidal selenium-based lateral flow immunoassay. Colloidal selenium was synthesized by L-ascorbic acid to reduce seleninic acid at room temperature. After conjugation with a monoclonal antibody anti-MEL, a test strip was successfully prepared. The detection limit of the test strip reached 150 μg/kg, 1,000 μg/kg, and 800 μg/kg in liquid milk, milk powder, and animal feed, respectively. No cross-reactions with homologues cyanuric acid, cyanurodiamide, or ammelide were found. Moreover, the MEL test strip can remain stable after storage for 1 year at room temperature. Our results demonstrate that the colloidal selenium MEL test strip can detect MEL in adulterated milk products or animal feed conveniently, rapidly, and sensitively. In contrast with a colloidal gold MEL test strip, the colloidal selenium MEL test strip was easy to prepare and more cost-efficient.

  16. Lateral flow test strip based on colloidal selenium immunoassay for rapid detection of melamine in milk, milk powder, and animal feed

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhizeng; Zhi, Dejuan; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Hailong; Wang, Xin; Ru, Yi; Li, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    Although high melamine (MEL) intake has been proven to cause serious health problems, MEL is sometimes illegally added to milk products and animal feed, arousing serious food safety concerns. A satisfactory method of detecting MEL in onsite or in-home testing is in urgent need of development. This work aimed to explore a rapid, convenient, and cost-effective method of identifying MEL in milk products or other food by colloidal selenium-based lateral flow immunoassay. Colloidal selenium was synthesized by L-ascorbic acid to reduce seleninic acid at room temperature. After conjugation with a monoclonal antibody anti-MEL, a test strip was successfully prepared. The detection limit of the test strip reached 150 μg/kg, 1,000 μg/kg, and 800 μg/kg in liquid milk, milk powder, and animal feed, respectively. No cross-reactions with homologues cyanuric acid, cyanurodiamide, or ammelide were found. Moreover, the MEL test strip can remain stable after storage for 1 year at room temperature. Our results demonstrate that the colloidal selenium MEL test strip can detect MEL in adulterated milk products or animal feed conveniently, rapidly, and sensitively. In contrast with a colloidal gold MEL test strip, the colloidal selenium MEL test strip was easy to prepare and more cost-efficient. PMID:24729705

  17. Short communication: Effects of nanofiltration and evaporation on the physiochemical properties of milk protein during processing of milk protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jialu; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Shaozong; Liu, Chang; Li, Yan; Li, Haimei; Zhang, Liebing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of nanofiltration and evaporation concentration technologies on the physiochemical properties of milk protein concentrate (MPC) during processing. Skim milk, ultrafiltered milk, evaporated milk, nanofiltered milk, evaporated MPC, and nanofiltered MPC samples were collected at different processing stages. Chemical composition, microstructure of casein micelles, free sulfhydryl content, and surface hydrophobicity of the samples were determined. The insolubility index of MPC was also determined. Casein micelles aggregated compactly after evaporation while surface hydrophobicity increased and free sulfhydryl content decreased in evaporated milk compared with skim milk. However, the microstructure of the casein micelles was relatively undisturbed after nanofiltration, with reduced surface hydrophobicity and free sulfhydryl content. No significant difference was found in chemical composition between the 2 MPC preparations: approximately 61.40% protein and 28.49% lactose. In addition, the particulate microstructures of both MPC were similar. However, the insolubility index of evaporated MPC was significantly (0.58mL) higher than that of nanofiltered MPC. Nanofiltration may be an effective way to improve the solubility of MPC products.

  18. Characterisation of the IAEA-152 milk powder reference material for radioactivity with assigned values traceable to the SI units.

    PubMed

    Altzitzoglou, T; Bohnstedt, A

    2008-11-01

    The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) participated in a research project initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to upgrade some of its existing reference materials (RMs). The aim of the project is to improve the RM metrological status by establishing traceability of their assigned values to SI units. The purpose of the work described in this article was to establish traceability to the International System of Units (SI) of the activity concentrations of the radionuclides (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (40)K, and (90)Sr in the IAEA-152 milk powder RM. The choice of the particular RM was based on the concern about radioactivity levels in foodstuff. The sample preparation and the assaying of the activity concentrations in the milk powder, the methods used to achieve instrument calibrations and measurements traceable to the SI units, the data reduction and analysis, and finally, the results obtained are presented.

  19. Least-squares support vector machines and near infrared spectroscopy for quantification of common adulterants in powdered milk.

    PubMed

    Borin, Alessandra; Ferrão, Marco Flôres; Mello, Cesar; Maretto, Danilo Althmann; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2006-10-02

    This paper proposes the use of the least-squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) as an alternative multivariate calibration method for the simultaneous quantification of some common adulterants (starch, whey or sucrose) found in powdered milk samples, using near-infrared spectroscopy with direct measurements by diffuse reflectance. Due to the spectral differences of the three adulterants a nonlinear behavior is present when all groups of adulterants are in the same data set, making the use of linear methods such as partial least squares regression (PLSR) difficult. Excellent models were built using LS-SVM, with low prediction errors and superior performance in relation to PLSR. These results show it possible to built robust models to quantify some common adulterants in powdered milk using near-infrared spectroscopy and LS-SVM as a nonlinear multivariate calibration procedure.

  20. Amino acid supplementation of calf milk replacers containing plasma protein.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S Y; Campbell, J M; Drackley, J K

    2017-03-22

    We determined the effects of calf milk replacers containing 0, 5, or 10% bovine plasma protein (PP), either without or with the supplemental amino acids (AA) Ile and Thr, on growth and health of male Holstein calves (n = 104) for 56 d. Milk replacers were formulated to contain 22% crude protein (CP), 20% fat, and 2.0% Lys. Milk replacers (12.5% solids) were fed at a rate of 1.5% of body weight (BW) on a dry matter basis during wk 1 and 1.75% of BW beginning on d 8. Starter was introduced on d 36 so that effects of PP and AA balance in milk replacers could be isolated. Intake, respiratory scores, and fecal scores were measured daily. Body weight and stature were measured weekly and blood serum samples were obtained during wk 4. Treatments had no effects on intakes of dry matter, CP, or metabolizable energy. During wk 6 and 8, BW was less as PP inclusion increased without AA supplementation compared with the other treatments. In wk 7, calves fed the higher level of PP without AA had lower BW than calves fed either the lower level of PP without supplemented AA or the higher inclusion of PP with supplemented AA. Average daily gain and gain:feed were lowest for calves fed the higher inclusion of PP without supplemented AA; heart girth in wk 7 was smallest for those calves. During the first 21 d, occurrence of scours was greater in calves fed the control milk replacer than in calves fed milk replacers containing the higher inclusion of PP either without or with supplemental AA. Occurrence of scours was also greater for the lower inclusion of PP compared with the higher inclusion of PP when AA were supplemented. Throughout the 56-d experiment, the chance of antibiotic treatment was greater for calves fed the control milk replacer than for all other treatments except the higher inclusion of PP without supplemental AA. Additionally, chance of antibiotic treatment was greater for the higher inclusion of PP without supplemental AA than for other milk replacers with PP. Calves

  1. The analysis of carbohydrates in milk powder by a new "heart-cutting" two-dimensional liquid chromatography method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Hou, Xiaofang; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Yunan; He, Langchong

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a new"heart-cutting" two-dimensional liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of carbohydrate contents in milk powder was presented. In this two dimensional liquid chromatography system, a Venusil XBP-C4 analysis column was used in the first dimension ((1)D) as a pre-separation column, a ZORBAX carbohydrates analysis column was used in the second dimension ((2)D) as a final-analysis column. The whole process was completed in less than 35min without a particular sample preparation procedure. The capability of the new two dimensional HPLC method was demonstrated in the determination of carbohydrates in various brands of milk powder samples. A conventional one dimensional chromatography method was also proposed. The two proposed methods were both validated in terms of linearity, limits of detection, accuracy and precision. The comparison between the results obtained with the two methods showed that the new and completely automated two dimensional liquid chromatography method is more suitable for milk powder sample because of its online cleanup effect involved.

  2. Determination of flavor enhancers in milk powder by one-step sample preparation and two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Yunan; Hou, Xiaofang; He, Langchong

    2014-04-01

    Maltol, ethyl maltol, vanillin, and ethyl vanillin are important food additives as flavor enhancers. To quantify the four additives in milk powder, a novel 2D liquid chromatographic (2DLC) method was developed in this article. In such a 2DLC system, the target fractions eluted from the first dimensional column (C4) are stored onto the trapping column (C8) for subsequent analysis; after that, they were switched into the second dimensional column (C18) by a two-position six-port switching valve. A one-step sample preparation method was used prior to 2DLC chromatographic analysis, which was easy and convenient. After optimization of all experimental parameters, the new method was validated in terms of linearity, LODs, and LOQs, intra- and interday precision, and accuracy. A conventional single-dimensional liquid chromatographic method was also proposed in this work for comparison. In order to evaluate the applicability of the new 2DLC method, five brands of commercial milk powder samples (n = 8) were analyzed. Vanillin and ethyl vanillin were detected in two samples, respectively. It is showed that the 2DLC method is effective in quality control programs of milk powder products.

  3. Rapid Detection of Enterobacter Sakazakii in milk Powder using amino modified chitosan immunomagnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinglian; Wang, Dongfeng

    2016-12-01

    Chitosan immunomagnetic beads (CIBs) were first prepared through converting hydroxyl groups of natural polymer material-chitosan into amino groups using epichlorohydrin and ethylenediamine as modification agent and then coupling with polyclonal antibodies of Enterobacter sakazakii using glutaraldehyde as cross-linking agent. The beads before coupling with antibodies were characterized by magnetic property measurement, FTIR, SEM and XRD technologies. In the assay a natural polysaccharide-chitosan, which has good biological and chemical properties such as non-toxicity, biocompatibility and high chemical reactivity was first used for synthesis of immunomagnetic beads. The detection method first established in this paper that combined the beads with chromogenic medium together to rapid detect E. sakazakii in milk powder could greatly improve the detection specificity and working efficiency. The beads exhibited a maximum capturing capacity of 1×10(6)cfu/g with the detection sensitivity of 4cfu/g. The results demonstrate that the assay is a straightforward, specific and sensitive alternative for rapid detection of E.sakazakii in food matrix. The total analysis time was as little as about 25h, which greatly shorten the detection time. The method can provides new ideas not only to preparation technique of immunomagnetic beads but to imunne detection technique in food safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-targeted detection of milk powder adulteration using Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics: melamine case study.

    PubMed

    Karunathilaka, Sanjeewa R; Farris, Samantha; Mossoba, Magdi M; Moore, Jeffrey C; Yakes, Betsy Jean

    2017-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics was explored as a rapid, non-targeted screening method for the detection of milk powder (MP) adulteration using melamine as an example contaminant. Raman spectroscopy and an unsupervised pattern-recognition method, principal component analysis (PCA), allowed for the differentiation of authentic MPs from adulterated ones at concentrations > 1.0% for dry-blended (DB) samples and > 0.30% for wet-blended (WB) ones. Soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA), a supervised pattern-recognition method, was also used to classify test samples as adulterated or authentic. Combined statistics at a 97% confidence level from the SIMCA models correctly classified adulteration of MP with melamine at concentrations ≥ 0.5% for DB samples and ≥ 0.30% for WB ones, while no false-positives from authentic MPs were found when the spectra in the 600-700 cm(-)(1) range were pre-processed using standard normal variate (SNV) followed by a gap-segment derivatisation. The combined technique of Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics proved to be a useful tool for the rapid and cost-efficient non-targeted detection of adulteration in MP at per cent spiking levels.

  5. Temperature effect on lactose crystallization, maillard reactions, and lipid oxidation in whole milk powder.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Marianne K; Lauridsen, Lene; Skibsted, Leif H; Risbo, Jens

    2005-09-07

    Whole milk powder with an initial water content of 4.4% (w/w) and a water activity of 0.23 stored in hermetically sealed vials for up to 147 days below (37 and 45 degrees C) and above (55 degrees C) the glass transition temperature (T(g) determined to have the value 48 degrees C) showed a strong temperature dependence for quality deterioration corresponding to energies of activation close to 200 kJ/mol for most deteriorative processes. The glass transition was found not to cause any deviation from Arrhenius temperature dependence. Lactose crystallization, which occurred as a gradual process as monitored by isothermal calorimetry, is concluded to liberate bound water (a(w) increase to 0.46) with a modest time delay (approximately 2 days at 55 degrees C) and with concomitant surface browning as evidenced by an increasing Hunter b-value. Browning and formation of bound hydroxymethyl-furfural determined by HPLC seem to be coupled, while formation of another Maillard reaction product, furosine, occurred gradually and was initiated prior to crystallization. Initiation of lipid oxidation, as detected by lipid-derived radicals (high g-value ESR spectra), and progression of lipid oxidation, as detected by headspace GC, seem not to be affected by lactose crystallization and browning, and no indication of browning products acting as antioxidants could be determined.

  6. Composition of interfacial layers in complex food emulsions before and after aeration: effect of egg to milk protein ratio.

    PubMed

    Martinet, V; Valentini, C; Casalinho, J; Schorsch, C; Vaslin, S; Courthaudon, J-L

    2005-01-01

    Whipped emulsions were prepared at pilot scale from fresh milk, whole egg, and other ingredients, for example, sugars and stabilizers (starch, polysaccharides). Egg content was varied: 4 recipes were studied differing in their egg to milk protein ratio (0, 0.25, 0.38, and 0.68). Protein and fat contents were kept constant by adjusting the recipes with skim-milk powder and fresh cream. Emulsions were prepared by high-pressure homogenization and whipped on a pilot plant. Particle-size distribution determined by laser-light scattering showed an extensive aggregation of fat globules in both mix and whipped emulsions, regardless of recipe. Amount of protein adsorbed at the oil-water interface and protein composition of adsorbed layer were determined after isolation of fat globules. Protein load is strongly increased by the presence of egg in formula. Values obtained for the whipped emulsions were dramatically lower than those obtained for the mix by a factor of 2 to 3. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE indicated a preferential adsorption of egg proteins over milk proteins at the oil-water interface, regardless of recipe. This phenomenon was more marked in aerated than in unaerated emulsions, showing evidence for desorption of some milk proteins during whipping. Egg proteins stabilize mainly the fat globule surface and ensure emulsion stability before whipping. Air bubble size distribution in whipped emulsions was measured after 15 d storage. When the egg to milk protein ratio is decreased to 0.25, large air cells appear in whipped emulsions during storage, indicating mousse destabilization. The present work allows linking the protein composition of adsorbed layers at the fat globule surface to mousse formula and mousse stability.

  7. A RAPD based study revealing a previously unreported wide range of mesophilic and thermophilic spore formers associated with milk powders in China.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Faizan A; Li, Yun; Liu, TongJie; Flint, Steve; Zhang, Guohua; He, GuoQing

    2016-01-18

    Aerobic spore forming bacteria are potential milk powder contaminants and are viewed as indicators of poor quality. A total of 738 bacteria, including both mesophilic and thermophilic, isolated from twenty-five powdered milk samples representative of three types of milk powders in China were analyzed based on the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) protocol to provide insight into species diversity. Bacillus licheniformis was found to be the most prevalent bacterium with greatest diversity (~43% of the total isolates) followed by Geobacillus stearothermophilus (~21% of the total isolates). Anoxybacillus flavithermus represented only 8.5% of the total profiles. Interestingly, actinomycetes represented a major group of the isolates with the predominance of Laceyella sacchari followed by Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, altogether comprising of 7.3% of the total isolates. Out of the nineteen separate bacterial species (except five unidentified groups) recovered and identified from milk powders, twelve proved to belong to novel or previously unreported species in milk powders. Assessment and characterization of the harmful effects caused by this particular micro-flora on the quality and safety of milk powders will be worth doing in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a method to characterize high-protein dairy powders using an ultrasonic flaw detector.

    PubMed

    Hauser, M; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-02-01

    Dissolution behavior of high-protein dairy powders plays a critical role for achieving functional and nutritional characteristics of a finished food product. Current methods for evaluating powder dissolution properties are time consuming, difficult to reproduce, and subjective. Ultrasound spectroscopy is a rapid and precise method, but requires expensive equipment and skilled technicians to carry out the tests. In the present study, an ultrasonic flaw detector (UFD) was used as an economical alternative to characterize the powder dissolution properties. The objective of study was to develop a method to characterize the dissolution behavior of milk protein concentrate (MPC) using a UFD. The experimental setup included a UFD connected to a 1-MHz immersion transducer that was kept a constant distance from a reflector plate. To validate the method, 2 batches of MPC80 from a commercial manufacturer were procured and stored at 25 and 40°C for 4 wk. Focus beam reflectance measurement and solubility index were used as reference methods. Relative ultrasound velocity and ultrasound attenuation were acquired during the dissolution of MPC samples. To characterize the MPC dissolution, 4 parameters including standard deviation of relative velocity, area under the attenuation curve, and peak attenuation were extracted from ultrasound data. As the storage temperature and time increased, the area under the attenuation curve and peak height decreased, indicating a loss of solubility. The proposed UFD-based method was able to capture the changes in dissolution of MPC during storage at 25 and 40°C. It was observed that a high-quality MPC had a low standard deviation and a larger area under the attenuation curve. As the MPC aged at 40°C, the particle dispersion rate decreased and, consequently, an increase in standard deviation and reduction in area were observed. Overall, the UFD can be a low-cost method to characterize the dissolution behavior of high-protein dairy powders

  9. Short communication: interaction of bovine milk protein with chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ying; Li, Xuefen; Wang, Zongyi; Zheng, Han; Zhang, Qi; Huo, Ran; Chen, Xiangning; Han, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Dairy products are considered as nutrient-dense foods and consumed by many people in western countries, as well as an increasing number of Asian people. Excessive and frequent application of pesticides on vegetables and fruits leads to a potential health hazard to consumers. The organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos has been reported to bind with human and bovine serum albumin. Thus, it is necessary to explore the interaction between food protein and chlorpyrifos. In this study, equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence spectra were used to demonstrate binding of milk proteins to chlorpyrifos. The amount of milk protein bound was 0.03±0.01mg/g. Moreover, the milk protein-chlorpyrifos complexes were stable at pH 3.5to 9.5 and ion concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0M. The amount of chlorpyrifos bound to milk proteins decreased to 50% after being in vitro digested by pepsin and trypsin. The results showed that the interaction between food proteins and the pesticide might partially remove the insecticide and reduce the concentration of pesticide absorbed into the blood and, thus, alleviate the corresponding toxicity.

  10. Protein profile of mature soybean seeds and prepared soybean milk.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; Samperi, Roberto; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Laganà, Aldo

    2014-10-08

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) is economically the most important bean in the world, providing a wide range of vegetable proteins. Soybean milk is a colloidal solution obtained as water extract from swelled and ground soybean seeds. Soybean proteins represent about 35-40% on a dry weight basis and they are receiving increasing attention with respect to their health effects. However, the soybean is a well-recognized allergenic food, and therefore, it is urgent to define its protein components responsible for the allergenicity in order to develop hypoallergenic soybean products for sensitive people. The main aim of this work was the characterization of seed and milk soybean proteome and their comparison in terms of protein content and specific proteins. Using a shotgun proteomics approach, 243 nonredundant proteins were identified in mature soybean seeds.

  11. Identification of lipid synthesis and secretion proteins in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Boeren, Sjef; Vervoort, Jacques; Hettinga, Kasper

    2014-02-01

    Lactation physiology is a process that is only partly understood. Proteomics techniques have shown to be useful to help advance the knowledge on lactation physiology in human and rodent species but have not been used as major tools for dairy cows, except for mastitis. In this paper, advanced non-targeted proteomics techniques (Filter aided sample preparation and NanoLC-Orbitrap-MS/MS) were applied to study the milk fat globule membrane and milk serum fraction, resulting in the identification of 246 proteins. Of these, 23 transporters and enzymes were related to lipid synthesis and secretion in mammary gland and their functions are discussed in detail. The identification of these intracellular transporters and enzymes in milk provides a possibility of using milk itself to study lipid synthesis and secretion pathways. This full-scale scan of milk proteins by using non-targeted proteomic analysis helps to reveal the important proteins involved in lipid synthesis and secretion for further examination in targeted studies.

  12. Proteomic tools to characterize the protein fraction of Equidae milk.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Guy; Mahé, Marie-Françoise; Leroux, Christine; Martin, Patrice

    2004-08-01

    The principal components of the protein fraction in pony mare's milk have been successfully identified and partially characterized using proteomic tools. Skimmed pony mare's milk was fractionated by either reversed phase-high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) on a C4 column or a bi-dimensional separation technique coupling RP-HPLC in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in the second dimension (two-dimensional RP-HPLC/SDS-PAGE). The fractions thus obtained were analyzed by Edman N-terminal microsequencing and mass determination, with or without tryptic digestion, on a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight spectrometer. Based on the sequence and molecular mass information obtained, identifications were achieved through a protein database search using homology or pattern research algorithms. This methodological approach was shown to be rapid, efficient and reliable in identifying the principal proteins in pony mare's milk. kappa-, alpha(s1)-, alpha(s2)-, and beta-casein, lysozyme C, alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin I and II were thus identified. alpha(s1) and beta-caseins displayed polymorphic patterns, probably due to alternative splicing processes leading to casual exon skipping events involving exons 7 and 14 in alpha(s1)-casein and exon 5 in beta-casein. Edman N-terminal microsequencing over 35 amino acid residues, for pony alpha(s1)-casein, clearly demonstrated the occurrence, in Equidae, of a splicing pattern similar to that reported in rodents, characterized by the constitutive outsplicing of exon 5. Pony mare's milk SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC patterns were compared with those obtained for other milks (cow, goat and human), as were the relative levels of caseins and major whey proteins in these milks. Our results provide further evidence to support the notion that Equidae milk is closer to human breast milk than milk from bovine and caprine with respect to the casein and

  13. Comparison of soymilk, powdered milk, Hank's balanced salt solution and tap water on periodontal ligament cell survival.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Fariborz; Mirhadi, Hosein; Geramizadeh, Bita; Sahebi, Safoura

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of soymilk, powdered milk, and Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) to maintain human periodontal ligament (PDL) cell viability in vitro. PDL cells were obtained from extracted healthy third molars and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagles medium (DMEM). The cultures were exposed for 1, 2, 4, and 8 h to experimental solutions (tap water served as negative control and DMEM as positive control) at 37°C. The viable cells were then counted using the trypan blue exclusion technique. Data were analyzed by using one-way anova, post hoc Scheffe and two-way anova test. Statistical analysis showed that HBSS, powdered baby formula, and soymilk maintain cell viability equally well in different periods of times. Tap water cannot keep cells viable as well as other solutions. Soymilk and powdered baby formula can be recommended as suitable storage media for avulsed teeth for up to 8 h.

  14. Rapid and sensitive detection of the food allergen glycinin in powdered milk using a lateral flow colloidal gold immunoassay strip test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Deng, Ruiguang; Zhang, Gaiping; Li, Qingmei; Yang, Jifei; Sun, Yaning; Li, Zhixi; Hu, Xiaofei

    2015-03-04

    A rapid immunochromatographic lateral flow test strip in a sandwich format was developed with the colloidal gold-labeled mouse antiglycinin monoclonal antibody (mAb) and rabbit antiglycinin polyclonal antibody (pAb) to specifically identify glycinin, a soybean allergen. The test strip is composed of a sample pad, a conjugate reagent pad, an absorbent pad, and a test membrane containing a control line and a test line. This test strip has high sensitivity, and results can be obtained within 10 min without sophisticated procedures. The limit of detection (LOD) of the test strip was calculated to be 0.69 mg/kg using an optical density scanner that measures relative optical density. The assay showed high specificity for glycinin, with no cross-reactions with other soybean proteins or other food allergens. The recoveries of the lateral flow test strip in detecting glycinin in powdered milk samples ranged between 80.5 and 89.9% with relative standard deviations of less than 5.29% (intra-assay) and 6.72% (interassay). Therefore, the test strip is useful as a quantitative, semiquantitative, or qualitative detection method for glycinin in powdered milk. In addition, the test strip can be used to detect glycinin in other processed foods and may be a valuable tool in identifying effective approaches for reducing the impact of glycinin.

  15. The use of radiolabelled milk proteins to study thermally-induced interactions in milk systems

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat induced complexes between milk proteins are of considerable importance in determining the heat stability and rennin clottability of milk products. Thiol-disulfide interchange reactions have been suggested as the principal reaction mechanism for complex formation. Studies to data have not adequately established the mechanism and stoichiometry of complex formation in situ in total milk system. Tracer amounts of {sup 14}C-{beta}-lactoglobulin and {alpha}-lactalbumin were heated under various conditions. After clotting with rennet, radioactivity retained in the curd was counted to estimate extent of interaction of {beta}-lactoglobulin with casein. {sup 14}C- and {sup 3}H-Methyl labelled proteins were used for the preparation of radiolabelled artificial casein micelles. These micelles with radiolabelled whey proteins were heated and heat-induced complexes were separated on Sephacryl S-300 eluting with 6 M guanidine hydrochloride to break all non-covalent bonds. Further separation of the protein complexes was obtained using CPG-10 or Sephacryl S-1000. The ratios of {sup 3}H to {sup 14}C labelled proteins in the protein complexes suggested that the stoichiometries of k-, {alpha}{sub s2}-casein, {beta}-lactoglobulin and {alpha}-lactalbumin in the heat-induced complexes varied as a function of the heat treatment.

  16. A simplified method using commercial milk powder for hand-rearing of the Caesarean-derived infant rabbits (author's transl).

    PubMed

    Murata, Y; Tada, M; Sugimoto, S; Sato, M; Katsumata, Y

    1977-01-01

    An efficient and simplified method for hand-rearing of Caesarean-derived infant rabbits under gnotobiotic condition was devised. The Caesarean-derived infant Dutch or Japanese-White rabbits and their hybrids (F1; Japanese-White female x Dutch male) were reared in sterilized vinyl-isolators by hand-feeding with two kinds of milk diets, A and B, consisted mainly ofa commercial milk powder for dogs and cats (Esbilac) supplemented with several minor components (Table 2) and administered intragastrically once a day through a Nelaton's catheter. Bacteriological examinations revealed that feces and urine were sterile for the first three days. On the third day, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus, and Bacteroides sp. were given with milk diet and the infant rabbits were reared until 10 to 12 weeks of age. The weaning rate at 5 weeks of age and the raising rate at 3 months of age were approximately 78% and 77%, respectively (Table 3), indicating that feeding once-a-day with a milk diet mainly composed of Esbilac is suitable for the hand-rearing of infant rabbits. There was, however, no significant difference milk diet A and B on the weaning rate.

  17. Identification of potent antioxidant bioactive peptides from goat milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ahmed S; El-Bassiony, Tawfik; Elmalt, Laila M; Ibrahim, Hisham R

    2015-08-01

    Goat milk proteins have gained increasing attention especially the bioactive peptides released from the parent proteins by digestive enzymes. Specifically, the interest in bioactives of goat milk is intensifying due to its reduced allergenicity compared to bovine milk. In this study, proteins of goat milk were fractionated into caseins (GCP) and whey proteins (GWP), hydrolyzed by pepsin and the generated peptides were examined for radical scavenging activities. The hydrolysates of whey (P-GWP) and casein (P-GCP) proteins exhibited potent superoxide anion (O2(・-)) scavenging activity in a dose-dependent manner, as investigated using the natural xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XOD) system. The P-GWP and P-GCP dramatically quenched the O2(・-) flux but had negligible effect on the catalytic function of the enzyme, indicating specificity to scavenge O2(・-) but not oxidase inhibition. Further, both P-GWP and P-GCP were able to remarkably quench the chemical DPPH radical. Fractionation of hydrolysates by size-exclusion chromatography produced four fractions (F1-F4) from both hydrolysates, with variable O2(・-) scavenging activities. However, the slow eluting fractions (F4) of both hydrolysates and fast eluting fraction (F2) of P-GCP contained peptides with the highest scavenging activities. Peptides in the active fractions of P-GWP and P-GCP, isolated by reversed phase-HPLC, exhibited significantly strong O2(・-) scavenging activities. MALDI-TOF-MS allowed the identification of several antioxidant peptides derived from both caseins and whey proteins, with β-casein and β-lactoglobulin being the major contributors, respectively. The results demonstrate that digestion with pepsin generates multiple soluble peptides from goat milk protein fractions with remarkable ability to scavenge superoxide radicals and thus providing a fascinating opportunity for their potential candidacy as antioxidant bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Milk protein and the restoration of fluid balance after exercise.

    PubMed

    James, Lewis

    2012-01-01

    Sweat is produced during exercise to help dissipate some of the extra heat produced due to an increase in metabolic rate. Inadequate drink ingestion during exercise means athletes finish exercise hypohydrated and when the time between exercise bouts is short, effective rehydration strategies will be necessary to prevent subsequent performance impairment. For complete rehydration, drink volume must be sufficient to replace sweat losses as well as the additional water losses during recovery. Once a sufficient volume of drink is ingested it is the drink composition that dictates the rehydration success of the drink. It is well known that addition of sodium and some other nutrients to rehydration drinks enhances fluid balance restoration after exercise, but the effects of milk proteins have been less well documented. Skimmed milk is an effective post-exercise rehydration solution and enhances the restoration of fluid balance after exercise-induced dehydration to a greater extent than a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink. Whilst there are a number of factors in skimmed milk that might be responsible for this enhancement of rehydration, it appears that some of the effect is due to the milk protein, as milk protein has been shown to be more effective for post-exercise rehydration than an isoenergetic amount of carbohydrate. Whilst the effects of whey protein on post-exercise rehydration are equivocal, whey protein addition to a carbohydrate-electrolyte rehydration solution certainly does not impair rehydration. Therefore, in situations where protein ingestion after exercise might be advantageous for the athlete, this protein might also enhance restoration of fluid balance.

  19. Sensitivity and specificity enhanced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by rational hapten modification and heterogeneous antibody/coating antigen combinations for the detection of melamine in milk, milk powder and feed samples.

    PubMed

    Cao, Biyun; Yang, Hong; Song, Juan; Chang, Huafang; Li, Shuqun; Deng, Anping

    2013-11-15

    The adulteration of food products with melamine has led to an urgent requirement for sensitive, specific, rapid and reliable quantitative/screening methods. To enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of melamine in milk, milk powder and feed samples, rational hapten modification and heterogeneous antibody/coating antigen combinations were adopted. Three melamine derivatives with different length of carboxylic spacer at the end were synthesized and linked to carrier proteins for the production of immunogens and coating antigens. Monoclonal antibody against melamine was produced by hybridoma technology. Under optimal experimental conditions, the standard curves of the ELISAs for melamine were constructed in range of 0.1-100 ng mL(-1). The sensitivity was 10-300 times enhanced compared to those in the published literatures. The cross-reactivity values of the ELISAs also demonstrated the assays exhibited high specificity. Five samples were spiked with melamine at different concentrations and detected by the ELISA. The recovery rates of 72.8-123.0% and intra-assay coefficients of variation of 0.8-18.9% (n=3) were obtained. The ELISA for milk sample was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with a high correlation coefficient of 0.9902 (n=6). The proposed ELISA was proven to be a feasible quantitative/screening method for melamine analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of adjusted pH prior to ultrafiltration of skim milk on membrane performance and physical functionality of milk protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Luo, X; Vasiljevic, T; Ramchandran, L

    2016-02-01

    Processing conditions during ultrafiltration of skim milk influence properties of the casein micelle and thereby the physical properties of milk protein concentrate (MPC). The aim of the study was to establish the effects of pH adjustment of skim milk feed to obtain MPC with desired emulsification properties. The ultrafiltration was conducted using commercially pasteurized skim milk with the pH adjusted to 6.7 (control), 6.3, 5.9, or 5.5 at 15°C until a volume concentration factor of 5 was reached. Effects of pH adjustment on selected physico-chemical properties (Ca content, particle size, ζ-potential) and functionalities (solubility, heat stability, emulsification capacity, and stability) of MPC were determined. Lowering the feed pH solubilized colloidal calcium phosphate that substantially contributed to modifying the properties of casein. This caused a reduction in the particle size while increasing the net negative charge. The structural modifications in proteins were manifested in the Fourier transform infrared spectra. Subsequent concentration did not induce any further protein structural changes. Such modifications to the casein micelles and colloidal calcium phosphate negatively affected the solubility and heat stability of the corresponding MPC powders. However, the emulsion activity index improved only until the pH of the feed was lowered to 5.9 and declined when pH was dropped to 5.5, followed with the loss of stability. Readjusting the pH of MPC powder dispersions to 6.7 restored their surface properties and thereby their functionality. Lowering the feed pH also negatively affected the membrane performance by clogging the membrane pores and lowering the flux, particularly at pH 5.5. Adjusting pH to 5.9 produced MPC with optimum emulsifying properties with minimal influence on membrane performance.

  1. A 90-day safety study in Sprague-Dawley rats fed milk powder containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) derived from transgenic cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cui; Wang, Jian Wu; Huang, Kun Lun; He, XiaoYun; Chen, Xiu Ping; Sun, Hong; Yu, Tian; Che, Hui Lian

    2011-10-01

    Transgenic cloned animals expressing beneficial human nutritional traits offer a new strategy for large-scale production of some kinds of functional substances. In some cases, the required safety testing for genetically modified (GM) foods do not seem appropriate for human food safety, though regulations do not seem to provide alternatives. A 90-day rat feeding study is the core study for the safety assessment of GM foods. The test material in this 90-day study was prepared nonfat milk powder containing recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF), which was expressed in transgenic cloned cattle. Groups of 10 male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were given a nutritionally balanced purified diet containing 7.5, 15, or 30% transgenic or conventional milk powder for 90 days. A commercial AIN93G diet was used as an additional control group. Clinical, biological, and pathological parameters were compared between groups. The only significant effect of treatment was higher mean ferritin and Fe(+) concentrations for both male and female rats fed the transgenic milk powder diets, as compared to rats fed nontransgenic milk diets or the commercial diet. The results of the present study are consistent with previous research, which indicates that milk powder containing rhLF derived from healthy transgenic cloned cattle is as safe as conventional milk powder.

