Science.gov

Sample records for power assisted wheelchair

  1. Drive Control Scheme of Electric Power Assisted Wheelchair Based on Neural Network Learning of Human Wheelchair Operation Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanohata, Naoki; Seki, Hirokazu

    This paper describes a novel drive control scheme of electric power assisted wheelchairs based on neural network learning of human wheelchair operation characteristics. “Electric power assisted wheelchair” which enhances the drive force of the operator by employing electric motors is expected to be widely used as a mobility support system for elderly and disabled people. However, some handicapped people with paralysis of the muscles of one side of the body cannot maneuver the wheelchair as desired because of the difference in the right and left input force. Therefore, this study proposes a neural network learning system of such human wheelchair operation characteristics and a drive control scheme with variable distribution and assistance ratios. Some driving experiments will be performed to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  2. Design and development of solar power-assisted manual/electric wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chi-Sheng; Huang, Tung-Yung; Liao, Tze-Yuan; Kuo, Tsung-Yuan; Lee, Tzer-Min

    2014-01-01

    Wheelchairs are an essential assistive device for many individuals with injury or disability. Manual wheelchairs provide a relatively low-cost solution to the mobility needs of such individuals. Furthermore, they provide an effective means of improving the user's cardiopulmonary function and upper-limb muscle strength. However, manual wheelchairs have a loss gross mechanical efficiency, and thus the risk of user fatigue and upper-limb injury is increased. Electric-powered wheelchairs reduce the risk of injury and provide a more convenient means of transportation. However, they have a large physical size and are relatively expensive. Accordingly, the present study utilizes a quality function deployment method to develop a wheelchair with a user-selectable manual/electric propulsion mode and an auxiliary solar power supply system. The auxiliary solar power supply increased the travel range of the wheelchair by approximately 26% compared with that of a wheelchair powered by battery alone. Moreover, the wheelchair has a modular design and can be disassembled and folded for ease of transportation or storage. Overall, the present results suggest that the proposed wheelchair provides an effective and convenient means of meeting the mobility needs of individuals with mobility difficulties.

  3. Rolling resistance and propulsion efficiency of manual and power-assisted wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Efthymia; Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Buurke, Jaap H; Rietman, Johan S; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2015-11-01

    Rolling resistance is one of the main forces resisting wheelchair propulsion and thus affecting stress exerted on the upper limbs. The present study investigates the differences in rolling resistance, propulsion efficiency and energy expenditure required by the user during power-assisted and manual propulsion. Different tire pressures (50%, 75%, 100%) and two different levels of motor assistance were tested. Drag force, energy expenditure and propulsion efficiency were measured in 10 able-bodied individuals under different experimental settings on a treadmill. Results showed that drag force levels were significantly higher in the 50%, compared to the 75% and 100% inflation conditions. In terms of wheelchair type, the manual wheelchair displayed significantly lower drag force values than the power-assisted one. The use of extra-power-assisted wheelchair appeared to be significantly superior to conventional power-assisted and manual wheelchairs concerning both propulsion efficiency and energy expenditure required by the user. Overall, the results of the study suggest that the use of power-assisted wheelchair was more efficient and required less energy input by the user, depending on the motor assistance provided.

  4. Effect of power-assisted hand-rim wheelchair propulsion on shoulder load in experienced wheelchair users: A pilot study with an instrumented wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Kloosterman, Marieke G M; Buurke, Jaap H; de Vries, Wiebe; Van der Woude, Lucas H V; Rietman, Johan S

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to compare hand-rim and power-assisted hand-rim propulsion on potential risk factors for shoulder overuse injuries: intensity and repetition of shoulder loading and force generation in the extremes of shoulder motion. Eleven experienced hand-rim wheelchair users propelled an instrumented wheelchair on a treadmill while upper-extremity kinematic, kinetic and surface electromyographical data was collected during propulsion with and without power-assist. As a result during power-assisted propulsion the peak resultant force exerted at the hand-rim decreased and was performed with significantly less abduction and internal rotation at the shoulder. At shoulder level the anterior directed force and internal rotation and flexion moments decreased significantly. In addition, posterior and the minimal inferior directed forces and the external rotation moment significantly increased. The stroke angle decreased significantly, as did maximum shoulder flexion, extension, abduction and internal rotation. Stroke-frequency significantly increased. Muscle activation in the anterior deltoid and pectoralis major also decreased significantly. In conclusion, compared to hand-rim propulsion power-assisted propulsion seems effective in reducing potential risk factors of overuse injuries with the highest gain on decreased range of motion of the shoulder joint, lower peak propulsion force on the rim and reduced muscle activity.

  5. Operationality Improvement Control of Electric Power Assisted Wheelchair by Fuzzy Algorithm Considering Posture Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hiroki; Seki, Hirokazu; Minakata, Hideaki; Tadakuma, Susumu

    This paper describes a novel operationality improvement control for electric power assisted wheelchairs. “Electric power assisted wheelchair” which assists the driving force by electric motors is expected to be widely used as a mobility support system for elderly people and disabled people, however, the performance of the straight and circular road driving must be further improved because the two wheels drive independently. This paper proposes a novel operationality improvement control by fuzzy algorithm to realize the stable driving on straight and circular roads. The suitable assisted torque of the right and left wheels is determined by fuzzy algorithm based on the posture angular velocity, the posture angle of the wheelchair, the human input torque proportion and the total human torque of the right and left wheels. Some experiments on the practical roads show the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  6. Stability analysis of electrical powered wheelchair-mounted robotic-assisted transfer device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwu; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Jeannis, Hervens; Chung, Cheng-Shiu; Kelleher, Annmarie; Grindle, Garrett G; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-01-01

    The ability of people with disabilities to live in their homes and communities with maximal independence often hinges, at least in part, on their ability to transfer or be transferred by an assistant. Because of limited resources and the expense of personal care, robotic transfer assistance devices will likely be in great demand. An easy-to-use system for assisting with transfers, attachable to electrical powered wheelchairs (EPWs) and readily transportable, could have a significant positive effect on the quality of life of people with disabilities. We investigated the stability of our newly developed Strong Arm, which is attached and integrated with an EPW to assist with transfers. The stability of the system was analyzed and verified by experiments applying different loads and using different system configurations. The model predicted the distributions of the system's center of mass very well compared with the experimental results. When real transfers were conducted with 50 and 75 kg loads and an 83.25 kg dummy, the current Strong Arm could transfer all weights safely without tip-over. Our modeling accurately predicts the stability of the system and is suitable for developing better control algorithms to enhance the safety of the device.

  7. A Study of a Handrim-Activated Power-Assist Wheelchair Based on a Non-Contact Torque Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Tae; Jang, Dae-Jin; Kim, Yong Chol; Heo, Yoon; Hong, Eung-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Demand for wheelchairs is increasing with growing numbers of aged and disabled persons. Manual wheelchairs are the most commonly used assistive device for mobility because they are convenient to transport. Manual wheelchairs have several advantages but are not easy to use for the elderly or those who lack muscular strength. Therefore, handrim-activated power-assist wheelchairs (HAPAW) that can aid driving power with a motor by detecting user driving intentions through the handrim are being researched. This research will be on HAPAW that judge user driving intentions by using non-contact torque sensors. To deliver the desired motion, which is sensed from handrim rotation relative to a fixed controller, a new driving wheel mechanism is designed by applying a non-contact torque sensor, and corresponding torques are simulated. Torques are measured by a driving wheel prototype and compared with simulation results. The HAPAW prototype was developed using the wheels and a driving control algorithm that uses left and right input torques and time differences are used to check if the non-contact torque sensor can distinguish users’ driving intentions. Through this procedure, it was confirmed that the proposed sensor can be used effectively in HAPAW. PMID:27509508

  8. Engineering manual and electric powered wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A

    1999-01-01

    The sophistication required to develop and properly configure a wheelchair is illustrated by the amount and complexity of the research being conducted. At this time there appears to be between 1.5 and 2.0 million full-time wheelchair users within the United States. The reliance of the user on the wheelchair and the amount of time in the wheelchair provide significant challenges for the wheelchair design engineer. Currently there are a wide variety of wheelchair designs that are commercially available. These wheelchairs accommodate a variety of people's needs, and represent significant progress. The current trend among manufacturers of manual wheelchairs seems to be cost-reduction engineering. The ergonomics of long-term wheelchair use are critical to the advancement of wheelchair design and to the clinical selection of wheelchairs. Electric powered wheelchairs appear to be progressing faster than nearly all other types of wheelchairs. This is due to the availability of computing power with low cost microcontrollers and associated peripherals. The greater range and availability of sensors are also making changes into the design of electric powered wheelchairs. The interaction between an electric powered wheelchair and the user can be extremely complex. In many cases, individual solutions are necessary. One of the more challenging questions is determining the abilities of the user required to drive an electric powered wheelchair effectively. There have been substantial improvements in the engineering of all wheelchairs. However, there remain significant issues to be addressed.

  9. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  10. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  11. 49 CFR 39.93 - What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring onto a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... and Services to Passengers With Disabilities § 39.93 What wheelchairs and other assistive devices may... must permit individuals with mobility disabilities to use wheelchairs and manually powered...

  12. Perceived exercise benefits and barriers among power wheelchair soccer players.

    PubMed

    Barfield, J P; Malone, Laurie A

    2013-01-01

    Lack of exercise is a major risk factor for secondary conditions among persons dependent upon motorized wheelchairs. Power wheelchair soccer is a unique exercise opportunity for this population, and understanding factors that influence exercise decision-making is necessary for clinicians to help those in motorized chairs reduce their secondary risk. Therefore, this study examined differences in perceived benefits and barriers to exercise among power wheelchair soccer players using a mixed-methods analysis. The most common perceived benefit to exercise was "Exercising lets me have contact with friends and persons I enjoy." Post hoc comparisons of quantitative data indicated that persons with muscular dystrophy perceived exercise to be significantly less important than did other disability groups (p < 0.05). "Exercise is hard work for me," "Exercise tires me," and "There are too few places for me to exercise" were the most common perceived barriers. These findings can assist with development of exercise opportunities for power wheelchair users.

  13. 21 CFR 890.3860 - Powered wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered wheelchair. 890.3860 Section 890.3860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3860 Powered wheelchair....

  14. 21 CFR 890.3860 - Powered wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered wheelchair. 890.3860 Section 890.3860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3860 Powered wheelchair....

  15. 21 CFR 890.3860 - Powered wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered wheelchair. 890.3860 Section 890.3860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3860 Powered wheelchair....

  16. 21 CFR 890.3860 - Powered wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered wheelchair. 890.3860 Section 890.3860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3860 Powered wheelchair....

  17. 21 CFR 890.3860 - Powered wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered wheelchair. 890.3860 Section 890.3860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3860 Powered wheelchair....

  18. An observational study of powered wheelchair provision in Italy.

    PubMed

    Salatino, Claudia; Andrich, Renzo; Converti, R M; Saruggia, M

    2016-01-01

    Powered wheelchairs are complex and expensive assistive devices that must be selected and configured on the basis of individual user needs, lifestyle, motivation, driving ability, and environment. Providing agencies often require evidence that their financial investment will lead to a successful outcome. The authors surveyed a sample of 79 users who had obtained powered wheelchairs from a Regional Health Service in Italy in the period 2008-2013. Follow-up interviews were conducted at the users' homes in order to collect information about wheelchair use, and its effectiveness, usefulness, and economic impact. The instruments used in the interviews included an introductory questionnaire, QUEST (Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology), PIADS (Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale), FABS/M (Facilitators and Barriers Survey/Mobility), and SCAI (Siva Cost Analysis Instrument). The results indicated positive outcomes, especially in relation to user satisfaction and psychosocial impact. A number of barriers were identified in various settings that sometimes restrict user mobility, and suggest corrective actions. The provision of a powered wheelchair generated considerable savings in social costs for most users: an average of about $38,000 per person over a projected 5-year period was estimated by comparing the cost of the intervention with that of non-intervention.

  19. Performance testing of collision-avoidance system for power wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Lopresti, Edmund F; Sharma, Vinod; Simpson, Richard C; Mostowy, L Casimir

    2011-01-01

    The Drive-Safe System (DSS) is a collision-avoidance system for power wheelchairs designed to support people with mobility impairments who also have visual, upper-limb, or cognitive impairments. The DSS uses a distributed approach to provide an add-on, shared-control, navigation-assistance solution. In this project, the DSS was tested for engineering goals such as sensor coverage, maximum safe speed, maximum detection distance, and power consumption while the wheelchair was stationary or driven by an investigator. Results indicate that the DSS provided uniform, reliable sensor coverage around the wheelchair; detected obstacles as small as 3.2 mm at distances of at least 1.6 m; and attained a maximum safe speed of 4.2 km/h. The DSS can drive reliably as close as 15.2 cm from a wall, traverse doorways as narrow as 81.3 cm without interrupting forward movement, and reduce wheelchair battery life by only 3%. These results have implications for a practical system to support safe, independent mobility for veterans who acquire multiple disabilities during Active Duty or later in life. These tests indicate that a system utilizing relatively low cost ultrasound, infrared, and force sensors can effectively detect obstacles in the vicinity of a wheelchair.

  20. Power Wheelchair Use in Persons With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Changes Over Time.

    PubMed

    Ward, Amber Lea; Hammond, Sara; Holsten, Scott; Bravver, Elena; Brooks, Benjamin Rix

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to survey persons with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) at 1 and 6 months after receiving power wheelchairs to determine long-term use, comfort, and function as well as the power wheelchair's impact on daily tasks and quality of life. A 33-question survey and Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS) were sent 1 month after getting a new power wheelchair; a follow-up survey was sent at 6 months. Based on satisfaction and feature use survey results, at 1 month, 81% of users found the power wheelchair overall comfort to be high, 88% found their overall mobility to be improved, and 95% found it easy to use. Their quality of life increased and pain decreased at 1 and 6 months. According to the PIADS, the power wheelchair gave users increased ability to participate and sense of competence. This study has important results for the ALS community, as it is the first to assess power wheelchair users at 1 and 6 months after power wheelchair procurement. The results demonstrate the impact the power wheelchair has on mobility, psychosocial issues, functional abilities, and quality of life for a person with ALS.

  1. Effect of visual perception, visual function, cognition, and personality on power wheelchair use in adults.

    PubMed

    Massengale, Samantha; Folden, Donna; McConnell, Pima; Stratton, Laurie; Whitehead, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent visual perception, visual function, cognition, and personality traits affect power wheelchair use in adults. It also proposes to establish baseline information to help clinicians determine or predict power wheelchair driving performance and to develop service plans to address those driving skills that need improvement or compensation. Sixty-two adult power wheelchair users were recruited. Standardized instruments were used to evaluate visual perceptual skills, visual function, cognitive skills, and personality traits. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with participants' scores on a power wheelchair performance test. Strong correlations were found between power wheelchair driving performance and visual perception (p = .000), ocular motor function (p = .000 and p < or = .001), stereodepth perception (p < or = .001), and alertness to the environment (p < or = .001). No significant correlations were found between personality traits and power wheelchair driving performance. These results indicate that good visual perceptual skills, visual function, and various aspects of cognition are necessary for proficient power wheelchair use. These data will assist clinicians in identifying significant factors to consider when evaluating and training clients for power wheelchair use.

  2. Autonomous assistance navigation for robotic wheelchairs in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Cheein, Fernando Auat; Carelli, Ricardo; De la Cruz, Celso; Muller, Sandra; Bastos Filho, Teodiano F

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a visual interface for the assistance of a robotic wheelchair's navigation is presented. The visual interface is developed for the navigation in confined spaces such as narrows corridors or corridor-ends. The interface performs two navigation modus: non-autonomous and autonomous. The non-autonomous driving of the robotic wheelchair is made by means of a hand-joystick. The joystick directs the motion of the vehicle within the environment. The autonomous driving is performed when the user of the wheelchair has to turn (90, 90 or 180 degrees) within the environment. The turning strategy is performed by a maneuverability algorithm compatible with the kinematics of the wheelchair and by the SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) algorithm. The SLAM algorithm provides the interface with the information concerning the environment disposition and the pose -position and orientation-of the wheelchair within the environment. Experimental and statistical results of the interface are also shown in this work.

  3. Effectiveness of a Wheelchair Skills Training Program for Powered Wheelchair Users: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, R. Lee; Miller, William C.; Routhier, Francois; Demers, Louise; Mihailidis, Alex; Polgar, Jan Miller; Rushton, Paula W.; Titus, Laura; Smith, Cher; McAllister, Mike; Theriault, Chris; Thompson, Kara; Sawatzky, Bonita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that powered wheelchair users who receive the Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) improve their wheelchair skills in comparison with a Control group that receives standard care. Our secondary objectives were to assess goal achievement, satisfaction with training, retention, injury rate, confidence with wheelchair use and participation. Design Randomized controlled trial (RCT). Setting Rehabilitation centers and communities. Participants 116 powered wheelchair users. Intervention Five 30-minute WSTP training sessions. Main Outcome Measures Assessments were done at baseline (T1), post-training (T2) and 3 months post-training (T3) using the Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q 4.1), Goal Attainment Score (GAS), Satisfaction Questionnaire, Injury Rate, Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale for Power Wheelchair Users (WheelCon) and Life Space Assessment (LSA). Results There was no significant T2-T1 difference between the groups for WST-Q capacity scores (p = 0.600) but the difference for WST-Q performance scores was significant (p = 0.016) with a relative (T2/T1 x 100%) improvement of the median score for the Intervention group of 10.8%. The mean (SD) GAS for the Intervention group after training was 92.8% (11.4) and satisfaction with training was high. The WST-Q gain was not retained at T3. There was no clinically significant difference between the groups in injury rate and no statistically significant differences in WheelCon or LSA scores at T3. Conclusions Powered wheelchair users who receive formal wheelchair skills training demonstrate modest transient post-training improvements in their WST-Q performance scores, they have substantial improvements on individualized goals and they are positive about training. PMID:26232684

  4. Using machine learning to blend human and robot controls for assisted wheelchair navigation.

    PubMed

    Goil, Aditya; Derry, Matthew; Argall, Brenna D

    2013-06-01

    This work presents an algorithm for collaborative control of an assistive semi-autonomous wheelchair. Our approach is based on a statistical machine learning technique to learn task variability from demonstration examples. The algorithm has been developed in the context of shared-control powered wheelchairs that provide assistance to individuals with impairments that affect their control in challenging driving scenarios, like doorway navigation. We validate our algorithm within a simulation environment, and find that with relatively few demonstrations, our approach allows for safe traversal of the doorway while maintaining a high level of user control.

  5. Design of assistive wheelchair system directly steered by human thoughts.

    PubMed

    Li, Junhua; Liang, Jianyi; Zhao, Qibin; Li, Jie; Hong, Kan; Zhang, Liqing

    2013-06-01

    Integration of brain-computer interface (BCI) technique and assistive device is one of chief and promising applications of BCI system. With BCI technique, people with disabilities do not have to communicate with external environment through traditional and natural pathways like peripheral nerves and muscles, and could achieve it only by their brain activities. In this paper, we designed an electroencephalogram (EEG)-based wheelchair which can be steered by users' own thoughts without any other involvements. We evaluated the feasibility of BCI-based wheelchair in terms of accuracies and real-world testing. The results demonstrate that our BCI wheelchair is of good performance not only in accuracy, but also in practical running testing in a real environment. This fact implies that people can steer wheelchair only by their thoughts, and may have a potential perspective in daily application for disabled people.

  6. Wheelchairs

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5pm ET. 1-800-539-7309 ☰ Living with Paralysis Get Support Get Involved Research Events Blog & Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Wheelchairs Wheelchairs There are many things to consider ...

  7. Wheelchair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA-developed aerospace computerized structural-analysis techniques and aerospace composite materials have resulted in an advanced wheelchair that weighs only 25 pounds. With only half the weight of a normal wheelchair, this advanced wheelchair is as strong and durable as a 50-pound stainless steel wheelchair yet can be easily collapsed forauto stowage. Its features include a seat, wheelguards, dynamic brakes, shaped hand rims, and a footrest with smooth contours to aid in opening doors.

  8. The Hephaestus Smart Wheelchair System.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard C; Poirot, Daniel; Baxter, Francie

    2002-06-01

    The Hephaestus Smart Wheelchair System is envisioned as a series of components that clinicians and wheelchair manufacturers will be able to attach to standard power wheelchairs to convert them into "smart wheelchairs." A prototype of the system has been developed and mounted on an Everest and Jennings Lancer2000 wheelchair. The prototype bases its navigation assistance behavior on the behavior developed for the NavChair Assistive Wheelchair Navigation System, but the underlying hardware and software are being designed to facilitate commercialization. This paper describes our design goals for the Hephaestus system and discusses the current status of the system prototype as well as plans for future work.

  9. Adaptive shared control for an intelligent power wheelchair

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.C.; Levine, S.P.

    1996-12-31

    The NavChair Assistive Navigation System is being developed to increase the mobility of severely handicapped individuals by providing navigation assistance for a power wheelchair. While designing the NavChair it became clear that obtaining the full range of desired functionality required several different {open_quotes}operating modes,{close_quotes} each of which was appropriate in different contexts. This also necessarily created a need for a method of choosing between these modes. One solution is for the user to manage the task of mode determination, which may place unacceptable performance burdens on NavChair users with severe disabilities. Instead, a means for the NavChair to automatically choose the proper operating mode is being sought.

  10. Wheelchairs

    MedlinePlus

    ... rolled into his new classroom and met his teacher. She asked if it would be OK to talk to the class about his wheelchair and Daniel agreed. Whew! He felt so relieved when she did. Mrs. Boyle told everyone that wheelchairs are just a good way of getting around if a person has ...

  11. RESNA Position on the Application of Power Wheelchairs for Pediatric Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Lauren; Arva, Julianna; Furumasu, Jan; Harris, Michele; Lange, Michelle L.; McCarthy, Elisabeth; Kermoian, Rosanne; Pinkerton, Heather; Plummer, Teresa; Roos, Jodi; Sabet, Andrina; Vander Schaaf, Paula; Wonsettler, Terri

    2009-01-01

    This document, approved by the Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Board of Directors in March 2007, shares typical clinical applications and provides evidence from the literature supporting the use of power wheelchairs for children. It is RESNA's position that age, limited vision or cognition,…

  12. Wheelchairs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Others have disabilities due to muscular dystrophy or cerebral palsy . In some cases, kids have wheelchairs but don' ... Therapist In the Band: Jens' Story Spina Bifida Cerebral Palsy Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  13. Using a smart wheelchair as a gaming device for floor-projected games: a mixed-reality environment for training powered-wheelchair driving skills.

    PubMed

    Secoli, R; Zondervan, D; Reinkensmeyer, D

    2012-01-01

    For children with a severe disability, such as can arise from cerebral palsy, becoming independent in mobility is a critical goal. Currently, however, driver's training for powered wheelchair use is labor intensive, requiring hand-over-hand assistance from a skilled therapist to keep the trainee safe. This paper describes the design of a mixed reality environment for semi-autonomous training of wheelchair driving skills. In this system, the wheelchair is used as the gaming input device, and users train driving skills by maneuvering through floor-projected games created with a multi-projector system and a multi-camera tracking system. A force feedback joystick assists in steering and enhances safety.

  14. A navigation system for increasing the autonomy and the security of powered wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, S; Leo, T; Longhi, S

    2000-12-01

    Assistive technology is an emerging area where some robotic devices can be used to strengthen the residual abilities of individuals with motor disabilities or to substitute their missing function thus helping them to gain a level of independence at least in the activities of daily living. This paper presents the design of a navigation system and its integration with a commercial powered wheelchair. The navigation system provides the commercial wheelchair with a set of functions which increase the autonomy of elderly and people with motor disabilities. In general, a robot device must be adapted to assistive applications in such a way as to be easily managed by the user. Users, especially young ones, prefer to directly control the robotic device and this aspect of usability has to be managed without affecting the security and efficiency of the navigation module. These aspects have been considered as specifications for the navigation module of powered wheelchairs. Different autonomy levels of the navigation module and proper user interfaces have been developed. Two autonomy levels have been designed. Simple collision avoidance is also implemented in order to stop the mobile base when an obstacle is detected. The preliminary technical tests performed on the navigation system have shown satisfactory results in terms of security and response time. A modular solution for the navigation module was considered in order to simplify the adaptation of the module to different powered wheelchairs.

  15. 14 CFR 382.125 - What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the cargo compartment? 382.125... Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.125 What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the...

  16. 14 CFR 382.125 - What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the cargo compartment? 382.125... Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.125 What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the...

  17. 14 CFR 382.125 - What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the cargo compartment? 382.125... Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.125 What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the...

  18. 14 CFR 382.125 - What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the cargo compartment? 382.125... Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.125 What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the...

  19. 14 CFR 382.125 - What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the cargo compartment? 382.125... Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.125 What procedures do carriers follow when wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be stowed in the...

  20. The power of power wheelchairs: Mobility choices of community-dwelling, older adults

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, WB; Hammell, KW; Luts, A; Soles, C; Miller, WC

    2015-01-01

    Background Power wheelchairs are purported to have a positive effect on health, occupation, and quality of life. However, there is limited knowledge about what factors shape power wheelchair use decisions. Aims/Objectives A study was undertaken to understand the mobility choices of community-dwelling, power wheelchair users. Methods A series of semi-structured qualitative interviews was conducted with 13 older adult power wheelchair users. Participants were interviewed at enrollment and four months later. Data analysis was informed by Bourdieu’s theoretical constructs of habitus, capital, and field. Results Three main styles of power wheelchair use were identified: reluctant use, strategic use and essential use, and each type is illustrated using an aggregate case study. Conclusion/Significance These findings highlight the need to alter the power relationship that exists between prescribers and device users and to effect policy changes that enable people with physical impairments to make as wide a range of mobility choices as possible. PMID:26027749

  1. REAL-TIME MODEL-BASED ELECTRICAL POWERED WHEELCHAIR CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongwu; Salatin, Benjamin; Grindle, Garrett G.; Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different control methods on driving speed variation and wheel-slip of an electric-powered wheelchair (EPW). A kinematic model as well as 3-D dynamic model was developed to control the velocity and traction of the wheelchair. A smart wheelchair platform was designed and built with a computerized controller and encoders to record wheel speeds and to detect the slip. A model based, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and an open-loop controller were applied with the EPW driving on four different surfaces at three specified speeds. The speed errors, variation, rise time, settling time and slip coefficient were calculated and compared for a speed step-response input. Experimental results showed that model based control performed best on all surfaces across the speeds. PMID:19733494

  2. Real-time model based electrical powered wheelchair control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwu; Salatin, Benjamin; Grindle, Garrett G; Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different control methods on driving speed variation and wheel slip of an electric-powered wheelchair (EPW). A kinematic model as well as 3D dynamic model was developed to control the velocity and traction of the wheelchair. A smart wheelchair platform was designed and built with a computerized controller and encoders to record wheel speeds and to detect the slip. A model based, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and an open-loop controller were applied with the EPW driving on four different surfaces at three specified speeds. The speed errors, variation, rise time, settling time and slip coefficient were calculated and compared for a speed step-response input. Experimental results showed that model based control performed best on all surfaces across the speeds.

  3. Power wheelchair range testing and energy consumption during fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A; VanSickle, D P; Albright, S J; Stewart, K J; Flannery, M; Robertson, R N

    1995-10-01

    The range of a power wheelchair depends on many factors including: battery type, battery state, wheelchair/rider weight, terrain, the efficiency of the drive train, and driving behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of three methods of estimating power wheelchair range. Another significant purpose was to compare the current draw on pavement to current draw on an International Standards Organization (ISO) Double Drum tester at one m/sec. Tests were performed on seven different power wheelchairs unloaded, and loaded with an ISO 100 kg test dummy. Each chair was configured according to the manufacturer's specifications, and tires were properly inflated. Experienced test technicians were used for the tennis court tests, and treadmill tests. An ISO 100 kg test dummy was used for the ISO Double Drum test. Energy consumption was measured over a distance of 1500 m for each of the three test conditions. The rolling surface was level in all cases. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant difference (p = 0.0001) between the predicted range at maximum speed for the three tests. Post hoc analysis demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.01) in estimated range at maximum speed between the Double Drum test and the treadmill test, as well as between the Double Drum test and the tennis court test. Our results indicate no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the predicted range at maximal speed between the treadmill and tennis court tests. A simple relationship does not exist between the results of range testing with the Double Drum tester and the tennis court. An alternative would be to permit the use of a treadmill for range testing as simple relationships between all pertinent treadmill and tennis court range data were found. For the Double Drum tester used, the current demand is higher than under normal usage. This presents a problem as current is related to load torque in a power wheelchair. Hence, the Double

  4. Power output for wheelchair driving on a treadmill compared with arm crank ergometry.

    PubMed Central

    Tropp, H; Samuelsson, K; Jorfeldt, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The limiting factors with regard to power output available for wheelchair ambulation have not been identified. The aim of the present study was to correlate power output during wheelchair driving with (i) power output and oxygen uptake during arm crank ergometry and (ii) arm muscle strength. METHODS: Eleven disabled men were examined for maximal power output (POmax) during wheelchair driving on a treadmill and during arm crank ergometry. Oxygen uptake (VO2) was recorded at submaximal and maximal arm crank ergometry in all men and during submaximal wheelchair driving on a treadmill in four men. Power output during wheelchair driving on a treadmill was measured. Static and dynamic elbow muscle strength was measured isokinetically. RESULTS: POmax was significantly lower (P < 0.001) for wheelchair driving (109 (31) W; mean (SD)) than for arm ergometry (163 (49) W). There was a significant correlation between POmax for arm crank ergometry and wheelchair driving (r = 0.73). There was no correlation between POmax and elbow strength. The mechanical efficiency was constant for the different levels on the arm crank ergometry test. The submaximal testing showed a consistently lower mechanical efficiency for wheelchair driving than for arm crank ergometry. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the lower level of power output for wheelchair driving is fully explained by the lower mechanical efficiency. Any improvement in power output available for ambulation must be based on wheelchair ergonomics. PMID:9132210

  5. Rare diseases: matching wheelchair users with rare metabolic, neuromuscular or neurological disorders to electric powered indoor/outdoor wheelchairs (EPIOCs)

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Lorraine H.; Frank, Andrew O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To describe the clinical features of electric powered indoor/outdoor wheelchair (EPIOC) users with rare diseases (RD) impacting on EPIOC provision and seating. Method: Retrospective review by a consultant in rehabilitation medicine of electronic and case note records of EPIOC recipients with RDs attending a specialist wheelchair service between June 2007 and September 2008. Data were systematically extracted, entered into a database and analysed under three themes; demographic, diagnostic/clinical (including comorbidity and associated clinical features (ACFs) of the illness/disability) and wheelchair factors. Results: Fifty-four (27 male) EPIOC users, mean age 37.3 (SD 18.6, range 11–70) with RDs were identified and reviewed a mean of 64 (range 0–131) months after receiving their wheelchair. Diagnoses included 27 types of RDs including Friedreich’s ataxia, motor neurone disease, osteogenesis imperfecta, arthrogryposis, cerebellar syndromes and others. Nineteen users had between them 36 comorbidities and 30 users had 44 ACFs likely to influence the prescription. Tilt-in-space was provided to 34 (63%) users and specialised seating to 17 (31%). Four users had between them complex control or interfacing issues. Conclusions: The complex and diverse clinical problems of those with RDs present unique challenges to the multiprofessional wheelchair team to maintain successful independent mobility and community living.Implications for RehabilitationPowered mobility is a major therapeutic tool for those with rare diseases enhancing independence, participation, reducing pain and other clinical features.The challenge for rehabilitation professionals is reconciling the physical disabilities with the individual’s need for function and participation whilst allowing for disease progression and/or growth.Powered wheelchair users with rare diseases with a (kypho) scoliosis require a wheelchair system that balances spine stability and movement to maximise

  6. Torque and power outputs on different subjects during manual wheelchair propulsion under different conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Seunghyeon; Son, Jongsang; Kim, Youngho

    2012-02-01

    Manual wheelchair users are at a high risk of pain and injuries to the upper extremities due to mechanical inefficiency of wheelchair propulsion motion. The kinetic analysis of the upper extremities during manual wheelchair propulsion in various conditions needed to be investigated. We developed and calibrated a wheelchair dynamometer for measuring kinetic parameters during propulsion. We utilized the dynamometer to investigate and compare the propulsion torque and power values of experienced and novice users under four different conditions. Experienced wheelchair users generated lower torques with more power than novice users and reacted alertly and sensitively to changing conditions. We expect that these basic methods and results may help to quantitatively evaluate the mechanical efficiency of manual wheelchair propulsion.

  7. Innovative Power Wheelchair Control Interface: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sandra L; Romero, Sergio; Prather, Emily; Ramroop, Marisa; Slaibe, Emmy; Christensen, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Some people without independent mobility are candidates for powered mobility but are unable to use a traditional power wheelchair joystick. This proof-of-concept study tested and further developed an innovative method of driving power wheelchairs for people whose impairments prevent them from operating commercial wheelchair controls. Our concept, Self-referenced Personal Orthotic Omni-purpose Control Interface (SPOOCI), is distinguished by referencing the control sensor not to the wheelchair frame but instead to the adjacent proximal lower-extremity segment via a custom-formed orthosis. Using a descriptive case-series design, we compared the pre-post functional power wheelchair driving skill data of 4 participants, measured by the Power Mobility Program, using descriptive analyses. The intervention consisted of standard-care power wheelchair training during 12 outpatient occupational or physical therapy sessions. All 4 participants who completed the 12-wk intervention improved their functional power wheelchair driving skills using SPOOCI, but only 3 were deemed safe to continue with power wheelchair driving.

  8. Innovative Power Wheelchair Control Interface: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Sergio; Prather, Emily; Ramroop, Marisa; Slaibe, Emmy; Christensen, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Some people without independent mobility are candidates for powered mobility but are unable to use a traditional power wheelchair joystick. This proof-of-concept study tested and further developed an innovative method of driving power wheelchairs for people whose impairments prevent them from operating commercial wheelchair controls. Our concept, Self-referenced Personal Orthotic Omni-purpose Control Interface (SPOOCI), is distinguished by referencing the control sensor not to the wheelchair frame but instead to the adjacent proximal lower-extremity segment via a custom-formed orthosis. Using a descriptive case-series design, we compared the pre–post functional power wheelchair driving skill data of 4 participants, measured by the Power Mobility Program, using descriptive analyses. The intervention consisted of standard-care power wheelchair training during 12 outpatient occupational or physical therapy sessions. All 4 participants who completed the 12-wk intervention improved their functional power wheelchair driving skills using SPOOCI, but only 3 were deemed safe to continue with power wheelchair driving. PMID:26943118

  9. 49 CFR 39.95 - May PVOs limit their liability for loss of or damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? 39.95 Section 39.95 Transportation Office of the... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? Consistent with any applicable requirements of..., damaged, or destroyed wheelchair or other assistive device is the original purchase price of the device....

  10. 49 CFR 39.95 - May PVOs limit their liability for loss of or damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? 39.95 Section 39.95 Transportation Office of the... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? Consistent with any applicable requirements of..., damaged, or destroyed wheelchair or other assistive device is the original purchase price of the device....

  11. 49 CFR 39.95 - May PVOs limit their liability for loss of or damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? 39.95 Section 39.95 Transportation Office of the... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? Consistent with any applicable requirements of..., damaged, or destroyed wheelchair or other assistive device is the original purchase price of the device....

  12. 49 CFR 39.95 - May PVOs limit their liability for loss of or damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? 39.95 Section 39.95 Transportation Office of the... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? Consistent with any applicable requirements of..., damaged, or destroyed wheelchair or other assistive device is the original purchase price of the device....

  13. 49 CFR 39.95 - May PVOs limit their liability for loss of or damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? 39.95 Section 39.95 Transportation Office of the... damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices? Consistent with any applicable requirements of..., damaged, or destroyed wheelchair or other assistive device is the original purchase price of the device....

  14. Exploring Powered Wheelchair Users and Their Caregivers’ Perspectives on Potential Intelligent Power Wheelchair Use: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kairy, Dahlia; Rushton, Paula W.; Archambault, Philippe; Pituch, Evelina; Torkia, Caryne; El Fathi, Anas; Stone, Paula; Routhier, François; Forget, Robert; Demers, Louise; Pineau, Joelle; Gourdeau, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Power wheelchairs (PWCs) can have a positive impact on user well-being, self-esteem, pain, activity and participation. Newly developed intelligent power wheelchairs (IPWs), allowing autonomous or collaboratively-controlled navigation, could enhance mobility of individuals not able to use, or having difficulty using, standard PWCs. The objective of this study was to explore the perspectives of PWC users (PWUs) and their caregivers regarding if and how IPWs could impact on current challenges faced by PWUs, as well as inform current development of IPWs. A qualitative exploratory study using individual interviews was conducted with PWUs (n = 12) and caregivers (n = 4). A semi-structured interview guide and video were used to facilitate informed discussion regarding IPWs. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes: (1) “challenging situations that may be overcome by an IPW” described how the IPW features of obstacle avoidance, path following, and target following could alleviate PWUs’ identified mobility difficulties; (2) “cautious optimism concerning IPW use revealed participants” addresses concerns regarding using an IPW as well as technological suggestions; (3) “defining the potential IPW user” revealed characteristics of PWUs that would benefit from IPW use. Findings indicate how IPW use may help overcome PWC difficulties and confirm the importance of user input in the ongoing development of IPWs. PMID:24566051

  15. Assessment of Joystick control during the performance of powered wheelchair driving tasks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Powered wheelchairs are essential for many individuals who have mobility impairments. Nevertheless, if operated improperly, the powered wheelchair poses dangers to both the user and to those in its vicinity. Thus, operating a powered wheelchair with some degree of proficiency is important for safety, and measuring driving skills becomes an important issue to address. The objective of this study was to explore the discriminate validity of outcome measures of driving skills based on joystick control strategies and performance recorded using a data logging system. Methods We compared joystick control strategies and performance during standardized driving tasks between a group of 10 expert and 13 novice powered wheelchair users. Driving tasks were drawn from the Wheelchair Skills Test (v. 4.1). Data from the joystick controller were collected on a data logging system. Joystick control strategies and performance outcome measures included the mean number of joystick movements, time required to complete tasks, as well as variability of joystick direction. Results In simpler tasks, the expert group's driving skills were comparable to those of the novice group. Yet, in more difficult and spatially confined tasks, the expert group required fewer joystick movements for task completion. In some cases, experts also completed tasks in approximately half the time with respect to the novice group. Conclusions The analysis of joystick control made it possible to discriminate between novice and expert powered wheelchair users in a variety of driving tasks. These results imply that in spatially confined areas, a greater powered wheelchair driving skill level is required to complete tasks efficiently. Based on these findings, it would appear that the use of joystick signal analysis constitutes an objective tool for the measurement of powered wheelchair driving skills. This tool may be useful for the clinical assessment and training of powered wheelchair skills. PMID

  16. An experimental method for measuring the moment of inertia of an electric power wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwu; Grindle, Garrett G; Connor, Samuel; Cooper, Rory A

    2007-01-01

    This study describe an experiment measuring the moment of inertia of an electric powered wheelchair (EPW) using a torsional pendulum method. Inertia of the wheelchair is an important factor for control, which is a key issue in wheelchair driving. The experimental test platform consisted of a bottom circular wood plate, an upper metal plate, and four ropes. Materials with known moments of inertia such as the metal disk and cylinder were used to test the accuracy of the system. The EPW used in the experiment was Invacare G3 Torque SP Storm Series. The measured result of the moment inertia of the wheelchair was 5.2280 kg.m(2) and the errors of the system are less than 10% even when the object is only 25lbs. The results are consistent when compared with other approximate methods. In addition, the experimental method could be used to measure the moment of inertia of manual wheelchairs and other irregular objects.

  17. Analysis of position and isometric joysticks for powered wheelchair driving.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A; Jones, D K; Fitzgerald, S; Boninger, M L; Albright, S J

    2000-07-01

    The control interface is one of the most critical components of the electric-powered wheelchair (EPW). The control interface must accommodate the user's limitations and maximize the user's abilities. This study extended Fitts' Law for target-acquisition to a continuously updated target. The extended Fitts' Law was used to examine EPW driving with a standard position sensing joystick and a prototype isometric joystick (IJ). The extended Fitts' Law provides insight into the difficulty of performing target-acquisition tasks with an EPW. The test results showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the two types of joysticks for selected measures of information processing capacity, movement time, root-mean-square-error, and average velocity while performing turning maneuvers. The mean values indicate that the IJ may provide superior turning performance.

  18. Design And Structural Analysis Of A Powered Wheelchair Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geonea, Ionut Daniel; Dumitru, Nicolae; Margine, Alexandru

    2015-09-01

    In this paper are presented the author's researches on designing, dynamical and structural evaluation of a transmission for a wheelchair, intended to persons with locomotors disabilities. The kinematics of proposed transmission is analyzed in order to realize a proper synthesis and design of gears. A 3D model of the transmission and wheelchair are designed in Solid Works, and they will be used for the dynamic simulation of the wheelchair robotic system in Adams software. In Adams is analyzed wheelchair trajectory and dynamics for a combined trajectory: linear motion and steering. Dynamic parameters obtained from simulation are used to perform a finite element analysis of bevel and worm gears. Simulation results reveal the transmission dynamics parameters, emphasize the efficiency of the transmission and enable implementation of this design to a wheelchair model.

  19. Wheelchair propulsion biomechanics and wheelers' quality of life: an exploratory review.

    PubMed

    Chow, John W; Levy, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. To provide an overview of associations between wheelchair propulsion biomechanics for both everyday and racing wheelchairs, wheeling-related upper limb injuries, and quality of life of manual wheelchair users through a synthesis of the available information. METHODS. A search of publications was carried out in PubMed and SportsDiscus databases. Studies on wheelchair propulsion biomechanics, upper limb injuries associated with wheelchair propulsion and quality of life of wheelchair users were identified. Relevant articles cited in identified articles but not cited in PubMed or SportsDiscus were also included. RESULTS. Wheelchair sports participation has positive impact on quality of life and research in racing wheelchair biomechanics can indirectly promote the visibility of wheelchair sports. The impact of pushrim-activated power-assisted wheelchairs (a hybrid between manual and battery-powered wheelchairs) and geared manual wheels on wheelers' everyday life were discussed. CONCLUSIONS. The study of wheelchair propulsion biomechanics focuses on how a wheelchair user imparts power to the wheels to achieve mobility and the accumulated knowledge can help to improve wheelchair users' mobility, reduce physical stress associated with wheelchair propulsion, and as a result, enhance quality of life.

  20. A robotic wheelchair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.; Grant, Edward

    1994-01-01

    Many people who are mobility impaired are incapable, for a variety of reasons, of using an ordinary wheelchair. These people must rely on either a power wheelchair, which they control, or another person to push and guide them while they are in an ordinary or power wheelchair. Power wheelchairs can be difficult to operate. If a person has additional disabilities, either in perception or fine motor control of their hands, a power chair can be difficult or impossible for them to use safely. Having one person push and guide a person who is mobility impaired is very expensive, and if the disabled person is otherwise independent, very inefficient and frustrating. This paper describes a low-cost robotic addition to a power wheelchair that assists the rider of the chair in avoiding obstacles, going to pre-designated places, and maneuvering through doorways and other narrow or crowded areas. This system can be interfaced to a variety of input devices, and can give the operator as much or as little moment by moment control of the chair as they wish.

  1. Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society (RESNA) position on the application of wheelchair standing devices: 2013 current state of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dicianno, Brad E; Morgan, Amy; Lieberman, Jenny; Rosen, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This article, approved by the Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society of North America Board of Directors on December 23, 2013, shares typical clinical applications and provides evidence from the literature supporting the use of wheelchair standers.

  2. Joystick-controlled video console game practice for developing power wheelchairs users' indoor driving skills.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei Pin; Wang, Chia Cheng; Hung, Jo Hua; Chien, Kai Chun; Liu, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Ng, How-Hing; Lin, Yang-Hua

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of joystick-controlled video console games in enhancing subjects' ability to control power wheelchairs. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy young adults without prior experience of driving power wheelchairs were recruited. Four commercially available video games were used as training programs to practice joystick control in catching falling objects, crossing a river, tracing the route while floating on a river, and navigating through a garden maze. An indoor power wheelchair driving test, including straight lines, and right and left turns, was completed before and after the video game practice, during which electromyographic signals of the upper limbs were recorded. The paired t-test was used to compare the differences in driving performance and muscle activities before and after the intervention. [Results] Following the video game intervention, participants took significantly less time to complete the course, with less lateral deviation when turning the indoor power wheelchair. However, muscle activation in the upper limbs was not significantly affected. [Conclusion] This study demonstrates the feasibility of using joystick-controlled commercial video games to train individuals in the control of indoor power wheelchairs.

  3. Design and User Evaluation of a Wheelchair Mounted Robotic Assisted Transfer Device

    PubMed Central

    Grindle, Garrett G.; Jeannis, Hervens; Teodorski, Emily; Cooper, Rory A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to describe the robotic assisted transfer device (RATD) and an initial focus group evaluation by end users. The purpose of the device is to aid in the transfers of people with disabilities to and from their electric powered wheelchair (EPW) onto other surfaces. The device can be used for both stand-pivot transfers and fully dependent transfers, where the person being transferred is in a sling and weight is fully on the robot. The RATD is fixed to an EPW to allow for its use in community settings. Method. A functional prototype of the RATD was designed and fabricated. The prototype was presented to a group of 16 end users and feedback on the device was obtained via a survey and group discussion. Results. Thirteen out of sixteen (83%) participants agreed that it was important to develop this type of technology. They also indicated that user, caregiver, and robotic controls were important features to be included in the device. Conclusions. Participants in this study suggested that they would be accepting the use of robotic technology for transfers and a majority did not feel that they would be embarrassed to use this technology. PMID:25793190

  4. Upper Body-Based Power Wheelchair Control Interface for Individuals with Tetraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Elias B.; Abdollahi, Farnaz; Chen, David; Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Lee, Mei-Hua; Pedersen, Jessica; Pierella, Camilla; Roth, Elliot J.; Gonzalez, Ismael Seanez; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2016-01-01

    Many power wheelchair control interfaces are not sufficient for individuals with severely limited upper limb mobility. The majority of controllers that do not rely on coordinated arm and hand movements provide users a limited vocabulary of commands and often do not take advantage of the user’s residual motion. We developed a body-machine interface (BMI) that leverages the flexibility and customizability of redundant control by using high dimensional changes in shoulder kinematics to generate proportional controls commands for a power wheelchair. In this study, three individuals with cervical spinal cord injuries were able to control the power wheelchair safely and accurately using only small shoulder movements. With the BMI, participants were able to achieve their desired trajectories and, after five sessions driving, were able to achieve smoothness that was similar to the smoothness with their current joystick. All participants were twice as slow using the BMI however improved with practice. Importantly, users were able to generalize training controlling a computer to driving a power wheelchair, and employed similar strategies when controlling both devices. Overall, this work suggests that the BMI can be an effective wheelchair control interface for individuals with high-level spinal cord injuries who have limited arm and hand control. PMID:26054071

  5. Upper Body-Based Power Wheelchair Control Interface for Individuals With Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Elias B; Abdollahi, Farnaz; Chen, David; Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Lee, Mei-Hua; Pedersen, Jessica P; Pierella, Camilla; Roth, Elliot J; Seanez Gonzalez, Ismael; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2016-02-01

    Many power wheelchair control interfaces are not sufficient for individuals with severely limited upper limb mobility. The majority of controllers that do not rely on coordinated arm and hand movements provide users a limited vocabulary of commands and often do not take advantage of the user's residual motion. We developed a body-machine interface (BMI) that leverages the flexibility and customizability of redundant control by using high dimensional changes in shoulder kinematics to generate proportional control commands for a power wheelchair. In this study, three individuals with cervical spinal cord injuries were able to control a power wheelchair safely and accurately using only small shoulder movements. With the BMI, participants were able to achieve their desired trajectories and, after five sessions driving, were able to achieve smoothness that was similar to the smoothness with their current joystick. All participants were twice as slow using the BMI however improved with practice. Importantly, users were able to generalize training controlling a computer to driving a power wheelchair, and employed similar strategies when controlling both devices. Overall, this work suggests that the BMI can be an effective wheelchair control interface for individuals with high-level spinal cord injuries who have limited arm and hand control.

  6. Driver Model of a Powered Wheelchair Operation as a Tool of Theoretical Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takuma; Inoue, Takenobu; Shino, Motoki; Kamata, Minoru

    This paper describes the construction of a driver model of a powered wheelchair operation for the understanding of the characteristics of the driver. The main targets of existing researches about driver models are the operation of the automobiles and motorcycles, not a low-speed vehicle such as powered wheelchairs. Therefore, we started by verifying the possibility of modeling the turning operation at a corner of a corridor. At first, we conducted an experiment on a daily powered wheelchair user by using his vehicle. High reproducibility of driving and the driving characteristics for the construction of a driver model were both confirmed from the result of the experiment. Next, experiments with driving simulators were conducted for the collection of quantitative driving data. The parameters of the proposed driver model were identified from experimental results. From the simulations with the proposed driver model and identified parameters, the characteristics of the proposed driver model were analyzed.

  7. Mechanical energy and power flow analysis of wheelchair use with different camber settings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueh-Chu; Guo, Lan-Yuen; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Su, Fong-Chin

    2013-04-01

    It has been suggested that minimisation of energy cost is one of the primary determinants of wheelchair designs. Wheel camber is one important parameter related to wheelchair design and its angle may affect usability during manual propulsion. However, there is little available literature addressing the effect of wheel camber on the mechanical energy or power flow involved in manual wheelchair propulsion. Twelve normal subjects (mean age, 22.3 years; SD, 1.6 years) participated in this study. A video-tracking system and an instrumented wheel were used to collect 3D kinematic and kinetic data. Wheel camber of 0° and 15° was chosen to examine the difference between mechanical power and power flow of the upper extremity during manual wheelchair propulsion. The work calculated from power flow and the discrepancy between the mechanical work and power flow work of upper extremity had significantly greater values with increased camber. The upper arm had a larger active muscle power compared with that in the forearm and hand segments. While propelling the increased camber, the magnitude of both the proximal and distal joint power and proximal muscle power was increased in all three segments. While the propelling wheel with camber not only needs a greater energy cost but also there is greater energy loss.

