Science.gov

Sample records for power introduction experiences

  1. Experience gained at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant with development and introduction of a unified automated system for accounting and control of radioactive substances and radioactive wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulka, S. K.; Rosnovskii, S. V.

    2014-02-01

    A unified automated system for accounting and control of radioactive substances and radioactive wastes was developed at the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant. The system consists of several interconnected subsystems, which can be developed and put in operation in a stage-wise manner. As of the first quarter of 2013, the subsystems for accounting liquid and solid radioactive wastes, very low-active wastes, and tracers have been developed. The experience gained from the development and putting in use of these systems showed that this is an efficient, timely, and much needed software product.

  2. 'Single molecule': theory and experiments, an introduction.

    PubMed

    Riveline, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    At scales below micrometers, Brownian motion dictates most of the behaviors. The simple observation of a colloid is striking: a permanent and random motion is seen, whereas inertial forces play a negligible role. This Physics, where velocity is proportional to force, has opened new horizons in biology. The random feature is challenged in living systems where some proteins--molecular motors--have a directed motion whereas their passive behaviors of colloid should lead to a Brownian motion. Individual proteins, polymers of living matter such as DNA, RNA, actin or microtubules, molecular motors, all these objects can be viewed as chains of colloids. They are submitted to shocks from molecules of the solvent. Shapes taken by these biopolymers or dynamics imposed by motors can be measured and modeled from single molecules to their collective effects. Thanks to the development of experimental methods such as optical tweezers, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), micropipettes, and quantitative fluorescence (such as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, FRET), it is possible to manipulate these individual biomolecules in an unprecedented manner: experiments allow to probe the validity of models; and a new Physics has thereby emerged with original biological insights. Theories based on statistical mechanics are needed to explain behaviors of these systems. When force-extension curves of these molecules are extracted, the curves need to be fitted with models that predict the deformation of free objects or submitted to a force. When velocity of motors is altered, a quantitative analysis is required to explain the motions of individual molecules under external forces. This lecture will give some elements of introduction to the lectures of the session 'Nanophysics for Molecular Biology'.

  3. 'Single molecule': theory and experiments, an introduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    At scales below micrometers, Brownian motion dictates most of the behaviors. The simple observation of a colloid is striking: a permanent and random motion is seen, whereas inertial forces play a negligible role. This Physics, where velocity is proportional to force, has opened new horizons in biology. The random feature is challenged in living systems where some proteins - molecular motors - have a directed motion whereas their passive behaviors of colloid should lead to a Brownian motion. Individual proteins, polymers of living matter such as DNA, RNA, actin or microtubules, molecular motors, all these objects can be viewed as chains of colloids. They are submitted to shocks from molecules of the solvent. Shapes taken by these biopolymers or dynamics imposed by motors can be measured and modeled from single molecules to their collective effects. Thanks to the development of experimental methods such as optical tweezers, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), micropipettes, and quantitative fluorescence (such as Förster Resonance Energy Transfer, FRET), it is possible to manipulate these individual biomolecules in an unprecedented manner: experiments allow to probe the validity of models; and a new Physics has thereby emerged with original biological insights. Theories based on statistical mechanics are needed to explain behaviors of these systems. When force-extension curves of these molecules are extracted, the curves need to be fitted with models that predict the deformation of free objects or submitted to a force. When velocity of motors is altered, a quantitative analysis is required to explain the motions of individual molecules under external forces. This lecture will give some elements of introduction to the lectures of the session 'Nanophysics for Molecular Biology'. PMID:24565227

  4. Lecture 1: introduction to power conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarjeant, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the course is to present an overview of the power conditioning aspects of energy transfer systems. The objective, then, is to develop an understanding and appreciation of the physical processes that govern the performance of these systems, including the role of such elements as switches, capacitors, inductors, and resistors. Secondly, to discuss where are the sources of information once a problem area has been identified. All the information will be current and state-of-the-art, and directed toward these pulse components, with particular emphasis on the area of high-repetition-rate systems, as these are taking on ever increasing significance.

  5. Neuroscience, power and culture: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Vrecko, Scott

    2010-01-01

    In line with their vast expansion over the last few decades, the brain sciences -- including neurobiology, psychopharmacology, biological psychiatry, and brain imaging -- are becoming increasingly prominent in a variety of cultural formations, from self-help guides and the arts to advertising and public health programmes. This article, which introduces the special issue of "History of the Human Science" on "Neuroscience, Power and Culture," considers the ways that social and historical research can, through empirical investigations grounded in the observation of what is actually happening and has already happened in the sciences of mind and brain, complement speculative discussions of the possible social implications of neuroscience that now appear regularly in the media and in philosophical bioethics. It suggests that the neurosciences are best understood in terms of their lineage within the "psy"-disciplines, and that, accordingly, our analyses of them will be strengthened by drawing on existing literatures on the history and politics of psychology -- particularly those that analyze formations of knowledge, power and subjectivity associated with the discipline and its practical applications. Additionally, it argues against taking today's neuroscientific facts and brain-targetting technologies as starting points for analysis, and for greater recognition of the ways that these are shaped by historical, cultural and political-economic forces. PMID:20514752

  6. The introduction of space technology power systems into developing countries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Allen F.; Ratajczak, Anthony F.

    1989-01-01

    Between 1978 and 1984, NASA-Lewis was responsible for the design, fabrication, installation and operational support of 57 photovoltaic power systems in 27 countries. These systems were installed in locations not served by a central power system and ranged in size from 40 W for powering street lights to 29 kW for providing power to a complete village. Several of the system projects had socio/economic studies components that provided for an assessment of how the introduction of both electricity and a novel high technology power system affected the users and their society.

  7. Introduction to Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), including what OSSEs are, and how and why they are performed. The intent is to educate the audience in light of the OSSE-related sections of the Forecast Improvement Act (H.R. 2413).

  8. The Galicia 3D experiment: an Introduction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, Timothy; Martinez Loriente, Sara; Holroyd, Luke; Merry, Tobias; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia; Jordan, Brian; Tesi Sanjurjo, Mari; Alexanian, Ara; Shillington, Donna; Gibson, James; Minshull, Tim; Karplus, Marianne; Bayracki, Gaye; Davy, Richard; Klaeschen, Dirk; Papenberg, Cord; Ranero, Cesar; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Martinez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    In June and July 2013, scientists from 8 institutions took part in the Galicia 3D seismic experiment, the first ever crustal -scale academic 3D MCS survey over a rifted margin. The aim was to determine the 3D structure of a critical portion of the west Galicia rifted margin. At this margin, well-defined tilted fault blocks, bound by west-dipping faults and capped by synrift sediments are underlain by a bright reflection, undulating on time sections, termed the S reflector and thought to represent a major detachment fault of some kind. Moving west, the crust thins to zero thickness and mantle is unroofed, as evidence by the "Peridotite Ridge" first reported at this margin, but since observed at many other magma-poor margins. By imaging such a margin in detail, the experiment aimed to resolve the processes controlling crustal thinning and mantle unroofing at a type example magma poor margin. The experiment set out to collect several key datasets: a 3D seismic reflection volume measuring ~20x64km and extending down to ~14s TWT, a 3D ocean bottom seismometer dataset suitable for full wavefield inversion (the recording of the complete 3D seismic shots by 70 ocean bottom instruments), the "mirror imaging" of the crust using the same grid of OBS, a single 2D combined reflection/refraction profile extending to the west to determine the transition from unroofed mantle to true oceanic crust, and the seismic imaging of the water column, calibrated by regular deployment of XBTs to measure the temperature structure of the water column. We collected 1280 km2 of seismic reflection data, consisting of 136533 shots recorded on 1920 channels, producing 260 million seismic traces, each ~ 14s long. This adds up to ~ 8 terabytes of data, representing, we believe, the largest ever academic 3D MCS survey in terms of both the area covered and the volume of data. The OBS deployment was the largest ever within an academic 3D survey.

  9. Missouri Introduction to Energy and Power Technology Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide provides materials for the first high school specialization course beyond the broad-based foundation provided by the Introduction to Industrial Technology and Exploration of Technology courses. Section I is the Instructor's Guide, which contains suggestions about how the energy and power technology cluster might be taught as a course…

  10. Introduction to the problem of rocket-powered aircraft performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivey, H Reese; Bowen, Edward N JR; Oborny, Lester F

    1947-01-01

    An introduction to the problem of determining the fundamental limitations on the performance possibilities of rocket-powered aircraft is presented. Previous material on the subject is reviewed and given in condensed form along with supplementary analyses. Some of the problems discussed are: 1) limiting velocity of a rocket projectile; 2) limiting velocity of a rocket jet; 3) jet efficiency; 4) nozzle characteristics; 5) maximum attainable altitudes; 6) ranges. Formulas are presented relating the performance of a rocket-powered aircraft to basic weight and nozzle dimensional parameters. The use of these formulas is illustrated by their application to the special case of a nonlifting rocket projectile.

  11. Power and environmental assessment: Introduction to the special issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, Matthew; Richardson, Tim

    2013-02-15

    The significance of politics and power dynamics has long been recognised in environmental assessment (EA) research, but there has not been sustained attention to power, either theoretically or empirically. The aim of this special issue is to encourage the EA community to engage more consistently with the issue of power. The introduction represents a ground-clearing exercise intended to clarify the terms of the debate about power in the EA field, and to contribute to the development of a research agenda. Research trends in the field are outlined, and potential analytic and normative lines of inquiry are identified. The contributions to this special issue represent contrasting conceptual and methodological approaches that navigate the analytical and normative terrain of power dynamics in EA. Together, they demonstrate that power cannot be removed from EA policy or practices, and is a necessary research focus for the development of the field. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Introduces the themed section on power Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provides an overview of the papers in the themed section Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identifies research trends and directions for future research.

  12. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Luigi

    This chapter introduces the context, objectives and structure of the book. This book aims both to contribute to disseminate the knowledge about the scientific research conducted in space and to promote new exploitation of existing data in this field. While space experiments are characterised by a long time for preparation, high costs and few opportunities, significant scientific value is expected from the resulting data for almost scientific disciplines. In this context, ISS is a unique experimental environment for research. As part of its Seventh Framework Programme, the European Commission intends to support further exploitation and valorisation of space experimental data. This book was realised as part of the ULISSE project, co-funded by the European Union. The book intends to provide an introduction to space research with a focus on the experiments performed on the ISS and related disciplines. The book also intends to be a useful guide, not only for scientists but also for teachers, students and newcomers to space research activities.

  13. Ranchero Explosive Pulsed Power Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, J.H.; Atchison, W.L.; Deninger, W.J.; Fowler, C.M.; Herrera, D.H.; King, J.C.; Lopez, E.A.; Oona, H.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Stokes, J.L.; Sena, F.C.; Tabaka, L.J.; Tasker, D.G.; Torres, D.T.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.; Taylor, A.J.; Rodriguez, G.; Oro, D.M.; Garcia, O.F.; parker, J.V.; Broste, W.B.

    1999-06-27

    The authors are developing the Ranchero high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system to power cylindrically imploding solid-density liners for hydrodynamics experiments. The near-term goal is to conduct experiments in the regime pertinent to the Atlas Capacitor bank. That is, they will attempt to implode liners of {approximately}50 g mass at velocities approaching 15 km/sec. The basic building block of the HEPP system is a coaxial generator with a 304.8 mm diameter stator, and an initial armature diameter of 152 mm. The armature is expanded by a high explosive (HE) charge detonated simultaneously along its axis. They have reported a variety of experiments conducted with generator modules 43 cm long and have presented an initial design for hydrodynamic liner experiments. In this paper they give a synopsis of their first system test, and a status report on the development of a generator module that is 1.4 m long.

  14. Introduction to Classical Density Functional Theory by a Computational Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levy, Nicolas; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We propose an in silico experiment to introduce the classical density functional theory (cDFT). Density functional theories, whether quantum or classical, rely on abstract concepts that are nonintuitive; however, they are at the heart of powerful tools and active fields of research in both physics and chemistry. They led to the 1998 Nobel Prize in…

  15. Introduction to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Kaune, W T

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the reader to electric and magnetic fields, particularly those fields produced by electric power systems and other sources using frequencies in the power-frequency range. Electric fields are produced by electric charges; a magnetic field also is produced if these charges are in motion. Electric fields exert forces on other charges; if in motion, these charges will experience magnetic forces. Power-frequency electric and magnetic fields induce electric currents in conducting bodies such as living organisms. The current density vector is used to describe the distribution of current within a body. The surface of the human body is an excellent shield for power-frequency electric fields, but power-frequency magnetic fields penetrate without significant attenuation; the electric fields induced inside the body by either exposure are comparable in magnitude. Electric fields induced inside a human by most environmental electric and magnetic fields appear to be small in magnitude compared to levels naturally occurring in living tissues. Detection of such fields thus would seem to require the existence of unknown biological mechanisms. Complete characterization of a power-frequency field requires measurement of the magnitudes and electrical phases of the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes of its three vector components. Most available instrumentation measures only a small subset, or some weighted average, of these quantities. Hand-held survey meters have been used widely to measure power-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Automated data-acquisition systems have come into use more recently to make electric- and magnetic-field recordings, covering periods of hours to days, in residences and other environments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8206045

  16. Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to a special issue of the journal General and Comparative Endocrinology dedicated to Insect Endocrinology. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequences ...

  17. Introduction and overall description of nuclear power plant. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Topics covered in this volume include content and purpose of booklets; how to study; producing electricity; the fossil fuel power plant; the nuclear power plant; the nuclear reactor; generating steam in a nuclear power plant; using the steam in a nuclear power plant; nuclear power station facilities; and special features of nuclear power plants.

  18. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.; Gunsing, F.; Pronyaev, V. G.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Volume 24 `Neutron Resonance Parameters' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides the introduction into the topic and an explanation of the symbols and notation used.

  19. Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introduction to the second edition of the Compendium of Apple and Pear Diseases contains a general description of genus and species of commercial importance, some general information about growth and fruiting habits as well as recent production statistics. A general description of major scion c...

  20. Introduction

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video provides a quick overview of high-power rocketry as well as a preview for the rest of the High-Power Rocketry video series. The video describes the two recognized rocketry organizations ...

  1. Power and replication - designing powerful experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological research is expensive, with monetary costs to granting agencies and emotional costs to researchers. As such, biological researchers should always follow the mantra, "failure is not an option." A failed experimental design is generally manifested as an experiment with high P-values, leavin...

  2. Low power laser therapy — an introduction and a review of some biological effects

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Haymo

    1986-01-01

    This report gives a brief introduction to the characteristics of therapeutic low power laser devices. Absorption, tissue penetration and physiological mechanisms of laser irradiation are discussed. The biological effects of low power laser light are reviewed in the areas of collagen metabolism, woundhealing, inflammation and pain control. Contraindications, precautions and side effects of low power laser irradiation are discussed.

  3. 78 FR 4477 - Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... COMMISSION Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Introduction AGENCY: Nuclear... subsection to NUREG-0800, ``Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power..., Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants:...

  4. Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinah; Hao, Ming; Wong, Pak C.; Chen, Chaomei

    2011-01-23

    Welcome to the Conference on Visualization and Data Analysis (VDA) 2011. The scope of VDA covers all topics and areas of data visualization and visual analytics. Since the first VDA conference in 1994, the annual event has grown steadily into a major venue for visualization researchers and practitioners from around the world to present their work and share their experiences.

  5. Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Taussig, Karen-Sue; Gibbon, Sahra Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    We introduce this special issue of Medial Anthropology Quarterly on public health genomics by exploring both the unique contribution of ethnographic sensibility that medical anthropologists bring to the study of genomics and some of the key insights offered by the essays in this collection. As anthropologists, we are concerned with the power dynamics and larger cultural commitments embedded in practices associated with public health. We seek to understand, first, the broad significance of genomics as a cultural object and, second, the social action set into motion as researchers seek to translate genomic knowledge and technology into public health benefits. PMID:24214906

  6. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koper, Rob

    In 2003 we started a new research programme at the Centre for Learning Sciences and Technologies (CELSTEC) that was aiming to help people to further develop their professional competences by using the innovative powers of new media, mobile devices, and modern Internet services. The idea behind the programme was to contribute to one of the bigger challenges in our society: how to deal with the growing complexity, the growing quantity and the permanent changes in knowledge and technologies. For companies this question relates to the core of their business: how to become innovative and stay competitive. For the employees, the ‘professionals’, this question relates directly to their jobs: how to become and stay employable. In this book we will concentrate on the last group, the professionals and their question how to stay employable, how to keep up-to-date and how to develop professional competence during their careers. The professionals represent the human capital, the knowledge, the innovative power in our economy.

  7. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graauw, T.

    2010-04-01

    about these exciting developments in this newsletter. And as usual, you will also find a list of upcoming events, seminars and workshops related to ALMA and radio astronomy that we strongly recommend as well as the latest job opportunities to join the exciting and challenging ALMA adventure. I cannot finish this introduction without drawing your attention to the emerging results of the Herschel satellite and its instruments, HIFI, PACS and SPIRE. The images and spectra are truly stunning and very exciting and of great interest for future ALMA observing programs.

  8. WISPER: Wirless Space Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 Advanced Design Project at the University of Alaska Fairbanks was to design a spacecraft as a technology demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT). With cost effectiveness as a design constraint, a micro-satellite in low earth orbit (LEO) was chosen for the mission. Existing and near term technologies were analyzed and selected for the project. In addition to the conceptual design of the payload, support systems, and structure, the analysis included attention to safety, environmental impact, cost, and schedule for construction and operation. Wireless power beaming is not a new concept. Experimental demonstrations and study efforts have continued since the early 1960's. With the latest progress in transmitter and receiver technology, the next natural step is to beam power from earth to space. This proposed flight demonstration will advance the science of power beaming and prove the viability of various applications of WPT in space. Two methods of power beaming will be examined during the two separate phases of the spacecraft life. The first phase will demonstrate the technology and examine the theory of microwave power transmission at a high frequency. Special aspects of the first phase will include a highly accurate attitude control system and a 14 m inflatable parabolic antenna. The second phase will investigate the utilization of high intensity laser power using modified photovoltaic arrays. Special instrumentation on the spacecraft will measure the conversion efficiency from the received microwave or laser power to direct current power.

  9. Introduction:

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Nick; Jones, Peter Murray; Kassell, Lauren; Secord, Jim

    2015-01-01

    summary Communication should be central to histories of reproduction, because it has structured how people do and do not reproduce. Yet communication has been so pervasive, and so various, that it is often taken for granted and the historical specificities overlooked. Making communication a frame for histories of reproduction can draw a fragmented field together, including by putting the promotion of esoteric ideas on a par with other practical activities. Paying communication close attention can revitalize the history of reproduction over the long term by highlighting continuities as well as the complex connections between new technologies and new approaches. Themes such as the power of storytelling, the claiming and challenging of expertise, and relations between knowledge and ignorance, secrecy and propriety also invite further study. PMID:26521666

  10. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortuem, Gerd; Eertink, Henk; Prehofer, Christian; Strohbach, Martin

    The convergence of wireless networks with mobile devices and embedded sensing technologies has a tremendous impact on how to model, develop and evaluate computer and software systems. Consequently, new computing and system models such as context-aware computing, spatially-aware computing and physically-embedded computing are supplementing or replacing traditional notions of distributed and parallel computing. This topic explores fundamental and practical research questions related to these emerging concepts and mobile and ubiquitous computing in general. This topic is new in the scope of the EuroPar series of conferences. It attracted 4 submissions, of which one was accepted, reflecting a 25% acceptance rate. This particular paper is quite representative for the ubiquitous computing area: it presents solutions for (near) optimal broadcasting, focusing on energy-efficiency in particular. This is very important for battery-powered wireless sensor networks, where broadcasting is the main communication mechanism, and energy efficiency is the key deployment requirement.

  11. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingshirn, C.

    The purpose of this introduction is - after a few general words on ZnO - to inform the reader about the history of ZnO research, the contents of this book and the intentions of the authors. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a IIb-VI compound semiconductor. This group comprises the binary compounds of Zn, Cd and Hg with O, S, Se, Te and their ternary and quaternary alloys. The band gaps of these compounds cover the whole band gap range from E g ≈ 3. 94 eV for hexagonal ZnS down to semimetals (i.e., E g = 0 eV) for most of the mercury compounds. ZnO itself is also a wide gap semiconductor with E g ≈ 3. 436 eV at T = 0 K and (3. 37 ± 0. 01) eV at room temperature. For more details on the band structure, see Chaps. 4 and 6 or for a recent collection of data on ZnO, for example, [Rössler et al. (eds) Landolt-Börnstein, New Series, Group III, Vols. 17 B, 22, and 41B, 1999]. Like most of the compounds of groups IV, III-V, IIb-VI and Ib-VII, ZnO shows a tetrahedral coordination. In contrast to several other IIb-VI compounds, which occur both in the hexagonal wurtzite and the cubic zinc blende type structure such as ZnS, which gave the name to these two modifications, ZnO occurs almost exclusively in the wurtzite type structure. It has a relatively strong ionic binding (see Chap. 2). The exciton binding energy in ZnO is 60 meV [Thomas, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 15:86, 1960], the largest among the IIb-VI compounds, but by far not the largest for all semiconductors since, for example, CuCl and CuO have exciton binding energies around 190 and 150 meV, respectively. See, for example, [Rössler et al. (eds) Landolt-Börnstein, New Series, Group III, Vols. 17B, 22, and 41B, 1999; Thomas, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 15:86, 1960; Klingshirn and Haug, Phy. Rep. 70:315, 1981; Hönerlage et al., Phys. Rep. 124:161, 1985] and references therein. More details on excitons will be given in Chap. 6. ZnO has a density of about 5. 6 g / cm3 corresponding to 4. 2 × 1022 ZnO molecules per cm3 [Hallwig and

  12. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging and Overhauser imaging are magnetic resonance techniques for detecting paramagnetic substances (i.e. molecules which have one or more unpaired electron(s) in their outer orbitals). The main impetus for developing these techniques is the intriguing possibility of detecting and imaging the distribution of free radicals in the body. Naturally occurring free radicals are widely believed to be involved in the early development of many diseases, so the ability to localize and quantify them in vivo would have profound implications for many areas of biomedical research. Stable free radicals can also be used as `contrast agents', and following their fate in the body can give useful insights into organ function. Some free radicals and paramagnetic solids have the ability to probe the chemical and physical nature of their surroundings, also offering a wide variety of potential applications, in particular the measurement of oxygen concentrations in tissues. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was first demonstrated in 1945, the same year that nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments were first carried out. EPR and NMR are very closely related at the fundamental level, differing mainly in the fact that EPR involves a magnetic resonance experiment on unpaired electrons in the sample, while NMR uses atomic nuclei with non-zero spin. On a practical level, the techniques are also closely related, despite the fact that most EPR experiments are continuous-wave, while virtually all NMR is carried out using pulsed, Fourier-transform methods. Overhauser-based techniques combine both flavours of magnetic resonance in EPR/NMR double-resonance experiments. While NMR has found a valuable place in clinical practice, in the form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biomedical EPR is still in its relative infancy, with about twenty research groups world-wide having the capability to use EPR spectroscopy or imaging to study small animals in vivo. It

  13. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Michael

    Fred's long and fruitful involvement with double beta decay began with a neodymium-150 experiment reported in the 1956 Nuovo Cimento paper written with his Los Alamos colleagues, Cowan, Harrison, and Langer. The experimental situation at the time was in a state of turmoil, with positive results reported for neutrinoless double beta decay by one laboratory being contradicted by another. A theoretical paper by Furry in 1939 had stimulated interest in measuring a double beta half life as a means of distinguishing between Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. The mode proposed by Furry had the neutrino emitted by one neutron reabsorbed by another in the same nucleus, leaving no neutrinos in the final state. Without neutrinos to share the transition energy, the two electrons would get essentially all of it, and the spectrum of their total energies would be a sharp spike…

  14. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graauw, T.

    2010-01-01

    First of all, I would like to wish all of you an happy New Year, which I sincerely hope will bring you success, happiness and interesting new opportunities. For us in ALMA, the end of 2009 and the beginning of 2010 have been very exciting and this is once more a special moment in the development of our observatory. After transporting our third antenna to the high altitude Chajnantor plateau, at 5000 meters above sea level, our team successfully combined the outputs of these antennas using "phase closure", a standard method in interferometry. This achievement marks one more milestone along the way to the beginning of Commissioning and Science Verification, CSV, which, once completed, will mark the beginning of Early Science for ALMA. There was an official announcement about this milestone at the AAS meeting early January and we also wanted to share this good news with you through this newsletter, which contains the content of the announcement. In another area, this newsletter contains the progress on site and a presentation of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA). This is the second part of a two part series on antennas, a continuation of the article in the last newsletter. The ACA plays a crucial part in the imaging of extended sources with ALMA. Without the ACA, the ability to produce accurate images would be very restricted. Finally, as you know, we like to show the human face of this great endeavour we are building and this time, we decided to highlight the Department of Technical Services, another fundamental piece working actively to make ALMA the most powerful radio observatory ever built.

  15. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.

    In the history of modern physics and engineering, the electron quantum mechanical effect and its utilization in electronics have attracted much attention. With increase in demand for ultrahigh sensitivity of signal sensing, ultrahigh speed of data processing, ultralow power dissipation of computer components and so on, quantum effect electronics has become more and more promising. Since the middle of the twentieth century most of vacuum electronics have been replaced by the solid state electronics, where the electron dynamics are well described by the band-diagram description. Solid state electronics itself and band-diagram description were originally in the category of quantum mechanics. However, the treatment of carriers based on the band-diagram inside semiconductors used the classical model where the electron wave concept has been missing. One should perceive it to be also true even for semiconductor superlattices. In the late twentieth century, along with the extremely miniaturized scale of semiconductor devices, mesoscopic physics and mesoscopic electronics have boomed. In this research area, one attempts to manipulate directly the coherent electron wave instead of the electron particle. In ordinary semiconductors, however, only the nanoscale dimension allowed us to handle electron wave interference, interaction and so on to some extent. Besides, success was obtained only at cryogenic temperatures. Collisions between electrons or between electron and lattice (or impurity) was recognized again as a forcible enemy of electron wave engineering. It was a time when both researchers and engineers in the field were urged forward to search for better physical and engineering stages where no electron collisions take place thereby maintaining electron wave coherency over very long distances in the appropriate temperature range.

  16. An introduction to the Amonix 8700 Solar Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesniak, A.; Garboushian, V.; Liu, M.; Gordon, R.; Bagienski, W.

    2013-09-01

    From 2009 through early 2012, Amonix installed nearly 40 MW AC of its flagship 7700 Solar Power Generator product in locations all across the southwestern USA. Since completion of these projects, Amonix has been adapting lessons learned from the 7700 build-out and new CPV technologies into the company's 8700 Solar Power Generator, to be released in late 2014. The paper will focus on the features of the 8700 product, including higher performance and lower cost, and how the 8700 plans to keep CPV competitive in the global solar marketplace.

  17. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieck, Hans Paetz Gen.

    Spin is an entirely non-classical property of (elementary) particles [1], p. 198. A reference which deals with many aspects of spin (although the—in my mind—seminal Stern-Gerlach experiment (for details see Sect. 8.1 ) is never even mentioned) is "The Story of Spin" by Tomonaga [2] from which we cite: "It is a mysterious beast, and yet its practical effect prevails over the whole of science. The existence of spin, and the statistics associated with it, is the most subtle and ingenious design of Nature—without it the whole universe would collapse" (from the translator's (T. Oka) preface, p. vii). In nuclear physics, the nuclear, nucleon, and even quark spins enter in many ways. Examples are: hyperfine interaction, spin-orbit interaction, tensor force, spin-spin nucleon-nucleon interaction, the relation between spin and statistics which is not only the basis of the periodic table, but markedly influences the scattering of identical particles (e.g.{^{12}C} on {^{12}C} vs.{^{13}C} on ^{13}C,) etc.

  18. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The formation of life remains a mystery. In our three-day scientific event, we will hear talks and see posters concerning what astrochemistry and astrobiology can currently tell us about this mystery. The first subject to be explored by our speakers will be astrochemistry, and what has been learned about the formation of complex molecules in star- and planet-forming regions of the interstellar medium. This topic will be sub-divided into three subjects: astronomical observations, laboratory experiments, and simulations of the chemistry leading to large molecules, both in the gas and on the surfaces of interstellar dust particles. Some introductory remarks will be given about these subjects. We will next learn about the roles of comets and exoplanets. We will hear how comets can produce water and complex molecules, and possibly deliver them to nascent planets such as the early earth, and we will learn what current space probes such as Rosetta can tell us about the chemical make-up of comets. Regarding exoplanets, speakers will explore their likely atmospheres, and what complex molecules can be simulated in them. The last part of the event will be divided into various fields of astrobiology, including synthetic approaches to primitive life, paths to observations of life on other worlds, simulations of the origin of life, and the particular role of hydrothermal environments. In summary, we will learn about significant progress in astrochemistry and astrobiology, and yet we will also learn about how much more must be known before we can solve in its entirety the basic problem of how life arose.

  19. Accelerating introduction of new vaccines: barriers to introduction and lessons learned from the recent Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine experience.

    PubMed

    Hajjeh, Rana

    2011-10-12

    Adoption of new vaccines in developing countries is critical to reducing child mortality and meeting Millennium Development Goal 4. However, such introduction has historically suffered from significant delays that can be attributed to various factors including (i) lack of recognition of the value of a vaccine, (ii) factors related to weak health systems, and (iii) policy considerations. Recently, the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI) supported efforts to accelerate the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccines in developing countries, which resulted in a significant surge in vaccine adoption by these countries. The experience with Hib vaccines, as well as similar efforts by GAVI to support the introduction of new pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines, provides a strategy for new vaccine adoption that is reviewed in this paper, providing a useful model to help accelerate the uptake of other life-saving vaccines. This strategy addresses barriers for vaccine adoption by focusing on three major areas: (i) communications to increase awareness about the various factors needed for evidence-based decisions that meet a country's health goals; (ii) research activities to answer key questions that support vaccine introduction and long-term programme sustainability; and (iii) coordination with the various stakeholders at global, regional and country levels to ensure successful programme implementation.

  20. Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Southern, Sarka O.; Mentzer, Mark A.; Rodriquez-Chavez, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 SPIE Sensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine and Environmental Monitoring conference embraced a wealth of state-of-the-art information in basic and applied science. This event covered the latest developments in the following areas: Non-invasive Disease Diagnostics for Global Health- This opening series of two consecutive sessions focused on oral biospecimen based rapid assays and point-of-care devices for the detection of pathogens causing infectious diseases, biomarkers for cancer, and analytes for noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes. They also covered presentations on the human proteasome and microbiome with linkage to human diseases and diagnostic approaches. The sessions were built on the past experience and expertise of the National Institutes of Health, National Institutes of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Military Medicine I: Traumatic Brain Injury and PTSD-This assembly covered oral-biomarker based diagnostics for brain damage and TBI as well as prevention and rehabilitation technologies. Neurorehabilitation and noninvasive neuromodulation were also discussed as critical approaches for effective functioning. Military Medicine II: Physiology and Medicine of Extreme Environments and Spaceflight-This scientific segment showcased physiological, pharmacological and diagnostic sensing methodologies during spaceflight per the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as well as military-relevant toxicans and future sensing trends per the Department of Defense. It also included latest technologies to determine hydration status in warfighters, eye surgery using the latest laser technologies, and sensing tools for blood analysis. ? Sensing Technologies for Disease Diagnostics and Environmental Monitoring-This closing series of two consecutive sessions provided the venues to learn and discuss more results on the next generation of diagnostic tools and field technologies for diseases, including biomarker detection by digital

  1. Nova pulse power design and operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, K.; Larson, D.; Merritt, B.; Christie, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nova is a 100 TW Nd++ solid state laser designed for experiments with laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The pulsed power for Nova includes a 58 MJ capacitor bank driving 5336 flashlamps with millisecond pulses and subnanosecond high voltages for electro optics. This paper summarizes the pulsed power designs and the operational experience to date.

  2. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Cees; Develder, Chris; Jukan, Admela; Mambretti, Joe

    throughput. The second session groups 3 papers presenting methods, protocols and architectures that enhance capacities in the Networks. The paper titled: “NIC-assisted Cache-Efficient Receive Stack for Message Passing over Ethernet” presents the addition of multiqueue support in the Open-MX receive stack so that all incoming packets for the same process are treated on the same core. It then introduces the idea of binding the target end process near its dedicated receive queue. In general this multiqueue receive stack performs better than the original single queue stack, especially on large communication patterns where multiple processes are involved and manual binding is difficult. The authors of: “A Multipath Fault-Tolerant Routing Method for High-Speed Interconnection Networks” focus on the problem of fault tolerance for high-speed interconnection networks by designing a fault tolerant routing method. The goal was to solve a certain number of link and node failures, considering its impact, and occurrence probability. Their experiments show that their method allows applications to successfully finalize their execution in the presence of several faults, with an average performance value of 97% with respect to the fault-free scenarios. The paper: “Hardware implementation study of the Self-Clocked Fair Queuing Credit Aware (SCFQ-CA) and Deficit Round Robin Credit Aware (DRR-CA) scheduling algorithms” proposes specific implementations of the two schedulers taking into account the characteristics of current high-performance networks. A comparison is presented on the complexity of these two algorithms in terms of silicon area and computation delay. Finally we selected one paper for the special paper session: “A Case Study of Communication Optimizations on 3D Mesh Interconnects”. In this paper the authors present topology aware mapping as a technique to optimize communication on 3-dimensional mesh interconnects and hence improve performance. Results are presented

  3. Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laat, Cees; Develder, Chris; Jukan, Admela; Mambretti, Joe

    throughput. The second session groups 3 papers presenting methods, protocols and architectures that enhance capacities in the Networks. The paper titled: “NIC-assisted Cache-Efficient Receive Stack for Message Passing over Ethernet” presents the addition of multiqueue support in the Open-MX receive stack so that all incoming packets for the same process are treated on the same core. It then introduces the idea of binding the target end process near its dedicated receive queue. In general this multiqueue receive stack performs better than the original single queue stack, especially on large communication patterns where multiple processes are involved and manual binding is difficult. The authors of: “A Multipath Fault-Tolerant Routing Method for High-Speed Interconnection Networks” focus on the problem of fault tolerance for high-speed interconnection networks by designing a fault tolerant routing method. The goal was to solve a certain number of link and node failures, considering its impact, and occurrence probability. Their experiments show that their method allows applications to successfully finalize their execution in the presence of several faults, with an average performance value of 97% with respect to the fault-free scenarios. The paper: “Hardware implementation study of the Self-Clocked Fair Queuing Credit Aware (SCFQ-CA) and Deficit Round Robin Credit Aware (DRR-CA) scheduling algorithms” proposes specific implementations of the two schedulers taking into account the characteristics of current high-performance networks. A comparison is presented on the complexity of these two algorithms in terms of silicon area and computation delay. Finally we selected one paper for the special paper session: “A Case Study of Communication Optimizations on 3D Mesh Interconnects”. In this paper the authors present topology aware mapping as a technique to optimize communication on 3-dimensional mesh interconnects and hence improve performance. Results are presented

  4. Introduction to Voigt's wind power plant. [energy conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkin, J.

    1973-01-01

    The design and operation of a 100 kilowatt wind driven generator are reported. Its high speed three-bladed turbine operates at a height of 50 meters. Blades are rigidly connected to the hub and turbine revolutions change linearly with wind velocity, maintaining a constant speed ratio of blade tip velocity to wind velocity over the full predetermined wind range. Three generators installed in the gondola generate either dc or ac current. Based on local wind conditions, the device has a maximum output of 720 kilowatts at a wind velocity of 16 meters per second. Total electrical capacity is 750 kilowatts, and power output per year is 2,135,000 kilowatt/hours.

  5. An Introduction to the Epr-Chameleon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Imafuku, Kentaro; Regoli, Massimo

    2003-02-01

    On September 27 (2001), as a side activity to the "Japan-Italy Joint workshop on: Quantum open systems and quantum measurement", the first public demonstration of the dynamical EPR-chameleon experiment was performed at Waseda University in order to give an experimental answer to a long standing question in the foundations of quantum theory: do there exist classical macroscopic systems which, by local independent choices, produce sequences of data which reproduce the singlet correlations, hence violating Bell's inequality? The EPR-chameleon experiment gives an affirmative answer to this question by concretely producing an example of such systems in the form of three personal computers which realize a local deterministic dynamical evolution whose mathematical structure is very simple and transparent. In the experiment performed on September 27 the local dynamics used was not a reversible one because the interaction with the degrees of freedom of the apparatus was integrated out giving rise to an effective Markovian dynamics which, although mapping probability measures into probability measures, did not preserve the ±1-values of the spin (or polarization) observables. This feature was criticized by some of the partecipants and the following two questions arose: i) is it possible to prove that the Markovian evolution, used in the experiment, is indeed the reduced evolution of a bona fide reversible evolution? ii) if the answer to question (i) is affirmative, is it possible to reproduce the EPR correlations by simply considering empirical averages of ±1-values, as one does in usual EPR type experiments? An affirmative answer to these questions was given in the paper [AcImRe01] and it is briefly reviewed in what follows.

  6. Independent mobility after early introduction of a power wheelchair in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dunaway, Sally; Montes, Jacqueline; O'Hagen, Jessica; Sproule, Douglas M; Vivo, Darryl C De; Kaufmann, Petra

    2013-05-01

    Weakness resulting from spinal muscular atrophy causes severe limitations in functional mobility. The early introduction of power mobility has potential to enhance development and mitigate disability. These outcomes are achieved by simulating normal skill acquisition and by promoting motor learning, visuospatial system development, self-exploration, cognition, and social development. There are few reports on early power mobility in spinal muscular atrophy, and it is typically not prescribed until school age. The authors evaluated 6 children under age 2 years with neuromuscular disease (5 spinal muscular atrophy, 1 congenital muscular dystrophy) for power mobility. Parents recorded the practice hours necessary to achieve independence using the Power Mobility Skills Checklist. Four children achieved independence in all items on the checklist by 7.9 months (range: 73-458 days). Introduction of early power mobility is feasible in spinal muscular atrophy patients under age 2 years and should be introduced in late infancy when children typically acquire locomotor skills.

  7. Nova power systems: status and operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Whitham, K.; Merritt, B.T.; Gritton, D.G.; Smart, A.J.; Holloway, R.W.; Oicles, J.A.

    1983-11-28

    This paper describes the pulse power systems that are used in these lasers; the status and the operating experiences. The pulsed power system for the Nova Laser is comprised of several distinct technology areas. The large capacitor banks for driving flashlamps that excite the laser glass is one area, the fast pulsers that drive pockels cell shutters is another area, and the contol system for the pulsed power is a third. This paper discusses the capacitor banks and control systems.

  8. Georgians Experience Astronomy Research in Schools: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Zodiac T.; Aguilar, J. C.; Higdon, S. J. U.

    2010-01-01

    Georgia Department of Education and its partners at Columbus State and Georgia Southern Universities are engaged in creating a comprehensive program to institutionalize high quality astronomy in its high schools. The goal of the Georgians Experience Astronomy Research in Schools (GEARS) project is to transform the way high-school Astronomy is taught in 100% of GA's public schools by 2012. GEARS will be an innovative and rigorous, NASA research-infused Astronomy curriculum, which will reach thousands of students in rural, urban, and suburban areas and will be taught by highly trained teachers. GEARS project leaders have two objectives: 1) Develop and implement an online high-school Astronomy course for inclusion in the GA Virtual School portal. The GEARS course will be a progression through inquiry-based research experiences culminating in authentic data analysis and data mining activities selected from the NASA archives. The GEARS framework and units will meet the new Georgia Performance Standards in Astronomy and will be incorporated into teacher workshops. 2) Ensure the sustainability and utilization of GEARS both online and in a blended classroom approach by providing teacher professional development, integrating it into Space Science for Teachers graduate courses, and by developing a network of Georgia Astronomy Resource Teachers who will teach GEARS astronomy and mentor other teachers in their local areas. This poster will provide an overview of the workshop and course curricular framework, design philosophy and sample units. Partnerships with interested parties, especially those with NASA data, are sought. The project website is http://cheller.phy.georgiasouthern.edu/ shigdon/GEARS/GEARS.html. This project is funded by NASA Grant NNX09AH83A through the GADOE, supported by CSU and GSU.

  9. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  10. Economic and technological aspects of the market introduction of renewable power technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worlen, Christine M.

    Renewable energy, if developed and delivered with appropriate technologies, is cleaner, more evenly distributed, and safer than conventional energy systems. Many countries and several states in the United States promote the development and introduction of technologies for "green" electricity production. This dissertation investigates economic and technological aspects of this process for wind energy. In liberalized electricity markets, policy makers use economic incentives to encourage the adoption of renewables. Choosing from a large range of possible policies and instruments is a multi-criteria decision process. This dissertation evaluates the criteria used and the trade-offs among the criteria, and develops a hierarchical flow scheme that policy makers can use to choose the most appropriate policy for a given situation. Economic incentives and market transformation programs seek to reduce costs through mass deployment in order to make renewable technologies competitive. Cost reduction is measured in "experience curves" that posit negative exponential relationships between cumulative deployment and production cost. This analysis reveals the weaknesses in conventional experience curve analyses for wind turbines, and concludes that the concept is limited by data availability, a weak conceptual foundation, and inappropriate statistical estimation. A revised model specifies a more complete set of economic and technological forces that determine the cost of wind power. Econometric results indicate that experience and upscaling of turbine sizes accounted for the observed cost reduction in wind turbines in the United States, Denmark and Germany between 1983 and 2001. These trends are likely to continue. In addition, future cost reductions will result from economies of scale in production. Observed differences in the performance of theoretically equivalent policy instruments could arise from economic uncertainty. To test this hypothesis, a methodology for the

  11. Loads for pulsed power cylindrical implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.E.; Armijo, E.V.; Barthell, B.L.; Bartos, J.J.; Bush, H.; Foreman, L.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Gobby, P.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Gurule, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pulse power can be used to generate high energy density conditions in convergent hollow cylindrical geometry through the use of appropriate electrode configuration and cylindrical loads. Cylindrically symmetric experiments are conducted with the Pegasus-H inductive store, capacitor energized pulse power facility at Los Alamos using both precision machined cylindrical liner loads and low mass vapor deposited cylindrical foil loads. The liner experiments investigate solid density hydrodynamic topics. Foil loads vaporize from Joule heating to generate an imploding cylindrical plasma which can be used to simulate some fluxes associated with fusion energy processes. Similar experiments are conducted with {open_quotes}Procyon{close_quotes} inductive store pulse power assemblies energized by explosively driven magnetic flux compression.