  2. Amino acid nutrition beyond methionine and lysine for milk protein

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Amino acids are involved in many important physiological processes affecting the production, health, and reproduction of high-producing dairy cows. Most research and recommendations for lactating dairy cows has focused on methionine and lysine for increasing milk protein yield. This is because these...

  3. Functional and technological properties of camel milk proteins: a review.

    PubMed

    Hailu, Yonas; Hansen, Egon Bech; Seifu, Eyassu; Eshetu, Mitiku; Ipsen, Richard; Kappeler, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    This review summarises current knowledge on camel milk proteins, with focus on significant peculiarities in protein composition and molecular properties. Camel milk is traditionally consumed as a fresh or naturally fermented product. Within the last couple of years, an increasing quantity is being processed in dairy plants, and a number of consumer products have been marketed. A better understanding of the technological and functional properties, as required for product improvement, has been gained in the past years. Absence of the whey protein β-LG and a low proportion of к-casein cause differences in relation to dairy processing. In addition to the technological properties, there are also implications for human nutrition and camel milk proteins are of interest for applications in infant foods, for food preservation and in functional foods. Proposed health benefits include inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties as well as an antidiabetogenic effect. Detailed investigations on foaming, gelation and solubility as well as technological consequences of processing should be investigated further for the improvement of camel milk utilisation in the near future.

  4. Consumer acceptability versus trained sensory panel scores of powdered milk shelf-life defects.

    PubMed

    Hough, G; Sánchez, R H; Garbarini de Pablo, G; Sánchez, R G; Calderón Villaplana, S; Giménez, A M; Gámbaro, A

    2002-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to correlate consumer panel acceptability versus trained sensory panel scores for appearance and flavor defects likely to appear during storage of whole milk powder. Descriptors selected for the study were: acid, caramel, cooked, dark color, lipolysis, and oxidized. For each descriptor a set of nine samples with different intensities were measured for acceptability and likelihood to consume by a 50-member consumer panel and for sensory intensity by a trained panel. Linear correlations between sensory acceptability and trained sensory panel scores were used to determine the sensory failure cut-off point for each descriptor, except caramel and cooked, which were not critical from the consumer's point of view. Differences in acceptability were found between Argentine and Uruguayan consumers for oxidized samples, while for lipolysis flavor, Argentine and Costa Rican consumers behaved similarly. For the color descriptor, significant changes in acceptability measured on a hedonic scale did not mean that consumers refused to consume the product. In contrast, for flavor descriptors, as soon as a significant decrease in acceptability occurred approximately 30% of the consumers said they would not consume the product. The sensory failure cut-off points presented in this paper can be used as a guide in future studies on the shelf life of MP and can also be of value in establishing sensory specifications for quality control programs. The methodology of correlating consumer acceptability to sensory panel scores and, thus, defining sensory failure is an improvement over more arbitrary criteria presented in most shelf-life studies.

  5. Longitudinal evolution of true protein, amino acids and bioactive proteins in breast milk: a developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo; Erdmann, Peter; Thakkar, Sagar K; Sauser, Julien; Destaillats, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    The protein content of breast milk provides a foundation for estimating protein requirements of infants. Because it serves as a guideline for regulatory agencies issuing regulations for infant formula composition, it is critical that information on the protein content of breast milk is reliable. We have therefore carried out a meta-analysis of the protein and amino acid contents of breast milk and how they evolve during lactation. As several bioactive proteins are not completely digested in the infant and therefore represent "non-utilizable" protein, we evaluated the quantity, mechanism of action and digestive fate of several major breast milk proteins. A better knowledge of the development of the protein contents of breast milk and to what extent protein utilization changes with age of the infant will help improve understanding of protein needs in infancy. It is also essential when designing the composition of infant formulas, particularly when the formula uses a "staging" approach in which the composition of the formula is modified in stages to reflect changes in breast milk and changing requirements as the infant ages.

  6. Proteomic analysis of cow, yak, buffalo, goat and camel milk whey proteins: quantitative differential expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Bu, Dengpan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Sun, Peng; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhou, Lingyun

    2013-04-05

    To aid in unraveling diverse genetic and biological unknowns, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the whey proteome in cow, yak, buffalo, goat, and camel milk based on the isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) techniques. This analysis is the first to produce proteomic data for the milk from the above-mentioned animal species: 211 proteins have been identified and 113 proteins have been categorized according to molecular function, cellular components, and biological processes based on gene ontology annotation. The results of principal component analysis showed significant differences in proteomic patterns among goat, camel, cow, buffalo, and yak milk. Furthermore, 177 differentially expressed proteins were submitted to advanced hierarchical clustering. The resulting clustering pattern included three major sample clusters: (1) cow, buffalo, and yak milk; (2) goat, cow, buffalo, and yak milk; and (3) camel milk. Certain proteins were chosen as characterization traits for a given species: whey acidic protein and quinone oxidoreductase for camel milk, biglycan for goat milk, uncharacterized protein (Accession Number: F1MK50 ) for yak milk, clusterin for buffalo milk, and primary amine oxidase for cow milk. These results help reveal the quantitative milk whey proteome pattern for analyzed species. This provides information for evaluating adulteration of specific specie milk and may provide potential directions for application of specific milk protein production based on physiological differences among animal species.

  7. Partial calcium depletion during membrane filtration affects gelation of reconstituted milk protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Eshpari, H; Jimenez-Flores, R; Tong, P S; Corredig, M

    2015-12-01

    Milk protein concentrate powders (MPC) with improved rehydration properties are often manufactured using processing steps, such as acidification and high-pressure processing, and with addition of other ingredients, such as sodium chloride, during their production. These steps are known to increase the amount of serum caseins or modify the mineral equilibrium, hence improving solubility of the retentates. The processing functionality of the micelles may be affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of partial acidification by adding glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) to skim milk during membrane filtration on the structural changes of the casein micelles by observing their chymosin-induced coagulation behavior, as such coagulation is affected by both the supramolecular structure of the caseins and calcium equilibrium. Milk protein concentrates were prepared by preacidification with GDL to pH 6 using ultrafiltration (UF) and diafiltration (DF) followed by spray-drying. Reconstituted UF and DF samples (3.2% protein) treated with GDL showed significantly increased amounts of soluble calcium and nonsedimentable caseins compared with their respective controls, as measured by ion chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE electrophoresis, respectively. The primary phase of chymosin-induced gelation was not significantly different between treatments as measured by the amount of caseino-macropeptide released. The rheological properties of the reconstituted MPC powders were determined immediately after addition of chymosin, both before and after dialysis against skim milk, to ensure similar serum composition for all samples. Reconstituted samples before dialysis showed no gelation (defined as tan δ=1), and after re-equilibration only control UF and DF samples showed gelation. The gelation properties of reconstituted MPC powders were negatively affected by the presence of soluble casein, and positively affected by the amount of both soluble and insoluble

  8. Review: Milk Proteins as Nanocarrier Systems for Hydrophobic Nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kimpel, Florian; Schmitt, Joachim J

    2015-11-01

    Milk proteins and milk protein aggregates are among the most important nanovehicles in food technology. Milk proteins have various functional properties that facilitate their ability to carry hydrophobic nutraceutical substances. The main functional transport properties that were examined in the reviewed studies are binding of molecules or ions, surface activity, aggregation, gelation, and interaction with other polymers. Hydrophobic binding has been investigated using caseins and isolated β-casein as well as whey proteins. Surface activity of caseins has been used to create emulsion-based carrier systems. Furthermore, caseins are able to self-assemble into micelles, which can incorporate molecules. Gelation and interaction with other polymers can be used to encapsulate molecules into protein networks. The release of transported substances mainly depends on pH and swelling behavior of the proteins. The targeted use of nanocarrier systems requires specific knowledge about the binding mechanisms between the proteins and the carried substances in a certain food matrix. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Simulation of protonic fluctuations in hydrated protein powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, Giorgio; Milotti, Edoardo

    2003-05-01

    Protons migrating on the surface of weakly hydrated protein powders provide a percolating mesoscopic system which exhibits charge fluctuations near room temperature. In this paper, we describe a simple numerical model where the statistical redistribution of protons on a space distribution of identical side chains lying on a spherical protein surface is varied by random ionization-recombination process to investigate the noise power spectrum of the fluctuating dipole moment, the ergodicity of this system, and the occurrence of localized or extended proton distributions. The case of lysozyme is considered to this end.

  10. Rapid non-invasive quality control of semi-finished products for the food industry by direct injection mass spectrometry headspace analysis: the case of milk powder, whey powder and anhydrous milk fat.

    PubMed

    Makhoul, Salim; Yener, Sine; Khomenko, Iuliia; Capozzi, Vittorio; Cappellin, Luca; Aprea, Eugenio; Scampicchio, Matteo; Gasperi, Flavia; Biasioli, Franco

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the suitability of direct injection mass spectrometry headspace analysis for rapid non-invasive quality control of semi-finished dairy ingredients, such as skim milk powder (SMP), whole milk powder (WMP), whey powder (WP) and anhydrous milk fat (AMF), which are widely used as ingredients in the food industry. In this work, for the first time, we applied proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) with a time-of-flight (ToF) analyzer for the rapid and non-invasive analysis of volatile compounds in different samples of SMP, WMP, WP and AMF. We selected different dairy ingredients in various concrete situations (e.g. same producer and different expiration times, different producers and same days of storage, different producers) based on their sensory evaluation. PTR-ToF-MS allowed the separation and characterization of different samples based on the volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles. Statistically significant differences in VOC content were generally coherent with differences in sensory evaluation, particularly for SMP, WMP and WP. The good separation of SMP samples from WMP samples suggested the possible application of PTR-ToF-MS to detect possible cases of adulteration of dairy ingredients for the food industry. Our findings demonstrate the efficient and rapid differentiation of dairy ingredients on the basis of the released VOCs via PTR-ToF-MS analysis and suggest this method as a versatile tool (1) for the facilitation/optimization of the selection of dairy ingredients in the food industry and (2) and for the prompt innovation in the production of dairy ingredients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Improvement of microwave-assisted digestion of milk powder with diluted nitric acid using oxygen as auxiliary reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzi, Cezar A.; Barin, Juliano S.; Garcia, Edivaldo E.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Dressler, Valderi L.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2011-05-01

    The feasibility of using diluted HNO 3 solutions under oxygen pressure for decomposition of whole and non-fat milk powders and whey powder samples has been evaluated. Digestion efficiency was evaluated by determining the carbon content in solution (digests) and the determination of Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Pb and Zn was performed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and Hg by chemical vapor generation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Samples (up to 500 mg) were digested using HNO 3 solutions (1 to 14 mol L - 1 ) and the effect of oxygen pressure was evaluated between 2.5 and 20 bar. It was possible to perform the digestion of 500 mg of milk powder using 2 mol L - 1 HNO 3 with oxygen pressure ranging from 7.5 to 20 bar with resultant carbon content in digests lower than 1700 mg L - 1 . Using optimized conditions, less than 0.86 mL of concentrated nitric acid (14 mol L - 1 ) was enough to digest 500 mg of sample. The accuracy was evaluated by determination of metal concentrations in certified reference materials, which presented an agreement better than 95% (Student's t test, P < 0.05) for all the analytes.

  12. Microencapsulation of anthocyanin-rich black soybean coat extract by spray drying using maltodextrin, gum Arabic and skimmed milk powder.

    PubMed

    Kalušević, Ana; Lević, Steva; Čalija, Bojan; Pantić, Milena; Belović, Miona; Pavlović, Vladimir; Bugarski, Branko; Milić, Jela; Žilić, Slađana; Nedović, Viktor

    2017-08-01

    Black soybean coat is insufficiently valorised food production waste rich in anthocyanins. The goal of the study was to examine physicochemical properties of spray dried extract of black soybean coat in regard to carrier materials: maltodextrin, gum Arabic, and skimmed milk powder. Maltodextrin and gum Arabic-based microparticles were spherical and non-porous while skimmed milk powder-based were irregularly shaped. Low water activity of microparticles (0.31-0.33), good powders characteristics, high solubility (80.3-94.3%) and encapsulation yields (63.7-77.0%) were determined. All microparticles exhibited significant antioxidant capacity (243-386 μmolTE/g), good colour stability after three months of storage and antimicrobial activity. High content of total anthocyanins, with cyanidin-3-glucoside as predominant, were achieved. In vitro release of anthocyanins from microparticles was sustained, particularly from gum Arabic-based. These findings suggest that proposed simple eco-friendly extraction and microencapsulation procedures could serve as valuable tools for valorisation and conversion of black soybean coat into highly functional and stable food colourant.

  13. Identification of lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins in porcine milk

    PubMed Central

    Shahriar, Farshid; Gordon, John R.; Simko, Elemir

    2006-01-01

    Septicemia and endotoxemia initiated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are relatively common in suckling and weaned piglets. Maternal milk is a source of both nutrition and immune protection for piglets. Passive transfer of colostral antibodies is necessary for protection of neonatal piglets against diseases, but the concentration of immunoglobulins in milk rapidly declines during the 1st wk of lactation in all mammals. We hypothesized, therefore, that nonimmunoglobulin substances in milk contribute to the innate protection of neonates against septicemia during the suckling period. Using LPS-affinity chromatography for isolation of LPS-binding proteins and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for their identification, we identified in porcine milk the following proteins with LPS-binding capacity: lactoferrin, soluble CD14, serum amyloid A, α-S1 casein, β-casein, and κ-casein. For lactoferrin, α-S1 casein, and κ-casein, in vitro pepsin digestion did not inhibit LPS-binding activity, whereas combined digestion with pepsin and pancreatin abolished it. The biologic functions of these LPS-binding proteins and peptides were not determined. PMID:17042375

  14. Circulating antibodies to cow's milk proteins in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, D. P.; Truelove, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Sera from patients with ulcerative colitis (51), Crohn's disease (30), hypolactasia (13), untreated adult coeliac disease (11), irritable colon syndrome (24), and sera from 38 healthy control subjects were tested for antibodies to the principal cow's milk proteins—casein, α-lactalbumin, and β-lactoglobulin. The red-cell-linked antigen-antiglobulin reaction was used to determine the titres of direct agglutinating antibodies and IgA and IgG incomplete antibodies. Apart from patients with coeliac disease, direct agglutinating antibodies were found infrequently and then in low titres. Approximately 50% of subjects had low titres of IgA and IgG antibodies. However, the titres found in sera from patients with ulcerative colitis did not differ from those found in the control subjects or in patients with Crohn's disease, hypolactasia, or irritable colon syndrome. Patients with untreated coeliac disease frequently had high antibody titres to the milk proteins. In all subjects tested, incomplete antibodies of IgA or IgG immunoglobulin class occurred with equal frequency. The frequent occurrence in adults of low titres of antibodies to the milk proteins may be due to continued absorption of minute amounts of protein. Absorption of allergens may be facilitated by mucosal damage, such as that of coeliac disease, with stimulation of antibody production. At the present time, however, there is little evidence to suggest that milk allergy is a factor in the aetiology of ulcerative colitis. PMID:5087069

  15. Deciphering the genetic blueprint behind Holstein milk proteins and production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Taeheon; Son, Jun Kyu; Yoon, Ho-Baek; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Jeong, Jin Young; Cho, Yong-Min; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Lim, Hyun-Joo; Cho, Kwanghyeon; Kim, Tae-Hun; Kwon, Eung Gi; Nam, Jungrye; Kwak, Woori; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2014-05-14

    Holstein is known to provide higher milk yields than most other cattle breeds, and the dominant position of Holstein today is the result of various selection pressures. Holstein cattle have undergone intensive selection for milk production in recent decades, which has left genome-wide footprints of domestication. To further characterize the bovine genome, we performed whole-genome resequencing analysis of 10 Holstein and 11 Hanwoo cattle to identify regions containing genes as outliers in Holstein, including CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN3, and KIT whose products are likely involved in the yield and proteins of milk and their distinctive black-and-white markings. In addition, genes indicative of positive selection were associated with cardiovascular disease, which is related to simultaneous propagation of genetic defects, also known as inbreeding depression in Holstein.

  16. Deciphering the Genetic Blueprint behind Holstein Milk Proteins and Production

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Taeheon; Son, Jun Kyu; Yoon, Ho-Baek; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Jeong, Jin Young; Cho, Yong-Min; Lee, Kyung-Tai; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Lim, Hyun-Joo; Cho, Kwanghyeon; Kim, Tae-Hun; Kwon, Eung Gi; Nam, Jungrye; Kwak, Woori; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal

    2014-01-01

    Holstein is known to provide higher milk yields than most other cattle breeds, and the dominant position of Holstein today is the result of various selection pressures. Holstein cattle have undergone intensive selection for milk production in recent decades, which has left genome-wide footprints of domestication. To further characterize the bovine genome, we performed whole-genome resequencing analysis of 10 Holstein and 11 Hanwoo cattle to identify regions containing genes as outliers in Holstein, including CSN1S1, CSN2, CSN3, and KIT whose products are likely involved in the yield and proteins of milk and their distinctive black-and-white markings. In addition, genes indicative of positive selection were associated with cardiovascular disease, which is related to simultaneous propagation of genetic defects, also known as inbreeding depression in Holstein. PMID:24920005

  17. Evaluation of a rapid protein analyzer for determination of protein in milk and cream.

    PubMed

    Amamcharla, J K; Metzger, L E

    2010-08-01

    Accurate and rapid measurement of the protein content of milk is important from both a product quality and an economic standpoint. The Sprint rapid protein analyzer (CEM Corporation, Matthews, NC) is a commercial system based on a dye-binding technique and can be used for rapid measurement of protein in foods. The objective of the present study was to compare the Sprint method with the reference method (Kjeldahl method). Milk and cream samples were analyzed in duplicate for true protein and crude protein (CP) using the reference method as well as the rapid method. Method comparison statistics (regression analysis, graphical representation, standard deviation of residuals, repeatability, and so on) were used to evaluate the agreement between the 2 methods. Regression coefficients and the intercepts were not significantly different from 1 and zero for CP measurement in milk and cream, respectively. The average coefficient of variance between the duplicate CP measurements for the Sprint method was found to be 0.40, 0.49, and 0.76 for milk, light cream, and heavy cream, respectively. True protein measurement in milk and cream also followed a similar trend. Overall, there exists a sufficient level of agreement between the Sprint rapid protein analyzer and Kjeldahl method for true protein and CP measurement of milk and cream samples.

  18. Multiresidue analysis of 30 organochlorine pesticides in milk and milk powder by gel permeation chromatography-solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guocan; Han, Chao; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Meiwen; Wang, Chengjun; Shen, Yan

    2014-10-01

    A method for simultaneous determination of the 30 organochlorine pesticides (OCP) in milk and milk powder samples has been developed. Prior to the gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric analysis, the residual OCP in samples were extracted with n-hexane and acetone mixture (1/1, vol/vol) and cleaned up by gel permeation chromatography and solid phase extraction. Selected reaction monitoring mode was used for gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric data acquisition to identify and quantify the OCP. To avoid the matrix effects, matrix-matched calibration solutions ranging from 2 to 50 ng/mL were used to record the calibration curve. Limits of quantification of all OCP were 0.8 μg/kg. With the exception of endrin, limits of quantification are significantly lower than maximum residue limits set by the European Union and China. The average recoveries were in the range of 70.1 to 114.7% at 3 spiked concentration levels (0.8, 2.0, and 10.0 μg/kg) with residual standard deviation lower than 12.9%. The developed method was successfully applied to analyze the OCP in commercial milk products. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The balance between caseins and whey proteins in cow's milk determines its allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Lara-Villoslada, F; Olivares, M; Xaus, J

    2005-05-01

    Cow's milk allergy is quite common in the first years of human life. Protein composition plays an important role in this pathology, particularly the casein/whey protein ratio. It is known that milks from different species have different sensitization capacities although their protein sources are quite similar. Thus, the objective of this work was to compare the allergenicity of native cow's milk and milk with a modified ratio of casein and whey proteins in a murine model of atopy. Twenty-four Balb/c mice were orally sensitized to native cow's milk or modified cow's milk with a casein/whey protein ratio of 40:60. During the sensitization period, the number of mice suffering from diarrhea was significantly higher in the native cow's milk-sensitized group than in the modified milk-sensitized group. Once mice were killed, plasma histamine levels were shown to be significantly higher in native cow's milk-sensitized mice. In addition, cow's milk proteins induced a higher lymphocyte sensitization in the native milk-sensitized mice, with a significant increase in the specific proliferation ratio of these cells. These results suggest that the balance between caseins and whey proteins plays an important role in the sensitization capacity of cow's milk, and its modification might be a way to reduce the allergenicity of cow's milk.

  20. In vivo digestomics of milk proteins in human milk and infant formula using a suckling rat pup model.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yasuaki; Phinney, Brett S; Weber, Darren; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-02-01

    Human milk is the optimal mode of infant feeding for the first several months of life, and infant formulas serve as an alternative when breast-feeding is not possible. Milk proteins have a balanced amino acid composition and some of them provide beneficial bioactivities in their intact forms. They also encrypt a variety of bioactive peptides, possibly contributing to infant health and growth. However, there is limited knowledge of how milk proteins are digested in the gastrointestinal tract and bioactive peptides are released in infants. A peptidomic analysis was conducted to identify peptides released from milk proteins in human milk and infant formula, using a suckling rat pup model. Among the major milk proteins targeted, α-lactalbumin and β-casein in human milk, and β-lactoglobulin and β-casein in infant formula were the main sources of peptides, and these peptides covered large parts of the parental proteins' sequences. Release of peptides was concentrated to specific regions, such as residues 70-92 of β-casein in human milk, residues 39-55 of β-lactoglobulin in infant formula, and residues 57-96 and 145-161 of β-CN in infant formula, where resistance to gastrointestinal digestion was suggested. In the context of bioactive peptides, release of fragments containing known bioactive peptides was confirmed, such as β-CN-derived opioid and antihypertensive peptides. It is therefore likely that these fragments are of biological significance in neonatal health and development.

  1. Determination of Dicyandiamide in Powdered Milk Using Direct Analysis in Real Time Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liya; Yong, Wei; Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Sai; Chen, Qilong; Guo, Tianyang; Zhang, Jichuan; Tan, Tianwei; Su, Haijia; Dong, Yiyang

    2015-08-01

    The direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization source coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) system has the capability to desorb analytes directly from samples without sample cleanup or chromatographic separation. In this work, a method based on DART/Q-TOF MS/MS has been developed for rapid identification of dicyandiamide (DCD) present in powdered milk. Simple sample extraction procedure employing acetonitrile-water (80:20, v/v) mixture was followed by direct, high-throughput determination of sample extracts spread on a steel mesh of the transmission module by mass spectrometry under ambient conditions. The method has been evaluated for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of DCD in powdered milk. Variables including experimental apparatus, DART gas heater temperature, sample presentation speed, and vacuum pressure were investigated. The quantitative method was validated with respect to linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, precision, and accuracy by using external standards. After optimization of these parameters, a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 μg kg(-1) was obtained for DCD with a linear working range from 100 to 10000 μg kg(-1) and a satisfactory correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.9997. Good recovery (80.08%-106.47%) and repeatability (RSD = 3.0%-5.4%) were achieved for DCD. The DART/Q-TOF MS/MS-based method provides a rapid, efficient, and powerful scheme to analyze DCD in powdered milk with limited sample preparation, thus reducing time and complexity of quality control.

  2. Determination of Dicyandiamide in Powdered Milk Using Direct Analysis in Real Time Quadrupole Time-of-Flight Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liya; Yong, Wei; Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Sai; Chen, Qilong; Guo, Tianyang; Zhang, Jichuan; Tan, Tianwei; Su, Haijia; Dong, Yiyang

    2015-08-01

    The direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization source coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS) system has the capability to desorb analytes directly from samples without sample cleanup or chromatographic separation. In this work, a method based on DART/Q-TOF MS/MS has been developed for rapid identification of dicyandiamide (DCD) present in powdered milk. Simple sample extraction procedure employing acetonitrile-water (80:20, v/v) mixture was followed by direct, high-throughput determination of sample extracts spread on a steel mesh of the transmission module by mass spectrometry under ambient conditions. The method has been evaluated for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of DCD in powdered milk. Variables including experimental apparatus, DART gas heater temperature, sample presentation speed, and vacuum pressure were investigated. The quantitative method was validated with respect to linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, precision, and accuracy by using external standards. After optimization of these parameters, a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 μg kg-1 was obtained for DCD with a linear working range from 100 to 10000 μg kg-1 and a satisfactory correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.9997. Good recovery (80.08%-106.47%) and repeatability (RSD = 3.0%-5.4%) were achieved for DCD. The DART/Q-TOF MS/MS-based method provides a rapid, efficient, and powerful scheme to analyze DCD in powdered milk with limited sample preparation, thus reducing time and complexity of quality control.

  3. Effect of solvent type on the determination of total iodine in milk powder and human serum by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vanhoe, H; Van Allemeersch, F; Versieck, J; Dams, R

    1993-08-01

    A method for the determination of the total iodine content in milk powder and human serum by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. It is shown that the oxidation state of the analyte has a strong impact on the analytical performance. If iodine is present as iodide and nitric acid is used for acidification, the observed ion signal is not stable and samples spiked with iodide yield erroneous recoveries up to 750%. Hence, as the iodine in milk powder is present almost exclusively as iodide, destruction of the sample with nitric acid is not suitable. It was found that such an excessive spike recovery does not occur if ammonia solution instead of nitric acid is used as the diluent. The proposed sample preparation was tested by analysing three reference milk powders, namely Certified Reference Materials 150 and 151 Spiked Skim Milk Powder (from the Community Bureau of Reference) and Standard Reference Material 1549 Non-Fat Milk Powder (from the National Institute of Standards and Technology). Good agreement with the certified values was obtained, indicating that no significant errors are introduced. For human serum, samples treated with nitric acid or with ammonia solution gave results that were not significantly different from each other. Results are given for both a 'second-generation' biological reference material, Freeze-Dried Human Serum (University of Ghent), and for sera from healthy individuals.

  4. Disorder in milk proteins: caseins, intrinsically disordered colloids.

    PubMed

    Redwan, Elrashdy M; Xue, Bin; Almehdar, Hussein A; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    This article opens a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. The focus of this introductory article on caseins is symbolic, since caseins were among the first recognized functional unfolded proteins and since they are definitely the most disordered, the most abundant, and the most studied of all milk proteins. In eutherian milks, the casein family includes at least three and usually four major members (αs1-, αs2-, β-, and κ-caseins) that are unrelated in sequence. However, in some species, two different αS2-casein genes are active, and therefore the total number of caseins can be as high as five. These proteins have found a number of uses in food industry. The functional repertoire of caseins ranges from nutritional function to involvement in the improving and/or maintaining cardiovascular health, to crucial contribution to the milk capacity to transport calcium phosphate, to serve as molecular chaperones, and to protect the mother's mammary gland against amyloidoses and ectopic calcification. An intricate feature of caseins is their ability to assemble to colloidal protein particles, casein micelles, serving to sequester and transport amorphous calcium phosphate. These and many other functions of caseins are obviously dependent on their intrinsically disordered nature and are controlled by various posttranslational modifications. Since various aspects of casein structure and function are rather well studied and since several recent reviews emphasized the functional roles of caseins' intrinsic disorder, the major goal of this article is to show how intrinsic disorder is encoded in the amino acid sequences of these proteins.

  5. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized oil powders for topical application-release and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from oil powders compared to redispersed powders.

    PubMed

    Kotzé, Magdalena; Otto, Anja; Jordaan, Anine; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-08-01

    Oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions are commonly converted into solid-like powders in order to improve their physical and chemical stabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized o/w emulsions could be converted into stable oil powders by means of freeze-drying. Moreover, during this study, the effects of pH and polymer type on release and trans(dermal) delivery of salicylic acid, a model drug, from these oil powders were investigated and compared to those of the respective template emulsions and redispersed oil powders. Physical characterization of the various formulations was performed, such as droplet size analysis and oil leakage, and relationships drawn with regards to release and trans(dermal) delivery. The experimental outcomes revealed that the oil powders could be redispersed in water without changing the release characteristics of salicylic acid. pH and polymer type affected the release of salicylic acid from the oil powders, template emulsions, and redispersed powders similarly. Contrary, the transdermal delivery from the oil powders and from their respective redispersed oil powders was differently affected by pH and polymer type. It was hypothesized that the release had been influenced by the electrostatic interactions between salicylic acid and emulsifiers, whereas the transdermal performance could have been determined by the particle or aggregate sizes of the formulations.

  6. Associations between individual cow factors and milk-protein production.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, J M; Martin, S W; Lissemore, K D; Leslie, K E; Gibson, J P; Scott, H M; Kelton, D F

    1998-02-06

    Associations between stage of lactation, cow characteristics, and protein production were evaluated using data from a 2-year period on 75 Ontario, 5 Alberta, and 3 Nova Scotia dairy farms. Individual-cow protein production was defined by 305-day protein yield and by the estimated breeding value for protein yield. Lactation curves for average daily protein yield were computed by parity, breed, and season of calving. Mean protein yield was highest in early lactation. However, there was no pronounced peak in daily protein yield. Parity was positively associated with 305-day protein yield and negatively associated with the estimated breeding values for protein yield. First-calf heifers had lower protein yields in early lactation and a slower rate of decline in protein yield in late lactation, as compared to later parity cows. Holstein cows had higher unadjusted protein yields and lower protein yields after adjusting for milk yield than other breeds. Holstein cows had significantly higher protein yields early in lactation compared to other breeds, but the rate of decline in protein production in late lactation was also greater. Season was associated with 305-day protein yield; the highest protein yields occurred in cows calving in the fall and winter months, but these cows had the greatest rate of decline in protein production in late lactation.

  7. Column liquid chromatography determination of vitamins A and E in powdered milk and local flour: a validation procedure.

    PubMed

    Ake, M; Fabre, H; Malan, A K; Mandrou, B

    1998-11-27

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous routine determination of vitamins A and E in powdered milk and flour made from local plants and purchased from open markets in the Ivory Coast. The method involves saponification followed by extraction with a mixture of organic solvents. The vitamins were resolved by reversed-phase HPLC and detection at a single wavelength. The main tests of method validation were applied to the procedure. The results show the reliability of the analytical method for the intended application.

  8. Elemental characterization of the National Bureau of Standards Milk Powder Standard Reference Material by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Greenburg, R.R.

    1986-10-01

    The Milk Powder Standard Reference Material, SRM 1549, recently prepared by the National Bureau of Standards has been analyzed by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The extremely low levels of many of the elements of interest, combined with the high levels of many of the matrix elements, necessitated improvements in many of the existing analytical procedures. Special attention has been given to reducing and evaluating the analytical uncertainties. Bovine Liver, SRM 1577, was analyzed as a control and the results obtained were compared with the literature and the NBS certified values.

  9. Spore test parameters matter: Mesophilic and thermophilic spore counts detected in raw milk and dairy powders differ significantly by test method.

    PubMed

    Kent, D J; Chauhan, K; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M; Martin, N H

    2016-07-01

    United States dairy industry exports have steadily risen in importance over the last 10yr, with dairy powders playing a particularly critical role. Currently, approximately half of US-produced nonfat dry milk and skim milk powder is exported. Reaching new and expanding existing export markets relies in part on the control of endospore-forming bacteria in dairy powders. This study reports baseline mesophilic and thermophilic spore counts and spore populations from 55 raw material samples (primarily raw milk) and 33 dairy powder samples from dairy powder processors across the United States. Samples were evaluated using various spore testing methodologies and included initial heat treatments of (1) 80°C for 12 min; (2) 100°C for 30 min; and (3) 106°C for 30 min. Results indicate that significant differences in both the level and population of spores were found for both raw milk and dairy powders with the various testing methods. Additionally, on average, spore counts were not found to increase significantly from the beginning to the end of dairy powder processing, most likely related to the absence of biofilm formation by processing plant-associated sporeformers (e.g., Anoxybacillus sp.) in the facilities sampled. Finally, in agreement with other studies, Bacillus licheniformis was found to be the most prevalent sporeformer in both raw materials and dairy powders, highlighting the importance of this organism in developing strategies for control and reduction of spore counts in dairy powders. Overall, this study emphasizes the need for standardization of spore enumeration methodologies in the dairy powder industry.

  10. Protein-Linked Glycan Degradation in Infants Fed Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Sela, David; Underwood, Mark A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito

    2014-01-01

    Many human milk proteins are glycosylated. Glycosylation is important in protecting bioactive proteins and peptide fragments from digestion. Protein-linked glycans have a variety of functions; however, there is a paucity of information on protein-linked glycan degradation in either the infant or the adult digestive system. Human digestive enzymes can break down dietary disaccharides and starches, but most of the digestive enzymes required for complex protein-linked glycan degradation are absent from both human digestive secretions and the external brush border membrane of the intestinal lining. Indeed, complex carbohydrates remain intact throughout their transit through the stomach and small intestine, and are undegraded by in vitro incubation with either adult pancreatic secretions or intact intestinal brush border membranes. Human gastrointestinal bacteria, however, produce a wide variety of glycosidases with regio- and anomeric specificities matching those of protein-linked glycan structures. These bacteria degrade a wide array of complex carbohydrates including various protein-linked glycans. That bacteria possess glycan degradation capabilities, whereas the human digestive system, perse, does not, suggests that most dietary protein-linked glycan breakdown will be of bacterial origin. In addition to providing a food source for specific bacteria in the colon, protein-linked glycans from human milk may act as decoys for pathogenic bacteria to prevent invasion and infection of the host. The composition of the intestinal microbiome may be particularly important in the most vulnerable humans-the elderly, the immunocompromised, and infants (particularly premature infants). PMID:24533224

  11. Glove powder's carrying capacity for latex protein: analysis using the ASTM ELISA test.

    PubMed

    Beezhold, D; Horton, K; Hickey, V; Daddona, J; Kostyal, D

    2003-01-01

    Glove donning powders carry latex proteins and disperse them into the workplace environment. We have used the ASTM D6499 ELISA to quantify the amount of latex antigen bound to and carried by glove powders. We could differentiate between a small amount of protein actually bound to the powders and a larger amount carried by the powder. Enhanced binding of a major allergen, Hev b 5, to the starch powders was demonstrated by Western blot. The D6499 ELISA is able to measure total latex antigen, soluble and powder bound, simultaneously without the need to centrifuge the samples.