  8. Accessibilities of Wheelchair Users to Cross the Gaps and Steps between Platforms and Trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Tsutomu; Yoneda, Ikuo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Shoichiro; Sueda, Osamu

    Gaps and steps between platforms and trains reduce the accessibility and mobility of people with wheelchairs in railway transportations. Using an experimental platform, the observations are performed how gaps and steps influence their capabilities for manual wheelchair or electric powered wheelchair users with spinal cord injury. A quantity of Normalized Driving Force (NDF) is introduced to evaluate the manual wheelchair user's abilities in the case of getting on or off the trains. Three types of electric powered wheelchairs are also tested under the same experimental conditions as the manual wheelchair. The dynamic wheelchair driving force is measured by using a torque meter equipped on a wheelchair to analyze the required force when getting on the trains. To improve practical accessibility of such people, an assistive device for boarding the trains is designed and its effect is verified.

  9. Real-time head movement system and embedded Linux implementation for the control of power wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H T; King, L M; Knight, G

    2004-01-01

    Mobility has become very important for our quality of life. A loss of mobility due to an injury is usually accompanied by a loss of self-confidence. For many individuals, independent mobility is an important aspect of self-esteem. Head movement is a natural form of pointing and can be used to directly replace the joystick whilst still allowing for similar control. Through the use of embedded LINUX and artificial intelligence, a hands-free head movement wheelchair controller has been designed and implemented successfully. This system provides for severely disabled users an effective power wheelchair control method with improved posture, ease of use and attractiveness.

  10. Evaluating gaze-driven power wheelchair with navigation support for persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Wästlund, Erik; Sponseller, Kay; Pettersson, Ola; Bared, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a novel add-on for powered wheelchairs that is composed of a gaze-driven control system and a navigation support system. The add-on was tested by three users. All of the users were individuals with severe disabilities and no possibility of moving independently. The system is an add-on to a standard power wheelchair and can be customized for different levels of support according to the cognitive level, motor control, perceptual skills, and specific needs of the user. The primary aim of this study was to test the functionality and safety of the system in the user's home environment. The secondary aim was to evaluate whether access to a gaze-driven powered wheelchair with navigation support is perceived as meaningful in terms of independence and participation. The results show that the system has the potential to provide safe, independent indoor mobility and that the users perceive doing so as fun, meaningful, and a way to reduce dependency on others. Independent mobility has numerous benefits in addition to psychological and emotional well-being. By observing users' actions, caregivers and healthcare professionals can assess the individual's capabilities, which was not previously possible. Rehabilitation can be better adapted to the individual's specific needs, and driving a wheelchair independently can be a valuable, motivating training tool.

  11. The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazzaglia, Mariella; Molinari, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) place a heavy burden on the healthcare system and have a high personal impact and marked socio-economic consequences. Clinically, no absolute cure for these conditions exists. However, in recent years, there has been an increased focus on new robotic technologies that can change the frame we think about the prognosis for recovery and for treating some functions of the body affected after SCIs. This review has two goals. The first is to assess the possibility of the embodiment of functional assistive tools after traumatic disruption of the neural pathways between the brain and the body. To this end, we will examine how altered sensorimotor information modulates the sense of the body in SCI. The second goal is to map the phenomenological experience of using external tools that typically extend the potential of the body physically impaired by SCI. More specifically, we will focus on the difference between the perception of one's physically augmented and non-augmented affected body based on observable and measurable behaviors. We discuss potential clinical benefits of enhanced embodiment of the external objects by way of multisensory interventions. This review argues that the future evolution of human robotic technologies will require adopting an embodied approach, taking advantage of brain plasticity to allow bionic limbs to be mapped within the neural circuits of physically impaired individuals.

  12. Downward Slope Driving Control for Electric Powered Wheelchair Based on Capacitor Regenerative Brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Yoshiaki

    This paper describes a novel capacitor regenerative braking control scheme of electric powered wheelchairs for efficient driving on downward slopes. An electric powered wheelchair, which generates the driving force by electric motors, is expected to be widely used as a mobility support system for elderly people and disabled people; however the energy efficiency has to be further improved because it is driven only by battery energy. This study proposes a capacitor regenerative braking circuit and two types of velocity control schemes with variable duty ratio. The proposed regenerative braking circuit is based on the step-up/down circuit with additional resistance and connects right and left motors in series in order to obtain a larger braking power. Some driving experiments on a practical downward slope show the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  13. Evaluation of a Smartphone Platform as a Wireless Interface Between Tongue Drive System and Electric-Powered Wheelchairs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeonghee; Huo, Xueliang; Minocha, Julia; Holbrook, Jaimee; Laumann, Anne; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a new wireless assistive technology (AT) for the mobility impaired population. It provides users with the ability to drive powered wheelchairs (PWC) and access computers using their unconstrained tongue motion. Migration of the TDS processing unit and user interface platform from a bulky personal computer to a smartphone (iPhone) has significantly facilitated its usage by turning it into a true wireless and wearable AT. After implementation of the necessary interfacing hardware and software to allow the smartphone to act as a bridge between the TDS and PWC, the wheelchair navigation performance and associated learning was evaluated in nine able-bodied subjects in five sessions over a 5-week period. Subjects wore magnetic tongue studs over the duration of the study and drove the PWC in an obstacle course with their tongue using three different navigation strategies; namely unlatched, latched, and semiproportional. Qualitative aspects of using the TDS–iPhone–PWC interface were also evaluated via a five-point Likert scale questionnaire. Subjects showed more than 20% improvement in the overall completion time between the first and second sessions, and maintained a modest improvement of ~9% per session over the following three sessions. PMID:22531737

  14. Evaluation of a smartphone platform as a wireless interface between tongue drive system and electric-powered wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonghee; Huo, Xueliang; Minocha, Julia; Holbrook, Jaimee; Laumann, Anne; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-06-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a new wireless assistive technology (AT) for the mobility impaired population. It provides users with the ability to drive powered wheelchairs (PWC) and access computers using their unconstrained tongue motion. Migration of the TDS processing unit and user interface platform from a bulky personal computer to a smartphone (iPhone) has significantly facilitated its usage by turning it into a true wireless and wearable AT. After implementation of the necessary interfacing hardware and software to allow the smartphone to act as a bridge between the TDS and PWC, the wheelchair navigation performance and associated learning was evaluated in nine able-bodied subjects in five sessions over a 5-week period. Subjects wore magnetic tongue studs over the duration of the study and drove the PWC in an obstacle course with their tongue using three different navigation strategies; namely unlatched, latched, and semiproportional. Qualitative aspects of using the TDS-iPhone-PWC interface were also evaluated via a five-point Likert scale questionnaire. Subjects showed more than 20% improvement in the overall completion time between the first and second sessions, and maintained a modest improvement of ∼9% per session over the following three sessions.

  15. Development of a Powered Wheelchair Driving Simulator for Research and Development Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takuma; Shino, Motoki; Inoue, Takenobu; Kamata, Minoru

    The purpose of a powered wheelchair driving simulator is to decrease the time and effort in the process of clinic, research and development. In this paper, the design concepts of our driving simulator for research and development use are explained. To design the simulator's software and hardware, two following experiments were conducted. 1: The driver's horizontal field of view was measured. While making a right turn at a corner of a corridor, the movement of the driver's gazing point was measured. From this result, the maximum and minimum values of gazing point movement were analyzed to design the simulator's angle of view. 2: Motion cues such as acceleration and vibration were measured. The characteristics of these motion cues were analyzed to design the motion system. From the experiment results, a driving simulator of a powered wheelchair was developed. To evaluate the driving simulator, the experiment for comparing with a real powered wheelchair driving was conducted. Evaluations improved by the components which were specially designed for the driving simulator.

  16. A Cost-Effective Virtual Environment for Simulating and Training Powered Wheelchairs Manoeuvres.

    PubMed

    Headleand, Christopher J; Day, Thomas; Pop, Serban R; Ritsos, Panagiotis D; John, Nigel W

    2016-01-01

    Control of a powered wheelchair is often not intuitive, making training of new users a challenging and sometimes hazardous task. Collisions, due to a lack of experience can result in injury for the user and other individuals. By conducting training activities in virtual reality (VR), we can potentially improve driving skills whilst avoiding the risks inherent to the real world. However, until recently VR technology has been expensive and limited the commercial feasibility of a general training solution. We describe Wheelchair-Rift, a cost effective prototype simulator that makes use of the Oculus Rift head mounted display and the Leap Motion hand tracking device. It has been assessed for face validity by a panel of experts from a local Posture and Mobility Service. Initial results augur well for our cost-effective training solution.

  17. Contribution of limb momentum to power transfer in athletic wheelchair pushing.

    PubMed

    Masson, G; Bégin, M-A; Lopez Poncelas, M; Pelletier, S-K; Lessard, J-L; Laroche, J; Berrigan, F; Langelier, E; Smeesters, C; Rancourt, D

    2016-09-06

    Pushing capacity is a key parameter in athletic racing wheelchair performance. This study estimated the potential contribution of upper limb momentum to pushing. The question is relevant since it may affect the training strategy adopted by an athlete. A muscle-free Lagrangian dynamic model of the upper limb segments was developed and theoretical predictions of power transfer to the wheelchair were computed during the push phase. Results show that limb momentum capacity for pushing can be in the order of 40J per push cycle at 10m/s, but it varies with the specific pushing range chosen by the athlete. Although use of momentum could certainly help an athlete improve performance, quantifying the actual contribution of limb momentum to pushing is not trivial. A preliminary experimental investigation on an ergometer, along with a simplified model of the upper limb, suggests that momentum is not the sole contributor to power transfer to a wheelchair. Muscles substantially contribute to pushing, even at high speeds. Moreover, an optimal pushing range is challenging to find since it most likely differs if an athlete chooses a limb momentum pushing strategy versus a muscular exertion pushing strategy, or both at the same time. The study emphasizes the importance of controlling pushing range, although one should optimize it while also taking the dynamics of the recovery period into account.

  18. Navigation-synchronized multimodal control wheelchair from brain to alternative assistive technologies for persons with severe disabilities.

    PubMed

    Puanhvuan, Dilok; Khemmachotikun, Sarawin; Wechakarn, Pongsakorn; Wijarn, Boonyanuch; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2017-04-01

    Currently, electric wheelchairs are commonly used to improve mobility in disabled people. In severe cases, the user is unable to control the wheelchair by themselves because his/her motor functions are disabled. To restore mobility function, a brain-controlled wheelchair (BCW) would be a promising system that would allow the patient to control the wheelchair by their thoughts. P300 is a reliable brain electrical signal, a component of visual event-related potentials (ERPs), that could be used for interpreting user commands. This research aimed to propose a prototype BCW to allowed severe motor disabled patients to practically control a wheelchair for use in their home environment. The users were able to select from 9 possible destination commands in the automatic mode and from 4 directional commands (forward, backward, turn left and right) in the shared-control mode. These commands were selected via the designed P300 processing system. The wheelchair was steered to the desired location by the implemented navigation system. Safety of the user was ensured during wheelchair navigation due to the included obstacle detection and avoidance features. A combination of P300 and EOG was used as a hybrid BCW system. The user could fully operate the system such as enabling P300 detection system, mode shifting and stop/cancelation command by performing a different consecutive blinks to generate eye blinking patterns. The results revealed that the prototype BCW could be operated in either of the proposed modes. With the new design of the LED-based P300 stimulator, the average accuracies of the P300 detection algorithm in the shared-control and automatic modes were 95.31 and 83.42% with 3.09 and 3.79 bits/min, respectively. The P300 classification error was acceptable, as the user could cancel an incorrect command by blinking 2 times. Moreover, the proposed navigation system had a flexible design that could be interfaced with other assistive technologies. This research developed

  19. A Driving Behaviour Model of Electrical Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Hamam, Y.; Djouani, K.; Daachi, B.; Steyn, N.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the presence of powered wheelchairs, some of the users still experience steering challenges and manoeuvring difficulties that limit their capacity of navigating effectively. For such users, steering support and assistive systems may be very necessary. To appreciate the assistance, there is need that the assistive control is adaptable to the user's steering behaviour. This paper contributes to wheelchair steering improvement by modelling the steering behaviour of powered wheelchair users, for integration into the control system. More precisely, the modelling is based on the improved Directed Potential Field (DPF) method for trajectory planning. The method has facilitated the formulation of a simple behaviour model that is also linear in parameters. To obtain the steering data for parameter identification, seven individuals participated in driving the wheelchair in different virtual worlds on the augmented platform. The obtained data facilitated the estimation of user parameters, using the ordinary least square method, with satisfactory regression analysis results. PMID:27148362

  20. A Driving Behaviour Model of Electrical Wheelchair Users.

    PubMed

    Onyango, S O; Hamam, Y; Djouani, K; Daachi, B; Steyn, N

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the presence of powered wheelchairs, some of the users still experience steering challenges and manoeuvring difficulties that limit their capacity of navigating effectively. For such users, steering support and assistive systems may be very necessary. To appreciate the assistance, there is need that the assistive control is adaptable to the user's steering behaviour. This paper contributes to wheelchair steering improvement by modelling the steering behaviour of powered wheelchair users, for integration into the control system. More precisely, the modelling is based on the improved Directed Potential Field (DPF) method for trajectory planning. The method has facilitated the formulation of a simple behaviour model that is also linear in parameters. To obtain the steering data for parameter identification, seven individuals participated in driving the wheelchair in different virtual worlds on the augmented platform. The obtained data facilitated the estimation of user parameters, using the ordinary least square method, with satisfactory regression analysis results.

  1. The influence of wheelchair propulsion hand pattern on upper extremity muscle power and stress.

    PubMed

    Slowik, Jonathan S; Requejo, Philip S; Mulroy, Sara J; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-06-14

    The hand pattern (i.e., full-cycle hand path) used during manual wheelchair propulsion is frequently classified as one of four distinct hand pattern types: arc, single loop, double loop or semicircular. Current clinical guidelines recommend the use of the semicircular pattern, which is based on advantageous levels of broad biomechanical metrics implicitly related to the demand placed on the upper extremity (e.g., lower cadence). However, an understanding of the influence of hand pattern on specific measures of upper extremity muscle demand (e.g., muscle power and stress) is needed to help make such recommendations, but these quantities are difficult and impractical to measure experimentally. The purpose of this study was to use musculoskeletal modeling and forward dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of the hand pattern used on specific measures of upper extremity muscle demand. The simulation results suggest that the double loop and semicircular patterns produce the most favorable levels of overall muscle stress and total muscle power. The double loop pattern had the lowest full-cycle and recovery-phase upper extremity demand but required high levels of muscle power during the relatively short contact phase. The semicircular pattern had the second-lowest full-cycle levels of overall muscle stress and total muscle power, and demand was more evenly distributed between the contact and recovery phases. These results suggest that in order to decrease upper extremity demand, manual wheelchair users should consider using either the double loop or semicircular pattern when propelling their wheelchairs at a self-selected speed on level ground.

  2. How many people would benefit from a smart wheelchair?

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard C; LoPresti, Edmund F; Cooper, Rory A

    2008-01-01

    Independent mobility is important, but some wheelchair users find operating existing manual or powered wheelchairs difficult or impossible. Challenges to safe, independent wheelchair use can result from various overlapping physical, perceptual, or cognitive symptoms of diagnoses such as spinal cord injury, cerebrovascular accident, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and cerebral palsy. Persons with different symptom combinations can benefit from different types of assistance from a smart wheelchair and different wheelchair form factors. The sizes of these user populations have been estimated based on published estimates of the number of individuals with each of several diseases who (1) also need a wheeled mobility device and (2) have specific symptoms that could interfere with mobility device use.

  3. Product development: using a 3D computer model to optimize the stability of the Rocket powered wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, S; Fernie, G

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) lumped-parameter model of a powered wheelchair was created to aid the development of the Rocket prototype wheelchair and to help explore the effect of innovative design features on its stability. The model was developed using simulation software, specifically Working Model 3D. The accuracy of the model was determined by comparing both its static stability angles and dynamic behavior as it passed down a 4.8-cm (1.9") road curb at a heading of 45 degrees with the performance of the actual wheelchair. The model's predictions of the static stability angles in the forward, rearward, and lateral directions were within 9.3, 7.1, and 3.8% of the measured values, respectively. The average absolute error in the predicted position of the wheelchair as it moved down the curb was 2.2 cm/m (0.9" per 3'3") traveled. The accuracy was limited by the inability to model soft bodies, the inherent difficulties in modeling a statically indeterminate system, and the computing time. Nevertheless, it was found to be useful in investigating the effect of eight design alterations on the lateral stability of the wheelchair. Stability was quantified by determining the static lateral stability angles and the maximum height of a road curb over which the wheelchair could successfully drive on a diagonal heading. The model predicted that the stability was more dependent on the configuration of the suspension system than on the dimensions and weight distribution of the wheelchair. Furthermore, for the situations and design alterations studied, predicted improvements in static stability were not correlated with improvements in dynamic stability.

  4. Fuzzy Inference Based Obstacle Avoidance Control of Electric Powered Wheelchair Considering Driving Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiso, Atsushi; Murakami, Hiroki; Seki, Hirokazu

    This paper describes a novel obstacle avoidance control scheme of electric powered wheelchairs for realizing the safe driving in various environments. The “electric powered wheelchair” which generates the driving force by electric motors is expected to be widely used as a mobility support system for elderly people and disabled people; however, the driving performance must be further improved because the number of driving accidents caused by elderly operator's narrow sight and joystick operation errors is increasing. This paper proposes a novel obstacle avoidance control scheme based on fuzzy algorithm to prevent driving accidents. The proposed control system determines the driving direction by fuzzy algorithm based on the information of the joystick operation and distance to obstacles measured by ultrasonic sensors. Fuzzy rules to determine the driving direction are designed surely to avoid passers-by and walls considering the human's intent and driving environments. Some driving experiments on the practical situations show the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  5. Capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering patterns with mobile cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jicheng; Hao, Wei; White, Travis; Yan, Yuqing; Jones, Maria; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    Power wheelchairs have been widely used to provide independent mobility to people with disabilities. Despite great advancements in power wheelchair technology, research shows that wheelchair related accidents occur frequently. To ensure safe maneuverability, capturing wheelchair maneuvering patterns is fundamental to enable other research, such as safe robotic assistance for wheelchair users. In this study, we propose to record, store, and analyze wheelchair maneuvering data by means of mobile cloud computing. Specifically, the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors in smart phones are used to record wheelchair maneuvering data in real-time. Then, the recorded data are periodically transmitted to the cloud for storage and analysis. The analyzed results are then made available to various types of users, such as mobile phone users, traditional desktop users, etc. The combination of mobile computing and cloud computing leverages the advantages of both techniques and extends the smart phone's capabilities of computing and data storage via the Internet. We performed a case study to implement the mobile cloud computing framework using Android smart phones and Google App Engine, a popular cloud computing platform. Experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed mobile cloud computing framework.

  6. Context-Based Filtering for Assisted Brain-Actuated Wheelchair Driving

    PubMed Central

    Vanacker, Gerolf; del R. Millán, José; Lew, Eileen; Ferrez, Pierre W.; Moles, Ferran Galán; Philips, Johan; Van Brussel, Hendrik; Nuttin, Marnix

    2007-01-01

    Controlling a robotic device by using human brain signals is an interesting and challenging task. The device may be complicated to control and the nonstationary nature of the brain signals provides for a rather unstable input. With the use of intelligent processing algorithms adapted to the task at hand, however, the performance can be increased. This paper introduces a shared control system that helps the subject in driving an intelligent wheelchair with a noninvasive brain interface. The subject's steering intentions are estimated from electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and passed through to the shared control system before being sent to the wheelchair motors. Experimental results show a possibility for significant improvement in the overall driving performance when using the shared control system compared to driving without it. These results have been obtained with 2 healthy subjects during their first day of training with the brain-actuated wheelchair. PMID:18354739

  7. A wheelchair with lever propulsion control for climbing up and down stairs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kai; Eguchi, Yosuke; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    This study proposes a novel stair-climbing wheelchair based on lever propulsion control using the human upper body. Wheelchairs are widely used as supporting locomotion devices for people with acquired lower limb disabilities. However, steps and stairs are critical obstacles to locomotion, which restrict their activities when using wheelchairs. Previous research focused on power-assisted, stair-climbing wheelchairs, which were large and heavy due to its large actuators and mechanisms. In the previous research, we proposed a wheelchair with lever propulsion mechanism and presented its feasibility of climbing up the stairs. The developed stair-climbing wheelchair consists of manual wheels with casters for planar locomotion and a rotary-leg mechanism based on lever propulsion that is capable of climbing up stairs. The wheelchair also has a passive mechanism powered by gas springs for posture transition to shift the user's center of gravity between the desired positions for planar locomotion and stair-climbing. In this paper, we present an advanced study on both climbing up and going down using lever propulsion control by the user's upper body motion. For climbing down the stairs, we reassembled one-way clutches used for the rotary-leg mechanism to help a user climb down the stairs through lever operation. We also equipped the wheelchair with sufficient torque dampers. The frontal wheels were fixed while climbing down the stairs to ensure safety. Relevant experiments were then performed to investigate its performance and verify that the wheelchair users can operate the proposed lever propulsion mechanism.

  8. Immersion factors affecting perception and behaviour in a virtual reality power wheelchair simulator.

    PubMed

    Alshaer, Abdulaziz; Regenbrecht, Holger; O'Hare, David

    2017-01-01

    Virtual Reality based driving simulators are increasingly used to train and assess users' abilities to operate vehicles in a controlled and safe way. For the development of those simulators it is important to identify and evaluate design factors affecting perception, behaviour, and driving performance. In an exemplary power wheelchair simulator setting we identified the three immersion factors display type (head-mounted display v monitor), ability to freely change the field of view (FOV), and the visualisation of the user's avatar as potentially affecting perception and behaviour. In a study with 72 participants we found all three factors affected the participants' sense of presence in the virtual environment. In particular the display type significantly affected both perceptual and behavioural measures whereas FOV only affected behavioural measures. Our findings could guide future Virtual Reality simulator designers to evoke targeted user behaviours and perceptions.

  9. Automatic Detection and Classification of Unsafe Events During Power Wheelchair Use

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Athena K.; Yuen, Hiu Kim; Archambault, Philippe S.; Routhier, François; Michaud, François; Boissy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Using a powered wheelchair (PW) is a complex task requiring advanced perceptual and motor control skills. Unfortunately, PW incidents and accidents are not uncommon and their consequences can be serious. The objective of this paper is to develop technological tools that can be used to characterize a wheelchair user’s driving behavior under various settings. In the experiments conducted, PWs are outfitted with a datalogging platform that records, in real-time, the 3-D acceleration of the PW. Data collection was conducted over 35 different activities, designed to capture a spectrum of PW driving events performed at different speeds (collisions with fixed or moving objects, rolling on incline plane, and rolling across multiple types obstacles). The data was processed using time-series analysis and data mining techniques, to automatically detect and identify the different events. We compared the classification accuracy using four different types of time-series features: 1) time-delay embeddings; 2) time-domain characterization; 3) frequency-domain features; and 4) wavelet transforms. In the analysis, we compared the classification accuracy obtained when distinguishing between safe and unsafe events during each of the 35 different activities. For the purposes of this study, unsafe events were defined as activities containing collisions against objects at different speed, and the remainder were defined as safe events. We were able to accurately detect 98% of unsafe events, with a low (12%) false positive rate, using only five examples of each activity. This proof-of-concept study shows that the proposed approach has the potential of capturing, based on limited input from embedded sensors, contextual information on PW use, and of automatically characterizing a user’s PW driving behavior. PMID:27170879

  10. Mobility profile and wheelchair driving skills of powered wheelchair users: sensor-based event recognition using a support vector machine classifier.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Athena K; Pineau, Joelle; Frank, Jordan; Archambault, Philippe; Routhier, François; Audet, Thérèse; Polgar, Jan; Michaud, François; Boissy, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method to automatically recognize events and driving activities during the use of a powered wheelchair (PW). The method uses a support vector machine classifier, trained from sensor-based data from a datalogging platform installed on the PW. Data from a 3D accelerometer positioned on the back of the PW were collected in a laboratory space during PW driving tasks. 16-segmented events and driving activities (i.e. impacts from different side on different objects, rolling down or up on incline surface, going across threshold of different height) were performed repeatedly (n=25 trials) by one operator at three different speeds (slow, normal, high). We present results from an experiment aiming to classify five different events and driving activities from the sensor data acquired using the datalogging platform. Classification results show the ability of the proposed method to reliably segment 100% of events, and to identify the correct event type in 80% of events.

  11. Development of a wheelchair maintenance training programme and questionnaire for clinicians and wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Toro, Maria Luisa; Bird, Emily; Oyster, Michelle; Worobey, Lynn; Lain, Michael; Bucior, Samuel; Cooper, Rory A; Pearlman, Jonathan

    2017-01-27

    Purpose of state: The aims of this study were to develop a Wheelchair Maintenance Training Programme (WMTP) as a tool for clinicians to teach wheelchair users (and caregivers when applicable) in a group setting to perform basic maintenance at home in the USA and to develop a Wheelchair Maintenance Training Questionnaire (WMT-Q) to evaluate wheelchair maintenance knowledge in clinicians, manual and power wheelchair users.

  12. To move as a human. Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Christina

    2016-03-01

    I agree with the authors, that "there have been very few attempts to develop user-centered medical technologies" [1] in the field of rehabilitation for persons with disabilities and wheelchair users in particular. The human-environment context in which humans plan and inhabit their actions as wheelchair users has not been extensively studied. The authors' unique work explores how a person embodies an exoskeleton (robotic legs or a wheelchair) in their everyday life and focuses on proprioception and brain's capacity to enlarge one's body schema in order to understand users' perspectives. Ultimately, Pazzaglia and Molinari wish to support persons who use assistive devices adapt and have successful, meaningful lives. The work is neuro-scientifically grounded, but doesn't forget the emotional or affective aspects of the user.

  13. A force feedback joystick and control algorithm for wheelchair obstacle avoidance.

    PubMed

    Brienza, D M; Angelo, J

    1996-03-01

    Many powered wheelchair users have difficulty manoeuvring in confined spaces. Common tasks such as traversing through doorways, turning around in halls or travelling on a straight path are complicated by an inability to accurately and reliably control the wheelchair with a joystick or other common input device, or by a sensory impairment that prevents the user from receiving feedback from the environment. An active joystick with force feedback to indicate obstacles in the environment has been developed. Two force feedback schemes designed to assist a powered wheelchair user have been developed and implemented using the active joystick. The development of the joystick and associated control algorithms are described.

  14. Use of Power Assist-Wheels Results in Increased Distance Traveled Compared to Conventional Manual Wheeling

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Charles E.; Buman, Matthew P.; Chow, John W.; Tillman, Mark D.; Fournier, Kimberly A.; Giacobbi, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of power assist wheels (PAWs) on the distance traveled by manual wheelchair users and analyze potential cofactors in the magnitude of response: To test the hypothesis that wheelers would travel significantly further with PAWs. Design A 16-week A (Pre-intervention)-B (Intervention)- A (Post-intervention) repeated measures design. Seven women and 13 men (age 43±15 years) full-time wheelers participated. During the pre-intervention and post-intervention phases (4 weeks each), participants used their own unaltered manual wheelchairs. During the 8-week intervention phase, the manual wheels were replaced with PAWs. Daily distance was measured with bicycle-style odometers. A composite score of laboratory wheelchair tasks was used to classify wheelchair performance. Mixed model repeated measures analysis of variance analyzed changes across phases of the trial. A post-hoc analysis tabulated the amount of days wheelers exceeded their individual daily averages in each phase by two standard deviations. Results Wheelers traveled significantly greater distances during the intervention phase compared to pre- or post-intervention phases regardless of baseline wheelchair performance . Wheelers who demonstrated higher baseline wheelchair performance traveled lesser average distances in the first two weeks after receiving PAWs than in the subsequent 6 weeks. Wheelers exceeded their individual daily averages per phase on a significantly greater number of days during the intervention phase. Conclusions PAWs enabled wheelers to travel farther and to travel beyond their usual distances on more days. Future studies may be strengthened by taking into account the two-week “adjustment phase” for PAWs. PMID:20647780

  15. Current Status of the Utilization of Powered Wheelchair in Preschool Children with Locomotive Disability in Japan

    PubMed Central

    UYAMA, Sachie; HANAKI, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to elucidate the actual state of powered wheelchair (PWC) prescription for preschool children with disabilities in Japan, and also to determine the approximate number of preschool children with disabilities who would potentially benefit from PWC use. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 318 facilities providing rehabilitation for disabled children in Japan were enrolled in the study. A questionnaire about PWC use for preschoolers was mailed to the facilities. Each study items were analyzed employing the Fisher's exact test. [Results] Of the 318 facilities, consent to participate in this study was obtained from 108 (return rate: 34.0%). After PWC provision, many facilities reported improvement in quality of life indices for preschool children with disabilities. It was revealed that there were 6 preschool children from 2 to 6 years of age with disabilities who might acquire a means of independent locomotion through PWC provision and thereby experience improved quality of life. [Conclusion] There was no negative comment from the facilities studied about the prescription and provision of PWC for preschool children with disabilities. PMID:28289577

  16. Force control strategies while driving electric powered wheelchairs with isometric and movement-sensing joysticks.

    PubMed

    Dicianno, Brad E; Spaeth, Donald M; Cooper, Rory A; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Boninger, Michael L; Brown, Karl W

    2007-03-01

    Innovations to control interfaces for electric powered wheelchairs (EPWs) could benefit 220000 current users and over 125000 individuals who desire mobility but cannot use a conventional motion sensing joystick (MSJ). We developed a digital isometric joystick (IJ) with sophisticated signal processing and two control functions. In a prior study, subjects' driving accuracy with our IJ was comparable to using an MSJ. However, we observed subjects using excessive force on the IJ possibly because its rigid post provides no positional feedback. Thus, this paper examines the time-series data recorded in the previous study to characterize subjects' force control strategies since weakness is a concern. Eleven EPW users with upper limb impairments drove an EPW using an IJ with two different control functions and an MSJ in a Fitts' law paradigm. Subjects relied upon positional feedback from the MSJ and used appropriate force. In contrast, subjects using the IJ with either control function applied significantly higher force than necessary (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0058). Using higher average force was correlated with quicker trial times but not associated with accuracy. Lack of positional feedback may result in use of excess isometric force. Modifying control functions, adjusting gain, or providing additional training or feedback might address this problem.

  17. Wheelchair armrest strength testing.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A; Rentschler, A J; O'Connor, T J; Ster, J F

    2000-01-01

    There are about 1.4 million manual wheelchair users, 100,000 electric-powered wheelchair users, and 60,000 electric-powered scooter users. The current study was undertaken to determine if the fasteners of a clamp-type armrest receiver were prone to failure. The first test was used to examine the potential misalignment of the armrest receiver components that attach it to the frame. The second test was to evaluate the entire armrest using the American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America armrest static strength standard. Finally, we conducted three fatigue tests. The first fatigue test was performed by repeating the static stability tests multiple times. The last two tests were a modified version of the double-drum wheelchair fatigue test used to apply repeated loading and vibration simultaneously. A paired t-test showed that there is no statistically significant difference (p = 0.08), with a confidence of 95%, between critical alignment measurements. The armrest including the receiver passed the standard requirement of a force of 760 N being applied outward at 15 degrees. During fatigue testing, we found that armrests did not exhibit any visible or functional damage. Upon completion of the tests, the armrests and receivers functioned properly. At about 100,289 cycles on a double-drum test machine, three bolts failed on each armrest receiver when the screws were loosened to have only five threads engaged prior to commencing the test. The design of the armrest tested was in compliance with existing national and international standards. Currently, both International Standards Organization and American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society committees are developing standards for seating systems that will include static, impact, and fatigue strength testing of devices like lateral torso supports, lateral hip support, etc. Methods similar to those

  18. Usability testing of multimodal feedback interface and simulated collision-avoidance power wheelchair for long-term-care home residents with cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rosalie H; Mihailidis, Alex; Dutta, Tilak; Fernie, Geoff R

    2011-01-01

    Many older adults in long-term-care homes have complex physical and cognitive impairments and have difficulty propelling manual wheelchairs. Power wheelchair use is restricted owing to safety concerns. Power wheelchairs with collision-avoidance features are being developed to enable safe and independent mobility; however, a paucity of information exists on interface features to help users navigate away from obstacles. We developed a system combining an interface with auditory, visual, and haptic feedback and a simulated collision-avoidance power wheelchair. This device allowed the investigator to stop movement of the power wheelchair when users approached obstacles and to deliver feedback to help them navigate. Five long-term-care home residents with mild or moderate cognitive impairments evaluated device usability, which included effectiveness, efficiency, and user satisfaction. Each resident used the device for six 1 h sessions. Observations, feedback interviews, and outcome questionnaires were completed during and after the sessions. We found the device effective in enabling residents to achieve basic driving tasks and self-identified indoor mobility goals. Furthermore, residents perceived workload to be low and were satisfied with the device. Residents also felt that the feedback was useful to help them navigate away from obstacles.

  19. Development of a Power Assist System of a Walking Chair Based on Human Arm Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunfeng; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Takeda, Yukio; Higuchi, Masaru; Sugimoto, Koichi

    In this paper, design of control system and power combination mechanism of a power assist system of the walking chair was discussed based on kinetostatic characteristics of human arm. The walking chair is a welfare walking machine which is an alternative vehicle of the wheelchair, and expected to be driven by user's cranking operation with assisting actuator. To efficiently utilize user power as much as possible for long locomotion without giving much fatigue to the user while providing comfortable driving feeling to the user, the human arm characteristics were taken into consideration. Kinetostatic characteristics of the human arm were experimentally investigated for its modeling. This model was applied to the design of mechanism and control system of the power assist system of the walking chair, and design parameters were determined for achieving comfortable driving feeling and efficient utilization of user power.

  20. Next generation autonomous wheelchair control.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Barrett, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Often times the physically challenged, limited to a wheelchair, also have difficulty with vision. In order to help, something must "see" for them. Therefore there must be some way for a wheelchair to know its environment, sense where it is, and where it must go. It also must be able to avoid any obstacles which are not normally part of the environment. An autonomous wheelchair will serve an important role by allowing users more freedom and independence. This design challenge is broken into four major steps: wheelchair control, environment recognition, route planning, and obstacle avoidance. The first step is to reverse engineer a wheelchair and rebuild the controls, which will be the main topic of discussion for this paper. Two big challenges with this step are high power motor control and joystick control. An H-bridge motor interface, controlled by a microprocessor, was designed for the motors. The joystick control is handled with the same microprocessor.

  1. Monitoring technology for wheelchair users with advanced multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Arias, Diego E; Aqueveque, Pablo; Vilugrón, Luis; Hermosilla, Daniela; Curtis, Dorothy W

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a non-invasive assistive device for people with advanced Multiple Sclerosis (MS) who use electric power wheelchairs (EPW). The proposed system can acquire respiration and heart activity from ballistocardiogram (BCG), seat and back pressure distribution, wheelchair tilt angle and ambient temperature and relative humidity. The sensors collect information related to the main issues of MS patients: fatigue, heat sensitivity and low mobility. Preliminary results show the signals as the wheelchair is moving, stopped and tilting. The system is able to capture sufficient relevant information to provide suggestions and alarms in a future stage. The system will be tested at The Boston Home, a specialized residence for adults with advanced MS.

  2. Advanced Wheelchair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A prototype lightweight wheelchair based on aerospace technology resulted from a Langley Research Center/University of VA project. The chair weighs 25 pounds and is collapsable. Commercial applications are under consideration.

  3. Power Soccer: Experiences of Students Using Power Wheelchairs in a Collegiate Athletic Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessel, Roger D.; Wentz, Joel; Markle, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletics provides an opportunity for improving the societal perceptions and overall quality of life of physically disabled persons. Athletic opportunities in the collegiate atmosphere allow such students to be socially, psychologically, and physically engaged. This study focused on how involvement in a Power Soccer collegiate…

  4. Development of Power Assisting Suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keijiro; Ishii, Mineo; Hyodo, Kazuhito; Yoshimitsu, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Takashi

    In order to realize a wearable power assisting suit for assisting a nurse to carry a patient in her arms, the power supply and control systems of the suit have to be miniaturized, and it has to be wireless and pipeline-less. The new wearable suit consists of shoulders, arms, back, waist and legs units to be fitted on the nurse's body. The arms, waist and legs have new pneumatic rotary actuators driven directly by micro air pumps supplied by portable Ni-Cd batteries. The muscle forces are sensed by a new muscle hardness sensor utilizing a sensing tip mounted on a force sensing film device. An embedded microcomputer is used for the calculations of control signals. The new wearable suit was applied practically to a human body and a series of movement experiments that weights in the arms were held and taken up and down was performed. Each unit of the suit could transmit assisting torque directly to each joint verifying its practicability.

  5. Driving to learn in a powered wheelchair: the process of learning joystick use in people with profound cognitive disabilities.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Lisbeth; Eklund, Mona; Nyberg, Per; Thulesius, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The Driving to Learn project explored ways to help people with profound cognitive disabilities practice operating a joystick-operated powered wheelchair. The project used a grounded theory approach with constant comparative analysis and was carried out over 12 yr. The participants were 45 children and adults with profound cognitive disabilities. Reference groups included 17 typically developing infants and 64 participants with lesser degrees of cognitive disability. The data sources included video recordings, field notes, open interviews, and a rich mixture of literature. The findings that emerged yielded strategies for facilitating achievements, an 8-phase learning process, an assessment tool, and a grounded theory of deplateauing explaining the properties necessary for participants to exceed expected limitations and plateaus. Eight participants with profound cognitive disabilities reached goal-directed driving or higher. Participants were empowered by attaining increased control over tool use, improving their autonomy and quality of life.

  6. Comparison of virtual and real electric powered wheelchair driving using a position sensing joystick and an isometric joystick.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rory A; Spaeth, Donald M; Jones, Daniel K; Boninger, Michael L; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Guo, Songfeng

    2002-12-01

    There are limited interface options for electric powered wheelchairs, which results in the inability of some individuals to drive independently. In addition, the development of new interface technologies will necessitate the development of alternative training methods. This study compares a conventional position sensing joystick to a novel isometric joystick during a driving task in a virtual environment and a real environment. The results revealed that there were few differences in task completion time and root-mean-square error (RMSE) between the two types of joysticks. There were significant correlations between the RMSE in the virtual environment and the real environment for both types of joysticks. The data indicate that performance in the virtual environment was representative of driving ability in the real environment, and the isometric joystick performed comparably to the position sensing joystick.

  7. Design and validation of an intelligent wheelchair towards a clinically-functional outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many people with mobility impairments, who require the use of powered wheelchairs, have difficulty completing basic maneuvering tasks during their activities of daily living (ADL). In order to provide assistance to this population, robotic and intelligent system technologies have been used to design an intelligent powered wheelchair (IPW). This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the design and validation of the IPW. Methods The main contributions of this work are three-fold. First, we present a software architecture for robot navigation and control in constrained spaces. Second, we describe a decision-theoretic approach for achieving robust speech-based control of the intelligent wheelchair. Third, we present an evaluation protocol motivated by a meaningful clinical outcome, in the form of the Robotic Wheelchair Skills Test (RWST). This allows us to perform a thorough characterization of the performance and safety of the system, involving 17 test subjects (8 non-PW users, 9 regular PW users), 32 complete RWST sessions, 25 total hours of testing, and 9 kilometers of total running distance. Results User tests with the RWST show that the navigation architecture reduced collisions by more than 60% compared to other recent intelligent wheelchair platforms. On the tasks of the RWST, we measured an average decrease of 4% in performance score and 3% in safety score (not statistically significant), compared to the scores obtained with conventional driving model. This analysis was performed with regular users that had over 6 years of wheelchair driving experience, compared to approximately one half-hour of training with the autonomous mode. Conclusions The platform tested in these experiments is among the most experimentally validated robotic wheelchairs in realistic contexts. The results establish that proficient powered wheelchair users can achieve the same level of performance with the intelligent command mode, as with the conventional command mode

  8. WheelchairNet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outreach Hub Newsletter Events News ISWP Branding and Marketing Wheelchair Product List ISWP Resource HUB Privacy Policy ... wheelchairs or services to repair them. Based on global data, we estimate that 23 million wheelchairs are ...

  9. Joystick use for virtual power wheelchair driving in individuals with tremor: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dicianno, Brad E; Sibenaller, Sara; Kimmich, Claire; Cooper, Rory A; Pyo, Jay

    2009-01-01

    People with disabilities such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease have difficulty operating conventional movement-sensing joysticks (MSJs) because of varying levels of tremor. We developed an isometric joystick (IJ) that has performed as well as a conventional MSJ when used by persons with upper-limb impairments in real and virtual wheelchair driving tasks. The Weighted-Frequency Fourier Linear Combiner (WFLC) filter has been used to cancel tremor effectively in microsurgery. In this study, we compared an MSJ, IJ, and IJ with the WFLC filter in individuals performing a virtual driving task. Although the WFLC filter did not improve driving performance in this study, the IJ without a filter yielded better results than the conventional MSJ and thus may be a potential alternative to the MSJ in minimizing the effects of tremor.

  10. 14 CFR 382.123 - What are the requirements concerning priority cabin stowage for wheelchairs and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning... Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and...

  11. 14 CFR 382.123 - What are the requirements concerning priority cabin stowage for wheelchairs and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning... Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and...

  12. 14 CFR 382.123 - What are the requirements concerning priority cabin stowage for wheelchairs and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning... Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and...

  13. 14 CFR 382.123 - What are the requirements concerning priority cabin stowage for wheelchairs and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning... Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and...

  14. 14 CFR 382.123 - What are the requirements concerning priority cabin stowage for wheelchairs and other assistive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning... Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and...

  15. Evaluation of an intelligent wheelchair system for older adults with cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Older adults are the most prevalent wheelchair users in Canada. Yet, cognitive impairments may prevent an older adult from being allowed to use a powered wheelchair due to safety and usability concerns. To address this issue, an add-on Intelligent Wheelchair System (IWS) was developed to help older adults with cognitive impairments drive a powered wheelchair safely and effectively. When attached to a powered wheelchair, the IWS adds a vision-based anti-collision feature that prevents the wheelchair from hitting obstacles and a navigation assistance feature that plays audio prompts to help users manoeuvre around obstacles. Methods A two stage evaluation was conducted to test the efficacy of the IWS. Stage One: Environment of Use – the IWS’s anti-collision and navigation features were evaluated against objects found in a long-term care facility. Six different collision scenarios (wall, walker, cane, no object, moving and stationary person) and three different navigation scenarios (object on left, object on right, and no object) were performed. Signal detection theory was used to categorize the response of the system in each scenario. Stage Two: User Trials – single-subject research design was used to evaluate the impact of the IWS on older adults with cognitive impairment. Participants were asked to drive a powered wheelchair through a structured obstacle course in two phases: 1) with the IWS and 2) without the IWS. Measurements of safety and usability were taken and compared between the two phases. Visual analysis and phase averages were used to analyze the single-subject data. Results Stage One: The IWS performed correctly for all environmental anti-collision and navigation scenarios. Stage Two: Two participants completed the trials. The IWS was able to limit the number of collisions that occurred with a powered wheelchair and lower the perceived workload for driving a powered wheelchair. However, the objective performance (time to complete course

  16. Exploring the Psychosocial Impact of Wheelchair and Contextual Factors on Quality of Life of People with Neuromuscular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Pousada García, Thais; Groba González, Betania; Nieto Rivero, Laura; Pereira Loureiro, Javier; Díez Villoria, Emiliano; Pazos Sierra, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) are a group of heterogeneous diseases that show differences in incidence, hereditary, etiology, prognosis, or functional impairments. Wheelchair use (manual or powered) is influenced by several factors, including personal and contextual factors, and comprehensive evaluation of their impact is required in order to optimize prescription and provision of wheelchairs. The authors therefore assessed the influence of wheelchair use on the quality of life (QoL) of 60 participants with NMD using the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and a specially developed questionnaire were used to obtain information about contextual factors and participants' activity profile of activities of the participants. The results showed that using a wheelchair has psychosocial benefits, with the main determinants of benefit being type of wheelchair (powered), non-ambulation ability, and independence in mobility. Ensuring a good match between user and assistive technology (AT; e.g., wheelchair), as well as the effectiveness of the particular device, will increase the likelihood that the user will adopt it and use it effectively in daily life. Clinical prescription of AT would be improved by making appropriate use of outcome measures.

  17. Flux Coupling for Wheelchair Battery Chargers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Battery-charger concept for wheelchairs includes magnetic-flux coupling instead of electrical connections between power sources and wheelchairs. Concept meant to facilitate operation by patients whose disabilities make it difficult or impossible to maneuver common electrical plugs into or out of ac wall outlets.

  18. Talking Wheelchair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Communication is made possible for disabled individuals by means of an electronic system, developed at Stanford University's School of Medicine, which produces highly intelligible synthesized speech. Familiarly known as the "talking wheelchair" and formally as the Versatile Portable Speech Prosthesis (VPSP). Wheelchair mounted system consists of a word processor, a video screen, a voice synthesizer and a computer program which instructs the synthesizer how to produce intelligible sounds in response to user commands. Computer's memory contains 925 words plus a number of common phrases and questions. Memory can also store several thousand other words of the user's choice. Message units are selected by operating a simple switch, joystick or keyboard. Completed message appears on the video screen, then user activates speech synthesizer, which generates a voice with a somewhat mechanical tone. With the keyboard, an experienced user can construct messages as rapidly as 30 words per minute.

  19. Airline Wheelchair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Accutron Tool & Instrument Co.'s wheelchair was designed to increase mobility within the airplane. Utilizing NASA's structural analysis and materials engineering technologies, it allows passage through narrow airline aisles to move passengers to their seats and give access to lavatories. Stable, durable, comfortable and easy to handle, it's made of composite materials weighing only 17 pounds, yet is able to support a 200 pound person. Folded easily and stored when not in use.

  20. Assessment of the Tongue-Drive System Using a Computer, a Smartphone, and a Powered-Wheelchair by People With Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonghee; Park, Hangue; Bruce, Joy; Rowles, Diane; Holbrook, Jaimee; Nardone, Beatrice; West, Dennis P; Laumann, Anne; Roth, Elliot J; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2016-01-01

    Tongue-Drive System (TDS) is a wireless and wearable assistive technology that enables people with severe disabilities to control their computers, wheelchairs, and smartphones using voluntary tongue motion. To evaluate the efficacy of the TDS, several experiments were conducted, in which the performance of nine able-bodied (AB) participants using a mouse, a keypad, and the TDS, as well as a cohort of 11 participants with tetraplegia (TP) using the TDS, were observed and compared. Experiments included the Fitts' law tapping, wheelchair driving, phone-dialing, and weight-shifting tasks over five to six consecutive sessions. All participants received a tongue piercing, wore a magnetic tongue stud, and completed the trials as evaluable participants. Although AB participants were already familiar with the keypad, throughputs of their tapping tasks using the keypad were only 1.4 times better than those using the TDS. The completion times of wheelchair driving task using the TDS for AB and TP participants were between 157 s and 180 s with three different control strategies. Participants with TP completed phone-dialing and weight-shifting tasks in 81.9 s and 71.5 s, respectively, using tongue motions. Results showed statistically significant improvement or trending to improvement in performance status over the sessions. Most of the learning occurred between the first and second sessions, but trends did suggest that more practice would lead to increased improvement in performance using the TDS.

  1. Could changes in the wheelchair delivery system improve safety?

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, R L; Coughlan, S G; Christie, M

    1995-01-01

    Despite emerging evidence about the high incidence and severity of wheelchair-related injuries, regulations governing wheelchair safety are almost nonexistent in Canada. The authors believe that, to improve wheelchair safety, a concerted effort by government, manufacturers, purchasing groups, users and clinicians is needed. Health Canada's Health Protection Branch should treat wheelchairs as medical devices (as defined in the Food and Drugs Act 1985) and improve its injury-reporting network. Manufacturers should give a higher priority to safety in wheelchair design, improve their educational materials and formalize postmarketing surveillance. Purchasing groups should try to ensure that they do not stifle innovation in wheelchair design by setting unrealistic reimbursement ceilings and should use their market power more effectively. Users should obtain their wheelchairs in specialized settings, heed safety warnings and make more effective use of litigation when such action is warranted. Clinicians should ensure that patients are equipped with the most appropriate wheelchair for their needs, that they are given adequate training in safe wheelchair use and that they understand the dangers involved. Rapid changes in wheelchair technology and emerging evidence about the high incidence and severity of injuries related to wheelchair use suggest that such changes are needed in the wheelchair delivery system. PMID:7489551

  2. 14 CFR 382.129 - What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be disassembled for stowage... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.129 What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must...

  3. 14 CFR 382.129 - What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be disassembled for stowage... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.129 What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must...

  4. 14 CFR 382.129 - What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be disassembled for stowage... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.129 What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must...

  5. 14 CFR 382.129 - What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be disassembled for stowage... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.129 What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must...

  6. 14 CFR 382.129 - What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must be disassembled for stowage... Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.129 What other requirements apply when passengers' wheelchairs, other mobility aids, and other assistive devices must...