  12. Satellite Power System (SPS) public outreach experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneal, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    An outreach experiment was conducted to improve the results of the satellite power system (SPS) concept development and evaluation program. The objectives of the outreach were to: (1) determine the areas of major concern relative to the SPS concept and (2) gain experience with an outreach process for use in future public involvement. The response to the outreach effort was positive, suggesting that the effort extended by the SPS project division to encourage an information exchange with the public was well received. The responses were analyzed and from them some questions and answers about the satellite power system are presented.

  13. The LDEF heat pipe experiment power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    A heatpipe experiment for a long duration exposure facility is described. The design and configuration of the power system of the spacecraft is reported with emphasis placed on its solar array panels, 12-ampere hour 18-cell nickel battery, and its electronic controller.

  14. Introduction to Biological Investigations: A First-Year Experience in Experimental Design and Scientific Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Linda C.; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction to Biological Investigations is a course that was developed to introduce the scientific method through practical application. This active, student-centered experience fosters fundamental skills that promote creativity, critical thinking, and scientific-communication. The course has been well received by first-year students, and…

  15. Photovoltaic array space power plus diagnostics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, D. R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to summarize the five years of hardware development and fabrication represented by the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) Instrument. The original PASP Experiment requirements and background is presented along with the modifications which were requested to transform the PASP Experiment into the PASP Plus Instrument. The PASP Plus hardware and software is described. Test results for components and subsystems are given as well as final system tests. Also included are appendices which describe the major subsystems and present supporting documentation such as block diagrams, schematics, circuit board artwork, drawings, test procedures and test reports.

  16. Pulse Detonation Rocket Magnetohydrodynamic Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Jones, J. E.; Dobson, C. C.; Cole, J. W.; Thompson, B. R.; Plemmons, D. H.; Turner, M. W.

    2003-01-01

    The production of onboard electrical power by pulse detonation engines is problematic in that they generate no shaft power; however, pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation represents one intriguing possibility for attaining self-sustained engine operation and generating large quantities of burst power for onboard electrical systems. To examine this possibility further, a simple heat-sink apparatus was developed for experimentally investigating pulse detonation driven MHD generator concepts. The hydrogen oxygen fired driver was a 90 cm long stainless steel tube having a 4.5 cm square internal cross section and a short Schelkin spiral near the head end to promote rapid formation of a detonation wave. The tube was intermittently filled to atmospheric pressure and seeded with a CsOH/methanol prior to ignition by electrical spark. The driver exhausted through an aluminum nozzle having an area contraction ratio of A*/A(sub zeta) = 1/10 and an area expansion ratio of A(sub zeta)/A* = 3.2 (as limited by available magnet bore size). The nozzle exhausted through a 24-electrode segmented Faraday channel (30.5 cm active length), which was inserted into a 0.6 T permanent magnet assembly. Initial experiments verified proper drive operation with and without the nozzle attachment, and head end pressure and time resolved thrust measurements were acquired. The exhaust jet from the nozzle was interrogated using a polychromatic microwave interferometer yielding an electron number density on the order of 10(exp 12)/cm at the generator entrance. In this case, MHD power generation experiments suffered from severe near-electrode voltage drops and low MHD interaction; i.e., low flow velocity, due to an inherent physical constraint on expansion with the available magnet. Increased scaling, improved seeding techniques, higher magnetic fields, and higher expansion ratios are expected to greatly improve performance.

  17. Microwave power transmission system studies. Volume 2: Introduction, organization, environmental and spaceborne systems analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, O. E.; Brown, W. C.; Edwards, A.; Haley, J. T.; Meltz, G.; Howell, J. M.; Nathan, A.

    1975-01-01

    Introduction, organization, analyses, conclusions, and recommendations for each of the spaceborne subsystems are presented. Environmental effects - propagation analyses are presented with appendices covering radio wave diffraction by random ionospheric irregularities, self-focusing plasma instabilities and ohmic heating of the D-region. Analyses of dc to rf conversion subsystems and system considerations for both the amplitron and the klystron are included with appendices for the klystron covering cavity circuit calculations, output power of the solenoid-focused klystron, thermal control system, and confined flow focusing of a relativistic beam. The photovoltaic power source characteristics are discussed as they apply to interfacing with the power distribution flow paths, magnetic field interaction, dc to rf converter protection, power distribution including estimates for the power budget, weights, and costs. Analyses for the transmitting antenna consider the aperture illumination and size, with associated efficiencies and ground power distributions. Analyses of subarray types and dimensions, attitude error, flatness, phase error, subarray layout, frequency tolerance, attenuation, waveguide dimensional tolerances, mechanical including thermal considerations are included. Implications associated with transportation, assembly and packaging, attitude control and alignment are discussed. The phase front control subsystem, including both ground based pilot signal driven adaptive and ground command approaches with their associated phase errors, are analyzed.

  18. Fuel supply of nuclear power industry with the introduction of fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraviev, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The results of studies conducted for the validation of the updated development strategy for nuclear power industry in Russia in the 21st century are presented. Scenarios with different options for the reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal reactors and large-scale growth of nuclear power industry based on fast reactors of inherent safety with a breeding ratio of ˜1 in a closed nuclear fuel cycle are considered. The possibility of enhanced fuel breeding in fast reactors is also taken into account in the analysis. The potential to establish a large-scale nuclear power industry that covers 100% of the increase in electric power requirements in Russia is demonstrated. This power industry may be built by the end of the century through the introduction of fast reactors (replacing thermal ones) with a gross uranium consumption of up to ˜1 million t and the termination of uranium mining even if the reprocessing of spent fuel of thermal reactors is stopped or suffers a long-term delay.

  19. Satellite power system (SPS) public outreach experiment

    SciTech Connect

    McNeal, S.R.

    1980-12-01

    To improve the results of the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program, an outreach experiment was conducted. Three public interest groups participated: the L-5 Society (L-5), Citizen's Energy Project (CEP), and the Forum for the Advancement of Students in Science and Technology (FASST). Each group disseminated summary information about SPS to approximately 3000 constituents with a request for feedback on the SPS concept. The objectives of the outreach were to (1) determine the areas of major concern relative to the SPS concept, and (2) gain experience with an outreach process for use in future public involvement. Due to the combined efforts of all three groups, 9200 individuals/organizations received information about the SPS concept. Over 1500 receipients of this information provided feedback. The response to the outreach effort was positive for all three groups, suggesting that the effort extended by the SPS Project Division to encourage an information exchange with the public was well received. The general response to the SPS differed with each group. The L-5 position is very much in favor of SPS; CEP is very much opposed and FASST is relatively neutral. The responses are analyzed, and from the responses some questions and answers about the satellite power system are presented in the appendix. (WHK)

  20. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Austin, K. N.; Waisman, E. M.; Hickman, R. J.; Davis, J.-P.; Haill, T. A.; Knudson, M. D.; Seagle, C. T.; Brown, J. L.; Goerz, D. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Goldlust, J. A.; Cravey, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM), circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  1. Introduction of Orimulsion{sup R} fuel into PowerGen PLC (UK)

    SciTech Connect

    Tombs, R.

    1995-09-01

    PowerGen has 4GW of oil fired plant comprising three power stations. Whilst burning fuel oil the load factor has been very low at between 3 and 20% because of the variable fuel price. Orimulsion, which is a bitumen-in-water emulsion, was seen as a candidate substitute fuel because of its stable cost. Because Orimulsion has very different characteristics to those of fuel oil, before committing itself to the fuel PowerGen decided to conduct full boiler trials to establish the effect of the fuel on the plant, the modifications that would be necessary to convert to full commercial operation and the environmental implications. This paper describes the outcome of the early trials that took place at each of the three power stations and the modifications that were necessary to convert plant at two of the stations. PowerGen is currently the world`s largest user of Orimulsion, consuming up to 1.5 m tonnes each year at two sites and the operational experience at each site since the start of commercial operation is summarized. Because of its unique experience with the use of Orimulsion, PowerGen can assist potential users in addressing the key conversion issues that need to be considered through consultancy services. A typical example of the issues addressed at a European utility is discussed in this paper.

  2. Experience the Power: Network Technology for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travaglini, Mark

    This booklet provides a basic introduction to the application of electronic telecommunications networks to the challenge of meeting the nation's education goals. Topics covered include telecommunications networks; the Internet; the Network Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and network technology, including SPEEDE/ExPRESS (Standardization of…

  3. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    magnet assembly were then installed on Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) rectangular channel pulse detonation research engine. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power extraction experiments were carried out for a range of load impedances in which cesium hydroxide seed (dissolved in methanol) was sprayed into the gaseous oxygen/hydrogen propellants. Positive power extraction was obtained, but preliminary analysis of the data indicated that the plasma electrical conductivity is lower than anticipated and the near-electrode voltage drop is not negligible. It is believed that the electrical conductivity is reduced due to a large population of negative OH ions. This occurs because OH has a strong affinity for capturing free electrons. The effect of near-electrode voltage drop is associated with the high surface-to-volume ratio of the channel (1-inch by 1-inch cross-section) where surface effects play a dominant role. As usual for MHD devices, higher performance will require larger scale devices. Overall, the gathered data is extremely valuable from the standpoint of understanding plasma behavior and for developing empirical scaling laws.

  4. Electric power management for the International Space Station experiment racks

    SciTech Connect

    Burcham, M.; Darty, M.A.; Thibodeau, P.E.; Coe, R.; Dunn, M.

    1995-12-31

    An intelligent, all solid state, electric power management system for International Space Station experiment racks is described. This power system is implemented via redundant internal microcomputers, controlling hybridized solid state power controllers in response to 1553B data bus commands. The solid state power controllers are programmable for current trip level and for normally-open or normally-closed operation.

  5. Starting to Experiment with Wave Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan; McCallie, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    Outlined is a simple design for a working wave-powered electrical generator based on one made on the BBC "Rough Science" TV series. The design has been kept deliberately simple to facilitate rapid pupil/student involvement and most importantly so that there is much scope for their own ingenuity and ideas. The generator works on the principle of…

  6. Advance Power Technology Experiment for the Starshine 3 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Wilt, David; Raffaelle, Ryne; Button, Robert; Smith, Mark; Kerslake, Thomas; Miller, Thomas; Bailey, Sheila (Technical Monitor); Hepp, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Starshine 3 satellite will carry several power technology demonstrations. Since Starshine 3 is primarily a passive experiment and does not need electrical power to successfully complete its mission, the requirement for a highly reliable power system is greatly reduced. This creates an excellent opportunity to test new power technologies. Several government and commercial interests have teamed up to provide Starshine 3 with a small power system using state-of-the-art components. Starshine 3 will also fly novel integrated microelectronic power supplies (IWS) for evaluation.

  7. MSG Power Subsystem Flight Return Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacometti, G.; Canard, JP.; Perron, O.

    2011-10-01

    The Meteosat programme has been running for more than twenty years under ESA leadership. Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) is a series of 4 geostationary satellites developed and procured by the European Space Agency (ESA) on behalf of the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT). Eumetsat is still operating two of the first generation satellites models named MOP3 and MTP1 which are pointed towards the Indian ocean. The European meteorological service is now enhanced by two spacecrafts of the Second Generation (MSG-1 and MSG-2). They have been launched by Ariane 5 in August 2002 and December 2005 respectively. Thales Alenia Space, Prime Contractor of the program, has developed the MSG spacecraft based on a spin-axis stabilized technology. The Electrical Power Subsystem was subcontracted to Astrium GmbH. The Solar Array is composed of 8 body mounted panels, based on Carbon Fibre Reinforced Panel substrate. The Solar network utilizes 7854 Silicon High Eta cells delivering a beginning of life power of 740W. The 28 volts mainbus is regulated using a series shunt regulating concept (S3R type). Two identical SAFT batteries, built from NiCd cells and offering a 29Ah nameplate capacity are connected to the mainbus through battery discharge and charge regulators. Both Solar Array and batteries have been designed to provide power and energy for a nominal 7 years lifetime. These equipments are continuously monitored and are still operating in excellent condition after more than eight and five years in orbit. This paper will present the major electrical design aspects of the power chain and will describe the main parameters performances, which are analysed during the in-orbit operations. Batteries ageing is detailed thanks to reconditioning processed telemetry while the solar array performances over lifetime use dedicated solar array telemetry.

  8. Green Power Marketing Abroad: Recent Experience and Trends

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.; Wustenhagen, R.; Aabakken, J.

    2002-04-01

    Green power marketing--the act of differentially selling electricity generated wholly or in part from renewable sources--has emerged in more than a dozen countries around the world. This report reviews green power marketing activity abroad to gain additional perspective on consumer demand and to discern key factors or policies that affect the development of green power markets. The objective is to draw lessons from experience in other countries that could be applicable to the U.S. market.

  9. EDF Nuclear Power Plants Operating Experience with MOX fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Thibault, Xavier

    2006-07-01

    EDF started Plutonium recycling in PWR in 1987 and progressively all the 20 reactors, licensed in using MOX fuel, have been loaded with MOX assemblies. At the origin of MOX introduction, these plants operated at full power in base load and the core management limited the irradiation time of MOX fuel assemblies to 3 annual cycles. Since 1995 all these reactors can operate in load follow mode. Since that time, a large amount of experience has been accumulated. This experience is very positive considering: - Receipt, handling, in core behaviour, pool storage and shipment of MOX fuel; - Operation of the various systems of the plant; - Environment impact; - Radioprotection; - Safety file requirements; - Availability for the grid. In order to reduce the fuel cost and to reach a better adequacy between UO{sub 2} fuel reprocessing flow and plutonium consumption, EDF had decided to improve the core management of MOX plants. This new core management call 'MOX Parity' achieves parity for MOX and UO{sub 2} assemblies in term of discharge burn-up. Compared to the current MOX assembly the Plutonium content is increased from 7,08% to 8,65% (equivalent to natural uranium enriched to respectively 3,25% and 3,7%) and the maximum MOX assembly burn-up moves from 42 to 52 GWd/t. This amount of burn-up is obtained from loading MOX assemblies for one additional annual cycle. Some, but limited, adaptations of the plant are necessary. In addition a new MOX fuel assembly has been designed to comply with the safety criteria taking into account the core management performances. These design improvements are based on the results of an important R and D program including numerous experimental tests and post-irradiated fuel examinations. In particular, envelope conditions compared to MOX Parity neutronic solicitations has been extensively investigated in order to get a full knowledge of the in reactor fuel behavior. Moreover, the operating conditions of the plant have been evaluated in many

  10. Symposium Introduction: Stepping into Their Power--The Development of a Teacher Leadership Stance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smulyan, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This introduction to the symposium on Teacher Leadership describes how a group of teachers have developed a definition of teacher leadership as a stance. The article explores how prior definitions of teacher leadership tend to focus on individual skills or roles. Neoliberal educational policies that emphasize market-based policy, privatization,…

  11. Experiments on H2-O2MHD power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic power generation experiments utilizing a cesium-seeded H2-O2 working fluid were carried out using a diverging area Hall duct having an entrance Mach number of 2. The experiments were conducted in a high-field strength cryomagnet facility at field strengths up to 5 tesla. The effects of power takeoff location, axial duct location within the magnetic field, generator loading, B-field strength, and electrode breakdown voltage were investigated. For the operating conditions of these experiments, it is found that the power output increases with the square of the B-field and can be limited by choking of the channel or interelectrode voltage breakdown which occurs at Hall fields greater than 50 volts/insulator. Peak power densities of greater than 100 MW/cu M were achieved.

  12. Experimental Design and Power Calculation for RNA-seq Experiments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijin; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Power calculation is a critical component of RNA-seq experimental design. The flexibility of RNA-seq experiment and the wide dynamic range of transcription it measures make it an attractive technology for whole transcriptome analysis. These features, in addition to the high dimensionality of RNA-seq data, bring complexity in experimental design, making an analytical power calculation no longer realistic. In this chapter we review the major factors that influence the statistical power of detecting differential expression, and give examples of power assessment using the R package PROPER. PMID:27008024

  13. The VELOCE pulsed power generator for isentropic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy; Asay, James Russell; Chantrenne, Sophie J.; Hickman, Randall John; Willis, Michael David; Shay, Andrew W.; Grine-Jones, Suzi A.; Hall, Clint Allen; Baer, Melvin R.

    2007-12-01

    Veloce is a medium-voltage, high-current, compact pulsed power generator developed for isentropic and shock compression experiments. Because of its increased availability and ease of operation, Veloce is well suited for studying isentropic compression experiments (ICE) in much greater detail than previously allowed with larger pulsed power machines such as the Z accelerator. Since the compact pulsed power technology used for dynamic material experiments has not been previously used, it is necessary to examine several key issues to ensure that accurate results are obtained. In the present experiments, issues such as panel and sample preparation, uniformity of loading, and edge effects were extensively examined. In addition, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the ALEGRA code were performed to interpret the experimental results and to design improved sample/panel configurations. Examples of recent ICE studies on aluminum are presented.

  14. Stopping Power in Dense Plasmas: Models, Simulations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Paul; Fichtl, Chris; Graziani, Frank; Hazi, Andrew; Murillo, Michael; Sheperd, Ronnie; Surh, Mike; Cimarron Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Our goal is to conclusively determine the minimal model for stopping power in dense plasmas via a three-pronged theoretical, simulation, and experimental program. Stopping power in dense plasma is important for ion beam heating of targets (e.g., fast ignition) and alpha particle energy deposition in inertial confinement fusion targets. We wish to minimize our uncertainties in the stopping power by comparing a wide range of theoretical approaches to both detailed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experiments. The largest uncertainties occur for slow-to-moderate velocity projectiles, dense plasmas, and highly charged projectiles. We have performed MD simulations of a classical, one component plasma to reveal where there are weaknesses in our kinetic theories of stopping power, over a wide range of plasma conditions. We have also performed stopping experiments of protons in heated warm dense carbon for validation of such models, including MD calculations, of realistic plasmas for which bound contributions are important.

  15. Power-Stepped HF Cross Modulation Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, S.; Moore, R. C.; Langston, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    High frequency (HF) cross modulation experiments are a well established means for probing the HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere. In this paper, we apply experimental observations of HF cross-modulation to the related problem of ELF/VLF wave generation. HF cross-modulation measurements are used to evaluate the efficiency of ionospheric conductivity modulation during power-stepped modulated HF heating experiments. The results are compared to previously published dependencies of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF peak power. The experiments were performed during the March 2013 campaign at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory. HAARP was operated in a dual-beam transmission format: the first beam heated the ionosphere using sinusoidal amplitude modulation while the second beam broadcast a series of low-power probe pulses. The peak power of the modulating beam was incremented in 1-dB steps. We compare the minimum and maximum cross-modulation effect and the amplitude of the resulting cross-modulation waveform to the expected power-law dependence of ELF/VLF wave amplitude on HF power.

  16. Modeling of high power ICRF heating experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L.; Khudaleev, A.; Petrov, M.P.; Murakami, M.

    1993-04-01

    Over the past two years, ICRF heating experiments have been performed on TFTR in the hydrogen minority heating regime with power levels reaching 11.2 MW in helium-4 majority plasmas and 8.4 MW in deuterium majority plasmas. For these power levels, the minority hydrogen ions, which comprise typically less than 10% of the total electron density, evolve into la very energetic, anisotropic non-Maxwellian distribution. Indeed, the excess perpendicular stored energy in these plasmas associated with the energetic minority tail ions is often as high as 25% of the total stored energy, as inferred from magnetic measurements. Enhanced losses of 0.5 MeV protons consistent with the presence of an energetic hydrogen component have also been observed. In ICRF heating experiments on JET at comparable and higher power levels and with similar parameters, it has been suggested that finite banana width effects have a noticeable effect on the ICRF power deposition. In particular, models indicate that finite orbit width effects lead to a reduction in the total stored energy and of the tail energy in the center of the plasma, relative to that predicted by the zero banana width models. In this paper, detailed comparisons between the calculated ICRF power deposition profiles and experimentally measured quantities will be presented which indicate that significant deviations from the zero banana width models occur even for modest power levels (P{sub rf} {approximately} 6 MW) in the TFTR experiments.

  17. Modeling of high power ICRF heating experiments on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Bell, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rogers, J.H.; Schilling, G.; Skinner, C.; Stevens, J.E.; Taylor, G.; Wong, K.L. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Khudaleev, A.; Petrov, M.P. ); Murakami, M. )

    1993-01-01

    Over the past two years, ICRF heating experiments have been performed on TFTR in the hydrogen minority heating regime with power levels reaching 11.2 MW in helium-4 majority plasmas and 8.4 MW in deuterium majority plasmas. For these power levels, the minority hydrogen ions, which comprise typically less than 10% of the total electron density, evolve into la very energetic, anisotropic non-Maxwellian distribution. Indeed, the excess perpendicular stored energy in these plasmas associated with the energetic minority tail ions is often as high as 25% of the total stored energy, as inferred from magnetic measurements. Enhanced losses of 0.5 MeV protons consistent with the presence of an energetic hydrogen component have also been observed. In ICRF heating experiments on JET at comparable and higher power levels and with similar parameters, it has been suggested that finite banana width effects have a noticeable effect on the ICRF power deposition. In particular, models indicate that finite orbit width effects lead to a reduction in the total stored energy and of the tail energy in the center of the plasma, relative to that predicted by the zero banana width models. In this paper, detailed comparisons between the calculated ICRF power deposition profiles and experimentally measured quantities will be presented which indicate that significant deviations from the zero banana width models occur even for modest power levels (P[sub rf] [approximately] 6 MW) in the TFTR experiments.

  18. Fuel Cells for Portable Power: 1. Introduction to DMFCs; 2. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenay, Piotr

    2012-07-16

    Thanks to generally less stringent cost constraints, portable power fuel cells, the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) in particular, promise earlier market penetration than higher power polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) for the automotive and stationary applications. However, a large-scale commercialization of DMFC-based power systems beyond niche applications already targeted by developers will depend on improvements to fuel cell performance and performance durability as well as on the reduction in cost, especially of the portable systems on the higher end of the power spectrum (100-250 W). In this part of the webinar, we will focus on the development of advanced materials (catalysts, membranes, electrode structures, and membrane electrode assemblies) and fuel cell operating concepts capable of fulfilling two key targets for portable power systems: the system cost of $5/W and overall fuel conversion efficiency of 2.0-2.5 kWh/L. Presented research will concentrate on the development of new methanol oxidation catalysts, hydrocarbon membranes with reduced methanol crossover, and improvements to component durability. Time permitted, we will also present a few highlights from the development of electrocatalysts for the oxidation of two alternative fuels for the direct-feed fuel cells: ethanol and dimethyl ether.

  19. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1995-04-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes.

  20. Introduction to the Design and Optimization of Experiments Using Response Surface Methodology. A Gas Chromatography Experiment for the Instrumentation Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Patricia L.; Miller, Benjamin I.; Nowak, Abigail Tuttle

    2006-01-01

    The study describes how to design and optimize an experiment with multiple factors and multiple responses. The experiment uses fractional factorial analysis as a screening experiment only to identify important instrumental factors and does not use response surface methodology to find the optimal set of conditions.

  1. Myopia Glasses and Optical Power Estimation: An Easy Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2015-02-01

    Human eye optics is a common high school physics topic and students usually show a great interest during our presentation of this theme. In this article, we present an easy way to estimate a diverging lens' optical power from a simple experiment involving myopia eyeglasses and a smartphone flashlight.

  2. Myopia Glasses and Optical Power Estimation: An Easy Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, Jair Lúcio Prados

    2015-01-01

    Human eye optics is a common high school physics topic and students usually show a great interest during our presentation of this theme. In this article, we present an easy way to estimate a diverging lens' optical power from a simple experiment involving myopia eyeglasses and a smartphone flashlight.

  3. HIGH AVERAGE POWER UV FREE ELECTRON LASER EXPERIMENTS AT JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, David; Evtushenko, Pavel; Gubeli, Joseph; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Legg, Robert; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Williams, Gwyn

    2012-07-01

    Having produced 14 kW of average power at {approx}2 microns, JLAB has shifted its focus to the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. This presentation will describe the JLab UV Demo FEL, present specifics of its driver ERL, and discuss the latest experimental results from FEL experiments and machine operations.

  4. Postanalysis of the CNPS (Compact Nuclear Power Source) critical experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The Compact Nuclear Power Source (CNPS) was designed to produce electric power for remote sites where fuel logistics and costs would justify a remotely sited nuclear power plant. Since the reactor was of novel design with no appropriate benchmarks, a series of critical experiments was carried out at LANL. This paper describes the methodology and reports the results of the postanalysis that was performed on the critical experiments, which included several distinct critical configurations, the measurement of the isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity and various material worths. Comparisons with measurements indicate that current methods and cross sections are adequate for calculating at least the beginning of life conditions in low enriched /sup 235/U-graphite cores. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission reduction potentials of renewable energy--case studies on photovoltaic and wind power introduction considering interactions among technologies in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu-Ming; Fukushima, Yasuhiro

    2009-03-01

    To achieve higher energy security and lower emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants, the development of renewable energy has attracted much attention in Taiwan. In addition to its contribution to the enhancement of reliable indigenous resources, the introduction of renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power systems reduces the emission of GHGs and air pollutants by substituting a part of the carbon- and pollutant-intensive power with power generated by methods that are cleaner and less carbon-intensive. To evaluate the reduction potentials, consequential changes in the operation of different types of existing power plants have to be taken into account. In this study, a linear mathematical programming model is constructed to simulate a power mix for a given power demand in a power market sharing a cost-minimization objective. By applying the model, the emission reduction potentials of capacity extension case studies, including the enhancement of PV and wind power introduction at different scales, were assessed. In particular, the consequences of power mix changes in carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulates were discussed. Seasonally varying power demand levels, solar irradiation, and wind strength were taken into account. In this study, we have found that the synergetic reduction of carbon dioxide emission induced by PV and wind power introduction occurs under a certain level of additional installed capacity. Investigation of a greater variety of case studies on scenario development with emerging power sources becomes possible by applying the model developed in this study.

  6. Introduction to Nuclear Fusion Power and the Design of Fusion Reactors. An Issue-Oriented Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillo, J. A.

    This three-part module focuses on the principles of nuclear fusion and on the likely nature and components of a controlled-fusion power reactor. The physical conditions for a net energy release from fusion and two approaches (magnetic and inertial confinement) which are being developed to achieve this goal are described. Safety issues associated…

  7. Feasibility study on introduction of the bio-fuel power generation in tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-03-01

    Study is made on feasibility of introducing the bio-fuel power generation in tropical regions, especially in South East Asia including Okinawa and South America. Biomass promising as bio-fuel is bagasse and palm oil mill dregs; and bagasse is found to be advantageous to the use for large-scaled power generation. Prospective uses of bagasse are a combined use of gasification process and gas turbine power generation, an effective use of gas turbine exhaust heat at sugar cane factories, and a use of the system to be developed which totalizes these two. As to how to carry out the R and D project, since the gasification power generation process itself is a high technology and has partially unknown fields, it is desirable that research and development are conducted in such technologically developed countries as Japan (Okinawa). A developmental plan, therefore, is worked out as such that a pilot plant of approximately 3000kW is to be constructed in Okinawa because the period for bagasse production is at least 3 months there, and a commercial-scale plant is to be constructed and operated in such big bagasse-producing countries as Brazil.

  8. Smallholder experiences with dairy cattle crossbreeding in the tropics: from introduction to impact.

    PubMed

    Roschinsky, R; Kluszczynska, M; Sölkner, J; Puskur, R; Wurzinger, M

    2015-01-01

    Crossbreeding of indigenous tropical and improved western dairy cattle breeds as tool to improve dairy cattle performance on smallholder farms has been widely advocated, criticised and yet applied. The government of Ethiopia supported this technology for decades but adoption rate is low. Constraints are documented but there is little information about farm level introduction and development of crossbreeding. A total 122 smallholders with mixed crop livestock farms and at least 8 years of successful crossbreeding were interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire in two contexts in Amhara Regional state in north-western Ethiopia. Crossbreeding initiator was either uncoordinated government extension or a coordinated development project, also implemented with governmental support. Qualitative and quantitative data on farmers' motivations, crossbreeding introduction, initiator support, breeding adaptation and impacts at farm level were analysed. Results show that even though motives vary between contexts the underlying reason to introduce crossbreeding was economic profit. To be able to introduce crossbreeding support of initiators (e.g. extension) and other farmers was essential. The crossbreeding introduction context had some influence. Governmental actors were the main source of support and supplier of exotic genetics but the farmer network acted as safety net filling gaps of government support. Breeding strategies focused on performance increase. A lack of basic understanding of crossbreeding has been identified. A surprising, probably biased, result was general satisfaction with initiator support and with breeding services. It was challenged by the high proportion of farmers unable to follow a breeding strategy due to insufficient bull and/or semen supply. Crossbreeding changed the smallholder production system to a high input - high output system. Except for crossbred adaptation problems, challenges were ranked context specific and influenced by the initiator

  9. Smallholder experiences with dairy cattle crossbreeding in the tropics: from introduction to impact.

    PubMed

    Roschinsky, R; Kluszczynska, M; Sölkner, J; Puskur, R; Wurzinger, M

    2015-01-01

    Crossbreeding of indigenous tropical and improved western dairy cattle breeds as tool to improve dairy cattle performance on smallholder farms has been widely advocated, criticised and yet applied. The government of Ethiopia supported this technology for decades but adoption rate is low. Constraints are documented but there is little information about farm level introduction and development of crossbreeding. A total 122 smallholders with mixed crop livestock farms and at least 8 years of successful crossbreeding were interviewed using a pre-tested questionnaire in two contexts in Amhara Regional state in north-western Ethiopia. Crossbreeding initiator was either uncoordinated government extension or a coordinated development project, also implemented with governmental support. Qualitative and quantitative data on farmers' motivations, crossbreeding introduction, initiator support, breeding adaptation and impacts at farm level were analysed. Results show that even though motives vary between contexts the underlying reason to introduce crossbreeding was economic profit. To be able to introduce crossbreeding support of initiators (e.g. extension) and other farmers was essential. The crossbreeding introduction context had some influence. Governmental actors were the main source of support and supplier of exotic genetics but the farmer network acted as safety net filling gaps of government support. Breeding strategies focused on performance increase. A lack of basic understanding of crossbreeding has been identified. A surprising, probably biased, result was general satisfaction with initiator support and with breeding services. It was challenged by the high proportion of farmers unable to follow a breeding strategy due to insufficient bull and/or semen supply. Crossbreeding changed the smallholder production system to a high input - high output system. Except for crossbred adaptation problems, challenges were ranked context specific and influenced by the initiator

  10. Applying fuel cell experience to sustainable power products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Joseph M.; O'Day, Michael J.

    the utility grid, but current standards do not recognize embedded protection functions, and, often, utilities mandate external protective devices. Consequently, current activity to develop such standards under IEEE auspices is important in eliminating the cost of extra protection equipment. Key fuel cell lessons learned from IFC's experience base along with the status of development for future vehicle and stationary power plants at IFC are discussed. These lessons have been applied to the 200 kW stationary fuel cell power plant as the information has become available. They are now being applied to a 50-kW, ambient pressure, polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plant that uses gasoline as the fuel. This power plant is intended for experimental bench testing demonstrations associated with vehicle power plant applications.

  11. Prognostics of Power Electronics, Methods and Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Celaya, Jose R.; Biswas, Gautam; Goebel, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Failure of electronic devices is a concern for future electric aircrafts that will see an increase of electronics to drive and control safety-critical equipment throughout the aircraft. As a result, investigation of precursors to failure in electronics and prediction of remaining life of electronic components is of key importance. DC-DC power converters are power electronics systems employed typically as sourcing elements for avionics equipment. Current research efforts in prognostics for these power systems focuses on the identification of failure mechanisms and the development of accelerated aging methodologies and systems to accelerate the aging process of test devices, while continuously measuring key electrical and thermal parameters. Preliminary model-based prognostics algorithms have been developed making use of empirical degradation models and physics-inspired degradation model with focus on key components like electrolytic capacitors and power MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistor). This paper presents current results on the development of validation methods for prognostics algorithms of power electrolytic capacitors. Particularly, in the use of accelerated aging systems for algorithm validation. Validation of prognostics algorithms present difficulties in practice due to the lack of run-to-failure experiments in deployed systems. By using accelerated experiments, we circumvent this problem in order to define initial validation activities.

  12. Advanced Receiver/Converter Experiments for Laser Wireless Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Joe T.; ONeill, Mark; Fork, Richard

    2004-01-01

    For several years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, UAH and ENTECH have been working on various aspects of space solar power systems. The current activity was just begun in January 2004 to further develop this new photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter technology. During the next few months, an improved prototype will be designed, fabricated, and thoroughly tested under laser illumination. The final paper will describe the new concept, present its advantages over other laser receiver/converter approaches (including planar photovoltaic arrays), and provide the latest experiment results on prototype hardware (including the effects of laser irradiance level and cell temperature). With NASA's new human exploration plans to first return to the Moon, and then to proceed to Mars, the new photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter technology could prove to be extremely useful in providing power to the landing sites and other phases of the missions. For example, to explore the scientifically interesting and likely resource-rich poles of the Moon (which may contain water) or the poles of Mars (which definitely contain water and carbon dioxide), laser power beaming could represent the simplest means of providing power to these regions, which receive little or no sunlight, making solar arrays useless there. In summary, the authors propose a paper on definition and experimental results of a novel photovoltaic concentrator approach for collecting and converting laser radiation to electrical power. The new advanced photovoltaic concentrator laser receiver/converter offers higher performance, lighter weight, and lower cost than competing concepts, and early experimental results are confirming the expected excellent Performance levels. After the small prototypes are successfully demonstrated, a larger array with even better performance is planned for the next phase experiments and demonstrations. Thereafter, a near-term flight experiment of the new technology

  13. Experience with organic Rankine cycles in heat recovery power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bronicki, L.Y.; Elovic, A.; Rettger, P.

    1996-11-01

    Over the last 30 years, organic Rankine cycles (ORC) have been increasingly employed to produce power from various heat sources when other alternatives were either technically not feasible or economical. These power plants have logged a total of over 100 million turbine hours of experience demonstrating the maturity and field proven technology of the ORC cycle. The cycle is well adapted to low to moderate temperature heat sources such as waste heat from industrial plants and is widely used to recover energy from geothermal resources. The above cycle technology is well established and applicable to heat recovery of medium size gas turbines and offers significant advantages over conventional steam bottoming cycles.

  14. The SPi chip as an integrated power management device for serial powering of future HEP experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trimpl, M.; Deptuch, G.; Gingu, C.; Yarema, R.; Holt, R.; Weber, M.; Kierstead, J.; Lynn, D.; /Brookhaven

    2009-01-01

    Serial powering is one viable and very efficient way to distribute power to future high energy physics (HEP) experiments. One promising way to realize serial powering is to have a power management device on the module level that provides the necessary voltage levels and features monitoring functionality. The SPi (Serial Powering Interface) chip is such a power manager and is designed to meet the requirements imposed by current SLHC upgrade plans. It incorporates a programmable shunt regulator, two linear regulators, current mode ADCs to monitor the current distribution on the module, over-current detection, and also provides module power-down capabilities. Compared to serially powered setups that use discrete components, the SPi offers a higher level of functionality in much less real estate and is designed to be radiation tolerant. Bump bonding techniques are used for chip on board assembly providing the most reliable connection at lowest impedance. This paper gives an overview of the SPi and outlines the main building blocks of the chip. First stand alone tests are presented showing that the chip is ready for operation in serially powered setups.

  15. Rabies vaccination compliance following introduction of the triennial vaccination interval--the Texas experience.

    PubMed

    Rogers, C L

    2011-06-01

    In 2003 the Texas Board of Health approved a modification to the Texas Administrative Code that permitted pet owners to have their dogs (Canis familiaris) and cats (Felis catus) vaccinated against rabies every 3 years, provided a triennial vaccine was used. The change had been opposed by hundreds in the veterinary community, some concerned that its implementation would be followed by a decrease in rabies vaccination rates. To determine if this decrease had occurred, rabies vaccination rates for 4 years before and after migration to the 3-year vaccination interval were examined. Data for dogs and cats, ≥ 4 months of age, were collected from the Texas Department of Health Rabies Incident Report database. Each animal's record included its current rabies vaccination status. The number of animals that were currently vaccinated against rabies was tallied and the percent vaccinated was calculated. From 1999 through 2002, 46% of dogs were vaccinated against rabies. From 2004 through 2007, 56% of dogs were vaccinated against rabies. From 1999 to 2002, 18% of cats were vaccinated against rabies. From 2004 to 2007, 30% of cats were vaccinated against rabies. There has been a significant increase in the numbers of dogs (P < 0.001), and cats (P < 0.001), vaccinated against rabies since the introduction of the triennial vaccination interval. This observational study documents the positive changes in rabies vaccination rates following migration from a 1-year to 3-year vaccination interval.

  16. Introduction of human papillomavirus DNA screening in the world: 15 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Castle, Philip E; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Qiao, You-Lin; Belinson, Jerome L; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Kinney, Walter

    2012-11-20

    The discovery of the necessary cause of cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), has led to important technological advances, including the development of molecular tests for HPV to identify women with cervical precancerous lesions. HPV testing has proven to be more sensitive and more reliable, albeit less specific, for detection of cervical precancer than cytologic methods of detection. As the result, HPV testing can reduce the incidence of cervical cancer within 4-5 years and reduce the mortality due to cervical cancer within 8 years compared to cytology. Additionally, a negative HPV test provides greater reassurance against cervical cancer than a negative Pap test. HPV testing, because of its attributes, is useful for screening out low-risk women who do not need further intervention for 5 or more years. Thus, HPV testing can shift the emphasis of the use of Pap testing or any other more specific diagnostic test from frequent use in the entire population to the ~10% subset of women who tested positive for the causal factor, HPV. Here, we highlight the current and future status of the introduction of HPV testing into routine cervical cancer screening. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012.

  17. Experiments in high power microwave susceptibility simulation issues

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, R.R.; Hudson, H.G.; Cabayan, H.S.; King, R.J.

    1986-07-01

    When testing the back-door coupling susceptibility of realistic systems to high power microwaves, several important issues emerge. This paper addresses the following issues through linear experiments on generic test objects: behavior of the receiving pattern with frequency and direction of incidence (theta,phi); whole body vs partial illumination of a test object having multiple ports of entry (POE's); and internal propagation of the coupled energy inside electrically large test objects having complex interiors.

  18. Introduction of a cultural training experience into interdisciplinary health science education program.

    PubMed

    Sasnett, Bonita; Royal, Patricia D; Ross, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In the 21st century the U.S. will have an increasingly diverse population, challenging healthcare communities to deliver culturally sensitive services. Healthcare professionals must be culturally competent to address the needs of this changing population. While education can assist health professional students to attain progressively higher levels of cultural competence, delivering this education must rely heavily on field experiences or engagement to help students simultaneously learn and apply culturally sensitive skills. The implementation of a cultural sensitivity training experience in an interdisciplinary curriculum and the use of the Purnell Model for Cultural Competence are discussed in the assessment of the case study write-up for cultural sensitivity and awareness. Overall, students gained a greater understanding of patient's cultural background and a willingness to incorporate cultural issues into their health assessments as a result of the cultural experience. PMID:20539922

  19. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  20. Balancing Treatment and Control Groups in Quasi-Experiments: An Introduction to Propensity Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Brian S.; Sackett, Paul R.; Waters, Shonna D.

    2013-01-01

    Organizational and applied sciences have long struggled with improving causal inference in quasi-experiments. We introduce organizational researchers to propensity scoring, a statistical technique that has become popular in other applied sciences as a means for improving internal validity. Propensity scoring statistically models how individuals in…

  1. Inquiry-Based Experiments for Large-Scale Introduction to PCR and Restriction Enzyme Digests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, Kelly E.; Watt, Terry J.

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction and restriction endonuclease digest are important techniques that should be included in all Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory curriculums. These techniques are frequently taught at an advanced level, requiring many hours of student and faculty time. Here we present two inquiry-based experiments that are…

  2. Going Beyond, Going Further: An Inexpensive Experiment for the Introduction of High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bidlingmeyer, Brian A.; Warren, F. Vincent, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Background information, materials needed, laboratory procedures, and typical results are provided for five high performance liquid chromatography experiments (three isocratic and two step gradient separations). Suggestions for further experimentation are also provided, including quantitative determinations and separation of charged solutes. (JN)

  3. Power supplies and quench protection for the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First plasma is scheduled for the year 2000. TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This is a new feature which requires not only a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes but also that ultra-reliable quench protection devices be used to rapidly discharge the stored energy from the magnets in the event of a quench. This paper describes the plan and basis for the adaptation and augmentation of the PPPL/TFTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Following a description of the basic operational requirements, four major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF power supply, the PF power supply, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems.

  4. Power and control choice in aquatic experiments with solvents.

    PubMed

    Green, John W

    2014-04-01

    Aquatic toxicology experiments to determine the effects of chemicals sometimes require the use of a carrier solvent. Such experiments typically include both a negative (water) control group and a solvent control group. False positive rates and power to detect treatment effects in such experiments are compared for six possible strategies for deciding the appropriate control or controls for comparison. The main purpose of the present study is to determine the best use of the two controls in statistical analysis. A secondary purpose is to determine purely on statistical grounds whether both controls are actually needed. The evidence supports using either the solvent control only in all cases or a sequential strategy of combining the water and solvent controls unless the two controls are found to be statistically significantly different, in which case only the solvent control should be used. These results extend, and in some ways contradict, a recently published simulation study.

  5. Hydrodynamics and Material Properties Experiments Using Pulsed Power Techniques*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinovsky, Robert; Trainor, R. James

    1999-06-01

    Within the last few years a new approach for exploring dynamic material properties and advanced hydrodynamics at extreme conditions has joined the traditional techniques of high velocity guns,and explosives. The principle tool is the high precision, magnetically imploded, near-solid density liner. The most attractive pulse power system for driving such experiments is an ultra-highcurrent, low impedance, microsecond time-scale source that is economical both the build and operate. Liner specifications vary but in general share requirements for a high degree of symmetry and uniformity after implosion. When imploded in free flight to velocities 10-30 km/sec and kinetic energies of from one to 25 MJ/cm of height, liners are attractive impactors for producing strong (>10 Mbar) shocks in the target. Simple geometries can, in principle, produce multi-shock environments to reach off-hugoniot states. When filled with a compressible material, liners can deliver almost adiabatic compression to the target. When the liner surrounds a (small)nearly incompressible target material, for example a condensed noble gas, a liner can deliver enormous pressure to the target almost isentropically. When the compressible material is a magnetic field, flux compression can results in compressed fields above 1000 tesla in macroscopic volumes for materials studies.In this paper we will review basic scaling argumentsthat set the scale of environments available. We will mention the pulse power technology under development at Los Alamos and provide a summary of results from experiments testing solid metal liners under magnetic drive and a few examples of experiments performed withinterim systems. Other papers in this conference will provide specific proposals for pulse power driven shock-wave experiments.