  12. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from powdered infant formula milk and infant rice cereal in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Meng, Jianghong; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Yanming; Yang, Baowei; Xi, Meili; Xia, Xiaodong

    2012-02-01

    Dry infant foods are not sterile and could be contaminated with various bacteria including certain pathogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in infant foods and to characterize these strains. A total of 367 infant food samples, including 143 samples of powdered infant formula milk (PIF) and 224 samples of infant rice cereal (IRC), were collected in the Shaanxi Province of China during the period of July to August 2010 and screened for S. aureus. All S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and detection of genes encoding enterotoxins, exfoliative toxins, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. Among all the samples examined, sixteen of 143 PIF samples (11.2%) and 14 of 224 IRC samples (6.3%) were positive for S. aureus. From these positive samples, 29 S. aureus strains were isolated from PIF and 25 from IRC. Of these S. aureus isolates, 83.3% were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, 35.2% to three or more antimicrobials. Resistance was most frequently observed to erythromycin (75.9%), followed by ciprofloxacin (51.9%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (27.8%), while significantly fewer isolates were resistant to gentamicin (22.2%), tetracycline (18.5%), or cefoxitin (3.7%). In addition, 63.0% of isolates were positive for one or more toxin genes tested. The three most predominant toxin genes were pvl (40.7%), seg (38.9%), and sec (18.5%), followed by sea (7.4%), seb (7.4%), sed (5.6%), and see (5.6%). The ets, tsst-1, seh, sei, and sej genes were not detected. A total of 39 PFGE patterns were generated among 51 selected food isolates. Our findings indicate that PIF and IRC in the Shaanxi province were contaminated with S. aureus, and many S. aureus isolates harbored multiple toxin genes and exhibited multiple antimicrobial resistance. In addition, these S. aureus isolates were genetically diverse. The

  13. Identification of goat milk powder by manufacturer using multiple chemical parameters.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Rebecca J; Prosser, Colin G; Wakefield, Joshua W

    2016-02-01

    Concentrations of multiple elements and ratios of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were measured and combined to create a chemical fingerprint of production batches of goat whole milk powder (WMP) produced by different manufacturers. Our objectives were to determine whether or not differences exist in the chemical fingerprint among samples of goat WMP produced at different sites, and assess temporal changes in the chemical fingerprint in product manufactured at one site. In total, 58 samples of goat WMP were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as well as isotope ratio mass spectrometry and a suite of 13 elements (Li, Na, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cs, and Ba), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N selected to create the chemical fingerprint. Differences in the chemical fingerprint of samples between sites and over time were assessed using principal components analysis and canonical analysis of principal coordinates. Differences in the chemical fingerprints of samples between production sites provided a classification success rate (leave-one-out classification) of 98.1%, providing a basis for using the approach to test the authenticity of product manufactured at a site. Within one site, the chemical fingerprint of samples produced at the beginning of the production season differed from those produced in the middle and late season, driven predominantly by lower concentrations of Na, Mg, K, Mn, and Rb, and higher concentrations of Ba and Cu. This observed temporal variability highlights the importance of obtaining samples from throughout the season to ensure a representative chemical fingerprint is obtained for goat WMP from a single manufacturing site. The reconstitution and spray drying of samples from one manufacturer by the other manufacturer enabled the relative influence of the manufacturing process on the chemical fingerprint to be examined. It was found that such reprocessing altered the chemical fingerprint, although the degree of alteration

  14. Milk-derived proteins and peptides in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Artym, Jolanta; Zimecki, Michał

    2013-08-06

    Clinical trials are reviewed, involving proteins and peptides derived from milk (predominantly bovine), with the exception of lactoferrin, which will be the subject of another article. The most explored milk fraction is α-lactalbumin (LA), which is often applied with glycomacropeptide (GMP) - a casein degradation product. These milk constituents are used in health-promoting infant and adult formulae as well as in a modified form (HAMLET) to treat cancer. Lactoperoxidase (LCP) is used as an additive to mouth hygiene products and as a salivary substitute. Casein derivatives are applied, in addition, in the dry mouth syndrome. On the other hand, casein hydrolysates, containing active tripeptides, found application in hypertension and in type 2 diabetes. Lysozyme is routinely used for food conservation and in pharmaceutical products. It was successfully used in premature infants with concomitant diseases to improve health parameters. When used as prophylaxis in patients with scheduled surgery, it significantly reduced the incidence of hepatitis resulting from blood transfusion. Lysozyme was also used in infected children as an antimicrobial agent showing synergistic effects in combination with different antibiotics. Proline-rich polypeptide (PRP) was introduced to therapy of Alzheimer's disease patients. The therapeutic value of PRP was proved in several clinical trials and supported by studies on its mechanism of action. Concentrated immunoglobulin preparations from colostrum and milk of hyperimmunized cows showed efficacy in prevention of infections by bacteria, viruses and protozoa. A nutrition formula with milk-derived TGF-β2 (Modulen IBD®) found application in treatment of pediatric Crohn's disease. In conclusion, the preparations containing milk-derived products are safe and effective measures in prevention and treatment of infections as well as autoimmune and neoplastic diseases.

  15. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    SciTech Connect

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C.

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Diagnosis and clinical observation of lactose-free milk powder on treatment of neonatal diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyan; Chang, Jing; Yao, Aimei; Hu, Yulian; Yuan, Yuxiao; Yu, Fengqin; Ma, Zhanmin; Wang, Guangzhou; Zhao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal lactose intolerance syndrome is a series of digestive system symptoms caused by the lack of lactase, and could not fully digest the lactose in breast milk or cow milk. Lactose is one of the disaccharides mainly existed in mammalian milk. Lactose content in breast milk is 7.2g/100ml, cow milk is 4.7g/100ml. Dairy products are the main energy sources for the newborn, and lactose provides 20% energy for infants. During the growth of the newborn, lactose not only play a significant role in energy supply, but also involve in the development of the brain growing. This study mainly studied the lactose development features, the reasons for lactose intolerance, and the measures to treat lactose deficiency.

  17. Variation in the bovine FABP4 gene affects milk yield and milk protein content in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H.; Cheng, L.; Azimu, W.; Hodge, S.; Edwards, G. R.; Hickford, J. G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) bind long-chain fatty acids and are involved in their intracellular transport. Of the known bovine FABP genes, FABP4 has been mapped to a region on chromosome 14 that contains quantitative trait loci for milk traits. This study investigated the association of FABP4 haplotypes with milk production traits in 719 Holstein-Friesian × Jersey cows. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis of a variable region of the gene revealed three haplotypes (A, B and C). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified: two in exon 3 and three in intron 3. A was associated (P = 0.032) with increased milk protein percentage (present: 4.00 ± 0.02%; absent: 3.95 ± 0.02%) and B was associated (P = 0.009) with increased milk yield (present: 23.81 ± 0.23 kg/d; absent: 23.06 ± 0.21 kg/d), but tended to be associated with a decrease in protein percentage and an increase in protein yield. Cows with genotypes AA, AB and AC produced less milk, but with a higher protein percentage than BC cows. This suggest that FABP4 affects milk yield and milk protein content, both economically important traits, and that further study of this gene is warranted. PMID:26067182

  18. [Effects of daily consumption of milk powder on menstrual cycles and urine sex hormone concentrations of young women].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Ju, Jing; Wang, Zhixu; Wu, Jieshu; Geng, Shanshan; Liu, Jing; Yang, Yuexin

    2014-09-01

    To observe the effects of daily consumption of milk powder on Healthy young women, including the effect on menstrual cycles, ovulation time and sex hormone concentrations in morning urine. Thirty-two young women were recruited as subjects and randomly assigned into two groups for a milk powder consumption experiment which lasted three menstrual cycles. The first menstrual cycle is control cycle, the second menstrual cycle is milk-taking cycle. The subjects take milk diluted by 33g or 55g milk powder each day, from the 4th to the 24th day of the second menstrual cycle. The third menstrual cycles is control cycle after milk-taking. During the whole three menstrual cycle, record the length of each menstrual cycle, determine ovulation time by using basal body temperature and oviposit test paper, collect their morning urine samples at specified times (the 4th, 7th, 10th, 13rd, 16th, 19th and 24th day of first and the third menstrual cycle; the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 9th, 12nd, 15th, 18th, 21st and 24th day of the second menstrual cycle), determine the concentrations of estradiol, pregnanediol and creatinine in morning urine samples; draw the curve of the concentration changing over time and calculate the area under the curve to the 24th day. In the high-dose group, the mean of the menstrual cycle length are (29.60 ±3.180) d, (28.87 ± 3.021) d, (29.60 ± 2.995) d, the mean of the ovulation time are (15.47 ± 2.200) d. There was no significant difference in menstrual cycle length and ovulation time among cycles and between groups (P>0.05). Calculate the difference between the first and the second menstrual cycle, and the difference between the two groups. In the high-dose group, the area under the curve of estradiol concentrations adjusted by creatinine are (7160.28 ±2305.52), (6700.26 ±2066.67); (6676.24 ±2573.89); the area under the curve of pregnanediol concentrations corrected by creatinine are (51.93 ±18.80), (44.55 ±14.62) and (46.49 ±22.44). In the low

  19. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Cameron J.; McGregor, Robin A.; D’Souza, Randall F.; Thorstensen, Eric B.; Markworth, James F.; Fanning, Aaron C.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring 13C6 phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h−1 in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein. PMID:26506377

  20. Consumption of Milk Protein or Whey Protein Results in a Similar Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Middle Aged Men.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Cameron J; McGregor, Robin A; D'Souza, Randall F; Thorstensen, Eric B; Markworth, James F; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-10-21

    The differential ability of various milk protein fractions to stimulate muscle protein synthesis (MPS) has been previously described, with whey protein generally considered to be superior to other fractions. However, the relative ability of a whole milk protein to stimulate MPS has not been compared to whey. Sixteen healthy middle-aged males ingested either 20 g of milk protein (n = 8) or whey protein (n = 8) while undergoing a primed constant infusion of ring (13)C₆ phenylalanine. Muscle biopsies were obtained 120 min prior to consumption of the protein and 90 and 210 min afterwards. Resting myofibrillar fractional synthetic rates (FSR) were 0.019% ± 0.009% and 0.021% ± 0.018% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively. For the first 90 min after protein ingestion the FSR increased (p < 0.001) to 0.057% ± 0.018% and 0.052% ± 0.024% h(-1) in the milk and whey groups respectively with no difference between groups (p = 0.810). FSR returned to baseline in both groups between 90 and 210 min after protein ingestion. Despite evidence of increased rate of digestion and leucine availability following the ingestion of whey protein, there was similar activation of MPS in middle-aged men with either 20 g of milk protein or whey protein.

  1. Identification of major milk fat globule membrane proteins from pony mare milk highlights the molecular diversity of lactadherin across species.

    PubMed

    Cebo, C; Rebours, E; Henry, C; Makhzami, S; Cosette, P; Martin, P

    2012-03-01

    Although several studies have been devoted to the colloidal and soluble protein fractions of mare milk (caseins and whey proteins), to date little is known about the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) protein fraction from mare milk. The objective of this study was thus to describe MFGM proteins from Equidae milk and to compare those proteins to already described MFGM proteins from cow and goat milk. Major MFGM proteins (namely, xanthine oxidase, butyrophilin, lactadherin, and adipophilin) already described in cow or goat milk were identified in mare milk using mass spectrometry. However, species-specific peculiarities were observed for 2 MFGM proteins: butyrophilin and lactadherin. A highly glycosylated 70-kDa protein was characterized for equine butyrophilin, whereas proteins of 64 and 67 kDa were characterized for cow and goat butyrophilin, respectively. Prominent differences across species were highlighted for lactadherin. Indeed, whereas 1 or 2 polypeptide chains were identified, respectively, by peptide mass fingerprinting matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight analysis for caprine and bovine lactadherin, 4 isoforms (60, 57, 48, and 45 kDa) for lactadherin from mare milk were identified by 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Polymerase chain reaction experiments on lactadherin transcripts isolated from milk fat globules revealed the existence of 2 distinct lactadherin transcripts in the horse mammary gland. Cloning and sequencing of both transcripts encoding lactadherin showed an alternative use of a cryptic splice site located at the end of intron 5 of the equine lactadherin-encoding gene. This event results in the occurrence of an additional alanine (A) residue in the protein that disrupts a putative atypical N-glycosylation site (VNGC/VNAGC) described in human lactadherin. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analyses confirmed the existence of both lactadherin variants in mare MFGM. We show here that lactadherin from

  2. Considerations in meeting protein needs of the human milk-fed preterm infant.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julie; Hanson, Corrine; Anderson-Berry, Ann

    2014-08-01

    Preterm infants provided with sufficient nutrition to achieve intrauterine growth rates have the greatest potential for optimal neurodevelopment. Although human milk is the preferred feeding for preterm infants, unfortified human milk provides insufficient nutrition for the very low-birth-weight infant. Even after fortification with human milk fortifier, human milk often fails to meet the high protein needs of the smallest preterm infants, and additional protein supplementation must be provided. Although substantial evidence exists to support quantitative protein goals for human milk-fed preterm infants, the optimal type of protein for use in human milk fortification remains uncertain. This question was addressed through a PubMed literature search of prospective clinical trials conducted since 1990 in preterm or low-birth-weight infant populations. The following 3 different aspects of protein quality were evaluated: whey-to-casein ratio, hydrolyzed versus intact protein, and bovine milk protein versus human milk protein. Because of a scarcity of current studies conducted with fortified human milk, studies examining protein quality using preterm infant formulas were included to address certain components of the clinical question. Twenty-six studies were included in the review study. No definite advantage was found for any specific whey-to-casein ratio. Protein hydrolyzate products with appropriate formulations can support adequate growth and biochemical indicators of nutrition status and may reduce gastrointestinal transit time, gastroesophageal reflux events, and later incidence of atopic dermatitis in some infants. Plasma amino acid levels similar to those of infants fed exclusive human milk-based diets can be achieved with products composed of a mixture of bovine proteins, peptides, and amino acids formulated to replicate the amino acid composition of human milk. Growth and biochemical indicators of nutrition status are similar for infants fed human milk

  3. [Cow milk protein allergies: primary prevention. Nutritional aspects].

    PubMed

    Dalmau Serra, J; Martorell Aragonés, A

    2008-03-01

    In 2001 the Nutrition Committee of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics, published a position paper on "Recommendations on the use of formulae for the treatment and prevention of adverse reactions to cow milk proteins" (An Esp Pediatr. 2001;54:372-9). Since most of the recommendations given in this report still remain effective, the Nutrition Committee of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics reaffirms its support of the data expressed in it. In the present publication we only approach the aspects that have changed due to new knowledge and the accumulated clinical experience, especially on the primary prevention of allergy to cow milk proteins, and on the basis of it, the present recommendations for this prevention are set out. In addition, the importance of the nutritional aspects in all infants and small children receiving special nutritional formulae and exclusion diets are reviewed.

  4. Influence of processing on functionality of milk and dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Mary Ann; Udabage, Punsandani

    2007-01-01

    The inherent physical functionality of dairy ingredients makes them useful in a range of food applications. These functionalities include their solubility, water binding, viscosity, gelation, heat stability, renneting, foaming, and emulsifying properties. The suitability of dairy ingredients for an application can be further tailored by altering the structure of the proteins using appropriate processes. The processes discussed include physical modification (heat treatment, acidification, addition of mineral slats, homogenization, and shear), enzymatic modification (renneting, hydrolysis, and transglutamination), and chemical modification (use of chemical agents and the Maillard reaction). Emerging food processes (high pressure and ultrasound) are also discussed. The challenges for using dairy ingredients for the delivery of nutrients and bioactive components, while maintaining physical functionality, are also highlighted. There is a need for continued research into the fundamental aspects of milk proteins and their responses to various stresses for further differentiation of milk products and for the delivery of ingredients with consistent quality for target applications.

  5. Towards proteomic analysis of milk proteins in historical building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuckova, S.; Crhova, M.; Vankova, L.; Hnizda, A.; Hynek, R.; Kodicek, M.

    2009-07-01

    The addition of proteinaceous binders to mortars and plasters has a long tradition. The protein additions were identified in many sacral and secular historical buildings. For this method of peptide mass mapping, three model mortar samples with protein additives were prepared. These samples were analysed fresh (1-2 weeks old) and after 9 months of natural ageing. The optimal duration of tryptic cleavage (2 h) and the lowest amount of material needed for relevant analysis of fresh and weathered samples were found; the sufficient amounts of weathered and fresh mortars were set to 0.05 and 0.005 g. The list of main tryptic peptides coming from milk additives (bovine milk, curd, and whey), their relative intensities and theoretical amino acid sequences assignment is presented. Several sequences have been "de novo" confirmed by mass spectrometry.

  6. Distribution of Animal Drugs among Curd, Whey, and Milk Protein Fractions in Spiked Skim Milk and Whey.

    PubMed

    Shappell, Nancy W; Shelver, Weilin L; Lupton, Sara J; Fanaselle, Wendy; Van Doren, Jane M; Hakk, Heldur

    2017-02-01

    It is important to understand the partitioning of drugs in processed milk and milk products, when drugs are present in raw milk, in order to estimate the potential consumer exposure. Radioisotopically labeled erythromycin, ivermectin, ketoprofen, oxytetracycline, penicillin G, sulfadimethoxine, and thiabendazole were used to evaluate the distribution of animal drugs among rennet curd, whey, and protein fractions from skim cow milk. Our previous work reported the distribution of these same drugs between skim and fat fractions of milk. Drug distribution between curd and whey was significantly correlated (R(2) = 0.70) to the drug's lipophilicity (log P), with improved correlation using log D (R(2) = 0.95). Distribution of drugs was concentration independent over the range tested (20-2000 nM). With the exception of thiabendazole and ivermectin, more drug was associated with whey protein than casein on a nmol/g protein basis (oxytetracycline experiment not performed). These results provide insights into the distribution of animal drug residues, if present in cow milk, among milk fractions, with possible extrapolation to milk products.

  7. Cow's milk protein allergy in children: a practical guide

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A joint study group on cow's milk allergy was convened by the Emilia-Romagna Working Group for Paediatric Allergy and by the Emilia-Romagna Working Group for Paediatric Gastroenterology to focus best practice for diagnosis, management and follow-up of cow's milk allergy in children and to offer a common approach for allergologists, gastroenterologists, general paediatricians and primary care physicians. The report prepared by the study group was discussed by members of Working Groups who met three times in Italy. This guide is the result of a consensus reached in the following areas. Cow's milk allergy should be suspected in children who have immediate symptoms such as acute urticaria/angioedema, wheezing, rhinitis, dry cough, vomiting, laryngeal edema, acute asthma with severe respiratory distress, anaphylaxis. Late reactions due to cow's milk allergy are atopic dermatitis, chronic diarrhoea, blood in the stools, iron deficiency anaemia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, constipation, chronic vomiting, colic, poor growth (food refusal), enterocolitis syndrome, protein-losing enteropathy with hypoalbuminemia, eosinophilic oesophagogastroenteropathy. An overview of acceptable means for diagnosis is included. According to symptoms and infant diet, three different algorithms for diagnosis and follow-up have been suggested. PMID:20205781

  8. Cow's milk protein allergy in children: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Carlo; Baldi, Francesco; Bendandi, Barbara; Calzone, Luigi; Marani, Miris; Pasquinelli, Pamela

    2010-01-15

    A joint study group on cow's milk allergy was convened by the Emilia-Romagna Working Group for Paediatric Allergy and by the Emilia-Romagna Working Group for Paediatric Gastroenterology to focus best practice for diagnosis, management and follow-up of cow's milk allergy in children and to offer a common approach for allergologists, gastroenterologists, general paediatricians and primary care physicians.The report prepared by the study group was discussed by members of Working Groups who met three times in Italy. This guide is the result of a consensus reached in the following areas. Cow's milk allergy should be suspected in children who have immediate symptoms such as acute urticaria/angioedema, wheezing, rhinitis, dry cough, vomiting, laryngeal edema, acute asthma with severe respiratory distress, anaphylaxis. Late reactions due to cow's milk allergy are atopic dermatitis, chronic diarrhoea, blood in the stools, iron deficiency anaemia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, constipation, chronic vomiting, colic, poor growth (food refusal), enterocolitis syndrome, protein-losing enteropathy with hypoalbuminemia, eosinophilic oesophagogastroenteropathy. An overview of acceptable means for diagnosis is included. According to symptoms and infant diet, three different algorithms for diagnosis and follow-up have been suggested.

  9. Milk C-reactive protein in canine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Vasiu, Iosif; Dąbrowski, Roman; Martinez-Subiela, Silvia; Ceron, Jose J; Wdowiak, Anna; Pop, Raul Alexandru; Brudaşcă, Florinel Gheorghe; Pastor, Josep; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2017-04-01

    Presence of mastitis in lactating bitches can become life threatening for both the bitch and pups. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) in both milk and serum for canine mastitis diagnosis. Our study showed that milk CRP levels ranged between 0.1 and 4.9μg/mL and from 0.3 to 40.0μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (P<0.01), respectively, while serum CRP levels ranged between 2.0 and 8.6μg/mL and between 0.3 and 162.3μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (P<0.01), respectively. Milk and serum CRP levels were higher in both clinical and subclinical mastitis when compared with healthy controls (P<0.05 in all cases). However, no significant differences were recorded in CRP concentrations between clinical and subclinical cases. Based on these results, it could be concluded that serum and milk CRP could be useful in order to diagnose canine mastitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Future of Milk Protein Texturization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extrusion processing and texturization of soy and other vegetable proteins developed in the 1970’s paved the way for the benefits the food industry is reaping now in their ability to deliver multi-functional products such as meat and seafood analogues. Our work at the USDA Agricultural Research Ser...

  11. Histopathologic findings in children diagnosed with cow's milk protein allergy.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Bustamante, R; Pedrero-Olivares, I; Toro-Monjaraz, E M; Murillo-Márquez, P; Ramírez-Mayans, J A; Montijo-Barrios, E; Zárate-Mondragón, F; Cadena-León, J; Cazares-Méndez, M; López-Ugalde, M

    2015-01-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy is the most common cause of food allergy. The challenge test, either open or doubled-blind with a placebo control, is regarded as the criterion standard. Endoscopy and histologic findings are considered a method that can aid in the diagnosis of this entity. The aim of this study was to describe the histopathologic findings in children suspected of cow's milk protein allergy that were seen at our hospital. A descriptive, observational study was conducted on 116 children clinically suspected of presenting with cow's milk protein allergy that were seen at the Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition of the Instituto Nacional de Pediatría. Upper endoscopy and rectosigmoidoscopy with biopsies were performed and the findings were described. Of the 116 patients, 64 (55.17%) were girls and 52 (44.83%) were boys. The rectum was the site with the greatest presence of eosinophils per field in both groups, followed by the duodenum. In general, more than 15 eosinophils were found in 46% of the patients. Between 40 and 45% of the cases had the histologic criterion of more than 15 to 20 eosinophils per field and the rectosigmoid colon was the most affected site. Therefore, panendoscopy and rectosigmoidoscopy with biopsy and eosinophil count are suggested. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of volatile compounds in powdered milk for infant nutrition by direct desorption (CIS4-TDU) and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Francesca, Ieri; Patrizia, Pinelli; Luca, Calamai; Federico, Marotta; Annalisa, Romani

    2015-08-15

    Direct thermal desorption coupled with the Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (TDU-CIS4-GC-MS) technique applied to powdered milk was used as a novel approach for the characterization and quantification, as relative abundance, of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The aim of this study was to exploit the potential applications and setup conditions of the CIS4-TDU-GC-MS technique for the identification of oxidized or non-oxidized samples of powdered milk for infant nutrition, subjected to accelerated aging through the changes in their VOCs profile over time. Thermal desorption at 30°C and subsequent cryotrapping at -40°C with a Gerstel Liner-in-Liner system allowed a direct thermal desorption and cryotrapping of VOCs without any memory effect, thus avoiding sample preparation and contamination. The analyses led to the identification of several characteristic off-flavors in the oxidized samples, which were used as molecular markers to discriminate samples with different oxidation degrees. Finally, VOC contaminants possibly present in the packaging can also be identified with this technique.

  13. Claudins, dietary milk proteins, and intestinal barrier regulation.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Belinda M; Kerstetter, Jane E; Insogna, Karl L

    2013-01-01

    The family of claudin proteins plays an important role in regulating the intestinal barrier by modulating the permeability of tight junctions. The impact of dietary protein on claudin biology has not been studied extensively. Whey proteins have been reported to improve intestinal barrier function, but their mechanism of action is not clear. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated increased intestinal claudin expression in response to milk protein components. Reviewed here are new findings suggesting that whey-protein-derived transforming growth factor β transcriptionally upregulates claudin-4 expression via a Smad-4-dependent pathway. These and other data, including limited clinical studies, are summarized below and, in the aggregate, suggest a therapeutic role for whey protein in diseases of intestinal barrier dysfunction, perhaps, in part, by regulating claudin expression. © 2013 International Life Sciences Institute.

  14. Fourier transform infared spectroscopy investigation of protein conformation in spray-dried protein/trehalose powders.

    PubMed

    French, Donna L; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Li, Tiansheng

    2004-03-01

    Spray drying is a way to generate protein solids (powders), which is also true for lyophilization. Sugars are used to protect proteins from conformational changes and chemical degradations arising from drying processes and storage conditions such as the humidity. The influence of trehalose and humidity on the conformation and hydration of spray-dried recombinant human granolucyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) and recombinant consensus interferon-alpha (rConIFN) was investigated using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. The spectral analysis of spray-dried powders in the amide I region demonstrated that trehalose stabilized the alpha-helical conformation of both rhG-CSF and rConIFN proteins. Exposure of the pure protein powders to 33% relative humidity (RH) resulted in the formation of beta sheets and loss of turns but no change in alpha-helical structure. Trehalose reduced the magnitude of the changes in beta sheets and turns. Exposure of the pure protein powders to 75% RH resulted in the loss of alpha-helical conformation with a corresponding increase in beta structures (beta sheets and turns). Trehalose did not protect proteins from the loss of alpha-helical structures, but it reduced the formation of antiparallel beta sheets. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange (H-D exchange) was used to further characterize these hydration-induced conformational changes. At 33% RH the percent exchange of the protein decreased with increasing trehalose content, indicating a greater protection of the protein from H-D exchange by a higher concentration of trehalose. Such protection correlates with decreased conformational changes of the protein by trehalose at this humidity. At 75% RH the degree of H-D exchange of the protein was insensitive to the powder composition in all powders. Surprisingly, the H-D exchange of trehalose was low at about 20-25%, which was nearly independent of the protein/trehalose ratio and humidity, indicating that the exchangeable protons on trehalose

  15. Storage of milk powders under adverse conditions. 2. Influence on the content of water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Ford, J E; Hurrell, R F; Finot, P A

    1983-05-01

    Storage of milk powder under unfavourable conditions accelerates the normally slow deterioration in nutritional quality. The effects of such storage on the water-soluble vitamin composition were examined. (a) Spray-dried whole milk containing 25 g water/kg was stored at 60 degrees and 70 degrees and sampled weekly to 9 weeks. (b) Spray-dried whole milk and skimmed milk were adjusted to contain 40 and 100 g water/kg and stored at 37 degrees in nitrogen and in oxygen. Samples were taken for analysis at intervals during storage. The samples were analysed for eight B-complex vitamins and ascorbic acid, and also for total lysine, 'reactive lysine' and 'lysine as lactulosyl-lysine'. Storage at 60 degrees caused rapid destruction of folic acid (53% loss at 4 weeks) and slower loss of thiamin, vitamin B6 and pantothenic acid (18% at 8 weeks). There was no change in the content of riboflavin, biotin, nicotinic acid and vitamin B12. At 70 degrees the rate of destruction of the four labile vitamins was much increased; 18% or less survived at 4 weeks. At 37 degrees and 40 g water/kg there was little change in total and 'reactive' lysine during storage for 57 d. Lactulosyl-lysine was demonstrably present but at low concentration. There was considerable loss of folate (72%) and ascorbate (91%) during storage for 30 d in O2, but no significant loss in N2. Thiamin fell by approximately 12% in 57 d, equally in O2 and N2. The content of the remaining vitamins was unchanged. At 100 g water/kg there were progressive Maillard changes. During 27 d in N2 the colour changed from cream to pale brown, but in O2 there was no perceptible colour change. Total lysine fell by 20% in 27 d, and 'reactive lysine' by 30%. Folate was stable during 16 d in N2, but largely (94%) destroyed in O2. Ascorbic acid was also destroyed in N2 as in O2. Thiamin fell by 41% in 27 d, equally in O2 and N2. Vitamin B6 was more labile, especially in N2, falling by 71% in 16 d. With skimmed-milk powder containing 100

  16. Determination of total fat in milk- and soy-based infant formula powder by supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Denis E; Wolf, Wayne R

    2003-01-01

    Commercially available simple benchtop systems using CO2 supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) eliminate expensive organic solvent disposal problems and offer potential to meet a demand for rapid, accurate high-volume gravimetric determinations of total fat content of infant formula powders. A Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) approach was used to evaluate the performance characteristics of instrumental SFE extraction for determination of total gravimetric fat in infant formula. The established DQOs included the following: ACCURACY: Correct values were obtained for a suitable reference material, SRM 1846 Infant Formula [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD]. RUGGEDNESS: Variables were defined as (1) extraction time (35 min optimum); (2) ratio of sample size to diatomaceous earth support material (1 g sample/2 g support); (3) ratio of distilled water to alcohol (50% isopropanol optimum for both milk- and soy-based infant formula samples); (4) extraction flow rate was 3-3.5 mL/min optimum. PRECISION: Relative standard deviations of multiple determinations fell within the Horwitz limits of acceptability of < or = 2.8% at the level of analyte determined (0.34-2.5% obtained). SCOPE OF APPLICABILITY: Includes milk- and soy-based infant formula powders. Research data were obtained by use of a commercially available fat analyzer. Samples of the SRM, 2 commercial milk-based and 3 commercial soy-based infant formula products were distributed to 2 additional collaborating laboratories. Very good agreement was obtained among the submitting and collaborating laboratories for these samples. The use of clearly defined DQOs to establish method performance characteristics, along with the commercially available reference material, provided the mechanism for verification and validation of analytical methodology.

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Zinc, Copper, Lead and Cadmium in Baby Weaning Food and Powder Milk by DPASV.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Naficeh; Oveisi, Mohammad Reza; Jannat, Behrooz; Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Behfar, Abdolazim; Behzad, Masoomeh; Norouzi, Narges; Oveisi, Morvarid; Jannat, Behzad

    2014-01-01

    Apart from the breast milk, infant formula and baby weaning food have a special role in infant diet. Infants and young children are very susceptible to amount of trace elements. Copper and zinc are two elements that add in infant food. Lead and cadmium are heavy metals that enter to food chain unavoidably. DPASV is a benefit and applicable method for measurement of trace elements in food products. In this study, concentration of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium in four brands of baby food (rice and wheat based) and powder milk was analyzed with DPASV and polarograph set. Total Mean ± SE of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium in baby foods (n = 240) were 11.86 ± 1.474 mg/100g, 508.197 ± 83.154 μg/100g, 0.445 ± 0.006, 0.050 ± 0.005 mg/Kg respectively. Also these amount in powder milk (n = 240) were 3.621± 0.529 mg/100g, 403.822 ± 133.953 μg/100g, 0.007 ± 0.003, 0.060 ± 0.040 mg/Kg respectively. Zinc level in baby food type I was higher than lablled value (P = 0.030), but in other brands was not difference. Concentration of copper in all of samples was in labeled range (P > 0.05). In each four products, level of lead and cadmium were lower than the standard limit (P < 0.05). Amount of zinc and lead in baby food I, had difference versus other products. Concentration of zinc, camium in baby food type I, was higher than type II (P = 0.043, 0.001 respectively). Concentration of lead and cadmium in baby food type II, was higher than infant formulas, but are in standard limit.

  18. Prevalence of soy protein hypersensitivity in cow's milk protein-sensitive children in Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kang-Mo; Han, Young-Shin; Nam, Seung-Yeon; Park, Hwa-Young; Shin, Mee-Yong; Lee, Sang-Il

    2003-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the prevalence of soy protein hypersensitivity in cow's milk protein-sensitive children in Korea. A total of 1,363 patients with atopic dermatitis, urticaria, enterocolitis syndrome, bronchial asthma or allergic rhinitis were recruited. First, we estimated the prevalence of sensitization to soy in children sensitized to cow's milk. Specific IgE levels > 0.7 kU/L by CAP assay were considered positive. Next, the prevalence of soy allergy in cow's milk allergy (CMA) patients was investigated. Those children whose parents agreed to participate the open challenge test with soy had a convincing history of allergic reactions elicited by cow's milk and these symptoms were relieved by elimination. All of them had negative soy-specific IgE. Patients with positive soy-specific IgE accounted for 18.3% of 224 children sensitized to cow's milk protein. The prevalence of sensitization to soy decreased with age (36.8% in the first year of life, 16.4% in the second year, and 13.7% in the third year). Of 21 CMA patients, 42.9% (n=9) were determined to have soy allergy (mean age 10.3 months). Our results suggest that soy protein formula should be carefully used as a substitute for cow's milk in CMA patients, especially during infancy. PMID:12923320

  19. Multi-residue determination of 115 veterinary drugs and pharmaceutical residues in milk powder, butter, fish tissue and eggs using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dasenaki, Marilena E; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2015-06-23

    A simple and sensitive multi-residue method for the determination of 115 veterinary drugs and pharmaceuticals, belonging in more than 20 different classes, in butter, milk powder, egg and fish tissue has been developed. The method involves a simple generic solid-liquid extraction step (solvent extraction, SE) with 0.1% formic acid in aqueous solution of EDTA 0.1% (w/v)-acetonitrile (ACN)-methanol (MeOH) (1:1:1, v/v) with additional ultrasonic-assisted extraction. Precipitation of lipids and proteins was promoted by subjecting the extracts at very low temperature (-23°C) for 12h. Further cleanup with hexane ensures fat removal from the matrix. Analysis was performed by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Two separate runs were performed for positive and negative ionization in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Particular attention was devoted to extraction optimization: different sample-to-extracting volume ratios, different concentrations of formic acid in the extraction solvent and different ultrasonic extraction temperatures were tested in butter, egg and milk powder samples. The method was also applied in fish tissue samples. It was validated, on the basis of international guidelines, for all four matrices. Quantitative analysis was performed by means of standard addition calibration. For over 80% of the analytes, the recoveries were between 50% and 120% in all matrices studied, with RSD values in the range of 1-18%. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) ranged from 0.008 μg kg(-1) (oxfendazole in butter) to 3.15 μg kg(-1) (hydrochlorthiazide in egg). The evaluated method provides reliable screening, quantification, and identification of 115 veterinary drug and pharmaceutical residues in foods of animal origin and has been successfully applied in real samples.