  7. A robotic wheelchair trainer: design overview and a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Experiencing independent mobility is important for children with a severe movement disability, but learning to drive a powered wheelchair can be labor intensive, requiring hand-over-hand assistance from a skilled therapist. Methods To improve accessibility to training, we developed a robotic wheelchair trainer that steers itself along a course marked by a line on the floor using computer vision, haptically guiding the driver's hand in appropriate steering motions using a force feedback joystick, as the driver tries to catch a mobile robot in a game of "robot tag". This paper provides a detailed design description of the computer vision and control system. In addition, we present data from a pilot study in which we used the chair to teach children without motor impairment aged 4-9 (n = 22) to drive the wheelchair in a single training session, in order to verify that the wheelchair could enable learning by the non-impaired motor system, and to establish normative values of learning rates. Results and Discussion Training with haptic guidance from the robotic wheelchair trainer improved the steering ability of children without motor impairment significantly more than training without guidance. We also report the results of a case study with one 8-year-old child with a severe motor impairment due to cerebral palsy, who replicated the single-session training protocol that the non-disabled children participated in. This child also improved steering ability after training with guidance from the joystick by an amount even greater than the children without motor impairment. Conclusions The system not only provided a safe, fun context for automating driver's training, but also enhanced motor learning by the non-impaired motor system, presumably by demonstrating through intuitive movement and force of the joystick itself exemplary control to follow the course. The case study indicates that a child with a motor system impaired by CP can also gain a short-term benefit

  8. Development of Power Assisting Suit for Assisting Nurse Labor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Keijiro; Hyodo, Kazuhito; Ishii, Mineo; Matsuo, Takashi

    In order to realize a power assisting suit for assisting a nurse caring a patient in her arm, a hardness sensor of muscle using load cell and a pneumatic rotary actuator utilizing pressure cuffs have been developed. The power assisting suit consists of shoulders, arms, waist and legs made of aluminum, and is fitted on the nurse body. The power assisting suit is originated with the concept of a master and slave system in one body. The arms, waist and legs have the pneumatic rotary actuators. The pneumatic rotary actuators are constructed with pressure cuffs sandwiched between thin plates. The action of the arms, waist and legs of the nurse are sensed with the muscle hardness sensor utilizing load cell with diaphragm mounted on a sensing tip. The dent of the sensing tip corresponds to the hardness of the muscle so that exerting muscle force produces electric signal. This paper gives the design and characteristics of the power assisting suit using the cuff type pneumatic rotary actuators and the muscle hardness sensor verifying its practicability.

  9. Evaluation of lightweight wheelchairs using ANSI/RESNA testing standards.

    PubMed

    Gebrosky, Benjamin; Pearlman, Jonathan; Cooper, Rory A; Cooper, Rosemarie; Kelleher, Annmarie

    2013-01-01

    Lightweight wheelchairs are characterized by their low cost and limited range of adjustment. Our study evaluated three different folding lightweight wheelchair models using the American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America (ANSI/RESNA) standards to see whether quality had improved since the previous data were reported. On the basis of reports of increasing breakdown rates in the community, we hypothesized that the quality of these wheelchairs had declined. Seven of the nine wheelchairs tested failed to pass the multidrum test durability requirements. An average of 194,502 +/- 172,668 equivalent cycles was completed, which is similar to the previous test results and far below the 400,000 minimum required to pass the ANSI/RESNA requirements. This was also significantly worse than the test results for aluminum ultralight folding wheelchairs. Overall, our results uncovered some disturbing issues with these wheelchairs and suggest that manufacturers should put more effort into this category to improve quality. To improve the durability of lightweight wheelchairs, we suggested that stronger regulations be developed that require wheelchairs to be tested by independent and certified test laboratories. We also proposed a wheelchair rating system based on the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration vehicle crash ratings to assist clinicians and end users when comparing the durability of different wheelchairs.

  10. Sensewheel: an adjunct to wheelchair skills training.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Andrew; Taylor, Stephen J G; Holloway, Catherine

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this Letter was to investigate the influence of real-time verbal feedback to optimise push arc during over ground manual wheelchair propulsion. Ten healthy non-wheelchair users pushed a manual wheelchair for a distance of 25 m on level paving, initially with no feedback and then with real-time verbal feedback aimed at controlling push arc within a range of 85°-100°. The real-time feedback was provided by a physiotherapist walking behind the wheelchair, viewing real-time data on a tablet personal computer received from the Sensewheel, a lightweight instrumented wheelchair wheel. The real-time verbal feedback enabled the participants to significantly increase their push arc. This increase in push arc resulted in a non-significant reduction in push rate and a significant increase in peak force application. The intervention enabled participants to complete the task at a higher mean velocity using significantly fewer pushes. This was achieved via a significant increase in the power generated during the push phase. This Letter identifies that a lightweight instrumented wheelchair wheel such as the Sensewheel is a useful adjunct to wheelchair skills training. Targeting the optimisation of push arc resulted in beneficial changes in propulsion technique.

  11. Toast: The power system operators assistant

    SciTech Connect

    Talukdar, S.N.; Cardozo, E.; Leao, L.

    1986-07-01

    The environments in which power system operators work are becoming more complex. New constraints are appearing, old constraints are tightening, and the number of decision variables is increasing. To cope with these trends, operators need intelligent assistants to help manage information and lighten their decision-making burdens. Such assistants can be divided into two types: Phase-1 assistants for off-line uses and Phase-2 assistants for on-line uses and Phase-2 assistants for on-line, real-time uses. Toast is an evolving Phase-1 assistant. Of the nine possible functions of an assistant, Toast has immediate potential in two-diagnosis and criticism. Its diagnostic knowledge, though hardly complete, is extensive enough to be useful to human operators. In contrast, its abilities to critique proposed courses of action are much less developed and, as yet, consist only of facilities to simulate some of the these courses of action. Toast has been written in Cops, a programming environment that allows for distributed processing and has a readily extensible library of both symbolic and numerical programs. These features should make the task of expanding Toast relatively painless. Of the many directions in which expansions could occur, we plan on adding diagnostic capabilities in the area of power system security. This area was identified in a study as the most worthy of development.

  12. Investigation of wheelchair instability during transport in large accessible transit vehicles.

    PubMed

    Salipur, Zdravko; Frost, Karen; Bertocci, Gina

    2012-01-01

    Large accessible transit vehicles (LATVs, fixed-route intracity buses), generally considered safe, may not be as safe for wheelchair-seated passengers. Transit provider practices vary regarding use of wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint systems (WTORSs), while recent research suggests high levels of WTORS disuse and misuse. We sought to better understand wheelchair and wheelchair passenger instabilities related to WTORS disuse and misuse on LATVs. This article presents a retrospective review of 295 video surveillance records of wheelchair passenger trips on LATVs. Wheelchair trips involving disuse and misuse of WTORS were quantified and categorized based on WTORS configurations. Cases of wheelchair and wheelchair passenger instability were categorized based on severity, type, and direction. Three adverse events involving severe wheelchair and/or passenger instability were examined in greater detail. Results showed 20.3% of records involved wheelchair-related adverse events (95% minor instabilities, 5% severe instabilities). Scooters were most likely to be unstable, followed by manual and power wheelchairs. In most instability cases, no tiedowns were used to secure the wheelchair and no lap belt was used to restrain the wheelchair passenger properly. In many instances, the lap belt was misused in an attempt to secure the wheelchair, whereas the shoulder belt was never used.

  13. Wheelchair propulsion biomechanics: implications for wheelchair sports.

    PubMed

    Vanlandewijck, Y; Theisen, D; Daly, D

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide the reader with a state-of-the-art review on biomechanics in hand rim wheelchair propulsion, with special attention to sport-specific implications. Biomechanical studies in wheelchair sports mainly aim at optimising sport performance or preventing sport injuries. The sports performance optimisation question has been approached from an ergonomic, as well as a skill proficiency perspective. Sports medical issues have been addressed in wheelchair sports mainly because of the extremely high prevalence of repetitive strain injuries such as shoulder impingement and carpal tunnel syndrome. Sports performance as well as sports medical reflections are made throughout the review. Insight in the underlying musculoskeletal mechanisms of hand rim wheelchair propulsion has been achieved through a combination of experimental data collection under realistic conditions, with a more fundamental mathematical modelling approach. Through a synchronised analysis of the movement pattern, force generation pattern and muscular activity pattern, insight has been gained in the hand rim wheelchair propulsion dynamics of people with a disability, varying in level of physical activity and functional potential. The limiting environment of a laboratory, however, has hampered the drawing of sound conclusions. Through mathematical modelling, simulation and optimisation (minimising injury and maximising performance), insight in the underlying musculoskeletal mechanisms during wheelchair propulsion is sought. The surplus value of inverse and forward dynamic simulation of hand rim stroke dynamics is addressed. Implications for hand rim wheelchair sports are discussed. Wheelchair racing, basketball and rugby were chosen because of the significance and differences in sport-specific movement dynamics. Conclusions can easily be transferred to other wheelchair sports where movement dynamics are fundamental.

  14. Mechanics in a wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Karin; Bernhard, Jonte

    1999-12-01

    It is not only possible for a student sitting in a wheelchair to participate in many active engagement activities. Using a wheelchair is also of extra value for non-physically disabled students in many experiential mechanics activities since the friction is low and kinesthetic experience involved. A wheelchair can also be used as an engaging "tool" for connecting mechanical concepts and real-world phenomena.

  15. Low cost wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Bosshard, R G; Yeo, J D

    1983-04-01

    This wheelchair is a new concept in wheelchair design, made entirely of readily available plastic materials and rear bicycle wheels. The chair does not require a cushion, weights only 12 kg with 100 mm front castors or 13 kg with 175 mm castors. It is easy to manoeuvre. The design allows this wheelchair to be used as a conventional wheelchair and a shower/commode chair. Side arms and brakes can be attached if required. The necessary materials are relatively inexpensive and generally available in most countries.

  16. User evaluation of a collaborative wheelchair system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Burdet, Etienne; Teo, Chee Leong

    2008-01-01

    The collaborative wheelchair assistant (CWA) is a robotic wheelchair which makes full use of human skills, by involving the user into the navigation control. The user gives the high-level commands and directly controls the speed, while the low-level control is taken over by the machine, which constrains the wheelchair to follow a software defined guide path. This paper presents an evaluation of the CWA system, consisting of experiments performed with human subjects including three people with cerebral palsy (CP) and two with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigate the performance of the system in terms of its interaction with human subjects and motion efficiency and compare to that of able-bodied subjects, who have previously performed the same evaluation. The results suggest that the CWA brings safe motion and drastically simplifies the control without compromising the navigation performance.

  17. An asynchronous wheelchair control by hybrid EEG-EOG brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Yu, Tianyou; Gu, Zhenghui

    2014-10-01

    Wheelchair control requires multiple degrees of freedom and fast intention detection, which makes electroencephalography (EEG)-based wheelchair control a big challenge. In our previous study, we have achieved direction (turning left and right) and speed (acceleration and deceleration) control of a wheelchair using a hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) combining motor imagery and P300 potentials. In this paper, we proposed hybrid EEG-EOG BCI, which combines motor imagery, P300 potentials, and eye blinking to implement forward, backward, and stop control of a wheelchair. By performing relevant activities, users (e.g., those with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and locked-in syndrome) can navigate the wheelchair with seven steering behaviors. Experimental results on four healthy subjects not only demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our brain-controlled wheelchair system but also indicate that all the four subjects could control the wheelchair spontaneously and efficiently without any other assistance (e.g., an automatic navigation system).

  18. Engineered embodiment: Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannape, Oliver Alan; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2016-03-01

    From brain-computer interfaces to wearable robotics and bionic prostheses - intelligent assistive devices have already become indispensable in the therapy of people living with reduced sensorimotor functioning of their physical body, be it due to spinal cord injury, amputation or brain lesions [1]. Rapid technological advances will continue to fuel this field for years to come. As Pazzaglia and Molinari [2] rightly point out, progress in this domain should not solely be driven by engineering prowess, but utilize the increasing psychological and neuroscientific understanding of cortical body-representations and their plasticity [3]. We argue that a core concept for such an integrated embodiment framework was introduced with the formalization of the forward model for sensorimotor control [4]. The application of engineering concepts to human movement control paved the way for rigorous computational and neuroscientific analysis. The forward model has successfully been adapted to investigate principles underlying aspects of bodily awareness such as the sense of agency in the comparator framework [5]. At the example of recent advances in lower limb prostheses, we propose a cross-disciplinary, integrated embodiment framework to investigate the sense of agency and the related sense of body ownership for such devices. The main onus now is on the engineers and cognitive scientists to embed such an approach into the design of assistive technology and its evaluation battery.

  19. Shoulder joint kinetics of the elite wheelchair tennis serve

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Machar; Elliott, Bruce; Alderson, Jacque

    2007-01-01

    Background The shoulder is a key joint in wheelchair locomotion and commonly implicated in injury among virtually all wheelchair populations. In tennis, quantification of the shoulder joint kinetics that characterise the wheelchair serve could enhance injury prevention and rehabilitation practices as well as assist coaches evaluate the efficacy of their current technical instruction. Methods A 12‐camera, 250 Hz Vicon motion analysis system (Oxford Metrics Inc., UK) recorded the 3D flat (WFS) and kick serve (WKS) motions of two male top 30‐ranked international wheelchair players. Mechanical comparisons between wheelchair players, as well as to the previously captured data of 12 high‐performance able‐bodied players executing the same types of serves, were undertaken. Results Without the benefit of a propulsive leg action, wheelchair players developed lower peak absolute (∼32 m/s) and horizontal (∼28 m/s) pre‐impact racquet velocities than able‐bodied players (∼42 m/s, ∼38 m/s). Wheelchair serve tactics nevertheless necessitated that higher pre‐impact horizontal and right lateral racquet velocities characterised the WFS (∼29 m/s, WKS: ∼26 m/s) and WKS (∼4 m/s, WFS: ∼11 m/s) respectively. The shoulder joint kinetics that contributed to the differential racquet velocity profiles were mostly developed independent of wheelchair serve type, but varied with and were likely related to the level and severity of spinal cord injury of the individual players. Conclusions Compared with able‐bodied players, wheelchair players experienced matching pre‐ and post‐impact shoulder joint loads, such that wheelchair and able‐bodied playing populations appear subject to similar shoulder joint injury risk. PMID:17957009

  20. Employees Who Use Wheelchairs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Disabilities Publications Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees Who Use Wheelchairs By Linda Carter Batiste, ... Audio Version Share Introduction JAN’s Accommodation and Compliance Series is designed to help employers determine effective accommodations ...

  1. Is the collaborative wheelchair adapted to cerebral palsy and traumatic brain injury subjects?

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Teo, Chee Leong; Burdet, Etienne

    2008-01-01

    The collaborative wheelchair assistant (CWA) provides guidance along software-defined paths while the user is in charge of the speed control, including start and stop. Three patients with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and two with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), who had been ruled out for independent mobility, performed experiments with the CWA. While initially no subject was able to move independently, all subjects learned to drive with the CWA in a few sessions. Two subjects became able to drive a normal powered wheelchair. The other three could use the mobility provided by the CWA, while two of them could also use the tools to modify the guide paths. This suggests that the CWA is useful for a range of people with different disabilities.

  2. Preliminary assessment of Tongue Drive System in medium term usage for computer access and wheelchair control.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Behnaz; Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2011-01-01

    Tongue Drive System (TDS) is a wireless, wearable assistive technology that enables individuals with severe motor impairments access computers, drive wheelchairs, and control their environments using tongue motion. In this paper, we have evaluated the TDS performance as a computer input device using ISO9241-9 standard tasks for pointing and selecting, based on the well known Fitts' Law, and as a powered wheelchair controller through an obstacle course navigation task. Nine able-bodied subjects who already had tongue piercing participated in this trial over 5 sessions during 5 weeks, allowing us to study the TDS learning process and its current limiting factors. Subjects worn tongue rings made of titanium in the form of a barbell with a small rare earth magnetic tracer hermetically sealed inside the upper ball. Comparing the results between 1(st) and 5(th) sessions showed that subjects' performance improved in all the measures through 5 sessions, demonstrating the effects of learning.

  3. Development of safety concept of electric wheelchair driving support system based on assessment of risk.

    PubMed

    Kurozumi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Toru; Fujisawa, Shoichiro

    2015-01-01

    In this research, we pay attention to the electric wheelchair driving support. We look at the functional safety of the electric wheelchair. Based on intrinsically-safe electric wheelchair, we add driving support system to increase functional safety. The driving support system processes the environmental information sensor data including the 3D laser Range scanner and biological monitoring sensor data including electrooculogram, and assists avoidance of dangerous objects. We have developed safety concept that based on assessment of risk.

  4. Embodying prostheses - how to let the body welcome assistive devices. Comment on "The embodiment of assistive devices-from wheelchair to exoskeleton" by M. Pazzaglia and M. Molinari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Matthew R.; Sadibolova, Renata; Tamè, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    A growing body of research has focused on the development of assistive devises to improve the recovery and ameliorate the quality of life of people suffering from spinal cord injuries (SCI). In their stimulating and timely paper, Pazzaglia and Molinari [1] review the significant progress made by biotechnology studies in providing increasing sophisticated assistive tools (e.g., prostheses and exoskeletons) that extend the functionality of patients' bodies. However, despite this extraordinary technological effort [2], it remains uncertain how these devices can be appropriately embedded into the mental representation of the body. Here, we wish to amplify the points raised by Pazzaglia and Molinari by discussing three challenges facing work on embodying prostheses raised by experimental research on body representation.

  5. Re-embodiment: incorporation through embodied learning of wheelchair skills.

    PubMed

    Standal, Øyvind F

    2011-05-01

    In this article, the notion of re-embodiment is developed to include the ways that rearrangement and renewals of body schema take place in rehabilitation. More specifically, the embodied learning process of acquiring wheelchair skills serves as a starting point for fleshing out a phenomenological understanding of incorporation of assistive devices. By drawing on the work of Merleau-Ponty, the reciprocal relation between acquisition habits and incorporation of instruments is explored in relation to the learning of wheelchair skills. On the basis of this, it is argued that through learning to manoeuvre the wheelchair, a reversible relation between is established between the moving body-subject and the wheelchair. In this sense, re-embodiment involves a gestalt switch from body image to body schema.

  6. Spotter strap for the prevention of wheelchair tipping.

    PubMed

    Kirby, R L; Lugar, J A

    1999-10-01

    Injuries caused by wheelchair rear-tipping accidents are common. This article reports on the safety and effectiveness of a spotter strap that attaches to the cross-brace or frame below the center of gravity of an occupied wheelchair. We videotaped five therapists spotting 89 wheelchair users while the users each performed six tasks that were designed to induce rear instability. We induced 16 episodes of complete rear tipping. In all cases, the spotter strap allowed the spotter to stay out of the way during the task, but step in easily when necessary to prevent the wheelchair user from being injured. In one instance, the spotter needed assistance lifting a heavy subject to the upright position after catching the subject with the strap. In summary, the spotter strap is a safe and effective device. We recommend its use when there is a high risk of a rear-tipping accident.

  7. Shared control strategies for obstacle avoidance tasks in an intelligent wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Trieu, Hoang T; Nguyen, Hung T; Willey, Keith

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a method of shared control strategy for an intelligent wheelchair to assist a disable user in performing obstacle avoidance tasks. The system detects obstacles in front of the wheelchair using a laser range finder sensor. As the wheelchair moves the information from the laser range finder is combined with data from the encoders mounted in its driving wheels to build a 360 degrees real-time map. The accuracy of the map is improved by eliminating the systematic error that would result from both the uncertainty of effective wheelbase and unequal driving wheel diameters. The usable wheelchair accessible space is determined by including the actual wheelchair dimensions in producing the real-time map. In making a decision the shared control method considers the user's intentions via the head-movement interface, accessible space of the environment and user safety. The experiments show promising results in the intelligent wheelchair system.

  8. RESNA Position on the Application of Seat-Elevating Devices for Wheelchair Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arva, Julianna; Schmeler, Mark R.; Lange, Michelle L.; Lipka, Daniel D.; Rosen, Lauren E.

    2009-01-01

    This document, approved by the Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Board of Directors in September 2005, shares typical clinical applications and provides evidence from the literature supporting the use of seat-elevating devices for wheelchair users. Wheelchair mobility is often only considered from…

  9. Towards evidence-based classification in wheelchair sports: impact of seating position on wheelchair acceleration.

    PubMed

    Vanlandewijck, Yves C; Verellen, Joeri; Tweedy, Sean

    2011-07-01

    In most Paralympic wheelchair sports, active trunk range of movement is assessed by observing shoulder girdle excursion during active trunk movements and is a key determinant of an athlete's class. However, to date research evaluating the impact of reduced trunk range of movement on wheelchair sports performance has not been conducted. In the present study, 15 non-disabled male participants performed two 20-s sprints on a wheelchair ergometer in each of three seating positions. Positions were typical of those used to enhance sitting stability in wheelchair sport and each impacted available trunk range of movement differently: condition-90 (seated with thighs horizontal; unrestricted range of movement) condition-45 (seated with thighs in 45°), and condition-0 (seated with hips maximally flexed; minimum range of movement). In condition-90, the trunk only actively contributed to the first push; for the remainder of the sprint, the trunk was held almost isometrically at 48.2° to the horizontal (range 42.1-56.4°). Similar patterns were observed for both condition-45 and condition-0. Compared with condition-90, participants in condition-0 had reduced capacity to accelerate of statistical (P < 0.05) and practical significance. These findings are an important initial step towards evidence-based decision making in classification. Future research should evaluate the individual and collective impact of other factors that affect the trunk's contribution to wheelchair sports performance, including strapping, seating position, and impairments of trunk muscle power and coordination.

  10. 14 CFR 382.103 - May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.103 May a carrier... enplaning, deplaning, or connecting assistance in a ground wheelchair, boarding wheelchair, or other device... applies even if another person (e.g., family member, personal care attendant) is accompanying...

  11. Mothers' Perceptions of Their Children's Use of Powered Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiart, Lesley; Darrah, Johanna; Hollis, Vivien; Cook, Al; May, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Physical therapists and occupational therapists frequently assist parents with the exploration and use of powered wheelchairs for their children with physical disabilities. The purpose of this study was to explore parents' experiences and perceptions of their children's experiences with the receipt and use of powered mobility. Qualitative methods…

  12. Towards a new modality-independent interface for a robotic wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Bastos-Filho, Teodiano Freire; Cheein, Fernando Auat; Müller, Sandra Mara Torres; Celeste, Wanderley Cardoso; de la Cruz, Celso; Cavalieri, Daniel Cruz; Sarcinelli-Filho, Mário; Amaral, Paulo Faria Santos; Perez, Elisa; Soria, Carlos Miguel; Carelli, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    This work presents the development of a robotic wheelchair that can be commanded by users in a supervised way or by a fully automatic unsupervised navigation system. It provides flexibility to choose different modalities to command the wheelchair, in addition to be suitable for people with different levels of disabilities. Users can command the wheelchair based on their eye blinks, eye movements, head movements, by sip-and-puff and through brain signals. The wheelchair can also operate like an auto-guided vehicle, following metallic tapes, or in an autonomous way. The system is provided with an easy to use and flexible graphical user interface onboard a personal digital assistant, which is used to allow users to choose commands to be sent to the robotic wheelchair. Several experiments were carried out with people with disabilities, and the results validate the developed system as an assistive tool for people with distinct levels of disability.

  13. Evaluation of the JACO robotic arm: clinico-economic study for powered wheelchair users with upper-extremity disabilities.

    PubMed

    Maheu, Veronique; Frappier, Julie; Archambault, Philippe S; Routhier, François

    2011-01-01

    Many activities of daily living, such as picking up glasses, holding a fork or opening a door, which most people do without thinking, can become insurmountable for people who have upper extremity disabilities. The alternative to asking for human help is to use some assistive devices to compensate their loss of mobility; however, many of those devices are limited in terms of functionality. Robotics may provide a better approach for the development of assistive devices, by allowing greater functionality. In this paper, we present results of a study (n=31) which objectives were to evaluate the efficacy of a new joystick-controlled seven-degree of freedom robotic manipulator and assess its potential economic benefits. Results show that JACO is easy to use as the majority of the participants were able to accomplish the testing tasks on their first attempt. The economic model results inferred that the use of the JACO arm system could potentially reduce caregiving time by 41%. These study results are expected to provide valuable data for interested parties, such as individuals with disabilities, their family or caregivers.

  14. Biomechanics and Physiology for Propelling Wheelchair Uphill Slope.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Tsutomu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Lee, Hokyoo; Ueda, Hisatoshi; Yoneda, Ikuo; Booka, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    A vertical slope of sidewalks significantly inhibits to the mobility of manual wheelchair users in their daily life. International guidelines of the vertical slope are specified approximately 4% or 5% (1:20) gradient or less as preferred, and allow 8.3% (1:12) as its maximum when it is impossible. Relevant research of the physical strain for wheelchair users with pushing on slopes, and the validity assessment of slope guidelines have been investigated. However, the analysis for the effect of a slope distance and their transient performance are still remained. The purpose of this study is to clarify the physiological and biomechanical characteristics of manual wheelchair users that propelling a wheelchair on an uphill slope. We measured these data by a metabolic analysis system, a heart rate monitor system and an instrumented wheelchair wheel. Sixteen unimpaired subjects (non-wheelchair users) were examined to investigate the effect of a long slope with 120m distance and 8% gradient. And five wheelchair users with cervical cord injury were examined to evaluate the influence of different gradients (5%, 6.7%, 8.3%, 10% and 12.5%) with 3m length in laboratory. Our experimental results of the long slope showed that wheelchair propulsion velocity and power increased considerably at the beginning of the slope where the peak mean value of them were 0.96 m/s and 70.8W and they decreased linearly to 0.55m/s and 33.6W at final interval. A mean oxygen uptake and heart rate were increased as the distance increased and their results indicated the extremely high exercise intensity at a final interval that were 1.2liter /min and 152bpm. While wheelchair pushing cadence reduced after an initial interval, mean of strokes per10m increased to compensate the decrease of upper limb's power. The results of different gradients indicated that the normalized power of subjects with cervical cord injury was significant difference between each subject in the ability to climb a slope. Mean

  15. Feedback Control for a Smart Wheelchair Trainer Based on the Kinect Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Aurelia McLaughlin

    This thesis describes a Microsoft Kinect-based feedback controller for a robot-assisted powered wheelchair trainer for children with a severe motor and/or cognitive disability. In one training mode, "computer gaming" mode, the wheelchair is allowed to rotate left and right while the children use a joystick to play video games shown on a screen in front of them. This enables them to learn the use of the joystick in a motivating environment, while experiencing the sensation and dynamics of turning in a safe setting. During initial pilot testing of the device, it was found that the wheelchair would creep forward while children were playing the games. This thesis presents a mathematical model of the wheelchair dynamics that explains the origin of the creep as a center of gravity offset from the wheel axis or a mismatch of the torques applied to the chair. Given these possible random perturbations, a feedback controller was developed to cancel these effects, correcting the system creep. The controller uses a Microsoft Kinect sensor to detect the distance to the screen displaying the computer game, as well as the left-right position (parallel parking concept) with respect to the screen, and then adjusts the wheel torque commands based on this measurement. We show through experimental testing that this controller effectively stops the creep. An added benefit of the feedback controller is that it approximates a washout filter, such as those used in aircraft simulators, to convey a more realistic sense of forward/backward motion during game play.

  16. Kinematic comparison of Hybrid II test dummy to wheelchair user.

    PubMed

    Dvorznak, M J; Cooper, R A; O'Connor, T J; Boninger, M L; Fitzgerald, S G

    2001-05-01

    Hybrid test dummies provide a safe alternative to human subjects when investigating mechanisms of wheelchair tips and falls. The data that researchers acquire from these test dummies are more useful if the test dummy represents the population being studied. The goal of this study was to measure the validity of a 50th percentile Hybrid II test dummy (HTD) as an accurate representation of a wheelchair user. A test pilot with T8 paraplegia due to traumatic spinal cord injury served as a basis for validation. Simple modifications were made to the HTD to approximate the trunk stability characteristics of a person with a spinal cord injury. An HTD, a modified HTD, and a human test pilot were seated in an electric-powered wheelchair and several braking tests performed. The standard HTD underestimated the kinematics when compared to the test pilot. The modified HTD had less trunk stability than the standard HTD during all braking methods. The modified HTD and wheelchair test pilot had similar trunk stability characteristics during kill switch and joystick full-reverse braking conditions. The modified HTD is a satisfactory representation of a wheelchair user with a spinal cord injury; however, the modified test dummy underestimates the trunk dynamics during the less extreme joystick release braking. Work should continue on the development of a low-speed, low-impact test dummy that emulates the wheelchair user population.

  17. A lower-limb power-assist robot with perception-assist.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshiaki; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    In order to assist the motion in the daily lives of physically weak persons such as elderly persons, many kinds of power-assist robots have been developed. In the case of some physically weak persons, the ability to perceive the environment is sometimes deteriorated also. A method of perception-assist has been proposed to assist not only the user's motion but also the user's interaction with an environment, by applying the modification force to the user's motion if it is necessary. In this paper, the perception-assist for a lower-limb power-assist exoskeleton robot is proposed. In the daily life, the walking is very important for persons to achieve desired tasks. Basically, the robot assists the user's muscle force according to the user's motion intention which is estimated based on EMG signals. If the robot has found problems which might lead the user to dangerous situation such as the falling down, the robot tries to modify the user's motion in addition to the ordinal power-assists to make the user walk properly. Since the user might fall down by the effect of the additional modification force of the perception-assist, the robot automatically prevents the user from falling down by considering ZMP (Zero Moment Point). The effectiveness of the proposed method has been evaluated by performing experiments.

  18. Federal financial assistance for hydroelectric power

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The Rural Energy Initiative seeks to maximize the effectiveness of Federal programs in developing certain energy resources, including small-scale hydropower. The REI target is to arrange financing for 100 hydro sites by 1981, with about 300 MWe of additional capacity. The REI financial assistance programs for small hydropower development in the US DOE; Economic Development Administration; REA; HUD; Farmers Home Administration; DOI; DOL's CETA programs; and the Community Services Administration are described. (MCW)

  19. Not your parent's wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Cox, Deborah I

    2004-01-01

    A pediatric wheelchair is indeed a smaller seating system mounted over a mobility base that helps a child get from point A to point B. The important thing to recognize is that the child is every day learning new things about how he or she fits in with the world. That child is making friends and exploring the playground and going to music or art class. He or she may be starting and ending the day with a parent, but midday is spent interacting with the school's bus driver, teachers, counselor, and therapists. It is the responsibility of the rehab specialist to make sure that, while using a wheelchair to get from point A to point B in all of these different settings and with all of these different people, that disability does not slow the child down.

  20. Restaurant wheelchair accessibility.

    PubMed

    McClain, L; Beringer, D; Kuhnert, H; Priest, J; Wilkes, E; Wilkinson, S; Wyrick, L

    1993-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the compliance of restaurants to the wheelchair accessibility standards set forth in the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards. The standards that were operationalized in this study are also found in Title III of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. The data were collected at 120 sites in three midwestern states. For one who uses a wheelchair, parking the car is often an obstacle to eating out. Only 53% of the restaurants surveyed provide handicapped parking. Entering the building may also be a problem. Of the restaurants that required a ramp, only 66% provided them. Inside the restaurant, the key problems were accessible rest-rooms and the height of tables. The study provided comparisons between restaurants in rural and urban settings, as well as comparisons between conventional restaurants and fast food restaurants. No notable differences emerged for these comparisons.

  1. Measuring Wheelchair Intervention Outcomes: Development of the Wheelchair Outcome Measure

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, William B; Miller, William C; Miller-Pogar, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Provision of a wheelchair has immediate intuitive benefits; however, it can be difficult to evaluate which wheelchair and seating components best meet an individual’s needs. As well, funding agencies now prefer evidence of outcomes; and therefore measurement upon prescription of a wheelchair or its components is essential to demonstrate the efficacy of intervention. As no existing tool can provide individualized goal-oriented measure of outcome after wheelchair prescription, a research project was undertaken to create the Wheelchair Outcome Measure (WhOM). Method A mixed method research design was employed to develop the instrument, which used in-depth interviews of prescribers, individuals who use wheelchairs and their associates, supplemented by additional questions in which participant preferences in key areas of the measure were quantified. Results The WhOM is a client-specific wheelchair intervention measurement tool that is based on the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Function, Disability, and Health. It identifies desired outcomes at a participation level and also acknowledges concerns about body structure and function. Conclusion The new outcome instrument will allow clients to identify and evaluate the outcomes they wish to achieve with their wheelchairs and seating and provide clinicians a way to quantify outcomes of their interventions in a way that is meaningful to the client and potential funding sources. PMID:19263533

  2. RESNA Wheelchair Service Provision Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arledge, Stan; Armstrong, William; Babinec, Mike; Dicianno, Brad E.; Digiovine, Carmen; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor; Pederson, Jessica; Piriano, Julie; Plummer, Teresa; Rosen, Lauren; Schmeler, Mark; Shea, Mary; Stogner, Jody

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the Wheelchair Service Provision Guide is to provide an appropriate framework for identifying the essential steps in the provision of a wheelchair. It is designed for use by all participants in the provision process including consumers, family members, caregivers, social service and health care professionals, suppliers,…

  3. Effect of wheelchair mass, tire type and tire pressure on physical strain and wheelchair propulsion technique.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Sonja; Vegter, Riemer J K; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of wheelchair mass, solid vs. pneumatic tires and tire pressure on physical strain and wheelchair propulsion technique. 11 Able-bodied participants performed 14 submaximal exercise blocks on a treadmill with a fixed speed (1.11 m/s) within 3 weeks to determine the effect of tire pressure (100%, 75%, 50%, 25% of the recommended value), wheelchair mass (0 kg, 5 kg, or 10 kg extra) and tire type (pneumatic vs. solid). All test conditions (except pneumatic vs. solid) were performed with and without instrumented measurement wheels. Outcome measures were power output (PO), physical strain (heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), gross mechanical efficiency (ME)) and propulsion technique (timing, force application). At 25% tire pressure PO and subsequently VO2 were higher compared to 100% tire pressure. Furthermore, a higher tire pressure led to a longer cycle time and contact angle and subsequently lower push frequency. Extra mass did not lead to an increase in PO, physical strain or propulsion technique. Solid tires led to a higher PO and physical strain. The solid tire effect was amplified by increased mass (tire × mass interaction). In contrast to extra mass, tire pressure and tire type have an effect on PO, physical strain or propulsion technique of steady-state wheelchair propulsion. As expected, it is important to optimize tire pressure and tire type.

  4. Vision based interface system for hands free control of an intelligent wheelchair

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jin Sun; Shin, Yunhee; Kim, Eun Yi

    2009-01-01

    Background Due to the shift of the age structure in today's populations, the necessities for developing the devices or technologies to support them have been increasing. Traditionally, the wheelchair, including powered and manual ones, is the most popular and important rehabilitation/assistive device for the disabled and the elderly. However, it is still highly restricted especially for severely disabled. As a solution to this, the Intelligent Wheelchairs (IWs) have received considerable attention as mobility aids. The purpose of this work is to develop the IW interface for providing more convenient and efficient interface to the people the disability in their limbs. Methods This paper proposes an intelligent wheelchair (IW) control system for the people with various disabilities. To facilitate a wide variety of user abilities, the proposed system involves the use of face-inclination and mouth-shape information, where the direction of an IW is determined by the inclination of the user's face, while proceeding and stopping are determined by the shapes of the user's mouth. Our system is composed of electric powered wheelchair, data acquisition board, ultrasonic/infra-red sensors, a PC camera, and vision system. Then the vision system to analyze user's gestures is performed by three stages: detector, recognizer, and converter. In the detector, the facial region of the intended user is first obtained using Adaboost, thereafter the mouth region is detected based on edge information. The extracted features are sent to the recognizer, which recognizes the face inclination and mouth shape using statistical analysis and K-means clustering, respectively. These recognition results are then delivered to the converter to control the wheelchair. Result & conclusion The advantages of the proposed system include 1) accurate recognition of user's intention with minimal user motion and 2) robustness to a cluttered background and the time-varying illumination. To prove these

  5. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  6. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  7. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  8. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  9. 14 CFR 382.127 - What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-powered mobility aids? 382.127 Section 382.127 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT... DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.127 What procedures apply to stowage of battery-powered mobility aids? (a) Whenever baggage...

  10. Evaluation of Dynamics of Pushing a Wheelchair Up or Down a Slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Kazuto; Sasaki, Makoto; Iwami, Takehiro; Obinata, Goro; Shimada, Yoichi

    Japan's progressing aging society increasingly needs evaluation of equipment used for human assistance. Earlier studies have evaluated the use of wheelchairs. However, the manner in which the equipment moderates the generated consumption energy of helpers has not been described sufficiently. This study performs mechanical evaluation of a helper's walking using a wheelchair on a slope. We use the Musculoskeletal Model to estimate the joint moment and energy consumption. Results obtained with 14 volunteers who assisted these wheelchair experiments were considered for cases in which the energy consumption of the wheelchair increased by 13% from that of a normal gait when moving up an incline. This evaluation method is useful for developing practical assistance equipment.

  11. How Technology Assists My Daughter to Compete in the Mainstream of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lode, Carol

    1992-01-01

    A mother recounts how her kindergarten-aged daughter (who has severe cerebral palsy and is quadriplegic and nonverbal) is able to participate in mainstream school life with the assistance of an electrically powered wheelchair, an electronic speech output device, and a computer. (DB)

  12. Security Assistance Dependence - Wielding American Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-09

    INTERNATIONAL. July 24, 2001. Dougherty, James E. and Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr. “From Realist to Neorealist Theory .” In Contending Theories of...International Traffic in Arms Regulation. US Code. Vol. 22 sec 2751. 22 CFR parts 120-130 (1999). Waltz , Kenneth . Theory of International Politics. Reading...respect to a state’s capabilities and its ability and willingness to express its power.25 Kenneth Waltz proposes that it is possible to rank

  13. Towards an intelligent wheelchair system for users with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Luis; Díaz, Marta; Bhaskar, Sonu; Minguez, Javier

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes and evaluates an intelligent wheelchair, adapted for users with cognitive disabilities and mobility impairment. The study focuses on patients with cerebral palsy, one of the most common disorders affecting muscle control and coordination, thereby impairing movement. The wheelchair concept is an assistive device that allows the user to select arbitrary local destinations through a tactile screen interface. The device incorporates an automatic navigation system that drives the vehicle, avoiding obstacles even in unknown and dynamic scenarios. It provides the user with a high degree of autonomy, independent from a particular environment, i.e., not restricted to predefined conditions. To evaluate the rehabilitation device, a study was carried out with four subjects with cognitive impairments, between 11 and 16 years of age. They were first trained so as to get acquainted with the tactile interface and then were recruited to drive the wheelchair. Based on the experience with the subjects, an extensive evaluation of the intelligent wheelchair was provided from two perspectives: 1) based on the technical performance of the entire system and its components and 2) based on the behavior of the user (execution analysis, activity analysis, and competence analysis). The results indicated that the intelligent wheelchair effectively provided mobility and autonomy to the target population.

  14. Wheelchair interventions, services and provision for disabled children: a mixed-method systematic review and conceptual framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wheelchairs for disabled children (≤18 years) can provide health, developmental and social benefits. World Health Organisation and United Kingdom Government reports demonstrate the need for improved access to wheelchairs both locally and internationally. The use of health economics within this field is lacking. Provision of wheelchairs based on cost-effectiveness evidence is not currently possible. We conducted the first systematic review in this field to incorporate evidence of effectiveness, service user perspectives, policy intentions and cost-effectiveness in order to develop a conceptual framework to inform future research and service development. Methods We used an adapted EPPI-Centre mixed-method systematic review design with narrative summary, thematic and narrative synthesis. 11 databases were searched. Studies were appraised for quality using one of seven appropriate tools. A conceptual framework was developed from synthesised evidence. Results 22 studies and 14 policies/guidelines were included. Powered wheelchairs appear to offer benefits in reduced need for caregiver assistance; improved communicative, personal-social and cognitive development; and improved mobility function and independent movement. From 14 months of age children can learn some degree of powered wheelchair driving competence. However, effectiveness evidence was limited and low quality. Children and parents placed emphasis on improving social skill and independence. Participation in wider society and development of meaningful relationships were key desired outcomes. Policy intentions and aspirations are in line with the perspectives of children and parents, although translation of policy recommendations into practice is lacking. Conclusions There is a distinct lack of high quality effectiveness and economic evidence in this field. Social and health needs should be seen as equally important when assessing the mobility needs of disabled children. Disabled children and

  15. Atmospheric freeze drying assisted by power ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santacatalina, J. V.; Cárcel, J. A.; Simal, S.; Garcia-Perez, J. V.; Mulet, A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric freeze drying (AFD) is considered an alternative to vacuum freeze drying to keep the quality of fresh product. AFD allows continuous drying reducing fix and operating costs, but presents, as main disadvantage, a long drying time required. The application of power ultrasound (US) can accelerate AFD process. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of power ultrasound to improve atmospheric freeze drying of carrot. For that purpose, AFD experiments were carried out with carrot cubes (10 mm side) at constant air velocity (2 ms-1), temperature (-10°C) and relative humidity (10%) with (20.5 kWm-3,USAFD) and without (AFD) ultrasonic application. A diffusion model was used in order to quantify the influence of US in drying kinetics. To evaluate the quality of dry products, rehydration capacity and textural properties were determined. The US application during AFD of carrot involved the increase of drying rate. The effective moisture diffusivity identified in USAFD was 73% higher than in AFD experiments. On the other hand, the rehydration capacity was higher in USAFD than in AFD and the hardness of dried samples did not show significant (p<0.05) differences. Therefore, US application during AFD significantly (p<0.05) sped-up the drying process preserving the quality properties of the dry product.

  16. Design of a Power-Assisted Spacesuit Glove Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Russell D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the details of the design and implementation of an electromechanical power-assisted spacesuit glove actuator. The project was a joint effort by the University of Maryland's Space Systems Laboratory and ILC Dover, Inc., and involved innovative approaches to power augmentation and compact actuator packaging. The first actuator built validated several basic design concepts, and the second demonstrated improved performance and met many of the goals for flight qualification of the technology.

  17. The tongue enables computer and wheelchair control for people with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeonghee; Park, Hangue; Bruce, Joy; Sutton, Erica; Rowles, Diane; Pucci, Deborah; Holbrook, Jaimee; Minocha, Julia; Nardone, Beatrice; West, Dennis; Laumann, Anne; Roth, Eliot; Jones, Mike; Veledar, Emir; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-11-27

    The Tongue Drive System (TDS) is a wireless and wearable assistive technology, designed to allow individuals with severe motor impairments such as tetraplegia to access their environment using voluntary tongue motion. Previous TDS trials used a magnetic tracer temporarily attached to the top surface of the tongue with tissue adhesive. We investigated TDS efficacy for controlling a computer and driving a powered wheelchair in two groups of able-bodied subjects and a group of volunteers with spinal cord injury (SCI) at C6 or above. All participants received a magnetic tongue barbell and used the TDS for five to six consecutive sessions. The performance of the group was compared for TDS versus keypad and TDS versus a sip-and-puff device (SnP) using accepted measures of speed and accuracy. All performance measures improved over the course of the trial. The gap between keypad and TDS performance narrowed for able-bodied subjects. Despite participants with SCI already having familiarity with the SnP, their performance measures were up to three times better with the TDS than with the SnP and continued to improve. TDS flexibility and the inherent characteristics of the human tongue enabled individuals with high-level motor impairments to access computers and drive wheelchairs at speeds that were faster than traditional assistive technologies but with comparable accuracy.

  18. Voice Controlled Wheelchair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Michael Condon, a quadraplegic from Pasadena, California, demonstrates the NASA-developed voice-controlled wheelchair and its manipulator, which can pick up packages, open doors, turn a TV knob, and perform a variety of other functions. A possible boon to paralyzed and other severely handicapped persons, the chair-manipulator system responds to 35 one-word voice commands, such as "go," "stop," "up," "down," "right," "left," "forward," "backward." The heart of the system is a voice-command analyzer which utilizes a minicomputer. Commands are taught I to the computer by the patient's repeating them a number of times; thereafter the analyzer recognizes commands only in the patient's particular speech pattern. The computer translates commands into electrical signals which activate appropriate motors and cause the desired motion of chair or manipulator. Based on teleoperator and robot technology for space-related programs, the voice-controlled system was developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the joint sponsorship of NASA and the Veterans Administration. The wheelchair-manipulator has been tested at Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California, and is being evaluated at the VA Prosthetics Center in New York City.

  19. Wheelchairs, walkers, and canes: what does Medicare pay for, and who benefits?

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Agree, Emily M; Kasper, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    Medicare's role in the distribution of mobility-related assistive technology has not been well documented, yet rapid growth and regional variation in spending, and concerns over "in-the-home" coverage criteria, highlight the need for facts. Using the 2001 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, we find that 6.2 percent percent of beneficiaries obtained mobility assistive technology under the Medicare durable medical equipment (DME) benefit. These beneficiaries were disproportionately poor, disabled, and users of both acute and postacute services. Average per item spending ranged from $52 for canes to $6,208 for power wheelchairs. Among beneficiaries who acquired such technology through the DME benefit, these devices comprised just 2 percent of overall Medicare spending.

  20. Variability in bimanual wheelchair propulsion: consistency of two instrumented wheels during handrim wheelchair propulsion on a motor driven treadmill

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Handrim wheelchair propulsion is a complex bimanual motor task. The bimanually applied forces on the rims determine the speed and direction of locomotion. Measurements of forces and torques on the handrim are important to study status and change of propulsion technique (and consequently mechanical strain) due to processes of learning, training or the wheelchair configuration. The purpose of this study was to compare the simultaneous outcomes of two different measurement-wheels attached to the different sides of the wheelchair, to determine measurement consistency within and between these wheels given the expected inter- and intra-limb variability as a consequence of motor control. Methods Nine able-bodied subjects received a three-week low-intensity handrim wheelchair practice intervention. They then performed three four-minute trials of wheelchair propulsion in an instrumented hand rim wheelchair on a motor-driven treadmill at a fixed belt speed. The two measurement-wheels on each side of the wheelchair measured forces and torques of one of the two upper limbs, which simultaneously perform the push action over time. The resulting data were compared as direct output using cross-correlation on the torque around the wheel-axle. Calculated push characteristics such as power production and speed were compared using an intra-class correlation. Results Measured torque around the wheel axle of the two measurement-wheels had a high average cross-correlation of 0.98 (std=0.01). Unilateral mean power output over a minute was found to have an intra-class correlation of 0.89 between the wheels. Although the difference over the pushes between left and right power output had a high variability, the mean difference between the measurement-wheels was low at 0.03 W (std=1.60). Other push characteristics showed even higher ICC’s (>0.9). Conclusions A good agreement between both measurement-wheels was found at the level of the power output. This indicates a high

  1. From Wheelchair to Cane

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Amanda; Berbrayer, David

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spina bifida is associated with foot deformities, which may lead to foot ulcers, osteomyelitis, and limb amputation. Calcanectomy and Symes amputations have been reported successful in spina bifida. There is lack of evidence for transtibial amputations. This case describes a 27-yr-old woman with L4 level spina bifida who underwent bilateral transtibial amputations. She ambulated with bilateral ankle foot orthoses and canes until age 22. At age 22, she had bilateral foot reconstructive surgeries complicated by nonunion, ulcerations, and osteomyelitis. She was using a wheelchair by age 25. She had elective bilateral transtibial amputations at age 27 for progressive osteomyelitis. Four weeks after amputations, she was fit with bilateral prostheses. On completion of 2 mos of rehabilitation, she ambulated with a cane. This case demonstrates good functional outcomes after transtibial amputations in a young spina bifida patient. Prosthetic fitting should be considered for similar, previously high functioning spina bifida patients with transtibial amputation(s). PMID:26259056

  2. From big data to rich data: The key features of athlete wheelchair mobility performance.

    PubMed

    van der Slikke, R M A; Berger, M A M; Bregman, D J J; Veeger, H E J

    2016-10-03

    Quantitative assessment of an athlete׳s individual wheelchair mobility performance is one prerequisite needed to evaluate game performance, improve wheelchair settings and optimize training routines. Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) based methods can be used to perform such quantitative assessment, providing a large number of kinematic data. The goal of this research was to reduce that large amount of data to a set of key features best describing wheelchair mobility performance in match play and present them in meaningful way for both scientists and athletes. To test the discriminative power, wheelchair mobility characteristics of athletes with different performance levels were compared. The wheelchair kinematics of 29 (inter-)national level athletes were measured during a match using three inertial sensors mounted on the wheelchair. Principal component analysis was used to reduce 22 kinematic outcomes to a set of six outcomes regarding linear and rotational movement; speed and acceleration; average and best performance. In addition, it was explored whether groups of athletes with known performance differences based on their impairment classification also differed with respect to these key outcomes using univariate general linear models. For all six key outcomes classification showed to be a significant factor (p<0.05). We composed a set of six key kinematic outcomes that accurately describe wheelchair mobility performance in match play. The key kinematic outcomes were displayed in an easy to interpret way, usable for athletes, coaches and scientists. This standardized representation enables comparison of different wheelchair sports regarding wheelchair mobility, but also evaluation at the level of an individual athlete. By this means, the tool could enhance further development of wheelchair sports in general.