  6. Introduction to project DUNE, a DUst experiment in a low Nutrient, low chlorophyll Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieu, C.; Dulac, F.; Ridame, C.; Pondaven, P.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of project DUNE was to estimate the impact of atmospheric deposition on an oligotrophic ecosystem based on mesocosm experiments simulating strong atmospheric inputs of eolian mineral dust. Our mesocosm experiments aimed at being representative of real atmospheric deposition events onto the surface of oligotrophic marine waters and were an original attempt to consider the vertical dimension after atmospheric deposition at the sea surface. This introductory paper describes the objectives of DUNE and the implementation plan of a series of mesocosm experiments conducted in the Mediterranean Sea in 2008 and 2010 during which either wet or dry and a succession of two wet deposition fluxes of 10 g m-2 of Saharan dust have been simulated based on the production of dust analogs from erodible soils of a source region. After the presentation of the main biogeochemical initial conditions of the site at the time of each experiment, a general overview of the papers published in this special issue is presented. From laboratory results on the solubility of trace elements in dust to biogeochemical results from the mesocosm experiments and associated modeling, these papers describe how the strong simulated dust deposition events impacted the marine biogeochemistry. Those multidisciplinary results are bringing new insights into the role of atmospheric deposition on oligotrophic ecosystems and its impact on the carbon budget. The dissolved trace metals with crustal origin - Mn, Al and Fe - showed different behaviors as a function of time after the seeding. The increase in dissolved Mn and Al concentrations was attributed to dissolution processes. The observed decrease in dissolved Fe was due to scavenging on sinking dust particles and aggregates. When a second dust seeding followed, a dissolution of Fe from the dust particles was then observed due to the excess Fe binding ligand concentrations present at that time. Calcium nitrate and sulfate were formed in the dust

  7. An overview of U.S. decommissioning experience -- A basic introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.

    1998-03-09

    This paper presents an overview of the US experiences in the decommissioning technical area. Sections included are: (1) an overview of the magnitude of the problem, (2) a review of the US decommissioning process, (3) regulation of decommissioning, (4) regulatory and funding requirements for decommissioning, and (5) a general overview of all on-going and completed decommissioning projects to date in the US. The final section presents a review of some issues in the decommissioning area currently being debated in the technical specialists community.

  8. Introduction to the special issue on the 2004 Parkfield earthquake and the Parkfield earthquake prediction experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.A.; Arrowsmith, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The 28 September 2004 M 6.0 Parkfield earthquake, a long-anticipated event on the San Andreas fault, is the world's best recorded earthquake to date, with state-of-the-art data obtained from geologic, geodetic, seismic, magnetic, and electrical field networks. This has allowed the preearthquake and postearthquake states of the San Andreas fault in this region to be analyzed in detail. Analyses of these data provide views into the San Andreas fault that show a complex geologic history, fault geometry, rheology, and response of the nearby region to the earthquake-induced ground movement. Although aspects of San Andreas fault zone behavior in the Parkfield region can be modeled simply over geological time frames, the Parkfield Earthquake Prediction Experiment and the 2004 Parkfield earthquake indicate that predicting the fine details of future earthquakes is still a challenge. Instead of a deterministic approach, forecasting future damaging behavior, such as that caused by strong ground motions, will likely continue to require probabilistic methods. However, the Parkfield Earthquake Prediction Experiment and the 2004 Parkfield earthquake have provided ample data to understand most of what did occur in 2004, culminating in significant scientific advances.

  9. Results from the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment physical oceanographic studies: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bane, John M.

    1989-08-01

    The Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) was conducted during early 1986 to investigate the rapidly developing, extratropical winter cyclones that travel across eastern North America and out over the northwestern Atlantic Ocean. Until only recently, these storms have been difficult to predict accurately [Sanders, 1986a, b], and they are well known for the devastating weather they sometimes bring to the eastern seaboard [Bosart, 1981; Kocin and Uccellini, 1984]. Such storms frequently produce "crippling" ice, heavy snow, and gale force winds, and they may batter the east coast from the Carolinas northward, often causing property damage and loss of life. The strong winds that accompany such a storm, as well as the cold, dry, continental air that often flows out over the Atlantic during the cold air outbreak stage of the storm's passage, are responsible for some of the most vigorous air-sea exchanges of momentum, heat, and moisture in this part of the world [Budyko, 1974; Bunker and Worthington, 1976].

  10. The Hawthorne experiments and the introduction of Jean Piaget in American industrial psychology, 1929-1932.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2002-05-01

    The Hawthorne interview program between 1929 and 1932 was one of the most significant industrial studies in the United States. The Hawthorne researchers applied Jean Piaget's clinical method in their extensive interviews with tens of thousands of workers. Chiefly responsible for the program's methodology was Elton Mayo, an Australian who saw interviewing as a means to promote social cooperation. Previous discussions of the Hawthorne experiments have ignored the influence of Piaget in the social sciences. This article provides an account of Mayo's and the Hawthorne researchers' efforts to fuse Piaget's innovation with burgeoning American industrial psychology. The endeavor was not an isolated event but rather drew on the theories and practice of Janet-Piaget psychology, on the support of the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Foundation, and on the discourse among social scientists about Piaget's work.

  11. The Hawthorne experiments and the introduction of Jean Piaget in American industrial psychology, 1929-1932.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2002-05-01

    The Hawthorne interview program between 1929 and 1932 was one of the most significant industrial studies in the United States. The Hawthorne researchers applied Jean Piaget's clinical method in their extensive interviews with tens of thousands of workers. Chiefly responsible for the program's methodology was Elton Mayo, an Australian who saw interviewing as a means to promote social cooperation. Previous discussions of the Hawthorne experiments have ignored the influence of Piaget in the social sciences. This article provides an account of Mayo's and the Hawthorne researchers' efforts to fuse Piaget's innovation with burgeoning American industrial psychology. The endeavor was not an isolated event but rather drew on the theories and practice of Janet-Piaget psychology, on the support of the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Foundation, and on the discourse among social scientists about Piaget's work. PMID:12096759

  12. High-power dielectric Cherenkov maser oscillator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Main, W. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Cherry, R. ); Garate, E. )

    1990-06-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of experiments conducted on the dielectric Cherenkov maser (DCM) oscillator. The device consists of a cylindrical metallic waveguide of inner radius 3.64 cm which is partially filled with a dielectric liner. Traveling through the lined waveguide is an annular relativistic electron beam. Liners of dielectric constant {epsilon} = 10, 5 and 2.3 were investigated for liner thicknesses of 4 and 6 mm. The 6-mm-thick, {epsilon} = 10 liner generated an RF output of 200 MW for 20 ns at 3.8 Hz with electron-beam parameters of 700 kV, 12 kA, and pulse duration of 100 ns. The maximum measured power output for the other configurations was 80 MW at a frequency of 7 GHz ({epsilon} = 5), with several MW of power output from the polyethylene liner ({epsilon} = 2.3) at a frequency of {approximately} 9 GHz.

  13. Space station experiment definition: Advanced power system test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, H. E.; Neff, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design for an advanced photovoltaic power system test bed was provided and the requirements for advanced photovoltaic power system experiments better defined. Results of this study will be used in the design efforts conducted in phase B and phase C/D of the space station program so that the test bed capabilities will be responsive to user needs. Critical PV and energy storage technologies were identified and inputs were received from the idustry (government and commercial, U.S. and international) which identified experimental requirements. These inputs were used to develop a number of different conceptual designs. Pros and cons of each were discussed and a strawman candidate identified. A preliminary evolutionary plan, which included necessary precursor activities, was established and cost estimates presented which would allow for a successful implementation to the space station in the 1994 time frame.

  14. Experiences with drug testing at a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, H.B.

    1987-01-01

    After more than 2 yr of operation of a drug testing program at the San Onofre nuclear power plant site, the Southern California Edison Co. has had a number of experiences and lessons considered valuable. The drug testing program at San Onofre, implemented in September of 1984, continues in essentially the same form today. Prior to describing the program, the paper reviews several underlying issues that believed to be simultaneously satisfied by the program: trustworthiness, fitness and safety, public trust, and privacy and search. The overall drug testing program, periodic drug monitoring program, and unannounced drug testing program are described. In addition to the obvious features of a good drug testing program, which are described in the EEI guide, it is essential to consider such issues as the stated program rationale, employee relations, and disciplinary action measures when contemplating or engaging in drug testing at nuclear power plants.

  15. Introduction to project DUNE, a DUst experiment in a low Nutrient, low chlorophyll Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guieu, C.; Dulac, F.; Ridame, C.; Pondaven, P.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of project DUNE was to estimate the impact of atmospheric deposition on an oligotrophic ecosystem based on mesocosm experiments simulating strong atmospheric inputs of eolian mineral dust. Our mesocosm experiments aimed at being representative of real atmospheric deposition events onto the surface of oligotrophic marine waters and were an original attempt to consider the vertical dimension after atmospheric deposition at the sea surface. This introductory paper describes the objectives of DUNE and the implementation plan of a series of mesocosm experiments conducted in the Mediterranean Sea in 2008 and 2010 during which either wet or dry and a succession of two wet deposition fluxes of 10 g m-2 of Saharan dust have been simulated based on the production of dust analogs from erodible soils of a source region. After the presentation of the main biogeochemical initial conditions of the site at the time of each experiment, a general overview of the papers published in this special issue is presented. From laboratory results on the solubility of trace elements in dust to biogeochemical results from the mesocosm experiments and associated modeling, these papers describe how the strong simulated dust deposition events impacted the marine biogeochemistry. Those multidisciplinary results are bringing new insights into the role of atmospheric deposition on oligotrophic ecosystems and its impact on the carbon budget. The dissolved trace metals with crustal origin - Mn, Al and Fe - showed different behaviors as a function of time after the seeding. The increase in dissolved Mn and Al concentrations was attributed to dissolution processes. The observed decrease in dissolved Fe was due to scavenging on sinking dust particles and aggregates. When a second dust seeding followed, a dissolution of Fe from the dust particles was then observed due to the excess Fe binding ligand concentrations present at that time. Calcium nitrate and sulfate were formed in the dust

  16. Greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission reduction potentials of renewable energy - case studies on photovoltaic and wind power introduction considering interactions among technologies in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Ming Kuo; Yasuhiro Fukushima

    2009-03-15

    To achieve higher energy security and lower emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants, the development of renewable energy has attracted much attention in Taiwan. In addition to its contribution to the enhancement of reliable indigenous resources, the introduction of renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power systems reduces the emission of GHGs and air pollutants by substituting a part of the carbon- and pollutant-intensive power with power generated by methods that are cleaner and less carbon-intensive. To evaluate the reduction potentials, consequential changes in the operation of different types of existing power plants have to be taken into account. In this study, a linear mathematical programming model is constructed to simulate a power mix for a given power demand in a power market sharing a cost-minimization objective. By applying the model, the emission reduction potentials of capacity extension case studies, including the enhancement of PV and wind power introduction at different scales, were assessed. In particular, the consequences of power mix changes in carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulates were discussed. Seasonally varying power demand levels, solar irradiation, and wind strength were taken into account. In this study, we have found that the synergetic reduction of carbon dioxide emission induced by PV and wind power introduction occurs under a certain level of additional installed capacity. Investigation of a greater variety of case studies on scenario development with emerging power sources becomes possible by applying the model developed in this study. 15 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Midcourse space experiment: Introduction to the spacecraft, instruments, and scientific objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mill, John D.; O'Neil, Robert R.; Price, Stephan; Romick, Gerald J.; Uy, O. Manuel; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Light, Glenn C.; Moore, W. Walding, Jr.; Murdock, Thomas L.; Stair, A. T., Jr.

    1994-09-01

    A suite of state-of-the-art sensors, including a cryogenic infrared scanning radiometer and Fourier-transform spectrometer, several visible and ultraviolet imagers and spectrographic imagers, and a set of contamination instruments, are at present being integrated with a highly capable spacecraft for a planned 1994 launch into a polar orbit. The optical sensors cover the spectrum from the far ultraviolet through the longwave infrared (110 nm to 28 micron). The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite, funded and managed by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, will be a long-duration, observatory-style measurement platform that will collect several terabytes of high-quality data on earth, earthlimb, and celestial backgrounds, ICBM-style targets, and resident space objects. While the principal focus of MSX is to collect phenomenology data in support of ballistic missile defense objectives, it will also be capable of collecting well-calibrated data in support of a variety of civilian science objectives in earth and atmospheric remote sensing and astronomy. This paper reviews the mission objectives, describes the spacecraft and the instrumentation, and discusses the planned observations. It also outlines an innovative approach to reducing, analyzing, and archiving the large database that will result from several years of data collection supporting a variety of scientific objectives.

  18. Solar-cell power system for the BESS Polar Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masaya

    The Balloon-born Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer (BESS), aiming to search for antiparticle/antimatter in the cosmic radiation, successfully carried out two long-duration flights over Antarctica in 2004 (BESS Polar-I, 8.5days) and 2007/2008 (BESS Polar-II, 24.5days science, 29.5 days total). To achieve the long duration flights, establishment of a reliable power supply system was one of our new challenges. The requirements for the new system were to enable detector system operation with a capacity of 500W for a flight period of ˜30 days, and the total weight was required to be less than ˜300kg from the view point of the global payload weight constraints. To meet these requirements, we adopted solar panels (Sharp NT3436BD solar cell modules) as a power source. Thanks to their high efficiency and light weight, we could design a simple and compact omni-directional solar array structure with enough power generation capability and mechanical strength. Moreover, because each side of the structure is designed to have the same solar-cell area, no directional control is required. This was preferred because the superconducting magnet controls the direction of the instrument and a directional system for the solar array would have to incorporate independent azimuth control. The basic performance was first verified through two technical flights. Subsequently, this system was flown for 8.5 days and nearly 30 days over Antarctica successfully supplying the electric power fro instrument as expected. In the paper, an overview and flight performance of the solar power system will be presented.

  19. Rocket experiment on microwave power transmission with Furoshiki deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Nobuyuki; Iwashita, Masashi; Tanaka, Kohei; Nakasuka, Shinichi; Summerer, Leopold

    2009-07-01

    Huge antennas has many useful applications in space as well as on the ground, for example, Solar Power Satellite to provide electricity to the ground, telecommunication for cellular phones, radars for remote sensing, navigation and observation, and so on. The S-310-36 sounding rocket was successfully launched on 22 January 2006 to verify our newly proposed scheme to construct huge antennas under microgravity condition in space. The rocket experiment has three main objectives, the first objective of which is to verify the Furoshiki deployment system [S. Nakasuka, R. Funase, K. Nakada, N. Kaya, J. Mankins, Large membrane "FUROSHIKI Satellite" applied to phased array antenna and its sounding rocket experiment, in: Proceedings of the 54th International Astronautical Congress, 2003. [1

  20. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. The purpose of this paper is to report NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs. The paper will describe the data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems. The paper also describes how the systems were used and covers the challenges encountered to make them work. Examples of raw data and derived results will be shown as well. Finally, future plans for these systems will be discussed.

  1. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF CONVERGING SHOCKS IN PULSED POWER DRIVEN EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    R. KANZLEITER; W. ATCHISON; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The final shot of the current Near Term Liner Experiment (NTLX) series occurred on September 29, 2000. Utilization of a pulsed power source with a standardized liner/target ''cartridge'' produced a uniform implosion to drive hydrodynamic experiments. Diagnostics showed that high quality data of shock propagation can be obtained from pulsed power liner drivers as in the current NTLX series. Very good agreement in calculating shock locations was obtained between the codes used to model the NTLX series, RAGE and RAVEN. RAVEN also accurately predicts liner/target impact as measured by B-Dot probes. Large differences are observed between the calculated and measured positions of converging shock waves even in simple geometrical configurations. Liner/target impact is accurately calculated and similar results are produced for shock velocities in Lucite. RAGE and RAVEN use different hydrodynamic algorithms, yet agree, this focuses current efforts on EOS issues within the outer tin target to resolve discrepancies. Further diagnostics covering shock breakout from the outer tin target and shock propagation shortly thereafter would be highly beneficial.

  2. Consequences and countermeasures in a nuclear power accident: Chernobyl experience.

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, Vladimir A; Kirichenko, Alexander V; Werts, Day E

    2012-09-01

    Despite the tragic accidents in Fukushima and Chernobyl, the nuclear power industry will continue to contribute to the production of electric energy worldwide until there are efficient and sustainable alternative sources of energy. The Chernobyl nuclear accident, which occurred 26 years ago in the former Soviet Union, released an immense amount of radioactivity over vast territories of Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, extending into northern Europe, and became the most severe accident in the history of the nuclear industry. This disaster was a result of numerous factors including inadequate nuclear power plant design, human errors, and violation of safety measures. The lessons learned from nuclear accidents will continue to strengthen the safety design of new reactor installations, but with more than 400 active nuclear power stations worldwide and 104 reactors in the Unites States, it is essential to reassess fundamental issues related to the Chernobyl experience as it continues to evolve. This article summarizes early and late events of the incident, the impact on thyroid health, and attempts to reduce agricultural radioactive contamination.

  3. Consequences and countermeasures in a nuclear power accident: Chernobyl experience.

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, Vladimir A; Kirichenko, Alexander V; Werts, Day E

    2012-09-01

    Despite the tragic accidents in Fukushima and Chernobyl, the nuclear power industry will continue to contribute to the production of electric energy worldwide until there are efficient and sustainable alternative sources of energy. The Chernobyl nuclear accident, which occurred 26 years ago in the former Soviet Union, released an immense amount of radioactivity over vast territories of Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, extending into northern Europe, and became the most severe accident in the history of the nuclear industry. This disaster was a result of numerous factors including inadequate nuclear power plant design, human errors, and violation of safety measures. The lessons learned from nuclear accidents will continue to strengthen the safety design of new reactor installations, but with more than 400 active nuclear power stations worldwide and 104 reactors in the Unites States, it is essential to reassess fundamental issues related to the Chernobyl experience as it continues to evolve. This article summarizes early and late events of the incident, the impact on thyroid health, and attempts to reduce agricultural radioactive contamination. PMID:22853775

  4. Asymmetric Power Boosts Extortion in an Economic Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Hagel, Kristin; Milinski, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Direct reciprocity is a major mechanism for the evolution of cooperation. Several classical studies have suggested that humans should quickly learn to adopt reciprocal strategies to establish mutual cooperation in repeated interactions. On the other hand, the recently discovered theory of ZD strategies has found that subjects who use extortionate strategies are able to exploit and subdue cooperators. Although such extortioners have been predicted to succeed in any population of adaptive opponents, theoretical follow-up studies questioned whether extortion can evolve in reality. However, most of these studies presumed that individuals have similar strategic possibilities and comparable outside options, whereas asymmetries are ubiquitous in real world applications. Here we show with a model and an economic experiment that extortionate strategies readily emerge once subjects differ in their strategic power. Our experiment combines a repeated social dilemma with asymmetric partner choice. In our main treatment there is one randomly chosen group member who is unilaterally allowed to exchange one of the other group members after every ten rounds of the social dilemma. We find that this asymmetric replacement opportunity generally promotes cooperation, but often the resulting payoff distribution reflects the underlying power structure. Almost half of the subjects in a better strategic position turn into extortioners, who quickly proceed to exploit their peers. By adapting their cooperation probabilities consistent with ZD theory, extortioners force their co-players to cooperate without being similarly cooperative themselves. Comparison to non-extortionate players under the same conditions indicates a substantial net gain to extortion. Our results thus highlight how power asymmetries can endanger mutually beneficial interactions, and transform them into exploitative relationships. In particular, our results indicate that the extortionate strategies predicted from ZD theory

  5. Millimeter-Gap Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line Power Flow Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hutsel, Brian Thomas; Stoltzfus, Brian S.; Fowler, William E.; LeChien, Keith R.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Moore, James K.; Mulville, Thomas D.; Savage, Mark E.; Stygar, William A.; McKenney, John L.; Jones, Peter A.; MacRunnels, Diego J.; Long, Finis W.; Porter, John L.

    2014-09-01

    An experiment platform has been designed to study vacuum power flow in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The platform was driven by the 400-GW Mykonos-V accelerator. The experiments conducted quantify the current loss in a millimeter-gap MITL with respect to vacuum conditions in the MITL for two different gap distances, 1.0 and 1.3 mm. The current loss for each gap was measured for three different vacuum pump down times. As a ride along experiment, multiple shots were conducted with each set of hardware to determine if there was a conditioning effect to increase current delivery on subsequent shots. The experiment results revealed large differences in performance for the 1.0 and 1.3 mm gaps. The 1.0 mm gap resulted in current loss of 40%-60% of peak current. The 1.3 mm gap resulted in current losses of less than 5% of peak current. Classical MITL models that neglect plasma expansion predict that there should be zero current loss, after magnetic insulation is established, for both of these gaps. The experiments result s indicate that the vacuum pressure or pump down time did not have a significant effect on the measured current loss at vacuum pressures between 1e-4 and 1e-5 Torr. Additionally, there was not repeatable evidence of a conditioning effect that reduced current loss for subsequent full-energy shots on a given set of hardware. It should be noted that the experiments conducted likely did not have large loss contributions due to ion emission from the anode due to the relatively small current densi-ties (25-40 kA/cm) in the MITL that limited the anode temperature rise due to ohmic heating. The results and conclusions from these experiments may have limited applicability to MITLs of high current density (>400 kA/cm) used in the convolute and load region of the Z which experience temperature increases of >400° C and generate ion emission from anode surfaces.

  6. Update on PHELIX Pulsed-Power Hydrodynamics Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, Christopher; Reass, William; Oro, David; Griego, Jeffery; Turchi, Peter; Reinovsky, Robert; Devolder, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    The PHELIX pulsed-power driver is a 300 kJ, portable, transformer-coupled, capacitor bank capable of delivering 3-5 MA, 10 μs pulse into a low inductance load. Here we describe further testing and hydrodynamics experiments. First, a 4 nH static inductive load has been constructed. This allows for repetitive high-voltage, high-current testing of the system. Results are used in the calibration of simple circuit models and numerical simulations across a range of bank charges (+/-20 < V0 < +/-40 kV). Furthermore, a dynamic liner-on-target load experiment has been conducted to explore the shock-launched transport of particulates (diam. ~ 1 μm) from a surface. The trajectories of the particulates are diagnosed with radiography. Results are compared to 2D hydro-code simulations. Finally, initial studies are underway to assess the feasibility of using the PHELIX driver as an electromagnetic launcher for planer shock-physics experiments. Work supported by United States-DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  7. [Gender power, poverty and contraception: multiparous women's experiences].

    PubMed

    Prates, Cibeli de Souza; Abib, Gilda Maria de Carvalho; de Oliveira, Dora Lúcia Leidens Correa

    2008-12-01

    Multiparity among poor women is associated to vulnerability as a generating or strengthening factor. This is a qualitative and exploratory research that aims at analyzing experiences of contraception among poor multiparae women, considering the influence of gender on their autonomy in choosing the number of children, the moment of getting pregnant, and the contraception strategies. It also aims at analyzing the mechanisms of resistance used by these women in the search for such autonomy. The data were gathered through focus groups. The content analysis suggests that the high number of children these women give birth to is explained by a reduced autonomy in their use of contraception, arising from poverty and gender inequalities. These women face these difficulties using resistance strategies that result in male power disruptions. This research has brought new elements for understanding the multiparity phenomenon in the context of poverty, and it also contributes towards a critical analysis of actions focused on promoting family planning.

  8. Photovoltaic Array Space Power flight experiment plus diagnostics (PASP+) modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooley, William T.; Adams, Steven F.; Reinhardt, Kitt C.; Piszczor, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics flight experiment (PASP+) subsumes twelve solar array modules which represent the state of the art in the space photovoltaic array industry. Each of the twelve modules individually feature specific photovoltaic technologies such as advanced semiconductor materials, multi-bandgap structures, lightweight array designs, advanced interconnect technologies, or concentrator array designs. This paper will describe each module in detail including the configuration, components, materials, anticipated on orbit performance, and some of the aspects of each array technology. The layout of each module and the photovoltaic cells or array cross section will be presented graphically. A discussion on the environmental constraints and materials selection will be included as well as a delineation of the differences between the modules and the baseline array configuration in its intended application.

  9. Calculations and experiments concerning lifting force and power in TEMPUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zong, J. H.; Szekely, J.; Lohofer, G.

    1993-01-01

    A critical comparison is reported between the theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for the electromagnetic lifting force and the heating rates which may be achieved, under simulated microgravity conditions, using the TEMPUS electromagnetic levitation device. The experiments involved the suspending of a metallic sample from one arm of a recording balance, such that it was carefully positioned between the heating and the positioning coils of the levitation device. The net force exerted by the sample was measured as a function of position, the coil currents, and the nature of the sample. Some calculations are also reported regarding the power absorption by the sample. The theoretical predictions, based on the numerical solution of Maxwell's equations using the volume integral technique, were found to be in excellent agreement with the measurements. For the idealized case of a spherical sample, analytical solutions describing the lifting force were also found to agree very well with the computed results.

  10. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs is reported. The data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems are described. How the systems were used is described and the challenges encountered to make them work are covered. Examples of raw data and derived results are shown as well. Finally, future plans for these systems are discussed. For some flight research applications where miniaturized instrumentation is a requirement, the authors conclude that commercially available data loggers and sensors are viable alternatives. In fact, the data loggers and sensors make it possible to gather research-quality data in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  11. Research Group Introduction : Power Electronics Laboratory, Dept. of Electrical, Electronics and Information Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    伊東, 淳一

    Our research focuses on power conversion and its control especially matrix converter, multi-level converter, DC-DC converter. Furthermore AC motor drives, wireless power transfer system, high frequency power circuit and new device technology.

  12. The good life of the powerful: the experience of power and authenticity enhances subjective well-being.

    PubMed

    Kifer, Yona; Heller, Daniel; Perunovic, Wei Qi Elaine; Galinsky, Adam D

    2013-03-01

    A common cliché and system-justifying stereotype is that power leads to misery and self-alienation. Drawing on the power and authenticity literatures, however, we predicted the opposite relationship. Because power increases the correspondence between internal states and behavior, we hypothesized that power enhances subjective well-being (SWB) by leading people to feel more authentic. Across four surveys representing markedly different primary social roles (general, work, romantic-relationship, and friendship surveys; Study 1), and in an experiment (Study 2a), we found consistent evidence that experiencing power leads to greater SWB. Moreover, authenticity mediated this effect. Further establishing the causal importance of authenticity, a final experiment (Study 2b), in which authenticity was manipulated, demonstrated that greater authenticity directly increased SWB. Although striving for power lowers well-being, these results demonstrate the pervasive positive psychological effects of having power, and indicate the importance of spreading power to enhance collective well-being.

  13. The joint astrophysical plasmadynamic experiment extreme ultraviolet spectrometer: resolving power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendse, F. B.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.; Yentis, D. J.; Hunter, W. R.; Fritz, G. G.; Siegmund, O.; Heidemann, K.; Lenke, R.; Seifert, A.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.

    2006-06-01

    The Joint astrophysical Plasmadynamic EXperiment (J-PEX) is a high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer (220-245 Å) used for the study of white dwarf atmospheres. Significant improvements have been achieved in both the normal-incidence gratings and the focal-plane detector since its first successful sounding rocket flight in 2001. The spherical laminar gratings have been replaced by paraboloidal gratings. The substrates of the new gratings have measured slope errors less than 0.35 arcsec. The gratings were recorded holographically and the rulings transferred into the silica substrates by ion etching. This procedure was followed by polymer overcoat to reduce the blaze angle of the groove profile. The detector uses microchannel plates with 6 μm pores and a cross-strip anode, providing 17.9 μm resolution in the dispersion direction. The detector employs a KBr photocathode with a projected efficiency of 0.24 at 256 Å. Using ray tracing simulations, we predict the resolving power expected from the spectrometer during upcoming EUV calibrations with a He II discharge source.

  14. On the experience of feeling powerful: perceived power moderates the effect of stereotype threat on women's math performance.

    PubMed

    Van Loo, Katie J; Rydell, Robert J

    2013-03-01

    This research examined whether feeling powerful can eliminate the deleterious effect of stereotype threat (i.e., concerns about confirming a negative self-relevant stereotype) on women's math performance. In Experiments 1 and 2, priming women with high power buffered them from reduced math performance in response to stereotype threat instructions, whereas women in the low and control power conditions showed poorer math performance in response to threat. Experiment 3 found that working memory capacity is one mechanism through which power moderates the effect of threat on women's math performance. In the low and control power conditions, women showed reduced working memory capacity in response to stereotype threat, accounting for threat's effect on performance. In contrast, women in the high power condition did not show reductions in working memory capacity or math performance in response to threat. This work demonstrates that perceived power moderates stereotype threat-based performance effects and explains why this occurs.

  15. High power heating of magnetic reconnection in merging tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Gi, K.; Watanabe, T.; Ii, T.; Yamada, T.; Gryaznevich, M.; Scannell, R.; Conway, N.; Crowley, B.; Michael, C.

    2015-05-15

    Significant ion/electron heating of magnetic reconnection up to 1.2 keV was documented in two spherical tokamak plasma merging experiment on MAST with the significantly large Reynolds number R∼10{sup 5}. Measured 1D/2D contours of ion and electron temperatures reveal clearly energy-conversion mechanisms of magnetic reconnection: huge outflow heating of ions in the downstream and localized heating of electrons at the X-point. Ions are accelerated up to the order of poloidal Alfven speed in the reconnection outflow region and are thermalized by fast shock-like density pileups formed in the downstreams, in agreement with recent solar satellite observations and PIC simulation results. The magnetic reconnection efficiently converts the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic energy mostly into ion thermal energy through the outflow, causing the reconnection heating energy proportional to square of the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic field B{sub rec}{sup 2}  ∼  B{sub p}{sup 2}. The guide toroidal field B{sub t} does not affect the bulk heating of ions and electrons, probably because the reconnection/outflow speeds are determined mostly by the external driven inflow by the help of another fast reconnection mechanism: intermittent sheet ejection. The localized electron heating at the X-point increases sharply with the guide toroidal field B{sub t}, probably because the toroidal field increases electron confinement and acceleration length along the X-line. 2D measurements of magnetic field and temperatures in the TS-3 tokamak merging experiment also reveal the detailed reconnection heating mechanisms mentioned above. The high-power heating of tokamak merging is useful not only for laboratory study of reconnection but also for economical startup and heating of tokamak plasmas. The MAST/TS-3 tokamak merging with B{sub p} > 0.4 T will enables us to heat the plasma to the alpha heating regime: T{sub i} > 5 keV without using any additional heating facility.

  16. An original experiment to determine impact of catch crop introduction in a crop rotation on N2O production fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallec, Tiphaine; Le Dantec, Valérie; Zawilski, Bartosz; Brut, Aurore; Boussac, Marion; Ferlicoq, Morgan; Ceschia, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The raise in N2O concentration from the preindustrial era (280 ppb) to nowadays (324 ppb) is estimated to account for approximately 6% of the predicted global warming (IPCC 2014). Worldwide, soils are considered to be the dominant source of N2O, releasing an estimated 9.5 Tg N2O-N y-1 (65% of global N2O emissions), of which 36.8% are estimated to originate from agricultural soils (IPCC 2001). Most N2O originating from agricultural soils is a by- or end-product of nitrification or denitrification. The fate of N2O produced by microbiological processes in the subsoil is controlled by biotic (crop species, occurring soil organic matter, human pressure via mineral and organic nitrogen fertilisation) and abiotic (environmental conditions such as temperature, soil moisture, pH, etc.) factors. In cropland, contrary to forest and grassland, long bare soil periods can occurred between winter and summer crops with a high level of mineral (fertilizer) and organic (residues) nitrogen remaining in the soil, causing important emissions of carbon and nitrogen induced by microbial activities. Introduction of catch crop has been identified as an important mitigation option to reduce environmental impact of crops mainly thanks to their ability to increase CO2 fixation, to decrease mineral nitrogen lixiviation and also reduce the potential fate of N2O production. Uncertainty also remains about the impact of released mineral nitrogen coming from crushed catch crop on N2O production if summer crop seedling and mineral nitrogen release are not well synchronized. To verify those assumptions, a unique paired-plot experiment was carried in the south-west of France from September 2013 to august 2014 to test impact of management change on N2O budget and production dynamic. A crop plot was divided into two subplots, one receiving a catch crop (mustard), the other one remaining conventionally managed (bare-soil during winter). This set-up allowed avoiding climate effect. Each subplot was

  17. POTENTIAL OF ENERGY GENERATION BY INTRODUCTION OF PHOTOVOLTAIC AND SMALL WIND POWER SYSTEM IN SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS IN JAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Ryo; Fukushi, Kensuke

    Sites of sewage treatment plants are available as s ites for renewable power generation, while the plants are large energy consumers. This study estimated generation potential of renewable energy by introducing photovoltaic power generation system and small wind power generation system at the sewage treatment plants in 18 major cities. As a result of estimation, 31% of power consumed in the targeted plants were generated by the solar and wind power generation systems when they were intalled in all the plants in the targeted cities. The generated power corresponds to 274,000 t-CO2/year. Approximately 50% of total generated power was generated at 25 plan ts of the 121 of targeted plants.

  18. Photovoltaic-powered refrigerator experiment at Isle Royale National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    The use of a photovoltaic power system to operate an electric refrigerator at a trail construction camp at Isle Royale, Michigan is investigated. The use of P/V power for refrigeration in a remote installation is demonstrated. System design as well as predicted and measured system performance are presented.

  19. KiloPower Project - KRUSTY Experiment Nuclear Design

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, David Irvin; Godfroy, Thomas; Mcclure, Patrick Ray; Sanchez, Rene Gerardo

    2015-07-20

    This PowerPoint presentation covers the following topics: Reference Kilopower configuration; Reference KRUSTY configuration; KRUSTY design sensitivities; KRUSTY reactivity coefficients; KRUSTY criticality safety and control; KRUSTY core activation/dose; and KRUSTY shielding, room activation/dose.

  20. Buying power in a competitive market (Part II): Public power experience in the new market

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlquist, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    Studies and subsequent contract negotiations engaged in by a municipal electric power agency to obtain alternative power supplies are outlined in the paper. Feasibility studies identified an 80 MW turbine for gas-fired peaking generation to be economically optimal. The request for proposal and contractual agreements to purchase 41 MW of baseload capacity are briefly described. Informal investigations of additional power purchases indicate that baseload power prices have dropped since the original purchase.

  1. Assessment of Zero Power Critical Experiments and Needs for a Fission Surface Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Jim R Parry; John Darrell bess; Brad T. Rearden; Gary A. Harms

    2009-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is providing funding to the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess, develop, and test nuclear technologies that could provide surface power to a lunar outpost. Sufficient testing of this fission surface power (FSP) system will need to be completed to enable a decision by NASA for flight development. The near-term goal for the FSP work is to conduct the minimum amount of testing needed to validate the system performance within an acceptable risk. This report attempts to assess the current modeling capabilities and quantify any bias associated with the modeling methods for designing the nuclear reactor. The baseline FSP system is a sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with 93% 235U enriched HEU-O2 fuel, SS316 cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. The FSP is to produce approximately 40 kWe net power with a lifetime of at least 8 years at full power. A flight-ready FSP is to be ready for launch and deployment by 2020. Existing benchmarks from the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Program (ICSBEP) were reviewed and modeled in MCNP. An average bias of less than 0.6% was determined using the ENDF/B-VII cross-section libraries except in the case of subcritical experiments, which exhibited an average bias of approximately 1.5%. The bias increases with increasing reflector worth of the beryllium. The uncertainties and sensitivities in cross section data for the FSP model and ZPPR-20 configurations were assessed using TSUNAMI-3D. The cross-section covariance uncertainty in the FSP model was calculated as 2.09%, which was dominated by the uncertainty in the 235U(n,?) reactions. Global integral indices were generated in TSUNAMI-IP using pre-release SCALE 6 cross-section covariance data. The ZPPR-20 benchmark models exhibit strong similarity with the FSP model. A penalty assessment was performed to determine the degree of which the FSP model could not be characterized

  2. Opportunities for and Barriers to Powerful and Transformative Learning Experiences in Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolger, Benjamin B.; Rowland, Gordon; Reuning-Hummel, Carrie; Codner, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Powerful and transformative learning experiences display characteristics in common with each other. Emerging communication technologies may increase opportunities for powerful and transformative learning experiences. To explore this question, there are four sections to this article. First, it is observed that there are many interesting synergies…

  3. Effects of Supervisors' Sex, Focus, and Experience on Preferences for Interpersonal Power Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robyak, James E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined the effects of counseling supervisors' sex, amount of supervisory experience, and supervisory focus on preferences for the referent, expert, and legitimate power bases. Supervisors rated the utility of trainee responses. Men and supervisors with relatively little experience preferred the referent power base. Supervisors who focused on…

  4. Total x-ray power improvement on recent wire array experiments on the Z machine.

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Savage, Mark Edward; Rochau, Gregory Alan; Lopez, Mike R.; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments on the refurbished Z-machine were conducted using large diameter stainless steel arrays which produced x-ray powers of 260 TW. Follow-up experiments were then conducted utilizing tungsten wires with approximately the same total mass with the hypothesis that the total x-ray power would increase. On the large diameter tungsten experiments, the x-ray power averaged over 300 TW and the total x-ray energy was greater than 2MJ. Different analysis techniques for inferring the x-ray power will be described in detail.

  5. Representative surface profile power spectra from capsules used in NOVA and Omega implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R C; McEachern, R L; Stephens, R

    1998-10-20

    Typical surface profile power spectra of capsules used in Nova and Omega implosion experiments are presented. All Nova capsules are essentially identical in size and composition; their differences reflect small shell-to-shell variations. Differences among the Omega capsule power spectra can be attributed to changes in material properties with doping and (very importantly) differences in processing experience. These capsule power spectra accurately reflect past and current production, but are only a starting point for future capabilities.

  6. High-power ICRF and LHCD experiments on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Saoutic, B.; Beaumont, B.; Becoulet, A.; Bizarro, J.P.; Fraboulet, D.; Garbet, X.; Goniche, M.; Guiziou, L.; Hoang, G.T.; Hutter, T.; Joffrin, E.; Kuus, H.; Litaudon, X.; Mollard, P.; Moreau, D.; Nguyen, F.; Pecquet, A.L.; Peysson, Y.; Rey, G.; van Houtte, D.; Zabiego, M. )

    1994-10-15

    For a given ICRF power, the sawtooth-free period duration increases with plama density. This trend, correlated with an increasing soft X-ray inversion radius, clearly shows a better stabilization by hot ions at higher density. A tentative explanation is given through a full modeling of the hot ion anisotropy using a Fokker Planck code coupled with a 1/2 D power balance code simulating experimental data. A linear stability analysis of the kink/tearing m=1 mode, in terms of a MHD kinetic functional, shows that the anisotropy of the distribution function may amplify the effect of the hot ion pressure gradient. A two-fold lengthening of the sawtooth-free period is obtained when applying LHCD to ICRF heated plasmas. Analysis of polarimetric data shows that, instead of the continuous decrease of the central safety factor observed when using ICRF alone, the q value freezes'' when LHCD power exceeds 3 MW. This demonstrates a current profile control effect opening the way towards steady-state stabilization. Working with both ICRH and LHCD on the same target plasma allows thorough comparisons of transport with different power deposition profiles and coupling mechanisms. The energy stored in electrons is the same although the electronic temperature gradients are quite different. Nevertheless, due to better ion heating, the energy life time (discarding hot ions contribution) is always higher with ICRH. Local transport analyses allow comparisons between both heating schemes for different confinement situations.

  7. Practical experiences with worm gearing for spacecraft power transmission applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, William; Mccown, William

    1989-01-01

    Experiences of several organizations using worm gearing for spacecraft are discussed. Practical aspects and subtleties of using worm gearing for design and operation is included. Knowledge gained from these applications is analyzed, and guidelines for usage are proposed.

  8. High power operational experience with the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    The heart of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a pulsed linear accelerator that is used to simultaneously provide H+ and H- beams to several user facilities. This accelerator contains two Cockcroft-Walton style injectors, a 100-MeV drift tube linac and an 800-MeV coupled cavity linac. This presentation will touch on various aspects of the high power operation including performance, tune-up strategy, beam losses and machine protection.

  9. The Physical Environment: A Powerful Regulator of Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Elizabeth

    1994-01-01

    Discusses five environmental dimensions (hardness/softness, open/closed, simple/complex, intrusion/seclusion, and high mobility/low mobility) that affect the experiences of children in day-care centers, demonstrating how to consider these dimensions in solving typical problems in child care settings. (MDM)

  10. The experience of power: examining the effects of power on approach and inhibition tendencies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Cameron; Jennifer, Berdahl L

    2002-12-01

    Two studies of task-focused dyads tested the approach/inhibition theory of power (D. Keltner, D. H. Gruenfeld, & C. Anderson, in press), which posits that having power increases the tendency to approach and decreases the tendency to inhibit. Results provided preliminary support for the theory: Participants higher in personality dominance or assigned control over resources expressed their true attitudes, experienced more positive and less negative emotion, were more likely to perceive rewards (i.e., that their partner liked them), and were less likely to perceive threats (e.g., that their partner felt anger toward them). Most of these effects were mediated by the sense of power, suggesting that subjective feelings of power are an important component in the effects of power.

  11. SNS Ring Operational Experience and Power Ramp Up Status

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The SNS Ring has now been operating for about 3.5 years, and our march continues to increase the beam power to the full design value of 1.4 MW. The Ring is a loss-limited machine, and in general the radioactivation levels are good, but there are some unanticipated hot spots that we are working to improve. High intensity collective effects such as space-charge and beam instability have had minimal impact on beam operations to date. The cross plane coupling issue in the ring to target beam transport line has been solved. We will also discuss the status of equipment upgrades in the high-energy beam transport beam line, the injection-dump beam transport line, the ring, and the ring-to-target beam transport line.

  12. A Free-Form Power Experiment to Enhance Student Creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fons, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory sessions offer students an opportunity to develop creative problem-solving skills and to better understand the nature of the scientific process through hands-on learning. Unfortunately, traditional procedures are often written in such detail, they require students to do little more than follow step-by-step directions. Under those circumstances, students do not have the opportunity for creative and critical thinking and often lose appreciation for the laboratory setting. To encourage student creativity in the lab, I assign a free-form exercise that requires students to measure their power output when performing an activity of their choosing. Students develop their own experimental procedure and analysis restricted only by equipment availability and safety. The short handout I provide for my students contains no formal procedure or guidelines; it simply lists the requirements for their reports.

  13. Experience with life extension for power plant piping

    SciTech Connect

    Arnswald, W. ); Kautz, H.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The major part of thermal power plant piping has a limited design life due to loading conditions and stresses such as: - erosion/corrosion - vibrations - thermal shock - mechanical failures - high-temperature creep stress. Methods for preventing premature exhaustion of the service life are required now in causes of extended plant operation beyond the design life in the course of retrofitting pollution control systems. Since partly the piping systems design life has been reached or exceeded and sometimes the initial operating mode has been changed, andy inspection/overhaul program or upgrading work must consider this very carefully. Design modifications, inspection measures, and change of the operating mode are ways of extending the service life of components.