  20. Molybdenum disulfide nanosheets coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite for highly sensitive determination of chloramphenicol in food samples milk, honey and powdered milk.

    PubMed

    Govindasamy, Mani; Chen, Shen-Ming; Mani, Veerappan; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Umamaheswari, Rajaji; Joseph Santhanaraj, K; Sathiyan, Anandaraj

    2017-01-01

    We have described a hybrid material that consists of molybdenum disulfide nanosheets (MoS2) coated on functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) for sensitive and selective determination of chloramphenicol (CAP). The MoS2/f-MWCNTs nanocomposite was successfully prepared through a hydrothermal process and its structure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The MoS2/f-MWCNTs nanocomposite holds excellent electrochemical properties and it displays excellent electrocatalytic ability to CAP. Under optimized working conditions, the nanocomposite film modified electrode responds linearly to CAP in the concentration range of 0.08-1392μM. The detection limit was obtained as 0.015μM (±0.003). The electrode has high level of selectivity in presence of large excess concentrations of interfering species. In addition, the modified electrode offers satisfactory repeatability, reproducibility and stability. The practical applicability of the electrode was demonstrated in food samples such as, milk, powdered milk and honey samples and the recoveries are agreeable which clearly revealed its practical feasibility in food analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Secretion of Human Protein C in Mouse Milk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chae-Won; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2015-01-01

    To determine the production of recombinant human protein C (rec-hPC) in milk, we created two homozygous mice lines for the goat β-casein/hPC transgene. Females and males of both lines (#10 and #11) displayed normal growth, fertility, and lactated normally. The copy number of the transgene was about fivefold higher in #10 line as compared to #11 line. mRNA expression of the transgene was only detected in the mammary glands of both lines. Furthermore, mRNA expression was fourfold higher on day 7 than on day 1 during lactation. Northern blot analysis of mRNA expression in the #10 line of transgenic (Tg) mice indicated a strong expression of the transgene in the mammary glands after seven days of lactation. Comparison of rec-hPC protein level with that of mRNA in the mammary glands showed a very similar pattern. A 52-kDa band corresponding to the hPC protein was strongly detected in mammary glands of the #10 line during lactation. We also detected two bands of heavy chain and one weak band of light chain in the milk of the #10 and #11 lines. One single band at 52 kDa was detected from CHO cells transfected with hPC cDNA. hPC was mainly localized in the alveolar epithelial cell of the mammary glands. The protein is strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of the cultured mammary gland tissue. hPC protein produced in milk ranged from 2 to 28 ng/mL. These experiments indicated that rec-hPC can be produced at high levels in mice mammary glands. PMID:25749471

  2. Bioactive Proteins in Human Milk-Potential Benefits for Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Human milk contains many bioactive proteins that are likely to be involved in the better outcomes of breast-fed infants compared with those fed infant formula. Bovine milk proteins or protein fractions may be able to provide some of these benefits and may, therefore, be used for preterm infants. Recombinant human milk proteins are likely to exert bioactivities similar to those of the native human milk proteins, but considerable research is needed before they can be used in routine care of preterm infants.

  3. Identification and quantification of bovine protein lactosylation sites in different milk products.

    PubMed

    Milkovska-Stamenova, Sanja; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-02-16

    The microbiological safety of milk is typically guaranteed by thermal treatments, such as pasteurization and ultra high temperature (UHT) treatment, whereas infant formula (IF) is often produced at even harsher conditions including a drying process. Thermal treatments have raised concerns, as they may denature proteins and initiate protein modifications. Previous studies identified already many lactosylation sites in milk and showed that the lactosylation degree of some proteins correlates to thermal treatment conditions. Here, we studied the glycation degrees of 124 lactosylation sites in 28 bovine milk proteins in raw milk, three brands of pasteurized milk, three brands of UHT milk, and five brands of IF. Whereas, the glycation degree of many lactosylation sites increased from raw milk, to pasteurized milk, UHT milk, and IF, several modification sites showed a different behavior indicating that global measures do not correctly reflect the reactivity of distinct sites. Interestingly, the glycation degrees varied considerably among the brands of UHT milk and IF indicating that specific production processes of a company have to be considered and not only the classification of milk as pasteurized or UHT. Thus, proper adjustments of the technical processes should allow reducing the lactosylation levels in both UHT milk and IF. It is well established that thermal treatment of milk triggers protein modifications, such as lactosylation of lysine residues in several proteins, although the extent of lactosylation has not been quantitatively compared for a broad panel of protein lactosylation sites among different commercial products. The current study extends previous reports by relatively quantifying 124 confirmed lactosylation sites in 28 bovine milk proteins including several low abundant proteins. Whereas, glycation is generally assumed to be an unspecific chemical reaction with the modification degrees depending on the protein and sugar concentrations, we could show

  4. [Intensity of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidative modification of goat and cow milk].

    PubMed

    Vysokogorskiĭ, V E; Gavrilova, N B; Arkhipenko, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Indices of free-radical peroxidation have been estimated: intensity of lipid per- oxidation and protein oxidative modification of goat and cow milk of specific breeds of forest-steppe zone of Omsk region. The obtained results indicate that processes of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidative destruction in goat and cow milk of different breeds occur with different gradation. The content of carbonile derivatives in goat milk of Saan breed 1.4 (0.95; 1.5) u/ml was lower than in cow's milk of black-and-white breed 4.6 (1.1; 6.0) u/ml (p = 0.005) what could be caused by large content of protein thiol groups of this kind of milk and lower quantity of amino acid residues that are available for carbonylation. This kind of milk is characterized by higher SH-group content than cow milk for 31% and Switzerland goat milk for 20% (p = 0.005). The content of cetodiens and attached triens in isopropanol phase of the lipid extract of goat milk of Swiss breed is lower by 30% than in cow milk. In isopropanol phase of the milk lipid extracts contain- ing phospholipids the level of Schiff grounding did not differ. The results obtained prove that goat milk contain less protein subjected to oxidative modification.

  5. Study of human allergic milk whey protein from different mammalian species using computational method

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Shikha Jaiprakash; KK, Appu Kuttan; Singh, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, safety and quality assessment of food used for human consumption have to consider by its possible contribution to the maintenance or improvement of the consumer's health. Milk is an important food with many nutrients. Cow milk is an important source of energy, protein, vitamins and minerals for the growing child as well as adults. But, numerous cow milk proteins have been implicated in allergic responses and most of these have been shown to contain multiple allergic epitopes. The present study disclosed best alternatives to cow milk, which are not allergic and as good as cow milk in nutritional value. The in silico analysis of casein (alpha s1, alpha s2, beta and kappa) and beta-lactoglobulin, unveils that sheep milk is a more suitable alternate to cow milk for allergic infants and buffalo milk for allergic adult humans. PMID:23275703

  6. Associations between milk protein concentration at various stages of lactation and reproductive performance in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Morton, J M; Auldist, M J; Douglas, M L; Macmillan, K L

    2016-12-01

    Milk protein concentration has been positively associated with a range of measures of reproductive performance in dairy cows. These beneficial associations are most likely due to factors affecting both milk protein concentration and reproductive performance possibly being mediated, in part, by energy balance during early lactation. However, it is likely that factors other than energy balance are also involved in these relationships. A retrospective single cohort study was conducted using subsets of data collected from 74 dairy herds with seasonal or split calving patterns. Associations between milk protein concentration at various stages of lactation and reproductive performance in Holstein dairy cows were assessed using random effects logistic regression and survival analysis with milk protein concentration during the cow's breeding period fitted as a time-varying covariate. The beneficial associations between milk protein concentration and each of the 4 selected indices for measuring reproductive performance were evident when milk protein concentration was derived for each 30-d period from calving up to 300d in milk. For the first 150d of lactation the adjusted odds ratios were highest from 31 to 60d and only slightly lower for all periods up to 150d of lactation. Estimated associations for 31 to 60d were stronger than for 0 to 30d. In addition, milk protein concentration during a cow's breeding period was positively associated with the subsequent daily hazard of conception, even after adjusting for milk protein concentration in the cow's first or second month of lactation. Milk protein concentrations from 0 to 30d of lactation were less closely correlated with concentrations measured at subsequent 30-d intervals; correlations were closer between other periods in lactation. These results indicate that the association between milk protein concentration and reproductive performance is partly due to factors other than the extent of negative energy balance in early

  7. Caries protective agents in human milk and bovine milk: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Vabitha; Hegde, Amitha M; Nandan, S; Shetty, Suchetha

    2011-01-01

    To estimate Calcium and Phosphorus withdrawal from hydroxyapatite in the presence of bovine milk and human milk from which the following protective fractions namely Casein, Whey protein, Lactose and Milk fat have been individually removed and to compare the above protective fractions in human and bovine milk. Human milk obtained from lactating mothers in the labor ward of Kshema hospital was subjected to immediate analysis. Bovine milk was obtained from a local dairy. Equal quantities of human milk and bovine milk (1 ml) were separately subjected to the systematic removal of the four milk fractions. As each fraction was removed, the remaining milk samples were subjected to testing. Powdered hydroxyapatite from human dental enamel was subjected to demineralization with the addition of the milk sample under test for 20 minutes. This mixture was then centrifuged. Aliquots of the supernatant were taken for calcium and Phosphorus analysis using photospectrometry. Ten demineralization tests were similarly carried out for every milk fraction for both human and bovine milk separately. Equal samples of whole bovine milk and whole human milk were also subjected to similar testing. The calcium and phosphorus dissolution values were higher when the individual fractions were eliminated from both human milk/enamel samples and bovine milk/enamel samples as compared to the values obtained from whole human milk/whole bovine milk/enamel samples. Further higher calcium and phosphorus dissolution values were observed when the fractions were individually and separately removed from the whole human milk/enamel samples as compared to the corresponding values obtained when these fractions were removed from bovine milk/enamel samples. The evaluated milk fraction in bovine milk namely casein, whey protein, lactose and milk fat were individually more caries protective when compared to the corresponding fractions in human milk.

  8. [Quantitative determination of the protein content of milk by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. 3. Determination of proteins in preserved milk samples].

    PubMed

    Reichardt, W; Schüler, E; Sieber, L; Schüler, E

    1987-01-01

    It is reported upon the results of the quantitative estimation of protein content from preserved milk by means of ultraviolet spectrophotometry. In addition to the preservation by boric acid, bronopol, copper sulphate, potassium dichromate and ammonium peroxodisulphate storage at temperatures below 0 degrees C and freeze drying were tested. Besides bronopol and copper sulphate especially physical preservation methods proves fit for the protein estimation by measurements of absorbance at 210 nm, 235 and 280 nm or 210 and 220 nm. It is recommended to use solutions and filters of quartz with evaluated absorbance in daily calibrating of the spectrophotometer.

  9. Differential digestion of human milk proteins in a simulated stomach model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Cundiff, Judy K; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Wickham, Martin S J; Faulks, Richard M; van Tol, Eric A F

    2014-02-07

    A key element in understanding how human milk proteins support the health and development of the neonate is to understand how individual proteins are affected during digestion. In the present study, a dynamic gastric model was used to simulate infant gastric digestion of human milk, and a subsequent proteomic approach was applied to study the behavior of individual proteins. A total of 413 human milk proteins were quantified in this study. This approach demonstrated a high degree of variability in the susceptibility of human milk proteins to gastric digestion. Specifically this study reports that lipoproteins are among the class of slowly digested proteins during gastric processes. The levels of integral lysozyme C and partial lactadherin in milk whey increase over digestion. Mucins, ribonuclease 4, and macrophage mannose receptor 1 are also resistant to gastric digestion. The retention or enhancement in whey protein abundance can be ascribed to the digestive release of milk-fat-globule-membrane or immune-cell enclosed proteins that are not initially accessible in milk. Immunoglobulins are more resistant to digestion compared to total milk proteins, and within the immunoglobulin class IgA and IgM are more resistant to digestion compared to IgG. The gastric digestion of milk proteins becomes more apparent from this study.

  10. Effect of mechanical denaturation on surface free energy of protein powders.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M; Forbes, Robert T; Blagbrough, Ian S; Conway, Barbara R

    2016-10-01

    Globular proteins are important both as therapeutic agents and excipients. However, their fragile native conformations can be denatured during pharmaceutical processing, which leads to modification of the surface energy of their powders and hence their performance. Lyophilized powders of hen egg-white lysozyme and β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae were used as models to study the effects of mechanical denaturation on the surface energies of basic and acidic protein powders, respectively. Their mechanical denaturation upon milling was confirmed by the absence of their thermal unfolding transition phases and by the changes in their secondary and tertiary structures. Inverse gas chromatography detected differences between both unprocessed protein powders and the changes induced by their mechanical denaturation. The surfaces of the acidic and basic protein powders were relatively basic, however the surface acidity of β-galactosidase was higher than that of lysozyme. Also, the surface of β-galactosidase powder had a higher dispersive energy compared to lysozyme. The mechanical denaturation decreased the dispersive energy and the basicity of the surfaces of both protein powders. The amino acid composition and molecular conformation of the proteins explained the surface energy data measured by inverse gas chromatography. The biological activity of mechanically denatured protein powders can either be reversible (lysozyme) or irreversible (β-galactosidase) upon hydration. Our surface data can be exploited to understand and predict the performance of protein powders within pharmaceutical dosage forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Milk yield and milk composition responses to change in predicted net energy and metabolizable protein: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J B; Friggens, N C; Chapoutot, P; Van Laar, H; Sauvant, D

    2016-12-01

    Using a meta-analysis of literature data, this study aimed to quantify the dry matter (DM) intake response to changes in diet composition, and milk responses (yield, milk component yields and milk composition) to changes in dietary net energy for lactation (NEL) and metabolizable protein (MP) in dairy cows. From all studies included in the database, 282 experiments (825 treatments) with experimentally induced changes in either NEL or MP content were kept for this analysis. These treatments covered a wide range of diet characteristics and therefore a large part of the plausible NEL and MP contents and supplies that can be expected in practical situations. The average MP and NEL contents were, respectively (mean±SD), 97±12 g/kg DM and 6.71±0.42 MJ/kg DM. On a daily supply basis, there were high between-experiment correlations for MP and NEL above maintenance. Therefore, supplies of MP and NEL above maintenance were, respectively, centred on MP supply for which MP efficiency into milk protein is 0.67, and NEL above maintenance supply for which the ratio of NEL milk/NEL above maintenance is 1.00 (centred variables were called MP67 and NEL100). The majority of the selected studies used groups of multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows in mid lactation, milked twice a day. Using a mixed model, between- and within-experiment variation was split to estimate DM intake and milk responses. The use of NEL100 and MP67 supplies substantially improved the accuracy of the prediction of milk yield and milk component yields responses with, on average, a 27% lower root mean square error (RMSE) relative to using dietary NEL and MP contents as predictors. For milk composition (g/kg), the average RMSE was only 3% lower on a supply basis compared with a concentration basis. Effects of NEL and MP supplies on milk yield and milk component yields responses were additive. Increasing NEL supply increases energy partitioning towards body reserve, whereas increasing MP supply increases the

  12. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-03

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a "fast" protein and caseinate (CA) as a "slow" protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP.

  13. Effects of Whey, Caseinate, or Milk Protein Ingestion on Muscle Protein Synthesis after Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Nagata, Masashi; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) is characterized as a “fast” protein and caseinate (CA) as a “slow” protein according to their digestion and absorption rates. We hypothesized that co-ingestion of milk proteins (WP and CA) may be effective for prolonging the muscle protein synthesis response compared to either protein alone. We therefore compared the effect of ingesting milk protein (MP) to either WP or CA alone on muscle protein synthesis after exercise in rats. We also compared the effects of these milk-derived proteins to a control, soy protein (SP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats swam for two hours. Immediately after exercise, one of the following four solutions was administered: WP, CA, MP, or SP. Individual rats were euthanized at designated postprandial time points and triceps muscle samples collected for measurement of the protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR). FSR tended to increase in all groups post-ingestion, although the initial peaks of FSR occurred at different times (WP, peak time = 60 min, FSR = 7.76%/day; MP, peak time = 90 min, FSR = 8.34%/day; CA, peak time = 120 min, FSR = 7.85%/day). Milk-derived proteins caused significantly greater increases (p < 0.05) in FSR compared with SP at different times (WP, 60 min; MP, 90 and 120 min; CA, 120 min). Although statistical analysis could not be performed, the calculated the area under the curve (AUC) values for FSR following this trend were: MP, 534.61; CA, 498.22; WP, 473.46; and SP, 406.18. We conclude that ingestion of MP, CA or WP causes the initial peak time in muscle protein synthesis to occur at different times (WP, fast; MP, intermediate; CA, slow) and the dairy proteins have a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis after exercise compared with SP. PMID:27271661

  14. Effect of microparticulated whey proteins on milk coagulation properties.

    PubMed

    Sturaro, A; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M; Varotto, A; De Marchi, M

    2014-11-01

    The enhancement of milk coagulation properties (MCP) and the reuse of whey produced by the dairy industry are of great interest to improve the efficiency of the cheese-making process. Native whey proteins (WP) can be aggregated and denatured to obtain colloidal microparticulated WP (MWP). The objective of this study was to assess the effect of MWP on MCP; namely, rennet coagulation time (RCT), curd-firming time, and curd firmness 30 min after rennet addition. Six concentrations of MWP (vol/vol; 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, 7.5, and 9.0%) were added to 3 bulk milk samples (collected and analyzed during 3 d), and a sample without MWP was used as control. Within each day of analysis, 6 replicates of MCP for each treatment were obtained, changing the position of the treatment in the rack. For control samples, 2 replicates per day were performed. In addition to MCP, WP fractions were measured on each treatment during the 3 d of analysis. Milk coagulation properties were measured on 144 samples by using a Formagraph (Foss Electric, Hillerød, Denmark). Increasing the amount of MWP added to milk led to a longer RCT. In particular, significant differences were found between RCT of the control samples (13.5 min) and RCT of samples with 3.0% (14.6 min) or more MWP. A similar trend was observed for curd-firming time, which was shortest in the control samples and longest in samples with 9.0% MWP (21.4 min). No significant differences were detected for curd firmness at 30 min across concentrations of MWP. Adjustments in cheese processing should be made when recycling MWP, in particular during the coagulation process, by prolonging the time of rennet activity before cutting the curd.

  15. [Therapeutic properties of proteins and peptides from colostrum and milk].

    PubMed

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta

    2005-01-01

    Colostrum and milk are rich in proteins and peptides which play a crucial role in innate immunity when transferred to the offspring and may accelerate maturation of the immune system in neonates. The immunotropic properties of these proteins prompted investigators research their potential application in prevention and therapy. Lactoferrin (LF) exhibits antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiparasitice, and antitumoral activities. It is protective with regard to intestinal epithelium, promotes bone growth, and accelerates the recovery of immune system function in immunocompromised animals. LF was tried in the treatment of hepatitis C infection and the intestinal form of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). A proline-rich polypeptide (PRP) demonstrated a variety of immunotropic functions, including the promotion of T-cell maturation and inhibition of autoimmune disorders. PRP, in the form of chewable tablets (Colostrinin) was recently found to improve or stabilize the health status of Alzheimer's disease patients. Casein and casein-derived peptides showed protective activities in enamel demineralization and as caries-preventing agents. The protein hydrolyzates were also protective in diabetic animals, reduced tumor growth, had antihypertensive activity and diminished colicky symptoms in infants. Glycomacropeptide (GMP), a peptide derived from kappa-casein, exhibited various antibacterial and antithrombotic activities. Alpha-lactalbumin (LA) demonstrated antiviral, antitumoral and anti-stress properties. LA-enriched diets were anxiolytic, lowered blood pressure in rats, prevented diarrhea, and led to a better weight gain in malnourished children. HAMLET, a complex of LA and oleic acid, was effective in patients with cutaneous papillomas. Lysozyme found application in infant formulas, the treatment of periodentitis, and the prevention of tooth decay. Milk enriched in lysozyme was used in feeding premature infants suffering from concomitant diseases. Interesting

  16. Proteomic characterization of human milk whey proteins during a twelve-month lactation period.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yalin; Alvarado, Rudy; Phinney, Brett; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2011-04-01

    Human milk is a rich source of bioactive proteins that support the early growth and development of the newborn. Although the major components of the protein fraction in human milk have been studied, the expression and relative abundance of minor components have received limited attention. We examined the expression of low-abundance proteins in the whey fraction of human milk and their dynamic changes over a twelve-month lactation period. The low-abundance proteins were enriched by ProteoMiner beads, and protein identification was performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. One hundred and fifteen proteins were identified, thirty-eight of which have not been previously reported in human colostrum or milk. We also for the first time described differences in protein patterns among the low-abundance proteins during lactation. These results enhance our knowledge about the complexity of the human milk proteome, which constitutes part of the advantages to the breast-fed infant.

  17. [Analysis of Spirulina powder by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and calculation of protein content].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Jing; Xu, Chang-Hua; Li, Wei-Ming; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Qun; Li, An; Zhao, Yue-Liang; Ha, Yi-Ming; Sun, Su-Qin

    2013-04-01

    Spirulina, Spirulina powder and dextrin standard were analyzed and identified by Infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The main components, protein (1 657 and 1 537 cm(-1)) and carbohydrate (1 069 and 1054 cm(-1)), had distinct fingerprint characteristics of IR spectra. By comparing the IR spectra of Spirulina, Spirulina powder and dextrin standard, the dominant nutrition in Spirulina powder was identified as protein and carbohydrate. The dominant accessory added in Spirulina powder was dextrin. Comparing the IR spectra of Spirulina powder from 28 different factories and figuring out the correlation provides the information about the amount of accessory. A standard curve of the ratio of absorption peak intensities to protein content was constructed to accurately determine the amount of protein in Spirulina powder.

  18. The aggregation behavior and interactions of yak milk protein under thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, T T; Guo, Z W; Liu, Z P; Feng, Q Y; Wang, X L; Tian, Q; Ren, F Z; Mao, X Y

    2016-08-01

    The aggregation behavior and interactions of yak milk protein were investigated after heat treatments. Skim yak milk was heated at temperatures in the range of 65 to 95°C for 10 min. The results showed that the whey proteins in yak milk were denatured after heat treatment, especially at temperatures higher than 85°C. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis indicated that heat treatment induced milk protein denaturation accompanied with aggregation to a certain extent. When the heating temperature was 75 and 85°C, the aggregation behavior of yak milk proteins was almost completely due to the formation of disulfide bonds, whereas denatured α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin interacted with κ-casein. When yak milk was heated at 85 and 95°C, other noncovalent interactions were found between proteins including hydrophobic interactions. The particle size distributions and microstructures demonstrated that the heat stability of yak milk proteins was significantly lowered by heat treatment. When yak milk was heated at 65 and 75°C, no obvious changes were found in the particle size distribution and microstructures in yak milk. When the temperature was 85 and 95°C, the particle size distribution shifted to larger size trend and aggregates were visible in the heated yak milk.

  19. Determination of vitamins A and E in milk powder using supercritical fluid extraction for sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Turner, C; Mathiasson, L

    2000-04-07

    A method for the analysis of the natural contents of vitamins A and E in milk powder has been developed. The method utilises supercritical fluid extraction, a miniaturised alkaline saponification procedure and reversed-phase HPLC with UV detection. Modifications of the sample matrix, combinations of static and dynamic modes of extraction and effects of changes in extraction parameters such as temperature, flow-rate, time, collection solvent and collection temperature were studied to optimise the extraction efficiency and selectivity. Supercritical CO2 at 80 degrees C and 37 MPa, modified with 5% methanol and pumped at a flow-rate of 1.0 ml/min, gave recoveries of 99 and 96% for vitamins A and E, respectively, using a 15 min static followed by a 15 min dynamic extraction. The measurements gave a within-day RSD of 4% for both vitamin A and E, and between-day RSDs of 4 and 8% for vitamins A and E, respectively.

  20. Comparison of methods for the recovery and detection of low levels of injured Salmonella in ice cream and milk powder.

    PubMed

    Baylis, C L; MacPhee, S; Betts, R P

    2000-04-01

    This study compared the ability of four rapid methods and a standard cultural method to detect low levels of heat-injured cells of Salmonella typhimurium in ice cream and skimmed milk powder. The detection of Salmonella in samples contaminated with low levels (< 10 cfu 25 g-1) was significantly greater with the novel broth method than with the other methods (P 10 cfu 25 g-1, there was no significant difference between the methods except for the novel broth method and a dipstick-based immunoassay (P

  1. Two types of radicals in whole milk powder. Effect of lactose crystallization, lipid oxidation, and browning reactions.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Marianne K; Lauridsen, Lene; Skibsted, Leif H; Risbo, Jens

    2005-03-09

    Whole milk powder was stored in closed vials at 60 degrees C to induce crystallization of lactose within a short time scale. After an induction period of 3-4 days simultaneous crystallization of lactose, increase of water activity, formation of browning products, and increase of radical content took place. Radicals detected before lactose crystallization were characterized by a narrow ESR spectrum (g = 2.006) and could be depleted by removal of oxygen and therefore were assigned to oxidation processes. Late-stage radicals present after crystallization of lactose gave much wider spectra (g = 2.0048) and were independent of oxygen availability and assigned to late-stage Maillard reaction products. The study indicates that the processes of lactose crystallization, browning, and formation of radical species (g = 2.0048) are strongly coupled, while lipid oxidation is less dependent on the other processes.

  2. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  3. Combining proteomic tools to characterize the protein fraction of llama (Lama glama) milk.

    PubMed

    Saadaoui, Besma; Bianchi, Leonardo; Henry, Céline; Miranda, Guy; Martin, Patrice; Cebo, Christelle

    2014-05-01

    Llamas belong to the Camelidae family along with camels. While dromedary camel milk has been broadly characterized, data on llama milk proteins are scarce. The objective of this study was thus to investigate the protein composition of llama milk. Skimmed llama milk proteins were first characterized by a 2D separation technique coupling RP-HPLC in the first dimension with SDS-PAGE in the second dimension (RP-HPLC/SDS-PAGE). Llama milk proteins, namely caseins (αs1 -, αs2 -, β-, and κ-caseins), α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, and serum albumin, were identified using PMF. Llama milk proteins were also characterized by online LC-ESI-MS analysis. This approach allowed attributing precise molecular masses for most of the previously MS-identified llama milk proteins. Interestingly, α-lactalbumin exhibits distinct chromatographic behaviors between llama and dromedary camel milk. De novo sequencing of the llama α-lactalbumin protein by LC coupled with MS/MS (LC-MS/MS) showed the occurrence of two amino acid substitutions (R62L/I and K89L/I) that partly explained the higher hydrophobicity of llama α-lactalbumin compared with its dromedary counterpart. Taken together, these results provide for the first time a thorough description of the protein fraction of Lama glama milk.

  4. Genotyping of present-day and historical Geobacillus species isolates from milk powders by high-resolution melt analysis of multiple variable-number tandem-repeat loci.

    PubMed

    Seale, R Brent; Dhakal, Rajat; Chauhan, Kanika; Craven, Heather M; Deeth, Hilton C; Pillidge, Christopher J; Powell, Ian B; Turner, Mark S

    2012-10-01

    Spores of thermophilic Geobacillus species are a common contaminant of milk powder worldwide due to their ability to form biofilms within processing plants. Genotyping methods can provide information regarding the source and monitoring of contamination. A new genotyping method was developed based on multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) in conjunction with high-resolution melt analysis (MLV-HRMA) and compared to the currently used method, randomized amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR). Four VNTR loci were identified and used to genotype 46 Geobacillus isolates obtained from retailed powder and samples from 2 different milk powder processing plants. These 46 isolates were differentiated into 16 different groups using MLV-HRMA (D = 0.89). In contrast, only 13 RAPD-PCR genotypes were identified among the 46 isolates (D = 0.79). This new method was then used to analyze 35 isolates obtained from powders with high spore counts (>10(4) spores · g(-1)) from a single processing plant together with 27 historical isolates obtained from powder samples processed in the same region of Australia 17 years ago. Results showed that three genotypes can coexist in a single processing run, while the same genotypes observed 17 years ago are present today. While certain genotypes could be responsible for powders with high spore counts, there was no correlation to specific genotypes being present in powder plants and retailed samples. In conclusion, the MLV-HRMA method is useful for genotyping Geobacillus spp. to provide insight into the prevalence and persistence of certain genotypes within milk powder processing plants.

  5. Comparison of the principal proteins in bovine, caprine, buffalo, equine and camel milk.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Katharina; O'Connor, Paula M; Huppertz, Thom; Ross, R Paul; Kelly, Alan L

    2012-05-01

    Proteomic analysis of bovine, caprine, buffalo, equine and camel milk highlighted significant interspecies differences. Camel milk was found to be devoid of β-lactoglobulin, whereas β-lactoglobulin was the major whey protein in bovine, buffalo, caprine, and equine milk. Five different isoforms of κ-casein were found in camel milk, analogous to the micro-heterogeneity observed for bovine κ-casein. Several spots observed in 2D-electrophoretograms of milk of all species could tentatively be identified as polypeptides arising from the enzymatic hydrolysis of caseins. The understanding gained from the proteomic comparison of these milks may be of relevance both in terms of identifying sources of hypoallergenic alternatives to bovine milk and detection of adulteration of milk samples and products.

  6. Temporal and spatial distribution of Cronobacter isolates in a milk powder processing plant determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hein, Ingeborg; Gadzov, Boris; Schoder, Dagmar; Foissy, Helmut; Malorny, Burkhard; Wagner, Martin

    2009-03-01

    A milk powder processing line was sampled for the presence of Enterobacteriaceae and the opportunistic neonatal pathogen Cronobacter at six different sampling sites during an 11-month period. The highest number of Enterobacteriaceae-positive samples was recovered from the raw milk concentrate before pasteurization (78.2%) and from nonproduct samples of the processing line (86.5%), which included swabs from the drying tower and screw conveyers, swabs from the explosion chamber, waste water after the automated cleaning-in-place procedure, air filter cut-outs, and floor samples underneath the outlet of the packaging machine. The prepackaged and packaged final product was contaminated at a rate of 6.6% and 7.1%, respectively. The prevalence of Cronobacter in the prefinal product and the prepackaged and packaged final product was 14.3%, 3.8%, and 2.1%, respectively. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of 133 Cronobacter isolates yielded 40 different PFGE profiles. Long-term persistence in the processing line of some of these PFGE profiles was observed. Comparison of the PFGE profiles recovered at different sampling sites revealed the supply air as a potential source for extrinsic Cronobacter contamination. In addition, recovery of the same PFGE profiles before and after CIP events followed by heat treatment indicated the inefficiency of these hygiene measures to completely eliminate Cronobacter from all areas of the processing line. This information provides an essential basis for developing control and prevention strategies concerning this opportunistic pathogen.

  7. Optimization of process parameters for supercritical fluid extraction of cholesterol from whole milk powder using ethanol as co-solvent.

    PubMed

    Dey Paul, Indira; Jayakumar, Chitra; Niwas Mishra, Hari

    2016-12-01

    In spite of being highly nutritious, the consumption of milk is hindered because of its high cholesterol content, which is responsible for numerous cardiac diseases. Supercritical carbon dioxide using ethanol as co-solvent was employed to extract cholesterol from whole milk powder (WMP). This study was undertaken to optimize the process parameters of supercritical fluid extraction (SCFE), viz. extraction temperature, pressure and volume of ethanol. The cholesterol content of WMP was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. The impact of the extraction conditions on the fat content (FC), solubility index (SI) and lightness (L*) of the SCFE-treated WMP were also investigated. The process parameters were optimized using response surface methodology. About 46% reduction in cholesterol was achieved at the optimized conditions of 48 °C, 17 MPa and 31 mL co-solvent; flow rate of expanded CO2 , static time and dynamic time of extraction were 6 L min(-1) , 10 min and 80 min respectively. The treated WMP retained its FC, SI, and L* at moderate limits of 183.67 g kg(-1) , 96.3% and 96.90, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of ethanol-modified SCFE of cholesterol from WMP with negligible changes in its physicochemical properties. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Detection and quantitation of pea and soy-derived proteins in calf milk replacers.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwoerd, M; Misra, V

    1989-01-01

    Preruminant calves on several farms had diarrhea nonresponsive to treatment and were doing poorly, despite being fed a high quality calf milk replacer. Because these reconstituted milk replacers always had a sediment, they were suspected of containing insoluble nonmilk-derived proteins. Microscopic examination of the milk replacer, however, did not show any evidence of starch granules. We therefore analyzed the samples by SDS PAGE. We were able to identify and quantitate pea protein in calf milk replacers in which all the protein was supposedly milk-derived. We were also able to differentiate polypeptides derived from pea and soy. We concluded that PAGE is a sensitive technique for detecting nonmilk-derived proteins in calf milk replacers.