  3. HMM based automated wheelchair navigation using EOG traces in EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Fayeem; Arof, Hamzah; Mokhtar, Norrima; Mubin, Marizan

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a wheelchair navigation system based on a hidden Markov model (HMM), which we developed to assist those with restricted mobility. The semi-autonomous system is equipped with obstacle/collision avoidance sensors and it takes the electrooculography (EOG) signal traces from the user as commands to maneuver the wheelchair. The EOG traces originate from eyeball and eyelid movements and they are embedded in EEG signals collected from the scalp of the user at three different locations. Features extracted from the EOG traces are used to determine whether the eyes are open or closed, and whether the eyes are gazing to the right, center, or left. These features are utilized as inputs to a few support vector machine (SVM) classifiers, whose outputs are regarded as observations to an HMM. The HMM determines the state of the system and generates commands for navigating the wheelchair accordingly. The use of simple features and the implementation of a sliding window that captures important signatures in the EOG traces result in a fast execution time and high classification rates. The wheelchair is equipped with a proximity sensor and it can move forward and backward in three directions. The asynchronous system achieved an average classification rate of 98% when tested with online data while its average execution time was less than 1 s. It was also tested in a navigation experiment where all of the participants managed to complete the tasks successfully without collisions.

  4. HMM based automated wheelchair navigation using EOG traces in EEG.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Fayeem; Arof, Hamzah; Mokhtar, Norrima; Mubin, Marizan

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a wheelchair navigation system based on a hidden Markov model (HMM), which we developed to assist those with restricted mobility. The semi-autonomous system is equipped with obstacle/collision avoidance sensors and it takes the electrooculography (EOG) signal traces from the user as commands to maneuver the wheelchair. The EOG traces originate from eyeball and eyelid movements and they are embedded in EEG signals collected from the scalp of the user at three different locations. Features extracted from the EOG traces are used to determine whether the eyes are open or closed, and whether the eyes are gazing to the right, center, or left. These features are utilized as inputs to a few support vector machine (SVM) classifiers, whose outputs are regarded as observations to an HMM. The HMM determines the state of the system and generates commands for navigating the wheelchair accordingly. The use of simple features and the implementation of a sliding window that captures important signatures in the EOG traces result in a fast execution time and high classification rates. The wheelchair is equipped with a proximity sensor and it can move forward and backward in three directions. The asynchronous system achieved an average classification rate of 98% when tested with online data while its average execution time was less than 1 s. It was also tested in a navigation experiment where all of the participants managed to complete the tasks successfully without collisions.

  5. Manual wheelchairs: Research and innovation in rehabilitation, sports, daily life and health.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, Lucas H V; de Groot, Sonja; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2006-11-01

    Those with lower limb disabilities are often dependent on manually propelled wheelchairs for their mobility, in Europe today some 3.3 million people. This implies a transfer from leg to arm work for ambulation and all other activities of daily living (ADL). Compared to the legs, arm work is less efficient and more straining, and leads to a lower physical capacity. Also, there is a major risk of mechanical overuse. Problems of long-term wheelchair use are not only pain or discomfort, but also a risk of a physically inactive lifestyle. Subsequently, serious secondary impairments (obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular problems) may eventually emerge. Wheelchair quality, including the ergonomic fitting to the individual may play a preventive role here, but also other modes of physical activity, and the understanding of training, rehabilitation, active lifestyle and sports on health and wellbeing. The 'International Classification of Functioning, Health and Disability' (ICF) model, a stress-strain-work capacity model, as well as the ergonomics model that relates human-activity-assistive technology are instrumental to the concepts, structure and aims of research in assistive technology for mobility. Apart from empirical developments and innovations from within wheelchair sports, systematic research has played a role in wheelchair development and design in three important areas: (1) the vehicle mechanics, (2) the human movement system and (3) the wheelchair-user interface. Current practical developments in design and technology are discussed. A position stand on the key-issues of a current and future research agenda in this area is presented.

  6. Equipping an automated wheelchair with an infrared encoder wheel odometer - biomed 2011.

    PubMed

    Schultz, D; Allen, M; Barrett, S F

    2011-01-01

    Assistive technology is a rapidly growing field that provides a degree of freedom and self-sufficiency to people of limited mobility. Smart wheelchairs are a subset of assistive technology, and are designed to be operated by people who are unable to use a traditional control system. Instead, smart wheelchairs are equipped with a combination of automated functionality and steering mechanisms specialized to meet a person’s individual needs. One feature common to the automated capabilities of smart wheelchairs is the tracking system. The wheelchair’s microcontroller needs to know how far the chair has travelled, its speed, and the rotational direction of its wheels in order to successfully navigate through an environment. The purpose of this research was to develop an odometer to track the motion of a motorized wheelchair. Due to federal regulations that prohibit changing the structure or internal mechanics of a medical device, the odometer had to be designed as a separate, removable part. The final design for the odometer consisted of two infrared sensors that measure edge transitions of a segmented black and white encoder wheel. The sensor output was then run through two comparator op amps and a high pass filter to produce a clean, crisp square wave signal output. The signal was then fed to an Atmel ATmega164P microcontroller. The microcontroller was programmed to compare the sensor signal with its internal clock, sense edge transitions, and thereby extrapolate the speed, travelled distance, and rotational direction of the wheelchair.

  7. Initial Skill Acquisition of Handrim Wheelchair Propulsion: A New Perspective.

    PubMed

    Vegter, Riemer J K; de Groot, Sonja; Lamoth, Claudine J; Veeger, Dirkjan Hej; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into cyclic motor learning processes, hand rim wheelchair propulsion is a suitable cyclic task, to be learned during early rehabilitation and novel to almost every individual. To propel in an energy efficient manner, wheelchair users must learn to control bimanually applied forces onto the rims, preserving both speed and direction of locomotion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique during the initial stage of motor learning. Therefore, 70 naive able-bodied men received 12-min uninstructed wheelchair practice, consisting of three 4-min blocks separated by 2 min rest. Practice was performed on a motor-driven treadmill at a fixed belt speed and constant power output relative to body mass. Energy consumption and the kinetics of propulsion technique were continuously measured. Participants significantly increased their mechanical efficiency and changed their propulsion technique from a high frequency mode with a lot of negative work to a longer-slower movement pattern with less power losses. Furthermore a multi-level model showed propulsion technique to relate to mechanical efficiency. Finally improvers and non-improvers were identified. The non-improving group was already more efficient and had a better propulsion technique in the first block of practice (i.e., the fourth minute). These findings link propulsion technique to mechanical efficiency, support the importance of a correct propulsion technique for wheelchair users and show motor learning differences.

  8. Mapping and navigational control for a “smart” wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Dana L; Shea, Kathleen M; Barrett, Steven F

    2012-01-01

    A “smart” wheelchair is in development to provide mobility to those unable to control a traditional wheelchair. A “smart” wheelchair is an autonomous machine with the ability to navigate a mapped environment while avoiding obstacles. The flexibility and complex design of “smart” wheelchairs have made those currently available expensive. Ongoing research at the University of Wyoming has been aimed at designing a cheaper, alternative control system that could be interfaced with a typical powered wheelchair. The goal of this project is to determine methods for mapping and navigational control for the wheelchair. The control system acquires data from eighteen sensors and uses the data to navigate around a pre-programmed map which is stored on a micro SD card. The control system also provides a user interface in the form of a touchscreen LCD. The designed system will be an easy-to-use and cost effective alternative to current “smart” wheelchair technology.

  9. Wheelchair Users' Problems With Community Living

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Those confined to wheelchairs face many frustrations when attempting to become more active in their communities. Many community and health facilities are inaccessible and available transportation is limited. Wheelchair users may have difficulty obtaining appropriate wheelchair prescriptions. Their quality of life and health may be jeopardized by pressure sores. Painful conditions in the arms may further increase the degree of disability. A special approach to fitness training may be required. The wheelchair user's self-image will be affected by society's general negativism toward the disabled. Knowledgeable and sympathetic medical care can reduce the stresses inevitable for patients confined to wheelchairs. PMID:21274033

  10. Economic viability of photovoltaic power for development assistance applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bifano, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the development assistance market and examines a number of specific photovoltaic (PV) development assistance field tests, including water pumping/grain grinding (Tangaye, Upper Volta), vaccine refrigerators slated for deployment in 24 countries, rural medical centers to be installed in Ecuador, Guyana, Kenya and Zimbabwe, and remote earth stations to be deployed in the near future. A comparison of levelized energy cost for diesel generators and PV systems covering a range of annual energy consumptions is also included. The analysis does not consider potential societal, environmental or political benefits associated with PV power. PV systems are shown to be competitive with diesel generators, based on life cycle cost considerations, assuming a system price of $20/W(peak), for applications having an annual energy demand of up to 6000 kilowatt-hours per year.

  11. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Rory A; De Luigi, Arthur Jason

    2014-08-01

    Wheelchair sports are an important tool in the rehabilitation of people with severe chronic disabilities and have been a driving force for innovation in technology and practice. In this paper, we will present an overview of the adaptive technology used in Paralympic sports with a special focus on wheeled technology and the impact of design on performance (defined as achieving the greatest level of athletic ability and minimizing the risk of injury). Many advances in manual wheelchairs trace their origins to wheelchair sports. Features of wheelchairs that were used for racing and basketball 25 or more years ago have become integral to the manual wheelchairs that people now use every day; moreover, the current components used on ultralight wheelchairs also have benefitted from technological advances developed for sports wheelchairs. For example, the wheels now used on chairs for daily mobility incorporate many of the components first developed for sports chairs. Also, advances in manufacturing and the availability of aerospace materials have driven current wheelchair design and manufacture. Basic principles of sports wheelchair design are universal across sports and include fit; minimizing weight while maintaining high stiffness; minimizing rolling resistance; and optimizing the sports-specific design of the chair. However, a well-designed and fitted wheelchair is not sufficient for optimal sports performance: the athlete must be well trained, skilled, and use effective biomechanics because wheelchair athletes face some unique biomechanical challenges.

  12. Design features of portable wheelchair ramps and their implications for curb and vehicle access.

    PubMed

    Storr, Tim; Spicer, Julie; Frost, Peggy; Attfield, Steve; Ward, Christopher D; Pinnington, Lorraine L

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluated a range of portable wheelchair ramps to highlight the effect of different product features on ease of use when wheelchair users climb curbs or access vehicles. Twelve portable ramps were evaluated. Although all the ramps were designed to load powered wheelchairs into motor vehicles, they were manufactured in different designs. The ramps were based on a "singlewide" platform or "channel" design. Some ramps had fixed dimensions, whereas others could be reduced in size because they were telescopic or designed to allow folding. Overall, the ramps could be divided into four subgroups on the basis of their key features. These were horizontally and longitudinally folding ramps, telescopic ramps, and ramps with fixed dimensions. The telescopic ramps could be subdivided into "U"-shaped gutter ramps and reverse profile ramps. Product appraisals and trials involving wheelchair users and caregivers of wheelchair users were done to evaluate each of these ramp designs. Although wheelchair ramps are available in a wide range of designs and configurations, we found that no single ramp design successfully met the needs of all wheelchair users or their caregivers. The evaluation highlighted a number of specific problems and potential hazards. Some ramps were found to move during a maneuver, showed poor stability when used with some vehicles, or were too narrow to allow wheelchair castors to pass through the channel without jamming. Some features, such as handles and locking mechanisms, influenced the ease with which the caregivers could use the ramps. Wheelchair users preferred the wide platform ramps because they were able to drive up these with ease and little preparation. The caregivers preferred folding or telescopic channel ramps because these were easier to handle and store.

  13. Wind-assist irrigation and electrical-power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.

    1982-07-01

    A wind turbine is mechanically connected to an existing irrigation well. The system can be operated in three modes: electric motor driving the water turbine pump. Wind assist mode where wind turbine supplements power from the utility line to drive the water turbine pump. At wind speeds of 12 m/s and greater, the wind turbine can pump water (15 kW) and feed power (10 kW) back into the utility grid at the same time. Electrical generation mode where the water pump is disconnected and all power is fed back to the utility grid. The concept is technically viable as the mechanical connection allows for a smooth transfer of power in parallel with an existing power source. Minor problems caused delays and major problems of two rotor failures precluded enough operation time to obtain a good estimation of the economics. Because reliability and maintenance are difficult problems with prototype or limited production wind energy conversion systems, the expense of the demonstration project has exceeded the estimated cost by a large amount.

  14. Prevalence of Sensor Saturation in Wheelchair Seat Interface Pressure Mapping.

    PubMed

    Wininger, Michael; Crane, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    Pressure mapping is a frequently used tool with great power to provide information about the forces between a patient and a wheelchair seat. One widely recognized limitation to this paradigm is the possibility of data loss due to sensor saturation. In this study, we seek to quantify and describe the saturation observed in the measurement of interface pressures of wheelchair users. We recorded approximately two minutes of interface pressure data from 22 elderly wheelchair users (11M/11F, 80 ± 10 years) and found that 4.7% of data frames had 1 saturated sensor, and 9.0% had more than one saturated sensor, for a total of 13.7% of all frames of data. Data from three of the 22 subjects (13.6%) were substantially affected by the persistent presence of saturated sensors. We conclude that for this population of elderly wheelchair users, sensor saturation may be a concern and should be factored properly into study design a priori.

  15. Experimental study on a smart wheelchair system using a combination of stereoscopic and spherical vision.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jordan S; Su, Steven W; Nguyen, Hung T

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the experimental study performance of a smart wheelchair system named TIM (Thought-controlled Intelligent Machine), which uses a unique camera configuration for vision. Included in this configuration are stereoscopic cameras for 3-Dimensional (3D) depth perception and mapping ahead of the wheelchair, and a spherical camera system for 360-degrees of monocular vision. The camera combination provides obstacle detection and mapping in unknown environments during real-time autonomous navigation of the wheelchair. With the integration of hands-free wheelchair control technology, designed as control methods for people with severe physical disability, the smart wheelchair system can assist the user with automated guidance during navigation. An experimental study on this system was conducted with a total of 10 participants, consisting of 8 able-bodied subjects and 2 tetraplegic (C-6 to C-7) subjects. The hands-free control technologies utilized for this testing were a head-movement controller (HMC) and a brain-computer interface (BCI). The results showed the assistance of TIM's automated guidance system had a statistically significant reduction effect (p-value = 0.000533) on the completion times of the obstacle course presented in the experimental study, as compared to the test runs conducted without the assistance of TIM.

  16. A fundamental model of quasi-static wheelchair biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Leary, M; Gruijters, J; Mazur, M; Subic, A; Burton, M; Fuss, F K

    2012-11-01

    The performance of a wheelchair system is a function of user anatomy, including arm segment lengths and muscle parameters, and wheelchair geometry, in particular, seat position relative to the wheel hub. To quantify performance, researchers have proposed a number of predictive models. In particular, the model proposed by Richter is extremely useful for providing initial analysis as it is simple to apply and provides insight into the peak and transient joint torques required to achieve a given angular velocity. The work presented in this paper identifies and corrects a critical error; specifically that the Richter model incorrectly predicts that shoulder torque is due to an anteflexing muscle moment. This identified error was confirmed analytically, graphically and numerically. The authors have developed a corrected, fundamental model which identifies that the shoulder anteflexes only in the first half of the push phase and retroflexes in the second half. The fundamental model has been extended by the authors to obtain novel data on joint and net power as a function of push progress. These outcomes indicate that shoulder power is positive in the first half of the push phase (concentrically contracting anteflexors) and negative in the second half (eccentrically contracting retroflexors). As the eccentric contraction introduces adverse negative power, these considerations are essential when optimising wheelchair design in terms of the user's musculoskeletal system. The proposed fundamental model was applied to assess the effect of vertical seat position on joint torques and power. Increasing the seat height increases the peak positive (concentric) shoulder and elbow torques while reducing the associated (eccentric) peak negative torque. Furthermore, the transition from positive to negative shoulder torque (as well as from positive to negative power) occurs later in the push phase with increasing seat height. These outcomes will aid in the optimisation of manual

  17. A Variable-Height Wheelchair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jack M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a variable-height wheelchair which can be raised 18 inches above normal chair height by means of an electrically operated screw jack. Photoqraphs illustrate the chair to be convenient and helpful for a handicapped chemistry student. (Author/SK)

  18. Moment generation in wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-Yuen; Zhao, K D; Su, Fong-Chin; An, Kai-Nan

    2003-01-01

    Wheelchair propulsion is a man machine interaction in which chair design and fit affect the relative positions and orientations of the upper extremity relative to the handrim and wheel axle. To understand these relationships better, experimental data were collected in five hand positions from five subjects exerting maximal effort to propel an instrumented wheelchair with its wheel in a locked position. The results of experiments revealed that the progression moment was greater at both initial and terminal propulsion positions and smaller in the mid-propulsion position. The vertical and horizontal force components were directed radially away from the wheel axle posterior to the dead centre position and radially towards the wheel axle anterior to top dead centre. Subsequently, a subject-specific quasi-static model of the upper extremity which maximized wheel progression moment was developed to augment our understanding of experimental measures. Model-predicted trends in progression moments and hand force direction were similar to experiment. Model predictions revealed that the optimal progression moment generation could potentially be affected by an individual's anthropometric parameters, joint strengths and also the direction of force applied by the hand on the handrim. Through wheelchair fitting and training of wheelchair users, it may be possible to improve propulsion technique.

  19. Plasma"anti-assistance" and"self-assistance" to high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2009-01-30

    A plasma assistance system was investigated with the goal to operate high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) at lower pressure than usual, thereby to enhance the utilization of the ballistic atoms and ions with high kinetic energy in the film growth process. Gas plasma flow from a constricted plasma source was aimed at the magnetron target. Contrary to initial expectations, such plasma assistance turned out to be contra-productive because it led to the extinction of the magnetron discharge. The effect can be explained by gas rarefaction. A better method of reducing the necessary gas pressure is operation at relatively high pulse repetition rates where the afterglow plasma of one pulse assists in the development of the next pulse. Here we show that this method, known from medium-frequency (MF) pulsed sputtering, is also very important at the much lower pulse repetition rates of HiPIMS. A minimum in the possible operational pressure is found in the frequency region between HiPIMS and MF pulsed sputtering.

  20. Training a Parent in Wheelchair Skills to Improve Her Child's Wheelchair Skills: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, R. Lee; Smith, Cher; Billard, Jessica L.; Irving, Jenny D. H.; Pitts, Janice E.; White, Rebecca S.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that training a parent in wheelchair-user and caregiver wheelchair skills would improve the child's wheelchair skills. We studied an 11-year-old girl with spina bifida and her mother. The mother received 4 training sessions averaging 42.5 minutes per session, over a period of 3 weeks. The total pre-training and, 4 weeks…

  1. Getting the Right Wheelchair for Travel: A WC19-Compliant Wheelchair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manary, Miriam A.; Hobson, Douglas A.; Schneider, Lawrence W.

    2007-01-01

    Children and adults who must remain seated in their wheelchairs while traveling are often at a disadvantage in terms of crash safety. The new voluntary wheelchair industry standard WC19 (short for Section 19 of the ANSI/RESNA wheelchair standards) works to close the safety gap by providing design and performance criteria and test methods to assess…

  2. Characterization of pediatric wheelchair kinematics and wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint system loading during rear impact.

    PubMed

    Fuhrman, Susan I; Karg, Patricia; Bertocci, Gina

    2010-04-01

    This study characterizes pediatric wheelchair kinematic responses and wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint system (WTORS) loading during rear impact. It also examines the kinematic and loading effects of wheelchair headrest inclusion in rear impact. In two separate rear-impact test scenarios, identical WC19-compliant manual pediatric wheelchairs were tested using a seated Hybrid III 6-year-old anthropomorphic test device (ATD) to evaluate wheelchair kinematics and WTORS loading. Three wheelchairs included no headrests, and three were equipped with slightly modified wheelchair-mounted headrests. Surrogate WTORS properly secured the wheelchairs; three-point occupant restraints properly restrained the ATD. All tests used a 26km/h, 11g rear-impact test pulse. Headrest presence affected wheelchair kinematics and WTORS loading; headrest-equipped wheelchairs had greater mean seatback deflections, mean peak front and rear tiedown loads and decreased mean lap belt loads. Rear-impact tiedown loads differed from previously measured loads in frontal impact, with comparable tiedown load levels reversed in frontal and rear impacts. The front tiedowns in rear impact had the highest mean peak loads despite lower rear-impact severity. These outcomes have implications for wheelchair and tiedown design, highlighting the need for all four tiedowns to have an equally robust design, and have implications in the development of rear-impact wheelchair transportation safety standards.

  3. Powered orthosis and attachable power-assist device with Hydraulic Bilateral Servo System.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Kengo; Saito, Yukio; Oshima, Toru; Higashihara, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the developments and control strategies of exoskeleton-type robot systems for the application of an upper limb powered orthosis and an attachable power-assist device for care-givers. Hydraulic Bilateral Servo System, which consist of a computer controlled motor, parallel connected hydraulic actuators, position sensors, and pressure sensors, are installed in the system to derive the joint motion of the exoskeleton arm. The types of hydraulic component structure and the control strategy are discussed in relation to the design philosophy and target joints motions.

  4. Partitioning kinetic energy during freewheeling wheelchair maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Medola, Fausto O; Dao, Phuc V; Caspall, Jayme J; Sprigle, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a systematic method to partition the kinetic energy (KE) of a free-wheeling wheelchair. An ultralightweight rigid frame wheelchair was instrumented with two axle-mounted encoders and data acquisition equipment to accurately measure the velocity of the drive wheels. A mathematical model was created combining physical specifications and geometry of the wheelchair and its components. Two able-bodied subjects propelled the wheelchair over four courses that involved straight and turning maneuvers at differing speeds. The KE of the wheelchair was divided into three components: translational, rotational, and turning energy. This technique was sensitive to the changing contributions of the three energy components across maneuvers. Translational energy represented the major component of total KE in all maneuvers except a zero radius turn in which turning energy was dominant. Both translational and rotational energies are directly related to wheelchair speed. Partitioning KE offers a useful means of investigating the dynamics of a moving wheelchair. The described technique permits analysis of KE imparted to the wheelchair during maneuvers involving changes in speed and direction, which are most representative of mobility in everyday life. This technique can be used to study the effort required to maneuver different types and configurations of wheelchairs.

  5. [Standard requirements for electric wheelchairs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fritsch, M

    1979-02-01

    Electric Wheelchairs are driven on public roads. Neither an operating license, liability insurance nor special driving license is necessary according to Road Traffic and Road Licensing Regulations. Statutory regulations prescribe that these wheelchairs must be fitted with two independent brakes and adequate lighting equipment. Safety can be increased by: Totmann brake system - battery servicing - improved battery chargers and technical safety tests. Maintenance of the wheelchair prolongs its life. Social security agencies should allow a large number of the most severely handicapped people to benefit from medically prescribed wheelchairs.

  6. Muscle damage occurring in wheelchair sports people.

    PubMed

    Ide, M; Ogata, H; Kobayashi, M; Wada, F

    1997-04-01

    Seven college-age healthy men exercised on a wheelchair treadmill to evaluate muscle damage that may occur from wheelchair propulsion. An experimental model in which a participant performs up-hill running in a wheelchair was prepared. Plasma creatinekinase (CK), myoglobin (Mb) and lactatedehydrogenase (LDH) were measured as parameters. Blood samples were taken pre-, immediately after-, 24 h after- and 72 h after the exercise. All of these parameters significantly increased after the exercise, but their time-courses were apparently varied. It is concluded that wheelchair propulsion causes muscle damage in certain situations such as up-hill running.

  7. Event-based and Multi Agent Control of an Innovative Wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diomin, U.; Witczak, P.; Stetter, R.

    2015-11-01

    Due to the aging population more and more people require mobility assistance in form of a wheelchair. Generally it would be desirable that such wheelchairs would be easy to use and would allow their users the possibility to move in any direction at any time. Concepts which allow such movements are existing since many years but have for several reasons not found their way to the market. Additionally for semi-autonomous (assisted) operation and fully autonomous operation (e. g. an empty wheelchair driving to its charging station) the control task is much less challenging for such drive system, because no complex manoeuvres needs to be considered and planned. In an ongoing research a drive system for a wheelchair was developed which offers such possibilities employing a relatively simple mechanical design. This drive system is based on a certain steering principle which is based on torque differences between different wheels. This allows a relatively simple mechanical design but poses challenges on the control of the vehicle. This paper describes two possible approaches to address this challenge - the use of an event based control and the application of multiple software agents. Both approaches can solve the control problem individually but can also complement each other for better system performance. The paper stars with a description of the wheelchair drive system. Then the asynchronous event based control software is described as well the multi agent based approach. The next sections report the results of the experiments and discuss the further improvements.

  8. Increases in Wheelchair Breakdowns, Repairs, and Adverse Consequences for People with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Worobey, Lynn; Oyster, Michelle; Nemunaitis, Gregory; Cooper, Rory; Boninger, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to report the current incidence of wheelchair breakdowns, repairs, and consequences and to compare current data with historical data. Design A convenience sample survey of 723 participants with spinal cord injury who use a wheelchair for more than 40 hrs/wk treated at a Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems center was conducted. Results Significant increases were found in the number of participants reporting repairs (7.8%) and adverse consequences (23.5%) in a 6-mo period (2006Y2011) compared with historical data (2004Y2006) (P G 0.001). When examining current data, minorities experienced a greater frequency and higher number of reported consequences (P = 0.03). Power wheelchair users reported a higher number of repairs and consequences than did manual wheelchair users (P G 0.001). Wheelchairs equipped with seat functions were associated with a greater frequency of adverse consequences (P = 0.01). Repairs did not vary across funding source, but individuals with wheelchairs provided by Medicare and Medicaid reported a higher frequency of consequences than did the combined group of the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, Worker’s Compensation, and the Veterans Administration (P = 0.034 and P = 0.013, respectively). Conclusions The incidence and consequences of repairs are increasing from what was already a very high statistic in this United States population. Further investigation into causality is required, and intervention is needed to reverse this potential trend. PMID:22549473

  9. Wheelchair assisted with laser range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Cheol U.; Wang, Hongbo; Ishimatsu, Takakazu; Ochiai, Tsumoru

    1995-12-01

    The paper presents a wheel chair system with the capability of self-localization and obstacle avoidance. Firstly, the approaches of landmark recognition and the self-localization of the wheel chair are described. Then, the principal of the obstacle avoidance using a laser range finder is described. Subsequently, the total system of the wheel chair is introduced. Finally, a navigation experiment is given. Experimental results indicate the effectiveness of our system.

  10. Performance analysis of elite men's and women's wheelchair basketball teams.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Miguel Ángel; Pérez, Javier; Molik, Bartosz; Szyman, Robert J; Sampaio, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify which game-related statistics discriminate winning and losing teams in men's and women's elite wheelchair basketball. The sample comprised all the games played during the Beijing Paralympics 2008 and the World Wheelchair Basketball Championship 2010. The game-related statistics from the official box scores were gathered and data were analysed in 2 groups: balanced games (final score differences ≤ 12 points) and unbalanced games (final score differences >13 points). Discriminant analysis allowed identifying the successful 2-point field-goals and free-throws, the unsuccessful 3-point field-goals and free-throws, the assists and fouls received as discriminant statistics between winning and losing teams in men's balanced games. In women's games, the teams were discriminated only by the successful 2-point field-goals. Linear regression analysis showed that the quality of opposition had great effects in final point differential. The field-goals percentage and free-throws rate were the most important factors in men's games, and field-goals percentage and offensive rebounding percentage in women's games. The identified trends allow improving game understanding and helping wheelchair basketball coaches to plan accurate practice sessions and, ultimately, deciding better in competition.

  11. Attendant Care for College Students with Physical Disabilities Using Wheelchairs: Transition Issues and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burwell, Nequel R.; Wessel, Roger D.; Mulvihill, Thalia

    2015-01-01

    From preschool through high school, accommodation and success, rather than self-advocacy and student development, are the predominant frameworks for students with physical disabilities. Many students with physical disabilities who use wheelchairs are assisted by their family members with daily life activities such as getting out of bed, showering,…

  12. All-terrain self-leveling wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Andrew; Barrett, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Limited mobility is something that affects approximately 6.8 million Americans. Approximately 1.7 million are using wheelchairs or scooters of some kind to enhance mobility. Everyday obstacles present a challenge to those in a wheelchair. Also, outdoor environments such as campsites, lakes, or even grass fields provide additional challenges for those with limited mobility. This project provides a solution to some of the limitations faced by those in wheelchairs. The wheels and tires of the wheelchair allow navigation through most terrains such as grass, gravel, and sand. Furthermore, as a wheelchair climbs or descends a hill it becomes unstable and the user risks tipping the wheelchair causing injury or even death. The self-leveling wheelchair uses an accelerometer to determine its angle of inclination and depending on user interface choices will display the angle or raise the seat with linear actuators to keep the seat level. This will keep the center of gravity towards the front of the chair when going up a hill and towards the back of the chair when going down a hill. This enhanced stability will give the user the confidence and ability to go places where most traditional wheelchairs can not. The chair has the ability to self-level at up to 45 degree and can provide a manual lift of 6 inches. The design presented in this report is patent pending.

  13. 21 CFR 890.3900 - Standup wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Standup wheelchair. 890.3900 Section 890.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3900 Standup wheelchair....

  14. 21 CFR 890.3900 - Standup wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Standup wheelchair. 890.3900 Section 890.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3900 Standup wheelchair....

  15. 21 CFR 890.3900 - Standup wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Standup wheelchair. 890.3900 Section 890.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3900 Standup wheelchair....

  16. 21 CFR 890.3900 - Standup wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standup wheelchair. 890.3900 Section 890.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3900 Standup wheelchair....

  17. 21 CFR 890.3900 - Standup wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Standup wheelchair. 890.3900 Section 890.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3900 Standup wheelchair....

  18. Development of a Bayesian recursive algorithm to find free-spaces for an intelligent wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh V; Su, Steven; Nguyen, Hung T

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a new shared control strategy for an intelligent wheelchair using a Bayesian recursive algorithm. Using the local environment information gathered by a laser range finder sensor and commands acquired through a user interface, a Bayesian recursive algorithm has been developed to find the most appropriate free-space, which corresponds to the highest posterior probability value. Then, an autonomous navigation algorithm will assist to manoeuvre the wheelchair in the chosen free-space. Experiment results demonstrate that the new method provides excellent performance with great flexibility and fast response.

  19. Influence of wheel configuration on wheelchair basketball performance: wheel stiffness, tyre type and tyre orientation.

    PubMed

    Mason, B S; Lemstra, M; van der Woude, L H V; Vegter, R; Goosey-Tolfrey, V L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to explore the lateral stiffness of different sports wheelchair wheels available to athletes in 'new' and 'used' conditions and to determine the effect of (a) stiffness, (b) tyre type (clincher vs. tubular) and (c) tyre orientation on the physiological and biomechanical responses to submaximal and maximal effort propulsion specific to wheelchair basketball. Eight able-bodied individuals participated in the laboratory-based testing, which took place on a wheelchair ergometer at two fixed speeds (1.1 and 2.2 m s(-1)). Outcome measures were power output and physiological demand (oxygen uptake and heart rate). Three participants with experience of over-ground sports wheelchair propulsion also performed 2 × 20 m sprints in each wheel configuration. Results revealed that wheels differed significantly in lateral stiffness with the 'new' Spinergy wheel shown to be the stiffest (678.2 ± 102.1 N mm(-1)). However the effects of stiffness on physiological demand were minimal compared to tyre type whereby tubular tyres significantly reduced the rolling resistance and power output in relation to clincher tyres. Therefore tyre type (and subsequently inflation pressure) remains the most important aspect of wheel specification for athletes to consider and monitor when configuring a sports wheelchair.

  20. Individual muscle contributions to push and recovery subtasks during wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Jeffery W; Richter, W Mark; Neptune, Richard R

    2011-04-29

    Manual wheelchair propulsion places considerable physical demand on the upper extremity and is one of the primary activities associated with the high prevalence of upper extremity overuse injuries and pain among wheelchair users. As a result, recent effort has focused on determining how various propulsion techniques influence upper extremity demand during wheelchair propulsion. However, an important prerequisite for identifying the relationships between propulsion techniques and upper extremity demand is to understand how individual muscles contribute to the mechanical energetics of wheelchair propulsion. The purpose of this study was to use a forward dynamics simulation of wheelchair propulsion to quantify how individual muscles deliver, absorb and/or transfer mechanical power during propulsion. The analysis showed that muscles contribute to either push (i.e., deliver mechanical power to the handrim) or recovery (i.e., reposition the arm) subtasks, with the shoulder flexors being the primary contributors to the push and the shoulder extensors being the primary contributors to the recovery. In addition, significant activity from the shoulder muscles was required during the transition between push and recovery, which resulted in increased co-contraction and upper extremity demand. Thus, strengthening the shoulder flexors and promoting propulsion techniques that improve transition mechanics have much potential to reduce upper extremity demand and improve rehabilitation outcomes.

  1. Ergonomic evaluation of a wheelchair transportation securement system.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Madiha; Campbell-Kyureghyan, Naira; Frost, Karen; Bertocci, Gina

    2012-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) specifies guidelines covering the securement system and environment for wheeled mobility device (WhMD) passengers on the public bus system in the United States, referred to as the wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint system (WTORS). The misuse or disuse of the WTORS system can be a source of injury for WhMD passengers riding the buses. The purpose of this study was to quantify the risks posed to the bus driver while performing the WTORS procedure using traditional ergonomic analysis methods. Four bus drivers completed the WTORS procedure for a representative passenger seated in three different WhMDs: manual wheelchair (MWC), scooter (SCTR), and power wheelchair (PWC). Potential work-related risks were identified using the four most applicable ergonomic assessment tools: PLIBEL, RULA, REBA, and iLMM. Task evaluation results revealed high levels of risk to be present to drivers during the WTORS procedure. The securement station space design and equipment layout were identified as contributing factors forcing drivers to adopt awkward postures while performing the WTORS task. These risk factors are known contributors to injury and the drivers could opt to improperly secure the passengers to avoid that risk.

  2. Participatory design and validation of mobility enhancement robotic wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Daveler, Brandon; Salatin, Benjamin; Grindle, Garrett G; Candiotti, Jorge; Wang, Hongwu; Cooper, Rory A

    2015-01-01

    The design of the mobility enhancement robotic wheelchair (MEBot) was based on input from electric powered wheelchair (EPW) users regarding the conditions they encounter when driving in both indoor and outdoor environments that may affect their safety and result in them becoming immobilized, tipping over, or falling out of their wheelchair. Phase I involved conducting a participatory design study to understand the conditions and barriers EPW users found to be difficult to drive in/over. Phase II consisted of creating a computer-aided design (CAD) prototype EPW to provide indoor and outdoor mobility that addressed these conditions with advanced applications. Phase III involved demonstrating the advanced applications and gathering feedback from end users about the likelihood they would use the advanced applications. The CAD prototype incorporated advanced applications, including self-leveling, curb climbing, and traction control, that addressed the challenging conditions and barriers discussed with EPW users (n = 31) during the participatory design study. Feedback of the CAD design and applications in phase III from end users (n = 12) showed a majority would use self-leveling (83%), traction control (83%), and curb climbing (75%). The overall design of MEBot received positive feedback from EPW users. However, these opinions will need to be reevaluated through user trials as the design advances.

  3. Autonomous caregiver following robotic wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, E. Venkata; Sivaramalingam, Sethurajan; Vignesh, A. Sri; Vasanth, Elanthendral; Joans, S. Mary

    2011-12-01

    In the last decade, a variety of robotic/intelligent wheelchairs have been proposed to meet the need in aging society. Their main research topics are autonomous functions such as moving toward some goals while avoiding obstacles, or user-friendly interfaces. Although it is desirable for wheelchair users to go out alone, caregivers often accompany them. Therefore we have to consider not only autonomous functions and user interfaces but also how to reduce caregivers' load and support their activities in a communication aspect. From this point of view, we have proposed a robotic wheelchair moving with a caregiver side by side based on the MATLAB process. In this project we discussing about robotic wheel chair to follow a caregiver by using a microcontroller, Ultrasonic sensor, keypad, Motor drivers to operate robot. Using camera interfaced with the DM6437 (Davinci Code Processor) image is captured. The captured image are then processed by using image processing technique, the processed image are then converted into voltage levels through MAX 232 level converter and given it to the microcontroller unit serially and ultrasonic sensor to detect the obstacle in front of robot. In this robot we have mode selection switch Automatic and Manual control of robot, we use ultrasonic sensor in automatic mode to find obstacle, in Manual mode to use the keypad to operate wheel chair. In the microcontroller unit, c language coding is predefined, according to this coding the robot which connected to it was controlled. Robot which has several motors is activated by using the motor drivers. Motor drivers are nothing but a switch which ON/OFF the motor according to the control given by the microcontroller unit.

  4. Life-cycle analysis of depot versus rehabilitation manual wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R A; Robertson, R N; Lawrence, B; Heil, T; Albright, S J; VanSickle, D P; Gonzalez, J

    1996-02-01

    The proper selection of a wheelchair requires making several critical decisions, not the least of which is what type of wheelchair is appropriate. The International Organization for Standards (ISO) continues to develop and refine wheelchair standards. Standards allow the objective comparison of products from various sources, permitting consumers or clinicians to assess wheelchairs with which they are not familiar by comparing test results. This study consisted of three components: 1) the comparison of fatigue test results with a planar ANSI/RESNA test dummy to a HERL contoured test dummy; 2) the comparison of fatigue test results for common depot versus common rehabilitation manual wheelchairs; and 3) the comparison of fatigue test results for manual rehabilitation wheelchairs with solid 8-inch casters versus those with pneumatic 8-inch casters. Rehabilitation wheelchairs lasted on average 13.2 times longer than the depot wheelchairs. Both types, tested with the standard ISO-ANSI/RESNA dummy, lasted on average 2.1 times longer than those wheelchairs tested using the contoured dummy. The three rehabilitation wheelchairs equipped with 8-inch pneumatic casters lasted on average 3.2 times longer than the 6 rehabilitation wheelchairs equipped with solid 8-inch casters. The depot wheelchairs cost about 3.4 times as much to operate per cycle or per meter than the rehabilitation wheelchairs. The rehabilitation wheelchairs tended to experience component failures, while the depot wheelchairs tended to experience frame failures. Our testing indicates that the tests in the ISO-ANSI/RESNA standards can relate design features to fatigue test results and durability. Rehabilitation wheelchairs tend to use higher quality materials and better manufacturing practices, and they provide greater mobility for wheelchair users. Purchasers and prescribers of wheelchairs should consider the life-cycle cost and not just the purchase price for wheelchairs.

  5. Road loads acting on manual wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    VanSickle, D P; Cooper, R A; Boninger, M L

    2000-09-01

    A barrier to performing more in-depth analyzes during the wheelchair design process is a lack of dynamic reaction force and moment data, and the instrumentation to collect this data. Instrumentation was developed to collect the dynamic force and moment data. New data collections methodologies and analysis techniques were implemented to facilitate computer-aided-engineering for wheelchair designs. Data were collected during standardized wheelchair fatigue tests, while driving over a simulated road course within a laboratory, and while driving in the community. Seventeen subjects participated in this study. Based upon the three test conditions, a pseudo-statistical distribution of the force and moment data at both a caster and rear wheel was developed. The key parameters describing the distribution and the extremums of the data (minima and maxima) were compared using analysis of variance. The results showed that the force and moment distributions and extreme values were similar for the both sets of human trials (i.e., simulated road course and field trials). However, the standardized testing (i.e., wheelchair fatigue testing) differed from both human trials. The force/moment data gathered during this study are suitable for inputs in finite element analysis and dynamic modeling. Our results suggest that the fatigue tests should be modified to change the magnitude and increase the frequency of the forces and moments imparted on the wheelchair. The data reported from this study can be used to improve wheelchair standards and to facilitate computer-aided-engineer in wheelchair design.

  6. Wheelchair wheels for use on sand.

    PubMed

    Hillman, M

    1994-05-01

    Mobility over sand and other rough surfaces can be a major problem for people in wheelchairs. From tests with a simple prototype, model tests and theoretical calculations the following observations were made for an attendant propelled chair. The rolling resistance of a wheelchair on sand may be improved by pulling, rather than pushing the chair. The use of a ball wheel at the front improves the rolling resistance, though standard large diameter rear wheels give acceptable performance. From these observations a prototype device for fitment to a standard wheelchair has been designed.

  7. Geospatial Analysis and Technical Assistance for Power Plant Siting Interagency

    SciTech Connect

    Neher, L A

    2002-03-07

    The focus of this contract (in the summer and fall of 2001) was originally to help the California Energy Commission (CEC) locate and evaluate potential sites for electric power generation facilities and to assist the CEC in addressing areas of congestion on transmission lines and natural gas supply line corridors. Subsequent events have reduced the immediate urgency, although not the ultimate need for such analyses. Software technology for deploying interactive geographic information systems (GIS) accessible over the Internet have developed to the point that it is now practical to develop and publish GIS web sites that have substantial viewing, movement, query, and even map-making capabilities. As part of a separate project not funded by the CEC, the GIS Center at LLNL, on an experimental basis, has developed a web site to explore the technical difficulties as well as the interest in such a web site by agencies and others concerned with energy research. This exploratory effort offers the potential or developing an interactive GIS web site for use by the CEC for energy research, policy analysis, site evaluation, and permit and regulatory matters. To help ground the geospatial capabilities in the realistic requirements and needs of the CEC staff, the CEC requested that the GIS Center conduct interviews of several CEC staff persons to establish their current and envisioned use of spatial data and requirements for geospatial analyses. This survey will help define a web-accessible central GIS database for the CEC, which will augment the well-received work of the CEC Cartography Unit. Individuals within each siting discipline have been contacted and their responses to three question areas have been summarized. The web-based geospatial data and analytical tools developed within this project will be available to CEC staff for initial area studies, queries, and informal, small-format maps. It is not designed for fine cartography or for large-format posters such as the

  8. Force application during handcycling and handrim wheelchair propulsion: an initial comparison.

    PubMed

    Arnet, Ursina; van Drongelen, Stefan; Veeger, D H; van der Woude L, H V

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the external applied forces, the effectiveness of force application and the net shoulder moments of handcycling in comparison with handrim wheelchair propulsion at different inclines. Ten able-bodied men performed standardized exercises on a treadmill at inclines of 1%, 2.5% and 4% with an instrumented handbike and wheelchair that measured three-dimensional propulsion forces. The results showed that during handcycling significantly lower mean forces were applied at inclines of 2.5% (P < .001) and 4% (P < .001) and significantly lower peak forces were applied at all inclines (1%: P = .014, 2.5% and 4%: P < .001). At the 2.5% incline, where power output was the same for both devices, total forces (mean over trial) of 22.8 N and 27.5 N and peak forces of 40.1 N and 106.9 N were measured for handbike and wheelchair propulsion. The force effectiveness did not differ between the devices (P = .757); however, the effectiveness did increase with higher inclines during handcycling whereas it stayed constant over all inclines for wheelchair propulsion. The resulting peak net shoulder moments were lower for handcycling compared with wheelchair propulsion at all inclines (P < .001). These results confirm the assumption that handcycling is physically less straining.

  9. Review of real brain-controlled wheelchairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Á.; Velasco-Álvarez, F.; Ron-Angevin, R.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a review of the state of the art regarding wheelchairs driven by a brain-computer interface. Using a brain-controlled wheelchair (BCW), disabled users could handle a wheelchair through their brain activity, granting autonomy to move through an experimental environment. A classification is established, based on the characteristics of the BCW, such as the type of electroencephalographic signal used, the navigation system employed by the wheelchair, the task for the participants, or the metrics used to evaluate the performance. Furthermore, these factors are compared according to the type of signal used, in order to clarify the differences among them. Finally, the trend of current research in this field is discussed, as well as the challenges that should be solved in the future.

  10. Wheelchair Design Changes: New Opportunities for Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Changes in wheelchair design (such as larger tires and lighter overall weight) make it possible for disabled persons to exercise more mobility and control and participate in a greater variety of recreational activities. (CL)

  11. Mechanical design and simulation of two-wheeled wheelchair using solidworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altalmas, T. M.; Ahmad, S.; Aula, A.; Akmeliawati, R.; Sidek, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    This article is presented a new design of two-wheeled wheelchair that can balance on two wheels to make it suitable in the narrow areas, especially in the domestic environments; it has the ability to extend the height of the chair to help the user to act independently in the life for example, in the library to pick and put books on the shelves. The 3D model has been built up using SolidWorks Software. Nowadays, SolidWorks environment is considered as a powerful tool that is helping designer to design products and attain its performance before physical prototype stage. SolidWorks simulation model has been employed to test the frame of the wheelchair under the weight of the human body and the upper part of the wheelchair. The static analysis has been done on the frame using steel and aluminium; however the aluminium material has been selected due to its light weight

  12. The wheelchair as a full-body tool extending the peripersonal space.

    PubMed

    Galli, Giulia; Noel, Jean Paul; Canzoneri, Elisa; Blanke, Olaf; Serino, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Dedicated multisensory mechanisms in the brain represent peripersonal space (PPS), a limited portion of space immediately surrounding the body. Previous studies have illustrated the malleability of PPS representation through hand-object interaction, showing that tool use extends the limits of the hand-centered PPS. In the present study we investigated the effects of a special tool, the wheelchair, in extending the action possibilities of the whole body. We used a behavioral measure to quantify the extension of the PPS around the body before and after Active (Experiment 1) and Passive (Experiment 2) training with a wheelchair and when participants were blindfolded (Experiment 3). Results suggest that a wheelchair-mediated passive exploration of far space extended PPS representation. This effect was specifically related to the possibility of receiving information from the environment through vision, since no extension effect was found when participants were blindfolded. Surprisingly, the active motor training did not induce any modification in PPS representation, probably because the wheelchair maneuver was demanding for non-expert users and thus they may have prioritized processing of information from close to the wheelchair rather than at far spatial locations. Our results suggest that plasticity in PPS representation after tool use seems not to strictly depend on active use of the tool itself, but is triggered by simultaneous processing of information from the body and the space where the body acts in the environment, which is more extended in the case of wheelchair use. These results contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying body-environment interaction for developing and improving applications of assistive technological devices in different clinical populations.

  13. Biomechanics and Strength of Manual Wheelchair Users

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Boninger, Michael L; Souza, Aaron L; Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Koontz, Alicia M; Cooper, Rory A

    2005-01-01

    Background/Objective: Previous investigations have identified muscular imbalance in the shoulder as a source of pain and injury in manual wheelchair users. Our aim was to determine whether a correlation exists between strength and pushrim biomechanical variables including: tangential (motive) force (Ft), radial force (Fr), axial force (Fz), total (resultant) force (FR), fraction of effective force (FEF), and cadence. Methods: Peak isokinetic shoulder strength (flexion [FLX], extension [EXT], abduction [ABD], adduction [ADD], internal rotation [IR], and external rotation [ER]) was tested in 22 manual wheelchair users with a BioDex system for 5 repetitions at 60°/s. Subjects then propelled their own manual wheelchair at 2 speeds, 0.9 m/s (2 mph) and 1.8 m/s (4 mph), for 20 seconds, during which kinematic (OPTOTRAK) and kinetic (SMARTWHEEL) data were collected. Peak isokinetic forces in the cardinal planes were correlated with pushrim biomechanical variables. Results: All peak torque strength variables correlated significantly (P ≤ 0.05) with Ft, Fr, and FR, but were not significantly correlated with Fz, FEF, or cadence. Finally, there were no relationships found between muscle strength ratios (for example, FLX/EXT) and Ft, Fr, FR, Fz, or FEF. Conclusion: There was a correlation between strength and force imparted to the pushrim among wheelchair users; however, there was no correlation found in wheelchair propulsion or muscle imbalance. Clinicians should be aware of this, and approach strength training and training in wheelchair propulsion techniques separately. PMID:16869087

  14. Predictors of Mobility among Wheelchair Using Residents in Long Term Care

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, W. Ben; Miller, William C.; Backman, Catherine L.; Oliffe, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of mobility among long term care residents who use wheelchairs as their main means of mobility. Based on the Matching Person to Technology Model, we hypothesized that wheelchair-related, personal and environmental factors would be independent predictors of mobility. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Eleven long term residential care facilities in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada Participants The study included 268 residents: 149 self-responding residents and 119 residents who required proxy respondents. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures Mobility was measured using the Nursing Home Life Space Diameter. Standardized measures of personal, wheelchair-related and environmental factors were administered and socio-demographic data were collected as independent variables. Results Independent mobility decreased as the distance from the resident’s room increased: 63% of participants were independently mobile on their units, 40% were independently mobile off their units within the facilities and 20% were independently mobile outdoors. For the total sample, the significant predictors of mobility, in descending order of importance, were wheelchair skills (including the capacity to engage brakes and manoeuvre), functional independence in activities of daily living, having four or more visits per week from friends or family and use of a power wheelchair. This regression model accounted for 48% of variance in mobility scores. Conclusions Limited independent mobility is a common problem among facility residents. Residents may benefit from interventions such as wheelchair skills training or provision of powered mobility but the effectiveness of these interventions needs to be evaluated. PMID:21840499

  15. Biomechanical Evaluation of an Electric Power-Assisted Bicycle by a Musculoskeletal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Shoichiro; Murakami, Musashi; Hase, Kazunori

    In this study, we construct an evaluation system for the muscular activity of the lower limbs when a human pedals an electric power-assisted bicycle. The evaluation system is composed of an electric power-assisted bicycle, a numerical simulator and a motion capture system. The electric power-assisted bicycle in this study has a pedal with an attached force sensor. The numerical simulator for pedaling motion is a musculoskeletal model of a human. The motion capture system measures the joint angles of the lower limb. We examine the influence of the electric power-assisted force on each muscle of the human trunk and legs. First, an experiment of pedaling motion is performed. Then, the musculoskeletal model is calculated by using the experimental data. We discuss the influence on each muscle by electric power-assist. It is found that the muscular activity is decreased by the electric power-assist bicycle, and the reduction of the muscular force required for pedaling motion was quantitatively shown for every muscle.