  14. Biomechanics and muscle coordination of human walking. Part I: introduction to concepts, power transfer, dynamics and simulations.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Felix E; Neptune, Richard R; Kautz, Steven A

    2002-12-01

    Current understanding of how muscles coordinate walking in humans is derived from analyses of body motion, ground reaction force and EMG measurements. This is Part I of a two-part review that emphasizes how muscle-driven dynamics-based simulations assist in the understanding of individual muscle function in walking, especially the causal relationships between muscle force generation and walking kinematics and kinetics. Part I reviews the strengths and limitations of Newton-Euler inverse dynamics and dynamical simulations, including the ability of each to find the contributions of individual muscles to the acceleration/deceleration of the body segments. We caution against using the concept of biarticular muscles transferring power from one joint to another to infer muscle coordination principles because energy flow among segments, even the adjacent segments associated with the joints, cannot be inferred from computation of joint powers and segmental angular velocities alone. Rather, we encourage the use of dynamical simulations to perform muscle-induced segmental acceleration and power analyses. Such analyses have shown that the exchange of segmental energy caused by the forces or accelerations induced by a muscle can be fundamentally invariant to whether the muscle is shortening, lengthening, or neither. How simulation analyses lead to understanding the coordination of seated pedaling, rather than walking, is discussed in this first part because the dynamics of pedaling are much simpler, allowing important concepts to be revealed. We elucidate how energy produced by muscles is delivered to the crank through the synergistic action of other non-energy producing muscles; specifically, that a major function performed by a muscle arises from the instantaneous segmental accelerations and redistribution of segmental energy throughout the body caused by its force generation. Part II reviews how dynamical simulations provide insight into muscle coordination of walking.

  15. Experiences in the Application of Project-Based Learning in a Switching-Mode Power Supplies Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamar, D. G.; Miaja, P. F.; Arias, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Rodriguez, M.; Vazquez, A.; Hernando, M. M.; Sebastian, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the introduction of problem-based learning (PBL) in a power electronics course at the University of Oviedo, Gijon, Spain, by means of two practical projects: the design and construction of a switching-mode power supply (SMPS) prototype and the static study of a dc-dc converter topology. The goal of this innovation was for…

  16. Testing the Waters. Duke Power State Park: An Environmental Education Learning Experience Designed for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhinehart, William C.; Beazley, Lea J.

    This learning packet, one in a group of eight, was developed by the Duke Power State Park in North Carolina for Grades 4-6 to learn to identify macroinvertebrates found in Lake Norman. Loose-leaf pages are presented in nine sections that contain: (1) introductions to the North Carolina State Park System, the Duke Power State Park, the park's…

  17. Cooling System for the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, F.; Pereira, H.; Silva, P.; Pezzetti, M.; Pavlov, O.; Pirotte, O.; Metselaar, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Lettry, J.; Kirk, H. G.; McDonald, K. T.; Titus, P.; Bennett, J. R. J.

    2010-04-01

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment of a target station suitable as source for future muon colliders or neutrino factories. When installed at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) PS (Proton Synchrotron) complex fast-extracted high-intensity proton beams intercepted a free mercury jet inside a normal-conducting, pulsed 15-T capture solenoid magnet cooled with liquid nitrogen. Up to 25 MJ of Joule heat was dissipated in the magnet during a pulse. The fully automated, remotely controlled cryogenic system of novel design permitted the transfer of nitrogen by the sole means of differential pressures inside the vessels. This fast cycling system permitted several hundred tests in less than three weeks during the 2007 data taking campaign.

  18. Characterizing Shrapnel and Debris Produced in High Power Laser Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, M; Andrew, J; Eder, D; Haupt, D; Johannes, A; Brown, B

    2003-09-01

    As large laser facilities increase in beam energy and target size, the propensity to produce shrapnel and debris that may impact target-facing optics lifetimes also increases. We present techniques and results using silica aerogel and thin glass plates to characterize the number, velocity, size, and spatial distribution of shrapnel and mass distribution of debris. We have conducted experiments on the HELEN laser to develop these techniques and provide data to support computer modeling of shrapnel and debris generation. We have begun to measure shrapnel and debris generation on Omega and are evolving plans to make similar measurements on NIF. These techniques appear viable for measuring shrapnel and debris with sufficient resolution to quantify their asymmetric deposition within the target chamber. These passive measurements can confirm improved target designs that reduce target shrapnel and debris effects and therefore aid in extending optics lifetime. Ultimately, these data support the most efficient use of optics in executing experimental campaigns on large laser facilities.

  19. A high voltage power supply for the AE-C and D low energy electron experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the electrical and mechanical design and operation of high voltage power supplies for space flight use. The supply was used to generate the spiraltron high voltage for low energy electron experiment on AE-C and D. Two versions of the supply were designed and built; one design is referred to as the low power version (AE-C) and the other as the high power version (AE-D). Performance is discussed under all operating conditions.

  20. Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power Systems (MCNSPS) conceptual design and evaluation report. Volume 1: Objectives, summary results and introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetch, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to determine which reactor, conversion, and radiator technologies would best fulfill future Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power System Requirements. Specifically, the requirement was 10 megawatts for 5 years of full power operation and 10 years systems life on orbit. A variety of liquid metal and gas cooled reactors, static and dynamic conversion systems, and passive and dynamic radiators were considered. Four concepts were selected for more detailed study. The concepts are: a gas cooled reactor with closed cycle Brayton turbine-alternator conversion with heat pipe and pumped tube-fin heat rejection; a lithium cooled reactor with a free piston Stirling engine-linear alternator and a pumped tube-fin radiator; a lithium cooled reactor with potassium Rankine turbine-alternator and heat pipe radiator; and a lithium cooled incore thermionic static conversion reactor with a heat pipe radiator. The systems recommended for further development to meet a 10 megawatt long life requirement are the lithium cooled reactor with the K-Rankine conversion and heat pipe radiator, and the lithium cooled incore thermionic reactor with heat pipe radiator.

  1. Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power Systems (MCNSPS) conceptual design and evaluation report. Volume 1: Objectives, summary results and introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetch, J. R.

    1988-09-01

    The objective was to determine which reactor, conversion, and radiator technologies would best fulfill future Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power System Requirements. Specifically, the requirement was 10 megawatts for 5 years of full power operation and 10 years systems life on orbit. A variety of liquid metal and gas cooled reactors, static and dynamic conversion systems, and passive and dynamic radiators were considered. Four concepts were selected for more detailed study. The concepts are: a gas cooled reactor with closed cycle Brayton turbine-alternator conversion with heat pipe and pumped tube-fin heat rejection; a lithium cooled reactor with a free piston Stirling engine-linear alternator and a pumped tube-fin radiator; a lithium cooled reactor with potassium Rankine turbine-alternator and heat pipe radiator; and a lithium cooled incore thermionic static conversion reactor with a heat pipe radiator. The systems recommended for further development to meet a 10 megawatt long life requirement are the lithium cooled reactor with the K-Rankine conversion and heat pipe radiator, and the lithium cooled incore thermionic reactor with heat pipe radiator.

  2. An introduction to the design, commissioning and operation of nuclear air cleaning systems for Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Xinliang Chen; Jiangang Qu; Minqi Shi

    1995-02-01

    This paper introduces the design evolution, system schemes and design and construction of main nuclear air cleaning components such as HEPA filter, charcoal adsorber and concrete housing etc. for Qinshan 300MW PWR Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP), the first indigenously designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. The field test results and in-service test results, since the air cleaning systems were put into operation 18 months ago, are presented and evaluated. These results demonstrate that the design and construction of the air cleaning systems and equipment manufacturing for QNPP are successful and the American codes and standards invoked in design, construction and testing of nuclear air cleaning systems for QNPP are applicable in China. The paper explains that the leakage rate of concrete air cleaning housings can also be assured if sealing measures are taken properly and embedded parts are designed carefully in the penetration areas of the housing and that the uniformity of the airflow distribution upstream the HEPA filters can be achieved generally no matter how inlet and outlet ducts of air cleaning unit are arranged.

  3. The Impact of Service-Learning Experiences on Students' Sense of Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    Students (n=327) participating in an undergraduate community service learning course were surveyed at the beginning and end of a semester concerning their sense of power to impact the world. Contrary to expectation, they reported a lesser sense of power following the experience, with the effect strongest for particular students and settings,…

  4. Power and Flow Experience in Time-Intensive Business Simulation Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiili, Kristian; Lainema, Timo

    2010-01-01

    Power is an influential component of social interaction and there are reasons for thinking that it may have important effects both on decision-making and psychological and interpersonal processes. The aim of this paper was to study the relations between the feeling of power, decision-making and flow experience in a collaborative business…

  5. Power Soccer: Experiences of Students Using Power Wheelchairs in a Collegiate Athletic Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wessel, Roger D.; Wentz, Joel; Markle, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletics provides an opportunity for improving the societal perceptions and overall quality of life of physically disabled persons. Athletic opportunities in the collegiate atmosphere allow such students to be socially, psychologically, and physically engaged. This study focused on how involvement in a Power Soccer collegiate…

  6. [Introduction of a Clinical Research Experience Program in Hospital Practical Training for Pharmacy Students and Its Evaluation].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Suda, Yasuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasutaka; Kawabata, Shiho; Kawakami, Noriko; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Nagayama, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Long-term clinical training based on a model core curriculum was conducted to nurture highly competent pharmacists in the clinical field. Pharmacists' responsibilities are expanding, and a system has been developed to help pharmacists gain accreditation, identify specialties, and improve their training. However, this system requires research competency. Therefore clinical research should be considered a part of clinical training to encourage high competency among pharmacists. Because the model core curriculum does not include a section on clinical research. Osaka City University Hospital introduced a hands-on clinical research experience program and evaluated its usefulness. A significant improvement in the level of knowledge and awareness of clinical research was seen among students who underwent the clinical research experience program. In addition, the level of student satisfaction was higher. These findings suggest that a clinical research experience program may be useful to nurture a greater awareness of clinical research and knowledge acquisition among pharmacists. PMID:26329554

  7. Emotional intimacy power predicts different sexual experiences for men and women.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Gaynor L; Barber, Bonnie L; Dziurawiec, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Those who are more emotionally invested in relationships have less power than their partners. Furthermore, less powerful individuals may attempt to equalize power imbalances by offering rewards to their partner and using sex and condom use as exchange resources. Australian young adults reported their condom use and pressured sex experiences in both romantic (n = 708) and casual (n = 118) relationships. Results showed that greater power (lower relative emotional investment) predicted more condom use among those wanting to use condoms. In casual relationships, an interaction with gender showed that women in particular used condoms more when they had more power. Power also interacted with gender for pressured sex and, unexpectedly, men who had more power experienced more pressured sex. The possibility that condom use and pressured sex have different meanings for men and women is explored.

  8. Introduction to Homogenous Catalysis with Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidation of Alcohols: An Experiment for Undergraduate Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miecznikowski, John R.; Caradonna, John P.; Foley, Kathleen M.; Kwiecien, Daniel J.; Lisi, George P.; Martinez, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    A three-week laboratory experiment, which introduces students in an advanced inorganic chemistry course to air-sensitive chemistry and catalysis, is described. During the first week, the students synthesize RuCl[subscript 2](PPh[subscript 3])[subscript 3]. During the second and third weeks, the students characterize the formed coordination…

  9. Personality Disorder Patients' Perspectives on the Introduction of Imagery within Schema Therapy: A Qualitative Study of Patients' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ten Napel-Schutz, Marieke C.; Abma, Tineke A.; Bamelis, Lotte; Arntz, Arnoud

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was done on patients' perspectives on the first phases of imagery work in the context of schema therapy (ST) for personality disorders. Patients participated in a multi-center randomized controlled study of the effectiveness of ST. Patients' experiences and opinions were collected with semistructured in-depth interviews at the…

  10. Early utility experience with wind power generation. Volume 3: Bonneville Power Administration Goodnoe Hills Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, T.; Henry, G.; Tennis, M.; Goldenblatt, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report is one of three presenting the results of EPRI Research Project 1590-1, Evaluation of Electric Utility Experience with Wind Power Generation. The objective of this project was to develop an improved understanding of wind power generation, in particular the process a utility must undergo to initiate and carry out a wind turbine project. The primary tasks of RP1590-1 were to document and evaluate the experience of two utilities with megawatt-scale wind turbine installations from project inception to the wind turbine's first rotation. This technical report presents the experiences of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as the participating utility in the MOD-2 cluster field test program. Under this program the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as management agent for the US Department of Energy, has installed three MOD-2 wind turbines at Bonneville's Goodnoe Hills site. All documents and reports pertaining to BPA's experience with wind energy at Goodnoe Hills were reviewed and excerpts made of the highlights. Gaps in the documentation were filled by talking with the appropriate people. Site visits were conducted to monitor current activity. The information obtained was evaluated for its generic relevance and benefit to other utilities. The chronology of the steps taken in implementing the wind turbine project and some of the lessons learned are included in the report. In each section, important activities, critical assumptions, and interesting insights which might benefit other utility wind programs are identified.

  11. Changes in survival rate of multiple myeloma after the introduction of bortezomib: a single institutional experience over 20 years.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Manabu; Suehara, Yasuhito; Fukumoto, Kota; Takeuchi, Masami; Matsue, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    The data of factors on the changes in survival before and after the introduction of bortezomib in unselected multiple myeloma (MM) patients is scarce in Asian population. We analyzed the clinical features and treatment outcomes of 270 consecutive MM patients admitted to our hospital between January 1995 and August 2014. The patients were divided into two groups, 1995–2005 (n=106) and 2006–2014 (n=164), based on bortezomib availability. There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the groups, except age and percentage of patients receiving autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT). The proportion of patients obtaining ≥very good partial response (VGPR) was higher in the recent cohort, which was translated as better overall survival in both younger and older patients (36.1 vs. 79.8 months, P=0.024, and 40.0 vs. 110.7 months, respectively). Patients receiving bortezomib early after diagnosis showed significantly better survival. However, there was no difference in survival between patients obtaining ≥VGPR in the two groups. On multivariate analysis, age ≥75 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) >normal were associated with shorter survival, while early bortezomib use and auto-SCT were associated with longer survival. On Cox regression analysis, International Staging System (ISS) stage III, LDH, and treatment response

  12. High power laser diodes for the NASA direct detection laser transceiver experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seery, Bernard D.; Holcomb, Terry L.

    1988-01-01

    High-power semiconductor laser diodes selected for use in the NASA space laser communications experiments are discussed. The diode selection rationale is reviewed, and the laser structure is shown. The theory and design of the third mirror lasers used in the experiments are addressed.

  13. The MERIT High-Power Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, H.G.; Tsang, T.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pereira, H.; Mohkov, N.; Striganov, S.; Carroll, A.J. /Oak Ridge /Princeton U. /Rutherford /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-06-01

    The MERIT experiment was designed as a proof-of-principle test of a target system based on a free mercury jet inside a 15-T solenoid that is capable of sustaining proton beam powers of up to 4 MW. The experiment was run at CERN in the fall of 2007. We describe the results of the tests and their implications.

  14. Benchmark Evaluation of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment Program Critical Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2013-02-01

    A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were performed in 1962-1965 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for the Medium-Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program. The MPRE was a stainless-steel clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuelled, BeO reflected reactor design to provide electrical power to space vehicles. Cooling and heat transfer were to be achieved by boiling potassium in the reactor core and passing vapor directly through a turbine. Graphite- and beryllium-reflected assemblies were constructed at ORCEF to verify the critical mass, power distribution, and other reactor physics measurements needed to validate reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. The experimental series was broken into three parts, with the third portion of the experiments representing the beryllium-reflected measurements. The latter experiments are of interest for validating current reactor design efforts for a fission surface power reactor. The entire series has been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments and submitted for publication in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments and in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  15. The MERIT High-Power Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, K.T.; Kirk, H.G.; Park, H.; Tsang, T.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pereira, H.; Mokhov, N.; /Fermilab /Oak Ridge /Rutherford

    2009-05-01

    The MERIT experiment was designed as a proof-of-principle test of a target system based on a free mercury jet inside a 15-T solenoid that is capable of sustaining proton beam powers of up to 4 MW. The experiment was run at CERN in the fall of 2007. We describe the results of the tests and their implications.

  16. Lived experience in teaching mental health nursing: issues of fear and power.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Bennetts, Wanda; Harris, Scott; Platania-Phung, Chris; Tohotoa, Jenny; Byrne, Louise; Wynaden, Dianne

    2015-02-01

    Australian mental health policy clearly articulates recovery focus as the underpinning of mental health services. Barriers to achieving a recovery focus are identified in the literature, with negative attitudes of health professionals receiving particular attention. The involvement of people with lived experience of significant mental health challenges and mental health service use is essential to enhancing more positive attitudes. Lived-experience involvement in the education of nurses is evident; however, it is generally limited and implemented on an ad hoc basis. Overall, there is a paucity of literature on this topic. A qualitative exploratory study was undertaken to elicit the views and perceptions of nurse academics and lived-experience educators about the inclusion of lived experience in mental health nursing education. One major theme to emerge from the research was issues of fear and power, which included three subthemes: facing fear, demystifying mental illness, and issues of power. Lived-experience involvement has an important role to play in the education of nurses in addressing fear and demystifying the experience of mental illness. The power that lived-experience educators exercised in their roles varied considerably, and for many, was limited. Therefore, the effectiveness of lived-experience involvement requires a more equitable distribution of power.

  17. Health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part 1, Introduction, integration, and summary: Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.S.; Abrahmson, S.; Bender, M.A.; Boecker, B.B.; Scott, B.R.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1993-10-01

    This report is a revision of NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 1 (1990), Health Effects Models for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis. This revision has been made to incorporate changes to the Health Effects Models recommended in two addenda to the NUREG/CR-4214, Rev. 1, Part 11, 1989 report. The first of these addenda provided recommended changes to the health effects models for low-LET radiations based on recent reports from UNSCEAR, ICRP and NAS/NRC (BEIR V). The second addendum presented changes needed to incorporate alpha-emitting radionuclides into the accident exposure source term. As in the earlier version of this report, models are provided for early and continuing effects, cancers and thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Weibull dose-response functions are recommended for evaluating the risks of early and continuing health effects. Three potentially lethal early effects -- the hematopoietic, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal syndromes are considered. Linear and linear-quadratic models are recommended for estimating the risks of seven types of cancer in adults - leukemia, bone, lung, breast, gastrointestinal, thyroid, and ``other``. For most cancers, both incidence and mortality are addressed. Five classes of genetic diseases -- dominant, x-linked, aneuploidy, unbalanced translocations, and multifactorial diseases are also considered. Data are provided that should enable analysts to consider the timing and severity of each type of health risk.

  18. Low density, microcellular, dopable, agar/gelatin foams for pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, W.F.; Aubert, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    Low-density, microcellular foams prepared from the natural polymers agar and gelatin have been developed for pulsed-power physics experiments. Numerous experiments were supported with foams having densities at or below 10 mg/cm{sup 3}. For some of the experiments, the agar/gelatin foam was uniformly doped with metallic elements using soluble salts. Depending on the method of preparation, cell sizes were typically below 10 microns and for one process were below 1.0 micron.

  19. Surface Experiments on a Jupiter Trojan Asteroid in the Solar Powered Sail Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsuaki

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: A new mission to a Jupiter Trojan asteroid is under study us-ing a solar-powered sail (SPS), and a science lander is being investigated in the joint study between Japan and Europe [1]. We present here the key sci-entific objectives and the strawman payloads of science experiments on the asteroid. Science Objectives: Jupiter Trojan asteroids are located around the Sun-Jupiter Lagrange points (L4 or L5) and most of them are classified as D- or P-type in asteroid taxonomy, but their origin still remains unknown. A classi-cal (static) model of solar system evolution indicates that they were formed around the Jupiter region and survived until now as the outer end members of asteroids. A new (dynamical) model such as Nice model suggests that they were formed at the far end of the solar system and transferred inward due to dynamical migration of giant planets [2]. Therefore physical, miner-alogical, and isotopic studies of surface materials and volatile compounds could solve their origin, and then the solar system formation [3]. Strawman Payloads: The SPS orbiter will be able to carry a 100 kg class lander with 20 kg mission payloads. Just after landing of the lander, geolog-ical, mineralogical, and geophysical observations will be performed to char-acterize the site using a panoramic optical camera, an infrared hyperspectral imager, a magnetometer, and a thermal radiometer. The surface and subsur-face materials of the asteroid will be collected into a carousel by the bullet-type and the pneumatic drill type samplers, respectively. Samples in the carousel will be investigated by a visible and an infrared microscope, and transferred for performing high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Mass resolution m/dm > 30,000 is expected to investigate isotopic ratios of D/H, 15N/14N, and 18O/16O, as well as molecules from organic matters. A set of strawman payloads are tentatively determined during the lander system study [4]. The constraints to select the strawman

  20. An introduction to analysis of variance (ANOVA) with special reference to data from clinical experiments in optometry.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R A; Slade, S V; Eperjesi, F

    2000-05-01

    This article is aimed primarily at eye care practitioners who are undertaking advanced clinical research, and who wish to apply analysis of variance (ANOVA) to their data. ANOVA is a data analysis method of great utility and flexibility. This article describes why and how ANOVA was developed, the basic logic which underlies the method and the assumptions that the method makes for it to be validly applied to data from clinical experiments in optometry. The application of the method to the analysis of a simple data set is then described. In addition, the methods available for making planned comparisons between treatment means and for making post hoc tests are evaluated. The problem of determining the number of replicates or patients required in a given experimental situation is also discussed.

  1. A Three-Day Seismic Experiment in an Urban Setting: An Introduction to Seismology for Minority Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J. M.; Anderson, L. C.; Bart, P. J.; Ferrell, R. E.; Tomkin, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    Summer program participants of LSU GAEMP (Geoscience Alliance to Improve Minority Participation) are non-traditional, STEM (science, technology, engineering, or math), underrepresented minorities from 9 Minority-Serving Institutions in the states of Louisiana, Texas and Mississippi. During this summer of 2004, twelve students completed a six-week field and lab program across the lower U.S.A. Because of the urban background of many of the participants one three-day module on earthquakes and earth deformation emphasized the design of a non-conventional seismic experiment, field acquisition and analysis of data in an urban setting. Day one introduced stress, major fault types and their plate tectonic setting based on a case study of active growth faulting, emphasizing its effects on urban planning. Students visited the field to verify the location of faults from prior interpretations using GPS and topographic maps, and to discuss observed faulted buildings, offices and roadways. Later, students were exposed to the principles of active seismology, divided into six working groups and required to design by the next morning a realistic experiment to verify faults in the shallow subsurface. Day two was dedicated to collecting shallow (<300m) shear-wave seismic refraction data from both sides of a suspected growth fault, with the student expectation that a thicker sediment sequence would be observed on the down-thrown block. Day three involved pencil-and-paper analyses of data for reflection and refraction-thickness and velocity estimation, capped with a discussion and formal oral presentations of group results. The student-led design, active field deployment of equipment and formal discussion groups provided the widest range of activities to promote awareness of the relevance of seismology in modern society.

  2. Design and Testing of a Breadboard Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluid Combustion Facility Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Fluid Combustion Facility (FCF) Project and the Power Technology Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) at Lewis Field in Cleveland, OH along with the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL are jointly developing an Electrical Power Converter Unit (EPCU) for the Fluid Combustion Facility to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The FCF facility experiment contains three racks: A core rack, a combustion rack, and a fluids rack. The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS 120V(sub dc) power distribution system by each FCF experiment rack which requires 28V(sub dc). The EPCU is a modular design which contains three 120V(sub dc)-to-28V(sub dc) full-bridge, power converters rated at 1 kW(sub e) each bus transferring input relays and solid-state, current-limiting input switches, 48 current-limiting, solid-state, output switches; and control and telemetry hardware. The EPCU has all controls required to autonomously share load demand between the power feeds and--if absolutely necessary--shed loads. The EPCU, which maximizes the usage of allocated ISS power and minimizes loss of power to loads, can be paralleled with other EPCUs. This paper overviews the electrical design and operating characteristics of the EPCU and presents test data from the breadboard design.

  3. Quantifying Motor Experience in the Infant Brain: EEG Power, Coherence, and Mu Desynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Sandy L.; Reeb-Sutherland, Bethany C.; Nelson, Eliza L.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of new motor skills, such as reaching and walking, dramatically changes how infants engage with the world socially and cognitively. Several examples of how motor experience can cascade into cognitive and social development have been documented, yet a significant knowledge gap remains in our understanding of whether these observed behavioral changes are accompanied by underlying neural changes. We propose that electroencephalography (EEG) measures such as power, coherence, and mu desynchronization are optimal tools to quantify motor experience in the infant brain. In this mini-review, we will summarize existing infant research that has separately assessed the relation between motor, cognitive, or social development with coherence, power, or mu desynchronization. We will discuss how the reviewed neural changes seen in seemingly separate developmental domains may be linked based on existing behavioral evidence. We will further propose that power, coherence, and mu desynchronization be used in research exploring the links between motor experience and cognitive and social development. PMID:26925022

  4. Introduction: The Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) - multidisciplinary, multiscale and multicomponent research and capacity-building initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, M.; Lappalainen, H. K.; Petäjä, T.; Kurten, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Viisanen, Y.; Hari, P.; Sorvari, S.; Bäck, J.; Bondur, V.; Kasimov, N.; Kotlyakov, V.; Matvienko, G.; Baklanov, A.; Guo, H. D.; Ding, A.; Hansson, H.-C.; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2015-11-01

    The Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) is a multidisciplinary, multiscale and multicomponent research, research infrastructure and capacity-building program. PEEX has originated from a bottom-up approach by the science communities and is aiming at resolving the major uncertainties in Earth system science and global sustainability issues concerning the Arctic and boreal pan-Eurasian regions, as well as China. The vision of PEEX is to solve interlinked, global grand challenges influencing human well-being and societies in northern Eurasia and China. Such challenges include climate change; air quality; biodiversity loss; urbanization; chemicalization; food and freshwater availability; energy production; and use of natural resources by mining, industry, energy production and transport sectors. Our approach is integrative and supra-disciplinary, recognizing the important role of the Arctic and boreal ecosystems in the Earth system. The PEEX vision includes establishing and maintaining long-term, coherent and coordinated research activities as well as continuous, comprehensive research and educational infrastructure and related capacity-building across the PEEX domain. In this paper we present the PEEX structure and summarize its motivation, objectives and future outlook.

  5. Power spectrum sensitivity of raster-scanned CMB experiments in the presence of 1/f noise

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Tom

    2007-09-15

    We investigate the effects of 1/f noise on the ability of a particular class of cosmic microwave background experiments to measure the angular power spectrum of temperature anisotropy. We concentrate on experiments that operate primarily in raster-scan mode and develop formalism that allows us to calculate analytically the effect of 1/f noise on power-spectrum sensitivity for this class of experiments and determine the benefits of raster-scanning at different angles relative to the sky field versus scanning at only a single angle (cross-linking versus not cross-linking). We find that the sensitivity of such experiments in the presence of 1/f noise is not significantly degraded at moderate spatial scales (l{approx}100) for reasonable values of scan speed and 1/f knee. We further find that the difference between cross-linked and non-cross-linked experiments is small in all cases and that the non-cross-linked experiments are preferred from a raw sensitivity standpoint in the noise-dominated regime - i.e., in experiments in which the instrument noise is greater than the sample variance of the target power spectrum at the scales of interest. This analysis does not take into account systematic effects.

  6. Power-Stepped HF Cross-Modulation Experiments: Simulations and Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    High frequency (HF) cross modulation experiments are a well established means for probing the HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere. The interaction between the heating wave and the probing pulse depends on the ambient and modified conditions of the D-region ionosphere. Cross-modulation observations are employed as a measure of the HF-modified refractive index. We employ an optimized version of Fejer's method that we developed during previous experiments. Experiments were performed in March 2013 at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the power of the HF heating signal incrementally increased in order to determine the dependence of cross-modulation on HF power. We found that a simple power law relationship does not hold at high power levels, similar to previous ELF/VLF wave generation experiments. In this paper, we critically compare these experimental observations with the predictions of a numerical ionospheric HF heating model and demonstrate close agreement.

  7. A video wireless capsule endoscopy system powered wirelessly: design, analysis and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guobing; Xin, Wenhui; Yan, Guozheng; Chen, Jiaoliao

    2011-06-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE), as a relatively new technology, has brought about a revolution in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) tract diseases. However, the existing WCE systems are not widely applied in clinic because of the low frame rate and low image resolution. A video WCE system based on a wireless power supply is developed in this paper. This WCE system consists of a video capsule endoscope (CE), a wireless power transmission device, a receiving box and an image processing station. Powered wirelessly, the video CE has the abilities of imaging the GI tract and transmitting the images wirelessly at a frame rate of 30 frames per second (f/s). A mathematical prototype was built to analyze the power transmission system, and some experiments were performed to test the capability of energy transferring. The results showed that the wireless electric power supply system had the ability to transfer more than 136 mW power, which was enough for the working of a video CE. In in vitro experiments, the video CE produced clear images of the small intestine of a pig with the resolution of 320 × 240, and transmitted NTSC format video outside the body. Because of the wireless power supply, the video WCE system with high frame rate and high resolution becomes feasible, and provides a novel solution for the diagnosis of the GI tract in clinic.

  8. A new paradigm on battery powered embedded system design based on User-Experience-Oriented method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Wu, Yue

    2014-03-01

    The battery sustainable time has been an active research topic recently for the development of battery powered embedded products such as tablets and smart phones, which are determined by the battery capacity and power consumption. Despite numerous efforts on the improvement of battery capacity in the field of material engineering, the power consumption also plays an important role and easier to ameliorate in delivering a desirable user-experience, especially considering the moderate advancement on batteries for decades. In this study, a new Top-Down modelling method, User-Experience-Oriented Battery Powered Embedded System Design Paradigm, is proposed to estimate the target average power consumption, to guide the hardware and software design, and eventually to approach the theoretical lowest power consumption that the application is still able to provide the full functionality. Starting from the 10-hour sustainable time standard, average working current is defined with battery design capacity and set as a target. Then an implementation is illustrated from both hardware perspective, which is summarized as Auto-Gating power management, and from software perspective, which introduces a new algorithm, SleepVote, to guide the system task design and scheduling.

  9. Clinical Outcomes and Women’s Experiences before and after the Introduction of Mifepristone into Second-Trimester Medical Abortion Services in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Jane; Malaba, Thokozile; Myer, Landon; Patel, Malika; Petro, Gregory; Grossman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To document clinical outcomes and women’s experiences following the introduction of mifepristone into South African public sector second-trimester medical abortion services, and compare with historic cohorts receiving misoprostol-only. Methods Repeated cross-sectional observational studies documented service delivery and experiences of women undergoing second-trimester medical abortion in public sector hospitals in the Western Cape, South Africa. Women recruited to the study in 2008 (n = 84) and 2010 (n = 58) received misoprostol only. Those recruited in 2014 (n = 208) received mifepristone and misoprostol. Consenting women were interviewed during hospitalization by study fieldworkers with respect to socio-demographic information, reproductive history, and their experiences with the abortion. Clinical details were extracted from medical charts following discharge. Telephone follow-up interviews to record delayed complications were conducted 2–4 weeks after discharge for the 2014 cohort. Results The 2014 cohort received 200 mg mifepristone, which was self-administered 24–48 hours prior to admission. For all cohorts, following hospital admission, initial misoprostol doses were generally administered vaginally: 800 mcg in the 2014 cohort and 600 mcg in the earlier cohorts. Women received subsequent doses of misoprostol 400 mcg orally every 3–4 hours until fetal expulsion. Thereafter, uterine evacuation of placental tissue was performed as needed. With one exception, all women in all cohorts expelled the fetus. Median time-to-fetal expulsion was reduced to 8.0 hours from 14.5 hours (p<0.001) in the mifepristone compared to the 2010 misoprostol-only cohort (time of fetal expulsion was not recorded in 2008). Uterine evacuation of placental tissue using curettage or vacuum aspiration was more often performed (76% vs. 58%, p<0.001) for those receiving mifepristone; major complication rates were unchanged. Hospitalization duration and extreme pain levels

  10. Evaluation of skill achievement levels and practical experiences of public health nursing students before and after the introduction of the public health nursing course as an elective.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshimi; Saito, Emiko; Sawai, Minako; Kishi, Emiko; Kakemoto, Satori; Nakada, Harumi; Igarashi, Chiyo; Asahara, Kiyomi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To equip public health nurses (PHNs) with higher qualifications, PHN education is shifting from an integrated curriculum for PHNs and registered nurses to a specific elective system of undergraduate or postgraduate programs. Most colleges in the special wards of Tokyo introduced the elective system in 2014 before the remaining areas. The outcomes of this must be evaluated. This study aimed to evaluate the achievement levels and practical experiences of PHN students at seven colleges in the special wards before and after introduction of the PHN course as an elective.Method Self-administered, anonymous questionnaires were completed by senior PHN students at seven colleges in the special wards who underwent training in 2013, the last year of an integrated curriculum, and in 2014, the first year of the elective system. The target numbers of participants were 663 in 2013 and 136 in 2014 with 20 students from each school exposed to the elective system. Our study focused on whether they achieved the 98 "technical items of PHN training and achievement levels at the time of graduation" required by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The study also determined whether participants obtained practical experience in 15 items developed by the special wards based on the standards set for training.Results In 2013, there were 348 total responses (52.5%) and 310 valid responses. In 2014, there were 136 total responses (88.2%) and 120 valid responses. The average achievement rate at which the student answered, "I was able to arrive at it," at an arrival degree level for the 98 technical items was 72.6% in 2014, an increase compared to the 67.9% obtained in 2013. Moreover, the average practical experience rate at which the student answered, "I was able to have an experience," regarding the 15 items was 85.7% in 2014, which constituted an increase compared to 70.5% attained in 2013. However, the number of items with an achievement rate of more than 80% remained

  11. Testing the Waters. Duke Power State Park: An Environmental Education Learning Experience Designed for Grades 4-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinehart, William C., Jr.; Beazley, Lea J.

    This learning packet of hands-on activities was developed by the Duke Power State Park in North Carolina for grades 4-7 to acquaint students with the concepts of water quality, watersheds, aquatic sampling, water pollution, preservation of natural areas, and land use. The loose-leaf book is divided into these sections: (1) introduction to the…

  12. Measurements of Plasma Power Losses in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Sergey; Smirnov, Artem; Garate, Eusebio; Donin, Alexandr; Kondakov, Alexey; Singatulin, Shavkat

    2013-10-01

    A high-confinement operating regime with plasma lifetimes significantly exceeding past empirical scaling laws was recently obtained by combining plasma gun edge biasing and tangential Neutral Beam Injection in the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment. To analyze the power balance in C-2, two new diagnostic instruments - the pyroelectric (PE) and infrared (IR) bolometers - were developed. The PE bolometer, designed to operate in the incident power density range from 0.1-100 W/cm2, is used to measure the radial power loss, which is dominated by charge-exchange neutrals and radiation. The IR bolometer, which measures power irradiated onto a thin metal foil inserted in the plasma, is designed for the power density range from 0.5-5 kW/cm2. The IR bolometer is used to measure the axial power loss from the plasma near the end divertors. The maximum measurable pulse duration of ~ 10 ms is limited by the heat capacitance of the IR detector. Both detectors have time resolution of about 10-100 μs and were calibrated in absolute units using a high power neutral beam. We present the results of first direct measurements of axial and radial plasma power losses in C-2.

  13. Verification of Space Station Secondary Power System Stability Using Design of Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Kamiar J.; Booker, Andrew J.; Mong, Alvin C.; Manners, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes analytical methods used in verification of large DC power systems with applications to the International Space Station (ISS). Large DC power systems contain many switching power converters with negative resistor characteristics. The ISS power system presents numerous challenges with respect to system stability such as complex sources and undefined loads. The Space Station program has developed impedance specifications for sources and loads. The overall approach to system stability consists of specific hardware requirements coupled with extensive system analysis and testing. Testing of large complex distributed power systems is not practical due to size and complexity of the system. Computer modeling has been extensively used to develop hardware specifications as well as to identify system configurations for lab testing. The statistical method of Design of Experiments (DoE) is used as an analysis tool for verification of these large systems. DOE reduces the number of computer runs which are necessary to analyze the performance of a complex power system consisting of hundreds of DC/DC converters. DoE also provides valuable information about the effect of changes in system parameters on the performance of the system. DoE provides information about various operating scenarios and identification of the ones with potential for instability. In this paper we will describe how we have used computer modeling to analyze a large DC power system. A brief description of DoE is given. Examples using applications of DoE to analysis and verification of the ISS power system are provided.

  14. Can the Maximum Power Principle predict Effective Conductivities of a Confined Aquifer? A Lab Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhoff, M.; Erpicum, S.; Archambeau, P.; Pirotton, M.; Zehe, E.; Dewals, B.

    2015-12-01

    Power can be performed by a system driven by a potential difference. From a given potential difference, the power that can be subtracted is constraint by the Carnot limit, which follows from the first and second laws of thermodynamics. If the system is such that the flux producing power (with power being the flux times its driving potential difference) also influences the potential difference, a maximum in power can be obtained as a result of the trade-off between the flux and the potential difference. This is referred to as the maximum power principle. It has already been shown that the atmosphere operates close to this maximum power limit when it comes to heat transport from the Equator to the poles, or vertically, from the surface to the atmospheric boundary layer. To reach this state of maximum power, the effective thermal conductivity of the atmosphere is adapted by the creation of convection cells. The aim of this study is to test if the soil's effective hydraulic conductivity also adapts in such a way that it produces maximum power. However, the soil's hydraulic conductivity adapts differently; for example by the creation of preferential flow paths. Here, this process is simulated in a lab experiment, which focuses on preferential flow paths created by piping. In the lab, we created a hydrological analogue to the atmospheric model dealing with heat transport between Equator and poles, with the aim to test if the effective hydraulic conductivity of the sand bed can be predicted with the maximum power principle. The experimental setup consists of two freely draining reservoir connected with each other by a confined aquifer. By adding water to only one reservoir, a potential difference will build up until a steady state is reached. The results will indicate whether the maximum power principle does apply for groundwater flow and how it should be applied. Because of the different way of adaptation of flow conductivity, the results differ from that of the

  15. Some Information of the Operational Experiences of Turbine-Powered Commercial Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.; Hunter, Paul A.; McLaughlin, Milton D.

    1961-01-01

    This report presents a brief discussion of some information on the operational experiences noted on VGH records from six types of turbine- powered commercial transport aircraft. These flight characteristics cover oscillatory motions, maneuver accelerations, sinking speeds, placard speed exceedances, and miscellaneous or unusual flight events.

  16. Institutional Power: Identity, Politics, and Lived Experiences in the Dance License via Portfolio Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    In this research study, I examined how institutional power affected the experiences of two dance educators attempting to gain their K-12 dance teaching license in Minnesota. My research analyzed the ways in which candidates applying for the portfolio review process constructed, amended, or abandoned their identities as teachers/artists/individuals…

  17. The MERIT High-Power Target Experiment at the CERN PS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, K.T.; Kirk, H.G.; Park, H.; Tsang, T.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pereira, H.; Mokhov, N.; /Fermilab /Oak Ridge /Princeton U., Plasma Physics Lab. /Rutherford

    2010-05-01

    We report on the analysis of data collected in the MERIT experiment at CERN during the Fall of 2007. These results validate the concept of a free mercury jet inside a high-field solenoid magnet as a target for a pulsed proton beam of 4-MW power, as needed for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory.

  18. High-Power Electrostatic Discharges in PETN: Threshold and Scaling Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, W; McCarrick, J F; Hodgin, R L; Phillips, D F

    2010-03-05

    There is a considerable set of data establishing the safety of PETN-based detonators that are insulted by electrostatic discharge (ESD) from a human body. However, the subject of ESD safety has garnered renewed interest because of the sparse data on high-power, low-impedance discharges that result when the source is a metallic object such as a tool. Experiments on as-built components, using pin-to-cap fault circuits through PETN-based detonators, showed significant evidence of a power dependence but with a very broad energy threshold and some uncertainty in the breakdown path. We have performed a series of experiments using a well-defined arc discharge path and a well-characterized source that is capable of independent variation of energy and power. Studies include threshold variation with power, arc length, powder surface area, and surface vs. bulk discharge paths. We find that an energy threshold variation with power does not appear to exist in the tested range of fractions to tens of MW, and that there are many subtleties to proper energy and power bookkeeping. We also present some test results for PBX 9407.

  19. Early utility experience with wind power generation. Volume 1. Summary report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, T.; Henry, G.; Tennis, M.; Goldenblatt, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report is one of three presenting the results of EPRI Research Project 1590-1, Evaluation of Electric Utility Experience with Wind Power Generation. The objective of this project was to develop an improved understanding of wind power generation, in particular the process a utility must undergo to initiate and carry out a wind turbine project. The primary tasks of RP1590-1 were to document and evaluate the experience of two utilities with megawatt-scale wind turbine installations from project inception to the first rotation of the wind turbine. This summary report presents in brief form the experiences of two utilities, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the Bonneville Power Administration, with wind turbine projects at Solano County, California and Goodnoe Hills, Washington, respectively. All documents and reports pertaining to the experiences with the wind turbine projects were reviewed and excerpts made of the highlights. Gaps in the documentation were filled by talking with appropriate people. Site visits were conducted to monitor current activity. The information obtained was evaluated for its generic relevance and benefit to other utilities. Condensed descriptions of the projects, a comparison of the projects, and highlights of the utilities' experiences are presented. Some of the insights which might benefit other utility wind programs are identified.

  20. Flight experience of solar mesosphere explorer's power system over high temperatures ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faber, Jack; Hurley, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    The performance of the power system on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite for the life of the mission and the techniques used to ensure power system health are summarized. Early in the mission high cell imbalances in one of the batteries resulted in a loading scheme which attempted to minimize the cell imbalances without causing an undervoltage condition. A short term model of the power system allowed planners to predict depth of discharge using the latest available data. Due to expected orbital shifts the solar arrays experience extended periods of no eclipse. This has required special conditioning schemes to keep the batteries healthy when the eclipses return. Analysis of the SME data indicates long term health of the SME power system as long as the conditioning scheme is continued.