  9. The composition and functional properties of whey protein concentrates produced from buttermilk are comparable with those of whey protein concentrates produced from skimmed milk.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Sigrid; Johansen, Anne-Grethe; Abrahamsen, Roger K; Skeie, Siv B

    2015-09-01

    The demand for whey protein is increasing in the food industry. Traditionally, whey protein concentrates (WPC) and isolates are produced from cheese whey. At present, microfiltration (MF) enables the utilization of whey from skim milk (SM) through milk protein fractionation. This study demonstrates that buttermilk (BM) can be a potential source for the production of a WPC with a comparable composition and functional properties to a WPC obtained by MF of SM. Through the production of WPC powder and a casein- and phospholipid (PL)-rich fraction by the MF of BM, sweet BM may be used in a more optimal and economical way. Sweet cream BM from industrial churning was skimmed before MF with 0.2-µm ceramic membranes at 55 to 58°C. The fractionations of BM and SM were performed under the same conditions using the same process, and the whey protein fractions from BM and SM were concentrated by ultrafiltration and diafiltration. The ultrafiltration and diafiltration was performed at 50°C using pasteurized tap water and a membrane with a 20-kDa cut-off to retain as little lactose as possible in the final WPC powders. The ultrafiltrates were subsequently spray dried, and their functional properties and chemical compositions were compared. The amounts of whey protein and PL in the WPC powder from BM (BMWPC) were comparable to the amounts found in the WPC from SM (SMWPC); however, the composition of the PL classes differed. The BMWPC contained less total protein, casein, and lactose compared with SMWPC, as well as higher contents of fat and citric acid. No difference in protein solubility was observed at pH values of 4.6 and 7.0, and the overrun was the same for BMWPC and SMWPC; however, the BMWPC made less stable foam than SMWPC.

  10. Invited review: milk protein polymorphisms in cattle: effect on animal breeding and human nutrition.

    PubMed

    Caroli, A M; Chessa, S; Erhardt, G J

    2009-11-01

    The 6 main milk proteins in cattle are encoded by highly polymorphic genes characterized by several nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations, with up to 47 protein variants identified. Such an extensive variation was used for linkage analysis with the description of the casein cluster more than 30 yr ago and has been applied to animal breeding for several years. Casein haplotype effects on productive traits have been investigated considering information on the whole casein complex. Moreover, mutations within the noncoding sequences have been shown to affect the specific protein expression and, as a consequence, milk composition and cheesemaking. Milk protein variants are also a useful tool for breed characterization, diversity, and phylogenetic studies. In addition, they are involved in various aspects of human nutrition. First, the occurrence of alleles associated with a reduced content of different caseins might be exploited for the production of milk with particular nutritional qualities; that is, hypoallergenic milk. On the other hand, the frequency of these alleles can be decreased by selection of sires using simple DNA tests, thereby increasing the casein content in milk used for cheesemaking. Furthermore, the biological activity of peptides released from milk protein digestion can be affected by amino acid exchanges or deletions resulting from gene mutations. Finally, the gene-culture coevolution between cattle milk protein genes and human lactase genes, which has been recently highlighted, is impressive proof of the nonrandom occurrence of milk protein genetic variation over the centuries.

  11. Penetration depth measurement of near-infrared hyperspectral imaging light for milk powder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The increasingly common application of near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique to the analysis of food powders has led to the need for optical characterization of samples. This study was aimed at exploring the feasibility of quantifying penetration depth of NIR hyperspectral imaging ligh...

  12. Conservative management of pediatric nephrolithiasis caused by melamine-contaminated milk powder.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Sheng-lang; Li, Jiu-hong; Chen, Lu; Bao, Zhong-xian; Zhang, Long-jiang; Li, Jia-ping; Chen, Jie-hui; Ji, Kun-mei

    2009-06-01

    In this article we report our experience with the diagnostic screening and management of children with melamine-induced nephrolithiasis. A total of 1091 children younger than 4 years who had been exposed to melamine-contaminated formula from September 17 to October 12, 2008, were screened for nephrolithiasis at the department of pediatrics at Shenzhen Nanshan Hospital in China. During the clinical examination, each patient's demographic characteristics were recorded together with the details of his or her milk-consumption profile during the contamination scare and any clinical signs of poisoning. Urinary stones were detected by B-ultrasonography, and renal status was examined by a routine urine test panel and a renal function test. When urinary stones were detected, patients were ordered to cease consumption of the suspected formula, and a conservative treatment course was adopted, including infusion of fluids, urinary alkalinization, increased water consumption, and diuresis. Of the 1091 children screened, 12 (1.1%) were diagnosed with kidney stones. They had been exposed to the contaminated milk from 1 to 24 months. Eleven (91.7%) of these 12 patients had consumed milk with a high level of melamine content (955-2563 ppm); 1 patient (8.3%) had consumed milk with a low-level melamine content (6.2-17.0 ppm). Six patients exhibited dysuria; the remaining 6 patients were asymptomatic. All 12 patients had normal renal function, although 4 had proteinuria, and 1 had hematuria. The kidney stones were resolved within 3 to 5 days of commencing treatment in all 12 cases. Nephrolithiasis was associated with high melamine-exposure levels. A combination of B-ultrasonography and urinalysis is suitable for screening for pediatric nephrolithiasis caused by melamine poisoning. The condition can be resolved with a conservative treatment approach in patients without serious clinical symptoms who have normal kidney function.

  13. Peptidomic analysis reveals proteolytic activity of kefir microorganisms on bovine milk proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Citerne, Florine; Tian, Tian; Silva, Vitor L. M.; Kalanetra, Karen M.; Frese, Steven A.; Robinson, Randall C.; Mills, David A.; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Scope The microorganisms that make up kefir grains are well known for lactose fermentation, but the extent to which they hydrolyze and consume milk proteins remains poorly understood. Peptidomics technologies were used to examine the proteolytic activity of kefir grains on bovine milk proteins. Methods and results Gel electrophoresis revealed substantial digestion of milk proteins by kefir grains, with mass spectrometric analysis showing the release of 609 protein fragments and alteration of the abundance of >1,500 peptides that derived from 27 milk proteins. Kefir contained 25 peptides identified from the literature as having biological activity, including those with antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, opioid and anti-oxidative functions. 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenomic sequencing identified the principle taxa in the culture as Lactobacillus species. Conclusion The model kefir sample contained thousands of protein fragments released in part by kefir microorganisms and in part by native milk proteases. PMID:26616950

  14. Peptidomic analysis reveals proteolytic activity of kefir microorganisms on bovine milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Dallas, David C; Citerne, Florine; Tian, Tian; Silva, Vitor L M; Kalanetra, Karen M; Frese, Steven A; Robinson, Randall C; Mills, David A; Barile, Daniela

    2016-04-15

    The microorganisms that make up kefir grains are well known for lactose fermentation, but the extent to which they hydrolyze and consume milk proteins remains poorly understood. Peptidomics technologies were used to examine the proteolytic activity of kefir grains on bovine milk proteins. Gel electrophoresis revealed substantial digestion of milk proteins by kefir grains, with mass spectrometric analysis showing the release of 609 protein fragments and alteration of the abundance of >1500 peptides that derived from 27 milk proteins. Kefir contained 25 peptides identified from the literature as having biological activity, including those with antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, opioid and anti-oxidative functions. 16S rRNA and shotgun metagenomic sequencing identified the principle taxa in the culture as Lactobacillus species. The model kefir sample contained thousands of protein fragments released in part by kefir microorganisms and in part by native milk proteases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of functional properties of 34% and 80% whey protein and milk serum protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Luck, P J; Vardhanabhuti, B; Yong, Y H; Laundon, T; Barbano, D M; Foegeding, E A

    2013-09-01

    This study compared the functional properties of serum protein concentrate (SPC) with whey protein concentrate (WPC) made from the same milk and with commercial WPC. The experimental SPC and WPC were produced at 34% or 80% protein from the same lot of milk. Protein contents of WPC and SPC were comparable; however, fat content was much lower in SPC compared with WPC and commercial WPC. The effect of drying methods (freeze vs. spray drying) was studied for 34% WPC and SPC. Few differences due to drying method were found in turbidity and gelation; however, drying method made a large difference in foam formation for WPC but not SPC. Between pH 3 and 7, SPC was found to have lower turbidity than WPC; however, protein solubility was similar between SPC and WPC. Foaming and gelation properties of SPC were better than those of WPC. Differences in functional properties may be explained by differences in composition and extent of denaturation or aggregation.

  16. Immunological studies in cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, M; Iyngkaran, N

    1981-01-01

    55 infants, aged between 1 and 13 months, who presented with persistent diarrhoea were placed on a diet free of cows' milk protein. The clinical condition of the infants improved and 6-8 weeks later each was challenged with low-lactose cows' milk. The following investigations were performed before and 24 hours after provocation: jejunal biopsy, serum and duodenal juice levels of complement C3 and C4, C3-activator, and immunoglobulins A, G, M, and D. Three groups were recognised on postchallenge clinical symptoms together with histological changes in the jejunal mucosa: group 1 (n=10 infants) with no clinical or mucosal abnormality, group 2 (n=18 infants) with mucosal abnormalities but lacking clinical symptoms, and group 3 (n=27 infants) with mucosal abnormalities and clinical symptoms; but in group 3 symptoms were delayed for over 24 hours in 7 infants, and in the remaining 20 infants symptoms appeared within 24 hours. After provocation the serum IgG levels were decreased in 3 infants in group 1, 12 in group 2, and 17 in group 3. The mean serum IgA and IgM levels were higher in group 1 compared with group 2 or 3; pre- and postchallenge mean serum immunoglobulin levels, complement, and complement activator levels were of equal magnitude in all three groups. A depletion of serum complement C3 level was observed in 4 (group 1), 4 (group 2), and 13 (group 3) infants 24 hours after provocation with cows' milk; the fall in serum IgG was often associated with depletion of complement in serum. This suggests the involvement in some infants of IgG-mediated complement-consuming immune reactions in the development of the damage in the intestinal mucosa. After challenge, exudation of IgG and IgA occurred irrespective of the presence or absence of mucosal damage and was not always associated with the decrease in serum IgG concentration. Because of the variable conditions present in the intestinal lumen it is suggested that the level of immunoglobulins in duodenal juice is not a

  17. Cheese production using kefir culture entrapped in milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Dimitrellou, Dimitra; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Koutinas, Athanasios A; Kanellaki, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of kefir culture entrapped in casein and in whey protein as starter cultures for the production of Feta-type cheese. Microbiological analysis showed that counts of enterobacteria, coliforms, and staphylococci were significantly reduced due to kefir culture. In addition, the effect of kefir culture on the formation of volatile compounds, such as esters, organic acids, alcohols, carbonyl compounds, and lactones, was also investigated using the SPME GC/MS technique. Cheese samples produced with kefir culture entrapped in milk proteins presented improved profile of aroma-related compounds. Principal component analysis of the results indicated that the volatile composition of the different cheese types was dependent on the nature of the starter culture. Finally, the sensory evaluation showed that the products produced with kefir culture had a soft, fine taste, and were of improved quality.

  18. Novel methods to study the effect of protein content and dissolution temperature on the solubility of milk protein concentrate: Focused beam reflectance and ultrasonic flaw detector-based methods.

    PubMed

    Hauser, M; Amamcharla, J K

    2016-05-01

    Processing, storage, dissolution conditions, and the composition of milk protein concentrates (MPC) affect the solubility of high-protein dairy powders. Increasing the storage temperature and time decrease the solubility of MPC and milk protein isolates (MPI). The MPC and MPI are popular ingredients in high-protein food products and have a variety of protein contents. In addition, the dissolution temperature has been shown to affect the solubility of the powders. This study focused on determining how protein content and dissolution temperature affect the solubility of MPC and MPI. For this study, 11 powders were obtained from a commercial manufacturer. The powders were classified as A, B, C, and D, and they had a mean protein content of 85, 87, 88, and 90%, respectively. A 5% (wt/wt) concentration of powder was dissolved in water at 40 and 48°C. The solubility of the MPC and MPI samples were characterized using an ultrasonic flaw detector (UFD) and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM). The UFD and FBRM data were collected every 15 and 10 s, respectively, for 1,800 s. At both dissolution temperatures, the UFD and FBRM data showed that the solubility decreased as the protein content increased. Powders A and B were found to be more soluble because they had a lower relative velocity standard deviation, high area under the attenuation curve, high peak height, and low peak time. With the FBRM, the fine and medium particle count decreased and large particle count increased as the protein content increased. Powders dissolved at 48°C typically had a lower relative velocity standard deviation, higher area under the attenuation curve, higher peak height, and lower peak time than the powders dissolved at 40°C. The FBRM showed that powders dissolved at 48°C reached a stable counts before the powders dissolved at 40°C. Overall, the study showed that increasing the protein content led to a reduction in solubility and increasing the dissolution temperature improved the

  19. Determination of Protein Content by NIR Spectroscopy in Protein Powder Mix Products.

    PubMed

    Ingle, Prashant D; Christian, Roney; Purohit, Piyush; Zarraga, Veronica; Handley, Erica; Freel, Keith; Abdo, Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Protein is a principal component in commonly used dietary supplements and health food products. The analysis of these products, within the consumer package form, is of critical importance for the purpose of ensuring quality and supporting label claims. A rapid test method was developed using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy as a compliment to current protein determination by the Dumas combustion method. The NIR method was found to be a rapid, low-cost, and green (no use of chemicals and reagents) complimentary technique. The protein powder samples analyzed in this study were in the range of 22-90% protein. The samples were prepared as mixtures of soy protein, whey protein, and silicon dioxide ingredients, which are common in commercially sold protein powder drink-mix products in the market. A NIR regression model was developed with 17 samples within the constituent range and was validated with 20 independent samples of known protein levels (85-88%). The results show that the NIR method is capable of predicting the protein content with a bias of ±2% and a maximum bias of 3% between NIR and the external Dumas method.

  20. Analysis of polymorphisms in milk proteins from cloned and sexually reproduced goats.

    PubMed

    Xing, H; Shao, B; Gu, Y Y; Yuan, Y G; Zhang, T; Zang, J; Cheng, Y

    2015-12-08

    This study evaluates the relationship between the genotype and milk protein components in goats. Milk samples were collected from cloned goats and normal white goats during different postpartum (or abortion) phases. Two cloned goats, originated from the same somatic line of goat mammary gland epithelial cells, and three sexually reproduced normal white goats with no genetic relationships were used as the control. The goats were phylogenetically analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The milk protein components were identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results indicated that despite the genetic fingerprints being identical, the milk protein composition differed between the two cloned goats. The casein content of cloned goat C-50 was significantly higher than that of cloned goat C-4. Conversely, although the genetic fingerprints of the normal white goats N-1, N-2, and N-3 were not identical, the milk protein profiles did not differ significantly in their milk samples (obtained on postpartum day 15, 20, 25, 30, and 150). These results indicated an association between milk protein phenotypes and genetic polymorphisms, epigenetic regulation, and/or non-chromosomal factors. This study extends the knowledge of goat milk protein polymorphisms, and provides new strategies for the breeding of high milk-yielding goats.

  1. Effect of summer season on milk protein fractions in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Bernabucci, U; Basiricò, L; Morera, P; Dipasquale, D; Vitali, A; Piccioli Cappelli, F; Calamari, L

    2015-03-01

    Milk characteristics are affected by heat stress, but very little information is available on changes of milk protein fractions and their relationship with cheesemaking properties of milk. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of hot season on milk protein fractions and cheesemaking properties of milk for Grana Padano cheese production. The study was carried out in a dairy farm with a cheese factory for transforming the milk to Grana Padano cheese. The study was carried out from June 2012 to May 2013. Temperature and relative humidity of the inside barn were recorded daily during the study period using 8 electronic data loggers programmed to record every 30 min. Constant managerial conditions were maintained during the experimental periods. During the experimental period, feed and diet characteristics, milk yield, and milk characteristics were recorded in summer (from June 29 to July 27, 2012), winter (from January 25 to March 8, 2013), and spring (from May 17 to May 31, 2013). Milk yield was recorded and individual milk samples were taken from 25 cows selected in each season during the p.m. milking. Content of fat, proteins, caseins (CN), lactose and somatic cell count (SCC), titratable acidity, and milk rennet coagulation properties were determined on fresh samples. Milk protein fraction concentrations were determined by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. Data were tested for nonnormality by the Shapiro-Wilk test. In case of nonnormality, parameters were normalized by log or exponential transformation. The data were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA using a mixed model procedure. For all the main milk components (fat, protein, total solids, and solids-not-fat), the lowest values were observed in the summer and the greatest values were observed in the winter. Casein fractions, with the exception of γ-CN, showed the lowest values in the summer and the greatest values in the winter. The content of IgG and serum albumin was greater in summer

  2. Effects of enzymatic dephosphorylation on infant in vitro gastrointestinal digestibility of milk protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dasong; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Yun; Hu, Jinhua; Lu, Naiyan; Regenstein, Joe M; Wang, Miao; Zhou, Peng

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the effects of dephosphorylation extent on infant in vitro gastric clotting property and gastrointestinal digestibility of milk protein concentrate. Dephosphorylation was affected by phosphatase type and incubation pH. A series of milk protein concentrate with 0-69% dephosphorylation were obtained by incubation with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase at pH 6.5 for 0-420 min. Both β- and αs1-caseins in the modified milk protein concentrate showed multiply dephosphorylated isoforms with different numbers of phosphate groups depending on the extent of dephosphorylation. With increased dephosphorylation of milk protein concentrate, the gastric clotting extent decreased and the gastrointestinal digestibility increased under infant in vitro conditions. These results suggested the potential of developing a dephosphorylated milk protein concentrate, with improved gastric clotting property and gastrointestinal digestibility, to simulate the multiply phosphorylated patterns of human casein and hence to further the humanization of infant formula on a molecular level.

  3. [Powdered milk enriched with iron and ascorbic acid as an intervention measure for treating iron deficiency anemia in children seen at a Basic Health Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Torres, M A; Sato, K; Juliano, Y; Queiroz, S de S

    1996-06-01

    This study was undertaken to verify the influence of the use of iron and Vitamin C fortified powdered whole milk on the hemoglobin levels of 238 children, aged 6 to 18 months, seen at a Basic Health Care Unit in the State of São Paulo. The powdered milk was fortified with 9 mg of iron (ferrous sulfate) and 65 mg of Vitamin C for each 100 g of powder. 4 kg/month were distributed to children under one year and 2 kg/month to those over one year of age. Clinical, anthropometric and hematological (hemoglobin level measurements) evaluations were performed at the onset of the study and at three month intervals after the beginning of the supplementation. At the end of the trial, there was still enough milk available to extend the intervention for a group of 39 children who had presented the worst evolution in the first six months. At the onset of the study, 72.6% of the children presented anemia. After 3 and 6 months, these percentages had decreased to 38.9% and 18.5%, respectively. Among the children that were followed-up for 9 months, their were only 2.5% who presented anemia at the end of the intervention. The highest prevalences were found in the 6 to 12 months age group and the best results in the 10 to 18 month group. There was intrafamilial dilution of the milk in 30.7% of the cases. With or without intrafamilial milk sharing, there were significant decreases in anemia occurrences with no differences between the two groups. The use of fortified milk did not affect the children nutritional condition. This study permitted the conclusion that the fortification of foodstuffs, besides being the method of election for the prevention of iron deficiency, is an excellent alternative for the treatment of and recovery from iron deficient anemia in children under two years of age.

  4. Good tolerance to goat's milk in patients with recurrent aphthous ulcers with increased immunoreactivity to cow's milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Besu, Irina; Jankovic, Ljiljana; Konic-Ristic, Aleksandra; Damjanovic, Ana; Besu, Valeri; Juranic, Zorica

    2013-08-01

    Recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAU) represent a very common, but poorly understood mucosal disorder. The connection between immunity to cow's milk proteins (CMP) and oral diseases was noted earlier. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of the increased levels of serum antibodies to goat's milk proteins (GMP), by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test, in subjects who have RAU and proven increased immunity to CMP. Fifty subjects with RAU (36 with proven increased immunity to CMP and 14 without this increased immunity) were included in this research. Levels of serum IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies to the same quantity of the examined antigens were determined by ELISA. The statistical analysis of data was performed by Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Mann-Whitney test. The levels of serum antifresh cow's milk IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies were significantly higher than the levels of serum antifresh goat's milk, in subjects with RAU with proven increased immunoreactivity to CMP (P = 0.0003; P < 0.0001; P < 0.0001). These results indicate that patients with RAU with increased immunity to CMP could consider the use of goat's milk as the alternative protein source. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Milk protein profiles in response to Streptococcus agalactiae subclinical mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Pongthaisong, Pongphol; Katawatin, Suporn; Thamrongyoswittayakul, Chaiyapas; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the milk protein profiles of normal milk and those of milk during the course of subclinical mastitis, caused by natural Streptococcus agalactiae infection. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry were used to assess protein profiles and to identify the proteins. The results showed that S. agalactiae subclinical mastitis altered the protein profiles of milk. Following Mascot database matching, 11 and 12 protein types were identified in the milk collected from healthy and S. agalactiae subclinical mastitic udders, respectively. The distinct presence of the antibacterial protein cathelicidin-1 was detected in infected milk samples, which in turn was highly correlated to the severity of subclinical mastitis as represented by the milk somatic cell count (r = 0.616), but not the bacterial count. The protein profile of milk reveals changes in the host response to S. agalactiae intramammary infection; cathelicidin-1 could therefore serve as a biomarker for the detection of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows.

  6. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of the human milk proteome: contribution of protein fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mangé, A; Bellet, V; Tuaillon, E; Van de Perre, P; Solassol, J

    2008-12-15

    In-depth analysis of the milk proteome by mass spectrometry is challenged by the presence of few high-abundance proteins that interfere with the detection of lower-abundance proteins. Here, we evaluated the proteomic analysis of milk samples following a strong anion exchange fractionation procedure using denaturating conditions ensuring the disruption of protein-protein interactions. Crude whey or skim milk and their different resulting fractions were analyzed by protein chip array mass spectrometry. Using protein chip array mass spectrometry, several high-abundance proteins were localized in distinct fractions increasing the total number of unique peptides and proteins detected. This total number increased by about 20-30% by combining different chromatographic surface arrays used for capture. Reproducible results were obtained in human skim milk and whey; however this approach was not successful with milk fat globule membrane and required refinement. Hence, milk profiling by anion exchange fractionation combined to protein chip array mass spectrometry represents a promising tool to detect unknown low-abundance milk proteins that may ultimately prove useful as biomarkers of diseases transmitted by breastfeeding.

  7. Rapid enrichment of bioactive milk proteins and iterative, consolidated protein identification by multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Panchaud, Alexandre; Kussmann, Martin; Affolter, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Direct injection of complex protein mixtures, e.g. those derived from crude biological fluids, is often incompatible with conventional LC supports, because of column clogging and rapid deterioration of chromatographic performance. In this paper, we report the use of restricted access media to rapidly enrich and fractionate human breast milk. This resin, combining size exclusion and anion exchange functionalities, yielded a fraction enriched in soluble CD14 and showing specific sCD14-dependant activity. This fraction was split into five aliquots, which were individually characterized using multidimensional protein identification technology. Reproducibility of the results was addressed by analysing and comparing five datasets using different protein identification tools available within the Sequest software. Furthermore, a comparison of three major releases of the Ensembl human protein database was performed to examine the effect of database updates on our results. We report here the benefit of repeated analysis of aliquots of the same fraction: first to increase the confidence in peptide identification by repeated confirmation in several aliquots; and second to assess experimental reproducibility. We demonstrate furthermore the effect of database modifications on the results and the importance of constantly re-analysing data with new releases to keep them consistent and up to date with the latest protein identities and predictions available.

  8. Role of intestinal brush border peptidases in the simulated digestion of milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Picariello, Gianluca; Miralles, Beatriz; Mamone, Gianfranco; Sánchez-Rivera, Laura; Recio, Isidra; Addeo, Francesco; Ferranti, Pasquale

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of the "often neglected" intestinal brush border membranes (BBMs) hydrolases on dietary peptides, exploring the possibility that the disintegration of proteins progressed in the small intestine up to a "core" of intrinsically stable oligopeptides, persisting independently on the up-stream breakdown. Samples of sodium caseinate, skim milk powder, and whey protein isolate were submitted to in vitro simulated gastropancreatic digestion using two different procedures: (i) a simplified model involving the main compartmental specific proteases; (ii) a static digestion method based on a frameset of parameters inferred from in vivo. The gastroduodenal digesta were further hydrolyzed with peptidases from porcine jejunal BBM. The peptidomes arising from the two digestion models, characterized by combined HPLC and MS techniques, differed to some extent. However, only specific protein domains survived digestion, among which are potential bioactive or immunogenic (food allergy) peptides. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) after BBM digestion (70-77%) practically did not differ between the digestion models and significantly increased the DH after duodenal steps. Any in vitro digestion model should be supplemented with a jejunal phase to realistically determine the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of dietary peptides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Rapid extraction of melamine in powdered milk for direct electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Elisângela do Carmo; Tireli, Aline Auxiliadora; Nunes, Cleiton Antonio; Batista, Alexandre Vieira; Guerreiro, Mário César; Pinto, Sandra Maria

    2015-01-01

    A combination of a simple pretreatment for melamine extraction and direct analysis in electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) is proposed. Three pretreatments were evaluated. The first was based on suppressing interference using acetonitrile. The second used sulphuric acid and trichloroacetic acid to suppress interference and for melamine extraction, respectively. The third used sulphuric acid to suppress milk interference, trichloroacetic acid for melamine precipitation, and ethyl acetate for melamine extraction. However, only the last pretreatment suppressed milk interference in melamine detection and a good linearity (R(2)=0.99) was obtained. The presence of MS/MS 85 on melamine fragmentation spectrum showed the selectivity of this method. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.269 µg L(-1) and 0.897 µg L(-1), respectively. The recoveries and relative standard deviation (RDS) of method were lower than 114% and 7.86%, respectively. Further, the research was extended to elucidate the nature of the melamine in the extract through infrared spectroscopy and microscopy analyses. The precipitate was characterized as melaminium bis(trichloroacetate) dihydrate, which is generated through hydrogen bound formation in an interaction between melamine and trichloroacetic acid. Therefore, a simple, fast, and easy method for melamine extraction and direct ESI-MS/MS analysis was developed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The distribution of environmental contaminants and pharmaceuticals among skim milk, milk fat, curd, whey, and milk protein fractions through milk processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twenty-seven environmental contaminants and pharmaceuticals encompassing a wide range of physicochemical properties were utilized to determine the effects of milk processing on xenobiotic distribution among milk fractions. Target compounds included radiolabeled antibiotics [ciprofloxacin (CIPR), cl...

  11. Breast milk jaundice: in vitro inhibition of rat liver bilirubin-uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase activity and Z protein-bromosulfophthalein binding by human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Foliot, A; Ploussard, J P; Housset, E; Christoforov

    1976-06-01

    Twenty-four samples of breast milk from nine mothers of infants suffering from breast milk jaundice were studied. Eight samples of milk from mothers of nonjaundiced infants, along with five formula milks enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids, served as controls. Milks from mothers with jaundiced infants had no inhibitory effect when assayed immediately after thawing. However, after these milk samples were stores at 4 degrees, they strongly inhibited bilirubin conjugation (80.3% inhibition of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT) activity) and bromosulfophthalein (BSP) binding to cytoplasmic Z protein (dye binding inhibited 82.1%). There was no effect on BSP binding to Y protein (see Table 1). Heating the milk to 56 degrees modified the results in the following manner; when the milk was heated immediately after thawing, no inhibitory effect was seen, even after storage for 96 hr. On the other hand, when the milk was first stored at 96 hr and then heated, it had the same inhibitory effects as the milks which were stored without heating. The present study shows that pathologic breast milk will inhibit BSP-Z protein binding only when stored under conditions that also cause the appearance of the capacity to inhibit bilirubin conjugation in vitro, as well as causing the liberation of nonesterified fatty acids. Thus, the appearance of this inhibitory capacity in vitro seems linked to the lipolytic activity particular to pathologic milks.

  12. Melamine detection by mid- and near-infrared (MIR/NIR) spectroscopy: a quick and sensitive method for dairy products analysis including liquid milk, infant formula, and milk powder.

    PubMed

    Balabin, Roman M; Smirnov, Sergey V

    2011-07-15

    Melamine (2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine) is a nitrogen-rich chemical implicated in the pet and human food recalls and in the global food safety scares involving milk products. Due to the serious health concerns associated with melamine consumption and the extensive scope of affected products, rapid and sensitive methods to detect melamine's presence are essential. We propose the use of spectroscopy data-produced by near-infrared (near-IR/NIR) and mid-infrared (mid-IR/MIR) spectroscopies, in particular-for melamine detection in complex dairy matrixes. None of the up-to-date reported IR-based methods for melamine detection has unambiguously shown its wide applicability to different dairy products as well as limit of detection (LOD) below 1 ppm on independent sample set. It was found that infrared spectroscopy is an effective tool to detect melamine in dairy products, such as infant formula, milk powder, or liquid milk. ALOD below 1 ppm (0.76±0.11 ppm) can be reached if a correct spectrum preprocessing (pretreatment) technique and a correct multivariate (MDA) algorithm-partial least squares regression (PLS), polynomial PLS (Poly-PLS), artificial neural network (ANN), support vector regression (SVR), or least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM)-are used for spectrum analysis. The relationship between MIR/NIR spectrum of milk products and melamine content is nonlinear. Thus, nonlinear regression methods are needed to correctly predict the triazine-derivative content of milk products. It can be concluded that mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy can be regarded as a quick, sensitive, robust, and low-cost method for liquid milk, infant formula, and milk powder analysis.

  13. Milk protein composition and stability changes affected by iron in water sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aili; Duncan, Susan E; Knowlton, Katharine F; Ray, William K; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2016-06-01

    Water makes up more than 80% of the total weight of milk. However, the influence of water chemistry on the milk proteome has not been extensively studied. The objective was to evaluate interaction of water-sourced iron (low, medium, and high levels) on milk proteome and implications on milk oxidative state and mineral content. Protein composition, oxidative stability, and mineral composition of milk were investigated under conditions of iron ingestion through bovine drinking water (infused) as well as direct iron addition to commercial milk in 2 studies. Four ruminally cannulated cows each received aqueous infusions (based on water consumption of 100L) of 0, 2, 5, and 12.5mg/L Fe(2+) as ferrous lactate, resulting in doses of 0, 200, 500 or 1,250mg of Fe/d, in a 4×4Latin square design for a 14-d period. For comparison, ferrous sulfate solution was directly added into commercial retail milk at the same concentrations: control (0mg of Fe/L), low (2mg of Fe/L), medium (5mg of Fe/L), and high (12.5mg of Fe/L). Two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis was applied to characterize milk protein composition. Oxidative stability of milk was evaluated by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay for malondialdehyde, and mineral content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For milk from both abomasal infusion of ferrous lactate and direct addition of ferrous sulfate, an iron concentration as low as 2mg of Fe/L was able to cause oxidative stress in dairy cattle and infused milk, respectively. Abomasal infusion affected both caseins and whey proteins in the milk, whereas direct addition mainly influenced caseins. Although abomasal iron infusion did not significantly affect oxidation state and mineral balance (except iron), it induced oxidized off-flavor and partial degradation of whey proteins. Direct

  14. Effects of temperature and supplementation with skim milk powder on microbial and proteolytic properties during storage of cottage cheese.

    PubMed

    Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Hyun Ah; Myung, Jae Hee; Joung, Jae Yeon; Lee, Ji Young; Shin, Yong Kook; Baick, Seung Chun

    2014-06-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of temperature and supplementation with skim milk powder (SMP) on the microbial and proteolytic properties during the storage of cottage cheese. Cottage cheese was manufactured using skim milk with 2% SMP and without SMP as the control, and then stored at 5°C or 12°C during 28 days. The chemical composition of the cottage cheese and the survival of the cheese microbiota containing starter lactic acid bacteria (SLAB) and non-starter culture lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) were evaluated. In addition, changes in the concentration of lactose and lactic acid were analyzed, and proteolysis was evaluated through the measurement of acid soluble nitrogen (ASN) and nonprotein nitrogen (NPN), as well as electrophoresis profile analysis. The counts of SLAB and NSLAB increased through the addition of SMP and with a higher storage temperature (12°C), which coincided with the results of the lactose decrease and lactic acid production. Collaborating with these microbial changes, of the end of storage for 28 days, the level of ASN in samples at 12°C was higher than those at 5°C. The NPN content was also progressively increased in all samples stored at 12°C. Taken together, the rate of SLAB and NSLAB proliferation during storage at 12°C was higher than at 5°C, and consequently it led to increased proteolysis in the cottage cheese during storage. However, it was relatively less affected by SMP fortification. These findings indicated that the storage temperature is the important factor for the quality of commercial cottage cheese.

  15. Health-promoting properties of bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins in infant food: a review.

    PubMed

    Raikos, Vassilios; Dassios, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    Milk proteins have attracted extensive interest in terms of their bioavailability following ingestion. Enzymatic digestion of dairy products generates numerous peptides with various biological activities. Both human milk and infant formulas based on cow's milk are potential sources of bioactive peptides. This review aims to present current knowledge on the formation and fate of bioactive peptides from milk feeds intended for infants. Emphasis is placed on the source of the bioactive peptides with the nutritional impact of human milk and cow milk-based formulas on infant health being critically discussed from that perspective. Furthermore, the effect of processing and in vitro or in vivo digestion on the release and availability of peptides with bioactive sequences is evaluated. Considerable differences with respect to bioavailability and metabolic effects between the biologically active fragments generated following ingestion of human milk and infant formulas are documented. Peptides from milk protein of bovine origin could be a valuable supplement to human milk as multiple health-promoting properties are attributed to peptide fractions identified in standard cow milk-based infant formulas.

  16. Cooling causes changes in the distribution of lipoprotein lipase and milk fat globule membrane proteins between the skim milk and cream phase.