  16. Motion Evaluation Of A Wheelchair Prototype For Disabled People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geonea, Ionut Daniel; Dumitru, Nicolae; Margine, Alexandru

    2015-09-01

    In this paper is presented the design solution and experimental prototype of a wheelchair for disabled people. Design solution proposed to be implemented uses two reduction gears motors and a mechanical transmission with chains. It's developed a motion controller based on a PWM technology, which allows the user to control the wheelchair motion. The wheelchair has the ability of forward - backward motion and steering. The design solution is developed in Solid Works, and it's implemented to a wheelchair prototype model. Wheelchair design and motion makes him suitable especially for indoor use. It is made a study of the wheelchair kinematics, first using a kinematic simulation in Adams. Are presented the wheelchair motion trajectory and kinematics parameters. The experimental prototype is tested with a motion analysis system based on ultra high speed video cameras recording. The obtained results from simulation and experimentally tests, demonstrate the efficiency of wheelchair proposed solution.

  17. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Rachel E; Fregly, Benjamin J; Boninger, Michael L; Chan, Leighton; Rodgers, Mary M; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2012-04-20

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments.

  18. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1) improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2) improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3) sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments. PMID:22520500

  19. Humanitarian Assistance and ’Soft’ Power Projection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-04

    challenge the current dogma that U.S. military humanitarian support must maintain the ‘status quo’ and remain reactionary. The decoupling will occur in...future challenges that go beyond humanitarian assistance. These were not an all inclusive list of similarities between Peace Operations and...Civil Authorities  Intergovernmental organizations (United Nations)  Local population This is not an all inclusive list, but it helps set the

  20. Principles and Practices for Championship Performances in Wheelchair Field Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Practical Pointers, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The article discusses training and competing in wheelchair sports. General principles of training, including scheduling and content considerations, are listed. Principles for specific wheelchair events (shotput, discus, and javelin) are detailed. A final part addresses training for the wheelchair pentathlon, which includes archery, swimming,…

  1. Upper limb joint motion of two different user groups during manual wheelchair propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Seunghyeon; Son, Jongsang; Lee, Jinbok; Kim, Youngho

    2013-02-01

    Manual wheelchair users have a high risk of injury to the upper extremities. Recent studies have focused on kinematic and kinetic analyses of manual wheelchair propulsion in order to understand the physical demands on wheelchair users. The purpose of this study was to investigate upper limb joint motion by using a motion capture system and a dynamometer with two different groups of wheelchair users propelling their wheelchairs at different speeds under different load conditions. The variations in the contact time, release time, and linear velocity of the experienced group were all larger than they were in the novice group. The propulsion angles of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices under all conditions. The variances in the propulsion force (both radial and tangential) of the experienced users were larger than those of the novices. The shoulder joint moment had the largest variance with the conditions, followed by the wrist joint moment and the elbow joint moment. The variance of the maximum shoulder joint moment was over four times the variance of the maximum wrist joint moment and eight times the maximum elbow joint moment. The maximum joint moments increased significantly as the speed and load increased in both groups. Quick and significant manipulation ability based on environmental changes is considered an important factor in efficient propulsion. This efficiency was confirmed from the propulsion power results. Sophisticated strategies for efficient manual wheelchair propulsion could be understood by observation of the physical responses of each upper limb joint to changes in load and speed. We expect that the findings of this study will be utilized for designing a rehabilitation program to reduce injuries.

  2. 14 CFR 382.103 - May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device? 382.103 Section 382.103 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.103 May a...

  3. 14 CFR 382.103 - May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device? 382.103 Section 382.103 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.103 May a...

  4. 14 CFR 382.103 - May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device? 382.103 Section 382.103 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.103 May a...

  5. 14 CFR 382.103 - May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May a carrier leave a passenger unattended in a wheelchair or other device? 382.103 Section 382.103 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and Connecting Assistance § 382.103 May a...

  6. Detection of physical activities using a physical activity monitor system for wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V; Intille, Stephen S; Kelleher, Annmarie; Cooper, Rory A; Ding, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Availability of physical activity monitors for wheelchair users can potentially assist these individuals to track regular physical activity (PA), which in turn could lead to a healthier and more active lifestyle. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate algorithms for a physical activity monitoring system (PAMS) to detect wheelchair based activities. The PAMS consists of a gyroscope based wheel rotation monitor (G-WRM) and an accelerometer device (wocket) worn on the upper arm or on the wrist. A total of 45 persons with spinal cord injury took part in the study, which was performed in a structured university-based laboratory environment, a semi-structured environment at the National Veterans Wheelchair Games, and in the participants' home environments. Participants performed at least ten PAs, other than resting, taken from a list of PAs. The classification performance for the best classifiers on the testing dataset for PAMS-Arm (G-WRM and wocket on upper arm) and PAMS-Wrist (G-WRM and wocket on wrist) was 89.26% and 88.47%, respectively. The outcomes of this study indicate that multi-modal information from the PAMS can help detect various types of wheelchair-based activities in structured laboratory, semi-structured organizational, and unstructured home environments.

  7. Using a Wheelchair as a Seat in a Motor Vehicle: An Overview of Wheelchair Transportation Safety and Related Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Larry

    2007-01-01

    This is the first of a series of six articles on the topic of transportation safety for wheelchair-seated travelers and will highlight some of the basic issues and principles that have been considered in the development of voluntary standards for wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraints systems (WTORS) as well as for wheelchairs that are used as…

  8. Safety assurance of assistive devices based on a two-level checking scheme.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua-Sheng; Chang, Yi-Chu; Chen, Chiun-Fan; Luh, Jer-Junn; Chiou, Ying-Han; Lai, Jin-Shin; Kuog, T-S

    2005-01-01

    The increasing number of physically challenged individuals has boosted the demand of powered wheelchairs. This paper is on the subject of a DSP (Digital Signal Processors) based assistive system, which is associated with a two-level checking scheme. The assistive system takes on the M3S (Multiple Master Multiple Slave) regulation for the assurance of safety. The CAN (Control Area Networks) embedded module in the DSP provides robust transmission of information within the system. The hardware interfaces based on the two-level checking scheme is implemented in input devices (e.g. joystick, head control apparatus) and in output devices (e.g. manipulator, prime mover motors).

  9. Relationship between aerobic and anaerobic parameters and functional classification in wheelchair basketball players.

    PubMed

    de Lira, C A B; Vancini, R L; Minozzo, F C; Sousa, B S; Dubas, J P; Andrade, M S; Steinberg, L L; da Silva, A C

    2010-08-01

    Participation in sports for individuals with disabilities continues to gain popularity. In order to provide fair and equitable competition among persons with different disabilities and functional capacity, a separate functional classification system has been devised for each sport. The aims of the present study were to evaluate aerobic and anaerobic performance of wheelchair basketball athletes and verify a correlation with the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation functional classification system. For this, 17 highly trained male Brazilian basketball wheelchair athletes (25.4+/-4.4 years) from the national team who had taken part in the Athens 2004 Paralympic Games were assessed. These athletes were submitted to cardiopulmonary exercise testing and Wingate-like 30-s sprint test using upper limbs. The present study demonstrated that the functional classification score correlated with relative (r=0.90; P<0.0001) and absolute peak power (r=0.50; P=0.0353) and absolute mean power (r=0.93; P<0.0001) obtained from the Wingate-like 30-s sprint test and also correlated with absolute O(2) peak (r=0.68; P=0.0026) and O(2) at ventilatory threshold (r=0.71; P=0.0014), measured on cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Therefore, our findings support the functional classification created to classify athletes' functional capability on the court, which also correlated with aerobic and anaerobic performance parameters of the elite wheelchair basketball players.

  10. Towards an intelligent system for clinical guidance on wheelchair tilt and recline usage.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jicheng; Wiechmann, Paul; Jan, Yih-Kuen; Jones, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We propose to construct an intelligent system for clinical guidance on how to effectively use power wheelchair tilt and recline functions. The motivations fall into the following two aspects. (1) People with spinal cord injury (SCI) are vulnerable to pressure ulcers. SCI can lead to structural and functional changes below the injury level that may predispose individuals to tissue breakdown. As a result, pressure ulcers can significantly affect the quality of life, including pain, infection, altered body image, and even mortality. (2) Clinically, wheelchair power seat function, i.e., tilt and recline, is recommended for relieving sitting-induced pressures. The goal is to increase skin blood flow for the ischemic soft tissues to avoid irreversible damage. Due to variations in the level and completeness of SCI, the effectiveness of using wheelchair tilt and recline to reduce pressure ulcer risks has considerable room for improvement. Our previous study indicated that the blood flow of people with SCI may respond very differently to wheelchair tilt and recline settings. In this study, we propose to use the artificial neural network (ANN) to predict how wheelchair power seat functions affect blood flow response to seating pressure. This is regression learning because the predicted outputs are numerical values. Besides the challenging nature of regression learning, ANN may suffer from the overfitting problem which, when occurring, leads to poor predictive quality (i.e., cannot generalize). We propose using the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to train ANN to mitigate the impact of overfitting so that ANN can make correct predictions on both existing and new data. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is promising to improve ANN's predictive quality for new data.

  11. Efforts toward an autonomous wheelchair - biomed 2011.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Steven; Streeter, Robert

    2011-01-01

    An autonomous wheelchair is in development to provide mobility to those with significant physical challenges. The overall goal of the project is to develop a wheelchair that is fully autonomous with the ability to navigate about an environment and negotiate obstacles. As a starting point for the project, we have reversed engineered the joystick control system of an off-the-shelf commercially available wheelchair. The joystick control has been replaced with a microcontroller based system. The microcontroller has the capability to interface with a number of subsystems currently under development including wheel odometers, obstacle avoidance sensors, and ultrasonic-based wall sensors. This paper will discuss the microcontroller based system and provide a detailed system description. Results of this study may be adapted to commercial or military robot control.

  12. On the construction of a skill-based wheelchair navigation profile.

    PubMed

    Urdiales, Cristina; Pérez, Eduardo Javier; Peinado, Gloria; Fdez-Carmona, Manuel; Peula, Jose M; Annicchiarico, Roberta; Sandoval, Francisco; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Assisted wheelchair navigation is of key importance for persons with severe disabilities. The problem has been solved in different ways, usually based on the shared control paradigm. This paradigm consists of giving the user more or less control on a need basis. Naturally, these approaches require personalization: each wheelchair user has different skills and needs and it is hard to know a priori from diagnosis how much assistance must be provided. Furthermore, since there is no such thing as an average user, sometimes it is difficult to quantify the benefits of these systems. This paper proposes a new method to extract a prototype user profile using real traces based on more than 70 volunteers presenting different physical and cognitive skills. These traces are clustered to determine the average behavior that can be expected from a wheelchair user in order to cope with significant situations. Processed traces provide a prototype user model for comparison purposes, plus a simple method to obtain without supervision a skill-based navigation profile for any user while he/she is driving. This profile is useful for benchmarking but also to determine the situations in which a given user might require more assistance after evaluating how well he/she compares to the benchmark. Profile-based shared control has been successfully tested by 18 volunteers affected by left or right brain stroke at Fondazione Santa Lucia, in Rome, Italy.

  13. Feasibility of a Hydraulic Power Assist System for Use in Hybrid Neuroprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Foglyano, Kevin M.; Kobetic, Rudi; To, Curtis S.; Bulea, Thomas C.; Schnellenberger, John R.; Audu, Musa L.; Nandor, Mark J.; Quinn, Roger D.; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility of using pressurized hydraulic fluid as a source of on-demand assistive power for hybrid neuroprosthesis combining exoskeleton with functional neuromuscular stimulation was explored. Hydraulic systems were selected as an alternative to electric motors for their high torque/mass ratio and ability to be located proximally on the exoskeleton and distribute power distally to assist in moving the joints. The power assist system (PAS) was designed and constructed using off-the-shelf components to test the feasibility of using high pressure fluid from an accumulator to provide assistive torque to an exoskeletal hip joint. The PAS was able to provide 21 Nm of assistive torque at an input pressure of 3171 kPa with a response time of 93 ms resulting in 32° of hip flexion in an able-bodied test. The torque output was independent of initial position of the joint and was linearly related to pressure. Thus, accumulator pressure can be specified to provide assistive torque as needed in exoskeletal devices for walking or stair climbing beyond those possible either volitionally or with electrical stimulation alone. PMID:27017963

  14. Feasibility of a Hydraulic Power Assist System for Use in Hybrid Neuroprostheses.

    PubMed

    Foglyano, Kevin M; Kobetic, Rudi; To, Curtis S; Bulea, Thomas C; Schnellenberger, John R; Audu, Musa L; Nandor, Mark J; Quinn, Roger D; Triolo, Ronald J

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility of using pressurized hydraulic fluid as a source of on-demand assistive power for hybrid neuroprosthesis combining exoskeleton with functional neuromuscular stimulation was explored. Hydraulic systems were selected as an alternative to electric motors for their high torque/mass ratio and ability to be located proximally on the exoskeleton and distribute power distally to assist in moving the joints. The power assist system (PAS) was designed and constructed using off-the-shelf components to test the feasibility of using high pressure fluid from an accumulator to provide assistive torque to an exoskeletal hip joint. The PAS was able to provide 21 Nm of assistive torque at an input pressure of 3171 kPa with a response time of 93 ms resulting in 32° of hip flexion in an able-bodied test. The torque output was independent of initial position of the joint and was linearly related to pressure. Thus, accumulator pressure can be specified to provide assistive torque as needed in exoskeletal devices for walking or stair climbing beyond those possible either volitionally or with electrical stimulation alone.

  15. Toward gesture controlled wheelchair: a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Kawarazaki, Noriyuki; Stefanov, Dimitar; Diaz, Alejandro Israel Barragan

    2013-06-01

    This study focuses on the early stages of developing and testing an interactive approach for gesture-based wheelchair control that could facilitate the user in various tasks such as cooking and food serving. The proposed method allows a user to hold an object (tray, saucepan, etc) with both hands and to control at the same time the wheelchair direction via changing the position of his/her arms. The wheelchair control system contains an image sensor directed to the user's arms. Sensor signals are processed via an image-recognition algorithm and the calculations for the arm positions are used for the computation of the wheelchair steering signals. Thus, the wheelchair direction depends on the arm positions and the user can control the wheelchair by moving his/her arms. An initial wheelchair prototype, operated by the intentional motions of one hand, was built and was tested by several initial experiments.

  16. A paired outcomes study comparing two pediatric wheelchairs for low-resource settings: the regency pediatric wheelchair and a similarly sized wheelchair made in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Rispin, Karen; Wee, Joy

    2014-01-01

    This comparative study of two similar wheelchairs designed for less-resourced settings provides feedback to manufacturers, informing ongoing improvement in wheelchair design. It also provides practical familiarity to clinicians in countries where these chairs are available, in their selection of prescribed wheelchairs. In Kenya, 24 subjects completed 3 timed skills and assessments of energy cost on 2 surfaces in each of 2 wheelchairs: the Regency pediatric chair and a pediatric wheelchair manufactured by the Association of the Physically Disabled of Kenya (APDK). Both wheelchairs are designed for and distributed in less-resourced settings. The Regency chair significantly outperformed the APDK chair in one of the energy cost assessments on both surfaces and in one of three timed skills tests.

  17. Motor adaptation during dorsiflexion-assisted walking with a powered orthosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    A robotic ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) that provides powered assistance could adjust to varying gait dynamics much better than a rigid AFO. To provide insight into how humans would adapt to a powered AFO, we studied the response of neurologically intact subjects walking with an active dorsiflexion assist orthosis proportionally controlled by tibialis anterior electromyography (EMG). We examined the two mechanical functions of ankle dorsiflexors in gait (power absorption at heel strike and power generation at toe-off) by recruiting two groups of healthy subjects: Group One, called Continuous Control, (n=5) had dorsiflexion assistance both at the initial heel contact and during swing; Group Two, called Swing Control, (n=5) had the assistance only during swing. We hypothesized both groups of subjects would reduce tibialis anterior EMG amplitude with practice walking with the powered dorsiflexion assist. Ten healthy subjects were fitted with custom-made orthoses that included an artificial pneumatic muscle providing dorsiflexor torque. We collected lower body kinematics, EMG, and artificial muscle force while subjects walked on a treadmill for two 30-minute training sessions. We found that subjects walked with increased ankle dorsiflexion by 9 degrees but showed different adaptation responses of the two tibialis anterior EMG bursts. The first EMG burst around heel strike had ~28% lower amplitudes (p<0.05) but the second EMG burst during swing had similar amplitudes. These results provide baseline data of EMG controlled dorsiflexion assist in neurologically intact humans that can be used to guide future studies on neurologically impaired individuals. PMID:18838269

  18. Muscle powered circulatory assist device for diastolic counterpulsator.

    PubMed

    Novoa, R; Jacobs, G; Sakakibara, N; Chen, J F; Davies, C; Cosgrove, D M; Golding, L R; Nosé, Y; Loop, F D

    1989-01-01

    A diastolic counterpulsator that uses either skeletal muscle or pneumatic actuation was developed. The unit is positioned between the latissimus dorsi and the chest wall, without interference with collateral blood supply, and is connected in series with the descending aorta. The system was able to generate stroke volumes between 52 and 16 ccs against pressures of 60 and 140 mmHg, respectively. Stroke work at 200 msec stimulation averaged 2.8 X 10(6) ergs. Power output at an afterload of 100 mmHg, and at a rate of 60 bpm, was 0.51 W. Back-up pneumatic actuation provided by an intraaortic balloon pump resulted in a 46% increase in the endocardial viability ratio (EVR).

  19. Plutonium-238: an ideal power source for intracorporeal ventricular assist devices?

    PubMed

    Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang; Bush, Bryan S; Swartz, Michael F; Day, Steven W; Massey, H Todd

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices emerged as a widely used modality for treatment of end-stage heart failure; however, despite significant advances, external energy supply remains a problem contributing to significant patient morbidity and potential mortality. One potential solution is using the nuclear radioisotope Plutonium-238 as a power source. Given its very high energy density and long half-life, Plutonium-238 could eventually allow a totally intracorporeal ventricular assist system that lasts for the patient's lifetime. Risks, such as leakage and theft identified decades ago, still remain. However, it is possible that newer technologies could be used to overcome the system complexity and unreliability of the previous generations of nuclear-powered mechanical assist systems. Were it not for the remaining safety risks, Plutonium-238 would be an ideal energy source for this purpose.

  20. Reaching High Bookshelves From a Wheelchair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    "Book retriever" allows people confined to wheelchairs to remove or replace books from upper shelves of library stacks. Retriever is mechanical device composed of aluminum tube approximately 5 feet long with two jaws at upper end. Jaws securely clamp selected book; they are thin enough to be inserted between adjacent books.

  1. Just a Body in a Wheelchair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Betty

    2014-01-01

    This article has no direct link with academics, children, students or those who teach: I severed almost all such connections several years ago. It describes the rewards and challenges of leading a reminiscence group of elderly people, all of whom suffer some level of memory loss and/or severe physical disability; most are wheelchair-bound. It…

  2. Biomechanics of Pediatric Manual Wheelchair Mobility.

    PubMed

    Slavens, Brooke A; Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Aurit, Christine M; Tarima, Sergey; Vogel, Lawrence C; Harris, Gerald F

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is limited research of the biomechanics of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility. Specifically, the biomechanics of functional tasks and their relationship to joint pain and health is not well understood. To contribute to this knowledge gap, a quantitative rehabilitation approach was applied for characterizing upper extremity biomechanics of manual wheelchair mobility in children and adolescents during propulsion, starting, and stopping tasks. A Vicon motion analysis system captured movement, while a SmartWheel simultaneously collected three-dimensional forces and moments occurring at the handrim. A custom pediatric inverse dynamics model was used to evaluate three-dimensional upper extremity joint motions, forces, and moments of 14 children with spinal cord injury (SCI) during the functional tasks. Additionally, pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. This research found that joint demands are significantly different amongst functional tasks, with greatest demands placed on the shoulder during the starting task. Propulsion was significantly different from starting and stopping at all joints. We identified multiple stroke patterns used by the children, some of which are not standard in adults. One subject reported average daily pain, which was minimal. Lower than normal physical health and higher than normal mental health was found in this population. It can be concluded that functional tasks should be considered in addition to propulsion for rehabilitation and SCI treatment planning. This research provides wheelchair users and clinicians with a comprehensive, biomechanical, mobility assessment approach for wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with SCI.

  3. 21 CFR 890.3930 - Wheelchair elevator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wheelchair elevator. 890.3930 Section 890.3930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3930...

  4. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  5. 21 CFR 890.3930 - Wheelchair elevator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wheelchair elevator. 890.3930 Section 890.3930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3930...

  6. 21 CFR 890.3920 - Wheelchair component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wheelchair component. 890.3920 Section 890.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3920...

  7. 21 CFR 890.3920 - Wheelchair component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wheelchair component. 890.3920 Section 890.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3920...

  8. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  9. 21 CFR 890.3850 - Mechanical wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mechanical wheelchair. 890.3850 Section 890.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3850...

  10. 21 CFR 890.3850 - Mechanical wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mechanical wheelchair. 890.3850 Section 890.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3850...

  11. 21 CFR 890.3930 - Wheelchair elevator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wheelchair elevator. 890.3930 Section 890.3930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3930...

  12. 21 CFR 890.3920 - Wheelchair component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wheelchair component. 890.3920 Section 890.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3920...

  13. 21 CFR 890.3850 - Mechanical wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mechanical wheelchair. 890.3850 Section 890.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3850...

  14. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  15. 21 CFR 890.3850 - Mechanical wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mechanical wheelchair. 890.3850 Section 890.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3850...

  16. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  17. 21 CFR 890.3850 - Mechanical wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mechanical wheelchair. 890.3850 Section 890.3850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3850...

  18. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  19. 21 CFR 890.3920 - Wheelchair component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wheelchair component. 890.3920 Section 890.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3920...

  20. 21 CFR 890.3930 - Wheelchair elevator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wheelchair elevator. 890.3930 Section 890.3930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3930...

  1. 21 CFR 890.3930 - Wheelchair elevator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wheelchair elevator. 890.3930 Section 890.3930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3930...

  2. 21 CFR 890.3920 - Wheelchair component.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wheelchair component. 890.3920 Section 890.3920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3920...

  3. Training Visual Control in Wheelchair Basketball Shooting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oudejans, Raoul R. D.; Heubers, Sjoerd; Ruitenbeek, Jean-Rene J. A. C.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of visual control training on expert wheelchair basketball shooting, a skill more difficult than in regular basketball, as players shoot from a seated position to the same rim height. The training consisted of shooting with a visual constraint that forced participants to use target information as late as possible.…

  4. Medical Concerns among Wheelchair Road Racers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Santos F.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a questionnaire administered to 43 wheelchair road racers suggest that their medical problems may lead to complications while training or racing. The study looked at the effects of training, injuries, bladder management, medications, and spasms. Sports medicine professionals are provided with information on handling disabled athletes.…

  5. Skills based evaluation of alternative input methods to command a semi-autonomous electric wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Mario; Ponce, Pedro; Molina, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the evaluation, under standardized metrics, of alternative input methods to steer and maneuver a semi-autonomous electric wheelchair. The Human-Machine Interface (HMI), which includes a virtual joystick, head movements and speech recognition controls, was designed to facilitate mobility skills for severely disabled people. Thirteen tasks, which are common to all the wheelchair users, were attempted five times by controlling it with the virtual joystick and the hands-free interfaces in different areas for disabled and non-disabled people. Even though the prototype has an intelligent navigation control, based on fuzzy logic and ultrasonic sensors, the evaluation was done without assistance. The scored values showed that both controls, the head movements and the virtual joystick have similar capabilities, 92.3% and 100%, respectively. However, the 54.6% capacity score obtained for the speech control interface indicates the needs of the navigation assistance to accomplish some of the goals. Furthermore, the evaluation time indicates those skills which require more user's training with the interface and specifications to improve the total performance of the wheelchair.

  6. Transportation Safety Standards for Wheelchair Users: A Review of Voluntary Standards for Improved Safety, Usability, and Independence of Wheelchair-Seated Travelers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Lawrence W.; Manary, Miriam A.; Hobson, Douglas A.

    2008-01-01

    Safe transportation for wheelchair users who do not transfer to the vehicle seat when traveling in motor vehicles requires after-market wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint systems (WTORS) to secure the wheelchair and provide crashworthy restraint for the wheelchair-seated occupant. In the absence of adequate government safety standards,…

  7. Compensatory Strategies during Manual Wheelchair Propulsion in Response to Weakness in Individual Muscle Groups: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Slowik, Jonathan S.; McNitt-Gray, Jill L.; Requejo, Philip S.; Mulroy, Sara J.; Neptune, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The considerable physical demand placed on the upper extremity during manual wheelchair propulsion is distributed among the individual muscles. The strategy used to distribute the workload is likely influenced by the relative force-generating capacities of individual muscles, and some strategies may be associated with a higher injury risk than others. The objective of this study was to use forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion to identify compensatory strategies that can be used to overcome weakness in individual muscle groups and identify specific strategies that may increase injury risk. Identifying these strategies can provide rationale for the design of targeted rehabilitation programs aimed at preventing the development of pain and injury in manual wheelchair users. Methods Muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of manual wheelchair propulsion were analyzed to identify compensatory strategies in response to individual muscle group weakness, using individual muscle mechanical power and stress as measures of upper extremity demand. Findings The simulation analyses found the upper extremity to be robust to weakness in any single muscle group as the remaining groups were able to compensate and restore normal propulsion mechanics. The rotator cuff muscles experienced relatively high muscle stress levels and exhibited compensatory relationships with the deltoid muscles. Interpretation These results underline the importance of strengthening the rotator cuff muscles and supporting muscles whose contributions do not increase the potential for impingement (i.e., the thoracohumeral depressors) and minimize the risk of upper extremity injury in manual wheelchair users. PMID:26945719

  8. Autonomous function of wheelchair-mounted robotic manipulators to perform daily activities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheng-Shiu; Wang, Hongwu; Cooper, Rory A

    2013-06-01

    Autonomous functions for wheelchair-mounted robotic manipulators (WMRMs) allow a user to focus more on the outcome from the task - for example, eating or drinking, instead of moving robot joints through user interfaces. In this paper, we introduce a novel personal assistive robotic system based on a position-based visual servoing (PBVS) approach. The system was evaluated with a complete drinking task, which included recognizing the location of the drink, picking up the drink from a start location, conveying the drink to the proximity of the user's mouth without spilling, and placing the drink back on the table. For a drink located in front of the wheelchair, the success rate was nearly 100%. Overall, the total time of completing drinking task is within 40 seconds.

  9. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    distance equal to the thickness of the material being welded. The TSW process can be significantly improved by reducing the draw forces. This can be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the weld workpieces and the containment plates. High-power ultrasonic (HPU) vibrations of the containment plates achieve friction reduction in the TSW process. Furthermore, integration of the HPU energy into the TSW stir rod can increase tool life of the stir rod, and can reduce shear forces to which the stir rod is subjected during the welding process. TSW has been used to successfully join 0.500-in (˜13-mm) thick commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium 6AL- 4V, and titanium 6AL-4V ELI in weld joint lengths up to 9 ft (˜2.75-m) long. In addition, the TSW process was used to fabricate a sub-scale hexagonally shaped gun turret component for the U.S. Navy. The turret is comprised of six 0.5000-in (˜13-mm) thick angled welds. Each angled weld joint was prepared by machining the mating surfaces to 120deg. The angled weld joint was then fixtured using an upper and lower containment plate of the same geometry of the angled weld joint. The weld joint was then stirred by the stir rod as it and the upper and lower containment plates traverse through the angled joint prep.

  10. The role of assistive robotics in the lives of persons with disability.

    PubMed

    Brose, Steven W; Weber, Douglas J; Salatin, Ben A; Grindle, Garret G; Wang, Hongwu; Vazquez, Juan J; Cooper, Rory A

    2010-06-01

    Robotic assistive devices are used increasingly to improve the independence and quality of life of persons with disabilities. Devices as varied as robotic feeders, smart-powered wheelchairs, independent mobile robots, and socially assistive robots are becoming more clinically relevant. There is a growing importance for the rehabilitation professional to be aware of available systems and ongoing research efforts. The aim of this article is to describe the advances in assistive robotics that are relevant to professionals serving persons with disabilities. This review breaks down relevant advances into categories of Assistive Robotic Systems, User Interfaces and Control Systems, Sensory and Feedback Systems, and User Perspectives. An understanding of the direction that assistive robotics is taking is important for the clinician and researcher alike; this review is intended to address this need.

  11. Micro-tubular flame-assisted fuel cells for micro-combined heat and power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milcarek, Ryan J.; Wang, Kang; Falkenstein-Smith, Ryan L.; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2016-02-01

    Currently the role of fuel cells in future power generation is being examined, tested and discussed. However, implementing systems is more difficult because of sealing challenges, slow start-up and complex thermal management and fuel processing. A novel furnace system with a flame-assisted fuel cell is proposed that combines the thermal management and fuel processing systems by utilizing fuel-rich combustion. In addition, the flame-assisted fuel cell furnace is a micro-combined heat and power system, which can produce electricity for homes or businesses, providing resilience during power disruption while still providing heat. A micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell achieves a significant performance of 430 mW cm-2 operating in a model fuel-rich exhaust stream.

  12. Aspects of manual wheelchair configuration affecting mobility: a review.

    PubMed

    Medola, Fausto Orsi; Elui, Valeria Meirelles Carril; Santana, Carla da Silva; Fortulan, Carlos Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Many aspects relating to equipment configuration affect users' actions in a manual wheelchair, determining the overall mobility performance. Since the equipment components and configuration determine both stability and mobility efficiency, configuring the wheelchair with the most appropriate set-up for individual users' needs is a difficult task. Several studies have shown the importance of seat/backrest assembly and the relative position of the rear wheels to the user in terms of the kinetics and kinematics of manual propulsion. More recently, new studies have brought to light evidence on the inertial properties of different wheelchair configurations. Further new studies have highlighted the handrim as a key component of wheelchair assembly, since it is the interface through which the user drives the chair. In light of the new evidence on wheelchair mechanics and propulsion kinetics and kinematics, this article presents a review of the most important aspects of wheelchair configuration that affect the users' actions and mobility.

  13. Do wheelchairs spread pathogenic bacteria within hospital walls?

    PubMed

    Peretz, Avi; Koiefman, Anna; Dinisman, Eleonora; Brodsky, Diana; Labay, Kozitta

    2014-02-01

    Transmission of nosocomial pathogens has been linked to transient colonization of health care workers, medical devices and other constituents of patients' environment. In this paper we present our findings concerning the presence of pathogenic bacteria on wheelchairs, and the possibility that wheelchairs constitute a reservoir of these bacteria and a means of spreading them. In this work we examined four wheelchairs, each from a different location: the internal medicine ward, the emergency department, the general surgery ward and wheelchair stockpile of the transportation unit of the hospital. The samples were collected and cultured on different media. Bacterial identification and antimicrobial sensitivity testing were carried out using accepted practices in the microbiology laboratory. We found that wheelchairs are contaminated with several pathogenic bacteria, among them antibiotic-resistant strains such as MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumanni etc. Since there is no specific guideline protocol that deals with disinfection and cleaning frequency of wheelchairs in hospitals, we suggest each hospital to write one.

  14. Aspects of Manual Wheelchair Configuration Affecting Mobility: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Medola, Fausto Orsi; Elui, Valeria Meirelles Carril; Santana, Carla da Silva; Fortulan, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects relating to equipment configuration affect users’ actions in a manual wheelchair, determining the overall mobility performance. Since the equipment components and configuration determine both stability and mobility efficiency, configuring the wheelchair with the most appropriate set-up for individual users’ needs is a difficult task. Several studies have shown the importance of seat/backrest assembly and the relative position of the rear wheels to the user in terms of the kinetics and kinematics of manual propulsion. More recently, new studies have brought to light evidence on the inertial properties of different wheelchair configurations. Further new studies have highlighted the handrim as a key component of wheelchair assembly, since it is the interface through which the user drives the chair. In light of the new evidence on wheelchair mechanics and propulsion kinetics and kinematics, this article presents a review of the most important aspects of wheelchair configuration that affect the users’ actions and mobility. PMID:24648656

  15. A Procedure Manual for the Health Assistant Curriculum: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park.

    A secondary education health assistant curriculum procedure manual for six occupational areas is presented. The six areas, the number of procedures described for each area, and an example procedure follow: nursing assistant, forty-six (assist patient to and from a wheelchair); home health assistant, six (baby holds); medical/dental offices…

  16. Shoulder pain and time dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion variability.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Moon, Yaejin; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-07-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion places considerable repetitive mechanical strain on the upper limbs leading to shoulder injury and pain. While recent research indicates that the amount of variability in wheelchair propulsion and shoulder pain may be related. There has been minimal inquiry into the fluctuation over time (i.e. time-dependent structure) in wheelchair propulsion variability. Consequently the purpose of this investigation was to examine if the time-dependent structure in the wheelchair propulsion parameters are related to shoulder pain. 27 experienced wheelchair users manually propelled their own wheelchair fitted with a SMARTWheel on a roller at 1.1m/s for 3min. Time-dependent structure of cycle-to-cycle fluctuations in contact angle and inter push time interval was quantified using sample entropy (SampEn) and compared between the groups with/without shoulder pain using non-parametric statistics. Overall findings were, (1) variability observed in contact angle fluctuations during manual wheelchair propulsion is structured (Z=3.15;p<0.05), (2) individuals with shoulder pain exhibited higher SampEn magnitude for contact angle during wheelchair propulsion than those without pain (χ(2)(1)=6.12;p<0.05); and (3) SampEn of contact angle correlated significantly with self-reported shoulder pain (rs (WUSPI) =0.41;rs (VAS)=0.56;p<0.05). It was concluded that the time-dependent structure in wheelchair propulsion may provide novel information for tracking and monitoring shoulder pain.

  17. Magnetic-assisted triboelectric nanogenerators as self-powered visualized omnidirectional tilt sensing system.

    PubMed

    Han, Mengdi; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Sun, Xuming; Meng, Bo; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-04-28

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a promising device in energy harvesting and self-powered sensing. In this work, we demonstrate a magnetic-assisted TENG, utilizing the magnetic force for electric generation. Maximum power density of 541.1 mW/m(2) is obtained at 16.67 MΩ for the triboelectric part, while the electromagnetic part can provide power density of 649.4 mW/m(2) at 16 Ω. Through theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, linear relationship between the tilt angle and output voltage at large angles is observed. On this basis, a self-powered omnidirectional tilt sensor is realized by two magnetic-assisted TENGs, which can measure the magnitude and direction of the tilt angle at the same time. For visualized sensing of the tilt angle, a sensing system is established, which is portable, intuitive, and self-powered. This visualized system greatly simplifies the measure process, and promotes the development of self-powered systems.

  18. Magnetic-assisted triboelectric nanogenerators as self-powered visualized omnidirectional tilt sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mengdi; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Sun, Xuming; Meng, Bo; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-04-01

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a promising device in energy harvesting and self-powered sensing. In this work, we demonstrate a magnetic-assisted TENG, utilizing the magnetic force for electric generation. Maximum power density of 541.1 mW/m2 is obtained at 16.67 MΩ for the triboelectric part, while the electromagnetic part can provide power density of 649.4 mW/m2 at 16 Ω. Through theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, linear relationship between the tilt angle and output voltage at large angles is observed. On this basis, a self-powered omnidirectional tilt sensor is realized by two magnetic-assisted TENGs, which can measure the magnitude and direction of the tilt angle at the same time. For visualized sensing of the tilt angle, a sensing system is established, which is portable, intuitive, and self-powered. This visualized system greatly simplifies the measure process, and promotes the development of self-powered systems.

  19. Magnetic-assisted triboelectric nanogenerators as self-powered visualized omnidirectional tilt sensing system

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mengdi; Zhang, Xiao-Sheng; Sun, Xuming; Meng, Bo; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a promising device in energy harvesting and self-powered sensing. In this work, we demonstrate a magnetic-assisted TENG, utilizing the magnetic force for electric generation. Maximum power density of 541.1 mW/m2 is obtained at 16.67 MΩ for the triboelectric part, while the electromagnetic part can provide power density of 649.4 mW/m2 at 16 Ω. Through theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, linear relationship between the tilt angle and output voltage at large angles is observed. On this basis, a self-powered omnidirectional tilt sensor is realized by two magnetic-assisted TENGs, which can measure the magnitude and direction of the tilt angle at the same time. For visualized sensing of the tilt angle, a sensing system is established, which is portable, intuitive, and self-powered. This visualized system greatly simplifies the measure process, and promotes the development of self-powered systems. PMID:24770490

  20. H∞-control of a rack-assisted electric power steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannöhl, C.; Müller, S.; Ulbrich, H.

    2012-04-01

    Electric power steering (EPS) is more and more in use for passenger cars. Compared with hydraulic steering systems there are many advantages, such as reduced CO2 emissions and the possibility to use the EPS motor torque for advanced driver assistance systems. One task of the steering system is to give the driver an adequate steering feel. This includes providing road feedback and the right level of assistance torque. This article describes the steering torque control of a rack-assisted EPS. The controller's task is to follow a reference steering torque quickly and accurately. First, a mechanical model of the EPS is shown. Then, an H∞-controller is designed, implemented and compared with other steering torque controllers. As steering torque discontinuities are a topic when looking at new control algorithms, the phenomenon and its cause are analysed using a detailed mechanical model. The results of this analysis are considered in the controller design.

  1. Training visual control in wheelchair basketball shooting.

    PubMed

    Oudejans, Raôul R D; Heubers, Sjoerd; Ruitenbeek, Jean-René J A C; Janssen, Thomas W J

    2012-09-01

    We examined the effects of visual control training on expert wheelchair basketball shooting, a skill more difficult than in regular basketball, as players shoot from a seated position to the same rim height. The training consisted of shooting with a visual constraint that forced participants to use target information as late as possible. Participants drove under a large screen that initially blocked the basket. As soon as they saw the basket they shot. When training with the screen, shooting percentages increased. We conclude that visual control training is an effective method to improve wheelchair basketball shooting. The findings support the idea that perceptual-motor learning can be enhanced by manipulating relevant constraints in the training environment, even for expert athletes.

  2. Development of high speed power thyristor: The gate assisted turn-off thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. R.; Brewster, J.; Frobenius, D.; Desmond, T.

    1972-01-01

    A high speed power switch with unique turn-off capability was developed. This gate-assisted turn-off thyristor was rated at 609 V and 50 A with turn-off times of 2 microsec. Twenty-two units were delivered for evaluation in a series inverter circuit. In addition, test circuits designed to relate to the series inverter application were built and demonstrated.

  3. Its okay to be a quad: wheelchair rugby players sense of community.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Donna; Johnston, Keith; Gustafson, Paul; Elliott, Melanie; Thurmeier, Robin; Kuttai, Heather

    2009-04-01

    This study explored the social experience of wheelchair rugby from the perspective of the players. Eleven national level rugby players (10 males, 1 female with a mean age of 33 years) shared their experiences through the phenomenological methods of semistructured focus group interviews and artifacts. Three themes emerged from the thematic analysis (a) it's okay to be a quad, (b) don't tell us we can't, and (c) the power of wheelchair rugby. The athletes identified with a shared sense of community and the membership, fulfillment of need, influence, and shared emotional connections they used to authentically express themselves through their sport. The implications of the findings were interpreted within the theoretical context of psychological sense of community.

  4. Capacitor regenerative braking system of electric wheelchair for senior citizen based on variable frequency chopper control.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Seki, Hirokazu

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel regenerative braking control system of electric wheelchairs for senior citizen. "Electric powered wheelchair", which generates the driving force by electric motors according to the human operation, is expected to be widely used as a mobility support system for elderly people. This study focuses on the braking control to realize the safety and smooth stopping motion using the regenerative braking control technique based on fuzzy algorithm. The ride quality improvement and energy recycling can be expected by the proposed control system with stopping distance estimation and variable frequency control on the step-up/down chopper type of capacitor regenerative circuit. Some driving experiments confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control system.

  5. 43 CFR 6302.17 - When may I use a wheelchair in BLM wilderness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When may I use a wheelchair in BLM... § 6302.17 When may I use a wheelchair in BLM wilderness? If you have a disability that requires the use of a wheelchair, you may use a wheelchair in a wilderness. Consistent with the Wilderness Act and...

  6. 43 CFR 6302.17 - When may I use a wheelchair in BLM wilderness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false When may I use a wheelchair in BLM... § 6302.17 When may I use a wheelchair in BLM wilderness? If you have a disability that requires the use of a wheelchair, you may use a wheelchair in a wilderness. Consistent with the Wilderness Act and...

  7. 43 CFR 6302.17 - When may I use a wheelchair in BLM wilderness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false When may I use a wheelchair in BLM... § 6302.17 When may I use a wheelchair in BLM wilderness? If you have a disability that requires the use of a wheelchair, you may use a wheelchair in a wilderness. Consistent with the Wilderness Act and...

  8. 43 CFR 6302.17 - When may I use a wheelchair in BLM wilderness?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false When may I use a wheelchair in BLM... § 6302.17 When may I use a wheelchair in BLM wilderness? If you have a disability that requires the use of a wheelchair, you may use a wheelchair in a wilderness. Consistent with the Wilderness Act and...

  9. Sliding and Lower Limb Mechanics during Sit-Stand-Sit Transitions with a Standing Wheelchair

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wei-Chien; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Kuo, Chang-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the shear displacement between the body and backrest/seat, range of motion (ROM), and force acting on the lower limb joints during sit-stand-sit transitions by operating an electric-powered standing wheelchair. Methods and Materials. The amounts of sliding along the backrest and the seat plane, ROM of lower limb joints, and force acting on the knee/foot were measured in twenty-four people with paraplegia. Results. Without an antishear mechanism, the shear displacement was approximately 9 cm between the user's body and the backrest/seat surfaces. During standing up, the user's back slid down and the thigh was displaced rearward, but they moved in opposite directions when wheelchair sat back down. A minimum of 60 degrees of ROM at the hip and knee was needed during sit-stand-sit transitions. The maximal resultant forces acting on the knee restraints could reach 23.5% of body weight. Conclusion. Sliding between the body and backrest/seat occurred while transitioning from sitting to standing and vice versa. A certain amount of ROM at lower limb joints and force acting on the knee was necessitated during sit-stand-sit transitions. Careful consideration needs to be given to who the user of the electric powered standing wheelchair is. PMID:25105120

  10. Female Wheelchair Athletes and Changes to Body Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Robert Thomas; Wettenhall, Robyn Sandra

    2000-01-01

    The effects of a psychological intervention program on attitudes of body image of six national female wheelchair basketball players was examined. As a result of the cognitive behavioral intervention program, physical self-perception increased for the wheelchair athletes and for 50 percent of the athletes on multidimensional components of body…

  11. Adolescents' Attitudes toward Wheelchair Users: A Provincial Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P.

    2010-01-01

    The study aims were to examine (i) adolescents' attitudes towards family members who use a wheelchair in relation to other health problems and conditions, and (ii) the association between perceived wheelchair stigma and socio-demographic factors. Data were based on surveys from 2790 seventh to 12th grade students derived from the 2007 cycle of the…

  12. Training Patterns of Wheelchair Basketball Players in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Yasar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze technical drills, warm-up and cool-down exercises used by wheelchair basketball players of the Turkish league in relation to training sessions. 33 male wheelchair basketball players participated in the study (mean age 26.6[plus or minus]5,95 years). All players reported that they used warm-up exercises before…

  13. Development of a Screening Tool for Safe Wheelchair Seating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    wheelchairs and seating systems do not fit the individual needs of nursing homes residents, many problems can become evident: pressure ulcers , difficulty in...from the MDS, including diagnosis, cognitive status, communication ability, sensation level, skin integrity (presence/absence of pressure ulcers ...Abstract Objectives: Most elderly nursing home residents who need wheelchairs are not being assessed individually to ensure proper prescription for

  14. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  15. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  16. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  17. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  18. 21 CFR 890.3940 - Wheelchair platform scale.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wheelchair platform scale. 890.3940 Section 890.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... platform scale. (a) Identification. A wheelchair platform scale is a device with a base designed...

  19. 49 CFR 37.205 - Additional passengers who use wheelchairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.205 Additional passengers who use wheelchairs. If a number of wheelchair users exceeding the number of securement locations on the bus seek to... transportation to them on the bus....

  20. 49 CFR 37.205 - Additional passengers who use wheelchairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.205 Additional passengers who use wheelchairs. If a number of wheelchair users exceeding the number of securement locations on the bus seek to... transportation to them on the bus....

  1. 49 CFR 37.205 - Additional passengers who use wheelchairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.205 Additional passengers who use wheelchairs. If a number of wheelchair users exceeding the number of securement locations on the bus seek to... transportation to them on the bus....

  2. 49 CFR 37.205 - Additional passengers who use wheelchairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.205 Additional passengers who use wheelchairs. If a number of wheelchair users exceeding the number of securement locations on the bus seek to... transportation to them on the bus....

  3. 49 CFR 37.205 - Additional passengers who use wheelchairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.205 Additional passengers who use wheelchairs. If a number of wheelchair users exceeding the number of securement locations on the bus seek to... transportation to them on the bus....

  4. Learning to Drive a Wheelchair in Virtual Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Dean P.; Loge, Ken; Cram, Aaron; Peterson, Missy

    2011-01-01

    This research project studied the effect that a technology-based training program, WheelchairNet, could contribute to the education of children with physical disabilities by providing a chance to practice driving virtual motorized wheelchairs safely within a computer-generated world. Programmers created three virtual worlds for training. Scenarios…

  5. A Microcomputer Training System for Electric Wheelchair Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, D. M. E.; Turner, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the development of a computer-based means of assessment and training for motorized wheelchair users. Programs designed to run on a BBC microcomputer that allow the ability of a severely handicapped person to be tested are explained; a joystick-controlled wheelchair simulation is described, and its use with children highlighted.…

  6. On the development of an expert system for wheelchair selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, Gregory R.; Bhansin, Charlotte A.; Alaraini, Sulaiman A.; Nour, Mohamed A.

    1994-01-01

    The presentation of wheelchairs for the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients involves the examination of a number of complicated factors including ambulation status, length of diagnosis, and funding sources, to name a few. Consequently, only a few experts exist in this area. To aid medical therapists with the wheelchair selection decision, a prototype medical expert system (ES) was developed. This paper describes and discusses the steps of designing and developing the system, the experiences of the authors, and the lessons learned from working on this project. Wheelchair Advisor, programmed in CLIPS, serves as diagnosis, classification, prescription, and training tool in the MS field. Interviews, insurance letters, forms, and prototyping were used to gain knowledge regarding the wheelchair selection problem. Among the lessons learned are that evolutionary prototyping is superior to the conventional system development life-cycle (SDLC), the wheelchair selection is a good candidate for ES applications, and that ES can be applied to other similar medical subdomains.

  7. An upper-limb power-assist exoskeleton using proportional myoelectric control.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhichuan; Zhang, Kejun; Sun, Shouqian; Gao, Zenggui; Zhang, Lekai; Yang, Zhongliang

    2014-04-10

    We developed an upper-limb power-assist exoskeleton actuated by pneumatic muscles. The exoskeleton included two metal links: a nylon joint, four size-adjustable carbon fiber bracers, a potentiometer and two pneumatic muscles. The proportional myoelectric control method was proposed to control the exoskeleton according to the user's motion intention in real time. With the feature extraction procedure and the classification (back-propagation neural network), an electromyogram (EMG)-angle model was constructed to be used for pattern recognition. Six healthy subjects performed elbow flexion-extension movements under four experimental conditions: (1) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation and for different periods (2-s, 4-s and 8-s periods); (2) holding a 1-kg load, without wearing the exoskeleton, for a fixed period; (3) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation, for a fixed period; (4) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton under proportional myoelectric control, for a fixed period. The EMG signals of the biceps brachii, the brachioradialis, the triceps brachii and the anconeus and the angle of the elbow were collected. The control scheme's reliability and power-assist effectiveness were evaluated in the experiments. The results indicated that the exoskeleton could be controlled by the user's motion intention in real time and that it was useful for augmenting arm performance with neurological signal control, which could be applied to assist in elbow rehabilitation after neurological injury.

  8. An Upper-Limb Power-Assist Exoskeleton Using Proportional Myoelectric Control

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhichuan; Zhang, Kejun; Sun, Shouqian; Gao, Zenggui; Zhang, Lekai; Yang, Zhongliang

    2014-01-01

    We developed an upper-limb power-assist exoskeleton actuated by pneumatic muscles. The exoskeleton included two metal links: a nylon joint, four size-adjustable carbon fiber bracers, a potentiometer and two pneumatic muscles. The proportional myoelectric control method was proposed to control the exoskeleton according to the user's motion intention in real time. With the feature extraction procedure and the classification (back-propagation neural network), an electromyogram (EMG)-angle model was constructed to be used for pattern recognition. Six healthy subjects performed elbow flexion-extension movements under four experimental conditions: (1) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation and for different periods (2-s, 4-s and 8-s periods); (2) holding a 1-kg load, without wearing the exoskeleton, for a fixed period; (3) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton, but with no actuation, for a fixed period; (4) holding a 1-kg load, wearing the exoskeleton under proportional myoelectric control, for a fixed period. The EMG signals of the biceps brachii, the brachioradialis, the triceps brachii and the anconeus and the angle of the elbow were collected. The control scheme's reliability and power-assist effectiveness were evaluated in the experiments. The results indicated that the exoskeleton could be controlled by the user's motion intention in real time and that it was useful for augmenting arm performance with neurological signal control, which could be applied to assist in elbow rehabilitation after neurological injury. PMID:24727501

  9. Heat Pipe-Assisted Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology for Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ju-Chan; Chi, Ri-Guang; Rhi, Seok-Ho; Lee, Kye-Bock; Hwang, Hyun-Chang; Lee, Ji-Su; Lee, Wook-Hyun

    2015-06-01

    Currently, large amounts of thermal energy dissipated from automobiles are emitted through hot exhaust pipes. This has resulted in the need for a new efficient recycling method to recover energy from waste hot exhaust gas. The present experimental study investigated how to improve the power output of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system assisted by a wickless loop heat pipe (loop thermosyphon) under the limited space of the exhaust gas pipeline. The present study shows a novel loop-type heat pipe-assisted TEG concept to be applied to hybrid vehicles. The operating temperature of a TEG's hot side surface should be as high as possible to maximize the Seebeck effect. The present study shows a novel TEG concept of transferring heat from the source to the sink. This technology can transfer waste heat to any local place with a loop-type heat pipe. The present TEG system with a heat pipe can transfer heat and generate an electromotive force power of around 1.3 V in the case of 170°C hot exhaust gas. Two thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for a conductive block model and four Bi2Te3 TEMs with a heat pipe-assisted model were installed in the condenser section. Heat flows to the condenser section from the evaporator section connected to the exhaust pipe. This novel TEG system with a heat pipe can be placed in any location on an automobile.