  1. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  2. A Smart Wirelessly Powered Homecage for Long-Term High-Throughput Behavioral Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byunghun; Kiani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    A wirelessly powered homecage system, called the EnerCage-HC, that is equipped with multicoil wireless power transfer, closed-loop power control, optical behavioral tracking, and a graphic user interface is presented for longitudinal electrophysiology and behavioral neuroscience experiments. The EnerCage-HC system can wirelessly power a mobile unit attached to a small animal subject and also track its behavior in real-time as it is housed inside a standard homecage. The EnerCage-HC system is equipped with one central and four overlapping slanted wire-wound coils with optimal geometries to form three- and four-coil power transmission links while operating at 13.56 MHz. Utilizing multicoil links increases the power transfer efficiency (PTE) compared with conventional two-coil links and also reduces the number of power amplifiers to only one, which significantly reduces the system complexity, cost, and heat dissipation. A Microsoft Kinect installed 90 cm above the homecage localizes the animal position and orientation with 1.6-cm accuracy. Moreover, a power management ASIC, including a high efficiency active rectifier and automatic coil resonance tuning, was fabricated in a 0.35-μm 4M2P standard CMOS process for the mobile unit. The EnerCage-HC achieves a max/min PTE of 36.3%/16.1% at the nominal height of 7 cm. In vivo experiments were conducted on freely behaving rats by continuously delivering 24 mW to the mobile unit for >7 h inside a standard homecage. PMID:26257586

  3. Collider Physics an Experimental Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvezio Pagliarone, Carmine

    2011-04-01

    This paper reviews shortly a small part of the contents of a set of lectures, presented at the XIV International School of Particles and Fields in Morelia, state of Michoacán, Mexico, during November 2010. The main goal of those lectures was to introduce students to some of the basic ideas and tools required for experimental and phenomenological analysis of collider data. In particular, after an introduction to the scientific motivations, that drives the construction of powerful accelerator complexes, and the need of reaching high center of mass energies and luminosities, some basic concept about collider particle detectors will be discussed. A status about the present running colliders and collider experiments as well as future plans and research and development is also given.

  4. Campus Networking Strategies: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Michael M.

    1988-01-01

    This article is adapted from the introduction to EDUCOM's forthcoming book, Campus Networking Strategies, which includes 10 case study chapters detailing academic experiences with computer networking. Topics discussed in the introduction include network issues for management, networking economics, engineering and telecommunications issues, and…

  5. Power analysis of artificial selection experiments using efficient whole genome simulation of quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Kessner, Darren; Novembre, John

    2015-04-01

    Evolve and resequence studies combine artificial selection experiments with massively parallel sequencing technology to study the genetic basis for complex traits. In these experiments, individuals are selected for extreme values of a trait, causing alleles at quantitative trait loci (QTL) to increase or decrease in frequency in the experimental population. We present a new analysis of the power of artificial selection experiments to detect and localize quantitative trait loci. This analysis uses a simulation framework that explicitly models whole genomes of individuals, quantitative traits, and selection based on individual trait values. We find that explicitly modeling QTL provides qualitatively different insights than considering independent loci with constant selection coefficients. Specifically, we observe how interference between QTL under selection affects the trajectories and lengthens the fixation times of selected alleles. We also show that a substantial portion of the genetic variance of the trait (50-100%) can be explained by detected QTL in as little as 20 generations of selection, depending on the trait architecture and experimental design. Furthermore, we show that power depends crucially on the opportunity for recombination during the experiment. Finally, we show that an increase in power is obtained by leveraging founder haplotype information to obtain allele frequency estimates.

  6. Air pollution and infant mortality: a natural experiment from power plant desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Luechinger, Simon

    2014-09-01

    The paper estimates the effect of SO2 pollution on infant mortality in Germany, 1985-2003. To avoid endogeneity problems, I exploit the natural experiment created by the mandated desulfurization at power plants and power plants' location and prevailing wind directions, which together determine treatment intensity for counties. Estimates translate into an elasticity of 0.07-0.13 and the observed reduction in pollution implies an annual gain of 826-1460 infant lives. There is no evidence for disproportionate effects on neonatal mortality, but for an increase in the number of infants with comparatively low birth weight and length.

  7. Noise power spectrum estimation and fast map making for CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amblard, A.; Hamilton, J.-Ch.

    2004-04-01

    We present a method designed to estimate the noise power spectrum in the time domain for CMB experiments. The noise power spectrum is extracted from the time ordered data avoiding the contamination coming from sky signal and accounting the pixellisation of the signal and the projection of the noise when making intermediate sky projections. This method is simple to implement and relies on Monte-Carlo simulations, it runs on a simple desk computer. We also propose a trick for filtering data before making coadded maps in order to avoid ringing due to the presence of signal in the timelines. These algorithms were succesfully tested on Archeops data.

  8. Air pollution and infant mortality: a natural experiment from power plant desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Luechinger, Simon

    2014-09-01

    The paper estimates the effect of SO2 pollution on infant mortality in Germany, 1985-2003. To avoid endogeneity problems, I exploit the natural experiment created by the mandated desulfurization at power plants and power plants' location and prevailing wind directions, which together determine treatment intensity for counties. Estimates translate into an elasticity of 0.07-0.13 and the observed reduction in pollution implies an annual gain of 826-1460 infant lives. There is no evidence for disproportionate effects on neonatal mortality, but for an increase in the number of infants with comparatively low birth weight and length. PMID:25105867

  9. Emotional Experience of Caam2 in Teaching: Power and Interpretation of Teachers’ Work

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Kwok K.; Kwong, Tsun L.

    2016-01-01

    The study explores the social psychological process of teachers’ emotional experiences. Twenty-one secondary schoolteachers in Hong Kong were interviewed. The findings show that the teachers generally felt caam2 (a Cantonese adjective that covers a range of meanings like gloomy, dreadful, tragic, pitiful, pathetic, and miserable) in teaching. The social psychological process of the emotional experience of caam2 involves how teachers interpret the significance of their actual work in attaining the teaching goal of making a difference. If they interpret their work as incapable of fulfilling the goal, they will experience negative emotions in teaching. The findings also suggest that the interpretation is affected by teachers’ power which is unequally distributed according to teachers’ teaching experience and managerial roles. PMID:27679593

  10. GPS Navigation Results from the Low Power Transceiver CANDOS Experiment on STS-107

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Lin; Massey, Chris; Baraban, Dmitri; Kelbel, David; Lee, Taesul; Long, Anne; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation results from the Communications and Savigation Demonstration on Shuttle (CANDOS) experiment flown on STS- 107. The CAkDOS experiment consisted of the Low Power Transceiver (LPT) that hosted the GPS Enhanced Orbit Determination Experiment (GEODE) orbit determination software. All CANDOS test data were recovered during the mission using the LPT's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) uplinh'downlink communications capabilit! . An overview of the LPT's navigation software and the GPS experiment timeline is presented. In addition. this paper discusses GEODE performance results. including comparisons ibith the Best Estimate of Trajectory (BET). N.ASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) real-time ground navigation vectors. and post-processed solutions using the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS).

  11. Emotional Experience of Caam2 in Teaching: Power and Interpretation of Teachers’ Work

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Kwok K.; Kwong, Tsun L.

    2016-01-01

    The study explores the social psychological process of teachers’ emotional experiences. Twenty-one secondary schoolteachers in Hong Kong were interviewed. The findings show that the teachers generally felt caam2 (a Cantonese adjective that covers a range of meanings like gloomy, dreadful, tragic, pitiful, pathetic, and miserable) in teaching. The social psychological process of the emotional experience of caam2 involves how teachers interpret the significance of their actual work in attaining the teaching goal of making a difference. If they interpret their work as incapable of fulfilling the goal, they will experience negative emotions in teaching. The findings also suggest that the interpretation is affected by teachers’ power which is unequally distributed according to teachers’ teaching experience and managerial roles.

  12. Emotional Experience of Caam(2) in Teaching: Power and Interpretation of Teachers' Work.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Kwok K; Kwong, Tsun L

    2016-01-01

    The study explores the social psychological process of teachers' emotional experiences. Twenty-one secondary schoolteachers in Hong Kong were interviewed. The findings show that the teachers generally felt caam(2) (a Cantonese adjective that covers a range of meanings like gloomy, dreadful, tragic, pitiful, pathetic, and miserable) in teaching. The social psychological process of the emotional experience of caam(2) involves how teachers interpret the significance of their actual work in attaining the teaching goal of making a difference. If they interpret their work as incapable of fulfilling the goal, they will experience negative emotions in teaching. The findings also suggest that the interpretation is affected by teachers' power which is unequally distributed according to teachers' teaching experience and managerial roles. PMID:27679593

  13. Detailed axial power profiles in a MOX fuel experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has chosen two options to dispose of surplus weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (WGPu). One option is to burn the WGPu in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in light water reactors. An average power test (<10 kW/ft) of WG-MOX fuel was inserted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in February 1998. A high power test (<15 kW/ft) of WG-MOX fuel in ATR will follow the average-power test. The ability to accurately predict fuel power is essential in the high-power WG-MOX fuel capsule design for the test in ATR. Detailed fission power and temperature profiles may influence gallium migration in WG-MOX fuel pins. Most of the fission heat generated in the MOX fuel capsules will transfer radially to the water coolant. However, because of the short length (15.24 cm) of the MOX fuel pellet stacks, some of the fission heat will transfer through the end pellets axially. Compounded with peak fission power local-to-average ratios (LTAR) at the ends of MOX fuel stacks, the hot spot created may exceed the design limit. Therefore, the prediction of the axial fission power profiles over the MOX fuel stacks at the beginning of life (BOL) and end of life (EOL) are important for MOX fuel performance analysis and capsule design for testing in ATR. Continuous-energy MCNP linked with ORIGEN2 can generate the burnup-dependent cross sections and fission power distribution for fuel burnup analysis while accurately including the effects of self-shielding. This approach is very important for the prediction of plutonium content and LTAR in MOX fuel pellet stacks with HfO{sub 2} ends. MCWO can accurately determine fuel pin power distributions in the ATR experiment when the MOX fuel and HfO{sub 2} are depleted simultaneously. This is significant because the authors quickly provided the customer with the required detailed power distributions within the MOX pins using the new approach. The MOX fuel pin with HfO{sub 2} can flatten the axial power profiles from BOL to EOL and meet the MOX

  14. Somatosensory Experiences with Action Modulate Alpha and Beta Power during Subsequent Action Observation

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Lorna C.; Marshall, Peter J.; Bouquet, Cedric A.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    How does prior experience with action change how we perceive a similar action performed by someone else? Previous research has examined the role of sensorimotor and visual experiences in action mirroring during subsequent observation, but the contribution of somatosensory experiences to this effect has not been adequately examined. The current study tests whether prior somatosensory stimulation experienced during action production modulates brain activity during observation of similar actions being performed by others. Specifically, changes in alpha- and beta-range oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) during observation of reaching actions were examined in relation to the observer’s own prior experience of somatosensory stimulation while carrying out similar actions. Analyses revealed that alpha power over central electrodes was significantly decreased during observation of an action expected to result in somatosensory stimulation. Conversely, beta power was increased when an observed action was expected to result in somatosensory stimulation. These results suggest that somatosensory experiences may uniquely contribute to the way in which we process others people’s actions. PMID:23994217

  15. Pulsed-Power Driven Liner-On-Target Hydrodynamics Experiments Diagnosed with Proton Radiography using PHELIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oro, D. M.; Rousculp, C. L.; Reass, W. A.; Griego, J. R.; Turchi, P. J.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Saunders, A.; Mariam, F. G.; Morris, C.

    2015-06-01

    The Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment, PHELIX, is a pulsed-power driver capable of delivering multi-mega-ampere currents to cylindrical loads. The pulsed-power system utilizes a high-efficiency transformer to couple a small capacitor bank (~400 kJ) to a ~5 cm diameter cylindrical Al liner. A peak current of ~4 MA causes the liner to implode in 20 - 30 μs and attain speeds of >1 km/s. The PHELIX system is designed to be compatible with the Los Alamos proton radiography facility. Initial experiments with PHELIX explore shocked-ejected particle transport into gas in converging geometries. For these experiments a liner-on-target configuration is employed. To control the initial conditions, micron-sized tungsten particles are used in place of shock-formed ejecta. The inner surface of the cylindrical target is coated with a 0.1 mm uniform layer of W powder. The liner impacts the target generating a shock that launches the W particles off the target surface. The time history of the trajectory of the shocked-ejected particulate is captured in 21 proton radiographs recorded during the experiment. Comparison of 3 experiments, one into vacuum, one into Ar at 8.3 bars and one into Xe at 8.3 bars are discussed. Results are compared to simulations. Work supported by United States-DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  16. CTS United States experiments - A progress report. [Communications Technology Satellite for high power broadcasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, W. H.; Donoughe, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) is a high-power broadcast satellite launched by NASA on January 17, 1976. CTS is the first satellite to operate at a frequency of 12 gigahertz and incorporates technology making possible new satellite telecommunications services. CTS is a cooperative program of the United States and Canada. This paper presents the results of the United States experimental activity to date. Wide segments of the population are involved in the Experiments Program, including the scientific community, other government agencies, industry, and the education and health entities. The experiments are associated with both technological objectives and the demonstration of new community and social services via satellite.

  17. Whose power/authority/knowledge? Conundrums in the experiences of parents whose children have cancer.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Juanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper is based on data collected from two different studies of parents (76 mothers and 14 fathers) whose children had been diagnosed with cancer. Although the goal of the first study, to describe parental experiences when their children have cancer, was different than the goal of the second study, to describe the home health care work done by parents whose children had cancer, the themes outlined here were reiterated from study to study. In both sets of data conflicts in the dynamics of power, authority and knowledge were pivotal to the dilemmas experienced by parents in their interactions with health care staff both during the time of diagnosis and later during the treatments when their children had cancer. The paper points to the significance of fundamental social processes such as power, authority and knowledge in understanding and ameliorating parental experiences when a child has cancer.

  18. Power cords on some InterMetro mobile workstations may experience insulation breakdown.

    PubMed

    2010-11-01

    The outer insulation layer of some power cords supplied with certain InterMetro mobile workstations (the Flo 1750, the Flo 1800 computing workstation, and the Flo 2400 medication workstation) may experience degradation along the inner surface of the coiled portion of the cord, which may expose the internal wires and increase the risk of electric shock. The damage is often not evident unless the cord is stretched out. InterMetro will provide free replacements for cords exhibiting this damage.

  19. Operating experience with the natural bridges national monument photovoltaic power system

    SciTech Connect

    Solman, F. J.; Grossman, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    The 100-kW photovoltaic power system at Natural Bridges National Monument in southwestern Utah has been in operation since May 1980. A comparison of system simulation with actual operation has been performed, good agreement has been found, and results are presented. In addition, conservation measures and their benefits are described. Operating experience with the system is presented, including measured component performance of the arrays, batteries, inverters, and system overhead loads.

  20. A qualitative study of Iranian nurses' understanding and experiences of professional power

    PubMed Central

    Adib Hagbaghery, Mohsen; Salsali, Mahvash; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2004-01-01

    Background Nurses are expected to empower their clients, but they cannot do so if they themselves feel powerless. They must become empowered before they can empower others. Some researchers have emphasized that understanding the concept of power is an important prerequisite of any empowerment program. While many authors have tried to define the concept of power, there is no comprehensive definition. This paper is an attempt to clarify the concept of power in nursing. It also would present a model describing the factors affecting nurse empowerment. Methods We chose the grounded-theory approach for analysis of the participants' experiences and their viewpoints regarding the concept of professional power in nursing. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation methods were used to gather the data. Forty-four participants were interviewed and 12 sessions of observation were carried out. The constant comparative analysis method was used. Results Six main themes emerged from the data: "Application of knowledge and skills", "Having authority", "Being self-confident", "Unification and solidarity", "Being supported" and "Organizational culture and structure". According to the participants, nurses' power is influenced by these six variables. A theoretical model was designed to represent the interrelationships between these six variables. Conclusions Nurses' power depends on gaining and applying professional knowledge and skills. Delegating authority and enhancing self-confidence of the nurses also help them to apply their knowledge in practice. Unification of the nurses and their mutual support play the key roles in development of their collective power and provide a base for better working conditions, professional independence and self-regulation. PMID:15217516

  1. Pegasus II experiments and plans for the Atlas pulsed power facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, J.S.; Adams, P.J.; Atchison, W.L.

    1997-09-01

    Atlas will be a high-energy (36 MJ stored), high-power ({approximately} 10 TW) pulsed power driver for high energy-density experiments, with an emphasis on hydrodynamics. Scheduled for completion in late 1999, Atlas is designed to produce currents in the 40-50 MA range with a quarter-cycle time of 4-5 {mu}s. It will drive implosions of heavy liners (typically 50 g) with implosion velocities exceeding 20 mm/{mu}s. Under these conditions very high pressures and magnetic fields are produced. Shock pressures in the 50 Mbar range and pressures exceeding 10 Mbar in an adiabatic compression will be possible. By performing flux compression of a seed field, axial magnetic fields in the 2000 T range may be achieved. A variety of concepts have been identified for the first experimental campaigns on Atlas. These experiments include Rayleigh-Taylor instability studies, convergent (e.g., Bell-Plesset type) instability studies, material strength experiments at very high strain and strain rate, hydrodynamic flows in 3-dimensional geometries, equation of state measurements along the hugoniot and adiabats, transport and shock propagation in dense strongly-coupled plasmas, and atomic and condensed matter studies employing ultra-high magnetic fields. Experimental configurations, associated physics issues, and diagnostic strategies are all under investigation as the design of the Atlas facility proceeds. Near-term proof-of-principle experiments employing the smaller Pegasus II capacitor bank have been identified, and several of these experiments have not been performed. This paper discusses a number of recent Pegasus II experiments and identifies several areas of research presently planned on Atlas.

  2. The νGeN experiment at the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, V.; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Filosofov, D.; Fomina, M.; Gurov, Yu.; Korotkova, L.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Medvedev, D.; Pritula, R.; Rozova, I.; Rozov, S.; Sandukovsky, V.; Timkin, V.; Yakushev, E.; Yurkowski, J.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-12-01

    The ν GeN is new experiment at the Kalinin Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) for detection of coherent Neutrino-Ge Nucleus elastic scattering. Recent neutrino and Dark Matter search experiments have revolutionized the detection of rear events, and rear events with low energies, in particular. Experiments have achieved sensitivities on the level of several events per hundred kg of detector material per day with energy thresholds from few hundred eV. This opens up a new unique possibility for experimental detection of neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering that has been considered to be impossible so far. The νGeN project uses low threshold high-purity Ge-detectors (HPGe) developed by JINR (Dubna, Russia) in collaboration with BSI (Baltic Scientific Instruments, Riga, Latvia) for creation of a setup designated for first observation of neutrino coherent scattering on Ge. As a powerful neutrino source the experiment will use electron antineutrinos from one of the power-generating units (reactor unit #3) of the KNPP. The coherent neutrino scattering will be observed using a differential method that compares 1) the spectra measured at the reactor operation and shut-down periods; 2) the spectra measured at different distances from the reactor core during the reactor operation. For a setup placed at a 10 m distance from the center of reactor core and with an energy threshold of 350 eV up to tens of events corresponding to neutrino coherent scattering on Ge are expected to be detected per day in the constructed setup with four HPGe low-energy-threshold detectors (~ 400 grams each). The setup sensitivity will be even more increased by using new detectors with total mass up to 5 kg.

  3. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  4. Carbon loaded Teflon (CLT): a power density meter for biological experiments using millimeter waves.

    PubMed

    Allen, Stewart J; Ross, James A

    2007-01-01

    The standard technique for measurement of millimeter wave fields utilizes an open-ended waveguide attached to a HP power meter. The alignment of the waveguide with the propagation (K) vector is critical to making accurate measurements. Using this technique, it is difficult and time consuming to make a detailed map of average incident power density over areas of biological interest and the spatial resolution of this instrument does not allow accurate measurements in non-uniform fields. For biological experiments, it is important to know the center field average incident power density and the distribution over the exposed area. Two 4 ft x 4 ft x 1/32 inch sheets of carbon loaded Teflon (CLT) (one 15% carbon and one 25% carbon) were procured and a series of tests to determine the usefulness of CLT in defining fields in the millimeter wavelength range was initiated. Since the CLT was to be used both in the laboratory, where the environment was well controlled, and in the field, where the environment could not be controlled, tests were made to determine effects of change in environmental conditions on ability to use CLT as a millimeter wave dosimeter. The empirical results of this study indicate CLT to be an effective dosimeter for biological experiments both in the laboratory and in the field.

  5. Experiment and theoretical study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Ren, A.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse, one of the main concerns is how to minimize the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination. In the very high power region, one has to prevent the cutoff reflection caused by the excessive ionization in the background air. A frequency auto-conversion process which can lead to reflectionless propagation of powerful EM pulses in self-generated plasmas is studied. The theory shows that under the proper conditions the carrier frequency, omega, of the pulse will indeed shift upward with the growth of plasma frequency, omega(sub pe). Thus, the plasma during breakdown will always remain transparent to the pulse (i.e., omega greater than omega(sub pe)). A chamber experiment to demonstrate the frequency auto-conversion during the pulse propagation through the self-generated plasma is then conducted in a chamber. The detected frequency shift is compared with the theoretical result calculated y using the measured electron density distribution along the propagation path of the pulse. Good agreement between the theory and the experiment results is obtained.

  6. Computational modeling of pulsed-power-driven magnetized target fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Lindemuth, I.

    1995-08-01

    Direct magnetic drive using electrical pulsed power has been considered impractically slow for traditional inertial confinement implosion of fusion targets. However, if the target contains a preheated, magnetized plasma, magnetothermal insulation may allow the near-adiabatic compression of such a target to fusion conditions on a much slower time scale. 100-MJ-class explosive flux compression generators with implosion kinetic energies far beyond those available with conventional fusion drivers, are an inexpensive means to investigate such magnetized target fusion (MTF) systems. One means of obtaining the preheated and magnetized plasma required for an MTF system is the recently reported {open_quotes}MAGO{close_quotes} concept. MAGO is a unique, explosive-pulsed-power driven discharge in two cylindrical chambers joined by an annular nozzle. Joint Russian-American MAGO experiments have reported D-T neutron yields in excess of 10{sup 13} from this plasma preparation stage alone, without going on to the proposed separately driven NM implosion of the main plasma chamber. Two-dimensional MED computational modeling of MAGO discharges shows good agreement to experiment. The calculations suggest that after the observed neutron pulse, a diffuse Z-pinch plasma with temperature in excess of 100 eV is created, which may be suitable for subsequent MTF implosion, in a heavy liner magnetically driven by explosive pulsed power. Other MTF concepts, such as fiber-initiated Z-pinch target plasmas, are also being computationally and theoretically evaluated. The status of our modeling efforts will be reported.

  7. 18 CFR 401.0 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Introduction. 401.0 Section 401.0 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE § 401.0 Introduction. (a) The Delaware River Basin...

  8. 18 CFR 401.0 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Introduction. 401.0 Section 401.0 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE § 401.0 Introduction. (a) The Delaware River Basin...

  9. Feasibility of an experiment to measure stopping powers in solid-density deuterium plasmas at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmann, B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Regan, S.; Sangster, C.; Graziani, F.; Collins, G. W.; Rygg, J. R.; Grabowski, P.; Glenzer, S.; Keiter, P.

    2014-10-01

    An experimental design to measure the stopping powers of charged-particles through solid-density, fully-ionized deuterium plasmas at temperatures around 10 eV is investigated. Stopping power in this regime is crucial to the understanding of alpha-heating and burn in Internal Confinement Fusion. Recent work by A.B. Zylstra et al. on the OMEGA laser facility has demonstrated such measurements of stopping power in partially ionized Be plasmas, by measuring the downshift of D3He-protons in an isochorically heated sample. As noted in their work, the effects of partial ionization are not well understood; however such effects are not applicable to hydrogenic fuels, for which the plasmas are expected to be fully ionized. This study will consider the viability of isochorically or shock heating a target to Warm Dense Matter conditions using a platform similar to the planar cryogenic system described by S.P. Regan et al. Plasma properties will be determined by x-ray Thomson scattering while stopping powers will be inferred through measuring downshift of either DD-protons, D3He-protons or D3He-alphas, the latter of which is directly applicable to the stopping of DT-alphas in ignition experiments. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLE, and LLNL.

  10. The generation and amplification of intergalactic magnetic fields in analogue laboratory experiments with high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of high-power laser facilities has, in the past two decades, opened a new field of research where astrophysical environments can be scaled down to laboratory dimensions, while preserving the essential physics. This is due to the invariance of the equations of magneto-hydrodynamics to a class of similarity transformations. Here we review the relevant scaling relations and their application in laboratory astrophysics experiments with a focus on the generation and amplification of magnetic fields in cosmic environment. The standard model for the origin of magnetic fields is a multi stage process whereby a vanishing magnetic seed is first generated by a rotational electric field and is then amplified by turbulent dynamo action to the characteristic values observed in astronomical bodies. We thus discuss the relevant seed generation mechanisms in cosmic environment including resistive mechanism, collision-less and fluid instabilities, as well as novel laboratory experiments using high power laser systems aimed at investigating the amplification of magnetic energy by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Future directions, including efforts to model in the laboratory the process of diffusive shock acceleration are also discussed, with an emphasis on the potential of laboratory experiments to further our understanding of plasma physics on cosmic scales.

  11. Design and experiment for realization of laser wireless power transmission for small unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Dechen; Zhu, Dandi; Shi, Qianyun; Gu, Jian; Ai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Currently various types of aircraft booming and maturing, however, their long-time navigational capability should be improved urgently. This paper aims at studying laser power beaming, which includes the technology of high-efficient photoelectric conversion and APT(acquiring, pointing and tracking) technology, to provide power for flying UAV(unmanned aerial vehicles) and improve their flight endurance. The experiment of testing different types of solar cells under various conditions has been done to choose the solar cell which has the highest photoelectric conversion rate and find its most sensitive wavelength. In addition, the charge management module has been chose on the base of the characteristics of lithium batteries. Besides, a laser APT system was designed and set up, at the same time FSM (Fast Scan Mirror) control program and digital image processing program were used to control the system. The success of the indoor experiment of scan-tracking and charging for the moving UAV model via laser proves that this system is workable. And in this experiment, the photoelectric conversion rate of the whole system is up to 17.55%.

  12. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  13. A wireless remote high-power laser device for optogenetic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Gong, Q.; Li, Y. Y.; Li, A. Z.; Zhang, Y. G.; Cao, C. F.; Xu, H. X.; Cui, J.; Gao, J. J.

    2015-04-01

    Optogenetics affords the ability to stimulate genetically targeted neurons in a relatively innocuous manner. Reliable and targetable tools have enabled versatile new classes of investigation in the study of neural systems. However, current hardware systems are generally limited to acute measurements or require external tethering of the system to the light source. Here we provide a low-cost, high-power, remotely controlled blue laser diode (LD) stimulator for the application of optogenetics in neuroscience, focusing on wearable and intelligent devices, which can be carried by monkeys, rats and any other animals under study. Compared with the conventional light emitting diode (LED) device, this LD stimulator has higher efficiency, output power, and stability. Our system is fully wirelessly controlled and suitable for experiments with a large number of animals.

  14. Active experiments in geospace plasmas with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, James

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere provides a relatively quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with millisecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of nonlinear plasma experiments in the inter¬action region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and optics for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. Applications are made to the controlled study of fundamental nonlinear plasma processes of relevance to laboratory plasmas, ionospheric irregularities affecting spacecraft communication and navigation systems, artificial ionization mirrors, wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, active global magnetospheric experiments, and many more.

  15. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant geometry using prototypic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments have been completed which utilize prototypic core materials. The experiments reported on here are a continuation of the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The experiments incorporated a 1/40 scale model of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant containment structures. The model included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt stimulant in the earlier IET experiments. These earlier IET experiments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena; however, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. Three tests have been completed, DCH-U1A, U1B and U2. DCH-U1A and U1B employed an inerted containment atmosphere and are counterpart to the IET-1RR test with iron/alumina thermite. DCH-U2 employed nominally the same atmosphere composition of its counterpart iron/alumina test, IET-6. All tests, with prototypic material, have produced lower peak containment pressure rises; 45, 111 and 185 kPa in U1A, U1B and U2, compared to 150 and 250 kPa IET-1RR and 6. Hydrogen production, due to metal-steam reactions, was 33% larger in U1B and U2 compared to IET-1RR and IET-6. The pressurization efficiency was consistently lower for the corium tests compared to the IET tests.

  16. Movable-molybdenum-reflector reactivity experiments for control studies of compact space power reactor concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental reflector reactivity study was made with a compact cylindrical reactor using a uranyl fluoride - water fuel solution. The reactor was axially unreflected and radially reflected with segments of molybdenum. The reflector segments were displaced incrementally in both the axial and radial dimensions, and the shutdown of each configuration was measured by using the pulsed-neutron source technique. The reactivity effects for axial and radial displacement of reflector segments are tabulated separately and compared. The experiments provide data for control-system studies of compact-space-power-reactor concepts.

  17. Theta13 Neutrino Experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, LBNL Engineering Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Oshatz, Daryl

    2004-03-12

    This summary document describes the results of conceptual design and cost estimates performed by LBNL Engineering staff between October 10, 2003 and March 12, 2004 for the proposed {theta}{sub 13} neutrino experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP). This document focuses on the detector room design concept and mechanical engineering issues associated with the neutrino detector structures. Every effort has been made not to duplicate information contained in the last LBNL Engineering Summary Report dated October 10, 2003. Only new or updated information is included in this document.

  18. Power Distribution Analysis for the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor Critical Experiment 3

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Primm, Trent; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program is to minimize and, to the extent possible, eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors, as well as radioisotope production processes, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and targets. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is currently reviewing the design bases and key operating criteria including fuel operating parameters, enrichment-related safety analyses, fuel performance, and fuel fabrication in regard to converting the fuel of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from HEU to LEU. The purpose of this study is to validate Monte Carlo methods currently in use for conversion analyses. The methods have been validated for the prediction offlux values in the reactor target, reflector, and beam tubes, but this study focuses on the prediction of the power density profile in the core. Power distributions were calculated in the fuel elements of the HFIR, a research reactor at ORNL, via MCNP and were compared to experimentally obtained data. This study was performed to validate Monte Carlo methods for power density calculations and to observe biases. A current three-dimensional MCNP model was modified to replicate the 1965 HFIR Critical Experiment 3 (HFIRCE-3). In this experiment, the power profile was determined by counting the gamma activity at selected locations in the core. 'Foils' (chunks of fuel meat and clad) were punched out of the fuel elements in HFIRCE-3 following irradiation, and experimental relative power densities were obtained by measuring the activity of these foils and comparing each foil's activity to the activity of a normalizing foil. This analysis consisted of calculating corresponding activities by inserting volume tallies into the modified MCNP model to represent the punchings. The average fission density was calculated for each foil location and then normalized to the reference foil

  19. Power Supply System for the Atlas Experiment: Design Specifications, Implementation, Test and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzaroni, M.; Citterio, M.; Latorre, S.; Lanza, A.; Cova, P.; Delmonte, N.; Giuliani, F.

    2014-06-01

    The planned upgrade of instrumentation sensitivity in the ATLAS experiment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), at CERN, calls for a new type of power distribution architecture. Moreover, power supplies require DC-DC power converters able to work in very hostile environment and maintaining high level of Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Safety (denoted as RAMS requirements) during the experimental activity. Two main issues need to be discussed: first, electronic devices and equipment must operate in very high background of both charged and neutral particles and high static magnetic field and, second, the increase of the radiation background and the requirements of new front-end electronics are indeed incompatible with the current capability of the actual distribution system. The APOLLO R&D collaboration, funded by the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), aims to study dedicated topologies of both distribution system and DC-DC power converters and to design, build and test demonstrators, developing the needed technology for the industrialization phase. The collaboration has designed a 3kW, 280V-12V converter (MC) based on the Switch in Line architecture (SIL), a DC to DC phase-shifted converter characterized by a disposition in line of the MOSFETs with good soft switching performances, and in the last year many steps have been taken to enhance the power dissipation and the reliability and to improve the general features of the designed converter. In particular a new water heat sink was designed on the basis of TFD simulation accounting for the layout of the specific converter. Experimental activities in order to characterize both thermal and electrical features of the MC confirm the correctness of the adopted design criteria.

  20. PVUSA experience with power conversion for grid-connected photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stolte, W.

    1995-11-01

    The Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Application (PVUSA) project was established to demonstrate photovoltaic (PV) systems in grid-connected utility applications. One of PVUSA`s key objectives is to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of the PV balance of system (BOS). Power conditioning units (PCUs) are the interface between the dc PV arrays and the ac utility lines, and have proved to be the most critical element in grid-connected PV systems. There are five different models of PCUs at PVUSA`s Davis and Kerman sites. This report describes the design, testing, performance characteristics, and maintenance history of each of these PCUs. PVUSA required PCUs in the power range 25 kW to 500 kW which could operate automatically and reliably under changing conditions of sunlight and changing conditions on the utility grid. Although a number of manufacturers can provide PCUs in this power range, none of these PCUs have been produced in sufficient quantity to allow refinement of a particular model into the highly reliable unit needed for long-term, unattended operation. Factory tests were useful but limited by the inability to test under full power and changing power conditions. The inability to completely test PCUs at the factory resulted in difficulty during startup, field testing, and subsequent operation. PVUSA has made significant progress in understanding the requirements for PCUs in grid-connected PV applications and improving field performance. This record of PVUSA`s experience with a variety of PCUs is intended to help utilities and their suppliers identify and retain the good performance characteristics of PCUs, and to make improvements where necessary to meet the needs of utilities.

  1. High average power CW FELs (Free Electron Laser) for application to plasma heating: Designs and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Booske, J.H.; Granatstein, V.L.; Radack, D.J.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Bidwell, S.; Carmel, Y.; Destler, W.W.; Latham, P.E.; Levush, B.; Mayergoyz, I.D.; Zhang, Z.X. . Lab. for Plasma Research); Freund, H.P. )

    1989-01-01

    A short period wiggler (period {approximately} 1 cm), sheet beam FEL has been proposed as a low-cost source of high average power (1 MW) millimeter-wave radiation for plasma heating and space-based radar applications. Recent calculation and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of this concept in such critical areas as rf wall heating, intercepted beam ( body'') current, and high voltage (0.5 - 1 MV) sheet beam generation and propagation. Results of preliminary low-gain sheet beam FEL oscillator experiments using a field emission diode and pulse line accelerator have verified that lasing occurs at the predicted FEL frequency. Measured start oscillation currents also appear consistent with theoretical estimates. Finally, we consider the possibilities of using a short-period, superconducting planar wiggler for improved beam confinement, as well as access to the high gain, strong pump Compton regime with its potential for highly efficient FEL operation.

  2. Review of recent theories and experiments for improving high-power microwave window breakdown thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Chao; Liu Guozhi; Tang Chuanxiang; Chen Changhua; Fang Jinyong

    2011-05-15

    Dielectric window breakdown is a serious challenge in high-power microwave (HPM) transmission and radiation. Breakdown at the vacuum/dielectric interface is triggered by multipactor and finally realized by plasma avalanche in the ambient desorbed or evaporated gas layer above the dielectric. Methods of improving breakdown thresholds are key challenges in HPM systems. First, the main theoretical and experimental progress is reviewed. Next, the mechanisms of multipactor suppression for periodic rectangular and triangular surface profiles by dynamic analysis and particle-in-cell simulations are surveyed. Improved HPM breakdown thresholds are demonstrated by proof-of-principle and multigigawatt experiments. The current theories and experiments of using dc magnetic field to resonantly accelerate electrons to suppress multipactor are also synthesized. These methods of periodic profiles and magnetic field may solve the key issues of HPM vacuum dielectric breakdown.

  3. Development of an Organic Rankine-Cycle power module for a small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiceniuk, T.

    1985-01-01

    An organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power module was developed for use in a multimodule solar power plant to be built and operated in a small community. Many successful components and subsystems, including the reciever, power conversion subsystem, energy transport subsystem, and control subsystem, were tested. Tests were performed on a complete power module using a test bed concentrator in place of the proposed concentrator. All major single-module program functional objectives were met and the multimodule operation presented no apparent problems. The hermetically sealed, self-contained, ORC power conversion unit subsequently successfully completed a 300-hour endurance run with no evidence of wear or operating problems.

  4. HT to HTO conversion and field experiments near Darlington Nuclear Power Generating Station (DNPGS) site.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Stuart, M; Bredlaw, M; Festarini, A; Beaton, D

    2014-06-01

    The Canadian input parameters related to tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) used in tritium dose models are currently based on experiments performed at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in 1986, 1987 and 1994. There is uncertainty in how well other sites experiencing atmospheric HT releases are represented by these data. In order to address this uncertainty, HT to HTO conversion factors were evaluated at different locations near the Darlington Nuclear Power Generating Station (DNPGS) site using various experimental approaches. These were D2 gas exposure chamber experiments, atmospheric tritium measurements, and HTO and OBT measurements in vegetation and soil. In addition to these field experiments, chamber experiments were conducted using HT gas on field soil samples. The suggested Canadian input parameters for atmospheric tritium releases estimate the total fraction of HT oxidized in air and in soil, at the site, to be up to a maximum of 2.4%. Based on the more limited data obtained near DNPGS in early spring, this fraction would likely be closer to 0.5%. The result suggests that current parameters provide a conservative estimate for the DNPGS site.

  5. Session Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliane Lessner, Co-Chair:

    2009-03-01

    A panel discussion session providing a worldwide assessment of the status and experiences of women in physics, paying attention to the different cultures and environments they work in and to how the age of the physicist affects their perspective. We will hear about women physicists in Korea in particular and Asia in general, in Egypt in particular and Africa in general, and in the Caribbean. Six invited speakers will present analyses of the progress being made in promoting women in physics from their personal experiences and as assessed from their participation in the Third International Conference on Women In Physics (ICWIP2008) convened in Seoul, Korea in October 2008. From Albania to Zimbabwe, with representation of all the continents, ICWIP2008 congregated 283 women and men physicists from 57 countries to share the participants' scientific accomplishments and evaluate international progress in improving the status of women in physics. This three-hour session is organized jointly by the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics of the APS (CSWP) and the Forum on International Physics of the APS (FIP). Audience participation in the panel discussion will be strongly encouraged.

  6. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets. Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Jaquelin; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Arent, Douglas J.

    2012-04-30

    Many countries - reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems - are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  7. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets. Best Practices from International Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Jaquelin; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Arent, Douglas J.

    2012-04-30

    Many countries—reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems—are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  8. U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, RL

    2003-09-18

    The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

  9. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience, Summary for Policymakers

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This document summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. There is no one-size-fits-all approach; each country studied has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. This study also emphatically underscores the value of countries sharing their experiences. The more diverse and robust the experience base from which a country can draw, the more likely that it will be able to implement an appropriate, optimized, and system-wide approach.

  10. Nonlinear plasma experiments in geospace with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    SciTech Connect

    Sheerin, J. P.; Cohen, Morris B.

    2015-12-10

    The ionosphere is the ionized uppermost layer of our atmosphere (from 70 – 500 km altitude) where free electron densities yield peak critical frequencies in the HF (3 – 30 MHz) range. The ionosphere thus provides a quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. High power RF experiments on ionospheric plasma conducted in the U.S. have been reported since 1970. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 – 10 MHz to the ionosphere with microsecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP’s unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of unique nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. One of the primary missions of HAARP, has been the generation of ELF (300 – 3000 Hz) and VLF (3 – 30 kHz) radio waves which are guided to global distances in the Earth

  11. Nonlinear plasma experiments in geospace with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Cohen, Morris B.

    2015-12-01

    The ionosphere is the ionized uppermost layer of our atmosphere (from 70 - 500 km altitude) where free electron densities yield peak critical frequencies in the HF (3 - 30 MHz) range. The ionosphere thus provides a quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. High power RF experiments on ionospheric plasma conducted in the U.S. have been reported since 1970. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with microsecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of unique nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. One of the primary missions of HAARP, has been the generation of ELF (300 - 3000 Hz) and VLF (3 - 30 kHz) radio waves which are guided to global distances in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. We review

  12. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  13. Effect of collisional heat transfer in ICRF power modulation experiment on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; D'Inca, R.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, Vl. V.; Brambilla, M.; Schneider, P.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-12

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating experiments were performed in D-H plasmas at various H concentrations on ASDEX Upgrade. The rf power was modulated to measure the electron power deposition profile from electron temperature modulation. To minimize the contribution from indirect collisional heating and the effect of radial transport, the rf power was modulated at 50 Hz. However, peaking of electron temperature modulation was still observed around the hydrogen cyclotron resonance indicating collisional heating contribution. Time dependent simulation of the hydrogen distribution function was performed for the discharges, using the full-wave code AORSA (E.F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. Plasmas, Vol. 8, page 1573 (2001)) coupled to the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D (R.W. Harvey, et al., Proc. IAEA (1992)). In the present experimental conditions, it was found that modulation of the collisional heating was comparable to that of direct wave damping. Impact of radial transport was also analyzed and found to appreciably smear out the modulation profile and reduce the phase delay.

  14. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  15. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Oda, Y.; Kasugai, A.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Doane, J.; Olstad, R.; Henderson, M.

    2011-06-15

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20 deg. - 40 deg. from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

  16. Case Studies for the Statistical Design of Experiments Applied to Powered Rotor Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.; Tanner, Philip E.; Martin, Preston B.; Commo, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The application of statistical Design of Experiments (DOE) to helicopter wind tunnel testing was explored during two powered rotor wind tunnel entries during the summers of 2012 and 2013. These tests were performed jointly by the U.S. Army Aviation Development Directorate Joint Research Program Office and NASA Rotary Wing Project Office, currently the Revolutionary Vertical Lift Project, at NASA Langley Research Center located in Hampton, Virginia. Both entries were conducted in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel with a small portion of the overall tests devoted to developing case studies of the DOE approach as it applies to powered rotor testing. A 16-47 times reduction in the number of data points required was estimated by comparing the DOE approach to conventional testing methods. The average error for the DOE surface response model for the OH-58F test was 0.95 percent and 4.06 percent for drag and download, respectively. The DOE surface response model of the Active Flow Control test captured the drag within 4.1 percent of measured data. The operational differences between the two testing approaches are identified, but did not prevent the safe operation of the powered rotor model throughout the DOE test matrices.

  17. Effect of collisional heat transfer in ICRF power modulation experiment on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; D'Inca, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, Vl. V.; Brambilla, M.; van Eester, D.; Harvey, R. W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lerche, E. A.; Schneider, P.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-02-01

    ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating experiments were performed in D-H plasmas at various H concentrations on ASDEX Upgrade. The rf power was modulated to measure the electron power deposition profile from electron temperature modulation. To minimize the contribution from indirect collisional heating and the effect of radial transport, the rf power was modulated at 50 Hz. However, peaking of electron temperature modulation was still observed around the hydrogen cyclotron resonance indicating collisional heating contribution. Time dependent simulation of the hydrogen distribution function was performed for the discharges, using the full-wave code AORSA (E.F. Jaeger, et al., Phys. Plasmas, Vol. 8, page 1573 (2001)) coupled to the Fokker-Planck code CQL3D (R.W. Harvey, et al., Proc. IAEA (1992)). In the present experimental conditions, it was found that modulation of the collisional heating was comparable to that of direct wave damping. Impact of radial transport was also analyzed and found to appreciably smear out the modulation profile and reduce the phase delay.