    PubMed

    Dickow, J A; Larsen, L B; Hammershøj, M; Wiking, L

    2011-02-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity and free fatty acid levels were studied in freshly milked, uncooled milk from individual Danish Holstein or Jersey cows, or after storage for up to 24h at either a cooling temperature (4°C) or at the milking temperature (31°C). Upon cooling for up to 24h, LPL activity increased in the cream phase, whereas the activity in the skim milk was steady, as observed for Jersey cows, or increased, as seen for the Holsteins. Storage at 31°C decreased the LPL activity in both the cream phase and the skim milk phase. The increase in free fatty acid levels was found to depend on LPL activity, incubation temperature, substrate availability, and incubation time. Furthermore, the migration of milk proteins between the skim milk phase and the cream phase upon cooling of milk from Jersey cows or from Danish Holstein cows was studied using proteomic methods involving 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Proteins associated with the milk fat globules were isolated from all milk fractions and analyzed. Major changes in the distributions of proteins between the skim milk phase and the cream phase were observed after cooling at 4°C for 4h, where a total of 29 proteins between the 2 breeds was found to change their association with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) significantly. Among these, the MFGM proteins adipophilin, fatty acid-binding protein, and lactadherin, as well as the non-MFGM proteins β-casein, lactoferrin, and heat shock protein-71, were identified. Adipophilin, lactadherin, and lactoferrin were quantitatively more associated with the MFGM upon cold storage at 4°C, whereas β-casein, fatty acid-binding protein, and heat shock protein-71 were found to be less associated with the MFGM upon cold storage.

  17. Effect of increasing amounts of milk replacer powder added to whole milk on postweaning performance, reproduction, glucose metabolism, and mammary fat pad in dairy heifers.

    PubMed

    Lage, C F A; Azevedo, R A; Machado, F S; Campos, M M; Pereira, L G R; Tomich, T R; Carvalho, B C; Alves, B R C; Santos, G B; Brandão, F Z; Coelho, S G

    2017-09-06

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing the total solids (TS) content of liquid feed, by adding increasing amounts of milk replacer powder to whole milk, on age at puberty and postweaning performance, glucose metabolism, and mammary fat pad of dairy heifers. Crossbreed Holstein × Gyr heifers (n = 58) were distributed into 4 different treatments during the preweaning period. Treatments consisted of liquid feeds with TS content of 12.5 (actual TS = 13.5 ± 0.53%; n = 15), 15.0 (actual TS = 16.1 ± 0.03%; n = 15), 17.5 (actual TS = 18.2 ± 0.14%; n = 13), or 20.0% (actual TS = 20.4 ± 0.24%; n = 15), which were provided up to 59 d old. From 60 to 89 d old, the animals received the same starter offered during the preweaning period in addition to corn silage ad libitum starting at 70 d old. From 90 to 104 d old, the animals were adapted to a total mixed ration. At 105 d old, the animals were distributed in 4 paddocks equipped with electronic feed and water bins and were fed the same total mixed ration ad libitum. A period of adaptation to the electronic feed bins occurred from 105 to 119 d old. Feed and water intake and body weight and body frame development were assessed until puberty. Mammary gland evaluations were performed monthly by ultrasonography from 120 d of age until puberty onset. Puberty onset was determined as plasma progesterone concentration greater than 1 ng/mL in 2 consecutive samples collected 7 d apart. The date of puberty onset was recorded as the collection day of the first of these samples. A glucose tolerance test was performed at 280 d of age. The increased TS content of the liquid feed fed during the preweaning period did not affect dry matter intake, performance, age at puberty, glucose metabolism, or mammary gland fat pad at later stages of rearing process. Conversely, hip width and heart girth increased linearly up to 150 and 240 d of age, respectively, as a result of the increased TS concentration of the liquid feed

  18. Changes in the surface protein of the fat globules during homogenization and heat treatment of concentrated milk.

    PubMed

    Ye, Aiqian; Anema, Skelte G; Singh, Harjinder

    2008-08-01

    The changes in milk fat globules and fat globule surface proteins of both low-preheated and high-preheated concentrated milks, which were homogenized at low or high pressure, were examined. The average fat globule size decreased with increasing homogenization pressure. The total surface protein (mg m-2) of concentrated milk increased after homogenization, the extent of the increase being dependent on the temperature and the pressure of homogenization, as well as on the preheat treatment. The concentrates obtained from high-preheated milks had higher surface protein concentration than the concentrates obtained from low-preheated milks after homogenization. Concentrated milks heat treated at 79 degrees C either before or after homogenization had greater amounts of fat globule surface protein than concentrated milks heat treated at 50 or 65 degrees C. This was attributed to the association of whey protein with the native MFGM (milk fat globule membrane) proteins and the adsorbed skim milk proteins. Also, at the same homogenization temperature and pressure, the amount of whey protein on the fat globule surface of the concentrated milk that was heated after homogenization was greater than that of the concentrated milk that was heated before homogenization. The amounts of the major native MFGM proteins did not change during homogenization, indicating that the skim milk proteins did not displace the native MFGM proteins but adsorbed on to the newly formed surface.

  19. Minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy in preschool age children with kidney calculi (including stones induced by melamine-contaminated milk powder).

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang; Al-Hayek, Samih; Gan, Weidong; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xiaogong; Guo, Hongqian

    2012-10-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PCNL) using ureteroscope and pneumatic intracorporeal lithotripsy in preschool age children with kidney calculi. We studied 27 renal units in 20 patients of preschool age (≤ 6 years) who underwent mini-PCNL at our institute. The mean age was 42.6 months (range 14-68 months). The average stone burden was 1.85 cm (range 0.9-2.8 cm). Eight patients aged 14 to 58 months had been exposed to melamine-tainted powdered formula. The mini-PCNL was performed with an X-ray-guided peripheral puncture. Minimal tract dilatation was undertaken to fit a 14-16 Fr peel-away sheath. Ureteroscope and pneumatic intracorporeal lithotripsy were used to fragment the stones. Complete clearance was achieved in 23 renal units (85.2 %) with mini-PCNL monotherapy. This has increased to 92.6 % after adjunctive ESWL. The average fall in hemoglobin was 1.28 g/dL. None of the patients required blood transfusion. The median length of hospital stay was 8.2 days. Patients were followed up every 6 months for 2 years. There has been only one recurrence of stone and no long-term complications. Mini-PCNL is a effective treatment for pediatric kidney stones refractory to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, including stones induced by melamine-contaminated milk powder. The "mini-PCNL" technique, which uses ureteroscope and pneumatic intracorporeal lithotripsy, is a safe and feasible modality for treating renal calculi in preschool age children.

  20. Simultaneous Determination of 2- and 3-MCPD Esters in Infant Formula Milk Powder by Solid-Phase Extraction and GC-MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    2016-04-07

    The objective of this study was to establish a method for detecting fatty acid esters of chloropropanols [including 2-monochloropropane-1,3-diol (2-MCPD) ester and 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) ester] in infant milk powder using isotope dilution and GC-MS. The fat fraction in infant milk powder samples was extracted and treated with sodium methylate-methanol to cleave the ester bonds of the 2- and 3-MCPD esters. The resultant 2- and 3-MCPDs in the samples were purified with matrix solid-phase liquid-liquid extraction and derivatized with heptafluorobutyryl imidazole for GC-MS analysis. Standard samples of deuterium isotope-labeled 2- and 3-MCPD palmitic acid double esters and stearic acid double esters were used as the internal standards. We also detected 2- and 3-MCPD ester contents in 88 commercial samples of infant formula milk powder using this system. The detection system we established showed a good linearity of 2- and 3-MCPD ester contents in serially diluted standard solutions within the concentration range 25-1000 μg/L, with r(2) > 0.9995 and an LOD of 30 μg/kg for both of the MCPD esters. The recoveries of the two MCPD esters spiked at 25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/kg in blank infant formula milk ranged from 98.2 to 110.5%, with RSDs <4.8%, suggesting good accuracy and reliability of this method. In the 88 commercial infant formula milk powder samples, the mean content of 2-MCPD ester was 41 μg/kg (0-52 μg/kg) and that of 3-MCPD was 185 μg/kg (0-316 μg/kg). Based on these results, we estimated the exposure levels of the two MCPD esters in infants fed on formula milk, and the results indicate potential health risks of consuming formula milk products contaminated by the two MCPD esters.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Powder Model of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein Tau.

    PubMed

    Fichou, Yann; Heyden, Matthias; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Weik, Martin; Tobias, Douglas J

    2015-10-01

    The tau protein, whose aggregates are involved in Alzheimer's disease, is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that regulates microtubule activity in neurons. An IDP lacks a single, well-defined structure and, rather, constantly exchanges among multiple conformations. In order to study IDP dynamics, the combination of experimental techniques, such as neutron scattering, and computational techniques, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is a powerful approach. Amorphous hydrated powder samples have been very useful for studying protein internal dynamics experimentally, e.g., using neutron scattering. Thus, there is demand for realistic in silico models of hydrated protein powders. Here we present an MD simulation analysis of a powder hydrated at 0.4 g water/g protein of the IDP tau in the temperature range 20-300 K. By comparing with neutron scattering data, we identify the protein-water interface as the predominant feature determining IDP dynamics. The so-called protein dynamical transition is shown to be attenuated, but not suppressed, in the parts of the protein that are not exposed to the solvent. In addition, we find similarities in the mean-squared displacements of the core of a globular protein and "dry" clusters formed by the IDP in hydrated powders. Thus, the ps to ns dynamics of proteins in hydrated powders originate mainly from those residues in contact with solvent. We propose that by measuring the dynamics of protein assemblies, such as aggregates, one might assess qualitatively their state of hydration.

  2. Detection and characterisation of Complement protein activity in bovine milk by bactericidal sequestration assay.

    PubMed

    Maye, Susan; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Kelly, Philip M

    2015-08-01

    While the Complement protein system in human milk is well characterised, there is little information on its presence and activity in bovine milk. Complement forms part of the innate immune system, hence the importance of its contribution during milk ingestion to the overall defences of the neonate. A bactericidal sequestration assay, featuring a Complement sensitive strain, Escherichia coli 0111, originally used to characterise Complement activity in human milk was successfully applied to freshly drawn bovine milk samples, thus, providing an opportunity to compare Complement activities in both human and bovine milks. Although not identical in response, the levels of Complement activity in bovine milk were found to be closely comparable with that of human milk. Differential counts of Esch. coli 0111 after 2 h incubation were 6.20 and 6.06 log CFU/ml, for raw bovine and human milks, respectively - the lower value representing a stronger Complement response. Exposing bovine milk to a range of thermal treatments e.g. 42, 45, 65, 72, 85 or 95 °C for 10 min, progressively inhibited Complement activity by increasing temperature, thus confirming the heat labile nature of this immune protein system. Low level Complement activity was found, however, in 65 and 72 °C heat treated samples and in retailed pasteurised milk which highlights the outer limit to which high temperature, short time (HTST) industrial thermal processes should be applied if retention of activity is a priority. Concentration of Complement in the fat phase was evident following cream separation, and this was also reflected in the further loss of activity recorded in low fat variants of retailed pasteurised milk. Laboratory-based churning of the cream during simulated buttermaking generated an aqueous (buttermilk) phase with higher levels of Complement activity than the fat phase, thus pointing to a likely association with the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) layer.

  3. Characterization of near-infrared spectral variance in the authentication of skim and nonfat dry milk powder collection using ANOVA-PCA, pooled-ANOVA, and partial least-squares regression.

    PubMed

    Harnly, James M; Harrington, Peter B; Botros, Lucy L; Jablonski, Joseph; Chang, Claire; Bergana, Marti Mamula; Wehling, Paul; Downey, Gerard; Potts, Alan R; Moore, Jeffrey C

    2014-08-13

    Forty-one samples of skim milk powder (SMP) and nonfat dry milk (NFDM) from 8 suppliers, 13 production sites, and 3 processing temperatures were analyzed by NIR diffuse reflectance spectrometry over a period of 3 days. NIR reflectance spectra (1700-2500 nm) were converted to pseudoabsorbance and examined using (a) analysis of variance-principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA), (b) pooled-ANOVA based on data submatrices, and (c) partial least-squares regression (PLSR) coupled with pooled-ANOVA. ANOVA-PCA score plots showed clear separation of the samples with respect to milk class (SMP or NFDM), day of analysis, production site, processing temperature, and individual samples. Pooled-ANOVA provided statistical levels of significance for the separation of the averages, some of which were many orders of magnitude below 10⁻³. PLSR showed that the correlation with Certificate of Analysis (COA) concentrations varied from a weak coefficient of determination (R²) of 0.32 for moisture to moderate R² values of 0.61 for fat and 0.78 for protein for this multinational study. In this study, pooled-ANOVA was applied for the first time to PLS modeling and demonstrated that even though the calibration models may not be precise, the contribution of the protein peaks in the NIR spectra accounted for the largest proportion of the variation despite the inherent imprecision of the COA values.

  4. Characterization of Near-Infrared Spectral Variance in the Authentication of Skim and Nonfat Dry Milk Powder Collection Using ANOVA-PCA, Pooled-ANOVA, and Partial Least-Squares Regression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Forty-one samples of skim milk powder (SMP) and nonfat dry milk (NFDM) from 8 suppliers, 13 production sites, and 3 processing temperatures were analyzed by NIR diffuse reflectance spectrometry over a period of 3 days. NIR reflectance spectra (1700–2500 nm) were converted to pseudoabsorbance and examined using (a) analysis of variance-principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA), (b) pooled-ANOVA based on data submatrices, and (c) partial least-squares regression (PLSR) coupled with pooled-ANOVA. ANOVA-PCA score plots showed clear separation of the samples with respect to milk class (SMP or NFDM), day of analysis, production site, processing temperature, and individual samples. Pooled-ANOVA provided statistical levels of significance for the separation of the averages, some of which were many orders of magnitude below 10–3. PLSR showed that the correlation with Certificate of Analysis (COA) concentrations varied from a weak coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.32 for moisture to moderate R2 values of 0.61 for fat and 0.78 for protein for this multinational study. In this study, pooled-ANOVA was applied for the first time to PLS modeling and demonstrated that even though the calibration models may not be precise, the contribution of the protein peaks in the NIR spectra accounted for the largest proportion of the variation despite the inherent imprecision of the COA values. PMID:25010570

  5. Milk bioactive peptide database: A comprehensive database of milk protein-derived bioactive peptides and novel visualization.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Søren Drud; Beverly, Robert L; Qu, Yunyao; Dallas, David C

    2017-10-01

    During processing and digestion, milk proteins are disassembled into peptides with an array of biological functions, including antimicrobial, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, antioxidant, opioid, and immunomodulation. These functions are summarized in numerous reviews, yet information on which peptides have which functions remains scattered across hundreds of research articles. We systematically searched the literature for all instances of bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins from any mammalian source. The data were compiled into a comprehensive database, which can be used to search for specific functions, peptides, or proteins (http://mbpdb.nws.oregonstate.edu). To review this large dataset, the bioactive peptides reported in the literature were visually mapped on the parent protein sequences, providing information on sites with highest abundance of bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of thermal treatments on donkey milk nutritional characteristics.

    PubMed

    Polidori, Paolo; Vincenzetti, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    Human breast milk is the best nutritional support to ensure right development and influence immune status of the newborn infant. However, when it is not possible to breast feed it may be necessary to use commercial infant formulas that mimic, where possible, the levels and types of nutrients present in human milk. Despite this, some formula-fed infants develop allergy and/or atopic disease compared to breast-fed infants. Most infants with cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) develop symptoms before 1 month of age, often within 1 week after introduction of cow's milk-based formula. Donkey milk may be considered a good substitute for cow's milk in feeding children with CMPA since its composition is very similar to human milk. An in-depth analysis of the donkey milk protein profile has been performed in this study. The interest was focused on the milk proteins considered safe for the prevention and treatment of various disorders in human. Since donkey milk supply is related to its seasonal availability during the year, in this study were evaluated the effects of different thermal treatments on the protein fractions of donkey milk. The results obtained in fresh, frozen, powdered and lyophilized donkey milk showed different values in total proteins, caseins, whey proteins and lysozyme content. This study demonstrated the possibility of using lyophilization in order to maintain the nutritional characteristics of donkey milk. The article presents some promising patents on the effects of thermal treatments on donkey milk nutritional characteristics.

  7. Rapid Quantification of Melamine in Different Brands/Types of Milk Powders Using Standard Addition Net Analyte Signal and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Multivariate calibration (MVC) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy have demonstrated potential for rapid analysis of melamine in various dairy products. However, the practical application of ordinary MVC can be largely restricted because the prediction of a new sample from an uncalibrated batch would be subject to a significant bias due to matrix effect. In this study, the feasibility of using NIR spectroscopy and the standard addition (SA) net analyte signal (NAS) method (SANAS) for rapid quantification of melamine in different brands/types of milk powders was investigated. In SANAS, the NAS vector of melamine in an unknown sample as well as in a series of samples added with melamine standards was calculated and then the Euclidean norms of series standards were used to build a straightforward univariate regression model. The analysis results of 10 different brands/types of milk powders with melamine levels 0~0.12% (w/w) indicate that SANAS obtained accurate results with the root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) values ranging from 0.0012 to 0.0029. An additional advantage of NAS is to visualize and control the possible unwanted variations during standard addition. The proposed method will provide a practically useful tool for rapid and nondestructive quantification of melamine in different brands/types of milk powders. PMID:27525154

  8. Rapid Quantification of Melamine in Different Brands/Types of Milk Powders Using Standard Addition Net Analyte Signal and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bang-Cheng; Cai, Chen-Bo; Shi, Wei; Xu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Multivariate calibration (MVC) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy have demonstrated potential for rapid analysis of melamine in various dairy products. However, the practical application of ordinary MVC can be largely restricted because the prediction of a new sample from an uncalibrated batch would be subject to a significant bias due to matrix effect. In this study, the feasibility of using NIR spectroscopy and the standard addition (SA) net analyte signal (NAS) method (SANAS) for rapid quantification of melamine in different brands/types of milk powders was investigated. In SANAS, the NAS vector of melamine in an unknown sample as well as in a series of samples added with melamine standards was calculated and then the Euclidean norms of series standards were used to build a straightforward univariate regression model. The analysis results of 10 different brands/types of milk powders with melamine levels 0~0.12% (w/w) indicate that SANAS obtained accurate results with the root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) values ranging from 0.0012 to 0.0029. An additional advantage of NAS is to visualize and control the possible unwanted variations during standard addition. The proposed method will provide a practically useful tool for rapid and nondestructive quantification of melamine in different brands/types of milk powders.

  9. [Determination of five triazine herbicides in infant milk powder by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ionic liquid-based homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Yao, Di; Li, Na; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin

    2015-07-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled with homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction was developed for the determination of five triazine herbicides in infant milk powders. The ionic liquid was used as microextraction solvent. The separation of the herbicides was performed on an Eclipse XDB-C18 column using acetonitrile and water as mobile phases in gradient mode. The effects of homogeneous liquid-liquid extraction conditions on the experimental results were investigated in detail. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the calibration curves for determining the analytes were linear and the correlation coefficients were ≥ 0.9992. The limits of detection for cyanazine, desmetryn, terbumeton, terbuthylazine and dimethametryn were 12.1, 13.8, 11.8, 14.6 and 13.7 μg/kg, respectively. The recoveries of the analytes spiked in four infant milk powders ranged from 92.2% to 103.2% and the relative standard deviations were lower than 6%. This method is sensitive, simple, and suitable for the determination of triazine herbicides in milk powder samples.

  10. Vitamin A Activity of Rice-based Weaning Foods Enriched with Germinated Cowpea Flour, Banana, Pumpkin and Milk Powder.

    PubMed

    Hashim, N; Pongjata, J

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the effect of different drying methods on vitamin A activity of formulated weaning food. Weaned foods on vitamin A activity of formulated using treated cowpea flour, locally available rice flour, banana-pumpkin, skim milk powder and sugar in the ratio 35:35:15:15:5. Treated cowpea flour consisted of original cowpea flour, 24 h germinated cowpea flour. Each treated flour was mixed separately with the other ingredients and cooked into a slurry. Each mixture was either oven-dried or freeze-dried to produce a dry flaky mixture. The carotenoid composition of the product was determined by HPLC. Vitamin A activity of oven-dried weaning food was significantly reduced (p<0.05) compared to freeze-dried weaning food. The freeze-dried weaning foods showed a higher retinol equivalent than oven-dried weaning foods for all treatments. The results of the study found that an intake of 100 g of freeze-dried weaning foods enriched with banana-pumpkin and cowpea flour provided an adequate amount of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin A for infants.

  11. Content and evolution of potential furfural compounds in commercial milk-based infant formula powder after opening the packet.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Servín, Jorge L; de la Torre Carbot, Karina; García-Gasca, Teresa; Castellote, Ana I; López-Sabater, M Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Potential furfural compounds were examined by RP-HPLC-DAD in 20 commercial milk-based powdered infant formula (IF) brands from local markets from Paris, France; DF, Mexico; Copenhagen, Denmark; England, UK; and Barcelona, Spain. We traced the evolution of these compounds after the packets had been opened at 0, 30 and 70 days of storage at room temperature (≈25 °C; minimum 23 °C and maximum 25.5 °C). All formula brands were analysed during the first 3-5 months of their shelf life. The mean values of all IFs for potential 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF)+2-furaldehyde (F) were 1115.2 μg/100 g (just opened), 1157.6 μg/100 g (30 days) and 1344.5 μg/100 g of product (70 days). In general, slight increases of potential furfural contents were observed in most of the studied IFs, which suggests that the Maillard reaction increases after opening the packets. The main furfural compound found was HMF, as expected. The range of potential HMF consumed for an infant about 6 months old feeding only on formula was estimated between 0.63 mg and 3.25 mg per day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation and Identification Enterobacter asburiae from Consumed Powdered Infant Formula Milk (PIF) in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

    PubMed

    Mardaneh, Jalal; Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a facultative anaerobic, non-spore-forming gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. It is an opportunistic pathogen that its strains are isolated from a variety of clinical and environmental specimens. Since powdered infant formula milk (PIF) is not a sterile product, it is an excellent medium for bacterial growth. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify E. asburiae from PIF in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of this bacterium. A total 125 PIF samples were purchased from drug stores between June 2011 to March 2012. E. asburiae was isolated according to FDA method. For final confirmation, biochemical tests embedded in the API-20E system were used. The drug susceptibility test was performed using the disc diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations. Out of the 125 PIF samples investigated, 2 (1.6%) samples were positive for E. asburiae. All isolated strains were uniformly susceptible to aztreonam, cefotaxim, amikacin, streptomycin, nalidixic acid, meropenem, tetracycline, ceftazidime, and colistin. Variable susceptibility was seen to the some antimicrobial agents tested. Each country should categorize its own designed guidelines for the preparation and handling of PIF adapted to the local environment. Moreover, the pathogenesis of the E. asburiae in infants hospitalized in NICU and other groups such as immunosuppressed patients and HIV infected individuals is uncertain and requires further study.

  13. Soft computing modelling of moisture sorption isotherms of milk-foxtail millet powder and determination of thermodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Simha, H V Vikram; Pushpadass, Heartwin A; Franklin, Magdaline Eljeeva Emerald; Kumar, P Arun; Manimala, K

    2016-06-01

    Moisture sorption isotherms of spray-dried milk-foxtail millet powder were determined at 10, 25 and 40 °C. Sorption data was fitted using classical and soft-computing approaches. The isotherms were of type II, and equilibrium moisture content (EMC) was temperature dependent. The BET monolayer moisture content decreased from 3.30 to 2.67 % as temperature increased from 10 to 40 °C. Amongst the classical models, Ferro-Fontan gave the best fit of EMC-aw data. However, the Sugeno-type adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) with generalized bell-shaped membership function performed better than artificial neural network and classical models with RMSE as low as 0.0099. The isosteric heat of sorption decreased from 150.32 kJ mol(-1) at 1 % moisture content to 44.11 kJ mol(-1) at 15 % moisture. The enthalpy-entropy compensation theory was validated, and the isokinetic and harmonic mean temperatures were determined as 333.1 and 297.5 K, respectively.

  14. A sensitive spectrofluorimetric method for the quantification of melamine residue in milk powder using the Mannich reaction in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Rima, Jamil; Assaker, Karine; El Omar, Fawaz; karim, Chawki bou

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a spectrofluorimetric method for the quantitative determination of melamine. The method was based on the complexation of melamine with a mixture of formaldehyde and chemicals including a ketone group, as described by the Mannich reaction. The complex was determined by spectrofluorimetric measurement as it is characterized by specific spectroscopic properties that are related to the chromophore of the ketone compounds. 1,3-Diphenylpropane-1,3-dione (DPPD) was tested as a ketone compound. The fluorescence spectrum of the complex presented a maximum of absorption at 325 nm.A quenching of the fluorescence occurred when melamine was added into the solution. The kinetic of fluorescence quenching was followed to determine quantitatively the melamine concentration. An internal standard was added to quantify melamine. The method was tested to determine the level of melamine in contaminated milk powder. The recovery value was 97% and the limit of detection was 0.007 μg mL(-1.) © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of acidification and heating on the rheological properties of oil-water interfaces with adsorbed milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Mellema, M; Isenbart, J G

    2004-09-01

    The behavior of casein and whey proteins at the oil-water interface was studied using a dynamic drop tensiometer (DDT). The dilational modulus of the interface was measured for aqueous solutions of skim milk powder (SMP) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) with various additions (salt, calcium, lactose) and (order of) various processing steps. Acidification or heating was performed before or after creation of the interface. The elastic properties of oil-water interfaces with adsorbed milk proteins could partly determine the rate of partial coalescence and resulting product instability. For WPC, preacidification slows down the adsorption, but the modulus is not affected. This is probably because, although the whey proteins change conformation more slowly at the interface, still a homogeneous film is formed. If postacidification is applied, coarsening of the protein film leads to loss of interfacial rigidity. Preheating of the aqueous phase with WPC leads to denaturation and aggregation, but the aggregates formed are still surface active and give high moduli. If preheating of a WPC solution is followed by postacidification, the resulting modulus is high (approximately 60 mN/m). The oil-water interfacial properties of SMP are only minimally affected by preheating or by choice of powder (low, medium, or high heat). At low pH, however, aggregates are formed that are less surface active, and interfacial moduli are lower. If measurements are performed at high temperature (i.e., if postheating is applied), for both SMP and WPC systems, moduli became much lower (approximately 10 mN/m). This is probably because of accelerated rearrangements, leading to the formation of inhomogeneous film structures.

  16. The Reasearch on the Anti-Fatigue Effect of Whey Protein Powder in Basketball Training.

    PubMed

    Ronghui, Sun

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe the effects of whey protein powder on hematological indexes of players majoring in physical education in the basketball training, the authors divided the players randomly into a control group and a nutrition group. Athletes complete the 30 minutes quantitative exercise using cycle ergometer respectively before the trial and after one month trial. Then we exsanguinated immediately after exercise, extracted heparin and measured hemoglobin, red blood cell count, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume and other hematological indices. The results showed that after taking whey protein powder, the HB, RBC, HCT of nutrition group was significantly higher that the control group. This suggests that in high-intensity training, taking whey protein powder can cause changes of HB, RBC and HCT in human body, meanwhile MCV essentially the same. So whey protein powder can improve exercise capacity, and has anti-fatigue effect.

  17. The Reasearch on the Anti-Fatigue Effect of Whey Protein Powder in Basketball Training

    PubMed Central

    Ronghui, Sun

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe the effects of whey protein powder on hematological indexes of players majoring in physical education in the basketball training, the authors divided the players randomly into a control group and a nutrition group. Athletes complete the 30 minutes quantitative exercise using cycle ergometer respectively before the trial and after one month trial. Then we exsanguinated immediately after exercise, extracted heparin and measured hemoglobin, red blood cell count, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume and other hematological indices. The results showed that after taking whey protein powder, the HB, RBC, HCT of nutrition group was significantly higher that the control group. This suggests that in high-intensity training, taking whey protein powder can cause changes of HB, RBC and HCT in human body, meanwhile MCV essentially the same. So whey protein powder can improve exercise capacity, and has anti-fatigue effect. PMID:26998184

  18. Application of effective wavelengths and BP neural network for the discrimination of varieties of instant milk tea powders using visible and near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; He, Yong; Wang, Li

    2007-11-01

    In order to implement the fast discrimination of different milk tea powders with different internal qualities, visible and near infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy combined with effective wavelengths (EWs) and BP neural network (BPNN) was investigated as a new approach. Five brands of milk teas were obtained and 225 samples were selected randomly for the calibration set, while 75 samples for the validation set. The EWs were selected according to x-loading weights and regression coefficients by PLS analysis after some preprocessing. A total of 18 EWs (400, 401, 452, 453, 502, 503, 534, 535, 594, 595, 635, 636, 688, 689, 987, 988, 995 and 996 nm) were selected as the inputs of BPNN model. The performance was validated by the calibration and validation sets. The threshold error of prediction was set as +/-0.1 and an excellent precision and recognition ratio of 100% for calibration set and 98.7% for validation set were achieved. The prediction results indicated that the EWs reflected the main characteristics of milk tea of different brands based on Vis/NIR spectroscopy and BPNN model, and the EWs would be useful for the development of portable instrument to discriminate the variety and detect the adulteration of instant milk tea powders.

  19. Comparative measurements of mineral elements in milk powders with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lei, W Q; El Haddad, J; Motto-Ros, V; Gilon-Delepine, N; Stankova, A; Ma, Q L; Bai, X S; Zheng, L J; Zeng, H P; Yu, J

    2011-07-01

    Mineral elements contained in commercially available milk powders, including seven infant formulae and one adult milk, were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The purpose of this work was, through a direct comparison of the analytical results, to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS, and especially of the procedure of calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS), to deal with organic compounds such as milk powders. In our experiments, the matrix effect was clearly observed affecting the analytical results each time laser ablation was employed for sampling. Such effect was in addition directly observed by determining the physical parameters of the plasmas induced on the different samples. The CF-LIBS procedure was implemented to deduce the concentrations of Mg and K with Ca as the internal reference element. Quantitative analytical results with CF-LIBS were validated with ICP-AES measurements and nominal concentrations specified for commercial milks. The obtained good results with the CF-LIBS procedure demonstrate its capacity to take into account the difference in physical parameters of the plasma in the calculation of the concentrations of mineral elements, which allows a significant reduction of the matrix effect related to laser ablation. We finally discuss the way to optimize the implementation of the CF-LIBS procedure for the analysis of mineral elements in organic materials.

  20. [Effect of proteins from bovine milk serum on the multiplication of human cancerous cells].

    PubMed

    Bourtourault, M; Buléon, R; Sampérez, S; Jouan, P

    1991-01-01

    The addition of bovine milk whey to the culture medium of human cancerous cells (MCF-7 and PC-3) results in a significant reduction of cells growth. Milk whey acts more efficiently on MCF-7 than on PC-3 growth. The inhibition could be due to a protein. Its identification is now on progress.

  1. Investigation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Bacillus licheniformis Strains Isolated from Retail Powdered Infant Milk Formulae.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Begley, Máire; Clifford, Tanya; Deasy, Thérèse; Considine, Kiera; O'Connor, Paula; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the potential antimicrobial activity of ten Bacillus licheniformis strains isolated from retail infant milk formulae against a range of indicator (Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Listeria innocua) and clinically relevant (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli) microorganisms. Deferred antagonism assays confirmed that all B. licheniformis isolates show antimicrobial activity against the Gram-positive target organisms. PCR and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses indicated that four of the B. licheniformis isolates produce the bacteriocin lichenicidin. The remaining six isolates demonstrated a higher antimicrobial potency than lichenicidin-producing strains. Further analyses identified a peptide of ~1,422 Da as the most likely bioactive responsible for the antibacterial activity of these six isolates. N-terminal sequencing of the ~1,422 Da peptide from one strain identified it as ILPEITXIFHD. This peptide shows a high homology to the non-ribosomal peptides bacitracin and subpeptin, known to be produced by Bacillus spp. Subsequent PCR analyses demonstrated that the six B. licheniformis isolates may harbor the genetic machinery needed for the synthesis of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase similar to those involved in production of subpeptin and bacitracin, which suggests that the ~1,422 Da peptide might be a variant of subpeptin and bacitracin.

  2. Bioavailability of milk protein-derived bioactive peptides: a glycaemic management perspective.

    PubMed

    Horner, Katy; Drummond, Elaine; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-06-01

    Milk protein-derived peptides have been reported to have potential benefits for reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. However, what the active components are and whether intact peptides exert this bioactivity has received little investigation in human subjects. Furthermore, potentially useful bioactive peptides can be limited by low bioavailability. Various peptides have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract and bloodstream after milk-protein ingestion, providing valuable insights into their potential bioavailability. However, these studies are currently limited and the structure and sequence of milk peptides exerting bioactivity for glycaemic management has received little investigation in human subjects. The present article reviews the bioavailability of milk protein-derived peptides in human studies to date, and examines the evidence on milk proteins and glycaemic management, including potential mechanisms of action. Areas in need of advancement are identified. Only by establishing the bioavailability of milk protein-derived peptides, the active components and the mechanistic pathways involved can the benefits of milk proteins for the prevention or management of type 2 diabetes be fully realised in future.

  3. Characterization of near infrared spectral variance in the authentication of skim and nonfat dry milk powder collection using ANOVA-PCA, Pooled-ANOVA, and partial least squares regression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Forty-one samples of skim milk powder (SMP) and non-fat dry milk (NFDM) from 8 suppliers, 13 production sites, and 3 processing temperatures were analyzed by NIR diffuse reflectance spectrometry over a period of three days. NIR reflectance spectra (1700-2500 nm) were converted to pseudo-absorbance ...