  10. Power-assistive finger exoskeleton with a palmar opening at the fingerpad.

    PubMed

    Heo, Pilwon; Kim, Jung

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a powered finger exoskeleton with an open fingerpad, named the Open Fingerpad eXoskeleton (OFX). The palmar opening at the fingerpad allows for direct contact between the user's fingerpad and objects in order to make use of the wearer's own tactile sensation for dexterous manipulation. Lateral side walls at the end of the OFX's index finger module are equipped with custom load cells for estimating the wearer's pinch grip force. A pneumatic cylinder generates assistance force, which is determined according to the estimated pinch grip force. The OFX transmits the assistance force directly to the objects without exerting pressure on the wearer's finger. The advantage of the OFX over an exoskeleton with a closed fingerpad was validated experimentally. During static and dynamic manipulation of a test object, the OFX exhibited a lower safety margin than the closed exoskeleton, indicating a higher ability to adjust the grip force within an appropriate range. Furthermore, the benefit of force assistance in reducing the muscular burden was observed in terms of muscle fatigue during a static pinch grip. The median frequency (MDF) of the surface electromyography (sEMG) signal from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle displayed a lower reduction rate for the assisted condition, indicating a lower accumulation rate of muscle fatigue.

  11. Home in a Wheelchair: House Design Ideas for Easier Wheelchair Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasin, Joseph

    Intended to aid in the building or purchase of a home suitable for use by a handicapped individual in a wheelchair, the booklet provides detailed design guidelines. Included is information on the decision process, finances, ramps, a car shelter, doors communication devices, electrical needs, windows, elevators and chair lifts, the kitchen, an…

  12. Dental Office Assisting; Glossary of Key Words. Vocational Reading Power Project, Title III, E.S.E.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremer, Bonnie

    The glossary is one of twenty in various subject areas of vocational education designed to assist the student in vocabulary mastery for particular vocational education courses. They are part of the Vocational Reading Power Project, Title III, E.S.E.A. This glossary is for a course in dental office assisting. It is divided into two parts: one…

  13. Development of an Upper Limb Power Assist System Using Pneumatic Actuators for Farming Lift-up Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Eiichi; Harada, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Masaaki

    A power assist system has lately attracted considerable attention to lifting-up an object without low back pain. We have been developing power assist systems with pneumatic actuators for the elbow and shoulder to farming support of lifting-up a bag of rice weighing 30kg. This paper describes the mechanism and control method of this power assist system. The pneumatic rotary actuator supports shoulder motion, and the air cylinder supports elbow motion. In this control method, the surface electromyogram(EMG) signals are used as input information of the controller. The joint support torques of human are calculated based on the antigravity term of necessary joint torques, which are estimated on the dynamics of a human approximated link model. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism and control method of the power assist system.

  14. Transportation safety standards for wheelchair users: a review of voluntary standards for improved safety, usability, and independence of wheelchair-seated travelers.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lawrence W; Manary, Miriam A; Hobson, Douglas A; Bertocci, Gina E

    2008-01-01

    Safe transportation for wheelchair users who do not transfer to the vehicle seat when traveling in motor vehicles requires after-market wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint systems (WTORS) to secure the wheelchair and provide crashworthy restraint for the wheelchair-seated occupant. In the absence of adequate government safety standards, voluntary standards for the design and performance of WTORS, and for wheelchairs used as seats in motor vehicles, have been developed. The initial versions of these standards qualify equipment for use in all types and sizes of motor vehicles using a 30-mph (48-kph), 20-g frontal sled-impact test. The wheelchair standard requires four accessible, crash-tested securement points on wheelchairs so they can be more easily and effectively secured using a four-point strap-type tie-down system. Future voluntary standards are aimed at reducing injury risk for wheelchair-seated occupants in rear impacts and at providing a method for evaluating the crashworthiness of wheelchair seating systems independent of wheelchair base-frames. They also address improved usability and independence for wheelchair-seated travelers using public transportation by specifying universal docking interface geometry for wheelchairs and design and performance requirements for rear-facing wheelchair passenger stations for use in the very low-g environments of large fixed-route transit buses.

  15. Gender differences in wheelchair marathon performance – Oita International Wheelchair Marathon from 1983 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lepers, Romuald; Stapley, Paul J; Knechtle, Beat

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was (1) to examine the changes in participation and performance of males and females at the Oita International Wheelchair Marathon in Oita, Japan, between 1983 and 2011, and (2) to analyze the gender difference in the age of peak wheelchair marathon performance. Methods Age and time performance data for all wheelchair athletes completing the Oita International Wheelchair Marathon from 1983 to 2011 were analyzed. Results Mean annual number of finishers was 123 ± 43 for males and 6 ± 3 for females (5.0% ± 2.0% of all finishers), respectively. Mean age of overall finishers was significantly (P = 0.026) greater for males (41.3 ± 1.8 years) compared to females (32.7 ± 1.4 years). In contrast, there was no difference in the mean age of the top three overall finishers between males (35.8 ± 3.2 years) and females (31.6 ± 1.5 years). The race time of the top three overall finishers was significantly lower (P < 0.01) for males (1:34 ± 0:11 hours:minutes) compared to females (1:59 ± 0:20 hours:minutes), but it was not significantly different between male (2:06 ± 0:12 hours:minutes) and female (2:12 ± 0:18 hours:minutes) overall finishers. The mean gender difference in time was 26.1% ± 9.7% for the top three overall finishers. Conclusion Further studies are required to investigate the reasons for the low participation of females in wheelchair marathons and why the gender difference in marathon performance is much greater for disabled athletes than for able-bodied athletes. PMID:24198599

  16. Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

    2013-02-01

    The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing

  17. Mechanical efficiency of two commercial lever-propulsion mechanisms for manual wheelchair locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lui, Jordon; MacGillivray, Megan K; Sheel, A William; Jeyasurya, Jeswin; Sadeghi, Mahsa; Sawatzky, Bonita Jean

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the mechanical efficiency (ME) of two commercially available lever-propulsion mechanisms for wheelchairs and (2) compare the ME of lever propulsion with hand rim propulsion within the same wheelchair. Of the two mechanisms, one contained a torsion spring while the other used a roller clutch design. We hypothesized that the torsion spring mechanism would increase the ME of propulsion due to a passive recovery stroke enabled by the mechanism. Ten nondisabled male participants with no prior manual wheeling experience performed submaximal exercise tests using both lever-propulsion mechanisms and hand rim propulsion on two different wheelchairs. Cardiopulmonary parameters including oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), and energy expenditure (En) were determined. Total external power (Pext) was measured using a drag test protocol. ME was determined by the ratio of Pext to En. Results indicated no significant effect of lever-propulsion mechanism for all physiological measures tested. This suggests that the torsion spring did not result in a physiological benefit compared with the roller clutch mechanism. However, both lever-propulsion mechanisms showed decreased VO2 and HR and increased ME (as a function of slope) compared with hand rim propulsion (p < 0.001). This indicates that both lever-propulsion mechanisms tested are more mechanically efficient than conventional hand rim propulsion, especially when slopes are encountered.

  18. Effects of Respiratory Resistance Training With a Concurrent Flow Device on Wheelchair Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Litchke, Lyn G; Russian, Christopher J; Lloyd, Lisa K; Schmidt, Eric A; Price, Larry; Walker, John L

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: To determine the effect of respiratory resistance training (RRT) with a concurrent flow respiratory (CFR) device on respiratory function and aerobic power in wheelchair athletes. Methods: Ten male wheelchair athletes (8 with spinal cord injuries, 1 with a neurological disorder, and 1 with postpolio syndrome), were matched by lesion level and/or track rating before random assignment to either a RRT group (n = 5) or a control group (CON, n = 5). The RRT group performed 1 set of breathing exercises using Expand-a-Lung, a CFR device, 2 to 3 times daily for 10 weeks. Pre/posttesting included measurement of maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and peak oxygen consumption ( ). Results: Repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant group difference in change for MIP from pre- to posttest (P < 0.05). The RRT group improved by 33.0 cm H2O, while the CON group improved by 0.6 cm H2O. Although not significant, the MVV increased for the RRT group and decreased for the CON group. There was no significant group difference between for pre/posttesting. Due to small sample sizes in both groups and violations of some parametric statistical assumptions, nonparametric tests were also conducted as a crosscheck of the findings. The results of the nonparametric tests concurred with the parametric results. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that 10 weeks of RRT training with a CFR device can effectively improve MIP in wheelchair athletes. Further research and a larger sample size are warranted to further characterize the impact of Expand-a-Lung on performance and other cardiorespiratory variables in wheelchair athletes. PMID:18533414

  19. Hybrid PID and PSO-based control for electric power assist steering system for electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifah, R. A.; Toha, S. F.; Ahmad, S.

    2013-12-01

    Electric power assist steering (EPAS) system provides an important significance in enhancing the driving performance of a vehicle with its energy-conserving features. This paper presents a hybrid PID (Proportional-Integral-Derivative) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) based control scheme to minimize energy consumption for EPAS. This single objective optimization scheme is realized using the PSO technique in searching for best gain parameters of the PID controller. The fast tuning feature of this optimum PID controller produced high-quality solutions. Simulation results show the performance and effectiveness of the hybrid PSO-PID based controller as opposed to the conventional PID controller.

  20. Evaluation of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility using advanced biomechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Slavens, Brooke A; Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Aurit, Christine M; Graf, Adam; Krzak, Joseph J; Reiners, Kathryn; Vogel, Lawrence C; Harris, Gerald F

    2015-01-01

    There is minimal research of upper extremity joint dynamics during pediatric wheelchair mobility despite the large number of children using manual wheelchairs. Special concern arises with the pediatric population, particularly in regard to the longer duration of wheelchair use, joint integrity, participation and community integration, and transitional care into adulthood. This study seeks to provide evaluation methods for characterizing the biomechanics of wheelchair use by children with spinal cord injury (SCI). Twelve subjects with SCI underwent motion analysis while they propelled their wheelchair at a self-selected speed and propulsion pattern. Upper extremity joint kinematics, forces, and moments were computed using inverse dynamics methods with our custom model. The glenohumeral joint displayed the largest average range of motion (ROM) at 47.1° in the sagittal plane and the largest average superiorly and anteriorly directed joint forces of 6.1% BW and 6.5% BW, respectively. The largest joint moments were 1.4% body weight times height (BW × H) of elbow flexion and 1.2% BW × H of glenohumeral joint extension. Pediatric manual wheelchair users demonstrating these high joint demands may be at risk for pain and upper limb injuries. These evaluation methods may be a useful tool for clinicians and therapists for pediatric wheelchair prescription and training.

  1. Modeling and Simulation of Two Wheelchair Accessories for Pushing Doors.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Soran Jalal; Shaikh Mohammed, Javeed

    2017-03-27

    Independent mobility is vital to individuals of all ages, and wheelchairs have proven to be great personal mobility devices. The tasks of opening and navigating through a door are trivial for healthy people, while the same tasks could be difficult for some wheelchair users. A wide range of intelligent wheelchair controllers and systems, robotic arms, or manipulator attachments integrated with wheelchairs have been developed for various applications, including manipulating door knobs. Unfortunately, the intelligent wheelchairs and robotic attachments are not widely available as commercial products. Therefore, the current manuscript presents the modeling and simulation of a novel but simple technology in the form of a passive wheelchair accessory (straight, arm-like with a single wheel, and arc-shaped with multiple wheels) for pushing doors open from a wheelchair. From the simulations using different wheel shapes and sizes, it was found that the arc-shaped accessory could push open the doors faster and with almost half the required force as compared to the arm-like accessory. Also, smaller spherical wheels were found to be best in terms of reaction forces on the wheels. Prototypes based on the arc-shaped accessory design will be manufactured and evaluated for pushing doors open and dodging or gliding other obstacles.

  2. Constraints influencing sports wheelchair propulsion performance and injury risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Paralympic Games are the pinnacle of sport for many athletes with a disability. A potential issue for many wheelchair athletes is how to train hard to maximise performance while also reducing the risk of injuries, particularly to the shoulder due to the accumulation of stress placed on this joint during activities of daily living, training and competition. The overall purpose of this narrative review was to use the constraints-led approach of dynamical systems theory to examine how various constraints acting upon the wheelchair-user interface may alter hand rim wheelchair performance during sporting activities, and to a lesser extent, their injury risk. As we found no studies involving Paralympic athletes that have directly utilised the dynamical systems approach to interpret their data, we have used this approach to select some potential constraints and discussed how they may alter wheelchair performance and/or injury risk. Organism constraints examined included player classifications, wheelchair setup, training and intrinsic injury risk factors. Task constraints examined the influence of velocity and types of locomotion (court sports vs racing) in wheelchair propulsion, while environmental constraints focused on forces that tend to oppose motion such as friction and surface inclination. Finally, the ecological validity of the research studies assessing wheelchair propulsion was critiqued prior to recommendations for practice and future research being given. PMID:23557065

  3. Patients' and health care providers' knowledge of wheelchair transportation issues.

    PubMed

    Brinkey, Lori; Savoie, Christopher; Hurvitz, Edward A; Flannagan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the level of knowledge about wheelchair transportation safety practices among wheelchair users (WCUs) and caregivers, therapists, physicians, and other professionals (CTPs). Two 10-question surveys were designed. One was administered to a convenience sample of 107 WCUs, average age 31 years (range: 4 to 86). Diagnoses included cerebral palsy (39%), spinal cord injury (19%), and others. The second was given to a convenience sample of 87 caregivers (33%), therapists (27%), physicians (18%), and others. Results indicated that most WCUs (67%) and about half of the CTPs had not received education about best transportation practices. Less than 20% in either group had heard of the transit option or a transit wheelchair, and less than 7% were aware of SAE J2249 and ANSI-RESNA WC/19 standards for wheelchairs and transportation. Sixty-seven percent of WCUs and 46% of CTPs felt lack of knowledge restricted their use of best transportation practices, followed by cost and vehicle space. Education about best practices was related to increased knowledge as well as increased use of occupant and wheelchair restraints. We concluded that there is a poor level of knowledge about wheelchair transportation safety practices among WCUs, caregivers, and professionals who prescribe wheelchairs. This knowledge deficit leads to a lack of standardized transport and a potential compromise of safety. Education can be beneficial, and should be pursued.

  4. Simulation model of a lever-propelled wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Makoto; Ota, Yuki; Hase, Kazunori; Stefanov, Dimitar; Yamaguchi, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Wheelchair efficiency depends significantly on the individual adjustment of the wheelchair propulsion interface. Wheelchair prescription involves reconfiguring the wheelchair to optimize it for specific user characteristics. Wheelchair tuning procedure is a complicated task that is performed usually by experienced rehabilitation engineers. In this study, we report initial results from the development of a musculoskeletal model of the wheelchair lever propulsion. Such a model could be used for the development of new advanced wheelchair approaches that allow wheelchair designers and practitioners to explore virtually, on a computer, the effects of the intended settings of the lever-propulsion interface. To investigate the lever-propulsion process, we carried out wheelchair lever propulsion experiments where joint angle, lever angle and three-directional forces and moments applied to the lever were recorded during the execution of defined propulsion motions. Kinematic and dynamic features of lever propulsion motions were extracted from the recorded data to be used for the model development. Five healthy male adults took part in these initial experiments. The analysis of the collected kinematic and dynamic motion parameters showed that lever propulsion is realized by a cyclical three-dimensional motion of upper extremities and that joint torque for propulsion is maintained within a certain range. The synthesized propulsion model was verified by computer simulation where the measured lever-angles were compared with the angles generated by the developed model simulation. Joint torque amplitudes were used to impose the torque limitation to the model joints. The results evidenced that the developed model can simulate successfully basic lever propulsion tasks such as pushing and pulling the lever.

  5. Investigation of Peak Pressure Index Parameters for People with Spinal Cord Injury Using Wheelchair Tilt-in-Space and Recline: Methodology and Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Lung, Chi-Wen; Yang, Tim D.; Crane, Barbara A.; Elliott, Jeannette; Dicianno, Brad E.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the sensel window's location and size when calculating the peak pressure index (PPI) of pressure mapping with varying degrees of wheelchair tilt-in-space (tilt) and recline in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Thirteen power wheelchair users were recruited into this study. Six combinations of wheelchair tilt (15°, 25°, and 35°) and recline (10° and 30°) were used by the participants in random order. Displacements of peak pressure and center of pressure were extracted from the left side of the mapping system. Normalized PPI was computed for three sensel window dimensions (3 sensels × 3 sensels, 5 × 5, and 7 × 7). At least 3.33 cm of Euclidean displacement of peak pressures was observed in the tilt and recline. For every tilt angle, peak pressure displacement was not significantly different between 10° and 30° recline, while center of pressure displacement was significantly different (P < .05). For each recline angle, peak pressure displacement was not significantly different between pairs of 15°, 25°, and 35° tilt, while center of pressure displacement was significantly different between 15° versus 35° and 25° versus 35°. Our study showed that peak pressure displacement occurs in response to wheelchair tilt and recline, suggesting that the selected sensel window locations used to calculate PPI should be adjusted during changes in wheelchair configuration. PMID:25057491

  6. Comparison of Healthcare Workers Transferring Patients Using Either Conventional Or Robotic Wheelchairs: Kinematic, Electromyographic, and Electrocardiographic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiromi; Ueki, Masaru; Uehara, Kazutake; Noma, Hisashi; Nozawa, Nobuko; Osaki, Mari; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to compare the musculoskeletal and physical strain on healthcare workers, by measuring range of motion (ROM), muscle activity, and heart rate (HR), during transfer of a simulated patient using either a robotic wheelchair (RWC) or a conventional wheelchair (CWC). Methods. The subjects were 10 females who had work experience in transferring patients and another female adult as the simulated patient to be transferred from bed to a RWC or a CWC. In both experimental conditions, ROM, muscle activity, and HR were assessed in the subjects using motion sensors, electromyography, and electrocardiograms. Results. Peak ROM of shoulder flexion during assistive transfer with the RWC was significantly lower than that with the CWC. Values for back muscle activity during transfer were lower with the RWC than with the CWC. Conclusions. The findings suggest that the RWC may decrease workplace injuries and lower back pain in healthcare workers. PMID:27372213

  7. Real-time performance of a hands-free semi-autonomous wheelchair system using a combination of stereoscopic and spherical vision.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jordan S; Nguyen, Tuan Nghia; Tran, Yvonne; Su, Steven W; Craig, Ashley; Nguyen, Hung T

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the operational performance of a semi-autonomous wheelchair system named TIM (Thought-controlled Intelligent Machine), which uses cameras in a system configuration modeled on the vision system of a horse. This new camera configuration utilizes stereoscopic vision for 3-Dimensional (3D) depth perception and mapping ahead of the wheelchair, combined with a spherical camera system for 360-degrees of monocular vision. The unique combination allows for static components of an unknown environment to be mapped and any surrounding dynamic obstacles to be detected, during real-time autonomous navigation, minimizing blind-spots and preventing accidental collisions with people or obstacles. Combining this vision system with a shared control strategy provides intelligent assistive guidance during wheelchair navigation, and can accompany any hands-free wheelchair control technology for people with severe physical disability. Testing of this system in crowded dynamic environments has displayed the feasibility and real-time performance of this system when assisting hands-free control technologies, in this case being a proof-of-concept brain-computer interface (BCI).

  8. Moving a patient from bed to a wheelchair

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000428.htm Moving a patient from bed to a wheelchair To use the sharing features on this ... move the footrests out of the way. Getting a Patient Ready to Transfer Before transferring into the ...

  9. WISDOM: wheelchair inertial sensors for displacement and orientation monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansiot, J.; Zhang, Z.; Lo, B.; Yang, G. Z.

    2011-10-01

    Improved wheelchair design in recent years has significantly increased the mobility of people with disabilities, which has also enhanced the competitive advantage of wheelchair sports. For the latter, detailed assessment of biomechanical factors influencing individual performance and team tactics requires real-time wireless sensing and data modelling. In this paper, we propose the use of a miniaturized wireless wheel-mounted inertial sensor for wheelchair motion monitoring and tracking in an indoor sport environment. Based on a combined use of 3D microelectromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscopes and 2D MEMS accelerometers, the proposed system provides real-time velocity, heading, ground distance covered and motion trajectory of the wheelchair across the sports court. The proposed system offers a number of advantages compared to existing platforms in terms of size, weight and ease of installation. Beyond sport applications, it also has important applications for training and rehabilitation for people with disabilities.

  10. Using Virtual Reality to Dynamically Setting an Electrical Wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dir, S.; Habert, O.; Pruski, A.

    2008-06-01

    This work uses virtual reality to find or refine in a recurring way the best adequacy between a person with physically disability and his electrical wheelchair. A system architecture based on "Experiment→Analyze and decision-making→Modification of the wheelchair" cycles is proposed. This architecture uses a decision-making module based on a fuzzy inference system which has to be parameterized so that the system converges quickly towards the optimal solution. The first challenge consists in computing criteria which must represent as well as possible particular situations that the user meets during each navigation experiment. The second challenge consists in transforming these criteria into relevant modifications about the active or non active functionalities or into adjustment of intrinsic setting of the wheelchair. These modifications must remain most stable as possible during the successive experiments. Objectives are to find the best wheelchair to give a beginning of mobility to a given person with physically disability.

  11. Influence of Handrim Wheelchair Propulsion Training in Adolescent Wheelchair Users, A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dysterheft, Jennifer L.; Rice, Ian M.; Rice, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten full-time adolescent wheelchair users (ages 13–18) completed a total of three propulsion trials on carpet and tile surfaces, at a self-selected velocity, and on a concrete surface, at a controlled velocity. All trials were performed in their personal wheelchair with force and moment sensing wheels attached bilaterally. The first two trials on each surface were used as pre-intervention control trials. The third trial was performed after receiving training on proper propulsion technique. Peak resultant force, contact angle, stroke frequency, and velocity were recorded during all trials for primary analysis. Carpet and tile trials resulted in significant increases in contact angle and peak total force with decreased stroke frequency after training. During the velocity controlled trials on concrete, significant increases in contact angle occurred, as well as decreases in stroke frequency after training. Overall, the use of a training video and verbal feedback may help to improve short-term propulsion technique in adolescent wheelchair users and decrease the risk of developing upper limb pain and injury. PMID:26042217

  12. Influence of handrim wheelchair propulsion training in adolescent wheelchair users, a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dysterheft, Jennifer L; Rice, Ian M; Rice, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Ten full-time adolescent wheelchair users (ages 13-18) completed a total of three propulsion trials on carpet and tile surfaces, at a self-selected velocity, and on a concrete surface, at a controlled velocity. All trials were performed in their personal wheelchair with force and moment sensing wheels attached bilaterally. The first two trials on each surface were used as pre-intervention control trials. The third trial was performed after receiving training on proper propulsion technique. Peak resultant force, contact angle, stroke frequency, and velocity were recorded during all trials for primary analysis. Carpet and tile trials resulted in significant increases in contact angle and peak total force with decreased stroke frequency after training. During the velocity controlled trials on concrete, significant increases in contact angle occurred, as well as decreases in stroke frequency after training. Overall, the use of a training video and verbal feedback may help to improve short-term propulsion technique in adolescent wheelchair users and decrease the risk of developing upper limb pain and injury.

  13. Laser assisted die bending: a new application of high power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuöcker, D.; Schumi, T.; Spitzer, O.; Bammer, F.; Schuöcker, G.; Sperrer, G.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays high power lasers are mainly used for cutting of sheet metals, for welding, hardening and rapid prototyping. In the forming of sheet metals as bending or deep drawing lasers are not used. Nevertheless a few years ago a new application of high power lasers has been invented, where bending of materials that break at room temperature becomes possible by heating them along the bending edge with high power lasers thus allowing their treatment without cracks and rupture. For this purpose a large number of diode lasers are arranged in the bottom tool of a bending machine (a V-shaped die) which heat up the initially flat sheet metal during the bending process what is performed by pressing it into the die with a knife shaped upper tool where due to the laser heating the material is softened and thus cracks are avoided. For the technical realization of the new process of laser assisted die bending, modules equipped with numerous laser diodes and a total beam power of 2,5 kW are used. The light emitted by these modules enters a tool with a length of 15cm and is deflected towards the workpiece. By using ten of these modules with adjacent dies and by integrating those in a bending press a bending edge of sheet metals with a length of 1500mm can be realized. Such a bending press with laser assistance also needs energization with a power of practically 50kW, a respective water flow, a heat exchanger system and also a control for all functions of this system. Special measures have also been developed to avoid radiating of those tools that are not covered by a workpiece in the case of bending edges shorter than the full length of the bending tools whereas individual short circuiting of diode modules can be performed. Specific measures to ensure a safe operation without any harm to the operational person have been realized. Exploitation of the bending process has been carried out for titanium, where material thicknesses up to 3mm have been bent successfully.

  14. Acceptance and meanings of wheelchair use in senior stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Barker, Donna J; Reid, Denise; Cott, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain understanding of the lived experience of senior stroke survivors who used prescribed wheelchairs in their homes and communities. The study involved semistructured, in-depth interviews that were conducted with 10 participants, ages 70 to 80 years old, who had used a wheelchair for a mean of 5.6 years. A constant comparative inductive method of analysis was performed. Three different categories of acceptance of wheelchair use were identified; reluctant acceptance, grateful acceptance, and internal acceptance. Increased mobility, varied social response, and loss of some valued roles were common to all three wheelchair acceptance categories. Aspects of level of burden, freedom, and spontaneity varied in degree among the three acceptance categories. As the wheelchair provided opportunity for increased continuity in the lives of these stroke survivors, it appeared to be accepted more fully and viewed more positively. Prestroke lifestyle and values need to be carefully considered in order to maximize acceptance of wheelchair use among senior stroke survivors.

  15. Data Logger Technologies for Manual Wheelchairs: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Routhier, François; Lettre, Josiane; Miller, William C; Borisoff, Jaimie F; Keetch, Kate; Mitchell, Ian M; CanWheel Research Team

    2016-11-15

    In recent years, studies have increasingly employed data logger technologies to record objective driving and physiological characteristics of manual wheelchair users. However, the technologies used offer significant differences in characteristics, such as measured outcomes, ease of use, and level of burden. In order to identify and describe the extent of published research activity that relies on data logger technologies for manual wheelchair users, we performed a scoping review of the scientific and gray literature. Five databases were searched: Medline, Compendex, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. The 119 retained papers document a wide variety of logging devices and sensing technologies measuring a range of outcomes. The most commonly used technologies were accelerometers installed on the user (18.8%), odometers installed on the wheelchair (12.4%), accelerometers installed on the wheelchair (9.7%), and heart monitors (9.7%). Not surprisingly, the most reported outcomes were distance, mobility events, heart rate, speed/velocity, acceleration, and driving time. With decreasing costs and technological improvements, data loggers are likely to have future widespread clinical (and even personal) use. Future research may be needed to assess the usefulness of different outcomes and to develop methods more appropriate to wheelchair users in order to optimize the practicality of wheelchair data loggers.

  16. Simulation of human walking with powered orthosis for designing practical assistive device.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Yoshiho; Nagai, Chikara; Obinata, Goro

    2012-01-01

    To design a powered assistive orthosis for human walking, we have simulated walking motion with an orthosis. The model dynamics of the coupled human-orthosis is represented by a 10-rigid-link system. In this model there exist rotational joints at lumbar, both thighs and both legs for orthosis, and each joints are controlled by a couple of central pattern generators (CPG) which imitates neuronal system in the spinal cord of mammals. The CPG controller modeled by 18 oscillators which have the sensory feedbacks and generates the joint torques to move the skeletal model of the coupled human-orthosis. This means that we use five actuators for controlling orthosis in the both of sagittal and frontal plane. The parameters of the CPG and the connecting gains are optimized by using a genetic algorithm. We have achieved the successful simulation of stable walking against disturbances with this model. The simulation results indicate the possibility of a practical assistive orthosis with five active joints for stable walking.

  17. Computer simulation to aid the risk assessment of wheelchair and special seating systems used in transport.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P D; Gibson, C; Wilcox, S J; Chong, A

    2009-01-01

    The crashworthiness of occupied proprietary wheelchairs, which are transported in motor vehicles, is currently assessed by physical crash testing in accordance with ISO 7176-19. If such wheelchairs are modified to meet the needs of the occupant, e.g. the addition of special seating, environmental control systems or life support equipment, then those making the modifications take on the manufacturer's responsibilities, one of these being the assessment of the modified wheelchair's ability to withstand vehicle crash forces. Destructively testing bespoke wheelchair designs is not practical so, currently, the transport-related risk is assessed using best engineering judgement. To improve this process virtual crash testing of the wheelchair and occupant was used. A modified crash criteria from ISO 7176-19 is proposed to enable assessment of the wheelchair's crashworthiness and provide the clinical engineer with an informed judgement of how both wheelchair alone and occupant and wheelchair together will behave in a crash.

  18. Influence of wheelchair front caster wheel on reverse directional stability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songfeng; Cooper, Rory A; Corfman, Tom; Ding, Dan; Grindle, Garrett

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study directional stability during reversing of rear-wheel drive, electric powered wheelchairs (EPW) under different initial front caster orientations. Specifically, the weight distribution differences caused by certain initial caster orientations were examined as a possible mechanism for causing directional instability that could lead to accidents. Directional stability was quantified by measuring the drive direction error of the EPW by a motion analysis system. The ground reaction forces were collected to determine the load on the front casters, as well as back-emf data to attain the speed of the motors. The drive direction error was found to be different for various initial caster orientations. Drive direction error was greatest when both casters were oriented 90 degrees to the left or right, and least when both casters were oriented forward. The results show that drive direction error corresponds to the loading difference on the casters. The data indicates that loading differences may cause asymmetric drag on the casters, which in turn causes unbalanced torque load on the motors. This leads to a difference in motor speed and drive direction error.

  19. Optimal dye concentration and power density for laser-assisted vascular anatomosis (LAVA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhen; Furnary, Anthony; Xie, Hua; Lagerquist, Kathryn A.; Burke, Allen; Prahl, Scott A.; Gregory, Kenton W.

    2003-06-01

    Laser tissue welding with albumin solder/indocyanine green (ICG) dye is an effective technique in surgical reconstruction. This study was carried out in vitro to find optimal ICG concentration and power density (PD) in laser assisted vascular anastomosis (LAVA). Fresh porcine carotid arteries incised into vascular strips (n = 120) were welded by diode laser in end-to-end with 50% albumin solder of 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mM ICG and at power density of 27.7, 56.7, and 76.9 W/cm2. Direct temperature was measured by inserting thermocouples outside and inside vessel. Tensile strength was tested immediately and histological study was performed. Temperature (both outside and inside vessel) significantly gradually decreasd (p < 0.01) with the increasing of ICG concentration at PD 56.7 W/cm2. Tensile strength significantly gradually decreased (p < 0.01) with increasing of ICG concentration at PD 56.7 W/cm2. Histological study showed minimal thermal injury limited to adventitia of vessels and no appreciable difference in all groups. We find that ICG concentration within solder is most important factor affecting both tissue temperature and tensile strength during laser vessel welding. The optimal balance between stronger strength and minimal thermal injury of vessel may be achieved primarily by using PD 56.7 W/cm2 at 0.01 mM ICG within solder during LAVA.

  20. DNA detection on a power-free microchip with laminar flow-assisted dendritic amplification.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kazuo; Sato, Takahiro; Sato, Yasunobu; Maeda, Mizuo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we describe DNA detection experiments using our two original technologies, power-free microchip and laminar flow-assisted dendritic amplification (LFDA), which were previously applied to immunoassays. A microchip was fabricated by combining a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) part having microchannel patterns and a glass plate modified with probe DNA. We carried out two kinds of experiments: the detection of 21-base biotinylated target DNA and the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in 56-base unlabeled target DNA by sandwich hybridization with biotinylated probe DNA. For both of the experiments, the necessary solutions were injected into microchannels not by an external power source, but by air dissolution into the PDMS part. After a hybridization reaction, the LFDA was started by injecting FITC-labeled streptavidin and biotinylated anti-streptavidin antibody onto the reaction site. With a detection time of 20 min, the limit of detection (LOD) for the biotinylated target was 2.2 pM, and the LOD for the SNP was 10-30 pM, depending on the SNP type.

  1. Respondent driven sampling of wheelchair users: A lack of traction?

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, John A.; Schluter, Philip J.; Hay-Smith, E. Jean C.; Snell, Deborah L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Internationally, wheelchair users are an emerging demographic phenomenon, due to their increased prevalence and rapidly increasing life-span. While having significant healthcare implications, basic robust epidemiological information about wheelchair users is often lacking due, in part, to this population’s ‘hidden’ nature. Increasingly popular in epidemiological research, Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) provides a mechanism for generating unbiased population-based estimates for hard-to-reach populations, overcoming biases inherent within other sampling methods. This paper reports the first published study to employ RDS amongst wheelchair users. Methods: Between October 2015 and January 2016, a short, successfully piloted, internet-based national survey was initiated. Twenty seeds from diverse organisations were invited to complete the survey then circulate it to peers within their networks following a well-defined protocol. A predetermined reminder protocol was triggered when seeds or their peers failed to respond. All participants were entered into a draw for an iPad. Results: Overall, 19 people participated (nine women); 12 initial seeds, followed by seven second-wave participants arising from four seeds . Completion time for the survey ranged between 7 and 36 minutes. Despite repeated reminders, no further people were recruited. Discussion: While New Zealand wheelchair user numbers are unknown, an estimated 14% of people have physical impairments that limited mobility. The 19 respondents generated from adopting the RDS methodology here thus represents a negligible fraction of wheelchair users in New Zealand, and an insufficient number to ensure equilibrium required for unbiased analyses. While successful in other hard-to-reach populations, applying RDS methodology to wheelchair users requires further consideration. Formative research exploring areas of network characteristics, acceptability of RDS, appropriate incentive options, and seed

  2. 49 CFR 37.91 - Wheelchair locations and food service on intercity rail trains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wheelchair locations and food service on intercity... Entities § 37.91 Wheelchair locations and food service on intercity rail trains. (a) As soon as practicable... on each train a number of spaces— (1) To park wheelchairs (to accommodate individuals who wish...

  3. 49 CFR 37.91 - Wheelchair locations and food service on intercity rail trains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wheelchair locations and food service on intercity... Entities § 37.91 Wheelchair locations and food service on intercity rail trains. (a) As soon as practicable... on each train a number of spaces— (1) To park wheelchairs (to accommodate individuals who wish...

  4. Wheelchair Use among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Prevalence and Risk Factors in a National Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Philippa; Colantonio, Angela

    2005-01-01

    Older adults are the largest group of wheelchair users yet there are no peer-reviewed studies on the national profile of older wheelchair users in Canada. We investigated the characteristics of wheelchair users in a national sample of community-dwelling older adults from the Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA-2). Questions on the use of…

  5. Aerobic, Anaerobic, and Skill Performance with Regard to Classification in Wheelchair Rugby Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Kosmol, Andrzej; Molik, Bartosz; Yilla, Abu B.; Laskin, James J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the sport-specific performance of wheelchair rugby players with regard to their classification. A group of 30 male athletes from the Polish Wheelchair Rugby League participated in the study. The seven International Wheelchair Rugby Federation classes were collapsed into four groups. Standardized measures of…

  6. 49 CFR 37.91 - Wheelchair locations and food service on intercity rail trains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... on each train a number of spaces— (1) To park wheelchairs (to accommodate individuals who wish to... providing intercity rail service shall provide on each train a number of spaces— (1) To park wheelchairs (to... providing intercity rail service may not provide more than two spaces to park wheelchairs nor more than...

  7. The Role of Parents and Caregivers in Providing Safe Transportation for Occupants Seated in Wheelchairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Lawrence W.; Manary, Miriam; Bertocci, Gina

    2007-01-01

    The responsibility for providing safe transportation for travelers seated in wheelchairs is shared by many stakeholders, including wheelchair and tiedown/restraint manufacturers, vehicle modifiers and equipment installers, transit providers, rehabilitation technology suppliers, wheelchair/seating clinicians, and even informed and responsible…

  8. Relationship between Functional Classification Levels and Anaerobic Performance of Wheelchair Basketball Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molik, Bartosz; Laskin, James J.; Kosmol, Andrzej; Skucas, Kestas; Bida, Urszula

    2010-01-01

    Wheelchair basketball athletes are classified using the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF) functional classification system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between upper extremity anaerobic performance (AnP) and all functional classification levels in wheelchair basketball. Ninety-seven male athletes…

  9. Lower-Energy Requirements for Power-Assist HEV Energy Storage Systems--Analysis and Rationale (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-03-18

    Presented at the 27th International Battery Seminar and Exhibit, 15-18 March 2010, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. NREL conducted simulations and analysis of vehicle test data with research partners in response to a USABC request; results suggest that power-assist hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), like conventional HEVs, can achieve high fuel savings with lower energy requirements at potentially lower cost.

  10. NASA Research Announcement Phase 2 Final Report for the Development of a Power Assisted Space Suit Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingo, Robert; Cadogan, Dave; Sanner, Rob; Sorenson, Beth

    1997-01-01

    The main goal of this program was to develop an unobtrusive power-assisted EVA glove metacarpalphalangeal (MCP) joint that could provide the crew member with as close to nude body performance as possible, and to demonstrate the technology feasibility of power assisted space suit components in general. The MCP joint was selected due to its being representative of other space suit joints, such as the shoulder, hip and carpometacarpal joint, that would also greatly benefit from this technology. In order to meet this objective, a development team of highly skilled and experienced personnel was assembled. The team consisted of two main entities. The first was comprised of ILC's experienced EVA space suit glove designers, who had the responsibility of designing and fabricating a low torque MCP joint which would be compatible with power assisted technology. The second part of the team consisted of space robotics experts from the University of Maryland's Space Systems Laboratory. This team took on the responsibility of designing and building the robotics aspects of the power-assist system. Both parties addressed final system integration responsibilities.

  11. Clinical evaluation of semiautonomous smart wheelchair architecture (Drive-Safe System) with visually impaired individuals.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinod; Simpson, Richard C; LoPresti, Edmund F; Schmeler, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Nonambulatory, visually impaired individuals mostly rely on caregivers for their day-to-day mobility needs. The Drive-Safe System (DSS) is a modular, semiautonomous smart wheelchair system aimed at providing independent mobility to people with visual and mobility impairments. In this project, clinical evaluation of the DSS was performed in a controlled laboratory setting with individuals who have visual impairment but no mobility impairment. Their performance using DSS was compared with their performance using a standard cane for navigation assistance. Participants rated their subjective appraisal of the DSS by using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index inventory. DSS significantly reduced the number and severity of collisions compared with using a cane alone and without increasing the time required to complete the task. Users rated DSS favorably; they experienced less physical demand when using the DSS, but did not feel any difference in perceived effort, mental demand, and level of frustration when using the DSS alone or along with a cane in comparison with using a cane alone. These findings suggest that the DSS can be a safe, reliable, and easy-to-learn and operate independent mobility solution for visually impaired wheelchair users.

  12. Sports Injuries in Wheelchair Rugby – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bauerfeind, Joanna; Koper, Magdalena; Wieczorek, Jacek; Urbański, Piotr; Tasiemski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze etiology and the incidence of sports injuries among wheelchair rugby players. Moreover, we verified if the levels of aggressiveness and anger presented by the athletes and their roles in the team influenced the incidence and severity of the injuries. The study involved 14 male players, members of the Polish National Wheelchair Rugby Team. During a 9-month period, the athletes participated in up to 9 training camps and 4 Wheelchair Rugby tournaments. The study was based on the Competitive Aggressiveness and Anger Scale, registry of sports injuries consulted and non-consulted with a physician and a demographic questionnaire. The following observations were made during the 9-month period corresponding to a mean of 25 training and tournament days: 1) wheelchair rugby players experienced primarily minor injuries (n=102) that did not require a medical intervention, 2) only four injuries needed to be consulted by a physician, 3) sports injuries occurred more frequently among offensive players than in defensive players, 4) offensive players showed a tendency to higher levels of anger and aggressiveness than defensive players. It can be concluded that wheelchair rugby is a discipline associated with a high incidence of minor injuries that do not require a medical intervention. The incidence rate of injuries during the analyzed period was 0.3 per athlete per training day. PMID:26834880

  13. An Investigation of Bilateral Symmetry During Manual Wheelchair Propulsion.

    PubMed

    Soltau, Shelby L; Slowik, Jonathan S; Requejo, Philip S; Mulroy, Sara J; Neptune, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    Studies of manual wheelchair propulsion often assume bilateral symmetry to simplify data collection, processing, and analysis. However, the validity of this assumption is unclear. Most investigations of wheelchair propulsion symmetry have been limited by a relatively small sample size and a focus on a single propulsion condition (e.g., level propulsion at self-selected speed). The purpose of this study was to evaluate bilateral symmetry during manual wheelchair propulsion in a large group of subjects across different propulsion conditions. Three-dimensional kinematics and handrim kinetics along with spatiotemporal variables were collected and processed from 80 subjects with paraplegia while propelling their wheelchairs on a stationary ergometer during three different conditions: level propulsion at their self-selected speed (free), level propulsion at their fastest comfortable speed (fast), and propulsion on an 8% grade at their level, self-selected speed (graded). All kinematic variables had significant side-to-side differences, primarily in the graded condition. Push angle was the only spatiotemporal variable with a significant side-to-side difference, and only during the graded condition. No kinetic variables had significant side-to-side differences. The magnitudes of the kinematic differences were low, with only one difference exceeding 5°. With differences of such small magnitude, the bilateral symmetry assumption appears to be reasonable during manual wheelchair propulsion in subjects without significant upper-extremity pain or impairment. However, larger asymmetries may exist in individuals with secondary injuries and pain in their upper extremity and different etiologies of their neurological impairment.

  14. A participatory approach to develop the Power Mobility Screening Tool and the Power Mobility Clinical Driving Assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Deepan C; Dicianno, Brad E; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-01-01

    The electric powered wheelchair (EPW) is an indispensable assistive device that increases participation among individuals with disabilities. However, due to lack of standardized assessment tools, developing evidence based training protocols for EPW users to improve driving skills has been a challenge. In this study, we adopt the principles of participatory research and employ qualitative methods to develop the Power Mobility Screening Tool (PMST) and Power Mobility Clinical Driving Assessment (PMCDA). Qualitative data from professional experts and expert EPW users who participated in a focus group and a discussion forum were used to establish content validity of the PMCDA and the PMST. These tools collectively could assess a user's current level of bodily function and their current EPW driving capacity. Further multicenter studies are necessary to evaluate the psychometric properties of these tests and develop EPW driving training protocols based on these assessment tools.

  15. A Participatory Approach to Develop the Power Mobility Screening Tool and the Power Mobility Clinical Driving Assessment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Kamaraj, Deepan C.; Dicianno, Brad E.; Cooper, Rory A.

    2014-01-01

    The electric powered wheelchair (EPW) is an indispensable assistive device that increases participation among individuals with disabilities. However, due to lack of standardized assessment tools, developing evidence based training protocols for EPW users to improve driving skills has been a challenge. In this study, we adopt the principles of participatory research and employ qualitative methods to develop the Power Mobility Screening Tool (PMST) and Power Mobility Clinical Driving Assessment (PMCDA). Qualitative data from professional experts and expert EPW users who participated in a focus group and a discussion forum were used to establish content validity of the PMCDA and the PMST. These tools collectively could assess a user's current level of bodily function and their current EPW driving capacity. Further multicenter studies are necessary to evaluate the psychometric properties of these tests and develop EPW driving training protocols based on these assessment tools. PMID:25276796

  16. Safety enhancement of a specialized power assisted tricycle for a child with osteogenesis imperfecta type III.

    PubMed

    Geu, Matthew J; Tuffner, Francis F; Madsen, Robert O; Harman, William M; Barrett, Steven F

    2005-01-01

    A child in the community of Laramie, Wyoming was born with Osteogenesis Imperfecta which is a genetic disorder that limits the physical abilities, size, and strength of the child. A customized power assisted tricycle was developed, which offered a unique opportunity to serve multiple purposes in his childhood development. This tricycle will ultimately provide him with the opportunity to gain muscle mass, strength, coordination, and confidence. The tricycle was completed as a senior design project in 2002, funded by the National Science Foundation, Biomedical Engineering Program and research to Aid Persons with Disabilities Program and University of Wyoming, College of Engineering Undergraduate Design Project to Aid Wyoming Persons with Disabilities. Unfortunately, the tricycle did not provide the necessary features to allow him to ride the tricycle safely. For this reason the tricycle was redesigned to include many different redundant safety systems which allows the tricycle to be safe for the child's use. Being funded by the same grant, new systems were added to the tricycle. A panic kill switch, automatic brakes, numerous redundant velocity sensors, tip over prevention circuitry, a redesigned operating system, a battery recharge port, and other systems were added, allowing for the tricycle to provide a high level of safety. A great deal of testing and sound design practices have been taken into consideration throughout the addition of these systems. Without these improvements, the child would not have the opportunity to use the tricycle to help with his development.

  17. Development of a powered mobile module for the ArmAssist home-based telerehabilitation platform.

    PubMed

    Jung, Je Hyung; Valencia, David B; Rodríguez-de-Pablo, Cristina; Keller, Thierry; Perry, Joel C

    2013-06-01

    The ArmAssist, developed by Tecnalia, is a system for at-home telerehabilitation of post-stroke arm impairments. It consists of a wireless mobile base module, a global position and orientation detection mat, a PC with display monitor, and a tele-rehabilitation software platform. This paper presents the recent development results on the mobile module augmenting its functionality by adding actuation components. Three DC servo motors were employed to drive the mobile module and a position control algorithm based on the kinematic model and velocity mode control was implemented such that the module tracks a path defined in the training software. Pilot tests of the powered mobile module were performed in experiments with different load conditions and two unimpaired subjects. Both test results show that the module is able to follow the predefined path within an acceptable error range for reach movement training. Further study and testing of the system in realistic conditions following stroke will be a future topic of research.

  18. Development, construct validity and test-retest reliability of a field-based wheelchair mobility performance test for wheelchair basketball.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Annemarie M H; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Berger, Monique A M; van der Slikke, Rienk M A; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Veeger, Dirkjan H E J

    2017-01-16

    The aim of this study was to develop and describe a wheelchair mobility performance test in wheelchair basketball and to assess its construct validity and reliability. To mimic mobility performance of wheelchair basketball matches in a standardised manner, a test was designed based on observation of wheelchair basketball matches and expert judgement. Forty-six players performed the test to determine its validity and 23 players performed the test twice for reliability. Independent-samples t-tests were used to assess whether the times needed to complete the test were different for classifications, playing standards and sex. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to quantify reliability of performance times. Males performed better than females (P < 0.001, effect size [ES] = -1.26) and international men performed better than national men (P < 0.001, ES = -1.62). Performance time of low (≤2.5) and high (≥3.0) classification players was borderline not significant with a moderate ES (P = 0.06, ES = 0.58). The reliability was excellent for overall performance time (ICC = 0.95). These results show that the test can be used as a standardised mobility performance test to validly and reliably assess the capacity in mobility performance of elite wheelchair basketball athletes. Furthermore, the described methodology of development is recommended for use in other sports to develop sport-specific tests.

  19. A case report of a severe musculoskeletal injury in a wheelchair user caused by an incorrect wheelchair ramp design.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Kelley, Angela R; Morton, Karrie; Gellman, Richard E; Berkey, Richard; Greene, Jill Amanda; Hill, Larry; Mears, Roy; Long, William B

    2010-02-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) gives all Americans with disabilities a chance to achieve the same quality of life that individuals without disabilities enjoy. In this case report, we will be discussing the consequences of having inaccessible ramps to persons with disabilities that can result in severe musculoskeletal injuries in a wheelchair user. While going down an inaccessible ramp in the garage of a hospital, a wheelchair tipped over, causing a fracture to the user's right femur. The injured patient was taken to the Emergency Department, where the diagnosis of a fracture of the right femur was made. The fracture then had to be repaired with an intramedullary rod under general anesthesia in the hospital. It was discovered that the ramps in the hospital garage did not comply with the guidelines of the ADA. The wheelchair ramps had a ramp run with a rise > 6 inches (150 mm) and a horizontal projection > 72 inches (1830 mm). This led to the redesign and construction of safe ramps for individuals using wheelchairs as well as for pedestrians using canes, within 1 month after the patient's injury, making it safe for wheelchair users as well as pedestrians using the parking facilities. The ADA specifies guidelines for safe ramps for patients with disabilities. It is important to ensure that hospital ramps comply with these guidelines.