  18. Symmetry Tuning with Cone Powers for Defect Induced Mix Experiment Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikova, N.; Schmitt, M.; Murphy, T.; Cobble, J.; Tregillis, I.; Kyrala, G.; Bradley, P.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S.; Kanzleiter, R.; Obrey, K.; Baumgaertel, J.; Batha, S.; DIME Team

    2013-10-01

    Recent DIME campaigns have demonstrated the effectiveness of cone power tuning to control the implosion symmetry in PDD configuration. DIME aims to assess the effects of mix on thermonuclear burn during a thin-shell capsule implosion. Plastic shell capsules doped with mid-Z material and filled with 5 atm of DD, are ablatively driven in a PDD laser configuration to a CR of ~7. Time-gated, spectrally and spatially resolved, dopant emission images characterize mix and temperature morphology during the implosion, while neutron diagnostics concurrently give the information about burn. Symmetry should be maintained throughout the implosions to achieve high neutron yield and optimum spectroscopic signal. 2D and 3D computer simulations using code HYDRA were performed to validate and optimize implosion symmetry using cone power tuning. In particular, Omega campaign confirmed P2 tunability with cone powers while experiments on NIF demonstrated that by reducing the energy in polar cones P2 was reduced to <1%. However, during NIF campaigns, self-emission images revealed a complex internal structure around the equator, which was not seen in HYDRA simulations and could be attributed to LPI effects. Subsequent DIME campaigns on NIF were able to eliminate this equatorial feature by reducing the laser drive substantiating the LPI hypothesis. Work performed by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the USDoE.

  19. Phase 1 of the First Small Power System Experiment (engineering Experiment No. 1). Volume 1: Executive Summary. [development and testing of a solar thermal power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holl, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a modular solar thermal power system for application in the 1 to 10 MWe range is presented. The system is used in remote utility applications, small communities, rural areas, and for industrial uses. Investigations are performed on the energy storage requirements and type of energy storage, concentrator design and field optimization, energy transport, and power conversion subsystems. The system utilizes a Rankine cycle, an axial flow steam turbine for power conversion, and heat transfer sodium for collector fluid.

  20. Test results of an organic Rankine-cycle power module for a small community solar thermal power experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. B.

    1985-01-01

    The organic Rankine-cycle (ORC) power conversion assembly was tested. Qualification testing of the electrical transport subsystem was also completed. Test objectives were to verify compatibility of all system elements with emphasis on control of the power conversion assembly, to evaluate the performance and efficiency of the components, and to validate operating procedures. After 34 hours of power generation under a wide range of conditions, the net module efficiency exceeded 18% after accounting for all parasitic losses.

  1. High Power Heating of Magnetic Reconnection in UTokyo Spherical Tokamak Merging Experiment: TS-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Y.; Kawanami, M.; Kimura, K.; Nakai, R.; Nishida, K.; Ishida, R.; Yamanaka, H.; Kuwahata, A.; Tanabe, H.; Inomoto, M.; Cheng, C. Z.; TS; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Significant ion heating of magnetic reconnection up to 0.2keV and 1.2keV were documented in two tokamak merging experiments: TS-3 and MAST, leading us to a new high-field merging experiment: TS-U in University of Tokyo. 1D and 2D contours of ion and electron temperatures measured in TS-3 already revealed clear energy-conversion of magnetic reconnection: huge outflow heating of ions in the downstream and electron heating localized at the X-point. It is noted that the ion heating energy is proportional to square of the reconnecting (poloidal) magnetic field Brec. It is because the reconnection outflow accelerates ions up to the poloidal Alfven speed. The accelerated ions are thermalized by shock-like density pileups in the downstreams. These results agree qualitatively with recent solar satellite observations and PIC simulation results. Based on those results, our poster will show the design of upscaled high-field tokamak merging experiment: TS-U. The high-power heating of tokamak merging is useful not only for laboratory study of reconnection heating mechanisms but also for economical startup and heating of tokamak plasmas. The tokamak merging with Brec>0.3T will enables us to heat the tokamak plasma to the burning regime: Ti>5keV without using any additional heating facility.

  2. Optical Spectroscopy Experiments on the 500 kA XP Pulsed-Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, K. S.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; McBride, R. D.; Blesener, I. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Hammer, D. A.; Greenly, J. B.; Maron, Y.

    2009-01-21

    Recent experiments on the 500 kA XP pulsed-power generator at Cornell University have explored the properties of optical spectra in single wires and wire arrays. In the single wire experiments, {approx}1% of the current from XP has been directed through the single wire. Spectra have been recorded using a half-meter spectrometer and a CCD camera located adjacent to the XP pulser. We are studying the visible spectra emitted by the wires and the background light from the machine hardware in order to identify the levels of current per wire for which visible spectroscopy might provide a means to measure magnetic field strength. We have also investigated the dependence of single wire visible spectra on the current, which was measured using a calibrated non-integrating Rogowski coil. UV and XUV diodes were employed to gather information about the temporal structure of the background and wire radiation. The line radiation in the spectra was recorded with wire currents at the few kA level. This is comparable to the first 10 ns of a 32-wire array experiment on 1 Ma generator and a 600-wire array at 20 MA.

  3. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Surry Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1994-06-01

    The Containment Technology Test Facility (CTTF) and the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories are used to perform scaled experiments that simulate High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) phenomena on the containment load. High-temperature, chemically reactive melt (thermite) is ejected by high-pressure steam into a scale model of a reactor cavity. Debris is entrained by the steam blowdown into a containment model where specific phenomena, such as the effect of subcompartment structures, prototypic air/steam/hydrogen atmospheres, and hydrogen generation and combustion, can be studied. Four Integral Effects Tests (IETs) have been performed with scale models of the Surry NPP to investigate DCH phenomena. The 1/61{sup th} scale Integral Effects Tests (IET-9, IET-10, and IET-11) were conducted in CTRF, which is a 1/6{sup th} scale model of the Surry reactor containment building (RCB). The 1/10{sup th} scale IET test (IET-12) was performed in the Surtsey vessel, which had been configured as a 1/10{sup th} scale Surry RCB. Scale models were constructed in each of the facilities of the Surry structures, including the reactor pressure vessel, reactor support skirt, control rod drive missile shield, biological shield wall, cavity, instrument tunnel, residual heat removal platform and heat exchangers, seal table room and seal table, operating deck, and crane wall. This report describes these experiments and gives the results.

  4. Combustion-Powered Actuation for Dynamic Stall Suppression - Simulations and Low-Mach Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matalanis, Claude G.; Min, Byung-Young; Bowles, Patrick O.; Jee, Solkeun; Wake, Brian E.; Crittenden, Tom; Woo, George; Glezer, Ari

    2014-01-01

    An investigation on dynamic-stall suppression capabilities of combustion-powered actuation (COMPACT) applied to a tabbed VR-12 airfoil is presented. In the first section, results from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations carried out at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.5 are presented. Several geometric parameters are varied including the slot chordwise location and angle. Actuation pulse amplitude, frequency, and timing are also varied. The simulations suggest that cycle-averaged lift increases of approximately 4% and 8% with respect to the baseline airfoil are possible at Mach numbers of 0.4 and 0.3 for deep and near-deep dynamic-stall conditions. In the second section, static-stall results from low-speed wind-tunnel experiments are presented. Low-speed experiments and high-speed CFD suggest that slots oriented tangential to the airfoil surface produce stronger benefits than slots oriented normal to the chordline. Low-speed experiments confirm that chordwise slot locations suitable for Mach 0.3-0.4 stall suppression (based on CFD) will also be effective at lower Mach numbers.

  5. SCHUMACHER HOT GAS FILTER LONG-TERM OPERATING EXPERIENCE in the NUON POWER BUGGENUM IGCC POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibner, B.; Wolters, C.

    2002-09-18

    Coal is a main source of primary energy for power generation and it will remain indispensable in the future. In order to increase the efficiency and to meet environmental challenges new advanced coal-fired power systems were developed starting in the beginning of the 1990s. One of these efficient and clean technologies is the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process.

  6. Theoretical Optics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, Hartmann

    2005-02-01

    Starting from basic electrodynamics, this volume provides a solid, yet concise introduction to theoretical optics, containing topics such as nonlinear optics, light-matter interaction, and modern topics in quantum optics, including entanglement, cryptography, and quantum computation. The author, with many years of experience in teaching and research, goes way beyond the scope of traditional lectures, enabling readers to keep up with the current state of knowledge. Both content and presentation make it essential reading for graduate and phD students as well as a valuable reference for researchers.

  7. Development of effective power supply using electric double layer capacitor for static magnetic field coils in fusion plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, M; Abe, K; Yamada, T; Kuwahata, A; Kamio, S; Cao, Q H; Sakumura, M; Suzuki, N; Watanabe, T; Ono, Y

    2011-02-01

    A cost-effective power supply for static magnetic field coils used in fusion plasma experiments has been developed by application of an electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). A prototype EDLC power supply system was constructed in the form of a series LCR circuit. Coil current of 100 A with flat-top longer than 1 s was successfully supplied to an equilibrium field coil of a fusion plasma experimental apparatus by a single EDLC module with capacitance of 30 F. The present EDLC power supply has revealed sufficient performance for plasma confinement experiments whose discharge duration times are an order of several seconds. PMID:21361590

  8. Phase 1 of the First Small Power System Experiment (engineering Experiment No. 1). Volume 2: System Concept Selection. [development and testing of a solar thermal power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holl, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The development of a modular solar thermal power system for application in the 1 to 10 MWe range is presented. The system is used in remote utility applications, small communities, rural areas, and for industrial uses. Systems design and systems optimization studies are conducted which consider plant size, annual capacity factors, and startup time as variables. Investigations are performed on the energy storage requirements and type of energy storage, concentrator design and field optimization, energy transport, and power conversion subsystems. The system utilizes a Rankine cycle, an axial flow steam turbine for power conversion, and heat transfer sodium for collector fluid.

  9. Detailed Fission Power 2D-Mapping of AFIP-2 Experiment in ATR CFT Position

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. A. Lillo

    2008-05-01

    The NNSA (National Nuclear Security Administration) RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program assigned INL (Idaho National Laboratory) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in the research reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate irradiation tests are proposed for the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor). Labeled the AFIP (ATR Full-size-plates In center flux trap Position) experiments, these tests will be conducted in the ATR center flux trap. The AFIP-2 experiment will contain two full size fuel plates fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory-Y-12 (ORNL). The nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.6l-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) in each fuel plate. The test holder accommodates two independent test trains. Each test train is designed to hold 2 plates, for a total of 4 plates per test holder. AFIP-2 test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C; to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and width of 1.6-in (4.064 cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To assure the AFIP-2 experiment will comply with the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2 dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential in the AFIP-2 fuel test train design and the irradiated fuel

  10. The Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Power Spectrum from the BEAST Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dwyer, Ian J.; Bersanelli, Marco; Childers, Jeffrey; Figueiredo, Newton; Halevi, Doron; Huey, Greg; Lubin, Philip M.; Maino, Davide; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Joshua; Meinhold, Peter R.; Mejía, Jorge; Natoli, Paolo; O'Neill, Hugh; Pina, Agenor; Seiffert, Michael D.; Stebor, Nathan C.; Tello, Camilo; Villela, Thyrso; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Williams, Brian; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2005-05-01

    The Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) is a 2.2 m off-axis telescope with an eight-element mixed Q-band (38-45 GHz) and Ka-band (26-36 GHz) focal plane, designed for balloon-borne and ground-based studies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Here we present the CMB angular power spectrum calculated from 682 hr of data observed with the BEAST instrument. We use a binned pseudo-Cl estimator (the MASTER method). We find results that are consistent with other determinations of the CMB anisotropy for angular wavenumbers l between 100 and 600. We also perform cosmological parameter estimation. The BEAST data alone produce a good constraint on Ωk≡1-Ωtot=-0.074+/-0.070, consistent with a flat universe. A joint parameter estimation analysis with a number of previous CMB experiments produces results consistent with previous determinations.

  11. Free-standing leaping experiments with a power-autonomous elastic-spined quadruped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusey, Jason L.; Duperret, Jeffrey M.; Haynes, G. Clark; Knopf, Ryan; Koditschek, Daniel E.

    2013-05-01

    We document initial experiments with Canid, a freestanding, power-autonomous quadrupedal robot equipped with a parallel actuated elastic spine. Research into robotic bounding and galloping platforms holds scientific and engineering interest because it can both probe biological hypotheses regarding bounding and galloping mammals and also provide the engineering community with a new class of agile, efficient and rapidly-locomoting legged robots. We detail the design features of Canid that promote our goals of agile operation in a relatively cheap, conventionally prototyped, commercial off-the-shelf actuated platform. We introduce new measurement methodology aimed at capturing our robot's "body energy" during real time operation as a means of quantifying its potential for agile behavior. Finally, we present joint motor, inertial and motion capture data taken from Canid's initial leaps into highly energetic regimes exhibiting large accelerations that illustrate the use of this measure and suggest its future potential as a platform for developing efficient, stable, hence useful bounding gaits.

  12. Randomized block experimental designs can increase the power and reproducibility of laboratory animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Festing, Michael F W

    2014-01-01

    Randomized block experimental designs have been widely used in agricultural and industrial research for many decades. Usually they are more powerful, have higher external validity, are less subject to bias, and produce more reproducible results than the completely randomized designs typically used in research involving laboratory animals. Reproducibility can be further increased by using time as a blocking factor. These benefits can be achieved at no extra cost. A small experiment investigating the effect of an antioxidant on the activity of a liver enzyme in four inbred mouse strains, which had two replications (blocks) separated by a period of two months, illustrates this approach. The widespread failure to use these designs more widely in research involving laboratory animals has probably led to a substantial waste of animals, money, and scientific resources and slowed down the development of new treatments for human and animal diseases.

  13. Relational experiences of power and gender for nurse-managers of private hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brito, Maria José Menezes; Montenegro, Lívia Cozer; Alves, Marília

    2010-01-01

    Influenced by increased technology and globalization, Brazilian hospitals are undergoing significant changes. The managerial models focused on the male model are being slowly and gradually replaced, with an expressive participation of female nurses in management positions. Thus, we aimed to uncover some aspects of the relational experiences of power and gender of nine female nurse-managers working in four large and medium-sized private hospitals in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, through a qualitative case study. The results show that management discourses value a managerial style focused on the organizations' humanized aspects, where authoritative styles have no space. In this scenario, the work of female nurse-managers strengthens teamwork, which improves their image and contributes to forming their identity.

  14. High-power targets: experience and R&D for 2 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Hurh, P.; Caretta, O.; Davenne, T.; Densham, C.; Loveridge, P.; Simos, N.; /Brookhaven

    2011-03-01

    High-power particle production targets are crucial elements of future neutrino and other rare particle beams. Fermilab plans to produce a beam of neutrinos (LBNE) with a 2.3 MW proton beam (Project X). Any solid target is unlikely to survive for an extended period in such an environment - many materials would not survive a single beam pulse. We are using our experience with previous neutrino and antiproton production targets, along with a new series of R&D tests, to design a target that has adequate survivability for this beamline. The issues considered are thermal shock (stress waves), heat removal, radiation damage, radiation accelerated corrosion effects, physics/geometry optimization and residual radiation.

  15. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.; Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Arent, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Many countries -- reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems -- are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy on the electric grid, including that from wind and solar energy. This study documents the diverse approaches to effective integration of variable renewable energy among six countries -- Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Western region-Colorado and Texas)-- and summarizes policy best practices that energy ministers and other stakeholders can pursue to ensure that electricity markets and power systems can effectively coevolve with increasing penetrations of variable renewable energy. Each country has crafted its own combination of policies, market designs, and system operations to achieve the system reliability and flexibility needed to successfully integrate renewables. Notwithstanding this diversity, the approaches taken by the countries studied all coalesce around five strategic areas: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations. The ability to maintain a broad ecosystem perspective, to organize and make available the wealth of experiences, and to ensure a clear path from analysis to enactment should be the primary focus going forward.

  16. Nonlinear Plasma Experiments in Geospace with Gigawatts of RF Power at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.; Rayyan, N.; Watkins, B. J.; Bristow, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2014-10-01

    The HAARP phased-array HF transmitter at Gakona, AK delivers up to 3.6 GW (ERP) of HF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with millisecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of nonlinear plasma experiments in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma including stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), artificial aurora, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and telescopes and cameras for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the plasma line, and suprathermal electrons. Applications are made to the study and control of irregularities affecting spacecraft communication and navigation systems.

  17. Study of thermal control systems for orbiting power systems. Materials experiment carrier thermal control system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Four possible arrangements of the materials experiment carrier (MEC) and power system (PS) thermal control loops were defined which would provide one kW of heat rejection for each kW of power to the MEC payload. These arrangements were compared to the baseline reference concept which provides only 16 kW heat rejection to show the cost of obtaining symmetry in terms of dollars, weight, complexity, growth potential, ease of integration, technology and total launch weight. The results of these comparisons was that the concept which splits the PS thermal control loop into two systems, one to reject PS waste heat and one payload waste heat, appeared favorable. The fluid selection study resulted in recommendation of FC72 as the MEC heat transport fluid based on the thermal and physical characteristics. The coatings reviewed indicated anodized and alodine treated aluminum surfaces or silver teflon are the best choices for the MEC vehicle where durability is an important factor. For high temperature radiators silver teflon or zinc orthotitanate are recommended choices.

  18. Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

  19. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  20. Evidence-based decision-making for vaccine introductions: Overview of the ProVac International Working Group’s experience

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, Barbara; Garcia, Ana Gabriela Felix; Janusz, Cara Bess; Blau, Julia; Munier, Aline; Atherly, Deborah; Mvundura, Mercy; Hajjeh, Rana; Lopman, Benjamin; Clark, Andrew David; Baxter, Louise; Hutubessy, Raymond; de Quadros, Ciro; Andrus, Jon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pan American Health Organization’s (PAHO) ProVac Initiative aims to strengthen countries’ technical capacity to make evidence-based immunization policy. With financial support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, PAHO established the ProVac International Working Group (IWG), a platform created for two years to transfer the ProVac Initiative’s tools and methods to support decisions in non-PAHO regions. Methods In 2011, WHO Regional Offices and partner agencies established the IWG to transfer the ProVac framework for new vaccine decision support, including tools and trainings to other regions of the world. During the two year period, PAHO served as the coordinating secretariat and partner agencies played implementing or advisory roles. Results Fifty nine national professionals from 17 countries received training on the use of economic evaluations to aid vaccine policy making through regional workshops. The IWG provided direct technical support to nine countries to develop cost-effectiveness analyses to inform decisions. All nine countries introduced the new vaccine evaluated or their NITAGs have made a recommendation to the Ministry of Health to introduce the new vaccine. Discussion Developing countries around the world are increasingly interested in weighing the potential health impact due to new vaccine introduction against the investments required. During the two years, the ProVac approach proved valuable and timely to aid the national decision making processes, even despite the different challenges and idiosyncrasies encountered in each region. The results of this work suggest that: (1) there is great need and demand for technical support and for capacity building around economic evaluations; and (2) the ProVac method of supporting country-owned analyses is as effective in other regions as it has been in the PAHO region. Conclusion Decision support for new vaccine introduction in low- and middle-income countries is critical to guiding

  1. Introduction to Horticulture. Teacher Edition. Horticulture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication is designed to provide a core of instruction for the many different fields in agricultural/horticultural education. This course contains 21 instructional units that cover the following topics: introduction to horticulture; beginning a career in horticulture; hand and power tools; introduction to safety; growing facilities;…

  2. A spreadsheet to construct power curves and clarify the meaning of the word equivalent in evaluating experiments with poultry.

    PubMed

    Pesti, G M; Shim, M Y

    2012-09-01

    Persons conducting research trials often want to be able to declare that treatments, or particularly products, are equivalent (will provide indistinguishable results). However, all research trials can ever provide is the probability that the observed differences in an experiment were due to chance. Also, in trials in which variances are high and there are few replications, it is quite easy to declare no significant differences and equivalency. This paper describes a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that can be used to easily construct experimental power curves. Such curves predict the proportion of experiments that would yield a given level of significance as the difference between the 2 means increases. The spreadsheet uses the mean and variances from an experiment with the Norm.inv and Rand functions of Excel to simulate outcomes from identical experiments. An experiment that declared GMO and normal feed ingredients to be equivalent was used to illustrate the application of power curves. The experiment had 12 replicate pens of broilers per treatment. The outcomes of 90,000 simulated experiments, each with the same overall variance, but 0 through 8 percent differences in treatment means, were graphed. When the published experiment purported to show equivalence, really it showed that a significant difference in growth (P < 0.05) would be expected to be detected 50% of the time if the means were different by 3.1%; a difference of 4.6% in treatment means could be detected 80% of the time by such an experiment. This Excel spreadsheet enables such a power analysis to be conducted. Easy modifications of the spreadsheet can illustrate the influence of changing the variance or number of replications on the expected power of future experiments. The economic impact of small changes in performance is also discussed.

  3. Phase 1 of the First Small Power System Experiment (engineering Experiment No. 1). Volume 4: Commercial System Definition. [development and testing of a solar thermal power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holl, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The development and design of a modular solar thermal power system for application in the 1 to 10 MWe range is described. The system is used in remote utility applications, small communities, rural areas, and for industrial uses. The operational reliability, the minimum risk of failure, and the maintenance and repair characteristics are determined and the commercial system design is defined.

  4. CWEX (Crop/Wind-Energy Experiment): Measurements of the interaction between crop agriculture and wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajewski, Daniel Andrew

    The current expansion of wind farms in the U.S. Midwest promotes an alternative renewable energy portfolio to conventional energy sources derived from fossil fuels. The construction of wind turbines and large wind farms within several millions of cropland acres creates a unique interaction between two unlike energy sources: electric generation by wind and bio-fuel production derived from crop grain and plant tissues. Wind turbines produce power by extracting mean wind speed and converting a portion of the flow to turbulence downstream of each rotor. Turbine-scale turbulence modifies fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture, and other gaseous constituents (e.g. carbon dioxide) between the crop canopy and the atmospheric boundary layer. Conversely, crop surfaces and tillage elements produce drag on the hub-height wind resource, and the release of sensible and latent heat flux from the canopy or soil influences the wind speed profile. The Crop-Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX) measured momentum, energy, and CO2 fluxes at several locations within the leading line of turbines in a large operational wind farm, and overall turbines promote canopy mixing of wind speed, temperature, moisture, and carbon dioxide in both the day and night. Turbine-generated perturbations of these fluxes are dependent on several factors influencing the turbine operation (e.g. wind speed, wind direction, stability, orientation of surrounding turbines within a wind park) and the cropland surface (e.g. crop type and cultivar, planting density, chemical application, and soil composition and drainage qualities). Additional strategies are proposed for optimizing the synergy between crop and wind power.

  5. 77 FR 12086 - Final Staff Guidance, Revision 4 to Standard Review Plan; Section 8.1 on Electric Power-Introduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants,'' Standard Review Plan (SRP) Section 8.1 on... New Reactors, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC, 20555- 0001; telephone at 301-415... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.301 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Electrical General § 1910.301 Introduction. This subpart addresses... all electric equipment and installations used to provide electric power and light for...

  7. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Lindgren, C. F.; Baker, M.; Mailhot, M.

    2011-12-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  8. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan; McCollum, Tim; Lindgren, Charles F.; Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  9. RF Power and Magnetic Field Modulation Experiments with Simple Mirror Geometry in the Central Cell of Hanbit Device

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.G.; Bak, J.G.; Jhang, H.G.; Kim, S.S.

    2005-01-15

    The radio frequency (RF) stabilization effects to investigate the characteristics of the interchange instability by RF power and magnetic field modulation experiments were performed near {omega}/{omega}{sub i} {approx} = 1 and with low beta ({approx} 0.1%) plasmas in the central cell of the Hanbit mirror device. Temporal behaviors of the interchange mode were measured and analyzed when the interchange mode was triggered by sudden changes of the RF power and magnetic field intensity.

  10. Phase 1 of the First Small Power System Experiment (engineering Experiment No. 1). Volume 3: Experimental System Descriptions. [development and testing of a solar thermal power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holl, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of a modular solar thermal power system for application in the 1 to 10 MWe range is described. The system consists of five subsystems: the collector, power conversion, energy transport, energy storage, and the plant control subsystem. The collector subsystem consists of concentrator, receiver, and tower assemblies. The energy transport subsystem uses a mixture of salts with a low melting temperature to transport thermal energy. A steam generator drives a steam Rankine cycle turbine which drives an electrical generator to produce electricity. Thermal and stress analysis tests are performed on each subsystem in order to determine the operational reliability, the minimum risk of failure, and the maintenance and repair characteristics.

  11. An experience of the introduction of a blood bank automation system (Ortho AutoVue Innova) in a regional acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuk Wah; Wilkinson, Jenny M

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the introduction of a blood bank automation system (Ortho AutoVue(®) Innova) in a hospital blood bank by considering the performance and workflow as compared with manual methods. The turnaround time was found to be 45% faster than the manual method. The concordance rate was found to be 100% for both ABO/Rh(D) typing and antibody screening in both of the systems and there was no significant difference in detection sensitivity for clinically significant antibodies. The Ortho AutoVue(®) Innova automated blood banking system streamlined the routine pre-transfusion testing in hospital blood bank with high throughput, equivalent sensitivity and reliability as compared with conventional manual method.

  12. Introduction to the Kinetics of Homogeneous Reactions. Hydrolysis of 2,4-Dinitrophenyl Acetate Catalyzed by Imidazole: A Simple Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levashov, Andrey V.; Ryabov, Alexander D.

    1986-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, typical results obtained, and calculations are provided for a short (4-6 hours) kinetic experiment which includes different methods both in performance and in analysis of the results. The experiment can be modified and extended depending on the level of students and the available laboratory time. (JN)

  13. A feasibility study on HTS SMES applications for power quality enhancement through both software simulations and hardware-based experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A. R.; Kim, J. G.; Kim, S.; Park, M.; Yu, I. K.; Seong, K. C.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-11-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) which promises the efficiency of more than 95% and fast response becomes a competitive energy storage device. Because of its advantages, SMES can provide benefit as a power quality enhancement device to an utility especially in connection with renewable energy sources. In this paper, a software simulation and an experiment aiming for power quality enhancement are reported. The utility was referred to Ulleung Island in Korea which had one wind power generation system. The simulation was performed using power system computer aided design/electromagnetic transient including DC (PSCAD/EMTDC) and power-hardware-in-the-loop simulation (PHILS) was implemented to monitor the operational characteristics of SMES when it was connected to utility. This study provides a highly reliable simulation results, and the feasibility of a SMES application is discussed.

  14. Powering up with indirect reciprocity in a large-scale field experiment.

    PubMed

    Yoeli, Erez; Hoffman, Moshe; Rand, David G; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-06-18

    A defining aspect of human cooperation is the use of sophisticated indirect reciprocity. We observe others, talk about others, and act accordingly. We help those who help others, and we cooperate expecting that others will cooperate in return. Indirect reciprocity is based on reputation, which spreads by communication. A crucial aspect of indirect reciprocity is observability: reputation effects can support cooperation as long as peoples' actions can be observed by others. In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, natural selection favors cooperation when observability is sufficiently high. Complimenting this theoretical work are experiments where observability promotes cooperation among small groups playing games in the laboratory. Until now, however, there has been little evidence of observability's power to promote large-scale cooperation in real world settings. Here we provide such evidence using a field study involving 2413 subjects. We collaborated with a utility company to study participation in a program designed to prevent blackouts. We show that observability triples participation in this public goods game. The effect is over four times larger than offering a $25 monetary incentive, the company's previous policy. Furthermore, as predicted by indirect reciprocity, we provide evidence that reputational concerns are driving our observability effect. In sum, we show how indirect reciprocity can be harnessed to increase cooperation in a relevant, real-world public goods game.

  15. Powering up with indirect reciprocity in a large-scale field experiment.

    PubMed

    Yoeli, Erez; Hoffman, Moshe; Rand, David G; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-06-18

    A defining aspect of human cooperation is the use of sophisticated indirect reciprocity. We observe others, talk about others, and act accordingly. We help those who help others, and we cooperate expecting that others will cooperate in return. Indirect reciprocity is based on reputation, which spreads by communication. A crucial aspect of indirect reciprocity is observability: reputation effects can support cooperation as long as peoples' actions can be observed by others. In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, natural selection favors cooperation when observability is sufficiently high. Complimenting this theoretical work are experiments where observability promotes cooperation among small groups playing games in the laboratory. Until now, however, there has been little evidence of observability's power to promote large-scale cooperation in real world settings. Here we provide such evidence using a field study involving 2413 subjects. We collaborated with a utility company to study participation in a program designed to prevent blackouts. We show that observability triples participation in this public goods game. The effect is over four times larger than offering a $25 monetary incentive, the company's previous policy. Furthermore, as predicted by indirect reciprocity, we provide evidence that reputational concerns are driving our observability effect. In sum, we show how indirect reciprocity can be harnessed to increase cooperation in a relevant, real-world public goods game. PMID:23754399

  16. PASP Plus: An experiment to measure space-environment effects on photovoltaic power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidice, Donald A.

    1992-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostic experiment (PASP Plus) was accepted as part of the APEX Mission payload aboard a Pegastar satellite to be orbited by a Pegasus launch vehicle in late 1992. The mission's elliptical orbit will allow us to investigate both space plasma and space radiation effects. PASP Plus will have eleven types of solar arrays and a full complement of environmental and interactions diagnostic sensors. Measurements of space-plasma interactions on the various solar arrays will be made at large negative voltages (to investigate arcing parameters) and at large positive voltages (to investigate leakage currents) by biasing the arrays to various levels up to -500 and +500 volts. The long-term deterioration in solar array performance caused by exposure to space radiation will also be investigated; radiation dosage will be measured by an electron/proton dosimeter included in the environmental sensor complement. Experimental results from PASP Plus will help establish cause-and-effect relationships and lead to improved design guidelines and test standards for new-technology solar arrays.

  17. Powering up with indirect reciprocity in a large-scale field experiment

    PubMed Central

    Yoeli, Erez; Hoffman, Moshe; Rand, David G.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    A defining aspect of human cooperation is the use of sophisticated indirect reciprocity. We observe others, talk about others, and act accordingly. We help those who help others, and we cooperate expecting that others will cooperate in return. Indirect reciprocity is based on reputation, which spreads by communication. A crucial aspect of indirect reciprocity is observability: reputation effects can support cooperation as long as peoples’ actions can be observed by others. In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, natural selection favors cooperation when observability is sufficiently high. Complimenting this theoretical work are experiments where observability promotes cooperation among small groups playing games in the laboratory. Until now, however, there has been little evidence of observability’s power to promote large-scale cooperation in real world settings. Here we provide such evidence using a field study involving 2413 subjects. We collaborated with a utility company to study participation in a program designed to prevent blackouts. We show that observability triples participation in this public goods game. The effect is over four times larger than offering a $25 monetary incentive, the company’s previous policy. Furthermore, as predicted by indirect reciprocity, we provide evidence that reputational concerns are driving our observability effect. In sum, we show how indirect reciprocity can be harnessed to increase cooperation in a relevant, real-world public goods game. PMID:23754399

  18. Survey of Field Programmable Gate Array Design Guides and Experience Relevant to Nuclear Power Plant Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrek, Miljko; Bouldin, Don; Holcomb, David Eugene; Killough, Stephen M; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Ward, Christina D

    2007-09-01

    From a safety perspective, it is difficult to assess the correctness of FPGA devices without extensive documentation, tools, and review procedures. NUREG/CR-6463, "Review Guidelines on Software Languages for Use in Nuclear Power Plant Safety Systems," provides guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on auditing of programs for safety systems written in ten high-level languages. A uniform framework for the formulation and discussion of language-specific programming guidelines was employed. Comparable guidelines based on a similar framework are needed for FPGA-based systems. The first task involves evaluation of regulatory experience gained by other countries and other agencies, and those captured in existing standards, to identify regulatory approaches that can be adopted by NRC. If existing regulations do not provide a sufficient regulatory basis for adopting relevant regulatory approaches that are uncovered, ORNL will identify the gaps. Information for this report was obtained through publicly available sources such as published papers and presentations. No proprietary information is represented.

  19. Phenylnaphthalene as a Heat Transfer Fluid for Concentrating Solar Power: High-Temperature Static Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Jason R; Joseph III, Robert Anthony; McFarlane, Joanna; Qualls, A L

    2012-05-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) may be an alternative to generating electricity from fossil fuels; however, greater thermodynamic efficiency is needed to improve the economics of CSP operation. One way of achieving improved efficiency is to operate the CSP loop at higher temperatures than the current maximum of about 400 C. ORNL has been investigating a synthetic polyaromatic oil for use in a trough type CSP collector, to temperatures up to 500 C. The oil was chosen because of its thermal stability and calculated low vapor and critical pressures. The oil has been synthesized using a Suzuki coupling mechanism and has been tested in static heating experiments. Analysis has been conducted on the oil after heating and suggests that there may be some isomerization taking place at 450 C, but the fluid appears to remain stable above that temperature. Tests were conducted over one week and further tests are planned to investigate stabilities after heating for months and in flow configurations. Thermochemical data and thermophysical predictions indicate that substituted polyaromatic hydrocarbons may be useful for applications that run at higher temperatures than possible with commercial fluids such as Therminol-VP1.

  20. PASP, a high voltage array/plasma interaction experiment. [Photovoltaic Array Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses the photovoltaic array space power (PASP) experiment, which is designed to obtain data on the interaction between high-voltage photovoltaic arrays and the polar, low-earth plasma environment. Up to six small test arrays (three each of planar and concentrator designs) can be voltage biased over a range of +/- 500 V. During the bias voltage sequence, the array current leakage is measured and array arc events are monitored. If any arcing occurs the arc characteristics will be measured by a transient pulse monitor. An emitter is included to allow voltage bias to be applied to a plasma-charged or uncharged spacecraft. Similarly, the frames of the concentrator arrays can be left floating or can be tied to the negative array terminal. An environmental data scan is made before each bias voltage sequence. This scan collects information on the plasma, array-current-versus-voltage curves, and neutral particle partial pressure. The requirement for high voltages created problems which were met by circuit isolation and logical fault protection.

  1. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.S.; Moeller, D.W.; Cooper, D.W.

    1985-07-01

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence modeling. The new models for early effects address four causes of mortality and nine categories of morbidity. The models for early effects are based upon two parameter Weibull functions. They permit evaluation of the influence of dose protraction and address the issue of variation in radiosensitivity among the population. The piecewise-linear dose-response models used in the Reactor Safety Study to predict cancers and thyroid nodules have been replaced by linear and linear-quadratic models. The new models reflect the most recently reported results of the follow-up of the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and permit analysis of both morbidity and mortality. The new models for genetic effects allow prediction of genetic risks in each of the first five generations after an accident and include information on the relative severity of various classes of genetic effects. The uncertainty in modeloling radiological health risks is addressed by providing central, upper, and lower estimates of risks. An approach is outlined for summarizing the health consequences of nuclear power plant accidents. 298 refs., 9 figs., 49 tabs.

  2. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Vernon H; Bellan, Paul M

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 10(19) m(-3) in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible. PMID:26233382

  3. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Vernon H; Bellan, Paul M

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 10(19) m(-3) in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible.

  4. Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power Systems (MCNSPS) conceptual design and evaluation report. Volume 1. Objectives, summary results and introduction. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wetch, J.R.

    1988-09-01

    The objective was to determine which reactor, conversion, and radiator technologies would best fulfill future Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power System Requirements. Specifically, the requirement was 10 megawatts for 5 years of full power operation and 10 years systems life on orbit. A variety of liquid metal and gas cooled reactors, static and dynamic conversion systems, and passive and dynamic radiators were considered. Four concepts were selected for more detailed study. The concepts are: a gas cooled reactor with closed cycle Brayton turbine-alternator conversion with heat pipe and pumped tube-fin heat rejection; a lithium cooled reactor with a free piston Stirling engine-linear alternator and a pumped tube-fin radiator; a lithium cooled reactor with potassium Rankine turbine-alternator and heat pipe radiator; and a lithium cooled incore thermionic static conversion reactor with a heat pipe radiator. The systems recommended for further development to meet a 10 megawatt long life requirement are the lithium cooled reactor with the K-Rankine conversion and heat pipe radiator, and the lithium cooled incore thermionic reactor with heat pipe radiator.

  5. Power-law viscous materials for analogue experiments: New data on the rheology of highly-filled silicone polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D.; Schrank, C.; Cruden, A.

    2008-03-01

    The selection of appropriate analogue materials is a central consideration in the design of realistic physical models. We investigate the rheology of highly-filled silicone polymers in order to find materials with a power-law strain-rate softening rheology suitable for modelling rock deformation by dislocation creep and report the rheological properties of the materials as functions of the filler content. The mixtures exhibit strain-rate softening behaviour but with increasing amounts of filler become strain-dependent. For the strain-independent viscous materials, flow laws are presented while for strain-dependent materials the relative importance of strain and strain rate softening/hardening is reported. If the stress or strain rate is above a threshold value some highly-filled silicone polymers may be considered linear visco-elastic (strain independent) and power-law strain-rate softening. The power-law exponent can be raised from 1 to ˜3 by using mixtures of high-viscosity silicone and plasticine. However, the need for high shear strain rates to obtain the power-law rheology imposes some restrictions on the usage of such materials for geodynamic modelling. Two simple shear experiments are presented that use Newtonian and power-law strain-rate softening materials. The results demonstrate how materials with power-law rheology result in better strain localization in analogue experiments.

  6. The origin of tablet boudinage: Results from experiments using power-law rock analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulauf, J.; Zulauf, G.; Kraus, R.; Gutiérrez-Alonso, G.; Zanella, F.

    2011-10-01

    We used power-law viscous plasticine ( n = ca. 7) as a rock analog to simulate boudinage of rocks undergoing dislocation creep and brittle fracture. A competent plasticine layer, oriented perpendicular to the main shortening direction, Z, underwent bulk pure flattening inside a less competent plasticine matrix. Computer tomographic analyses of the deformed samples revealed that boudinage results from an initial phase of viscous necking followed by tensile failure along the previously formed necks. The resulting boudins display a polygonal shape in plan-view and are referred to as 'tablet boudins' (in contrast to the square to rectangular shaped chocolate-tablet boudins). The ratio between the plan-view long and short axis, R, ranges from 1.2 to 2.6. The polygonal, non-isometric shape of the tablet boudins can be explained by the strong interaction of concentric and radial tensile fractures. With increasing layer thickness, Hi, the mean diameter of the boudin tablets, Wa, increases, while the number of boudins, N, decreases. Progressive finite strain results in a higher number of the boudins and a smaller mean diameter. The thickness of the boudins, Hf, is almost the same as the initial layer thickness, Hi, while the aspect ratio ( Wd = Wa / Hf) decreases with layer thickness and finite strain. The mean Wd values obtained from all experiments span from ca. 4 to ca. 11. Tablet boudins, described in the present paper, have yet not been described from natural outcrops. The reasons might be that pure flattening strain is not common in nature, and the characterization and evaluation of tablet boudins requires geometrical analysis in three dimensions, which is a difficult task when such structures occur in nature.

  7. Zebra Mussel control experiences at Detroit Edison Harbor Beach Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, D.B.; Buda, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Detroit Edison Co. Harbor Beach Power Plant on Lake Huron in Michigan`s thumb and is comprised of one 100 MW coal-fired unit. Zebra mussels first were discovered during a routine inspection of the plant screen house in August 1991. The initial population of 5 mussels/m{sup 2} increased to 650 mussels/m{sup 2} by March 1992. During this eight-month period the plant began to experience problems with zebra mussels clogging small coolers, check valves, and miscellaneous service water connections. Although the mussels had not affected the unit`s availability, it was evident that they soon might if left uncontrolled. A treatment program was devised in 1992 to eliminate the mussels living in the screen house and inside the plant. Targeted in-plant systems included the condenser cooling supply lines, plant service water system, and plant fire fighting system. An oxygen scavenger (sodium sulfate) was used in conjunction with thermal treatment (saturated steam) to asphyxiate and heat the mussels over a several day period. Inspection dives in the screen house before and after treatment as well as subsequent in-plant equipment inspections have revealed the treatment to be successful. Complete mortality was achieved in the screen house and in-plant systems. By April, 1993, the zebra mussel colony had re-established itself in the plant screen house to a level of 400 mussels/m{sup 2}. In October 1993, the colony had grown to 2,600 mussels/m{sup 2}. A second treatment was scheduled and completed on October 18--21, 1993. Thermal treatment was used alone during this treatment episode in which 100% mortality again wax achieved. Test bags, an in-line viewport, and post treatment dive inspections confirmed that the treatment was completely successful. Population monitoring and treatments continue on a regular basis.

  8. Nano-mineralogical investigation of coal and fly ashes from coal-based captive power plant (India): an introduction of occupational health hazards.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos L S; Marostega, Fabiane; Taffarel, Silvio R; Saikia, Binoy K; Waanders, Frans B; DaBoit, Kátia; Baruah, Bimala P; Silva, Luis F O

    2014-01-15

    Coal derived nano-particles has been received much concern recently around the world for their adverse effects on human health and the environment during their utilization. In this investigation the mineral matter present in some industrially important Indian coals and their ash samples are addressed. Coal and fly ash samples from the coal-based captive power plant in Meghalaya (India) were collected for different characterization and nano-mineralogy studies. An integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to know their extent of risks to the human health when present in coal and fly ash. The study has revealed that the coals contain mainly clay minerals, whilst glass fragments, spinel, quartz, and other minerals in lesser quantities were found to be present in the coal fly ash. Fly ash carbons were present as chars. Indian coal fly ash also found to contain nanominerals and ultrafine particles. The coal-fired power plants are observed to be the largest anthropogenic source of Hg emitted to the atmosphere and expected to increase its production in near future years. The Multi Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes (MWCNTs) are detected in our fly ashes, which contains residual carbonaceous matter responsible for the Hg capture/encapsulation. This detailed investigation on the inter-relationship between the minerals present in the samples and their ash components will also be useful for fulfilling the clean coal technology principles.

  9. 14 CFR 61.163 - Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Airline... applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a powered-lift category rating must have at...

  10. 14 CFR 61.163 - Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Airline... applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a powered-lift category rating must have at...

  11. 14 CFR 61.163 - Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Airline... applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a powered-lift category rating must have at...

  12. 14 CFR 61.163 - Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Airline... applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a powered-lift category rating must have at...

  13. 14 CFR 61.163 - Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Airline... applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a powered-lift category rating must have at...