  4. Proteomic characterization of human milk fat globule membrane proteins during a 12 month lactation period.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yalin; Alvarado, Rudy; Phinney, Brett; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2011-08-05

    The milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) contains proteins which have been implicated in a variety of health benefits. Milk fat globule membrane proteins were isolated from human milk during a 12 month lactation period and subjected to in-solution digestion and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Data were pooled, and our results showed that 191 proteins were identified. Relative quantification of the identified MFGM proteins during the course of lactation was performed by label free spectral counting and differentiation expression analysis, which showed some proteins decreasing during the course of lactation whereas some increased or remained at a relatively constant level. The human MFGM proteins are distributed between intracellular, extracellular, and membrane-associated proteins, and they are mainly involved in cell communication and signal transduction, immune function, metabolism and energy production. This study provides more insights into the dynamic composition of human MFGM proteins, which in turn will enhance our understanding of the physiological significance of MFGM proteins.

  5. Balanced intraintestinal nutrition: digestion, absorption and biological value of selected preparations of milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Ziemlański, S; Cieślakowa, D; Kunachowicz, H; Pałaszewska, M

    1978-01-01

    The absorption of an enzymatic hydrolysate of whey proteins, hydrolysates of milk proteins and casein, 7% hydrolysate of bovine blood produced by Polfa under the trade name "Aminokwasy", and a standard mixture of amino acids from isolated small intestine loop of dogs and rats was compared. The composition of amino acids of the initial proteins and hydrolysates obtained from these proteins was determined. The biological value of selected proteins and hydrolysates was assessed determining the mean weight gain, nitrogen content of the body, urinary excretion of urea and creatinine, blood urea level and NPU. No significant differences were found in the absorption of nitrogen from the hydrolysate of milk and whey proteins. The nutritional value of whey protein hydrolysate was, however, slightly higher than that of an analogous hydrolysate of milk proteins. It seems that of all tested proteins whey hydrolysate (free of lactose) is the most suitable source for obtaining preparations for no-residue intraintestinal feeding.

  6. Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins and their health beneficial potentials: an update.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Ravinder; Behare, Pradip; Rana, Rajiv; Kumar, Ashwani; Kumar, Manoj; Arora, Sanu; Morotta, Fransesco; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2011-01-01

    It has been well recognized that dietary proteins provide a rich source of biologically active peptides. Today, milk proteins are considered the most important source of bioactive peptides and an increasing number of bioactive peptides have been identified in milk protein hydrolysates and fermented dairy products. Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins offer a promising approach for the promotion of health by means of a tailored diet and provide interesting opportunities to the dairy industry for expansion of its field of operation. The potential health benefits of milk protein-derived peptides have been a subject of growing commercial interest in the context of health-promoting functional foods. Hence, these peptides are being incorporated in the form of ingredients in functional and novel foods, dietary supplements and even pharmaceuticals with the purpose of delivering specific health benefits.

  7. Bioactive Proteins in Human Milk: Health, Nutrition, and Implications for Infant Formulas.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Breast milk confers many benefits to the newborn and developing infant. There is substantial support for better long-term outcomes, such as less obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, in breastfed compared with formula-fed infants. More short-term outcomes, such as incidence and duration of illness, nutrient status, and cognitive development during the first year of life also demonstrate benefits of breastfeeding. Several proteins in breast milk, including lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin, milk fat globule membrane proteins, and osteopontin, have been shown to have bioactivities that range from involvement in the protection against infection to the acquisition of nutrients from breast milk. In some cases, bovine counterparts of these proteins exert similar bioactivities. It is possible by dairy technology to add protein fractions highly enriched in these proteins to infant formula.

  8. Enterobacter sakazakii in food and beverages (other than infant formula and milk powder).

    PubMed

    Friedemann, Miriam

    2007-05-01

    The ubiqitous microorganism Enterobacter sakazakii is a rare contaminant of infant formula and may cause severe systemic infection in neonates. So far, other food is not known to cause E. sakazakii-infections. The scarce information about the ecology of E. sakazakii and the uncertainty concerning the source of infection in children and adults warrant a summary of the current knowledge about the presence of this opportunistic microorganism in food other than infant formula. This review systematizes publications on the presence of E. sakazakii in food and beverages until June 2006. Food other than infant formula has been rarely investigated for the presence of E. sakazakii. Nevertheless, this microorganism could be isolated from a wide spectrum of food and food ingredients. E. sakazakii was isolated from plant food and food ingredients like cereal, fruit and vegetables, legume products, herbs and spices as well as from animal food sources like milk, meat and fish and products made from these foods. The spectrum of E. sakazakii-contaminated food covers both raw and processed food. The kind of processing of E. sakazakii-contaminated food was not restricted to dry products. Fresh, frozen, ready-to-eat, fermented and cooked food products as well as beverages and water suitable for the preparation of food, were found to be contaminated by E. sakazakii. Although E. sakazakii-contaminated food do not have general public health significance, measures for prevention should consider the presence of E. sakazakii in food, food ingredients, their processing and preparation as possible source of contamination, colonization or infection.

  9. Consuming Transgenic Goats' Milk Containing the Antimicrobial Protein Lysozyme Helps Resolve Diarrhea in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Caitlin A.; Garas Klobas, Lydia C.; Maga, Elizabeth A.; Murray, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood diarrhea is a significant problem in many developing countries and E. coli is a main causative agent of diarrhea in young children. Lysozyme is an antimicrobial protein highly expressed in human milk, but not ruminant milk, and is thought to help protect breastfeeding children against diarrheal diseases. We hypothesized that consumption of milk from transgenic goats which produce human lysozyme (hLZ-milk) in their milk would accelerate recovery from bacterial-induced diarrhea. Young pigs were used as a model for children and infected with enterotoxigenic E. coli. Once clinical signs of diarrhea developed, pigs were fed hLZ-milk or non-transgenic control goat milk three times a day for two days. Clinical observations and complete blood counts (CBC) were performed. Animals were euthanized and samples collected to assess differences in histology, cytokine expression and bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph node. Pigs consuming hLZ-milk recovered from clinical signs of infection faster than pigs consuming control milk, with significantly improved fecal consistency (p = 0.0190) and activity level (p = 0.0350). The CBC analysis showed circulating monocytes (p = 0.0413), neutrophils (p = 0.0219), and lymphocytes (p = 0.0222) returned faster to pre-infection proportions in hLZ-milk fed pigs, while control-fed pigs had significantly higher hematocrit (p = 0.027), indicating continuing dehydration. In the ileum, pigs fed hLZ-milk had significantly lower expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 (p = 0.0271), longer intestinal villi (p<0.0001), deeper crypts (p = 0.0053), and a thinner lamina propria (p = 0.0004). These data demonstrate that consumption of hLZ-milk helped pigs recover from infection faster, making hLZ-milk an effective treatment of E. coli-induced diarrhea. PMID:23516474

  10. Proteomic and functional analyses reveal MAPK1 regulates milk protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li-Min; Li, Qing-Zhang; Huang, Jian-Guo; Gao, Xue-Jun

    2012-12-27

    L-Lysine (L-Lys) is an essential amino acid that plays fundamental roles in protein synthesis. Many nuclear phosphorylated proteins such as Stat5 and mTOR regulate milk protein synthesis. However, the details of milk protein synthesis control at the transcript and translational levels are not well known. In this current study, a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)/MS-based proteomic technology was used to identify phosphoproteins responsible for milk protein synthesis in dairy cow mammary epithelial cells (DCMECs). The effect of L-Lys on DCMECs was analyzed by CASY technology and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). The results showed that cell proliferation ability and β-casein expression were enhanced in DCMECs treated with L-Lys. By phosphoproteomics analysis, six proteins, including MAPK1, were identified up-expressed in DCMECs treated with 1.2 mM L-Lys for 24 h, and were verified by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot. Overexpression and siRNA inhibition of MAPK1 experiments showed that MAPK1 upregulated milk protein synthesis through Stat5 and mTOR pathway. These findings that MAPK1 involves in regulation of milk synthesis shed new insights for understanding the mechanisms of milk protein synthesis.

  11. Estimating the causal effect of milk powder supplementation on bone mineral density: a randomized controlled trial with both non-compliance and loss to follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Zhang, Q; Wang, Y; Xiao, Y; Fu, R; Bao, H; Liu, M

    2015-07-01

    Although previous studies reported that calcium supplementation can effectively improve bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, some studies showed the reverse conclusion. One of the reasons was that most of the studies did not take into full consideration the information of noncompliers, which seriously influenced the precision of conclusion. The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of calcium supplementation on bone mineral density with correcting impact of noncompliance using the complier average causal effect (CACE). A randomized controlled trial was designed to investigate the effect of high-calcium milk powder on bone mineral density. One hundred and forty-one postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to either a control group (n=72) or a milk powder supplementation group (n=69). The participants in the intervention group took 50 g of high-calcium milk powder containing 450 mg of elemental calcium and 400 IU vitamin D every morning and evening, respectively. The effects of the intervention on the primary outcome, bone mineral density, were assessed using the CACE model and intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) analyses. Using the CACE model, the calcium supplementation was found to significantly reduce the bone loss at the lumbar spine compared with the control group at 24 months when adjusting the covariates (effect size 1.170, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.376~1.964, P=0.0040). At the hip site, there was no significant difference between the calcium group and the control group. Compared with the control group, no significant weight gain was found in the calcium group over 24 months. However, the calcium group had less height loss at 24 months (effect size 1.040, 95% CI 0.012~2.066, P=0.0470) than the control group. High-density lipoprotein was significantly increased in the calcium group at 12 months (effect size 0.120, 95% CI 0.009~0.232, P=0.0340). Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein were

  12. Effect of long-term bovine somatotropin (sometribove) treatment on nitrogen (protein) distribution in Jersey milk.

    PubMed

    Kindstedt, P S; Pell, A N; Rippe, J K; Tsang, D S; Hartnell, G F

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-six Jersey cows were assigned randomly to one of two treatments. Twelve cows received biweekly subcutaneous injection of 500 mg of sometribove, USAN (recombinant methionyl bovine somatotropin), beginning 60 +/- 3 d postpartum and continuing throughout one lactation. Fourteen control animals received injections of placebo carrier. Milk samples were taken biweekly on weeks alternate to injection when differences in milk components were expected to be greatest compared with controls. The milk samples were analyzed for total nitrogen, noncasein nitrogen, and non-protein nitrogen. The average SCC for control and treatment groups was 44,000 +/- 47,000 and 56,000 +/- 65,000. Milk from sometribove-treated cows was significantly lower in total protein (3.92, 4.12%), true protein (3.74, 3.95%), and casein (3.11, 3.34%) than that from control cows on d 8 of the 14 d injection cycle. Casein as a percentage of true protein was lower (83.38, 84.52%), and non-protein nitrogen as a percentage of total nitrogen was higher (4.61, 4.26%) in milk from treated cows. The theoretical yield of Cheddar cheese was ca. .07% less for milk from treated cows than from control cows due to ca. 1% less casein as a percentage of true protein in the former. The differences in nitrogen distribution represent the response during the middle of the injection cycle when milk output was the highest and milk protein the lowest rather than the average response for the injection cycle. The results of the study indicate minimal impact on the cheese manufacturer because in practice milk is commingled from many dairies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. A microfiltration process to maximize removal of serum proteins from skim milk before cheese making.

    PubMed

    Nelson, B K; Barbano, D M

    2005-05-01

    Microfiltration (MF) is a membrane process that can separate casein micelles from milk serum proteins (SP), mainly beta-lactoglobulin and alpha-lactalbumin. Our objective was to develop a multistage MF process to remove a high percentage of SP from skim milk while producing a low concentration factor retentate from microfiltration (RMF) with concentrations of soluble minerals, nonprotein nitrogen (NPN), and lactose similar to the original skim milk. The RMF could be blended with cream to standardize milk for traditional Cheddar cheese making. Permeate from ultrafiltration (PUF) obtained from the ultrafiltration (UF) of permeate from MF (PMF) of skim milk was successfully used as a diafiltrant to remove SP from skim milk before cheese making, while maintaining the concentration of lactose, NPN, and nonmicellar calcium. About 95% of the SP originally in skim milk was removed by combining one 3 x MF stage and two 3 x PUF diafiltration stages. The final 3 x RMF can be diluted with PUF to the desired concentration of casein for traditional cheese making. The PMF from the skim milk was concentrated in a UF system to yield an SP concentrate with protein content similar to a whey protein concentrate, but without residuals from cheese making (i.e., rennet, culture, color, and lactic acid) that can produce undesirable functional and sensory characteristics in whey products. Additional processing steps to this 3-stage MF process for SP removal are discussed to produce an MF skim retentate for a continuous cottage cheese manufacturing process.

  14. Evaluation of milk basic protein supplementation on bone density and bone metabolism in Chinese young women.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhi-Yong; Lin, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xian-Rong; Xu, Rui; Ma, Le; Li, Ying; Wang, Ming-Fang

    2009-08-01

    Milk is a good source of bioavailable calcium compared with other foods. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that milk whey protein, especially its basic protein fraction (milk basic protein, MBP), contains several components capable of promoting bone formation and inhibiting bone resorption. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of MBP on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone metabolism of healthy young women. Eighty-four healthy young women were randomly assigned to three groups: control group, whole milk group or MBP group treated with milk containing 40 mg MBP for 8 months. The bone mineral density of total body, the lumbar vertebrae L2-L4 and the left forearm of each subject were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) at 0 and 8 months of treatment. Serum indexes of bone metabolism were measured at 0, 3, 6 and 8 months. Eighty-one subjects who completed the study in accordance with the protocol were included in the analysis. Total BMD in all groups significantly increased compared with baseline values. However, no significant difference on the mean rate of gain of total BMD was observed among the MBP group (2.19%), the whole milk group (2.63%) and the control group (1.61%). Serum cross-linked N-teleopeptides of type-I collagen (NTx) in MBP group at 8 months and in whole milk group at 6 months were significantly decreased from baseline. There were no significant differences between whole milk group and MBP group; however, after combining the milk groups, NTx had significantly decreased from baseline. No significant increase was observed in serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) in both whole milk group and MBP group. No significant effect of MBP on bone mineral density and bone metabolism was observed, but milk supplementation was effective in suppressing bone resorption.

  15. Microstructural Changes in High-Protein Nutrition Bars Formulated with Extruded or Toasted Milk Protein Concentrate.

    PubMed

    Banach, J C; Clark, S; Lamsal, B P

    2016-02-01

    Milk protein concentrates with more than 80% protein (that is, MPC80) are underutilized as the primary protein source in high-protein nutrition bars as they impart crumbliness and cause hardening during storage. High-protein nutrition bar texture changes are often associated with internal protein aggregations and macronutrient phase separation. These changes were investigated in model high-protein nutrition bars formulated with MPC80 and physically modified MPC80s. High-protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80s hardened slower than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80. Extruded MPC80 had reduced free sulfhydryl group exposure, whereas measurable increases were seen in the toasted MPC80. High-protein nutrition bar textural performance may be related to the number of exposed free sulfhydryl groups in MPC80. Protein aggregations resulting from ingredient modification and high-protein nutrition bar storage were studied with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disulfide-based protein aggregations and changes in free sulfhydryl concentration were not consistently relatable to high-protein nutrition bar texture change. However, the high-protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80 were less prone to phase separations, as depicted by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and underwent less texture change during storage than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80.

  16. Multiparous cows categorized by milk protein concentration and energy-corrected milk yield during early lactation--metabolism, productivity and effect of a short-term feed restriction.

    PubMed

    Sigl, T; Gellrich, K; Meyer, H H D; Kaske, M; Wiedemann, S

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this experiment was to study milk productivity, metabolic adaptation and effect of a short-term feed restriction (FR) on key performance indicators during early lactation in cows classified according to energy-corrected milk (ECM) yield and milk protein concentration. Twenty-three multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows were categorized in four groups according to respective averaged values on Days 23-25 postpartum: high ECM yield and high protein concentration; low ECM yield and low protein concentration; high ECM yield and low protein concentration and low ECM yield and high protein concentration. Dry matter intake was reduced to 68.3% for three subsequent days. Our results showed that short-time FR in early lactation succeeded in enhancing energy deficit of cows in all groups. Milk fat, milk protein and lactose concentrations as well as milk fat yield were not influenced by FR. Several hepatic genes encoding for enzymes involved in catabolism of amino acids, β-oxidation, gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis as well as mRNA encoding for insulin receptor showed increased transcript abundances after FR, primarily in cows with high milk yield and low milk protein concentration.

  17. [Initiation of a cure for kwashiorkor patients using a whey milk product. A comparison with cows milk].

    PubMed

    Prinsloo, J G; Conradie, J M; Odendaal, W A; Van der Walt, W H

    1983-10-22

    Whey milk, a side-product of cheese production, is not utilized for human nutrition. Whey protein is of good nutritional quality with a high biological value, exceeding that of whole-milk protein. A whey milk product consisting of liquid whey milk 60%, whole cow's milk 40% and skimmed milk powder 0.5% was mixed, spray-dried and prepared in instant form. After reconstitution with water, it was compared with sterilized whole cow's milk for the initiation of cure in 30 acute kwashiorkor patients randomly allocated to the two feeds. The diets were given for 3 weeks. There were no statistically significant differences between the two diets with regard to weight gain or levels of serum albumin, globulin, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, urea or haemoglobin. Judging from this limited investigation, whey milk deserves consideration for human utilization. Should economical production be possible, it could contribute towards preventing and treating protein energy malnutrition.

  18. Experimental and Modelling Study of the Denaturation of Milk Protein by Heat Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Fang; Sun, Jiayue; Cao, Di; Tuo, Yanfeng; Jiang, Shujuan; Mu, Guangqing

    2017-01-01

    Heat treatment of milk aims to inhibit the growth of microbes, extend the shelf-life of products and improve the quality of the products. Heat treatment also leads to denaturation of whey protein and the formation of whey protein-casein polymer, which has negative effects on milk product. Hence the milk heat treatment conditions should be controlled in milk processing. In this study, the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein and casein when undergoing heat treatment were also determined by using the Native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE analysis. The results showed that the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein with casein extended with the increase of the heat-treated temperature and time. The effects of the heat-treated temperature and heat-treated time on the denaturation degree of whey protein and on the combination degree of whey protein and casein were well described using the quadratic regression equation. The analysis strategy used in this study reveals an intuitive and effective measure of the denaturation degree of whey protein, and the changes of milk protein under different heat treatment conditions efficiently and accurately in the dairy industry. It can be of great significance for dairy product proteins following processing treatments applied for dairy product manufacturing. PMID:28316470

  19. Experimental and Modelling Study of the Denaturation of Milk Protein by Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Fang; Sun, Jiayue; Cao, Di; Tuo, Yanfeng; Jiang, Shujuan; Mu, Guangqing

    2017-01-01

    Heat treatment of milk aims to inhibit the growth of microbes, extend the shelf-life of products and improve the quality of the products. Heat treatment also leads to denaturation of whey protein and the formation of whey protein-casein polymer, which has negative effects on milk product. Hence the milk heat treatment conditions should be controlled in milk processing. In this study, the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein and casein when undergoing heat treatment were also determined by using the Native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE analysis. The results showed that the denaturation degree of whey protein and the combination degree of whey protein with casein extended with the increase of the heat-treated temperature and time. The effects of the heat-treated temperature and heat-treated time on the denaturation degree of whey protein and on the combination degree of whey protein and casein were well described using the quadratic regression equation. The analysis strategy used in this study reveals an intuitive and effective measure of the denaturation degree of whey protein, and the changes of milk protein under different heat treatment conditions efficiently and accurately in the dairy industry. It can be of great significance for dairy product proteins following processing treatments applied for dairy product manufacturing.

  20. Effects of the adulteration technique on the near-infrared detection of melamine in milk powder

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fraudulent adulteration of protein-rich food ingredients with melamine in 2007 and 2008 highlighted the public health and economic consequences of adulterating foods with chemicals not approved for food use. U.S. Pharmacopeia is leading a collaborative project to develop reference materials as w...

  1. Expression of Active Fluorophore Proteins in the Milk of Transgenic Pigs Bypassing the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ayan; Garrels, Wiebke; Talluri, Thirumala R.; Tiedemann, Daniela; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Kues, Wilfried A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the expression of recombinant fluorescent proteins in the milk of two lines of transgenic pigs generated by Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated genetic engineering. The Sleeping Beauty transposon consisted of an ubiquitously active CAGGS promoter driving a fluorophore cDNA, encoding either Venus or mCherry. Importantly, the fluorophore cDNAs did not encode for a signal peptide for the secretory pathway, and in previous studies of the transgenic animals a cytoplasmic localization of the fluorophore proteins was found. Unexpectedly, milk samples from lactating sows contained high levels of bioactive Venus or mCherry fluorophores. A detailed analysis suggested that exfoliated cells of the mammary epithelium carried the recombinant proteins passively into the milk. This is the first description of reporter fluorophore expression in the milk of livestock, and the findings may contribute to the development of an alternative concept for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins in the udder. PMID:27086548

  2. Prediction of individual milk proteins including free amino acids in bovine milk using mid-infrared spectroscopy and their correlations with milk processing characteristics.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A; Visentin, G; De Marchi, M; Berry, D P; Fenelon, M A; O'Connor, P M; Kenny, O A; McParland, S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mid-infrared spectroscopy in predicting milk protein and free amino acid (FAA) composition in bovine milk. Milk samples were collected from 7 Irish research herds and represented cows from a range of breeds, parities, and stages of lactation. Mid-infrared spectral data in the range of 900 to 5,000 cm(-1) were available for 730 milk samples; gold standard methods were used to quantify individual protein fractions and FAA of these samples with a view to predicting these gold standard protein fractions and FAA levels with available mid-infrared spectroscopy data. Separate prediction equations were developed for each trait using partial least squares regression; accuracy of prediction was assessed using both cross validation on a calibration data set (n=400 to 591 samples) and external validation on an independent data set (n=143 to 294 samples). The accuracy of prediction in external validation was the same irrespective of whether undertaken on the entire external validation data set or just within the Holstein-Friesian breed. The strongest coefficient of correlation obtained for protein fractions in external validation was 0.74, 0.69, and 0.67 for total casein, total β-lactoglobulin, and β-casein, respectively. Total proteins (i.e., total casein, total whey, and total lactoglobulin) were predicted with greater accuracy then their respective component traits; prediction accuracy using the infrared spectrum was superior to prediction using just milk protein concentration. Weak to moderate prediction accuracies were observed for FAA. The greatest coefficient of correlation in both cross validation and external validation was for Gly (0.75), indicating a moderate accuracy of prediction. Overall, the FAA prediction models overpredicted the gold standard values. Near-unity correlations existed between total casein and β-casein irrespective of whether the traits were based on the gold standard (0.92) or mid

  3. Effect of different levels of mangosteen peel powder supplement on the performance of dairy cows fed concentrate containing yeast fermented cassava chip protein.

    PubMed

    Polyorach, Sineenart; Wanapat, Metha; Phesatcha, Kampanat; Kang, Sungchhang

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) peel powder (MSP) supplementation on feed intake, nutrient digestibility, ruminal fermentation, and milk production in lactating dairy cows fed a concentrate containing yeast fermented cassava chip protein (YEFECAP). Four crossbred dairy cows (50 % Holstein-Friesian and 50 % Thai native breed) in mid-lactation, 404 ± 50.0 kg of body weight and 90 ± 5 day in milk with daily milk production of 9 ± 2.0 kg/day, were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design to receive 4 dietary treatments. The treatments were different levels of MSP supplementation at 0, 100, 200, and 300 g/head/day. Rice straw was used as a roughage source and fed ad libitum to all cows, and concentrate containing YEFECAP at 200 g/kg concentrate was offered corresponding to concentrate to milk yield ratio at 1:2. Results revealed that feed intake, apparent nutrient digestibility, ruminal pH and temperature, and total volatile fatty acid were not significantly affected by MSP supplementation (P > 0.05). However, increasing levels of MSP supplementation increased molar proportion of propionate while ammonia-nitrogen, acetate, and acetate to propionate ratio were decreased (P < 0.01). Moreover, milk production and economic return were increased linearly (P < 0.01) with the increasing level of MSP supplementation. The present findings suggested that supplementation of MSP especially at 300 g/head/day with concentrate containing YEFECAP at 200 g/kg could improve rumen fermentation efficiency, milk production and protein content, and economical return of lactating dairy cows fed on rice straw.

  4. Effects of protein and peptide addition on lipid oxidation in powder model system.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mori, Tomohiko; Matsumura, Yasuki

    2005-01-12

    The effect of protein and peptide addition on the oxidation of eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl ester (EPE) encapsulated by maltodextrin (MD) was investigated. The encapsulated lipid (powder lipid) was prepared in two steps, i.e., mixing of EPE with MD solutions (+/- protein and peptides) to produce emulsions and freeze-drying of the resultant emulsions. EPE oxidation in MD powder progressed more rapidly in the humid state [relative humidity (RH) = 70%] than in the dry state (RH = 10%). The addition of soy protein, soy peptide, and gelatin peptides improved the oxidation stability of EPE encapsulated by MD, and the inhibition of lipid oxidation by the protein and the peptides was more dramatic in the humid state. Especially, the oxidation of EPE was almost perfectly suppressed when the lipid was encapsulated with MD + soy peptide during storage in the humid state for 7 days. Several physical properties such as the lipid particle size of the emulsions, the fraction of nonencapsulated lipids, scanning electron microscopy images of powder lipids, and the mobility of the MD matrix were investigated to find the modification of encapsulation behavior by the addition of the protein and peptides, but no significant change was observed. On the other hand, the protein and peptides exhibited a strong radical scavenging activity in the powder systems as well as in the solution systems. These results suggest that a chemical mechanism such as radical scavenging ability plays an important role in the suppression of EPE oxidation in MD powder by soy proteins, soy peptides, and gelatin peptides.

  5. Prospective evaluation of testing with baked milk to predict safe ingestion of baked milk in unheated milk-allergic children.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Allison; Asper, Maria; Lavi, Sasson; Lavine, Elana; Hummel, David; Upton, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Cow's milk allergy is one of the most common food allergies affecting young children. A subset of milk-allergic individuals can eat baked milk without allergic symptoms which is beneficial in terms of prognostication and liberalization of the diet. A retrospective study suggested that skin prick testing (SPT) with a baked milk (muffin) slurry may provide a sensitive means of predicting the outcome of a medically supervised baked milk oral food challenge. We evaluated the predictive value of SPT with baked milk to identify unheated milk-allergic children who are able to safely eat baked milk. Children aged 2-16 years with a prior history of reaction to milk and a milk extract SPT of 8-14 mm were recruited. Investigator-blinded SPT to muffin slurry and powdered milk in triplicate and specific IgE (sIgE) to casein and milk were performed. Graded oral challenge to egg-free baked milk muffins (total 2.6 gm milk protein) was performed in the hospital. Reliability of tests was analyzed for intraclass correlation. Statistical significance for clinical characteristics of population and muffin testing versus baked milk reactivity was calculated with Fisher exact test for dichotomous and t-test for continuous variables. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare immunological characteristics between individuals who tolerated or reacted to baked milk. Fitted predicted probability curves and ROC curves were generated. Thirty-eight children were consented and 30 met study criteria. The muffin SPT and casein sIgE were significantly different in those who passed versus failed baked milk challenge. Negative (<3 mm) baked milk tests were found in 8/30 children (27 %) and were associated with non-reactivity to baked milk (p = 0.01) with a sensitivity of 1 (0.70-1.00). All children with negative SPT for baked milk passed the oral challenge. Specificity was 0.41 (0.19-0.67). The optimal decision point for the muffin SPT was 4 mm and the casein sIgE was 6 kU/L. The powdered milk

  6. Effect of gestation length on the levels of five innate defence proteins in human milk.

    PubMed

    Broadhurst, Marita; Beddis, Keryn; Black, Janet; Henderson, Harold; Nair, Arun; Wheeler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Human milk contains a range of host defence proteins that appear to contribute to health and wellbeing, but their variability in abundance among individuals has not been very well characterised. Milk from mothers of premature infants has altered composition, but the effect of gestation length on the host-defence properties of milk is not known. A study was therefore undertaken to determine the variability and effect of gestation length on the abundance of five host-defence proteins in milk; lactoferrin, secretory IgA, IgG, secretory component, and complement C3. Milk was obtained from 30 mothers at their second and fifth week of lactation. These were from three groups of ten mothers having had very premature (V; 28-32 weeks gestation), premature (P; 33-36 weeks) or full term deliveries (T; 37-41 weeks). The concentration of each of the five proteins was measured in each milk sample by either ELISA or quantitative western blotting. The concentration of IgG, and complement C3 ranged 22- and 17-fold respectively between mothers, while lactoferrin, secretory IgA, and secretory component ranged 7-, 9-, and 4-fold, respectively. The V group had significantly lower concentrations of four of the five proteins, the exception being IgG. Levels of these four proteins also decreased between weeks 2 and 5 of lactation in the P and T groups. Significant correlation was found between the concentrations of the host defence proteins within individual mothers, indicating some degree of co-ordinate regulation. Mothers vary widely in the levels of host defence proteins in milk. Very short gestation length results in decreased abundance of host-defence proteins in milk. This may have functional implications for very premature infants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Minor milk constituents are affected by protein concentration and forage digestibility in the feed ration.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Torben; Alstrup, Lene; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2016-02-01

    The present study was conducted in order to investigate if selected minor milk components would be indicative for the nutritional situation of the cow. Forty-eight dairy cows were offered a high digestible ration vs. a lower digestible ration combined with 2 protein levels in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Milk glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, cholesterol, triacylglycerides (TAG), uric acid and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) were measured and correlated mutually and towards other milking parameters (yield, h since last milking, days in milk (DIM), urea, etc). The variation range of the suggested variables were broad, a fact that may support their utilisation as predictive parameters. The content of milk metabolites was significantly affected by the change in rations as milk glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, uric acid, and the ratio cholesterol: triacylglycerides increased with higher energy intake while BHBA and TAG decreased. The content of some of the milk metabolites changed during 24 h day/night periods: BHBA, cholesterol, uric acid and TAG increased whereas free glucose decreased in the night period. Certain associations between milk metabolites and calculated energy parameters like ECM, body condition score (BCS), and body weight gain were found, however, these associations were to some extent explained by an interaction with DIM, just as changes in milk metabolites during a 24 h period seems to interfere. It is concluded that the practical use of the suggested milk variables should be based on more than one metabolite and that stage of lactation and possibly time of the day where the milk is collected should be incorporated in predictive models.

  8. Comparative proteomics of milk fat globule membrane proteins from transgenic cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Sui, Shunchao; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jianwu; Zhang, Ran; Guo, Chengdong; Yu, Tian; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The use of transgenic livestock is providing new methods for obtaining pharmaceutically useful proteins. However, the protein expression profiles of the transgenic animals, including expression of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins, have not been well characterized. In this study, we compared the MFGM protein expression profile of the colostrum and mature milk from three lines of transgenic cloned (TC) cattle, i.e., expressing recombinant human α-lactalbumin (TC-LA), lactoferrin (TC-LF) or lysozyme (TC-LZ) in the mammary gland, with those from cloned non-transgenic (C) and conventionally bred normal animals (N). We identified 1, 225 proteins in milk MFGM, 166 of which were specifically expressed only in the TC-LA group, 265 only in the TC-LF group, and 184 only in the TC-LZ group. There were 43 proteins expressed only in the transgenic cloned animals, but the concentrations of these proteins were below the detection limit of silver staining. Functional analysis also showed that the 43 proteins had no obvious influence on the bovine mammary gland. Quantitative comparison revealed that MFGM proteins were up- or down-regulated more than twofold in the TC and C groups compared to N group: 126 in colostrum and 77 in mature milk of the TC-LA group; 157 in colostrum and 222 in mature milk of the TC-LF group; 49 in colostrum and 98 in mature milk of the TC-LZ group; 98 in colostrum and 132 in mature milk in the C group. These up- and down-regulated proteins in the transgenic animals were not associated with a particular biological function or pathway, which appears that expression of certain exogenous proteins has no general deleterious effects on the cattle mammary gland.

  9. Comparative Proteomics of Milk Fat Globule Membrane Proteins from Transgenic Cloned Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwu; Zhang, Ran; Guo, Chengdong; Yu, Tian; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The use of transgenic livestock is providing new methods for obtaining pharmaceutically useful proteins. However, the protein expression profiles of the transgenic animals, including expression of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteins, have not been well characterized. In this study, we compared the MFGM protein expression profile of the colostrum and mature milk from three lines of transgenic cloned (TC) cattle, i.e., expressing recombinant human α-lactalbumin (TC-LA), lactoferrin (TC-LF) or lysozyme (TC-LZ) in the mammary gland, with those from cloned non-transgenic (C) and conventionally bred normal animals (N). We identified 1, 225 proteins in milk MFGM, 166 of which were specifically expressed only in the TC-LA group, 265 only in the TC-LF group, and 184 only in the TC-LZ group. There were 43 proteins expressed only in the transgenic cloned animals, but the concentrations of these proteins were below the detection limit of silver staining. Functional analysis also showed that the 43 proteins had no obvious influence on the bovine mammary gland. Quantitative comparison revealed that MFGM proteins were up- or down-regulated more than twofold in the TC and C groups compared to N group: 126 in colostrum and 77 in mature milk of the TC-LA group; 157 in colostrum and 222 in mature milk of the TC-LF group; 49 in colostrum and 98 in mature milk of the TC-LZ group; 98 in colostrum and 132 in mature milk in the C group. These up- and down-regulated proteins in the transgenic animals were not associated with a particular biological function or pathway, which appears that expression of certain exogenous proteins has no general deleterious effects on the cattle mammary gland. PMID:25133402

  10. Manganese binding proteins in human and cow's milk

    SciTech Connect

    Loennerdal, B.; Keen, C.L.; Hurley, L.S.