  20. Motion analysis of wheelchair propulsion movements in hemiplegic patients: effect of a wheelchair cushion on suppressing posterior pelvic tilt.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Kyohei; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Takanashi, Akira; Miyazima, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Sumiko

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] This study sought to ascertain whether, in hemiplegic patients, the effect of a wheelchair cushion to suppress pelvic posterior tilt when initiating wheelchair propulsion would continue in subsequent propulsions. [Subjects] Eighteen hemiplegic patients who were able to propel a wheelchair in a seated position participated in this study. [Methods] An adjustable wheelchair was fitted with a cushion that had an anchoring function, and a thigh pad on the propulsion side was removed. Propulsion movements from the seated position without moving through three propulsion cycles were measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system, and electromyography was used to determine the angle of pelvic posterior tilt, muscle activity of the biceps femoris long head, and propulsion speed. [Results] Pelvic posterior tilt could be suppressed through the three propulsion cycles, which served to increase propulsion speed. Muscle activity of the biceps femoris long head was highest when initiating propulsion and decreased thereafter. [Conclusion] The effect of the wheelchair cushion on suppressing pelvic posterior tilt continued through three propulsion cycles.

  1. VARIABILITY OF PEAK SHOULDER FORCE DURING WHEELCHAIR PROPULSION IN MANUAL WHEELCHAIR USERS WITH AND WITHOUT SHOULDER PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Y.; Chandrasekaran, J.; Hsu, I.M.K.; Rice, I.M.; Hsiao-Wecksler, E.T.; Sosnoff, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Manual wheelchair users report a high prevalence of shoulder pain. Growing evidence shows that variability in forces applied to biological tissue is related to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the variability of forces acting on the shoulder during wheelchair propulsion as a function of shoulder pain. Methods Twenty-four manual wheelchair users (13 with pain, 11 without pain) participated in the investigation. Kinetic and kinematic data of wheelchair propulsion were recorded for three minutes maintaining a constant speed at three distinct propulsion speeds (fast speed of 1.1 m/s, a self-selected speed, and a slow speed of 0.7 m/s). Peak resultant shoulder forces in the push phase were calculated using inverse dynamics. Within individual variability was quantified as the coefficient of variation of cycle to cycle peak resultant forces. Findings There was no difference in mean peak shoulder resultant force between groups. The pain group had significantly smaller variability of peak resultant force than the no pain group (p < 0.01, η2 = 0.18). Interpretation The observations raise the possibility that propulsion variability could be a novel marker of upper limb pain in manual wheelchair users. PMID:24210512

  2. Time and Effort Required by Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Learn to Use a Powered Exoskeleton for Assisted Walking

    PubMed Central

    Bryce, Thomas N.; Dijkers, Marcel P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Powered exoskeletons have been demonstrated as being safe for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), but little is known about how users learn to manage these devices. Objective: To quantify the time and effort required by persons with SCI to learn to use an exoskeleton for assisted walking. Methods: A convenience sample was enrolled to learn to use the first-generation Ekso powered exoskeleton to walk. Participants were given up to 24 weekly sessions of instruction. Data were collected on assistance level, walking distance and speed, heart rate, perceived exertion, and adverse events. Time and effort was quantified by the number of sessions required for participants to stand up, walk for 30 minutes, and sit down, initially with minimal and subsequently with contact guard assistance. Results: Of 22 enrolled participants, 9 screen-failed, and 7 had complete data. All of these 7 were men; 2 had tetraplegia and 5 had motor-complete injuries. Of these, 5 participants could stand, walk, and sit with contact guard or close supervision assistance, and 2 required minimal to moderate assistance. Walk times ranged from 28 to 94 minutes with average speeds ranging from 0.11 to 0.21 m/s. For all participants, heart rate changes and reported perceived exertion were consistent with light to moderate exercise. Conclusion: This study provides preliminary evidence that persons with neurological weakness due to SCI can learn to walk with little or no assistance and light to somewhat hard perceived exertion using a powered exoskeleton. Persons with different severities of injury, including those with motor complete C7 tetraplegia and motor incomplete C4 tetraplegia, may be able to learn to use this device. PMID:26364280

  3. Design intelligent wheelchair with ECG measurement and wireless transmission function.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsi-Chiang; Wang, Yi-Ming; Chang, Huai-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of aging populations has produced widespread health awareness and magnified the need for improved medical quality and technologies. Statistics show that ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death for older people and people with reduced mobility; therefore, wheelchairs have become their primary means of transport. Hence, an arrhythmia-detecting smart wheelchair was proposed in this study to provide real-time electrocardiography (ECG)-monitoring to patients with heart disease and reduced mobility. A self-developed, handheld ECG-sensing instrument was integrated with a wheelchair and a lab-written, arrhythmia-detecting program. The measured ECG data were transmitted through a Wi-Fi module and analyzed and diagnosed using the human-machine interface.

  4. Valid detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving with two accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Kooijmans, H; Horemans, H L D; Stam, H J; Bussmann, J B J

    2014-11-01

    This study assessed whether self-propelled wheelchair driving can be validly detected by a new method using a set of two commonly used accelerometers.In a rehabilitation centre, 10 wheelchair-bound persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) (aged 29-63 years) performed a series of representative daily activities according to a protocol including self-propelled wheelchair driving and other activities. Two ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers were used; one was attached at the wrist, the other to the spokes of the wheelchair wheel. Based on the movement intensity of the two accelerometers, a custom-made algorithm in MatLab differentiated between self-propelled wheelchair driving and other activities (e.g. being pushed or arm movements not related to wheelchair driving). Video recordings were used for reference. Validity scores between the accelerometer output and the video analyses were expressed in terms of agreement, sensitivity and specificity scores.Overall agreement for the detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving was 85%; sensitivity was 88% and specificity 83%. Disagreement between accelerometer output and video analysis was largest for wheelchair driving at very low speed on a treadmill, wheelchair driving on a slope on a treadmill, and being pushed in the wheelchair whilst making excessive arm movements.Valid detection of self-propelled wheelchair driving is provided by two accelerometers and a simple algorithm. Disagreement with the video analysis was largest during three atypical daily activities.

  5. Design and Experimental Verification of Vibration Suppression Device on the Lift of Wheelchair-accessible Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Yasuyoshi; Takahashi, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the number of wheelchair-accessible vehicles has increased with the aging of the population. Such vehicles are effective in reducing the burden on caregivers because the wheelchair user does not have to move from his/her wheelchair to a seat of the vehicle. Wheelchair-accessible vehicles are expected to be widely used in the future. However, wheelchair users have reported poor ride comfort. It is thus necessary to suppress the vibration of the vehicle considering the wheelchair user. We designed a passive damping device on the lift of wheelchair-accessible vehicles to improve the ride comfort for wheelchair users. The vibration due to road disturbances reaches the wheelchair user's body through the vehicle and wheelchair. Our control device decreases the acceleration of the torso and improves the ride comfort by ensuring that the frequency of the vibration reaching the wheelchair user differs from the resonance frequency band of the acceleration of the torso, which is the body part that feels the most discomfort. The effectiveness of the control device is verified experimentally.

  6. Variability in Wheelchair Propulsion: A New Window into an Old Problem

    PubMed Central

    Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Rice, Ian M.; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T.; Hsu, Iris M. K.; Jayaraman, Chandrasekaran; Moon, Yaejin

    2015-01-01

    Manual wheelchair users are at great risk for the development of upper extremity injury and pain. Any loss of upper limb function due to pain adversely impacts the independence and mobility of manual wheelchair users. There is growing theoretical and empirical evidence that fluctuations in movement (i.e., motor variability) are related to musculoskeletal pain. This perspectives paper discusses a local review on several investigations examining the association between variability in wheelchair propulsion and shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users. The experimental data reviewed highlights that the variability of wheelchair propulsion is impacted by shoulder pain in manual wheelchair users. We maintain that inclusion of these metrics in future research on wheelchair propulsion and upper limb pain may yield novel data. Several promising avenues for future research based on this collective work are discussed. PMID:26284239

  7. Brain-Computer Interface for Control of Wheelchair Using Fuzzy Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Abiyev, Rahib H; Akkaya, Nurullah; Aytac, Ersin; Günsel, Irfan; Çağman, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The design of brain-computer interface for the wheelchair for physically disabled people is presented. The design of the proposed system is based on receiving, processing, and classification of the electroencephalographic (EEG) signals and then performing the control of the wheelchair. The number of experimental measurements of brain activity has been done using human control commands of the wheelchair. Based on the mental activity of the user and the control commands of the wheelchair, the design of classification system based on fuzzy neural networks (FNN) is considered. The design of FNN based algorithm is used for brain-actuated control. The training data is used to design the system and then test data is applied to measure the performance of the control system. The control of the wheelchair is performed under real conditions using direction and speed control commands of the wheelchair. The approach used in the paper allows reducing the probability of misclassification and improving the control accuracy of the wheelchair.

  8. Preliminary reliability and internal consistency of the Wheelchair Components Questionnaire for Condition.

    PubMed

    Rispin, Karen; Dittmer, Melanie; McLean, Jessica; Wee, Joy

    2017-01-19

    Wheelchair durability and maintenance condition are key factors of wheelchair function. Durability studies done with double drum and drop testers, although valuable, do not perfectly imitate conditions of use. Durability may be harvested from clinical records; however, these may be inconsistent because protocols for recording information differ from place to place. Wheelchair professionals with several years of experience often develop a good eye for wheelchair maintenance condition. The Wheelchair Components Questionnaire for Condition (WCQc) was developed as a professional report questionnaire to provide data specifically on the maintenance condition of a wheelchair. The goal of this study was to obtain preliminary test-retest reliability and internal consistency for the WCQc. Participants were a convenience sample of wheelchair professionals who self-reported more than two years' of wheelchair experience, and completed the WCQc on the same wheelchair twice. Results indicated preliminary reliability and internal consistency for domain related questions and the entire questionnaire. Implications for rehabilitation The WCQc, if administered routinely at regular intervals, can be used to monitor wheelchair condition and alert users and health professionals about the need for repair or replacement. The WCQc is not difficult to use, making early monitoring for wear or damage more feasible. The earlier a tool can detect need for maintenance, the higher likelihood that appropriate measures may be employed in a timely fashion to maximize the overall durability of wheelchairs and minimize clinical complications. Keeping wheelchairs appropriately maintained allows users to minimize effort expended when using them, and maximize their function. It also lowers the risk of injury due to component failure. When assessing groups of similar wheelchairs, organizations involved in funding wheelchairs can use data from the WCQc to make purchase decisions based on durability, and

  9. Wearable EEG headband using printed electrodes and powered by energy harvesting for emotion monitoring in ambient assisted living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiko, Joseph W.; Wei, Yang; Torah, Russel; Grabham, Neil; Paul, Gordon; Beeby, Stephen; Tudor, John

    2015-12-01

    Globally, human life expectancy is steadily increasing causing an increase in the elderly population and consequently increased costs of supporting them. Ambient assisted living is an active research area aimed at supporting elderly people to live independently in their preferred living environment. This paper presents the design and testing of a self-powered wearable headband for electroencephalogram (EEG) based detection of emotions allowing the evaluation of the quality of life of assisted people. Printed active electrode fabrication and testing is discussed followed by the design of an energy harvester for powering the headband. The results show that the fabricated electrodes have similar performance to commercial electrodes and that the electronics embedded into the headband, as well as the wireless sensor node used for processing the EEG, can be powered by energy harvested from solar panels integrated on the headband. An average real time emotion classification accuracy of 90 (±9) % was obtained from 12 subjects. The results show that the self-powered wearable headband presented in this paper can be used to measure the wellbeing of assisted people with good accuracy.

  10. Commanding a robotic wheelchair with a high-frequency steady-state visual evoked potential based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Diez, Pablo F; Torres Müller, Sandra M; Mut, Vicente A; Laciar, Eric; Avila, Enrique; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano Freire; Sarcinelli-Filho, Mário

    2013-08-01

    This work presents a brain-computer interface (BCI) used to operate a robotic wheelchair. The experiments were performed on 15 subjects (13 of them healthy). The BCI is based on steady-state visual-evoked potentials (SSVEP) and the stimuli flickering are performed at high frequency (37, 38, 39 and 40 Hz). This high frequency stimulation scheme can reduce or even eliminate visual fatigue, allowing the user to achieve a stable performance for long term BCI operation. The BCI system uses power-spectral density analysis associated to three bipolar electroencephalographic channels. As the results show, 2 subjects were reported as SSVEP-BCI illiterates (not able to use the BCI), and, consequently, 13 subjects (12 of them healthy) could navigate the wheelchair in a room with obstacles arranged in four distinct configurations. Volunteers expressed neither discomfort nor fatigue due to flickering stimulation. A transmission rate of up to 72.5 bits/min was obtained, with an average of 44.6 bits/min in four trials. These results show that people could effectively navigate a robotic wheelchair using a SSVEP-based BCI with high frequency flickering stimulation.

  11. Physical performance and cardiovascular and metabolic adaptation of elite female wheelchair basketball players in wheelchair ergometry and in competition.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A; Huonker, M; Stober, P; Barturen, J M; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Dürr, H; Völpel, H J; Keul, J

    1998-01-01

    Spinal cord injury leads to a pronounced reduction of cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic ability. Physical activity, up to and including high-performance sports, has obtained importance in the course of rehabilitation and the postclinical phase. Thirteen elite female wheelchair basketball players from the German National Basketball Team and 10 female sedentary spinal cord-injured persons were examined in the study. Heart volume was measured by an echocardiography. All subjects underwent a graded exercise test on a wheelchair ergometer. Additionally, heart rate, lactate, and player points were measured during a competitive basketball game in wheelchair basketball players. Cardiac dimensions were larger for spinal cord-injured wheelchair basketball players (620.3 ml; 9.6 ml x kg(-1)) in comparison with spinal cord-injured persons (477.4 ml; 8.2 ml x kg(-1)) but did not exceed the heart volume of untrained nonhandicapped persons. In contrast, athletes with amputations or those having had poliomyelitis reached training-induced cardiac hypertrophy in relation to body mass (713.7 ml; 13.2 ml x kg(-1)), as observed in nonhandicapped athletes. During graded wheelchair ergometry, wheelchair basketball players showed a higher maximal work rate (59.9 v 45.5 W), maximal oxygen consumption (33.7 v 18.3 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1)), and maximal lactate (9.1 v 5.47 mmol x l(-1)) without a difference in maximal heart rate and workload at AT4 than did spinal cord-injured persons. The average heart rate during the wheelchair basketball game was 151 x min(-1), and the lactate concentration was 1.92 mmol x l(-1). Female athletes with a less severe handicap and higher maximal oxygen consumption during the graded exercise test reached a higher game level in the evaluation. During the competitive basketball game, high cardiovascular stress was observed, indicating a fast aerobic metabolism; the anaerobic lactic acid capacity played a subordinate role. Wheelchair basketball is an

  12. Multimodality gynecomastia repair by cross-chest power-assisted superficial liposuction combined with endoscopic-assisted pull-through excision.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Ytzhack; Fodor, Lucian; Peled, Isaac J; Eldor, Liron; Egozi, Dana; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Numerous methods of gynecomastia repair have been described to accomplish removal of breast tissue. Our multimodality surgical approach for the treatment of gynecomastia combines the use of power-assisted superficial cross-chest liposuction with direct pull-through excision of the breast parenchyma under endoscopic supervision. Seventeen patients, aging 17-39, underwent this multimodality approach. According to Simon's grading, 3 patients had grade 1, 5 had grade 2a, 6 had grade 2b, and 3 had grade 3 gynecomastia. Power-assisted liposuction was performed with a 3- or 4-mm triple-hole cannula inserted through the contralateral periareolar medial incision to suction the contralateral prepectoral fatty breast. At the end of the liposuction, the fibrous tissue was easily pulled through the ipsilateral stab wound and excised under endoscopic control. Follow-up time ranged from 6 to 34 months. The amount of fat removed by liposuction varied from 100-800 mL per breast, and the amount of breast parenchyma removed by excision varied from 20-110 g. All patients recovered remarkably well. No complications were recorded. All patients were satisfied with their results. This technique enables an effective treatment of both the fatty and fibrous tissue of the male breast and avoids skin redundancy due to skin contraction. A smooth masculine breast contour is consistently achieved without the stigma of this type of surgery.

  13. The Power of Peers in Employee Assistance: A Unique Program for a Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Marcia D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Red Deer College employee assistance program "Resources for Employee Assistance, Counselling and Health (REACH)" which has moved beyond this traditional approach to become an autonomous program run by employees for employees. Notes REACH is concerned with job performance and coping skills that contribute to individual and…

  14. Lightweight Regulated Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Power-supply circuit regulates output voltage by adjusting frequency of chopper circuit according to variations. Currently installed in battery charger for electric wheelchair, circuit is well suited to other uses in which light weight is important - for example, in portable computers, radios, and test instruments.

  15. Effect of wheelchair frame material on users' mechanical work and transmitted vibration.

    PubMed

    Chénier, Félix; Aissaoui, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    Wheelchair propulsion exposes the user to a high risk of shoulder injury and to whole-body vibration that exceeds recommendations of ISO 2631-1:1997. Reducing the mechanical work required to travel a given distance (WN-WPM, weight-normalized work-per-meter) can help reduce the risk of shoulder injury, while reducing the vibration transmissibility (VT) of the wheelchair frame can reduce whole-body vibration. New materials such as titanium and carbon are used in today's wheelchairs and are advertised to improve both parameters, but current knowledge on this matter is limited. In this study, WN-WPM and VT were measured simultaneously and compared between six folding wheelchairs (1 titanium, 1 carbon, and 4 aluminium). Ten able-bodied users propelled the six wheelchairs on three ground surfaces. Although no significant difference of WN-WPM was found between wheelchairs (P < 0.1), significant differences of VT were found (P < 0.05). The carbon wheelchair had the lowest VT. Contrarily to current belief, the titanium wheelchair VT was similar to aluminium wheelchairs. A negative correlation between VT and WN-WPM was found, which means that reducing VT may be at the expense of increasing WN-WPM. Based on our results, use of carbon in wheelchair construction seems promising to reduce VT without increasing WN-WPM.

  16. Effect of Wheelchair Frame Material on Users' Mechanical Work and Transmitted Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Aissaoui, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    Wheelchair propulsion exposes the user to a high risk of shoulder injury and to whole-body vibration that exceeds recommendations of ISO 2631-1:1997. Reducing the mechanical work required to travel a given distance (WN-WPM, weight-normalized work-per-meter) can help reduce the risk of shoulder injury, while reducing the vibration transmissibility (VT) of the wheelchair frame can reduce whole-body vibration. New materials such as titanium and carbon are used in today's wheelchairs and are advertised to improve both parameters, but current knowledge on this matter is limited. In this study, WN-WPM and VT were measured simultaneously and compared between six folding wheelchairs (1 titanium, 1 carbon, and 4 aluminium). Ten able-bodied users propelled the six wheelchairs on three ground surfaces. Although no significant difference of WN-WPM was found between wheelchairs (P < 0.1), significant differences of VT were found (P < 0.05). The carbon wheelchair had the lowest VT. Contrarily to current belief, the titanium wheelchair VT was similar to aluminium wheelchairs. A negative correlation between VT and WN-WPM was found, which means that reducing VT may be at the expense of increasing WN-WPM. Based on our results, use of carbon in wheelchair construction seems promising to reduce VT without increasing WN-WPM. PMID:25276802

  17. Characterization of wheelchair maneuvers based on noisy inertial sensor data: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jicheng; Liu, Tao; Jones, Maria; Qian, Gang; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2014-01-01

    A wheelchair user's activity and mobility level is an important indicator of his/her quality of life and health status. To assess the activity and mobility level, wheelchair maneuvering data must be captured and analyzed. Recently, the inertial sensors, such as accelerometers, have been used to collect wheelchair maneuvering data. However, these sensors are sensitive to noises, which can lead to inaccurate analysis results. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of wheelchair maneuvering data and developed a novel machine-learning algorithm, which could classify wheelchair maneuvering data into a series of wheelchair maneuvers. The use of machine-learning techniques empowers our approach to tolerate noises by capturing the patterns of wheelchair maneuvers. Experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm could accurately classify wheelchair maneuvers into eight classes, i.e., stationary, linear acceleration/deceleration, linear constant speed, left/right turns, and left/right spot turns. The fine-grained analysis on wheelchair maneuvering data can depict a more comprehensive picture of wheelchair users' activity and mobility levels, and enable the quantitative analysis of their quality of life and health status.

  18. Multidimensional Self-Efficacy and Affect in Wheelchair Basketball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, variables grounded in social cognitive theory with athletes with disabilities were examined. Performance, training, resiliency, and thought control self-efficacy, and positive (PA) and negative (NA) affect were examined with wheelchair basketball athletes (N = 79). Consistent with social cognitive theory, weak to strong…

  19. Wheelchair Athletes Need Special Treatment--But Only for Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Terry

    1986-01-01

    Disabled athletes now compete in many sports, but many physicians don't know what opportunities for sports participation are available for disabled people. Research into injuries is needed because wheelchair athletes have different needs in terms of injury management and rehabilitation. Resources for physicians are listed. (Author/MT)

  20. Promoting Independence for Wheelchair Users: The Role of Home Accommodations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Susan; Resnik, Linda; Roy, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this research is to investigate whether home accommodations influence the amount of human help provided to a nationally representative sample of adults who use wheelchairs. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from the Adult Disability Follow-back Survey (DFS), Phase II, of the Disability Supplement to the 1994-1995…

  1. 21 CFR 890.3880 - Special grade wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special grade wheelchair. 890.3880 Section 890.3880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3880 Special...

  2. 21 CFR 890.3890 - Stair-climbing wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stair-climbing wheelchair. 890.3890 Section 890.3890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3890...

  3. 21 CFR 890.3880 - Special grade wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special grade wheelchair. 890.3880 Section 890.3880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3880 Special...

  4. 21 CFR 890.3890 - Stair-climbing wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stair-climbing wheelchair. 890.3890 Section 890.3890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3890...

  5. 21 CFR 890.3890 - Stair-climbing wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stair-climbing wheelchair. 890.3890 Section 890.3890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3890...

  6. 21 CFR 890.3880 - Special grade wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special grade wheelchair. 890.3880 Section 890.3880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3880 Special...

  7. Student Attitudes toward Intimacy with Persons Who Are Wheelchair Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; Chan, Roy; Feist, Amber; Flores-Torres, Lelia

    2011-01-01

    The present study explored whether students would be attracted to having an intimate relationship with a wheelchair user if participants were able to first see a head shot photo and later read a short biography of the person. Four hundred and eight undergraduate students were surveyed regarding their interest in potentially being friends, dating…

  8. 21 CFR 890.3890 - Stair-climbing wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stair-climbing wheelchair. 890.3890 Section 890.3890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3890...

  9. 21 CFR 890.3880 - Special grade wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special grade wheelchair. 890.3880 Section 890.3880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3880 Special...

  10. 21 CFR 890.3890 - Stair-climbing wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stair-climbing wheelchair. 890.3890 Section 890.3890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3890...

  11. 21 CFR 890.3880 - Special grade wheelchair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special grade wheelchair. 890.3880 Section 890.3880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3880 Special...

  12. Principles and Practices for Championship Performances in Wheelchair Track Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Practical Pointers, 1979

    1979-01-01

    The booklet discusses training methods and approaches for wheelchair track and field. Detailed information and charts are presented on types of workouts (such as interval, distance, rhythm, speed play, and pace work) and mechanics of track events. A section on relay strategy and coaching approaches concludes the document. (CL)

  13. Patterns of shoulder muscle coordination vary between wheelchair propulsion techniques.

    PubMed

    Qi, Liping; Wakeling, James; Grange, Simon; Ferguson-Pell, Martin

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated changes in the coordination patterns of shoulder muscles and wheelchair kinetics with different propulsion techniques by comparing wheelchair users' self-selected propulsion patterns with a semicircular pattern adopted after instruction. Wheelchair kinetics data were recorded by Smart(Wheel) on an ergometer, while EMG activity of seven muscles was recorded with surface electrodes on 15 able-bodied inexperienced participants. The performance data in two sessions, first using a self-selected and then the learned semicircular pattern, were compared with a paired t-test. Muscle coordination patterns across seven muscles were analyzed by principal component analysis. The semicircular pattern was characterized by significantly lower push frequency, significantly longer push length, push duration and push distance (p < 0.05, all cases) without a significant increase in push force, when compared with the self-selected pattern. In addition, our results show that in the semicircular propulsion technique, synergistic muscles were recruited in distinct phases and displayed a clearer separation between activities in the push phase and recovery phase muscles. An instruction session in semicircular propulsion technique is recommended for the initial use of a wheelchair after an injury.

  14. Temporal Parameters Estimation for Wheelchair Propulsion Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Manoela; Ding, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Due to lower limb paralysis, individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) rely on their upper limbs for mobility. The prevalence of upper extremity pain and injury is high among this population. We evaluated the performance of three triaxis accelerometers placed on the upper arm, wrist, and under the wheelchair, to estimate temporal parameters of wheelchair propulsion. Twenty-six participants with SCI were asked to push their wheelchair equipped with a SMARTWheel. The estimated stroke number was compared with the criterion from video observations and the estimated push frequency was compared with the criterion from the SMARTWheel. Mean absolute errors (MAE) and mean absolute percentage of error (MAPE) were calculated. Intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the agreement. Results showed reasonable accuracies especially using the accelerometer placed on the upper arm where the MAPE was 8.0% for stroke number and 12.9% for push frequency. The ICC was 0.994 for stroke number and 0.916 for push frequency. The wrist and seat accelerometer showed lower accuracy with a MAPE for the stroke number of 10.8% and 13.4% and ICC of 0.990 and 0.984, respectively. Results suggested that accelerometers could be an option for monitoring temporal parameters of wheelchair propulsion. PMID:25105133

  15. Relationship of Physiological Parameters and Achievement in Wheelchair Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Judith A.

    The relationship between achievement in track and field events (60, 100, 200, 400 meter runs and shotput, discus, and javelin throws) and selected physiological parameters (grip strength, body fat, vital lung capacity, and cardiovascular efficiency) of 20 wheelchair athletes was investigated. Results of track and field events were obtained from…

  16. Clinicians' and researchers' perspectives on manual wheelchair data loggers.

    PubMed

    Routhier, François; Lettre, Josiane; Miller, William C; Borisoff, Jaimie F; Keetch, Kate; Mitchell, Ian M

    2017-02-12

    Recent studies have employed data loggers to record a wide range of, sometimes differing, objective outcomes associated with the use of manual wheelchairs. To identify which outcomes are broadly perceived to be the most important to measure when objectively documenting manual wheelchair use, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with groups of researchers and clinicians in the field of wheeled mobility. We also surveyed the challenges these groups experienced when using data loggers. The survey was informed by a previous scoping review of the scientific and gray literature. Seventy-four people, with various academic and professional backgrounds, completed the survey: 57 researchers (77.0%) and 17 clinicians (23.0%). Regarding the importance they attributed to commonly measured outcomes, the most highly rated outcome identified by both groups was "distance traveled." There were significant differences between the groups' perspectives in rating and ranking the importance of "pressure-relief activities", "seat pressure" and "acceleration." In terms of challenges or barriers associated with the use of data loggers for monitoring manual wheelchair use, it appears that researchers and clinicians have relatively similar needs and preferences. However, only clinicians reported that the time they wanted to, or could, allocate to review recorded information was a potential hardship. Our hope is that these results will help further development and increase the functionality and applicability of data loggers for manual wheelchairs in research and clinical contexts.

  17. Gender and Attitudes toward People Using Wheelchairs: A Multidimensional Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilchinsky, Noa; Werner, Shirli; Findler, Liora

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of observer's gender and target's gender on attitudes toward people who use wheelchairs due to a physical disability. Four hundred four Jewish Israeli students without disabilities completed the "Multidimensional Attitudes Scale Toward Persons With Disabilities" (MAS). Initially, confirmatory…

  18. Development and evaluation of one-hand drivable manual wheelchair device for hemiplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hwa S; Park, Gemus; Kim, Young-Shim; Jung, Hyung-Shik

    2015-05-01

    This study was conducted for one-hand users including hemiplegic clients currently using standard manual wheelchairs, so as to analyze their specific problems and recommend solutions regarding usage. Thirty hemiplegic clients who were admitted to rehabilitation and convalescent hospitals participated as subjects. The research tools were standard manual wheelchairs commonly used by people with impaired gait and a "one-hand drivable manual wheelchair," which was developed for this study. The Wheelchair Skills Test (WST) was adopted for the objective assessment tool, while drivability, convenience, difference, and acceptability were developed for the subjective evaluation tools. The assessment procedures comprise two phases of pre-assessment and post-assessment. In the pre-assessment phase, the WST and subjective evaluation (drivability, convenience) were conducted using the existing standard manual wheelchair and with/without use of a foot to control the wheelchair. In the post-assessment phase, the WST and subjective evaluation (drivability, convenience, difference, acceptability) were also carried out using the developed one-hand drivable manual wheelchair. The results showed that the highest pass rate recorded for the WST items was 3.3% when the participants drove standard manual wheelchairs without the use of either foot and 96.7% when using the manual wheelchairs equipped with developed device. As compared to the existing wheelchair, statistical results showed significant effects on the WST, drivability, convenience, difference and acceptability when the participants drove wheelchairs equipped with the developed device. These findings imply that the one-hand drivable wheelchair equipped with the developed device can be an active and effective solution for hemiplegic clients using existing manual wheelchairs to increase their mobility and occupational performance.

  19. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  20. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  1. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  2. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  3. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  4. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  5. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  6. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  7. 14 CFR 382.121 - What mobility aids and other assistive devices may passengers with a disability bring into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What mobility aids and other assistive... Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.121 What mobility aids and other assistive devices may... or collapsible wheelchairs; (2) Other mobility aids, such as canes (including those used by...

  8. 14 CFR 382.131 - Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... mobility aids and other assistive devices? 382.131 Section 382.131 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Stowage of Wheelchairs, Other Mobility Aids, and Other Assistive Devices § 382.131 Do baggage liability limits apply to mobility aids and other assistive devices?...

  9. An Investigation of Bilateral Symmetry During Manual Wheelchair Propulsion

    PubMed Central

    Soltau, Shelby L.; Slowik, Jonathan S.; Requejo, Philip S.; Mulroy, Sara J.; Neptune, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of manual wheelchair propulsion often assume bilateral symmetry to simplify data collection, processing, and analysis. However, the validity of this assumption is unclear. Most investigations of wheelchair propulsion symmetry have been limited by a relatively small sample size and a focus on a single propulsion condition (e.g., level propulsion at self-selected speed). The purpose of this study was to evaluate bilateral symmetry during manual wheelchair propulsion in a large group of subjects across different propulsion conditions. Three-dimensional kinematics and handrim kinetics along with spatiotemporal variables were collected and processed from 80 subjects with paraplegia while propelling their wheelchairs on a stationary ergometer during three different conditions: level propulsion at their self-selected speed (free), level propulsion at their fastest comfortable speed (fast), and propulsion on an 8% grade at their level, self-selected speed (graded). All kinematic variables had significant side-to-side differences, primarily in the graded condition. Push angle was the only spatiotemporal variable with a significant side-to-side difference, and only during the graded condition. No kinetic variables had significant side-to-side differences. The magnitudes of the kinematic differences were low, with only one difference exceeding 5°. With differences of such small magnitude, the bilateral symmetry assumption appears to be reasonable during manual wheelchair propulsion in subjects without significant upper-extremity pain or impairment. However, larger asymmetries may exist in individuals with secondary injuries and pain in their upper extremity and different etiologies of their neurological impairment. PMID:26125019

  10. Development of a wheelchair occupant injury risk assessment method and its application in the investigation of wheelchair securement point influence on frontal crash safety.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, G E; Hobson, D A; Digges, K H

    2000-03-01

    To promote proper wheelchair securement in transportation, the proposed ANSI/RESNA Standard on Wheelchairs Used as Seats in Motor Vehicles will require that all transit wheelchairs be equipped with four securement points compatible with strap-type tiedowns. Through computer simulations, the location of these securement points has been found to influence wheelchair user response to a frontal crash. This study develops and employs an injury risk assessment method to compare the crashworthiness of various securement point configurations. The comparative injury risk assessment method is designed to predict the risk associated with internalized crash forces, as well as risk associated with secondary occupant impact with the vehicle interior. Injury criteria established by Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards and General Motors, along with excursion limitations set by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2249 Wheelchair Tiedowns and Occupant Restraint Systems (WTORS) Standard were used as benchmarks for the risk assessment method. The simulation model subjected a secured commercial powerbase wheelchair with a seated 50th percentile male Hybrid III test dummy to a 20 g/30 mph crash. The occupant was restrained using pelvic and shoulder belts, and the wheelchair was secured with four strap-type tiedowns. Results indicated that securement points located 1.5 in to 2.5 in above the evaluated wheelchair's center of gravity provide the most effective occupant protection.

  11. Thyristor-based current-fed drive with direct power control for permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, J.; Kwak, S.-S.; Toliyat, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a robust and simple direct power control (DPC) of a thyristor-based current-fed drive for generator applications. A current-fed drive and permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance generator (PMa-SynRG) are investigated to deliver 3 kW power using a combustion engine. The current-fed drive utilises a thyristor-based three-phase rectifier to convert generator power to DC-link power and a single-phase current-fed inverter to supply a single-phase inductive load. In addition, a new control algorithm is developed based on DPC for the current-fed drive. The DC-link voltage-based DPC is proposed in order to directly control the output power. The goal of the DPC is to maintain the DC-link voltage at the required output power operating point. The DPC has advantages such as a simple algorithm for constant speed operation. Another feature of the developed current-fed drive is its inherent capability to provide generating action by making the PMa-SynRG operates as a generator, rectifying the phase voltages by means of the three-phase rectifier and feeding the power into the load. These features make the current-fed drive a good candidate for driving any type of synchronous generators including the proposed PMa-SynRG.

  12. Design of a Robotic System to Measure Propulsion Work of Over-Ground Wheelchair Maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Liles, Howard; Huang, Morris; Caspall, Jayme; Sprigle, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    A wheelchair-propelling robot has been developed to measure the efficiency of manual wheelchairs. The use of a robot has certain advantages compared to the use of human operators with respect to repeatability of measurements and the ability to compare many more wheelchair configurations than possible with human operators. Its design and implementation required significant engineering and validation of hardware and control systems. The robot can propel a wheelchair according to pre-programmed accelerations and velocities and measures the forces required to achieve these maneuvers. Wheel velocities were within 0.1 m/s of programmed values and coefficients of variation . Torque measurements were also repeatable with . By determining the propulsion torque required to propel the wheelchair through a series of canonical maneuvers, task-dependent input work for various wheelchairs and configurations can be compared. This metric would serve to quantify the combined inertial and frictional resistance of the mechanical system.

  13. A lateral dynamics of a wheelchair: identification and analysis of tire parameters.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C A; Corrêa, F C; Eckert, J J; Santiciolli, F M; Dedini, F G

    2017-02-01

    In vehicle dynamics studies, the tire behaviour plays an important role in planar motion of the vehicle. Therefore, a correct representation of tire is a necessity. This paper describes a mathematical model for wheelchair tire based on the Magic Formula model. This model is widely used to represent forces and moments between the tire and the ground; however some experimental parameters must be determined. The purpose of this work is to identify the tire parameters for the wheelchair tire model, implementing them in a dynamic model of the wheelchair. For this, we developed an experimental test rig to measure the tires parameters for the lateral dynamics of a wheelchair. This dynamic model was made using a multi-body software and the wheelchair behaviour was analysed and discussed according to the tire parameters. The result of this work is one step further towards the understanding of wheelchair dynamics.

  14. A longitudinal study assessing the maintenance condition of cadres of four types of wheelchairs provided in low-resource areas.

    PubMed

    Rispin, Karen; Riseling, Kristofer; Wee, Joy

    2017-03-22

    Wheelchair breakdowns increase the risk of injury and limit the mobility of wheelchair users. In the endeavour to meet the enormous global need for wheelchairs, manufacturers of wheelchairs for low-resource settings face a cost-benefit tension between affordability and durability. Field studies are needed to provide feedback on durability. Four manufacturers provided cadres of wheelchairs to the organization providing rehabilitation to students at a boarding school for children with disabilities in a low-resource area. The Wheelchair Components Questionnaire for Condition was used to evaluate wheelchair maintenance condition at several time intervals after fitting. Because the maintenance regime was not identical for the four wheelchair types, wheelchair types were not compared. Analysis of variance indicated differences in condition across time and between wheelchair components. Tukey's simultaneous comparison of means indicated that across the entire group, brakes, seats, casters and foot rests received lower ratings than frame. Preliminary data after each iteration of this study were provided to manufactures and resulted in responsive design changes. Implications for Rehabilitation Longitudinal studies with the Wheelchair Components Questionnaire for Condition (WCQc) have enabled manufacturers to make responsive design improvements. Additional studies could be done with other wheelchair types to result in responsive positive design changes for those wheelchairs as well. The WCQc can be used in studies on wheelchair condition even when records of repair history are not reliably available, a situation which is not uncommon in low-resource areas. Data sets collected at an individual clinic uses the WCQc could focus attention on wheelchair components needing regular repair. With that data in mind, the maintenance regime could be modified to respond and in so doing improve wheelchair condition and reduce loss of mobility or risk of injury. Organizations involved in

  15. Powered Sit-to-Stand and Assistive Stand-to-Sit Framework for a Powered Transfemoral Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Sup, Frank; Goldfarb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This work extends the three level powered knee and ankle prosthesis control framework previously developed by the authors by adding sitting mode. A middle level finite state based impedance controller is designed to accommodate sitting, sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitions. Moreover, a high level Gaussian Mixture Model based intent recognizer is developed to distinguish between standing and sitting modes and switch the middle level controllers accordingly. Experimental results with unilateral transfemoral amputee subject show that sitting down and standing up intent can be inferred from the prosthesis sensor signals by the intent recognizer. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the prosthesis generates net active power of 50 W during standing up and dissipates up to 50 W of power during stand-to-sit transition at the knee joint. PMID:20046838

  16. Feasibility study on a perceived fatigue prediction dependent power control for an electrically assisted bicycle.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, T; Minagawa, H

    2013-01-01

    Several types of electric motor assists have been developed, as a result, it is important to control muscular fatigue on-site in terms of health promotion and motor rehabilitation. Predicting the perceived fatigue by several biosignal-related variables with the multiple regression model and polynomial approximation, we try to propose a self control design for the electrically assisted bicycle (EAB). We also determine the meaningful muscles during pedaling by muscle synergies in relation to the motion maturity. In field experiments, prediction of ongoing perceived physical fatigue could have the potential of suitable control of EAB.

  17. Merlin's 'invalid or gouty chair' and the origin of the self-propelled wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Marie-France; Silver, John R

    2016-08-01

    Wheelchairs are a major advance in enabling independence for people with walking difficulties. The first self-propelled wheelchair has been attributed to John Joseph Merlin, the 'ingenious mechanick', in the early 19th century and his 'gouty chair' is exhibited at Kenwood House. Research would suggest that comparable chairs existed in France as early as 1751 and the French Revolutionary, Georges Couthon, used one to get around Paris. A later design, also attributed to Merlin, the invalid wheelchair, features large wheels with outer hoops for the occupant to grasp and this is the true ancestor of the modern wheelchair.

  18. Support of Wheelchairs Using Pheromone Information with Two Types of Communication Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Koji; Nitta, Katsumi

    In this paper, we propose a communication framework which combined two types of communication among wheelchairs and mobile devices. Due to restriction of range of activity, there is a problem that wheelchair users tend to shut themselves up in their houses. We developed a navigational wheelchair which loads a system that displays information on a map through WWW. However, this wheelchair is expensive because it needs a solid PC, a precise GPS, a battery, and so on. We introduce mobile devices and use this framework to provide information to wheelchair users and to facilitate them to go out. When a user encounters other users, they exchange messages which they have by short-distance wireless communication. Once a message is delivered to a navigational wheelchair, the wheelchair uploads the message to the system. We use two types of pheromone information which represent trends of user's movement and existences of a crowd of users. First, when users gather, ``crowd of people pheromone'' is emitted virtually. Users do not send these pheromones to the environment but carry them. If the density exceeds the threshold, messages that express ``people gethered'' are generated automatically. The other pheromone is ``movement trend pheromone'', which is used to improve probability of successful transmissions. From results of experiments, we concluded that our method can deliver information that wheelchair users gathered to other wheelchairs.

  19. Changes in inertia and effect on turning effort across different wheelchair configurations.

    PubMed

    Caspall, Jayme J; Seligsohn, Erin; Dao, Phuc V; Sprigle, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    When executing turning maneuvers, manual wheelchair users must overcome the rotational inertia of the wheelchair system. Differences in wheelchair rotational inertia can result in increases in torque required to maneuver, resulting in greater propulsion effort and stress on the shoulder joints. The inertias of various configurations of an ultralightweight wheelchair were measured using a rotational inertia-measuring device. Adjustments in axle position, changes in wheel and tire type, and the addition of several accessories had various effects on rotational inertias. The configuration with the highest rotational inertia (solid tires, mag wheels with rearward axle) exceeded the configuration with the lowest (pneumatic tires, spoke wheels with forward axle) by 28%. The greater inertia requires increased torque to accelerate the wheelchair during turning. At a representative maximum acceleration, the reactive torque spanned the range of 11.7 to 15.0 N-m across the wheelchair configurations. At higher accelerations, these torques exceeded that required to overcome caster scrub during turning. These results indicate that a wheelchair's rotational inertia can significantly influence the torque required during turning and that this influence will affect active users who turn at higher speeds. Categorizing wheelchairs using both mass and rotational inertia would better represent differences in effort during wheelchair maneuvers.

  20. Improvements of a Brain-Computer Interface Applied to a Robotic Wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, André; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano Freire; Sarcinelli-Filho, Mário; Sánchez, José Luis Martín; García, Juan Carlos García; Quintas, Manuel Mazo

    Two distinct signal features suitable to be used as input to a Support-Vector Machine (SVM) classifier in an application involving hands motor imagery and the correspondent EEG signal are evaluated in this paper. Such features are the Power Spectral Density (PSD) components and the Adaptive Autoregressive (AAR) parameters. The best result (an accuracy of 97.1%) is obtained when using PSD components, while the AAR parameters generated an accuracy of 91.4%. The results also demonstrate that it is possible to use only two EEG channels (bipolar configuration around C 3 and C 4), discarding the bipolar configuration around C z . The algorithms were tested with a proprietary EEG data set involving 4 individuals and with a data set provided by the University of Graz (Austria) as well. The resulting classification system is now being implemented in a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) used to guide a robotic wheelchair.

  1. Exploring Winter Community Participation Among Wheelchair Users: An Online Focus Group.

    PubMed

    Ripat, Jacquie; Colatruglio, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of what people who use wheeled mobility devices (WMDs; e.g., manual and power wheelchairs, and scooters) identify as environmental barriers to community participation in cold weather climates, and to explore recommendations to overcome environmental barriers to community participation. Researchers conducted an online asynchronous focus group that spanned seven days, with eight individuals who use WMDs. Each day, participants were asked to respond to a moderator-provided question, and to engage with one another around the topic area. The researchers analyzed the verbatim data using an inductive content-analysis approach. Four categories emerged from the data: (1) winter barriers to community participation; (2) life resumes in spring and summer; (3) change requires awareness, education, and advocacy; and (4) winter participation is a right. Participants confirmed that it is a collective responsibility to ensure that WMD users are able to participate in the community throughout the seasons.

  2. Exploring Winter Community Participation Among Wheelchair Users: An Online Focus Group

    PubMed Central

    Ripat, Jacquie; Colatruglio, Angela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of what people who use wheeled mobility devices (WMDs; e.g., manual and power wheelchairs, and scooters) identify as environmental barriers to community participation in cold weather climates, and to explore recommendations to overcome environmental barriers to community participation. Researchers conducted an online asynchronous focus group that spanned seven days, with eight individuals who use WMDs. Each day, participants were asked to respond to a moderator-provided question, and to engage with one another around the topic area. The researchers analyzed the verbatim data using an inductive content-analysis approach. Four categories emerged from the data: (1) winter barriers to community participation; (2) life resumes in spring and summer; (3) change requires awareness, education, and advocacy; and (4) winter participation is a right. Participants confirmed that it is a collective responsibility to ensure that WMD users are able to participate in the community throughout the seasons. PMID:26295488

  3. Development and validation of rear impact computer simulation model of an adult manual transit wheelchair with a seated occupant.

    PubMed

    Salipur, Zdravko; Bertocci, Gina

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that ANSI WC19 transit wheelchairs that are crashworthy in frontal impact exhibit catastrophic failures in rear impact and may not be able to provide stable seating support and thus occupant protection for the wheelchair occupant. Thus far only limited sled test and computer simulation data have been available to study rear impact wheelchair safety. Computer modeling can be used as an economic and comprehensive tool to gain critical knowledge regarding wheelchair integrity and occupant safety. This study describes the development and validation of a computer model simulating an adult wheelchair-seated occupant subjected to a rear impact event. The model was developed in MADYMO and validated rigorously using the results of three similar sled tests conducted to specifications provided in the draft ISO/TC 173 standard. Outcomes from the model can provide critical wheelchair loading information to wheelchair and tiedown manufacturers, resulting in safer wheelchair designs for rear impact conditions.

  4. Evaporation-assisted high-power impulse magnetron sputtering: The deposition of tungsten oxide as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Hemberg, Axel; Dauchot, Jean-Pierre; Snyders, Rony; Konstantinidis, Stephanos

    2012-07-15

    The deposition rate during the synthesis of tungsten trioxide thin films by reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a tungsten target increases, above the dc threshold, as a result of the appropriate combination of the target voltage, the pulse duration, and the amount of oxygen in the reactive atmosphere. This behavior is likely to be caused by the evaporation of the low melting point tungsten trioxide layer covering the metallic target in such working conditions. The HiPIMS process is therefore assisted by thermal evaporation of the target material.

  5. A Front-Row Seat at a Wheelchair Crash Test: EP Kicks Off Its Wheelchair Transportation Safety Series with a Visit to the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2007-01-01

    The centerpiece of the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) Sled Lab is "the impact sled," as it is called in the business. It's the business of conducting sled impact tests, perhaps better known as crash tests, on all types of wheelchairs and wheelchair seating systems as well as wheelchair tiedowns and…

  6. Noise Robust Speech Recognition Applied to Voice-Driven Wheelchair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasou, Akira; Kojima, Hiroaki

    2009-12-01

    Conventional voice-driven wheelchairs usually employ headset microphones that are capable of achieving sufficient recognition accuracy, even in the presence of surrounding noise. However, such interfaces require users to wear sensors such as a headset microphone, which can be an impediment, especially for the hand disabled. Conversely, it is also well known that the speech recognition accuracy drastically degrades when the microphone is placed far from the user. In this paper, we develop a noise robust speech recognition system for a voice-driven wheelchair. This system can achieve almost the same recognition accuracy as the headset microphone without wearing sensors. We verified the effectiveness of our system in experiments in different environments, and confirmed that our system can achieve almost the same recognition accuracy as the headset microphone without wearing sensors.

  7. The effect of rear wheel camber in manual wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Veeger, D; van der Woude, L H; Rozendal, R H

    1989-01-01

    Eight nonimpaired subjects participated in a wheelchair exercise test using a motor-driven treadmill in order to study the effect of rear wheel camber on wheelchair ambulation. The test consisted of four runs with rear wheels in 0, 3, 6, and 9 degrees camber at four speed steps of 2, 3, 4, and 5 km/hr. There were no significant effects upon oxygen cost, heart rate, and mechanical efficiency. The kinematic parameters of push time, push angle, and abduction showed differences between 3 and 6 degrees camber. The relationship between the findings, using surface EMG results for six shoulder muscles, is discussed. For one subject, data were extended to study the angular velocities of shoulder and elbow.

  8. Tests of two new polyurethane foam wheelchair tires.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J; Kauzlarich, J J; Thacker, J G

    1989-01-01

    The performance characteristics of four 24-inch wheelchair tires are considered; one pneumatic and three airless. Specifically, two new airless polyurethane foam tires (circular and tapered cross-section) were compared to both a molded polyisoprene tire and a rubber pneumatic tire. Rolling resistance, coefficient of static friction, spring rate, tire roll-off, impact absorption, wear resistance, and resistance to compression set were the characteristics considered for the basis of comparison. Although the pneumatic tire is preferred by many wheelchair users, the two new polyurethane foam tires were found to offer a performance similar to the high-pressure pneumatic tire. In addition, the foam tires are less expensive and lighter in weight than the other tires tested.

  9. Finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Rene

    1994-01-01

    The finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design is presented. The design is the result of a technology utilization request. The designer's intent is to soften the riding feeling by incorporating a mechanism attaching the wheel rim to the spokes that would allow considerable deflection upon compressive loads. A finite element analysis was conducted to verify proper structural function. Displacement and stress results are presented and conclusions are provided.

  10. Evaluation of a redesigned self-checkout station for wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Komal; Mirka, Gary A; Sommerich, Carolyn M; Khachatoorian, Haig

    2006-01-01

    Self-checkout is the emergent/emerging retail technology wherein users (shoppers) check out their own items using an interactive kiosk. A dramatic growth is anticipated in the prevalence of self-checkout systems in retail environments. A study was conducted to develop and evaluate a redesign of a self-checkout system with a focus on issues related to physical accessibility for wheelchair users. Two checkout station prototypes were built: a full-scale model of an existing system and a full-scale model of a system with design modifications (e.g., inclusion of appropriate wheelchair clearance under the workstation, reduced vertical position of the credit card reader, etc.). Five wheelchair users and 10 non-wheelchair users performed simulated self-checkout activities using both workstations. The principal independent variable was workstation type (standard design vs. modified design). The dependent measures were productivity (time to complete a transaction), shoulder flexion angle, torso flexion angle, and the user's subjective assessment of the experience. The results of this study indicate that workstation type did not influence productivity levels in either participant group (wheelchair users or non-wheelchair users). Posture, on the other hand, was significantly improved: the peak shoulder angle was reduced by 64% in wheelchair users and by 69% in the non-wheelchair user group. Peak flexion angle of the torso was also reduced by 67% for wheelchair users. Subjective feedback from the wheelchair user group supported the postural data by showing an overall preference for the redesigned workstation, whereas the non-wheelchair group showed no preference between the two. These results indicate that design for populations with specific limitations does not need to come at a cost of reduced accessibility for persons without these limitations; universal design is achievable.