  14. IBA for novice experimentalists. I. Introduction to IBA: mostly symmetries. II. Tests in even-even nuclei: mostly transitional systems. III. Supersymmetries: theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    The report contains the notes from a series of lectures on the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) model. The lectures were presented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on July 28, 30 and August 1, 1982 by Jolie A. Cizewski from Yale University. The IBA was developed by F. Iachello and A. Arima starting about seven years ago to understand collective quadrupole excitations in medium and heavy mass nuclei away from closed shells. Since then the formalism has been extended to odd-mass nuclei and considerable work has gone into understanding the microscopic construction of the bosons in this model. The IBA has been applied to nuclei as light as Zn and Ge and as heavy as U and Pu; to nuclei near closed shells, such as Mo and Hg; to stable nuclei and nuclei far from stability. The present lectures were designed to give the experimentalist an introduction to the IBA and to give specific examples of how it could be applied to understand the structure of heavy even and odd mass nuclei. Much of the emphasis was on the symmetries (and supersymmetries) of the model and how the use of symmetries enabled the relatively straightforward understanding of empirical systems as deviations from these symmetries. The richness of possible applications of the IBA to understanding collective phenomena in nuclei was not fully explored, but rather a few illustrative examples were selected and described in detail. The references, accumulated at the end of this report, provide a more comprehensive, although not complete, list of tests of the IBA in even mass nuclei and the new symmetries in odd mass nuclei. The references also list the main theoretical papers which provide the details of the IBA formalism.

  15. "Power, Regulation and Physically Active Identities": The Experiences of Rural and Regional Living Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, M.; Mooney, A.; Smyth, J.; Payne, W.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on interpretations of Foucault's techniques of power, we explored the discourses and power relations operative between groups of girls that appeared to influence their participation in Physical Education (PE) and outside of school in sport and physical activity (PA) in rural and regional communities. Interviews and focus groups were…

  16. The College Experience and Its Effects on Family Closeness and Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Jo Anna; Folwell, Annette L.; Holder, John; Layne, Jill Cole; Garrison, Joel; Wilson, Andria; Bain, Lisa

    This study examined the differences in family closeness and power structure between first semester college freshmen and upperclassmen. Fifty-two freshmen and fifty-four upperclassmen completed the Family Systems Test (Gehring & Feldman, 1988) to indicate the closeness and power structure in their immediate families. Aspen-Welch t-tests were used…

  17. Student Attitudes toward Nuclear Power Plants: A Classroom Experiment in the Field of Environmental Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spada, Hans; And Others

    1977-01-01

    As part of a senior high school physics unit on nuclear power, changes in student attitudes toward nuclear power plants and problems of energy supply were analyzed. Tests included a situational test, semantic differentials, knowledge or achievement, and a final questionnaire. The results are discussed. (CTM)

  18. Microwave heating power distribution in electron-cyclotron resonance processing plasmas, experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, S.R.; Eddy, C. Jr.; Lampe, M.; Joyce, G.; Slinker, S.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-12-31

    The authors are currently investigating the mechanisms of microwave power absorption in an ECR plasma. The microwave electric field is detected with an antenna at the end of a shielded co-ax cable, connected to a bolometer for power measurements. Initial measurements have been 1-D along the axis of the plasma chamber. Later, 3-D profiles will be made of the microwave heating power distribution. A comparison of the experimental results with the theoretical microwave absorption are presented. A ray tracing analysis of the propagating right hand wave are given, including both collisional and collisionless absorption. Mode conversion effects are studied to explain why most of the power is absorbed at the entry window, especially the L wave power.

  19. Numerical Predictions of Wind Turbine Power and Aerodynamic Loads for the NREL Phase II and IV Combined Experiment Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Johnson, Wayne; vanDam, C. P.; Chao, David D.; Cortes, Regina; Yee, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and robust numerical predictions of wind turbine rotor power remain a challenge to the wind energy industry. The literature reports various methods that compare predictions to experiments. The methods vary from Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEM), Vortex Lattice (VL), to variants of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS). The BEM and VL methods consistently show discrepancies in predicting rotor power at higher wind speeds mainly due to inadequacies with inboard stall and stall delay models. The RaNS methodologies show promise in predicting blade stall. However, inaccurate rotor vortex wake convection, boundary layer turbulence modeling and grid resolution has limited their accuracy. In addition, the inherently unsteady stalled flow conditions become computationally expensive for even the best endowed research labs. Although numerical power predictions have been compared to experiment. The availability of good wind turbine data sufficient for code validation experimental data that has been extracted from the IEA Annex XIV download site for the NREL Combined Experiment phase II and phase IV rotor. In addition, the comparisons will show data that has been further reduced into steady wind and zero yaw conditions suitable for comparisons to "steady wind" rotor power predictions. In summary, the paper will present and discuss the capabilities and limitations of the three numerical methods and make available a database of experimental data suitable to help other numerical methods practitioners validate their own work.

  20. Experiences of Healthcare Professionals to the Introduction in Sweden of a Public eHealth Service: Patients' Online Access to their Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Ålander, Ture; Scandurra, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Patients' increasing demands for medical information, the digitization of health records and the fast spread of Internet access form a basis of introducing new eHealth services. An international trend is to provide access for patients to health information of various kind. In Sweden, access by patients to their proper electronic health record (EHR) has been provided in a pilot county since November 2012. This eHealth service is controversial and criticism has arised from the clinical professions, mainly physicians. Two web surveys were conducted to discover whether the opinions of healthcare professionals differ; between staff that have had experience with patients accessing their own EHR and those who have no such expericence. Experienced nurses found the EHR more important for the patients and a better reform, compared to unexperienced nurses in the rest of the country. Similarly, physicians with their own experience had a more positive attitude compared to non-experienced physicians. The conclusion of this study is that healthcare professionals must be involved in the implementation of public eHealth services such as EHRs and that real experiences of the professionals should be better disseminated to their inexperienced peers. PMID:26262029

  1. 18 CFR 801.0 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Introduction. 801.0 Section 801.0 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL... water and related natural resources of the basin, which includes part of New York, Pennsylvania,...

  2. 18 CFR 801.0 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Introduction. 801.0 Section 801.0 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL... water and related natural resources of the basin, which includes part of New York, Pennsylvania,...

  3. 18 CFR 801.0 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Introduction. 801.0 Section 801.0 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL... water and related natural resources of the basin, which includes part of New York, Pennsylvania,...

  4. 18 CFR 801.0 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Introduction. 801.0 Section 801.0 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL... water and related natural resources of the basin, which includes part of New York, Pennsylvania,...

  5. 18 CFR 801.0 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Introduction. 801.0 Section 801.0 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION GENERAL... water and related natural resources of the basin, which includes part of New York, Pennsylvania,...

  6. Operation of Direct Drive Systems: Experiments in Peak Power Tracking and Multi-Thruster Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John Steven; Brophy, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Direct-drive power and propulsion systems have the potential to significantly reduce the mass of high-power solar electric propulsion spacecraft, among other advantages. Recent experimental direct-drive work has significantly mitigated or retired the technical risks associated with single-thruster operation, so attention is now moving toward systems-level areas of interest. One of those areas is the use of a Hall thruster system as a peak power tracker to fully use the available power from a solar array. A simple and elegant control based on the incremental conductance method, enhanced by combining it with the unique properties of Hall thruster systems, is derived here and it is shown to track peak solar array power very well. Another area of interest is multi-thruster operation and control. Dualthruster operation was investigated in a parallel electrical configuration, with both thrusters operating from discharge power provided by a single solar array. Startup and shutdown sequences are discussed, and it is shown that multi-thruster operation and control is as simple as for a single thruster. Some system architectures require operation of multiple cathodes while they are electrically connected together. Four different methods to control the discharge current emitted by individual cathodes in this configuration are investigated, with cathode flow rate control appearing to be advantageous. Dual-parallel thruster operation with equal cathode current sharing at total powers up to 10 kW is presented.

  7. [Pain beyond the confines of man: a preliminary introduction to the debate between Frances Power Cobbe and the Darwinists with respect to vivisection in Victorian England (1863-1904)].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, André Luis de Lima; Waizbort, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a person who is little known and studied in the Brazilian and South-American academic communities. Frances Power Cobbe was a British woman in the Victorial period engaged in various social causes, among them the abolition of vivisection. In her later years, Cobbe criticized any use of live animals in laboratory experiments, with or without the use of anesthetics. Our initial focus is on the relationship between Cobbe and Charles Darwin and the conflict they both were involved in regarding the ethical legitimacy of using live animals in physiological experiments for the good (or not) of knowledge and mankind.

  8. Design and operating experience of a 40 MW, highly-stabilized power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Ferner, J.A.; Bogdan, F.; Morris, G.C.; Rumrill, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    Four 10 MW, highly-stabilized power supply modules have been installed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL, to energize water-cooled, resistive, high-field research magnets. The power supply modules achieve a long term current stability if 10 ppM over a 12 h period with a short term ripple and noise variation of <10 ppM over a time period of one cycle. The power supply modules can operate independently, feeding four separate magnets, or two, three or four modules can operate in parallel. Each power supply module consists of a 12.5 kV vacuum circuit breaker, two three-winding, step-down transformers, a 24-pulse rectifier with interphase reactors, and a passive and an active filter. Two different transformer tap settings allow rated dc supply output voltages of 400 and 500 V. The rated current of a supply module is 17 kA and each supply module has a one-hour overload capability of 20 kA. The isolated output terminals of each power supply module are connected to a reversing switch. An extensive high-current bus system allows the modules to be connected to 16 magnet cells. This paper presents the detailed design of the power supply components. Various test results taken during the commissioning phase with a 10 MW resistive load and results taken with the research magnets are shown. The effects of the modules on the electrical supply system and the operational behavior of the power factor correction/harmonic filters are described. Included also are results of a power supply module feeding a superconducting magnet during quench propagation tests. Problems with the power supply design and solutions are presented. Some suggestions on how to improve the performance of these supplies are outlined.

  9. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr.; Jenkins, B.M.; Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A.; Bryers, R.W.; Oden, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  10. Perihelion Power Constraint and Wheel-Off-Loading Impact on BepiColombo's Relativity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Anja Katharina; Jehn, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the consequences of the Perihelion Power Constraint (PPC) are presented along with the impact of the Momentum Wheel-Off-loading (WOL) events on the estimation precision of the post-Newtonian parameters (PNP). This analysis will provide an estimate of the outcome of the relativity experiment in the framework of the joint mission between ESA and JAXA, named BepiColombo. The Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), one of the two scientific elements of the composite spacecraft, aims to verify Einstein's theory of General Relativity plus alternative theories of gravitation to an unprecedented degree of accuracy [1]. The PPC describes the switch-off of the Ka-transponder when Mercury is ±35° around perihelion [2]. This causes a decrease in the quality of radiometric measurements. The implemented PPC distinguishes between different geometries such as inferior and superior constellations. Moreover, it differentiates between the case in which Mercury is close to superior solar conjunction (SSC) while being around perihelion and the one of only being in SSC. Our treatment has the essential effect that the standard deviation of range and doppler measurements is increased in the perihelion region by up to 1.83 ṡ 10‑5 km/s (doppler noise). There is no clear trend to be seen in the resulting PNP uncertainties. For instance, the value of the estimation bias of the PNP γ of 8.232 ṡ 10‑6 is almost by factor two larger than in the case when the PPC is not activated (4.243 ṡ 10‑6). But applying the PPC to the back-up trajectory this trend is not confirmed, since the reverse is true for the γ uncertainty σ(γPPC) < σ(γref). However, the order of magnitude is comparable to the results obtained by Schettino [3], that is 1.04 ṡ 10‑6. The influence of the WOL frequency of about 12 hours compared to about 24 hours is investigated. Wheel off-loadings are implemented in the software by increasing the diagonal values of the covariance matrix that correspond to

  11. Perihelion Power Constraint and Wheel-Off-Loading Impact on BepiColombo's Relativity Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Anja Katharina; Jehn, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the consequences of the Perihelion Power Constraint (PPC) are presented along with the impact of the Momentum Wheel-Off-loading (WOL) events on the estimation precision of the post-Newtonian parameters (PNP). This analysis will provide an estimate of the outcome of the relativity experiment in the framework of the joint mission between ESA and JAXA, named BepiColombo. The Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), one of the two scientific elements of the composite spacecraft, aims to verify Einstein's theory of General Relativity plus alternative theories of gravitation to an unprecedented degree of accuracy [1]. The PPC describes the switch-off of the Ka-transponder when Mercury is ±35° around perihelion [2]. This causes a decrease in the quality of radiometric measurements. The implemented PPC distinguishes between different geometries such as inferior and superior constellations. Moreover, it differentiates between the case in which Mercury is close to superior solar conjunction (SSC) while being around perihelion and the one of only being in SSC. Our treatment has the essential effect that the standard deviation of range and doppler measurements is increased in the perihelion region by up to 1.83 ṡ 10-5 km/s (doppler noise). There is no clear trend to be seen in the resulting PNP uncertainties. For instance, the value of the estimation bias of the PNP γ of 8.232 ṡ 10-6 is almost by factor two larger than in the case when the PPC is not activated (4.243 ṡ 10-6). But applying the PPC to the back-up trajectory this trend is not confirmed, since the reverse is true for the γ uncertainty σ(γPPC) < σ(γref). However, the order of magnitude is comparable to the results obtained by Schettino [3], that is 1.04 ṡ 10-6. The influence of the WOL frequency of about 12 hours compared to about 24 hours is investigated. Wheel off-loadings are implemented in the software by increasing the diagonal values of the covariance matrix that correspond to the

  12. Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, William J.

    Coincidentally, as I sat down in late October 2003 to read and review the second edition of Wallace H. Campbell's text, Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields, we received warnings from the news media of a massive solar flare and its possible effect on power supply systems and satellite communications. News programs briefly explained the source of Sun-Earth interactions. If you are interested in learning more about the physics of the connection between sun spots and power supply systems and their impact on orbiting satellites, I urge you to become acquainted with Campbell's book. It presents an interesting and informative explanation of the geomagnetic field and its applications to a wide variety of topics, including oil exploration, climate change, and fraudulent claims of the utility of magnetic fields for alleviating human pain. Geomagnetism, the study of the nature and processes of the Earth's magnetic fields and its application to the investigation of the Earth, its processes, and history, is a mature science with a well-developed theoretical foundation and a vast array of observations. It is discussed in varied detail in Earth physics books and most entry-level geoscience texts. The latter treatments largely are driven by the need to discuss paleomagnetism as an essential tool in studying plate tectonics. A more thorough explanation of geomagnetism is needed by many interested scientists in related fields and by laypersons. This is the objective of Campbell's book. It is particularly germane in view of a broad range of geomagnetic topics that are at the forefront of today's science, including environmental magnetism, so-called ``jerks'' observed in the Earth's magnetic field, the perplexing magnetic field of Mars, improved satellite magnetic field observations, and the increasing availability of high-quality continental magnetic anomaly maps, to name only a few.

  13. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments I: 2D Power Spectra from the PAPER-32 Imaging Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Pober, J. C.; Ali, Z. S.; Bradley, R. F.; Carilli, C. L.; DeBoer, D. R.; Gugliucci, N. E.; Jacobs, D. C.; Klima, P.; MacMahon, D. H. E.; Manley, J. R.; Moore, D. F.; Parsons, A. R.; Stefan, I. I.; Walbrugh, W. P.

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  14. Navigation Flight Test Results from the Low Power Transceiver Communications and Navigation Demonstration on Shuttle (CANDOS) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Lin; Massey, Christopher; Baraban, Dmitri

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation results from the Communications and Navigation Demonstration on Shuttle (CANDOS) experiment flown on STS-107. This experiment was the initial flight of a Low Power Transceiver (LPT) that featured high capacity space- space and space-ground communications and GPS- based navigation capabilities. The LPT also hosted the GPS Enhanced Orbit Determination Experiment (GEODE) orbit determination software. All CANDOS test data were recovered during the mission using LPT communications links via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). An overview of the LPT s navigation software and the GPS experiment timeline is presented, along with comparisons of test results to the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) real-time ground navigation vectors and Best Estimate of Trajectory (BET).

  15. Early utility experience with wind power generation. Volume 2. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Solano County project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, T.; Henry, G.; Tennis, M.; Goldenblatt, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report is one of three presenting the results of EPRI Research Project 1590-1, Evaluation of Electric Utility Experience with Wind Power Generation. The objective of this project was to develop an improved understanding of wind power generation, in particular the process a utility must undergo to initiate and carry out a wind turbine project. The primary tasks of RP1590-1 were to document and evaluate the experience of two utilities with megawatt-scale wind turbine installations from project inception to the wind turbine's first rotation. This technical report presents the experiences of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E) with its wind turbine installation at Solano County, California. All documents and reports pertaining to PG and E's experience with wind energy at Solano County were reviewed and excerpts made of the highlights. Gaps in the documentation were filled by talking with appropriate people. Site visits were conducted to monitor current activity. The information obtained was evaluated for its generic relevance and benefit to other utilities. The chronology of steps taken by PG and E in implementing the Solano wind turbine experience and some of the lessons learned are included in the report. In each section, important activities, critical assumptions, and interesting insights which might benefit other utility wind programs are identified.

  16. Closed cycle MHD power generation experiments using a helium-cesium working fluid in the NASA Lewis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The MHD channel in the NASA Lewis Research Center was redesigned and used in closed cycle power generation experiments with a helium-cesium working fluid. The cross sectional dimensions of the channel were reduced to 5 by 16.5 cm to allow operation over a variety of conditions. Experiments have been run at temperatures of 1900-2100 K and Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.55 in argon and 0.2 in helium. Improvements in Hall voltage isolation and seed vaporization techniques have resulted in significant improvements in performance. Typical values obtained with helium are Faraday open circuit voltage 141 V (92% of uBh) at a magnetic field strength of 1.7 T, power outputs of 2.2 kw for tests with 28 electrodes and 2.1 kw for tests with 17 electrodes. Power densities of 0.6 MW/cu m and Hall fields of about 1100 V/m were obtained in the tests with 17 electrodes, representing a factor of 18 improvement over previously reported results. The V-I curves and current distribution data indicate that while near ideal equilibrium performance is obtained under some conditions, no nonequilibrium power has been generated to date.

  17. Reconstruction of the primordial power spectrum using temperature and polarisation data from multiple experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Gavin; Contaldi, Carlo R. E-mail: c.contaldi@imperial.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    We develop a method to reconstruct the primordial power spectrum, P(k), using both temperature and polarisation data from the joint analysis of a number of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) observations. The method is an extension of the Richardson-Lucy algorithm, first applied in this context by Shafieloo and Souradeep [1]. We show how the inclusion of polarisation measurements can decrease the uncertainty in the reconstructed power spectrum. In particular, the polarisation data can constrain oscillations in the spectrum more effectively than total intensity only measurements. We apply the estimator to a compilation of current CMB results. The reconstructed spectrum is consistent with the best-fit power spectrum although we find evidence for a 'dip' in the power on scales k ≈ 0.002 Mpc{sup −1}. This feature appears to be associated with the WMAP power in the region 18 ≤ l ≤ 26 which is consistently below best-fit models. We also forecast the reconstruction for a simulated, Planck-like [2] survey including sample variance limited polarisation data.

  18. Power, Jobs and Bodies: The Experiences of Becoming a Gender Scholar in Doctoral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danowitz, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that doctoral students' learning and experiences are influenced by their relationships and predominant organizational norms and structures, create gender inequality and discourage or prevent alternative behaviors. However, there is very little empirical information on the nature of doctoral experiences and organizational…

  19. A Classroom Experiment on Exchange Rate Determination with Purchasing Power Parity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, David T.; Rebelein, Robert P.; Schneider, Patricia H.; Simpson, Nicole B.; Fisher, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed a classroom experiment on exchange rate determination appropriate for undergraduate courses in macroeconomics and international economics. In the experiment, students represent citizens from different countries and need to obtain currency to purchase goods. By participating in an auction to buy currency, students gain a…

  20. Revisiting the Stanford Prison Experiment: A Lesson in the Power of Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimbardo, Philip G.

    2007-01-01

    When he conducted the Stanford prison experiment, Philip G. Zimbardo wanted to know who would win--good people or an evil situation--when they were brought into direct confrontation. The situation won; humanity lost. Out the window went the moral upbringings of the young men involved in the experiment, as well as their middle-class civility. Power…

  1. Introduction to machine learning.

    PubMed

    Baştanlar, Yalin; Ozuysal, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The machine learning field, which can be briefly defined as enabling computers make successful predictions using past experiences, has exhibited an impressive development recently with the help of the rapid increase in the storage capacity and processing power of computers. Together with many other disciplines, machine learning methods have been widely employed in bioinformatics. The difficulties and cost of biological analyses have led to the development of sophisticated machine learning approaches for this application area. In this chapter, we first review the fundamental concepts of machine learning such as feature assessment, unsupervised versus supervised learning and types of classification. Then, we point out the main issues of designing machine learning experiments and their performance evaluation. Finally, we introduce some supervised learning methods. PMID:24272434

  2. Introduction to machine learning.

    PubMed

    Baştanlar, Yalin; Ozuysal, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The machine learning field, which can be briefly defined as enabling computers make successful predictions using past experiences, has exhibited an impressive development recently with the help of the rapid increase in the storage capacity and processing power of computers. Together with many other disciplines, machine learning methods have been widely employed in bioinformatics. The difficulties and cost of biological analyses have led to the development of sophisticated machine learning approaches for this application area. In this chapter, we first review the fundamental concepts of machine learning such as feature assessment, unsupervised versus supervised learning and types of classification. Then, we point out the main issues of designing machine learning experiments and their performance evaluation. Finally, we introduce some supervised learning methods.

  3. Introduction: The Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) - multi-disciplinary, multi-scale and multi-component research and capacity building initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, M.; Lappalainen, H. K.; Petäjä, T.; Kurten, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Viisanen, Y.; Hari, P.; Bondur, V.; Kasimov, N.; Kotlyakov, V.; Matvienko, G.; Baklanov, A.; Guo, H. D.; Ding, A.; Hansson, H.-C.; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2015-08-01

    The Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) is a multi-disciplinary, multi-scale and multi-component research, research infrastructure and capacity building program. PEEX has originated from a bottom-up approach by the science communities, and is aiming at resolving the major uncertainties in Earth System Science and global sustainability issues concerning the Arctic and boreal Pan-Eurasian regions, as well as China. The vision of PEEX is to solve interlinked global grand challenges influencing human well-being and societies in northern Eurasia and China. Such challenges include climate change, air quality, biodiversity loss, urbanization, chemicalization, food and fresh water availability, energy production and use of natural resources by mining, industry, energy production and transport sectors. Our approach is integrative and supra-disciplinary, recognizing the important role of the Arctic and boreal ecosystems in the Earth system. The PEEX vision includes establishing and maintaining long-term, coherent and coordinated research activities as well as continuous, comprehensive research and educational infrastructures and related capacity building across the PEEX domain. In this paper we present the PEEX structure, summarize its motivation, objectives and future outlook.

  4. A Short Introduction to Computer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Ulrich

    Computer Networks have become an essential tool in many aspects: human communication, gathering, exchange and sharing of information, distributed work environments, access to remote resources (data and computing power) and many more. Starting from an historical overview, this paper will give an introduction to the underlying ideas and technologies. The second half will concentrate on the most commonly used network technology today (Ethernet and TCP/IP) and give an introduction to the communication mechanisms used.

  5. Design and experiment of a cross-shaped mode converter for high-power microwave applications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shengren; Yuan, Chengwei; Zhong, Huihuang; Fan, Yuwei

    2013-12-01

    A compact mode converter, which is capable of converting a TM01 mode into a circularly polarized TE11 mode, was developed and experimentally studied with high-power microwaves. The converter, consisting of two turnstile junctions, is very short along the wave propagation direction, and therefore is suitable for designing compact and axially aligned high-power microwave radiation systems. In this paper, the principle of a converter working at 1.75 GHz is demonstrated, as well as the experimental results. The experimental and simulation results are in good agreement. At the center frequency, the conversion efficiency is more than 95%, the measured axial ratio is about 0.4 dB, and the power-handing capacity is excess of 1.9 GW.

  6. Design and experiment of a cross-shaped mode converter for high-power microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Shengren Yuan, Chengwei; Zhong, Huihuang; Fan, Yuwei

    2013-12-15

    A compact mode converter, which is capable of converting a TM{sub 01} mode into a circularly polarized TE{sub 11} mode, was developed and experimentally studied with high-power microwaves. The converter, consisting of two turnstile junctions, is very short along the wave propagation direction, and therefore is suitable for designing compact and axially aligned high-power microwave radiation systems. In this paper, the principle of a converter working at 1.75 GHz is demonstrated, as well as the experimental results. The experimental and simulation results are in good agreement. At the center frequency, the conversion efficiency is more than 95%, the measured axial ratio is about 0.4 dB, and the power-handing capacity is excess of 1.9 GW.

  7. On the power regulation of small wind turbines based on experience with small Danish wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundsager, P.

    The state of development of the small wind turbines on the Danish market covering a range of 10 to 55 kW, of which approximately 500 are in operation is discussed. A typical feature of Danish small wind turbines is the regulation of the power output by stalling of the rotor blades. The merits of the stall regulation are discussed with respect to both power regulation and structural design and safety. The characteristic benefits and problems are discussed in some detail and compared to those of the pitch regulation. A survey of problems in both methods to be solved by research and development work in the next few years is given.

  8. Educational Experiences in Oceanography through Hands-On Involvement with Surface Drifters: an Introduction to Ocean Currents, Engineering, Data Collection, and Computer Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Northeast Fisheries Science Center's (NEFSC) Student Drifters Program is providing education opportunities for students of all ages. Using GPS-tracked ocean drifters, various educational institutions can provide students with hands-on experience in physical oceanography, engineering, and computer science. In building drifters many high school and undergraduate students may focus on drifter construction, sometimes designing their own drifter or attempting to improve current NEFSC models. While learning basic oceanography younger students can build drifters with the help of an educator and directions available on the studentdrifters.org website. Once drifters are deployed, often by a local mariner or oceanographic partner, drifter tracks can be visualised on maps provided at http://nefsc.noaa.gov/drifter. With the lesson plans available for those interested in computer science, students may download, process, and plot the drifter position data with basic Python code provided. Drifter tracks help students to visualize ocean currents, and also allow them to understand real particle tracking applications such as in search and rescue, oil spill dispersion, larval transport, and the movement of injured sea animals. Additionally, ocean circulation modelers can use student drifter paths to validate their models. The Student Drifters Program has worked with over 100 schools, several of them having deployed drifters on the West Coast. Funding for the program often comes from individual schools and small grants but in the future will preferably come from larger government grants. NSF, Sea-Grant, NOAA, and EPA are all possible sources of funding, especially with the support of multiple schools and large marine education associations. The Student Drifters Program is a unique resource for educators, students, and scientists alike.

  9. Complication rates associated with the introduction of new technology into the clinical health care setting correlate with operator experience and training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, William A.; Cooper, Christopher S.; Fisher, Ronald J.

    1994-12-01

    At three months and at one year following completion of a formal training course in laparoscopic urologic surgery, course participants were surveyed as to their interim laparoscopic experience. Data regarding practice setting, subspecialization, course attendance (alone or with a partner), nature and training of surgical assistant, and additional training subsequent to the course was collected. These variables were then correlated with information on the number and nature of surgical complications encountered subsequent to the course. In the three months following course completion, surgeons who performed clinical procedures without additional training were 3.39 times more likely to have at least one complication compared to surgeons who sought additional training (p equals 0.030). One year following course completion surgeons who had attended the training course alone, were in solo practice, or performed laparoscopic surgery with a variable assistant, were, respectively, 4.85, 7.74, and 4.80 times more likely to have had a complication than their counterparts who attend the course with a partner, were in group practice, or who operated with the same assistant (p equals 0.004, p equals 0.001, and p equals 0.002). At both three months and one year following training, laparoscopic complication rates of individual surgeons (number of complications/number of cases) demonstrated a highly significant inverse correlation with the number of laparoscopic procedures performed. These data suggest that the rate of complications associated with the clinical `learning' curve can be decreased by additional education following an initial course in laparoscopy. An ongoing clinical association with surgeons performing similar procedures appears to decrease long-term complication rates. Findings from this study argue for the regulation of the clinical application of new surgical skills acquired in the post-residency setting, and maintenance of the new skills through continuing

  10. Conceptual design of an Open-Cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Net Power-Producing Experiment (OC-OTEC NPPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Green, H. J.; Link, H. F.; Parsons, B. K.; Parsons, J. M.; Zangrando, F.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of an experiment to investigate heat and mass transfer and to assess the viability of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The experiment will be developed in two stages, the Heat- and Mass-Transfer Experimental Apparatus (HMTEA) and the Net Power-Producing Experiment (NPPE). The goal for the HMTEA is to test heat exchangers. The goal for the NPPE is to experimentally verify OC-OTEC's feasibility by installing a turbine and testing the power-generating system. The design effort met the goals of both the HMTEA and the NPPE, and duplication of hardware was minimal. The choices made for the design resource water flow rates are consistent with the availability of cold and warm seawater as a result of the seawater systems upgrade carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the state of Hawaii, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. The choices regarding configuration of the system were made based on projected performance, degree of technical risk, schedule, and cost. The cost for the future phase of the design and the development of the HMTEA/NPPE is consistent with the projected future program funding levels. The HMTEA and NPPE were designed cooperatively by PICHTR, Argonne National Laboratory, and Solar Energy Research Institute under the guidance of DOE. The experiment will be located at the DOE's Seacoast Test Facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii.

  11. Conceptual design of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment (OC-OTEC NPPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.; Link, H.F.; Parsons, B.K.; Parsons, J.M.; Zangrando, F.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of an experiment to investigate heat and mass transfer and to assess the viability of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The experiment will be developed in two stages, the Heat- and Mass-Transfer Experimental Apparatus (HMTEA) and the Net Power-Producing Experiment (NPPE). The goal for the HMTEA is to test heat exchangers. The goal for the NPPE is to experimentally verify OC-OTEC's feasibility by installing a turbine and testing the power-generating system. The design effort met the goals of both the HMTEA and the NPPE, and duplication of hardware was minimal. The choices made for the design resource water flow rates are consistent with the availability of cold and warm seawater as a result of the seawater systems upgrade carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the state of Hawaii, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. The choices regarding configuration of the system were made based on projected performance, degree of technical risk, schedule, and cost. The cost for the future phase of the design and the development of the HMTEA/NPPE is consistent with the projected future program funding levels. The HMTEA and NPPE were designed cooperatively by PICHTR, Argonne National Laboratory, and Solar Energy Research Institute under the guidance of DOE. The experiment will be located at the DOE's Seacoast Test Facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. 71 refs., 41 figs., 34 tabs.

  12. Power Distance in Online Learning: Experience of Chinese Learners in U.S. Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yi (Leaf)

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore the influence of Confucian-heritage culture on Chinese learners' online learning and engagement in online discussion in U.S. higher education. More specifically, this research studied Chinese learners' perceptions of power distance and its impact on their interactions with instructors and…

  13. Radiation and Magnetic Field Effects on New Semiconductor Power Devices for Hl-Lhc Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, S.; Abbate, C.; Baccaro, S.; Busatto, G.; Citterio, M.; Iannuzzo, F.; Lanza, A.; Latorre, S.; Lazzaroni, M.; Sanseverino, A.; Velardi, F.

    2014-06-01

    The radiation hardness of commercial Silicon Carbide and Gallium Nitride power MOSFETs is presented in this paper, for Total Ionizing Dose effects and Single Event Effects, under γ, neutrons, protons and heavy ions. Similar tests are discussed for commercial DC-DC converters, also tested in operation under magnetic field.

  14. Sacramento Power Authority experience of building and testing a successful turn key combined cycle project

    SciTech Connect

    Maring, J.; Yost, J.; Zachary, J.

    1998-07-01

    The following paper will describe a combined cycle power plant providing power and steam to a food processing plant. The project owner is Sacramento Power Authority in Sacramento, California, USA. A consortium led by Siemens supplied the equipment and provided the turn key project management. The project was completed in 23 months and the plant was released for dispatch 3 weeks ahead of schedule. The formal performance tests conducted in December 1997, indicated a better net output and a lower net heat rate from the guaranteed values. The thermal acceptance test procedure was in full compliance with the new Performance Test Code PTC-46 of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for combined cycle power plant testing, issued in 1996 and also met all the requirements of ISO 2314 Procedure. The paper will also discuss the performance of an evaporative cooler, used to lower compressor air inlet temperature and the methodology used to reduce the additional instrumentation uncertainty associated with such devices. The paper will also deal with the unique environmental emissions restrictions imposed on the project.

  15. Language, Identity, and Power: Navajo and Pueblo Young Adults' Perspectives and Experiences with Competing Language Ideologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tiffany S.

    2009-01-01

    Native American languages, contemporary youth identity, and powerful messages from mainstream society and Native communities create complex interactions that require deconstruction for the benefit of Native-language revitalization. This study showed how Native youth negotiate mixed messages such as the necessity of Indigenous languages for…

  16. FERMI magnet power supplies: design strategies and five years of operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visintini, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    FERMI is the FEL-based light source in operation for external users since 2011 at the Elettra Research Center in Trieste, Italy. FERMI@Elettra is the name of the project for the construction and commissioning of this source. The design strategies adopted in the project had to consider the extremely close presence and the routine operation for users of the synchrotron-based source Elettra. There are more than 350 magnets and coils distributed along the linear accelerator, the two chains of undulators and the electron beam dump. Almost each magnetic element requires a dedicated DC power supply. Magnets, power supplies, and the connecting cables constitute a system, strongly interconnected with the remote control system, the machine and personnel safety system, and the infrastructure. All this has to fulfill the requirements from the particle physics specialists. We adopted a "systemic" approach in the design of new magnets and the re-use of the old ones, as well as the choice and the design of the associated power supplies. The commissioning of the systems started early 2010 and almost all magnet power supplies are in operation since then. During these 5 years, we introduced few minor upgrades and patches while the adopted solutions proved their soundness in terms of performance and reliability, causing very little downtime to the FERMI operations.

  17. Power Beaming for Space-Based Electricity on Earth: Near-Term Experiments with Radars, Lasers and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffert, E.; Soukup, P.; Hoffert, M.

    2004-12-01

    Power beaming experiments thus far have been done over distances close enough where receiver apertures approximately the same diameter as transmitters can capture most of the beam (the "near- field"). The best experimentally verified wireless power transmission DC-to-DC efficiencies are 54% for a microwave transmission measured over a short distance; the longest range wireless power transmission stands at 1.6 km in 1975 (Brown, 1998; Dickinson, 1975, 2002). The next logical step is longer-range, "far-field" power beaming, particularly Space-to-Earth, or its reciprocal, Earth-to-Space, to validate beam propagation models and establish a solid experimental basis for power transmission through the atmosphere. To minimize costs, we propose adapting ground-based microwave transmitters designed for radio astronomy (Arecibo), planetary communications (NASA Deep Space Network) and detection (USAF Space Surveillance Network) for Earth-to-Space beaming tests. The receiving end could, in principle, be an NRO satellite antenna reportedly orbiting today and/or rectennas unfurled by the International Space Station (ISS). Laser SSP has lower transmission efficiency; but smaller, more flexible, and potentially cheaper components make it worth exploring. Lasers require smaller components because diffraction effects are less at optical than at microwave wavelengths The Air Force Maui Optical Station (AMOS), with facilities for accurately firing lasers through ground-based telescopes with adaptive optics at targets in space, appears ideal for laser beaming tests in conjunction with orbiting PV arrays targets. Platforms like the ISS and/or GEO communication satellites may likewise have (or could easily have) lightweight PV arrays capable of converting light to DC for end-to-end power efficiency tests. If successful, these experiments might be followed with impressive demonstrations of SSP technology such as illumination of lamps visible from Earth's surface on orbiting satellites, or

  18. Nuclear Power from Fission Reactors. An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Technical Information Center.

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide a basic understanding of nuclear fission energy and different fission reaction concepts. Topics discussed are: energy use and production, current uses of fuels, oil and gas consumption, alternative energy sources, fossil fuel plants, nuclear plants, boiling water and pressurized water reactors, the light…

  19. Operating experience with ABB Power Plant Laboratories multi-use combustion test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jukkola, G.; Levasseur, A.; Mylchreest, D.; Turek, D.

    1999-07-01

    Combustion Engineering, Inc.'s ABB Power Plant Laboratories (PPL) has installed a new Multi-Use Combustion Test Facility to support the product development needs for ABB Group's Power Generation Businesses. This facility provides the flexibility to perform testing under fluidized bed combustion, conventional pulverized-coal firing, and gasification firing conditions, thus addressing the requirements for several test facilities. Initial operation of the facility began in late 1997. This paper will focus on the design and application of this Multi-Use Combustion Test Facility for fluidized bed product development. In addition, this paper will present experimental facility results from initial circulating fluidized bed operation, including combustion and environmental performance, heat transfer, and combustor profiles.

  20. Experience of Orimulsion{reg_sign} fired power plant in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, S.; Iwanaga, A.; Hishida, M.

    1996-12-31

    Orimulsion{reg_sign} is an emulsified fuel, a mixture of natural bitumen (Orinoco-bitumen), water (approx. 30% of Orimulsion), and a small quantity Orinoco-bitumen droplets are surrounded by water, and it can therefore be handled easily at atmospheric temperatures. The diversification of fuel resources has become an important matter for the power industry in recent years. Although Orimulsion is one possibility for diversification, it has several unique characteristics that should be taken into account.

  1. The quest for TPa Hugoniot data: using the DEMG in high velocity pulsed power experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jeff H; Rousculp, Christopher L; Holtkamp, David B; Oro, David M; Griego, Jeffrey R; Atchison, Walter L; Reinovsky, Robert E

    2010-12-20

    ALT-3 is an experiment being designed in collaboration between Russian VNIIEF scientists and LANL that aims to conduct high velocity material experiments to measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator) is used to drive >60MA currents to accelerate an aluminum liner to speeds in excess of 20 km/s. The 1-D model of the DEMG has been refined from a given current profile to a time-varying inductance. Various techniques are used to model the FOS (Foil Opening Switch) on the DEMG and a refined DEMG model is then used to drive a liner into various targets to determine the optimum design for the experiment and analyze the possible conditions and complications.

  2. Linear halogen bulb as a powerful light source for physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochníček, Zdeněk

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes the usage of a conventional lamp equipped with a linear halogen bulb for physics experiments. The irradiance gain and limitation of spectral resolution are treated in detail theoretically and verified experimentally. The analysis shows that, in comparison with a standard bulb and slit arrangement, the linear bulb can increase irradiance of the spectrum image by an order of magnitude without a significant loss of spectral resolution in comparable experimental arrangements. Some concrete examples of experiments with a white light spectrum and diffraction are presented.

  3. The First Pulsed-Power Z-Pinch Liner-On-Target Hydrodynamics Experiment Diagnosed with Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, C. L.; Reass, W. A.; Oro, D. M.; Griego, J. R.; Turchi, P. J.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Saunders, A.; Mariam, F. G.; Morris, C.

    2014-10-01

    The first pulse-power driven, dynamic, liner-on-target experiment was successfully conducted at the Los Alamos proton radiography (pRad) facility. 100% data return was achieved on this experiment including a 21-image pRad movie. The experiment was driven with the PHELIX pulsed-power machine that utilizes a high-efficiency (k ~ 0.93) transformer to couple a small capacitor bank (U ~ 300 kJ) to a low inductance condensed-matter experimental load in a Z-pinch configuration. The current pulse (Ipeak = 3.7 MA, δt ~10 μs) was measured via a fiber optic Faraday rotation diagnostic. The experimental load consisted of a cylindrical Al liner (6 cm diam, 3 cm tall, 0.8 mm thick) and a cylindrical Al target (3 cm diam, 3 cm tall, 0.1 mm thick) that was coated with a thin (0.1 mm) uniform layer of tungsten powder (1 micron diam). It is observed that the shock-launched powder layer fully detaches from the target into a spatially correlated, radially converging (vr ~ 800 m/s) ring. The powder distribution is highly modulated in azimuth indicating particle interactions are significant. Results are compared to MHD simulations. Work supported by United States-DOE under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  4. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  5. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  6. Aluminum-air power cell: The M3-3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimoni, A.; Muelder, S. A.

    1985-03-01

    The M3-3 experiment was a test of the M3 cell coupled to a crystallizer and hydrocyclone for separation of coarse solids before return of electrolyte to the cell. It was essentially a repeat of the M3-2 experiment, but with increased emphasis to understand the sources of experimental error and the evolution of the particle size distributions during the course of the experiment. A new hydrocyclone, scaled to operation with 1 to 5 cells, was tested in conjunction with peristaltic pumps. The test ran at 14 A for 101 min, followed by 122 A for 269 min at 60 C. The main operational problem was failure of the rubber tubing in the peristaltic pump feeding the hydrocyclone. Primary results include reasonable agreement in the material balances and with the calculated crystallization rates, the 50% cut point of the new hydrocyclone at about 8 (MU)m, and the aluminate concentration decreased from 2.4 M to 1.4 M in 21 h at 30 C in a subsequent batch crystallization experiment. The particle size distributions do not change significantly on aging de-ionized water.

  7. The Invisible Hand: The Power of Language in Creating Welcoming Postsecondary Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Lisa C.; Higbee, Jeanne L.

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript discusses from the joint perspectives of an undergraduate student and a faculty member the often invisible role that language can play in providing postsecondary learning experiences that can either include or exclude students on the basis of social identity. The authors discuss ignorance, uncertainty, and political correctness as…

  8. Supporting Solar Power in Renewables Portfolio Standards: Experience from the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Holt, Edward

    2010-10-01

    Among the available options for encouraging the increased deployment of renewable electricity, renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have become increasingly popular. The RPS is a relatively new policy mechanism, however, and experience with its use is only beginning to emerge. One key concern that has been voiced is whether RPS policies will offer adequate support to a wide range of renewable energy technologies and applications or whether, alternatively, RPS programs will favor a small number of the currently least-cost forms of renewable energy. This report documents the design of and early experience with state-level RPS programs in the United States that have been specifically tailored to encourage a wider diversity of renewable energy technologies, and solar energy in particular. As shown here, state-level RPS programs specifically designed to support solar have already proven to be an important, albeit somewhat modest, driver for solar energy deployment, and those impacts are projected to continue to build in the coming years. State experience in supporting solar energy with RPS programs is mixed, however, and full compliance with existing requirements has not been achieved. The comparative experiences described herein highlight the opportunities and challenges of applying an RPS to specifically support solar energy, as well as the importance of policy design details to ensuring that program goals are achieved.