    1985-03-01

    Manganese nutrition in the neonatal period is poorly understood, due in part to a lack of information on the amount of manganese in infant foods and its bioavailability. Since the molecular localization of an element in foods is one determinant of its subsequent bioavailability, a study was made of the binding of manganese in human and cow's milk. An extrinsic label of /sup 54/Mn was shown to equilibrate isotopically with native manganese in milks and formulas. Milk samples were separated into fat, casein and whey by ultracentrifugation. In human milk, the major part (71%) of manganese was found in whey, 11% in casein and 18% in the lipid fraction. In contrast, in cow's milk, 32% of total manganese was in whey, 67% in casein and 1% in lipid. Within the human whey fraction, most of the manganese was bound to lactoferrin, while in cow's whey, manganese was mostly complexed to ligands with molecular weights less than 200. The distribution of manganese in formulas was closer to that of human milk than of cow's milk. The bioavailability of manganese associated with lactoferrin, casein and low molecular weight complexes needs to be assessed.

  11. Chocolate milk and endurance exercise recovery: protein balance, glycogen, and performance.

    PubMed

    Lunn, William R; Pasiakos, Stefan M; Colletto, Megan R; Karfonta, Kirstin E; Carbone, John W; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Rodriguez, Nancy R

    2012-04-01

    This study examined effects of fat-free chocolate milk (MILK) consumption on kinetic and cellular markers of protein turnover, muscle glycogen, and performance during recovery from endurance exercise. Male runners participated in two trials separated by 1 wk and consumed either MILK or a nonnitrogenous isocaloric carbohydrate (CHO) control beverage (CON) after a 45-min run at 65% of V˙O(2peak). Postexercise muscle protein fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and whole-body protein turnover were determined during 3 h of recovery using muscle biopsies and primed constant infusions of L-[ring-²H₅]phenylalanine and L-[1-¹³C]leucine, respectively. Phosphorylation of translational signaling proteins and activity of proteolytic molecules were determined using Western blotting and enzymatic activity assays. Muscle glycogen was quantified, and treadmill time to exhaustion was determined after the recovery period. Consuming MILK after exercise resulted in higher mixed muscle FSR with lower whole-body proteolysis and synthesis compared with CON (P ≤ 0.05). Phosphorylation of eIF4E-BP1 and FOXO3a was higher for MILK (P < 0.01), whereas Akt phosphorylation was lower during recovery regardless of dietary treatment (P < 0.05). Enzymatic activity assays indicated lower caspase-3 activity during recovery for MILK (P < 0.01) and higher 26S proteasome activity for CON (P < 0.01). Muscle glycogen was not affected by either dietary treatment; however, time to exhaustion was greater for MILK than for CON (P < 0.05). The effects of consumption of MILK after endurance exercise on FSR, signaling molecules of skeletal muscle protein turnover, leucine kinetics, and performance measures suggest unique benefits of milk compared with a CHO-only beverage.

  12. Quantitation of human milk proteins and their glycoforms using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM).

    PubMed

    Huang, Jincui; Kailemia, Muchena J; Goonatilleke, Elisha; Parker, Evan A; Hong, Qiuting; Sabia, Rocchina; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2017-01-01

    Human milk plays a substantial role in the child growth, development and determines their nutritional and health status. Despite the importance of the proteins and glycoproteins in human milk, very little quantitative information especially on their site-specific glycosylation is known. As more functions of milk proteins and other components continue to emerge, their fine-detailed quantitative information is becoming a key factor in milk research efforts. The present work utilizes a sensitive label-free MRM method to quantify seven milk proteins (α-lactalbumin, lactoferrin, secretory immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, α1-antitrypsin, and lysozyme) using their unique peptides while at the same time, quantifying their site-specific N-glycosylation relative to the protein abundance. The method is highly reproducible, has low limit of quantitation, and accounts for differences in glycosylation due to variations in protein amounts. The method described here expands our knowledge about human milk proteins and provides vital details that could be used in monitoring the health of the infant and even the mother. Graphical Abstract The glycopeptides EICs generated from QQQ.

  13. Molecular characterization of two novel milk proteins in the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guangxiao; Attardo, Geoffrey M.; Lohs, Claudia; Aksoy, Serap

    2009-01-01

    Tsetse reproduction is unique among insects due to the small numbers of offspring the flies produce and because the female fly carries and nourishes her offspring for their entire immature development. Larval nourishment is supplied by the female as a “milk” substance synthesized by a specialized accessory gland. The milk consists of ~50% fat and ~50% protein. Two milk proteins were identified as the Major Milk gland Protein (GmmMGP) and Transferrin (GmmTsf). Here we describe the identification of two novel gene transcripts (gmmmgp2 and gmmmgp3) produced by the milk gland tissue. These putative secretory products bear no homology to known proteins in the NCBI nr database. Transcripts for these genes can only be detected in the milk gland and their temporal expression correlates with larval development. Functional analysis of these products by RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown analysis shows that GmmMGP2 is critical to reproductive function. The protein appears to affect ovulation, suggesting that it may play a regulatory role in the tsetse reproductive cycle. GmmMGP3 knockdown lacks a phenotype, suggesting its function as a milk protein is possibly redundant. PMID:20136662

  14. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of bioactive milk proteins in the intestine of newborns.

    PubMed

    Chatterton, Dereck E W; Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Bering, Stine Brandt; Sangild, Per Torp

    2013-08-01

    The human newborn infant is susceptible to gut inflammatory disorders. In particular, growth-restricted infants or infants born prematurely may develop a severe form of intestinal inflammation known as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), which has a high mortality. Milk provides a multitude of proteins with anti-inflammatory properties and in this review we gather together some recent significant advances regarding the isolation and proteomic identification of these minor constituents of both human and bovine milk. We introduce the process of inflammation, with a focus on the immature gut, and describe how a multitude of milk proteins act against the inflammatory process according to both in vitro and in vivo studies. We highlight the effects of milk proteins such as caseins, and of whey proteins such as alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, osteopontin, immunoglobulins, trefoil factors, lactoperoxidase, superoxide dismutase, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, alkaline phosphatase, and growth factors (TGF-β, IGF-I and IGF-II, EGF, HB-EGF). The effects of milk fat globule proteins, such as TLR-2, TLR-4, sCD14 and MFG-E8/lactadherin, are also discussed. Finally, we indicate how milk proteins could be useful for the prophylaxis and therapy of intestinal inflammation in infants and children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling the heat inactivation of foodborne pathogens in milk powder: High relevance of the substrate water activity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Emilie; Chemlal, Layla; Molin, Paul; Guyot, Stéphane; Alvarez-Martin, Pablo; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Dantigny, Philippe; Gervais, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Due to the ability of foodborne pathogens to survive in low moisture foods, the decontamination of these products is an important issue in food hygiene. Up to now, such decontamination has mostly been achieved through empirical methods. The intention of this work is to establish a more rational use of heat treatment cycles. The effects of thermal treatment cycles on the inactivation of dried Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Senftenberg, Cronobacter sakazakii and Escherichia coli were assessed. Bacteria were mixed with whole milk powder and dried down to different water activity levels (0.11, 0.25, 0.44 and 0.58). The rate of inactivated bacteria was determined after thermal treatment at 85°C, 90°C, 95°C and 100°C, from 0s to 180s in closed vessels, in order to maintain aw during treatment. In a first step, logarithmic bacterial inactivation was fitted by means of a classical loglinear model in which temperature and aw have a significant effect (p<0.05). DT,aw values were estimated for each T, aw condition and the results clearly showed that aw is a major parameter in the thermal decontamination of dried foods, a lower aw involving greater thermal resistance. In a second step, Bigelow's law was used to determine zT, a classical parameter relative to temperature, and yaw values, a new parameter relative to aw resistance. The values obtained for zT and yaw showed that the bacterium most resistant to temperature variations is Salmonella Typhimurium, while the one most resistant to aw variations is Escherichia coli. These data will help design decontamination protocols or processes in closed batches for low moisture foods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi; Bellinger, David C; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to explore infancy as a critical period of arsenic exposure in regard to developmental neurotoxicity and its possible persistence through adulthood. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and the neurological outcomes more than 50 years later. We conducted a retrospective cohort study during the period from April 2012 to February 2013 in two hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. The study sample consisted of 50 individuals: 27 known poisoning victims from Okayama Prefecture, and 23 non-exposed local controls of similar age. In addition to neurological examination, we adapted a battery of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests to identify the types of brain functions affected by early-life arsenic exposure. While limited abnormalities were found in the neurophysiological tests, neuropsychological deficits were observed. Except for Finger tapping, all test scores in the exposed group--Vocabulary and Block Design from Wechsler Adults Intelligent Scale III, Design memory subtest from Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2, and Grooved pegboard test--were substantially below those obtained by the unexposed. The exposed group showed average performance at least 1.2 standard deviations below the average for the controls. Exposed participants performed less well than controls, even after exclusion of subjects with recognized disabilities or those with a high level of education. Adults who had suffered arsenic poisoning during infancy revealed neuropsychological dysfunctions, even among those subjects not recognized as having disabilities. Developmental neurotoxicity due to arsenic likely results in permanent

  17. Bioactive Functions of Milk Proteins: a Comparative Genomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Julie A; Modepalli, Vengama; Enjapoori, Ashwanth Kumar; Bisana, Swathi; Abud, Helen E; Lefevre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2014-12-01

    The composition of milk includes factors required to provide appropriate nutrition for the growth of the neonate. However, it is now clear that milk has many functions and comprises bioactive molecules that play a central role in regulating developmental processes in the young while providing a protective function for both the suckled young and the mammary gland during the lactation cycle. Identifying these bioactives and their physiological function in eutherians can be difficult and requires extensive screening of milk components that may function to improve well-being and options for prevention and treatment of disease. New animal models with unique reproductive strategies are now becoming increasingly relevant to search for these factors.

  18. Photolytic Cross-Linking to Probe Protein-Protein and Protein-Matrix Interactions in Lyophilized Powders.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lavanya K; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2015-09-08

    Protein structure and local environment in lyophilized formulations were probed using high-resolution solid-state photolytic cross-linking with mass spectrometric analysis (ssPC-MS). In order to characterize structure and microenvironment, protein-protein, protein-excipient, and protein-water interactions in lyophilized powders were identified. Myoglobin (Mb) was derivatized in solution with the heterobifunctional probe succinimidyl 4,4'-azipentanoate (SDA) and the structural integrity of the labeled protein (Mb-SDA) confirmed using CD spectroscopy and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Mb-SDA was then formulated with and without excipients (raffinose, guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn HCl)) and lyophilized. The freeze-dried powder was irradiated with ultraviolet light at 365 nm for 30 min to produce cross-linked adducts that were analyzed at the intact protein level and after trypsin digestion. SDA-labeling produced Mb carrying up to five labels, as detected by LC-MS. Following lyophilization and irradiation, cross-linked peptide-peptide, peptide-water, and peptide-raffinose adducts were detected. The exposure of Mb side chains to the matrix was quantified based on the number of different peptide-peptide, peptide-water, and peptide-excipient adducts detected. In the absence of excipients, peptide-peptide adducts involving the CD, DE, and EF loops and helix H were common. In the raffinose formulation, peptide-peptide adducts were more distributed throughout the molecule. The Gdn HCl formulation showed more protein-protein and protein-water adducts than the other formulations, consistent with protein unfolding and increased matrix interactions. The results demonstrate that ssPC-MS can be used to distinguish excipient effects and characterize the local protein environment in lyophilized formulations with high resolution.

  19. Chromatographic separation and detection of contaminants from whole milk powder using a chitosan-modified silver nanoparticles surface-enhanced Raman scattering device.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Lv, Di Y; Zhu, Qing X; Li, Hao; Chen, Hui; Wu, Mian M; Chai, Yi F; Lu, Feng

    2017-06-01

    Methods for the on-site analysis of food contaminants are in high demand. Although portable Raman spectroscopy is commonly used to test food on-site, it can be challenge to achieve this goal with rapid detection and inexpensive substrate. In this study, we detected trace food contaminants in samples of whole milk powder using the methods that combined chromatography with surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection (SERS). We developed a simple and efficient technique to fabricate the paper with chitosan-modified silver nanoparticles as a SERS-active substrate. The soaking time of paper and the concentration of chitosan solution were optimized for chromatographic separation and SERS detection. We then studied the separation properties for real applications including complex sample matrices, and detected melamine at 1mg/L, dicyandiamide at 100mg/L and sodium sulfocyanate at 10mg/L in whole milk powder. As such, our methods have great potential for field-based detection of milk contaminants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human milk galectin-3 binding protein and breast-feeding-associated HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Chan, Christina S; Kim, Hae-Young; Autran, Chloe; Kim, Jae H; Sinkala, Moses; Kankasa, Chipepo; Mwiya, Mwiya; Thea, Donald M; Aldrovandi, Grace M; Kuhn, Louise; Bode, Lars

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of milk from 247 HIV-infected Zambian mothers showed that galectin-3 binding protein concentrations were significantly higher among HIV-infected mothers who transmitted HIV through breast-feeding (6.51 ± 2.12 μg/mL) than among nontransmitters but were also correlated with higher milk and plasma HIV RNA copies/mL and lower CD4+ cell counts. The association between galectin-3 binding protein and postnatal transmission was attenuated after adjustment for milk and plasma HIV load and CD4+ cell counts. This suggests that although milk galectin-3 binding protein is a marker of advanced maternal disease, it does not independently modify transmission risk.

  1. A rapid analytical method for cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) in fortified infant formula, milk and milk powder using Diels-Alder derivatisation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, Grant A

    2012-05-01

    A method for analysing vitamin D(3) (VD3, cholecalciferol) has been established and validated. This method is rapid and cost effective and is intended for use in quality control in the manufacture of fortified infant formulae and milk powders. Milk or reconstituted milk powder was solubilised in methanol and extracted in one step into isooctane, which was separated by centrifugation. A portion of the isooctane layer was then transferred, and an aliquot of 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione was added to derivatise VD3. The analyte was then re-extracted into a small volume of acetonitrile and analysed by reverse-phase chromatography. Detection was by triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using a selective transition, m/z 560 → 298. An internal standard, deuterium-labelled VD3, was used to correct for losses in extraction and any variation in derivatisation and ionisation efficiencies. The method has been subjected to a single-laboratory validation and has been found to be linear, highly selective and accurate with respect to National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 1849, analyte spiking experiments and comparison with an LC-UV-based method. The repeatability standard deviation was 4.23 %. Significantly for routine laboratories, the method returns results within 2 h, generates minimal waste and minimises health and safety concerns to the analyst.

  2. Compared with casein or total milk protein, digestion of milk soluble proteins is too rapid to sustain the anabolic postprandial amino acid requirement.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Magali; Bos, Cécile; Léonil, Joëlle; Airinei, Gheorge; Luengo, Catherine; Daré, Sophie; Benamouzig, Robert; Fouillet, Hélène; Fauquant, Jacques; Tomé, Daniel; Gaudichon, Claire

    2006-11-01

    The in vivo quality of milk protein fractions has seldom been studied in humans. Our objective was to compare the postprandial utilization of dietary nitrogen from 3 [(15)N]-labeled milk products: micellar caseins (MC), milk soluble protein isolate (MSPI), and total milk protein (TMP). The macronutrient intakes of 23 healthy volunteers were standardized for 1 wk, after which time the subjects ingested a meal containing MC (n = 8), MSPI (n = 7), or TMP (n = 8). [(15)N] was measured for an 8-h period in plasma amino acids, proteins, and urea and in urinary urea. The transfer of dietary nitrogen to urea occurred earlier after MSPI ingestion than after MC and TMP ingestion, and concentrations remained high for 8 h, concomitantly with higher but transient hyperaminoacidemia and a higher incorporation of dietary nitrogen into plasma amino acids. In contrast, deamination, postprandial hyperaminoacidemia, and the incorporation of dietary nitrogen into plasma amino acids were lower in the MC and TMP groups. Finally, total postprandial deamination values were 18.5 +/- 2.9%, 21.1 +/- 2.8%, and 28.2 +/- 2.9% of ingested nitrogen in the TMP, MC, and MSPI groups, respectively. Our results confirm the major role of kinetics in dietary nitrogen postprandial utilization and highlight the paradox of MSPI, which, despite its high Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score, ensures a rate of amino acid delivery that is too rapid to sustain the anabolic requirement during the postprandial period. Milk proteins had the best nutritional quality, which suggested a synergistic effect between soluble proteins and caseins.

  3. Effect of thermal processing of cow and buffalo milk on the allergenic response to caseins and whey proteins in mice.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, Umesh Kumar; Kapila, Rajeev; Haq, Raies M; Kapila, Suman; Kansal, V K

    2013-07-01

    Heat treatment is the most common method for reducing pathogen load, but it remains controversial in reducing the incidence of hyperimmune reactions. The aim of this study was to compare the allergenicity of caseins (CSN) and whey proteins (WP) of thermally processed cow and buffalo milk in a mouse model. Swiss albino mice were sensitised by intraperitoneal injections (administered in three doses at weekly intervals) of CSN or WP from cow or buffalo milk for the evaluation of humoral response and splenocyte stimulation index. After 3 weeks of intraperitoneal stimulation of mice with milk proteins, the sterilised milk protein group displayed significantly lowered (P ≤ 0.05) serum IgG and IgE levels, while considerably increased cow milk protein-specific responses (IgE) were shown by proteins of pasteurised milk compared with those of raw milk. The stimulation index of splenocytes induced by CSN or WP of boiled and sterilised milk was also lower (P ≤ 0.05) than that of raw milk of both cow and buffalo. The experiment showed that boiling and sterilisation of cow and buffalo milk clearly affect the allergenicity by decreasing the humoral and cell-mediated responses in mice. All results indicated that CSN and WP of sterilised milk are less allergenic than those of raw milk in mice. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Development and validation of a method for the quantification of milk proteins in food products based on liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Petra; Parisod, Véronique; Weymuth, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The protection of allergic consumers is crucial to the food industry. Therefore, accurate methods for the detection of food allergens are required. Targeted detection of selected molecules by MS combines high selectivity with accurate quantification. A confirmatory method based on LC/selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS/MS was established and validated for the quantification of milk traces in food. Tryptic peptides of the major milk proteins beta-lactoglobulin, beta-casein, alphaS2-casein, and K-casein were selected as quantitative markers. Precise quantification was achieved using internal standard peptides containing isotopically labeled amino acids. For each peptide, qualifier and quantifier fragments were selected according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. A simple sample preparation method was established without immunoaffinity or SPE enrichment steps for food matrixes containing different amounts of protein, such as baby food, breakfast cereals, infant formula, and cereals. Intermediate reproducibility, repeatability, accuracy, and measurement uncertainty were determined for each matrix. LOD values of 0.2-0.5 mg/kg, e.g., for beta-lactoglobulin, were comparable to those obtained with ELISA kits. An LOQ of approximately 5 mg/kg, expressed as mass fraction skim milk powder, was validated in protein-rich infant cereals. The obtained validation data show that the described LC/SRM-MS/MS approach can serve as a confirmatory method for the determination of milk traces in selected food matrixes.

  5. Case report: hematemesis could be an unusual presentation of cow's milk protein allergy in children in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Manal Mohamed; Ahmed, Eman Mohamed; Morsy, Amal Abd El Alim

    2014-01-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is common in infants with variable clinical presentation including varied gastrointestinal manifestation. Cow's milk protein allergy chiefly, involving occurs in children below the age of 3 years, successful therapy depends on completely eliminating cow's milk proteins (CMP) from the child's diet. Ideally, with the replacement of hypo or an allergenic food. Symptoms suggestive of CMPA may be encountered in approximately 5 to 15% of infants emphasizing the importance of controlled elimination/milk challenge procedures. We report on an Egyptian male infant, who developed frequent attacks of hematemesis when begin to eat foods other than breast milk including cow's milk and its dairy products at the age of three months. Possible cow's milk protein allergy was suspected. Further diagnostic work-up was done including: Hb, hematocrit, MCV: iron, ferritin, CRP, occult blood in stools, antibodies to H-pylori and upper GIT endoscopy and biopsy from snip of duodenal mucosa. Measurement of serum cow milk protein specific IgE by radio allegro sorbent test (RAST) technique (immune CAP specific IgE method) and results revealed cow's milk protein allergy. It is concluded that cow's milk protein allergy should be considered in cases of hematemesis presented in early infancy in infants who fed cow's milk early and that hematemesis should be added to the list of clinical presentation of CMPA.

  6. Characterization of milk proteins-lutein complexes and the impact on lutein chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiang; Fan, Yuting; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhang, Yuzhu; Zhao, Liqing

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the interaction of WPI (whey protein isolate) and SC (sodium caseinate) with hydrophobic lutein was investigated through UV-vis spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) as well as fluorescence. The effects on lutein's chemical stability were also examined. The decrease of turbidity of lutein suggested that lutein's aqueous solubility was improved after binding with milk proteins. CD analysis indicated lutein had little impact on the secondary structures of both proteins. Different preparation methods have significant impacts on the binding constant. Fluorescence results indicated that WPI and SC interact with lutein by hydrophobic contacts. Milk proteins have protective effects on lutein against oxidation and decomposition, and SC showed better capability in protecting lutein from oxidation than WPI during 16 days storage. The lutein's chemical stability was increased with increasing of proteins concentration. The results indicated that milk proteins may act as effective carriers for lipophilic nutraceuticals.

  7. External cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopy for protein analysis in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Kuligowski, Julia; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Alcaráz, Mirta Raquel; Quintás, Guillermo; Mayer, Helmut; Vento, Máximo; Lendl, Bernhard

    2017-04-22

    The analytical determination of bovine milk proteins is important in food and non-food industrial applications and yet, rather labour-intensive wet-chemical, low-throughput methods have been employed since decades. This work proposes the use of external cavity-quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) spectroscopy for the simultaneous quantification of the most abundant bovine milk proteins and the total protein content based on the chemical information contained in mid-infrared (IR) spectral features of the amide I band. Mid-IR spectra of protein standard mixtures were used for building partial least squares (PLS) regression models. Protein concentrations in commercial bovine milk samples were calculated after chemometric compensation of the matrix contribution employing science-based calibration (SBC) without sample pre-processing. The use of EC-QCL spectroscopy together with advanced multivariate data analysis allowed the determination of casein, α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin and total protein content within several minutes.

  8. Porcine colostrum and milk stimulate visceral organ and skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Burrin, D G; Shulman, R J; Reeds, P J; Davis, T A; Gravitt, K R

    1992-06-01

    Our objective was to determine the relative contributions of protein synthesis and protein absorption in the rapid accretion of gastrointestinal protein in suckling piglets during the early neonatal period. We measured the rates of tissue protein synthesis using a flooding dose of L-[4-3H]phenylalanine in various visceral and peripheral tissues of neonatal piglets fed water, mature milk or colostrum for 6 h. The jejunal and ileal protein synthesis rates in piglets fed either colostrum or milk were three- to fourfold higher than in piglets fed water. The increased jejunal and ileal protein synthesis could not, however, account for the differences in protein mass between the colostrum-fed and water-fed groups. The relative abundance of IgG, a major porcine colostral protein, in jejunal tissue was markedly higher in piglets fed colostrum than in piglets fed either milk or water. The fractional protein synthesis rates in liver, kidney, spleen and skeletal muscle and the absolute protein synthesis rates in liver and spleen were also greater in piglets fed colostrum than in those fed milk or water. Increased endogenous protein synthesis made only a minor contribution to the increased intestinal protein accretion in neonatal piglets fed colostrum. A much larger proportion of this increase seemed to be a result of absorption and retention of ingested immunoglobulins.

  9. Use of layer silicate for protein crystallization: effects of Micromica and chlorite powders in hanging drops.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Masahide; Ino, Keita; Takakusagi, Yoichi; Oshikane, Hiroyuki; Nureki, Osamu; Ebina, Takeo; Mizukami, Fujio; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2008-02-15

    Two kinds of layer silicate powder, Micromica and chlorite, were used to aid protein crystallization by the addition to hanging drops. Using appropriate crystallization buffers, Micromica powder facilitated crystal growth speed for most proteins tested in this study. Furthermore, the addition of Micromica powder to hanging drops allowed the successful crystallization of lysozyme, catalase, concanavalin A, and trypsin even at low protein concentrations and under buffer conditions that otherwise would not generate protein crystals. Except for threonine synthase and apoferritin, the presence of chlorite delayed crystallization but induced the formation of large crystals. X-ray analysis of thaumatin crystals generated by our novel procedure gave better quality data than did that of crystals obtained by a conventional hanging drop method. Our results suggest that the speed of crystal growth and the quality of the corresponding X-ray data may be inversely related, at least for the formation of thaumatin crystals. The effect of Micromica and chlorite powders and the application of layer silicate powder for protein crystallization are discussed.

  10. Fluorescence sensor array for identification of commercial milk samples according to their thermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Mungkarndee, Radeemada; Techakriengkrai, Ittipon; Tumcharern, Gamolwan; Sukwattanasinitt, Mongkol

    2016-04-15

    Identification of processed milk is of importance for commercial and legal concerns. The fluorescence response patterns induced by fluorophore/protein interactions allow a possible discrimination of processed milk samples corresponding to their thermal treatment. The fluorescence responses of 4 fluorophores upon addition of commercial milk samples in 96-well plate are measured in the range of 400-600 nm using the excitation wavelength at 375 nm. The pattern recognition of the 53,126 fluorescence responses (4 fluorophores×41 wavelengths×4 thermally processed milks×3 brands×3 lots×3 bottles×3 repeats) are analyzed by multivariate statistical methods. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) successfully recognizes the milk samples according to their thermal processing, i.e. pasteurized milk, sterilized milk, UHT fresh milk and recombined milk (UHT milk having milk powder), with 100% classification accuracy in a cross validation using a leave-one-out technique.

  11. A milk diet partly containing soy protein does not change growth but regulates jejunal proteins in young goats.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, S; Rudolph, P E; Albrecht, D; Schoenhusen, U; Zitnan, R; Tomek, W; Huber, K; Voigt, J; Metges, C C

    2007-09-01

    Soy protein is known to alter intestinal function and structure. We determined in young goats whether a diet partly containing soy protein differently affects intestinal morphology and the jejunal and hepatic proteome as compared with a milk diet. Fourteen male 2-wk-old White German dairy goat kids were fed comparable diets based on whole cow's milk in which 35% of the crude protein was casein (milk protein group; MP) or soy protein supplemented by indispensable AA (SPAA) for 34 d (n = 7/group). Body weight gain and food efficiency were not different. Jejunal and hepatic tissue was collected to determine intestinal morphology by microscopy and protein repertoire by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Jejunal crypt depth was reduced and villus height to crypt depth ratio was higher in SPAA than in milk protein. Out of 131 proteins identified, 32 proteins were found to be differently expressed in both groups. In SPAA, down-regulated jejunal proteins were involved in processes related to cytoskeleton generation, protein, lipid, and energy metabolism. Downregulated hepatic proteins were related to glycolysis and Krebs cycle. Thirteen proteins were upregulated in SPAA. Among these, 2 hepatic proteins were related to carbohydrate breakdown. The other 11 jejunal proteins were involved in cytoskeleton assembly, proteolysis, and carbohydrate breakdown. In addition, glutathione-S-transferase was found to be upregulated in the medial jejunum. In conclusion, a SPAA diet as compared with a milk diet was related to changes in jejunal morphology and jejunal proteins relevant for protein turnover, energy metabolism, and cytoskeleton assembly with no apparent impact on animal BW gain.

  12. Development of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin E antibodies to cow's milk proteins and ovalbumin after a temporary neonatal exposure to hydrolyzed and whole cow's milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Juvonen, P; Månsson, M; Kjellman, N I; Björkstén, B; Jakobsson, I

    1999-08-01

    The ingestion of food antigens usually results in the induction of oral tolerance, but the clinical and immunologic consequences of brief exposure to cow's milk proteins during the neonatal period are not well-documented. The aim of this work was to study immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG responses to cow's milk proteins and ovalbumin after exposure during the first three days of life in infants who were otherwise exclusively breast-fed. A group of 129 infants was randomly assigned at birth to one of three feeding regimens: human milk (HM), cow's milk formula (CMF), or a casein hydrolysate formula (CHF), during the first three days of life. They were then all exclusively breast-fed for a varying period of time and followed for two years. Serum IgG and IgE antibodies to cow's milk proteins and ovalbumin (OVA) were analyzed in blood samples obtained at birth, at 4 days and at 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 months of age. The levels of IgG antibodies to beta-lactoglobulin (IgG-BLG) and bovine serum albumin (IgG-BSA) were higher in the CMF and the HM groups than in the CHF group for up to two years. This was particularly obvious for IgG-BLG in infants who started weaning before two months. The levels of IgG antibodies to casein (IgG-CAS) were higher in the CMF group, as compared with the CHF group at 8 and 12 months. The levels of IgG antibodies to OVA were similar in all three feeding groups. The levels of IgE antibodies to CAS or OVA were similar in the three feeding groups. Exposure to cow's milk during the first three days of life stimulated IgG antibody production to cow's milk proteins and this was still obvious at 2 years of age, while feeding with a casein hydrolysate during the first three days of life was associated with low levels of IgG antibodies to cow's milk proteins.

  13. Selenoprotein P Is the Major Selenium Transport Protein in Mouse Milk

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kristina E.; Motley, Amy K.; Winfrey, Virginia P.; Burk, Raymond F.

    2014-01-01

    Selenium is transferred from the mouse dam to its neonate via milk. Milk contains selenium in selenoprotein form as selenoprotein P (Sepp1) and glutathione peroxidase-3 (Gpx3) as well as in non-specific protein form as selenomethionine. Selenium is also present in milk in uncharacterized small-molecule form. We eliminated selenomethionine from the mice in these experiments by feeding a diet that contained sodium selenite as the source of selenium. Selenium-replete dams with deletion of Sepp1 or Gpx3 were studied to assess the effects of these genes on selenium transfer to the neonate. Sepp1 knockout caused a drop in milk selenium to 27% of the value in wild-type milk and a drop in selenium acquisition by the neonates to 35%. In addition to decreasing milk selenium by eliminating Sepp1, deletion of Sepp1 causes a decline in whole-body selenium, which likely also contributes to the decreased transfer of selenium to the neonate. Deletion of Gpx3 did not decrease milk selenium content or neonate selenium acquisition by measurable amounts. Thus, when the dam is fed selenium-adequate diet (0.25 mg selenium/kg diet), milk Sepp1 transfers a large amount of selenium to neonates but the transfer of selenium by Gpx3 is below detection by our methods. PMID:25068390

  14. Composition, yield, and functionality of reduced-fat Oaxaca cheese: effects of using skim milk or a dry milk protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Caro, I; Soto, S; Franco, M J; Meza-Nieto, M; Alfaro-Rodríguez, R H; Mateo, J

    2011-02-01

    The effect of adding either skim milk or a commercial dry milk protein concentrate (MPC) to whole milk on the composition, yield, and functional properties of Mexican Oaxaca cheese were investigated. Five batches of Oaxaca cheeses were produced. One batch (the control) was produced from whole milk containing 3.5% fat and 9% nonfat solids (SNF). Two batches were produced from milk standardized with skim milk to 2.7 and 1.8% fat, maintaining the SNF content at 9%. In the other 2 batches, an MPC (40% protein content) was used to standardize the milk to a SNF content of 10 and 11%, maintaining the milk fat content at 3.5%. The use of either skim milk or MPC caused a significant decrease in the fat percentage in cheese. The use of skim milk or MPC showed a nonsignificant tendency to lower total solids and fat recoveries in cheese. Actual, dry matter, and moisture-adjusted cheese yields significantly decreased with skim milk addition, but increased with MPC addition. However, normalized yields adjusted to milk fat and protein reference levels did not show significant differences between treatments. Considering skim milk-added and control cheeses, actual yield increased with cheese milk fat content at a rate of 1.34 kg/kg of fat (R=0.88). In addition, cheese milk fat and SNF:fat ratio proved to be strong individual predictors of cheese moisture-adjusted yield (r(2) ≈ 0.90). Taking into account the results obtained from control and MPC-added cheeses, a 2.0-kg cheese yield increase rate per kg of milk MPC protein was observed (R=0.89), with TS and SNF being the strongest predictors for moisture adjusted yield (r(2) ≈ 0.77). Reduced-fat Oaxaca cheese functionality differed from that of controls. In unmelted reduced-fat cheeses, hardness and springiness increased. In melted reduced-fat cheeses, meltability and free oil increased, but stretchability decreased. These changes were related to differences in cheese composition, mainly fat in dry matter and calcium in SNF.

  15. Determination of iodide and thiocyanate in powdered milk and infant formula by on-line enrichment ion chromatography with photodiode array detection.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Richard A; Anderson, David L

    2008-07-25

    Thiocyanate ranks after perchlorate as a potent inhibitor of iodide uptake by the thyroid but may be more concentrated in some food items such as milk products as to supersede perchlorate as the goitrogen of concern. A column-switching anion-exchange chromatographic method with UV spectral detection was developed to measure and confirm iodide and thiocyanate in powders of dry milk and infant formula. An aqueous solution was subjected to centrifugal ultrafiltration, the ultrafiltrate was cleaned up on a carbon solid-phase extraction column, and an aliquot was transferred to a precolumn for enrichment and subsequent injection onto an analytical column. In infant formula samples, thiocyanate was found at 2.0-5.1 mg/kg in five of seven milk-based products and was not found in the other two nor in three soy-based products tested (0.2 mg/kg LOQ); iodide was found at 0.3-1.3mg/kg (0.04 mg/kg LOQ). In 13 dry milk samples, thiocyanate was found at 27-38 mg/kg (1 mg/kg LOQ), and iodide was found at 1.8-3.2 mg/kg (0.2 mg/kg LOQ).

  16. Functions of milk protein gene 5' flanking regions on human growth hormone gene.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, T; Hirabayashi, M; Sagara, J; Yuki, A

    1994-03-01

    Fragments containing 5' flanking regions of four bovine milk protein genes--alpha lactalbumin (b alpha LA), alpha S1 casein (b alpha S1CN), beta casein (b beta CN), kappa casein (b kappa CN)--and mouse whey acidic protein (mWAP) gene were prepared by PCR and ligated to human growth hormone (hGH) gene. These recombinant DNAs were microinjected into rat embryos to produce transgenic rats, and the functions of the 5' regio