  11. Electric Wheelchair Controlled by Human Body Motion Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Sho; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Yasuhiro; She, Jin-Hua

    This research studies the possibility of an intuitive interface for an electric wheelchair by using human body except hands. For this purpose, we focused on the human body motion which has relation to actions or behavior. This motion comes from the human stabilization function for holding expectable collapsing caused by voluntary motion. Thus this motion is considered as a kind of characteristics of human motion, and is linked to intentions unconsciously. Therefore, the interface which does not require conscious and complex motion is realized by applying this human body motion to the interface of electric wheelchair. In this paper, first, we did experiment to search a part which vividly shows the pressure change on the seat. As a result, it was confirmed that pressure change of the seat back vividly shows the human body motion. Next, we designed the prototype based on this evidence. Finally, experiment was conducted by using 10 subjects and SD method to evaluate feeling of operation. For this result, it was turned out that all subjects feel that proposed interface was intuitive, or to control at their direction. Therefore it was confirmed that human body motion interface has a possibility to be used for an interface of electric wheelchair.

  12. Comparison between overground and dynamometer manual wheelchair propulsion.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Alicia M; Worobey, Lynn A; Rice, Ian M; Collinger, Jennifer L; Boninger, Michael L

    2012-08-01

    Laboratory-based simulators afford many advantages for studying physiology and biomechanics; however, they may not perfectly mimic wheelchair propulsion over natural surfaces. The goal of this study was to compare kinetic and temporal parameters between propulsion overground on a tile surface and on a dynamometer. Twenty-four experienced manual wheelchair users propelled at a self-selected speed on smooth, level tile and a dynamometer while kinetic data were collected using an instrumented wheel. A Pearson correlation test was used to examine the relationship between propulsion variables obtained on the dynamometer and the overground condition. Ensemble resultant force and moment curves were compared using cross-correlation and qualitative analysis of curve shape. User biomechanics were correlated (R ranging from 0.41 to 0.83) between surfaces. Overall, findings suggest that although the dynamometer does not perfectly emulate overground propulsion, wheelchair users were consistent with the direction and amount of force applied, the time peak force was reached, push angle, and their stroke frequency between conditions.

  13. Soft, conformal bioelectronics for a wireless human-wheelchair interface.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Saswat; Norton, James J S; Lee, Yongkuk; Lee, Dong Sup; Agee, Nicolas; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-05-15

    There are more than 3 million people in the world whose mobility relies on wheelchairs. Recent advancement on engineering technology enables more intuitive, easy-to-use rehabilitation systems. A human-machine interface that uses non-invasive, electrophysiological signals can allow a systematic interaction between human and devices; for example, eye movement-based wheelchair control. However, the existing machine-interface platforms are obtrusive, uncomfortable, and often cause skin irritations as they require a metal electrode affixed to the skin with a gel and acrylic pad. Here, we introduce a bioelectronic system that makes dry, conformal contact to the skin. The mechanically comfortable sensor records high-fidelity electrooculograms, comparable to the conventional gel electrode. Quantitative signal analysis and infrared thermographs show the advantages of the soft biosensor for an ergonomic human-machine interface. A classification algorithm with an optimized set of features shows the accuracy of 94% with five eye movements. A Bluetooth-enabled system incorporating the soft bioelectronics demonstrates a precise, hands-free control of a robotic wheelchair via electrooculograms.

  14. Synchrophasor-Assisted Prediction of Stability/Instability of a Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha Roy, Biman Kumar; Sinha, Avinash Kumar; Pradhan, Ashok Kumar

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a technique for real-time prediction of stability/instability of a power system based on synchrophasor measurements obtained from phasor measurement units (PMUs) at generator buses. For stability assessment the technique makes use of system severity indices developed using bus voltage magnitude obtained from PMUs and generator electrical power. Generator power is computed using system information and PMU information like voltage and current phasors obtained from PMU. System stability/instability is predicted when the indices exceeds a threshold value. A case study is carried out on New England 10-generator, 39-bus system to validate the performance of the technique.

  15. Visual Estimation of Spatial Requirements for Locomotion in Novice Wheelchair Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Takada, Hajime; Matsuura, Yoshifusa; Imanaka, Kuniyasu

    2004-01-01

    Locomotion using a wheelchair requires a wider space than does walking. Two experiments were conducted to test the ability of nonhandicapped adults to estimate the spatial requirements for wheelchair use. Participants judged from a distance whether doorlike apertures of various widths were passable or not passable. Experiment 1 showed that…

  16. Aerodynamic characteristics of wheelchairs. [Langley V/STOL wind tunnel tests for human factors engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The overall aerodynamic drag characteristics of a conventional wheelchair were defined and the individual drag contributions of its components were determined. The results show that a fiftieth percentile man sitting in the complete wheelchair would experience an aerodynamic drag coefficient on the order of 1.4.

  17. Ethnic, Gender, and Contact Differences in Intimacy Attitudes toward Wheelchair Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; Wang, Xiaohui; Etzbach, Colleen A.; Del Castillo, Alinka

    2013-01-01

    Student attitudes toward having a relationship with a wheelchair user were explored. Participants initially selected one of six opposite gender head shots and subsequently viewed their selection's whole body photograph in a wheelchair along with reading a short biography. Primarily undergraduate Hispanic and Caucasian students (N = 810) were…

  18. 14 CFR 382.65 - What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs? 382.65 Section 382.65 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... TRAVEL Accessibility of Aircraft § 382.65 What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?...

  19. 14 CFR 382.65 - What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs? 382.65 Section 382.65 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... TRAVEL Accessibility of Aircraft § 382.65 What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?...

  20. 14 CFR 382.65 - What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs? 382.65 Section 382.65 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... TRAVEL Accessibility of Aircraft § 382.65 What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?...

  1. 14 CFR 382.65 - What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs? 382.65 Section 382.65 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... TRAVEL Accessibility of Aircraft § 382.65 What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?...

  2. Demographic Profile and Athletic Identity of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injured Wheelchair Basketball Athletes in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasiliadis, Angelo; Evaggelinou, Christina; Avourdiadou, Sevastia; Grekinis, Petros

    2010-01-01

    An epidemiological study conducted across the country of Greece was conducted in order to determine the profile and the athletic identity of spinal cord injured (SCI) wheelchair basketball athletes who participated to the 13th Greek Wheelchair Basketball Championship and Cup. The Disability Sport Participation questionnaire was used for data…

  3. The development and testing of a system for wheelchair stability measurement.

    PubMed

    Stefanov, Dimitar; Avtanski, Alexander; Shapcott, Nigel; Magee, Paul; Dryer, Paul; Fielden, Simon; Heelis, Mike; Evans, Jill; Moody, Louise

    2015-11-01

    Wheelchair stability has an impact on safety as well as wheelchair performance, propulsion and manoeuvrability. Wheelchair stability is affected by the addition of life-supporting heavy equipment, e.g. ventilators and oxygen cylinders, as well as the characteristics of the user e.g. limb amputations, obesity. The aim of the research described here was to develop and test a stability assessment system that would guide and support the adjustment of wheelchairs to individual needs, characteristics and lifestyles. The resulting system provides assessment of centre of gravity and wheelchair stability and calculates the wheelchair tipping angles. The system consists of a force platform that senses the weight distribution of the wheelchair and calculates the centres of the contact points of the wheels and the distances between them. The measurement data are transferred via a WiFi connection to a portable tablet computer where wheelchair stability parameters are calculated. A touchscreen GUI provides visualization of the stability results and navigation through the measurement modes. The developed new concept has been evaluated through technical laboratory-based testing to determine the validity of the data collected. Initial testing has been undertaken within the clinical setting in 3 large hospitals in the UK. Initial results suggest that Wheelsense® provides a valuable tool to support clinical judgement.

  4. 14 CFR 382.65 - What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs? 382.65 Section 382.65 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... TRAVEL Accessibility of Aircraft § 382.65 What are the requirements concerning on-board wheelchairs?...

  5. A five-wheel wheelchair with an active-caster drive system.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Yu; Tanaka, Aki; Wada, Masayoshi

    2013-06-01

    A novel wheelchair system with an active-caster drive mechanism is presented in this paper. A manual (hand propelled) wheelchair with an external single-wheel drive system forms a five-wheel configuration. The active-caster mechanism is applied to a drive system to motorize a manual wheelchair. Two electric motors which drive a wheel axis and a steering axis of a drive wheel independently are equipped on the active-caster. A coordinated control of the two motors enables the velocity vector on the steering shaft to direct in an arbitrary direction with an arbitrary magnitude. The generated velocity vector allows a wheelchair to go straight and/or rotate completely in a same way as a standard electric wheelchair. Namely 2DOF of the wheelchair can be controlled independently by a single drive wheel without any constraint, such as the orientation of the drive wheel which is well known as a non-holonomic constraint. In addition to the 2DOF mobility, the proposed system enables wheelchair users to change drive modes, a rear drive and a front drive. The drive wheel on the back side of the wheelchair is vertically actuated by a linear motor to change the height of the drive wheel that can vary load distribution and the number of wheels contacting to the ground. The five-wheel-contact makes the wheelchair to move as the normal mode in which the center of rotation is located at the midpoint of the main wheels. Depressing the drive wheel results in lost contacts of the main wheels from the ground in which the center of rotation is jumped at the midpoint of the front wheels, namely it performs as a front drive wheelchair. In this paper, kinematic models of the wheelchair and that with an active-caster drive system are analyzed and a control method by using a 2DOF joystick is derived. Based on the kinematic model, a prototype mechanism of the active-caster is designed and mounted on a manual wheelchair to realize the five-wheel wheelchair. In the experiments, the independent 2

  6. Pilot study of strap-based custom wheelchair seating system in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, John E; Wittig, Becky L; Payette, Mark; Goldish, Gary D; Hansen, Andrew H

    2014-01-01

    Custom wheelchair seats can be used to help prevent pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury. In this study, a strap-based system was evaluated in three Veterans with spinal cord injury. Interface pressure distributions were measured after transfers, wheeling, and pressure relief maneuvers and after fittings by three different therapists. We found that pressure distribution measures were not generally affected after transfers and wheeling using the strap-based wheelchair and that pressure relief maneuvers were able to be performed. Additionally, all therapists were able to customize the wheelchair seat to clinically acceptable levels in 4 to 40 min for the three subjects. Future studies can test the long-term effects of using the strap-based wheelchair seat and identifying individuals that would most benefit from a rapidly customizable wheelchair seat.

  7. Effectiveness of Social Behaviors for Autonomous Wheelchair Robot to Support Elderly People in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Masahiro; Iio, Takamasa; Kamei, Koji; Sharma, Chandraprakash; Hagita, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    We developed a wheelchair robot to support the movement of elderly people and specifically implemented two functions to enhance their intention to use it: speaking behavior to convey place/location related information and speed adjustment based on individual preferences. Our study examines how the evaluations of our wheelchair robot differ when compared with human caregivers and a conventional autonomous wheelchair without the two proposed functions in a moving support context. 28 senior citizens participated in the experiment to evaluate three different conditions. Our measurements consisted of questionnaire items and the coding of free-style interview results. Our experimental results revealed that elderly people evaluated our wheelchair robot higher than the wheelchair without the two functions and the human caregivers for some items. PMID:25993038

  8. Effectiveness of social behaviors for autonomous wheelchair robot to support elderly people in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Masahiro; Iio, Takamasa; Kamei, Koji; Sharma, Chandraprakash; Hagita, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    We developed a wheelchair robot to support the movement of elderly people and specifically implemented two functions to enhance their intention to use it: speaking behavior to convey place/location related information and speed adjustment based on individual preferences. Our study examines how the evaluations of our wheelchair robot differ when compared with human caregivers and a conventional autonomous wheelchair without the two proposed functions in a moving support context. 28 senior citizens participated in the experiment to evaluate three different conditions. Our measurements consisted of questionnaire items and the coding of free-style interview results. Our experimental results revealed that elderly people evaluated our wheelchair robot higher than the wheelchair without the two functions and the human caregivers for some items.

  9. Evaluation of wheelchair tire rolling resistance using dynamometer-based coast-down tests.

    PubMed

    Kwarciak, Andrew M; Yarossi, Mathew; Ramanujam, Arvind; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A; Sisto, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the rolling resistance of four common manual wheelchair tires (two pneumatic and two airless solid) and the solid tires used on a commercially available force- and moment-sensing wheel. Coast-down tests were performed with a wheelchair positioned on a two-drum dynamometer. Within each of three load conditions, tire type had a significant effect on rolling resistance (p < 0.001). The pneumatic tires had smaller rolling resistances and were less affected by load increases than the solid tires. Within the two tire types, higher air pressure or firmness and lower profile tread corresponded to less rolling resistance. Wheelchair users, clinicians, and researchers must consider the effect of tire type on wheelchair rolling resistance when selecting a manual wheelchair tire.

  10. Control of a simulated wheelchair based on a hybrid brain computer interface.

    PubMed

    Long, Jinyi; Li, Yuanqing; Wang, Hongtao; Yu, Tianyou; Pan, Jiahui

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid BCI system was described for the control of a simulated wheelchair. This hybrid BCI was based on the motor imagery-based mu rhythm and the P300 potential. With our paradigm, the user may perform left- or right-hand imagery to control the direction (left or right turn) of the simulated wheelchair. Furthermore, a hybrid manner was used for speed control: e.g., foot imagery without button attention for deceleration and a specific button attention without any motor imagery for acceleration. An experiment based on a simulated wheelchair in virtual environment was conducted to assess the BCI control. Subjects effectively steered the simulated wheelchairs by controlling the direction and speed with our hybrid BCI system. Data analysis validated that our hybrid BCI system can be used to control the direction and speed of a simulated wheelchair.

  11. Look at energy compression as an assist for high power rf production

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Farkas, Z.D.; Wilson, P.B.

    1984-08-09

    The desire to construct electron linacs of higher and higher energies, coupled with the realities of available funding and real estate, has forced machine designers to reassess the limitations in both accelerator gradient (MeV/m) and energy. The gradients achieved in current radio-frequency (RF) linacs are sometimes set by electrical breakdown in the accelerating structure, but are in most cases determined by the RF power level available to drive the linac. In this paper we will not discuss RF power sources in general, but rather take a brief look at several energy compression schemes which might be of service in helping to make better use of the sources we employ. We will, however, diverge for a bit and discuss what the RF power requirements are. 12 references, 21 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Responses of subjects with spinal cord injuries to maximal wheelchair exercise: comparison of discontinuous and continuous protocols.

    PubMed

    Rasche, W; Janssen, T W; Van Oers, C A; Hollander, A P; Van der Woude, L H

    1993-01-01

    Six male subjects with spinal cord injuries (SCI) participated in this investigation to compare peak values of oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (fc), ventilation (VE), respiratory exchange ratio (R) and power output (W) obtained using a discontinuous (DP) and a continuous jump max protocol (JMP) in a maximal wheelchair exercise test on a treadmill. The W increments were achieved by imposing an extra mass upon the wheelchair through a pulley system. The DP involved exercise periods of 3 min separated by 2-min intervals at relative rest. Increments in W consisted of 0.10 or 0.15 W.kg-1 total mass. During the rest intervals no mass was imposed on the wheelchair. The JMP involved an increase in W each minute. Increments and velocity in the JMP were the same as during the exercise periods for DP. Mean peak values for W [99.5 (SD 13.6) W], VO2 [2.13 (SD 0.27) l.min-1, standard temperature and pressure, dry], R [1.25 (SD 0.16)] and VE [82.8 (SD 11.2) l.min-1, body temperature and pressure, saturated] in DP were not different from values observed for W [103.5 (SD 13.1)], VO2 [2.18 (SD 0.31) l.min-1], R [1.17 (SD 0.16)] and VE [78.9 (SD 16.0) l.min-1] in the JMP. The only significant difference was observed for fc: 198 (SD 11) beats.min-1 in DP and 187 (SD 11) beats.min-1 in JMP. The higher values for fc elicited using DP have been discussed. It was concluded that both a DP and a JMP seem to be equally appropriate in determining peak VO2 and peak W in SCI persons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Effectiveness of an automatic manual wheelchair braking system in the prevention of falls.

    PubMed

    Martorello, Laura; Swanson, Edward

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an automatic manual wheelchair braking system in the reduction of falls for patients at high risk of falls while transferring to and from a manual wheelchair. The study design was a normative survey carried out through the use of a written questionnaire sent to 60 skilled nursing facilities to collect data from the medical charts, which identified patients at high risk for falls who used an automatic wheelchair braking system. The facilities participating in the study identified a frequency of falls of high-risk patients while transferring to and from the wheelchair ranging from 2 to 10 per year, with a median fall rate per facility of 4 falls. One year after the installation of the automatic wheelchair braking system, participating facilities demonstrated a reduction of zero to three falls during transfers by high-risk patients, with a median fall rate of zero falls. This represents a statistically significant reduction of 78% in the fall rate of high-risk patients while transferring to and from the wheelchair, t (18) = 6.39, p < .0001. Incident reports of falls to and from manual wheelchairs were reviewed retrospectively for a 1-year period. This study suggests that high-risk fallers transferring to or from manual wheelchairs sustained significantly fewer falls when the Steddy Mate automatic braking system for manual wheelchairs was installed. The application of the automatic braking system allows clients, families/caregivers, and facility personnel an increased safety factor for the reduction of falls from the wheelchair.

  14. Power Management Based Current Control Technique for Photovoltaic-Battery Assisted Wind-Hydro Hybrid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Prabhakar, J.; Ragavan, K.

    2013-07-01

    This article proposes new power management based current control strategy for integrated wind-solar-hydro system equipped with battery storage mechanism. In this control technique, an indirect estimation of load current is done, through energy balance model, DC-link voltage control and droop control. This system features simpler energy management strategy and necessitates few power electronic converters, thereby minimizing the cost of the system. The generation-demand (G-D) management diagram is formulated based on the stochastic weather conditions and demand, which would likely moderate the gap between both. The features of management strategy deploying energy balance model include (1) regulating DC-link voltage within specified tolerances, (2) isolated operation without relying on external electric power transmission network, (3) indirect current control of hydro turbine driven induction generator and (4) seamless transition between grid-connected and off-grid operation modes. Furthermore, structuring of the hybrid system with appropriate selection of control variables enables power sharing among each energy conversion systems and battery storage mechanism. By addressing these intricacies, it is viable to regulate the frequency and voltage of the remote network at load end. The performance of the proposed composite scheme is demonstrated through time-domain simulation in MATLAB/Simulink environment.

  15. The Instruments of Power: A Computer-Assisted Game for the ACSC Curriculum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Tolbert, Brian G. "Instruments of Power Game and Rules Development." Air Command and Staff College, 2005. Wang, Wallace. Visual Basic 6 for Dummies . New...Wang, Visual Basic 6 for Dummies (New York, NY: Wiley Publishing, 1998), 56-58. 56 Hasbro, Risk Rules (Pawtucket, RI: 1999). 57 Hasbro, Risk II Game

  16. CARAPACE: a novel composite advanced robotic actuator powering assistive compliant exoskeleton: preliminary design.

    PubMed

    Masia, Lorenzo; Cappello, Leonardo; Morasso, Pietro; Lachenal, Xavier; Pirrera, Alberto; Weaver, Paul; Mattioni, Filippo

    2013-06-01

    A novel actuator is introduced that combines an elastically compliant composite structure with conventional electromechanical elements. The proposed design is analogous to that used in Series Elastic Actuators, its distinctive feature being that the compliant composite part offers different stable configurations. In other words, its elastic potential presents points of local minima that correspond to robust stable positions (multistability). This potential is known a priori as a function of the structural geometry, thus providing tremendous benefits in terms of control implementation. Such knowledge enables the complexities arising from the additional degrees of freedom associated with link deformations to be overcome and uncover challenges that extends beyond those posed by standard rigidlink robot dynamics. It is thought that integrating a multistable elastic element in a robotic transmission can provide new scenarios in the field of assistive robotics, as the system may help a subject to stand or carry a load without the need for an active control effort by the actuators.

  17. High-power widely tunable all-fiber thulium-assisted optical parametric oscillator at SWIR band.

    PubMed

    Li, Can; Chen, Nan; Wei, Xiaoming; Kang, Jiqiang; Li, Bowen; Tan, Sisi; Song, Liang; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2016-11-15

    A novel short-wave infrared (SWIR) all-fiber thulium-assisted optical parametric oscillator (TAOPO) that exploits jointly optical parametric conversion and thulium amplification in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) and thulium-doped fiber (TDF) is demonstrated. This is implemented through constructing a joint fiber line by directly fusion splicing 50 m HNLF with 1.5 m TDF. Incorporating a bidirectional-pumping scheme, i.e., forward-pumped by a step-tuned C-band pulsed laser, and simultaneously backward-pumped by an L-band continuous-wave laser, this TAOPO produces a pulsed SWIR laser at output power higher than 200 mW, signal-to-noise ratio over 40 dB, and wavelength tuning range beyond 150 nm from 1815 to 1968 nm. Via separate characterization of the HNLF and TDF joint fiber line, the tunability of the current TAOPO to shorter wavelength is only limited by the employed fiber components, while higher power could be realized by increasing the backward pump power. This TAOPO could be a promising platform for the generation of a highly functional SWIR source that facilitates applications such as bond-selective imaging of deep tissue.

  18. Microwave-assisted synthesis of metal oxide/hydroxide composite electrodes for high power supercapacitors - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Soheila; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2014-10-01

    Electrochemical capacitors (ECs), also known as pseudocapacitors or supercapacitors (SCs), is receiving great attention for its potential applications in electric and hybrid electric vehicles because of their ability to store energy, alongside with the advantage of delivering the stored energy much more rapidly than batteries, namely power density. To become primary devices for power supply, supercapacitors must be developed further to improve their ability to deliver high energy and power simultaneously. In this concern, a lot of effort is devoted to the investigation of pseudocapacitive transition-metal-based oxides/hydroxides such as ruthenium oxide, manganese oxide, cobalt oxide, nickel oxide, cobalt hydroxide, nickel hydroxide, and mixed metal oxides/hydroxides such as nickel cobaltite and nickel-cobalt oxy-hydroxides. This is mainly due to the fact that they can produce much higher specific capacitances than typical carbon-based electric double-layer capacitors and electronically conducting polymers. This review presents supercapacitor performance data of metal oxide thin film electrodes by microwave-assisted as an inexpensive, quick and versatile technique. Supercapacitors have established the specific capacitance (Cs) principles, therefore, it is likely that metal oxide films will continue to play a major role in supercapacitor technology and are expected to considerably increase the capabilities of these devices in near future.

  19. Outer-selective pressure-retarded osmosis hollow fiber membranes from vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization for osmotic power generation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-Peng; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-11-19

    In this paper, we report the technical breakthroughs to synthesize outer-selective thin-film composite (TFC) hollow fiber membranes, which is in an urgent need for osmotic power generation with the pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) process. In the first step, a defect-free thin-film composite membrane module is achieved by vacuum-assisted interfacial polymerization. The PRO performance is further enhanced by optimizing the support in terms of pore size and mechanical strength and the TFC layer with polydopamine coating and molecular engineering of the interfacial polymerization solution. The newly developed membranes can stand over 20 bar with a peak power density of 7.63 W/m(2), which is equivalent to 13.72 W/m(2) of its inner-selective hollow fiber counterpart with the same module size, packing density, and fiber dimensions. The study may provide insightful guidelines for optimizing the interfacial polymerization procedures and scaling up of the outer-selective TFC hollow fiber membrane modules for PRO power generation.

  20. Applying basic principles of child passenger safety to improving transportation safety for children who travel while seated in wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Manary, Miriam A; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2011-01-01

    Occupant restraint systems are designed based on knowledge of crash dynamics and the application of proven occupant-protection principles. For ambulatory children or children who use wheelchairs but can transfer out of their wheelchair when traveling in motor vehicles, there is a range of child safety seats that comply with federal safety standards and that therefore offer high levels of crash protection. For children who remain seated in wheelchairs for travel, the use of wheelchairs and wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint systems (WTORS) that comply with voluntary industry standards significantly enhances safety. Revisions to the initial versions of these standards will further improve safety for smaller children who travel seated in wheelchairs by requiring wheelchairs for children between 13 and 22 kg (18 and 50 lb) to provide a five-point, wheelchair-integrated crash-tested harness similar to that used in forward-facing child safety seats. While wheelchair and tiedown/restraint manufacturers, van modifiers, transportation personnel, clinicians, and others involved with children who use wheelchairs have clearly defined responsibilities relative to providing these children with safe transportation, parents and caregivers should be knowledgeable about best-practice in wheelchair transportation safety and should use this knowledge to advocate for the safest transportation possible.

  1. NASA Research Announcement Phase 1 Report and Phase 2 Proposal for the Development of a Power Assisted Space Suit Glove Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadogan, Dave; Lingo, Bob

    1996-01-01

    In July of 1996, ILC Dover was awarded Phase 1 of a contract for NASA to develop a prototype Power Assisted Space Suit glove to enhance the performance of astronauts during Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA). This report summarizes the work performed to date on Phase 1, and details the work to be conducted on Phase 2 of the program. Phase 1 of the program consisted of research and review of related technical sources, concept brainstorming, baseline design development, modeling and analysis, component mock-up testing, and test data analysis. ILC worked in conjunction with the University of Maryland's Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) to develop the power assisted glove. Phase 2 activities will focus on the design maturation and the manufacture of a working prototype system. The prototype will be tested and evaluated in conjunction with existing space suit glove technology to determine the performance enhancement anticipated with the implementation of the power assisted joint technology in space suit gloves.

  2. The TACIS Nuclear Programme: Assistance in Upgrading Russian Nuclear Power Stations - An Overview of the Individual Projects in the Internet

    SciTech Connect

    Bieth, Michel; Schoels, Hubert

    2006-07-01

    The European Union' TACIS1 programme has been established for the New Independent States (NIS), among them in the Russian Federation since 1991. One priority of TACIS funding is Nuclear Safety. The European Commission has made available a total of 944 Million Euros for nuclear safety programmes covering the period 1991-2003. The TACIS nuclear safety programme is devoted to the improvement of the safety of Soviet designed nuclear installations in providing technology and safety culture transfer. JRC is carrying out works in the following areas: On-Site Assistance for TACIS operating Nuclear Power Plants; Design Safety and Dissemination of TACIS results; Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement for VVER; Regulatory Assistance; Industrial Waste Management; Nuclear Safeguards; All TACIS projects, dealing with these areas of activity are now available in so called Project Description Sheets (PDS) or Project Results Sheets (PRS) in the Internet for everybody. JRC has created in the Internet an easy to open and to browse database which contains the result of works in relation to the above mentioned nuclear activities. This presentation gives an on-line overview of the app. 430 projects which have been implemented so far since the outset of the TACIS Nuclear Programme in the Russian Federation, which is representative to the other CIS countries, benefiting from the TACIS. The presentation will mainly consist of an on-line-demonstration of the TACIS Nuclear WEB Page, created by JRC. (authors)

  3. Plasma diagnostics of low pressure high power impulse magnetron sputtering assisted by electron cyclotron wave resonance plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stranak, Vitezslav; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Drache, Steffen; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Hippler, Rainer; Cada, Martin; Hubicka, Zdenek; Tichy, Milan

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the hybrid pulsed sputtering source based on the combination of electron cyclotron wave resonance (ECWR) inductively coupled plasma and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) of a Ti target. The plasma source, operated in an Ar atmosphere at a very low pressure of 0.03 Pa, provides plasma where the major fraction of sputtered particles is ionized. It was found that ECWR assistance increases the electron temperature during the HiPIMS pulse. The discharge current and electron density can achieve their stable maximum 10 {mu}s after the onset of the HiPIMS pulse. Further, a high concentration of double charged Ti{sup ++} with energies of up to 160 eV was detected. All of these facts were verified experimentally by time-resolved emission spectroscopy, retarding field analyzer measurement, Langmuir probe, and energy-resolved mass spectrometry.

  4. Effect of durations of wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline on skin perfusion over the ischial tuberosity in people with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Liao, Fuyuan; Jones, Maria A.; Rice, Laura A.; Tisdell, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of various durations of wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline on enhancing skin perfusion over the ischial tuberosity in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Repeated measures, intervention and outcomes measure design. Setting University research laboratory. Participants Power wheelchair users with SCI (N=9). Interventions Three protocols of various durations (3 min, 1 min and zero) of wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline were randomly assigned to the participants. Each protocol consisted of a baseline 15 min sitting, a duration of zero to 3 min reclined and tilted, a second 15 min sitting, and a 5 min recovery. The position at the baseline and second sitting was no tilt/recline of the participant and at the reclined and tilted and recovery was at 35° tilt-in-space and 120° recline. Main Outcome Measures Skin perfusion response to tilt and recline was assessed by laser Doppler and was normalized to mean skin perfusion at the baseline sitting. Results The results showed that mean skin perfusion during recovery at the 3 min duration was significantly higher compared to the 1 min duration (P<.017), and mean skin perfusion was not significantly different between the 1 min and zero durations (N.S.). Skin perfusion during the second sitting was significantly higher at the 3 min duration compared to the 1 min and zero durations (P<.017). Conclusions Our findings suggest that performing the 3 min duration of wheelchair tilt-in-space and recline is more effective than the 1 min duration on enhancing skin perfusion of weight bearing soft tissues. PMID:23178540

  5. Progress in the development of a transcutaneously powered axial flow blood pump ventricular assist system.

    PubMed

    Parnis, S M; Conger, J L; Fuqua, J M; Jarvik, R K; Inman, R W; Tamez, D; Macris, M P; Moore, S; Jacobs, G; Sweeney, M J; Frazier, O H

    1997-01-01

    Development of the Jarvik 2000 intraventricular assist system for long-term support is ongoing. The system integrates the Jarvik 2000 axial flow blood pump with a microprocessor based automatic motor controller to provide response to physiologic demands. Nine devices have been evaluated in vivo (six completed, three ongoing) with durations in excess of 26 weeks. Instrumented experiments include implanted transit-time ultrasonic flow probes and dual micromanometer LV/AoP catheters. Treadmill exercise and heart pacing studies are performed to evaluate control system response to increased heart rates. Pharmacologically induced cardiac dysfunction studies are performed in awake and anesthetized calves to demonstrate control response to simulated heart failure conditions. No deleterious effects or events were encountered during any physiologic studies. No hematologic, renal, hepatic, or pulmonary complications have been encountered in any study. Plasma free hemoglobin levels of 7.0 +/- 5.1 mg/dl demonstrate no device related hemolysis throughout the duration of all studies. Pathologic analysis at explant showed no evidence of thromboembolic events. All pump surfaces were free of thrombus except for a minimal ring of fibrin, (approximately 1 mm) on the inflow bearing. Future developments for permanent implantation will include implanted physiologic control systems, implanted batteries, and transcutaneous energy and data transmission systems.

  6. Evaluation of activity monitors in manual wheelchair users with paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Ding, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of SenseWear® (SW) and RT3 activity monitors (AMs) in estimating energy expenditure (EE) in manual wheelchair users (MWUs) with paraplegia for a variety of physical activities. Methods Twenty-four subjects completed four activities including resting, wheelchair propulsion, arm-ergometry exercise, and deskwork. The criterion EE was measured by a K4b2 portable metabolic cart. The EE estimated by the SW and RT3 were compared with the criterion EE by the absolute differences and absolute percentage errors. Intraclass correlations and the Bland and Altman plots were also used to assess the agreements between the two AMs and the metabolic cart. Correlations between the criterion EE and the estimated EE and sensors data from the AMs were evaluated. Results The EE estimation errors for the AMs varied from 24.4 to 125.8% for the SW and from 22.0 to 52.8% for the RT3. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the criterion EE and the EE estimated by the two AMs for each activity and all activities as a whole were considered poor with all the ICCs smaller than 0.75. Except for deskwork, the EE from the SW was more correlated to the criterion EE than the EE from the RT3. Conclusion The results indicate that neither of the AMs is an appropriate tool for quantifying physical activity in MWUs with paraplegia. However, the accuracy of EE estimation could be potentially improved by building new regression models based on wheelchair-related activities. PMID:21528634

  7. Brain-Computer Interface for Control of Wheelchair Using Fuzzy Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Akkaya, Nurullah; Aytac, Ersin; Günsel, Irfan; Çağman, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The design of brain-computer interface for the wheelchair for physically disabled people is presented. The design of the proposed system is based on receiving, processing, and classification of the electroencephalographic (EEG) signals and then performing the control of the wheelchair. The number of experimental measurements of brain activity has been done using human control commands of the wheelchair. Based on the mental activity of the user and the control commands of the wheelchair, the design of classification system based on fuzzy neural networks (FNN) is considered. The design of FNN based algorithm is used for brain-actuated control. The training data is used to design the system and then test data is applied to measure the performance of the control system. The control of the wheelchair is performed under real conditions using direction and speed control commands of the wheelchair. The approach used in the paper allows reducing the probability of misclassification and improving the control accuracy of the wheelchair. PMID:27777953

  8. Biomechanical model for evaluation of pediatric upper extremity joint dynamics during wheelchair mobility.

    PubMed

    Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Slavens, Brooke A; Wang, Mei; Vogel, Lawrence C; Smith, Peter A; Harris, Gerald F

    2014-01-03

    Pediatric manual wheelchair users (MWU) require high joint demands on their upper extremity (UE) during wheelchair mobility, leading them to be at risk of developing pain and pathology. Studies have examined UE biomechanics during wheelchair mobility in the adult population; however, current methods for evaluating UE joint dynamics of pediatric MWU are limited. An inverse dynamics model is proposed to characterize three-dimensional UE joint kinematics and kinetics during pediatric wheelchair mobility using a SmartWheel instrumented handrim system. The bilateral model comprises thorax, clavicle, scapula, upper arm, forearm, and hand segments and includes the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, glenohumeral, elbow and wrist joints. A single 17 year-old male with a C7 spinal cord injury (SCI) was evaluated while propelling his wheelchair across a 15-meter walkway. The subject exhibited wrist extension angles up to 60°, large elbow ranges of motion and peak glenohumeral joint forces up to 10% body weight. Statistically significant asymmetry of the wrist, elbow, glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints was detected by the model. As demonstrated, the custom bilateral UE pediatric model may provide considerable quantitative insight into UE joint dynamics to improve wheelchair prescription, training, rehabilitation and long-term care of children with orthopedic disabilities. Further research is warranted to evaluate pediatric wheelchair mobility in a larger population of children with SCI to investigate correlations to pain, function and transitional changes to adulthood.

  9. A novel mobile-cloud system for capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering data: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jicheng; Jones, Maria; Liu, Tao; Hao, Wei; Yan, Yuqing; Qian, Gang; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to provide a new approach for capturing and analyzing wheelchair maneuvering data, which are critical for evaluating wheelchair users' activity levels. We proposed a mobile-cloud (MC) system, which incorporated the emerging mobile and cloud computing technologies. The MC system employed smartphone sensors to collect wheelchair maneuvering data and transmit them to the cloud for storage and analysis. A k-nearest neighbor (KNN) machine-learning algorithm was developed to mitigate the impact of sensor noise and recognize wheelchair maneuvering patterns. We conducted 30 trials in an indoor setting, where each trial contained 10 bouts (i.e., periods of continuous wheelchair movement). We also verified our approach in a different building. Different from existing approaches that require sensors to be attached to wheelchairs' wheels, we placed the smartphone into a smartphone holder attached to the wheelchair. Experimental results illustrate that our approach correctly identified all 300 bouts. Compared to existing approaches, our approach was easier to use while achieving similar accuracy in analyzing the accumulated movement time and maximum period of continuous movement (p > 0.8). Overall, the MC system provided a feasible way to ease the data collection process and generated accurate analysis results for evaluating activity levels.

  10. Toward brain-computer interface based wheelchair control utilizing tactually-evoked event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background People with severe disabilities, e.g. due to neurodegenerative disease, depend on technology that allows for accurate wheelchair control. For those who cannot operate a wheelchair with a joystick, brain-computer interfaces (BCI) may offer a valuable option. Technology depending on visual or auditory input may not be feasible as these modalities are dedicated to processing of environmental stimuli (e.g. recognition of obstacles, ambient noise). Herein we thus validated the feasibility of a BCI based on tactually-evoked event-related potentials (ERP) for wheelchair control. Furthermore, we investigated use of a dynamic stopping method to improve speed of the tactile BCI system. Methods Positions of four tactile stimulators represented navigation directions (left thigh: move left; right thigh: move right; abdomen: move forward; lower neck: move backward) and N = 15 participants delivered navigation commands by focusing their attention on the desired tactile stimulus in an oddball-paradigm. Results Participants navigated a virtual wheelchair through a building and eleven participants successfully completed the task of reaching 4 checkpoints in the building. The virtual wheelchair was equipped with simulated shared-control sensors (collision avoidance), yet these sensors were rarely needed. Conclusion We conclude that most participants achieved tactile ERP-BCI control sufficient to reliably operate a wheelchair and dynamic stopping was of high value for tactile ERP classification. Finally, this paper discusses feasibility of tactile ERPs for BCI based wheelchair control. PMID:24428900

  11. Technological and physiological characteristics of a newly developed hand-lever drive system for wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Engel, P; Seeliger, K

    1986-10-01

    It may be concluded that, by use of the newly developed Swing-Turn-gear system, mobility of the disabled person using wheelchairs outdoors can be improved. The qualities of the drive gear in push and pull action, the free wheel, the full selection of frequency, and the range of moving the hand levers represent important progress in wheelchair engineering research. The handrim drive is an alternative, especially for indoor use. But, for the first time, an indoor wheelchair can be offered as a combination vehicle for both indoor and outdoor use. The acceptance of the new wheelchair integrated Swing-Turn-gear is much better than the conspicuous hand-lever drive in standard outdoor wheelchairs. At present, the German wheelchair manufacturer, MEYRA Vlotho, is preparing the new hand-lever drive system for production. Initially, the drive system will be adapted to a standard indoor wheelchair made by this company. Development of a lever drive system is also in progress in the United States, which employs force transmission characteristics in one direction.

  12. Development and validation of a frontal impact 6-year-old occupant and wheelchair computer model.

    PubMed

    Ha, DongRan; Bertocci, Gina; Jategaonkar, Rohit

    2007-01-01

    Many children with disabilities use their wheelchair as a vehicle seat when traveling. To date, few studies have focused on pediatric wheelchair users in transit. A computer model representing a manual pediatric wheelchair seated with a Hybrid III 6-year-old anthropomorphic test device subjected to a 20-g/48-kph (30-mph) frontal crash was developed in MADYMO. The wheelchair was secured using a 4-point tiedown system, and the occupant was restrained using a 3-point belt system. The time history profiles of the computer model were tuned to those of the sled tests. The peak value for key variables was compared between the sled tests and the model. To evaluate model variable time histories, Pearson's correlation coefficients (r) between the sled test and the model outcome measures were determined. The correlation coefficients ranged from .86 to .95, with an average r of .91. This indicates that there are "high" correlations between the model and sled tests across all variables. The pediatric wheelchair model developed and validated in this study will provide a foundation for studying the response of a manual pediatric wheelchair in frontal impacts and associated injury risks for pediatric wheelchair users.

  13. A self-paced motor imagery based brain-computer interface for robotic wheelchair control.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Chun Sing Louis; Gan, John Q; Hu, Huosheng

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a simple self-paced motor imagery based brain-computer interface (BCI) to control a robotic wheelchair. An innovative control protocol is proposed to enable a 2-class self-paced BCI for wheelchair control, in which the user makes path planning and fully controls the wheelchair except for the automatic obstacle avoidance based on a laser range finder when necessary. In order for the users to train their motor imagery control online safely and easily, simulated robot navigation in a specially designed environment was developed. This allowed the users to practice motor imagery control with the core self-paced BCI system in a simulated scenario before controlling the wheelchair. The self-paced BCI can then be applied to control a real robotic wheelchair using a protocol similar to that controlling the simulated robot. Our emphasis is on allowing more potential users to use the BCI controlled wheelchair with minimal training; a simple 2-class self paced system is adequate with the novel control protocol, resulting in a better transition from offline training to online control. Experimental results have demonstrated the usefulness of the online practice under the simulated scenario, and the effectiveness of the proposed self-paced BCI for robotic wheelchair control.

  14. How does lever length and the position of its axis of rotation influence human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion?

    PubMed

    Fiok, Krzysztof; Mróz, Anna

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate empirically how lever length and its axis of rotation position influences human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion. In order to fulfill this goal, a dedicated test stand allowing easy implementation of various lever positions was created. In the experiment, 10 young, healthy, male subjects performed 8 tests consisting of propulsion work with levers of different lengths and lever axis of rotation positions. During tests heart rate, oxygen consumption and EMG assessment of 6 muscles was carried out. Measurements of power output on the test stand were done as well. Together with oxygen consumption analysis, this allowed calculation of human work efficiency. The results show significant (p<0.05 and p<0.001) differences between lever configurations when comparing various parameters values. From the carried out experiments, the authors conclude that levers' length and their axis of rotation position significantly influence human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion. For the examined subjects, placing the levers' axis of rotation close behind the back wheels axis of rotation offered advantageous work conditions.

  15. Power ultrasound-assisted cleaner leather dyeing technique: influence of process parameters.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Venkatasubramanian; Rao, Paruchuri Gangadhar

    2004-03-01

    The application of power ultrasound to leather processing has a significant role in the concept of "clean technology" for leather production. The effect of power ultrasound in leather dyeing has been compared with dyeing in the absence of ultrasound and conventional drumming. The power ultrasound source used in these experiments was ultrasonic cleaner (150 W and 33 kHz). The effect of various process parameters such as amount of dye offer, temperature, and type of dye has been experimentally found out. The effect of presonication of dye solution as well as leather has been studied. Experiments at ultrasonic bath temperature were carried out to find out the combined thermal as well as stirring effects of ultrasound. Dyeing in the presence of ultrasound affords about 37.5 (1.8 times) difference as increase in % dye exhaustion or about 50% decrease in the time required for dyeing compared to dyeing in the absence of ultrasound for 4% acid red dye. About 29 (1.55 times) increase in % dye exhaustion or 30% reduction in time required for dyeing was observed using ultrasound at stationary condition compared with conventional dynamic drumming conditions. The effect of ultrasound at constant temperature conditions with a control experiment has also been studied. The dye exhaustion increases as the temperature increases (30-60 degrees C) and better results are observed at higher temperature due to the use of ultrasound. Presonication of dye solution or crust leather prior to the dyeing process has no significant improvement in dye exhaustion, suggesting ultrasound effect is realized when it is applied during the dyeing process. The results indicate that 1697 and 1416 ppm of dye can be reduced in the spent liquor due to the use of ultrasound for acid red (for 100 min) and acid black (for 3 h) dyes, respectively, thereby reducing the pollution load in the effluent stream. The color yield of the leather as inferred from the reflectance measurement indicates that dye offer can

  16. Shoulder Disease Patterns of the Wheelchair Athletes of Table-Tennis and Archery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the shoulder disease patterns for the table-tennis (TT) and archery (AR) wheelchair athletes via ultrasonographic evaluations. Methods A total of 35 wheelchair athletes were enrolled, made up of groups of TT (n=19) and AR (n=16) athletes. They were all paraplegic patients and were investigated for their wheelchair usage duration, careers as sports players, weekly training times, the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index (WUSPI) scores and ultrasonographic evaluation. Shoulders were divided into playing arm of TT, non-playing arm of TT, bow-arm of AR, and draw arm of AR athletes. Shoulder diseases were classified into five entities of subscapularis tendinopathy, supraspinatus tendinopathy, infraspinatus tendinopathy, biceps long head tendinopathy, and subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. The pattern of shoulder diseases were compared between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney and the chi-square tests Results WSUPI did not significantly correlate with age, wheelchair usage duration, career as players or weekly training times for all the wheelchair athletes. For the non-playing arm of TT athletes, there was a high percentage of subscapularis (45.5%) and supraspinatus (40.9%) tendinopathy. The percentage of subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis showed a tendency to be present in the playing arm of TT athletes (20.0%) compared with their non-playing arm (4.5%), even though this was not statistically significant. Biceps long head tendinopathy was the most common disease of the shoulder in the draw arm of AR athletes, and the difference was significant when compared to the non-playing arm of TT athletes (p<0.05). Conclusion There was a high percentage of subscapularis and supraspinatus tendinopathy cases for the non-playing arm of TT wheelchair athletes, and a high percentage of biceps long head tendinopathy for the draw arm for the AR wheelchair athletes. Consideration of the biomechanical properties of each sport may be needed to tailor specific

  17. Vacuum-powered bubble-assisted solvent extraction followed by macroporous resin enrichment for isolation of podophyllotoxin from Sinopodophyllum emodi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Sui, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jie; Li, Li; Fu, Shuang; Li, Wenjing; Liang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    A vacuum-powered bubble-assisted solvent extraction (VBE) technique was used to extract podophyllotoxin from the root of Sinopodophyllum emodi. We optimized the VBE procedure and showed it had the highest efficiency of extraction compared to other conventional extraction techniques. Based upon the results of single-factor experiments, a three-factor, three-level experiment design was developed by application of a Box-Behnken design. The method was validated by stability, repeatability and recovery experiments. The optimal conditions were: solvent, 60% (v/v) ethanol; particle size of the sample, 60-80 mesh; soak time, 2h; liquid/solid ratio, 21L/kg; air flow, 32mL/min; vacuum-powered bubble extraction time, 65min. The VBE method we developed achieved efficient extraction of podophyllotoxin from S. emodi. The podophyllotoxin extracted can be enriched and separated by an HPD300 macroporous resin adsorption and desorption process. The results indicated that VBE is a convenient, rapid and efficient sample preparation technique.

  18. Computer modeling of a regenerative solar-assisted Rankine power cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed interpretation of the computer program that describes the performance of one of these cycles; namely, a regenerative Rankine power cycle is presented. Water is used as the working medium throughout the cycle. The solar energy collected at relatively low temperature level presents 75 to 80% of the total heat demand and provides mainly the latent heat of vaporization. Another energy source at high temperature level superheats the steam and supplements the solar energy share. A program summary and a numerical example showing the sequency of computations are included. The outcome from the model comprises line temperatures, component heat rates, specific steam consumption, percentage of solar energy contribution, and the overall thermal efficiency.

  19. Barriers, facilitators, and access for wheelchair users: substantive and methodologic lessons from a pilot study of environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Allan R; Anderson, Jennifer J; Miller, Donald R; Shipp, Kathy; Hoenig, Helen

    2002-10-01

    We undertook a month-long intensive pilot study of a sample of adult wheelchair-users in Boston, Massachusetts and Durham, North Carolina, USA. The study had four objectives; to: (1) measure experiences of reaching and failing to reach specific destinations; (2) measure encounters with environmental facilitators and barriers, including both those overcome and not overcome; (3) determine the frequencies of destinations, facilitators, and barriers, and (4) test for consistency between daily reports and retrospective reports. Full participation entailed baseline and exit telephone interviews, and 28 daily telephone contacts. Participants reported reaching a wide range of destinations, most notably, banks, stores and shops, friends' and relatives' homes and health professionals' offices. There was a smaller range of destinations that they could not reach, despite trying; most notably, religious buildings, friends' and relatives' homes and work-places. They encountered an array of barriers, some of which they were able to overcome and others they could not overcome. Reported barriers included personal, interpersonal, and environmental barriers. The 25 subjects completing the study reported a wide range of human, environmental, and technologic support. In general, the consistency among daily, baseline, and exit interviews was high. This study has both substantive and methodologic implications. It suggests that efforts to facilitate social participation by wheelchair-users should focus not only on the built environment, but also on interventions in personal assistance and assistive technology, health promotion and fitness, and programs that improve civility. Methodologically, the data suggest that it is possible to make reliable measures of environmental encounters without the administrative and respondent burden associated with daily interviews.

  20. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis to assist level-ground and stair-descent gaits.

    PubMed

    Au, Samuel; Berniker, Max; Herr, Hugh

    2008-05-01

    The human ankle varies impedance and delivers net positive work during the stance period of walking. In contrast, commercially available ankle-foot prostheses are passive during stance, causing many clinical problems for transtibial amputees, including non-symmetric gait patterns, higher gait metabolism, and poorer shock absorption. In this investigation, we develop and evaluate a myoelectric-driven, finite state controller for a powered ankle-foot prosthesis that modulates both impedance and power output during stance. The system employs both sensory inputs measured local to the external prosthesis, and myoelectric inputs measured from residual limb muscles. Using local prosthetic sensing, we first develop two finite state controllers to produce biomimetic movement patterns for level-ground and stair-descent gaits. We then employ myoelectric signals as control commands to manage the transition between these finite state controllers. To transition from level-ground to stairs, the amputee flexes the gastrocnemius muscle, triggering the prosthetic ankle to plantar flex at terminal swing, and initiating the stair-descent state machine algorithm. To transition back to level-ground walking, the amputee flexes the tibialis anterior muscle, triggering the ankle to remain dorsiflexed at terminal swing, and initiating the level-ground state machine algorithm. As a preliminary evaluation of clinical efficacy, we test the device on a transtibial amputee with both the proposed controller and a conventional passive-elastic control. We find that the amputee can robustly transition between the finite state controllers through direct muscle activation, allowing rapid transitioning from level-ground to stair walking patterns. Additionally, we find that the proposed finite state controllers result in a more biomimetic ankle response, producing net propulsive work during level-ground walking and greater shock absorption during stair descent. The results of this study highlight the