  9. Mathematics, Power, and Language: Implications from Lived Experiences to Empower English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uribe-Flórez, Lida J.; Araujo, Blanca; Franzak, Mark; Haynes Writer, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    Because the English learners' (ELs) population is growing in the United States, teacher candidates should be provided with experiences that prepare them to effectively teach and empower linguistically/culturally diverse students. Teacher candidates should be provided with opportunities to learn skills that engage ELs in mathematics. In this…

  10. The Power of Adult Learning in Fine Arts: Drawing upon Personal Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orzelski-Konikowski, Izabella

    2011-01-01

    The utility of definitions and descriptions applied to adult learning can be effectively measured only by direct application to a specific field of learning, in this case, fine arts. Based on the author's 12 years of experience as an art educator, the article provides a conceptual framework for those who are at the beginning of their pedagogical…

  11. Method to improve the noise figure and saturation power in multi-contact semiconductor optical amplifiers: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Carney, Kevin; Lennox, Robert; Maldonado-Basilio, Ramon; Philippe, Severine; Surre, Frederic; Bradley, Louise; Landais, Pascal

    2013-03-25

    The consequences of tailoring the longitudinal carrier density along the active layer of a multi-contact bulk semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) are investigated using a rate equation model. It is shown that both the noise figure and output power saturation can be optimized for a fixed total injected bias current. The simulation results are validated by comparison with experiment using a multi-contact SOA. The inter-contact resistance is increased using a focused ion beam in order to optimize the carrier density control. A chip noise figure of 3.8 dB and a saturation output power of 9 dBm are measured experimentally for a total bias current of 150 mA.

  12. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions on Power-Scaling Experiments at National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bleuel, D.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D.; Dewald, E. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hartouni, E.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S.; Hicks, D.; Hsing, W. W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Key, M. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Pape, S. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A.; Moran, M.; Moses, E. I.; Pak, A.; Parham, T; Park, H. -S.; Patel, P. K.; Petrasso, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L J; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Weber, S. V.; Widmann, K.

    2013-10-19

    The radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm 2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm 2. Moreover, for future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF.

  13. Performance of High-Convergence, Layered DT Implosions on Power-Scaling Experiments at National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bleuel, D.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; et al

    2013-10-19

    The radiation-driven, low-adiabat, cryogenic DT layered plastic capsule implosions were carried out on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the sensitivity of performance to peak power and drive duration. An implosion with extended drive and at reduced peak power of 350 TW achieved the highest compression with fuel areal density of ~1.3±0.1 g/cm 2, representing a significant step from previously measured ~1.0 g/cm2 toward a goal of 1.5 g/cm 2. Moreover, for future experiments will focus on understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and mix, and improving symmetry required to reach the threshold for thermonuclear ignition on NIF.

  14. Investigation of lower hybrid physics through power modulation experiments on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Porkolab, M.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is an attractive tool for off-axis current profile control in magnetically confined tokamak plasmas and burning plasmas (ITER), because of its high current drive efficiency. The LHCD system on Alcator C-Mod operates at 4.6 GHz, with ~ 1 MW of coupled power, and can produce a wide range of launched parallel refractive index (n||) spectra. A 32 chord, perpendicularly viewing hard x-ray camera has been used to measure the spatial and energy distribution of fast electrons generated by lower hybrid (LH) waves. Square-wave modulation of LH power on a time scale much faster than the current relaxation time does not significantly alter the poloidal magnetic field inside the plasma and thus allows for realistic modeling and consistent plasma conditions for different n|| spectra. Inverted hard x-ray profiles show clear changes in LH-driven fast electron location with differing n||. Boxcar binning of hard x-rays during LH power modulation allows for ~ 1 ms time resolution which is sufficient to resolve the build-up, steady-state, and slowing-down phases of fast electrons. Ray-tracing/Fokker-Planck modeling in combination with a synthetic hard x-ray diagnostic shows quantitative agreement with the x-ray data for high n|| cases. The time histories of hollow x-ray profiles have been used to measure off-axis fast electron transport in the outer half of the plasma, which is found to be small on a slowing down time scale.

  15. An evolution of nozzle design: The low NOx burner experience at the Baldwin Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Forney, D.W.; Murray, D.G.; Beal, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    Illinois Power Company (IPC) installed low NO{sub x} burners on Baldwin Unit 3 in the Spring of 1994. Although the NO{sub x} reduction performance of these burners has been outstanding, IPC suffered catastrophic nozzle failure in the first 8 weeks of operation. The nozzles were then modified and later, replaced. Within 1 week of operation, 2 of the new nozzles also failed. This paper traces the development of the original nozzle, the influences-of other nozzle failures on its design, the determination of the cause of the original and subsequent failures, and the current state of the nozzles.

  16. Conceptual design of a 1013 -W pulsed-power accelerator for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Ao, T.; Benage, J. F.; Breden, E. W.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Davis, J.-P.; Ennis, J. B.; Gard, P. D.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Haill, T. A.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jones, P. A.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Lucero, D. J.; McKee, G. R.; Moore, J. K.; Mulville, T. D.; Muron, D. J.; Root, S.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Spielman, R. B.; Waisman, E. M.; Wisher, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a conceptual design of a next-generation pulsed-power accelerator that is optimized for megajoule-class dynamic-material-physics experiments. Sufficient electrical energy is delivered by the accelerator to a physics load to achieve—within centimeter-scale samples—material pressures as high as 1 TPa. The accelerator design is based on an architecture that is founded on three concepts: single-stage electrical-pulse compression, impedance matching, and transit-time-isolated drive circuits. The prime power source of the accelerator consists of 600 independent impedance-matched Marx generators. Each Marx comprises eight 5.8-GW bricks connected electrically in series, and generates a 100-ns 46-GW electrical-power pulse. A 450-ns-long water-insulated coaxial-transmission-line impedance transformer transports the power generated by each Marx to a system of twelve 2.5-m-radius water-insulated conical transmission lines. The conical lines are connected electrically in parallel at a 66-cm radius by a water-insulated 45-post sextuple-post-hole convolute. The convolute sums the electrical currents at the outputs of the conical lines, and delivers the combined current to a single solid-dielectric-insulated radial transmission line. The radial line in turn transmits the combined current to the load. Since much of the accelerator is water insulated, we refer to it as Neptune. Neptune is 40 m in diameter, stores 4.8 MJ of electrical energy in its Marx capacitors, and generates 28 TW of peak electrical power. Since the Marxes are transit-time isolated from each other for 900 ns, they can be triggered at different times to construct-over an interval as long as 1 μ s -the specific load-current time history required for a given experiment. Neptune delivers 1 MJ and 20 MA in a 380-ns current pulse to an 18 -m Ω load; hence Neptune is a megajoule-class 20-MA arbitrary waveform generator. Neptune will allow the international scientific community to conduct dynamic

  17. Preliminary analysis of fluctuations in the received uplink-beacon-power data obtained from the GOLD experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, M.; Wilson, K. E.; Lesh, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Uplink data from recent free-space optical communication experiments carried out between the Table Mountain Facility and the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite are used to study fluctuations caused by beam propagation through the atmosphere. The influence of atmospheric scintillation, beam wander and jitter, and multiple uplink beams on the statistics of power received by the satellite is analyzed and compared to experimental data. Preliminary analysis indicates the received signal obeys an approximate lognormal distribution, as predicted by the weak-turbulence model, but further characterization of other sources of fluctuations is necessary for accurate link predictions.

  18. Preliminary Analysis of Fluctuations in the Received Uplink-Beacon-Power Data Obtained From the GOLD Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeganathan, M.; Wilson, K. E.; Lesh, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Uplink data from recent free-space optical communication experiments carried out between the Table Mountain Facility and the Japanese Engineering Test Satellite are used to study fluctuations caused by beam propagation through the atmosphere. The influence of atmospheric scintillation, beam wander and jitter, and multiple uplink beams on the statistics of power received by the satellite is analyzed and compared to experimental data. Preliminary analysis indicates the received signal obeys an approximate lognormal distribution, as predicted by the weak-turbulence model, but further characterization of other sources of fluctuations is necessary for accurate link predictions.

  19. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  20. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the sixteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  1. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the fifteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  2. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  3. Introduction to Biophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Paras N.

    2003-04-01

    Paras Prasad's text provides a basic knowledge of a broad range of topics so that individuals in all disciplines can rapidly acquire the minimal necessary background for research and development in biophotonics. Introduction to Biophotonics serves as both a textbook for education and training as well as a reference book that aids research and development of those areas integrating light, photonics, and biological systems. Each chapter contains a topic introduction, a review of key data, and description of future directions for technical innovation. Introduction to Biophotonics covers the basic principles of Optics Optical spectroscopy Microscopy Each section also includes illustrated examples and review questions to test and advance the reader's knowledge. Sections on biosensors and chemosensors, important tools for combating biological and chemical terrorism, will be of particular interest to professionals in toxicology and other environmental disciplines. Introduction to Biophotonics proves a valuable reference for graduate students and researchers in engineering, chemistry, and the life sciences.

  4. Introduction to stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scilla, Degl'Innocenti

    2016-04-01

    This contribution is meant as a first brief introduction to stellar physics. First I shortly describe the main physical processes active in stellar structures then I summarize the most important features during the stellar life-cycle.

  5. Introduction to artificial intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Charniak, E.; McDermott, D.

    1985-01-01

    This book is an introduction on artificial intelligence. Topics include reasoning under uncertainty, robot plans, language understanding, and learning. The history of the field as well as intellectual ties to related disciplines are presented.

  6. Operating experience with the southwire 30-meter high-temperature superconducting power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, J. P.; Lue, J. W.; Demko, J. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Gouge, M. J.; Hawsey, R. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hughey, R. L.; Lindsay, D. T.; Roden, M. L.; Sinha, U. K.; Tolbert, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    Southwire Company is operating a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system at its corporate headquarters. The 30-m long, 3-phase cable system is powering three Southwire manufacturing plants and is rated at 12.4-kV, 1250-A, 60-Hz. Cooling is provided by a pressurized liquid nitrogen system operating at 70-80 K. The cables were energized on January 5, 2000 for on-line testing and operation and in April 2000 were placed into extended service. As of June 1, 2001, the HTS cables have provided 100% of the customer load for 8000 hours. The cryogenic system has been in continuous operation since November 1999. The HTS cable system has not been the cause of any power outages to the average 20 MW industrial load served by the cable. The cable has been exposed to short-circuit currents caused by load-side faults without damage. Based upon field measurements described herein, the cable critical current-a key performance parameter-remains the same and has not been affected by the hours of real-world operation, further proving the viability of this promising technology.

  7. Can we estimate the cellular phone RF peak output power with a simple experiment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioreze, Maycon; dos Santos Junior, Sauli; Goncalves Hönnicke, Marcelo

    2016-07-01

    Cellular phones are becoming increasingly useful tools for students. Since cell phones operate in the microwave bandwidth, they can be used to motivate students to demonstrate and better understand the properties of electromagnetic waves. However, since these waves operate at higher frequencies (L-band, from 800 MHz to 2 GHz) it is not simple to detect them. Usually, expensive real-time high frequency oscilloscopes are required. Indirect measurements are also possible through heat-based and diode-detector-based radio-frequency (RF) power sensors. Another didactic and intuitive way is to explore a simple and inexpensive detection system, based on the interference effect caused in the electronic circuit of TV and PC soundspeakers, and to try to investigate different properties of the cell phones’ RF electromagnetic waves, such as its power and modulated frequency. This manuscript proposes a trial to quantify these measurements, based on a simple Friis equation model and the time constant of the circuit used in the detection system, in order to show it didactically to the students and even allow them also to explore such a simple detection system at home.

  8. Experience and prospects of oil shale utilization for power production in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, O. P.

    2016-09-01

    Due to termination of work at the Leningrad Shale Deposit, the Russian shale industry has been liquidated, including not only shale mining and processing but also research and engineering (including design) activities, because this deposit was the only commercially operated complex in Russia. UTT-3000 plants with solid heat carrier, created mainly by the Russian specialists under scientific guidance of members of Krzhizhanovsky Power Engineering Institute, passed under the control of Estonian engineers, who, alongside with their operation in Narva, construct similar plants in Kohtla-Jarve, having renamed the Galoter Process into the Enifit or Petroter. The main idea of this article is to substantiate the expediency of revival of the oil shale industry in Russia. Data on the UTT-3000 plants' advantages, shale oils, and gas properties is provided. Information on investments in an UTT-3000 plant and estimated cost of Leningrad oil shale mining at the Mezhdurechensk Strip Mine is given. For more detailed technical and economic assessment of construction of a complex for oil shale extraction and processing, it is necessary to develop a feasibility study, which should be the first stage of this work. Creation of such a complex will make it possible to produce liquid and gaseous power fuel from oil shale of Leningrad Deposit and provide the opportunity to direct for export the released volumes of oil and gas for the purposes of Russian budget currency replenishment.

  9. Phenylnaphthalene Derivatives as Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrating Solar Power: Loop Experiments and Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Bell, Jason R; Felde, David K; Joseph III, Robert Anthony; Qualls, A L; Weaver, Samuel P

    2013-02-01

    ORNL and subcontractor Cool Energy completed an investigation of higher-temperature, organic thermal fluids for solar thermal applications. Although static thermal tests showed promising results for 1-phenylnaphthalene, loop testing at temperatures to 450 C showed that the material isomerized at a slow rate. In a loop with a temperature high enough to drive the isomerization, the higher melting point byproducts tended to condense onto cooler surfaces. So, as experienced in loop operation, eventually the internal channels of cooler components such as the waste heat rejection exchanger may become coated or clogged and loop performance will decrease. Thus, pure 1-phenylnaphthalene does not appear to be a fluid that would have a sufficiently long lifetime (years to decades) to be used in a loop at the increased temperatures of interest. Hence a decision was made not to test the ORNL fluid in the loop at Cool Energy Inc. Instead, Cool Energy tested and modeled power conversion from a moderate-temperature solar loop using coupled Stirling engines. Cool Energy analyzed data collected on third and fourth generation SolarHeart Stirling engines operating on a rooftop solar field with a lower temperature (Marlotherm) heat transfer fluid. The operating efficiencies of the Stirling engines were determined at multiple, typical solar conditions, based on data from actual cycle operation. Results highlighted the advantages of inherent thermal energy storage in the power conversion system.

  10. RF breakdown experiments in "cold" slow wave structures under experimental circumstances of high power microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dian; Zhang, Jun; Jin, Zhenxing; Yang, Jianhua; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhou, Shengyue

    2015-07-01

    RF breakdown tests in "cold" slow wave structures (SWSs) are executed under experimental circumstance of high power microwave (HPM). All the SWSs under tests are made of stainless steel and are designed as traveling wave structures, which operate at π/2 mode of TM01 wave. The "cold" SWSs are fed by an X-band overmoded relativistic backward wave oscillator, which generates TM01 mode at 9.46 GHz with power around 1.8 GW, pulse duration about 100 ns, and repetition rate of 30 Hz. In the tests, the variances of peak surface electric field (Es-max, 0.53 MV/cm-1.79 MV/cm), number of periods (2-6 periods) of SWSs, and external magnetic field (Bext, 0-2.5 T) versus RF breakdown effects are recorded. The tests results indicate that the input microwave energy is mainly absorbed, not reflected by the RF breakdown process in traveling wave SWSs. Both larger magnitude of Es-max and more numbers of periods of SWSs aggravate the microwave absorption in the breakdown process and bring about shorter transmission pulse width. However, little correlation between RF breakdown effects and Bext is observed in the tests. Further theoretical and experimental studies would be helpful for understanding of the effects of Bext on RF breakdown and breakdown mechanisms under the experimental circumstances of HPM sources.

  11. Methods of the aerodynamical experiments with simulation of massflow-traction ratio of the power unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokotko, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling massflow-traction characteristics of the power unit (PU) may be of interest in the study of aerodynamic characteristics (ADC) aircraft models with full dynamic likeness, and in the study of the effect of interference PU. These studies require the use of a number of processing methods. These include: 1) The method of delivery of the high-pressure body of jets model engines on the sensitive part of the aerodynamic balance. 2) The method of estimate accuracy and reliability of measurement thrust generated by the jet device. 3) The method of implementation of the simulator SU in modeling the external contours of the nacelle, and the conditions at the inlet and outlet. 4) The method of determining the traction simulator PU. 5) The method of determining the interference effect from the work of power unit on the ADC of model. 6) The method of producing hot jets of jet engines. The paper examines implemented in ITAM methodology applied to testing in a supersonic wind tunnel T-313.

  12. Virtual Constraint Control of a Powered Prosthetic Leg: From Simulation to Experiments with Transfemoral Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, Tommaso; Hargrove, Levi J.; Sensinger, Jonathon W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent powered (or robotic) prosthetic legs independently control different joints and time periods of the gait cycle, resulting in control parameters and switching rules that can be difficult to tune by clinicians. This challenge might be addressed by a unifying control model used by recent bipedal robots, in which virtual constraints define joint patterns as functions of a monotonic variable that continuously represents the gait cycle phase. In the first application of virtual constraints to amputee locomotion, this paper derives exact and approximate control laws for a partial feedback linearization to enforce virtual constraints on a prosthetic leg. We then encode a human-inspired invariance property called effective shape into virtual constraints for the stance period. After simulating the robustness of the partial feedback linearization to clinically meaningful conditions, we experimentally implement this control strategy on a powered transfemoral leg. We report the results of three amputee subjects walking overground and at variable cadences on a treadmill, demonstrating the clinical viability of this novel control approach. PMID:25558185

  13. Proof-of-Concept Experiments on a Gallium-Based Ignitron for Pulsed Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, H. K.; Hanson, V. S.; Polzin, K. A.; Pearson, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Ignitrons are electrical switching devices that operate at switching times that are on the order of microseconds, can conduct high currents of thousands of amps, and are capable of holding off tens of thousands of volts between pulses. They consist of a liquid metal pool within an evacuated tube that serves both the cathode and the source of atoms and electrons for an arc discharge. Facing the liquid metal pool is an anode suspended above the cathode, with a smaller ignitor electrode tip located just above the surface of the cathode. The ignitron can be charged to significant voltages, with a potential difference of thousands of volts between anode and cathode. When an ignition pulse is delivered from the ignitor electrode to the cathode, a small amount of the liquid metal is vaporized and subsequently ionized, with the high voltage between the anode and cathode causing the gas to bridge the gap between the two electrodes. The electrons and ions move rapidly towards the anode and cathode, respectively, with the ions liberating still more atoms from the liquid metal cathode surface as a high-current plasma arc discharge is rapidly established. This arc continues in a self-sustaining fashion until the potential difference between the anode and cathode drops below some critical value. Ignitrons have been used in a variety of pulsed power applications, including the railroad industry, industrial chemical processing, and high-power arc welding. In addition, they might prove useful in terrestrial power grid applications, serving as high-current fault switches, quickly shunting dangerous high-current or high-voltage spikes safely to ground. The motivation for this work stemmed from the fact that high-power, high-reliability, pulsed power devices like the ignitron have been used for ground testing in-space pulsed electric thruster technologies, and the continued use of ignitrons could prove advantageous to the future development and testing of such thrusters. Previous

  14. [Introduction to nursing aesthetics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Chen, Yi-Chang

    2011-04-01

    Empirical, aesthetic, ethical, and personal knowing are the four fundamental patterns of knowledge inquiry. Of these, the aesthetic knowing pattern is least discussed in nursing literature. This article discusses the definition of nursing aesthetics; its utilization in practice; and correlations between aesthetics and clinical practice. One of the advantages inherent to nursing is its ability to deliver skillful care directly to patients. Skillful performance is essential to reduce discrepancies between goals and patterns. Aesthetic nursing addresses more than the form of nursing. It further addresses the crucial elements of nursing knowledge. The science of nursing is influential in its ability to attain harmony among abundant empiric content, power of beneficence, and pleasure of aesthetic experience. In clinical practice, nurses can employ aesthetic nursing through various channels to create meaning and promote the professional image of nurses. Concepts listed in this article may be utilized in clinical supervision, practice and education.

  15. Ares I Avionics Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchant, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    The Ares I is the next generation human-rated launcher for the United States Constellation program. This system is required to provide single fault tolerance within defined crew safety and mission reliability limits. As part of the effort to achieve those safety goals, Ares I includes an avionics subsystem built as a multistring, voting architecture. The avionics design draws upon experience gained from building fly-by-wire systems for Shuttle, X- 38, and Seawolf. Architectural drivers for the avionics design include using proven technologies with existing suppliers of space rated parts for critical functions (to reduce overall development risk), easing the software development effort by using an off-theshelf, DO-178B certifiable, ARINC-653 operating system in the main flight computers, minimizing mutual data and power connections that might lead to a common-mode hardware failure of the redundant avionics strings, and centralizing overall Ares I command & control within the Upper Stage.

  16. Optical pyrometer system for collisionless shock experiments in high-power laser-produced plasmas.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Sakawa, Y; Kuramitsu, Y; Dono, S; Ide, T; Shibata, S; Aoki, H; Tanji, H; Sano, T; Shiroshita, A; Waugh, J N; Gregory, C D; Woolsey, N C; Takabe, H

    2012-10-01

    A temporally and spatially resolved optical pyrometer system has been fielded on Gekko XII experiments. The system is based on the self-emission measurements with a gated optical imager (GOI) and a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). Both detectors measure the intensity of the self-emission from laser-produced plasmas at the wavelength of 450 nm with a bandpass filter with a width of ~10 nm in FWHM. The measurements were calibrated with different methods, and both results agreed with each other within 30% as previously reported [T. Morita et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 283 (2011)]. As a tool for measuring the properties of low-density plasmas, the system is applicable for the measurements of the electron temperature and density in collisionless shock experiments [Y. Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)]. PMID:23126856

  17. Optical pyrometer system for collisionless shock experiments in high-power laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sano, T.; Takabe, H.; Dono, S.; Ide, T.; Tanji, H.; Shiroshita, A.; Shibata, S.; Aoki, H.; Waugh, J. N.; Woolsey, N. C.; Gregory, C. D.

    2012-10-15

    A temporally and spatially resolved optical pyrometer system has been fielded on Gekko XII experiments. The system is based on the self-emission measurements with a gated optical imager (GOI) and a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). Both detectors measure the intensity of the self-emission from laser-produced plasmas at the wavelength of 450 nm with a bandpass filter with a width of {approx}10 nm in FWHM. The measurements were calibrated with different methods, and both results agreed with each other within 30% as previously reported [T. Morita et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 283 (2011)]. As a tool for measuring the properties of low-density plasmas, the system is applicable for the measurements of the electron temperature and density in collisionless shock experiments [Y. Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)].

  18. Initial results of a high-power microwave sintering experiment at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Kimrey, H.D.; White, T.L.; Bigelow, T.S.; Becher, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments have recently begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop microwave sintering techniques suitable for large ceramic parts. Microwave sintering offers the advantages of faster heating rates, more uniform heating, and greater energy efficiency than conventional sintering techniques. We are using 28-GHz, 200-kW cw gyrotrons as the heating source. An untuned cavity is used as the applicator to eliminate geometry sensitivity in coupling efficiency.

  19. Powerful Literacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Jim, Ed.; Hamilton, Mary, Ed.; Tett, Lyn, Ed.

    These 15 papers share a common theme: seeking to promote literacy as a powerful tool for challenging existing inequalities and dependencies. "Powerful Literacies" (Jim Crowther et al.) is an introduction. Section 1 establishes the theoretical and policy frameworks that underpin the book and shows how literacy is situated in different geographical…

  20. The Atlas project -- A new pulsed power facility for high energy density physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Ballard, E.O.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1997-04-01

    Atlas is a facility being designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to perform high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon physics and basic research programs. It is designed to be an international user facility, providing experimental opportunities to researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions. For hydrodynamic experiments, it will be capable of achieving a pressure exceeding 30 Mbar in a several cubic centimeter volume. With the development of a suitable opening switch, it will be capable of producing more than 3 MJ of soft X-rays. The capacitor bank design consists of a 36 MJ array of 240 kV Marx modules. The system is designed to deliver a peak current of 45--50 MA with a 4--5-{micro}s rise time. The Marx modules are designed to be reconfigured to a 480-kV configuration for opening switch development. The capacitor bank is resistively damped to limit fault currents and capacitor voltage reversal. An experimental program for testing and certifying prototype components is currently underway. The capacitor bank design contains 300 closing switches. These switches are a modified version of a railgap switch originally designed for the DNA-ACE machines. Because of the large number of switches in the system, individual switch prefire rates must be less than 10{sup {minus}4} to protect the expensive target assemblies. Experiments are underway to determine if the switch-prefire probability can be reduced with rapid capacitor charging.

  1. Analysis and evaluation of ZPPR (Zero Power Physics Reactor) critical experiments for a 100 kilowatt-electric space reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.; Carpenter, S.G.; Olsen, D.N.; Smith, D.M.; Schaefer, R.W. ); Doncals, R.A.; Andre, S.V.; Porter, C.A. ); Cowan, C.L; Stewart, S.L.; Protsik, R. . Astro Space Div.)

    1990-01-01

    ZPPR critical experiments were used for physics testing the reactor design of the SP-100, a 100-kW thermoelectric LMR that is being developed to provide electrical power for space applications. These tests validated all key physics characteristics of the design, including the ultimate safety in the event of a launch or re-entry accident. Both the experiments and the analysis required the use of techniques not previously applied to fast reactor designs. A few significant discrepancies between the experimental and calculated results leave opportunities for further optimization. An initial investigation has been made into application of the ZPPR-20 results, along with those of other relevant integral data, to the SP-100 design. 13 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Design and experiment of wireless power transfer systems via electromagnetic field near-zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wensong; Chen, Yinchao; Yang, Shuhui; Chan, Allan; Wang, Yi; Cao, Qunsheng

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the fundamental principle, circuit implementation and measurement of wireless power transfer (WPT) technology through both Colpitts and Hartley oscillation prototype circuits. The Colpitts and Hartley oscillation prototypes are used to convert DC voltages into AC ones. Meanwhile, both half- and full-wave rectification circuits are designed correspondingly for AC/DC voltage conversion. In addition, the orientation and distance effects between the transmitting and receiving coils are investigated. The self-inductance, mutual-inductance and coupling coefficient for the coupled inductors are extracted as a function of distance and frequency by using an equivalent T-circuit network and a derived Z-parameter matrix. The proposed WPT systems operate at around 3.6 MHz and the transferred voltage is measured at the WPT receiving terminal. The measured results indicate that the two proposed WPT systems can operate properly for potential short-distance applications.

  3. Line-focus solar central power system, phase I. Subsystem experiment: receiver heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Slemmons, A J

    1980-04-01

    Wind-tunnel tests confirmed that heat losses due to natural convection are negligible in the line-focus, solar-powered receiver. Anomalies in the forced-convection tests prevented definitive conclusions regarding the more important forced convection. Flow-visualization tests using a water table show much lower velocities inside the receiver cavity than outside, supporting the supposition that the forced-heat transfer should be less than that from a standard exposed cylinder. Furthermore, the water-table tests showed ways to decrease the low velocities in the cavity should this be desired. Further wind-tunnel testing should be done to confirm estimates and to support advanced design. This testing can be done in standard wind tunnels since only the forced convection is of concern.

  4. Pulsed Power Issues for the Phillips Laboratory's Capillary Discharge Soft X-Ray Laser Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruden, Edward L.; Graham, Jack D.

    1996-11-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is presently attempting to reproduce the high gain laser results of J. Rocca's Capillary Discharge z-pinch pumped 46.9 nm Ne-like Ar laser. This poster discusses the design and operation of the PL laser's pulsed power circuit. The capillary circuit consists of a low inductance 3nH water capacitor discharged by a coaxial spark gap into a presently 12 cm capillary. The capillary is supplied with 39 kA of current which rises in 20ns. The capillary tube itself is submerged in the same water supply as the capacitor. The effect of the slower speed of electromagnetic propagation in water vs. plastic on the dynamic inductance of the plastic capillary is discussed. Higher current rise rates for the first few ns apparently result from the lag in the EM propagation in the water. This effect may improve implosion uniformity during the initial formative phase of the imploding z- pinch plasma.

  5. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cappellini, G.; Lombardi, P.; Mancini, M.; Pagano, G.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fallani, L.; Catani, J.

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic {sup 173}Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  6. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578 nm ytterbium clock transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellini, G.; Lombardi, P.; Mancini, M.; Pagano, G.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fallani, L.; Catani, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to an ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic 173Y b with a <50 Hz linewidth over 5 min, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  7. Operating experience with a 250 kW el molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Manfred; Huppmann, Gerhard

    The MTU MCFC program is carried out by a European consortium comprising the German companies MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH, Ruhrgas AG and RWE Energie AG as well as the Danish company Energi E2 S/A. MTU acts as consortium leader. The company shares a license and technology exchange agreement with Fuel Cell Energy Inc., Danbury, CT, USA (formerly Energy Research Corp., ERC). The program was started in 1990 and covers a period of about 10 years. The highlights of this program to date are: Considerable improvements regarding component stability have been demonstrated on laboratory scale. Manufacturing technology has been developed to a point which enables the consortium to fabricate the porous components on a 250 cm 2 scale. Several large area stacks with 5000-7660 cm 2 cell area and a power range of 3-10 kW have been tested at the facilities in Munich (Germany) and Kyndby (Denmark). These stacks have been supplied by FCE. As far as the system design is concerned it was soon realized that conventional systems do not hold the promise for competitive power plants. A system analysis led to the conclusion that a new innovative design approach is required. As a result the "Hot Module" system was developed by the consortium. A Hot Module combines all the components of a MCFC system operating at the similar temperatures and pressures into a common thermally insulated vessel. In August 1997 the consortium started its first full size Hot Module MCFC test plant at the facilities of Ruhrgas AG in Dorsten, Germany. The stack was assembled in Munich using 292 cell packages purchased from FCE. The plant is based on the consortium's unique and proprietary "Hot Module" concept. It operates on pipeline natural gas and was grid connected on 16 August 1997. After a total of 1500 h of operation, the plant was intentionally shut down in a controlled manner in April 1998 for post-test analysis. The Hot Module system concept has demonstrated its functionality. The safety concept has been

  8. Integrating Variable Renewable Energy in Electric Power Markets: Best Practices from International Experience (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    Many countries--reflecting very different geographies, markets, and power systems--are successfully managing high levels of variable renewable energy (RE) on the grid. Australia (South Australia), Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Spain, and the United States (Colorado and Texas), for example, have effectively integrated variable RE utilizing diverse approaches. Analysis of the results from these case studies reveals a wide range of mechanisms that can be used to accommodate high penetrations of variable RE (e.g., from new market designs to centralized planning). Nevertheless, the myriad approaches collectively suggest that governments can best enable variable RE grid integration by implementing best practices in five areas of intervention: lead public engagement, particularly for new transmission; coordinate and integrate planning; develop rules for market evolution that enable system flexibility; expand access to diverse resources and geographic footprint of operations; and improve system operations.

  9. The photovoltaic-powered water desalination plant 'SORO' design, start up, operating experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaeusser, G.; Mohn, J.; Petersen, G.

    Design features, operational parameters, and test results of a year of operation of the SORO prototype photovoltaic (PV) reverse osmosis salt water desalinization plant are described. Chemicals are added to the salt water to control the pH, prevent formation of compounds which could plug the flow system, and kill bacteria and slime which might grow in the solution. The water is pressurized and forced into contact with membranes which separate the fresh water from the brackish or sea water. The flow rate in the project was 180 l/h, with the main electrical energy load being the high pressure pump and the well pump. Batteries are charged before current is switched to power the desalinization system. The plant yielded 1.50 cu of fresh water/day and is concluded to be a viable design for scale-up to larger production figures, besides being economically competitive with solar desalinization installations where the salt content is 2000 ppm.

  10. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.

    1997-02-01

    The Surtsey Test Facility is used to perform scaled experiments simulating High Pressure Melt Ejection accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). The experiments investigate the effects of direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load. The results from Zion and Surry experiments can be extrapolated to other Westinghouse plants, but predicted containment loads cannot be generalized to all Combustion Engineering (CE) plants. Five CE plants have melt dispersal flow paths which circumvent the main mitigation of containment compartmentalization in most Westinghouse PWRs. Calvert Cliff-like plant geometries and the impact of codispersed water were addressed as part of the DCH issue resolution. Integral effects tests were performed with a scale model of the Calvert Cliffs NPP inside the Surtsey test vessel. The experiments investigated the effects of codispersal of water, steam, and molten core stimulant materials on DCH loads under prototypic accident conditions and plant configurations. The results indicated that large amounts of coejected water reduced the DCH load by a small amount. Large amounts of debris were dispersed from the cavity to the upper dome (via the annular gap). 22 refs., 84 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. Emergent Power-Law Phase in the 2D Heisenberg Windmill Antiferromagnet: A Computational Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Orth, Peter P.

    2015-10-01

    In an extensive computational experiment, we test Polyakov's conjecture that under certain circumstances an isotropic Heisenberg model can develop algebraic spin correlations. We demonstrate the emergence of a multispin U(1) order parameter in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The correlations of this relative phase angle are observed to decay algebraically at intermediate temperatures in an extended critical phase. Using finite-size scaling we show that both phase transitions are of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type, and at lower temperatures we find long-range Z6 order.

  12. Emergent Power-Law Phase in the 2D Heisenberg Windmill Antiferromagnet: A Computational Experiment.

    PubMed

    Jeevanesan, Bhilahari; Chandra, Premala; Coleman, Piers; Orth, Peter P

    2015-10-23

    In an extensive computational experiment, we test Polyakov's conjecture that under certain circumstances an isotropic Heisenberg model can develop algebraic spin correlations. We demonstrate the emergence of a multispin U(1) order parameter in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet on interpenetrating honeycomb and triangular lattices. The correlations of this relative phase angle are observed to decay algebraically at intermediate temperatures in an extended critical phase. Using finite-size scaling we show that both phase transitions are of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless type, and at lower temperatures we find long-range Z(6) order.

  13. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Homoelle, D C; Baker, K L; Patel, P K; Utterback, E; Rushford, M C; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-10-22

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32 x 32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from {approx}75{micro}rad to <2{micro}rad.

  14. GroundBIRD Experiment: Detecting CMB Polarization Power in a Large Angular Scale from the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, S.; Choi, J.; Hazumi, M.; Kawai, M.; Tajima, O.; Won, E.; Yoshida, M.

    2014-09-01

    GroundBIRD is a ground-based experiment designed to detect large angular scale odd-parity patterns in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization (-modes). We employ a high-speed rotation scan (20 rpm) instead of the usual left-right azimuthal scan; it allows a significant expansion of the scan range to without any effect from the detector noise. We use microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) arrays with a small telescope; our target multipole () range is . We plan to start the test observation in Japan in 2014; these will then be moved to the Atacama highland in Chile for scientific observations.

  15. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homoelle, D.; Baker, K. L.; Patel, P. K.; Utterback, E.; Rushford, M. C.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-08-01

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32×32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from ~75μrad to <2μrad.

  16. Configuration and Heating Power Dependence of Edge Parameters and H-mode Dynamics in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Bush; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J. Boedo; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S. Kubota; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; R.J. Maqueda; S.A. Sabbagh; V.A. Soukhanovskii; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; J.B. Wilgen; S.J. Zweben; W.M. Davis; D.A. Gates; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; H.W. Kugel; D. Mastrovito; S. Medley; J.E. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S.J. Paul; Y-K.M. Peng; R. Raman; P.G. Roney; A.L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; E.J. Synakowski; G. Taylor; the NSTX Team

    2003-01-09

    Edge parameters play a critical role in H-mode (high-confinement mode) access, which is a key component of plasma discharge optimization in present-day toroidal confinement experiments and the design of next-generation devices. Because the edge magnetic topology of a spherical torus (ST) differs from a conventional aspect ratio tokamak, H-modes in STs exhibit important differences compared with tokamaks. The dependence of the NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) edge plasma on heating power, including the L-H transition requirements and the occurrence of edge-localized modes (ELMs), and on divertor configuration is quantified. Comparisons between good L-modes (low-confinement modes) and H-modes show greater differences in the ion channel than the electron channel. The threshold power for the H-mode transition in NSTX is generally above the predictions of a recent ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) scaling. Correlations of transition and ELM phenomena with turbulent fluctuations revealed by Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and reflectometry are observed. In both single-null and double-null divertor discharges, the density peaks off-axis, sometimes developing prominent ''ears'' which can be sustained for many energy confinement times, tau subscript ''E'', in the absence of ELMs. A wide variety of ELM behavior is observed, and ELM characteristics depend on configuration and fueling.

  17. Study of the power exhaust and the role of impurities in the Torus Experiment for Technological Oriented Research (TEXTOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.; Bertschinger, G.; Bogen, P.; Claassen, H.A.; Esser, G.; Gerhauser, H.; Hey, J.D.; Hintz, E.; Koenen, L.; Lie, Y.T.; Rusbueldt, D.; Schorn, R.P.; Schweer, B.; Tokar, M.; Winter, J.; Durodie, F.; Koch, R.; Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Telesca, G.; Vanderplas, R.E.; van Nieuwenhove, R.; van Oost, G.; van Wassenhove, G.; Weynants, R.R.; the TEXTOR Team

    1995-06-01

    Controlled application of radiating impurities in the boundary layer can help to solve the problem of power exhaust in a fusion reactor. Experiments in the Torus Experiment for Technological Oriented Research (TEXTOR) [J. Nucl. Mater. {bold 145-147}, 3 (1987)] are presented, which show that impurities with sufficiently high atomic number ({ge}10) are well suited for this purpose. Injection of neon, a gas recycled at the wall, enabled the establishment of a quasistationary radiating boundary layer, from which more than 90% of the input power was emitted. The required neon density was established by means of a feedback control for the neon influx, which was made possible by the toroidal pump limiter Advanced Limiter Technology (ALT-II) [J. Nucl. Mater. {bold 162-164}, 115 (1989)]. Alternatively, or in addition silicon was introduced as a condensing element---either by surface reactions from siliconized walls or by silane [SiH(D){sub 4}] injection---which revealed self-controlling mechanisms effective with changing plasma parameters. In neither case was a significant increase in central impurity concentration observed and good energy confinement time was maintained up to the highest plasma densities. Based on the information from various refined edge diagnostics, the underlying mechanisms for the buildup of a radiating plasma mantle and the interdependences of neon and silicon on other impurities are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Auto- and cross-power spectral analysis of dual trap optical tweezer experiments using Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hansen, Yann; Mehlich, Alexander; Pelz, Benjamin; Rief, Matthias; Netz, Roland R.

    2012-09-01

    The thermal fluctuations of micron-sized beads in dual trap optical tweezer experiments contain complete dynamic information about the viscoelastic properties of the embedding medium and—if present—macromolecular constructs connecting the two beads. To quantitatively interpret the spectral properties of the measured signals, a detailed understanding of the instrumental characteristics is required. To this end, we present a theoretical description of the signal processing in a typical dual trap optical tweezer experiment accounting for polarization crosstalk and instrumental noise and discuss the effect of finite statistics. To infer the unknown parameters from experimental data, a maximum likelihood method based on the statistical properties of the stochastic signals is derived. In a first step, the method can be used for calibration purposes: We propose a scheme involving three consecutive measurements (both traps empty, first one occupied and second empty, and vice versa), by which all instrumental and physical parameters of the setup are determined. We test our approach for a simple model system, namely a pair of unconnected, but hydrodynamically interacting spheres. The comparison to theoretical predictions based on instantaneous as well as retarded hydrodynamics emphasizes the importance of hydrodynamic retardation effects due to vorticity diffusion in the fluid. For more complex experimental scenarios, where macromolecular constructs are tethered between the two beads, the same maximum likelihood method in conjunction with dynamic deconvolution theory will in a second step allow one to determine the viscoelastic properties of the tethered element connecting the two beads.

  19. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in CrossFit exercise.

    PubMed

    Bellar, D; Hatchett, A; Judge, L W; Breaux, M E; Marcus, L

    2015-11-01

    CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time) with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete), VO2max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p < 0.05) in the model. The second workout (repetitions), when examined similarly using regression, only resulted in CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p < 0.05). The results of the study suggest that a history of participation in CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success.

  20. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  1. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in CrossFit exercise.

    PubMed

    Bellar, D; Hatchett, A; Judge, L W; Breaux, M E; Marcus, L

    2015-11-01

    CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time) with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete), VO2max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p < 0.05) in the model. The second workout (repetitions), when examined similarly using regression, only resulted in CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p < 0.05). The results of the study suggest that a history of participation in CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success. PMID:26681834

  2. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in CrossFit exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hatchett, A; Judge, LW; Breaux, ME; Marcus, L

    2015-01-01

    CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time) with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete), VO2max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p < 0.05) in the model. The second workout (repetitions), when examined similarly using regression, only resulted in CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p < 0.05). The results of the study suggest that a history of participation in CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success. PMID:26681834

  3. All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute experience in using difficult to burn fuels in the power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugov, A. N.; Ryabov, G. A.; Shtegman, A. V.; Ryzhii, I. A.; Litun, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    This article presents the results of the research carried out at the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute (VTI) aimed at using saline coal, municipal solid waste and bark waste, sunflower husk, and nesting/ manure materials from poultry farms. The results of saline coal burning experience in Troitsk and Verkhny Tagil thermal power plants (TPP) show that when switching the boiler to this coal, it is necessary to take into account its operating reliability and environmental safety. Due to increased chlorine content in saline coal, the concentration of hydrogen chloride can make over 500 mg/m3. That this very fact causes the sharp increase of acidity in sludge and the resulting damage of hydraulic ash removal system equipment at these power stations has been proven. High concentration of HCl can trigger damage of the steam superheater due to high-temperature corrosion and result in a danger of low-temperature corrosion of air heating surfaces. Besides, increased HCl emissions worsen the environmental characteristics of the boiler operation on the whole. The data on waste-to-energy research for municipal solid waste (MSW) has been generalized. Based on the results of mastering various technologies of MSW thermal processing at special plants nos. 2 and 4 in Moscow, as well as laboratory, bench, and industrial studies, the principal technical solutions to be implemented in the modern domestic thermal power plant with the installed capacity of 24 MW and MSW as the primary fuel type has been developed. The experience of the VTI in burning various kinds of organic waste—bark waste, sunflower husk, and nesting/manure materials from poultry farms—has been analyzed.

  4. An Introduction to Distributions Using Weighted Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Bart K.

    2011-01-01

    Distributions are the basis for an enormous amount of theoretical and applied work in statistics. While there are formal definitions of distributions and many formulas to characterize them, it is important that students at first get a clear introduction to this basic concept. For many of them, neither words nor formulas can match the power of a…

  5. 14 CFR 34.80 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Smoke Emissions (Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.80 Introduction. Except as provided under § 34.5,...

  6. 7 CFR 1730.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEM OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE General § 1730.1 Introduction. (a) This part contains the policies and procedures of the Rural Utilities Service (RUS) related to electric borrowers' operation and... included in this part apply to all electric borrowers (both distribution borrowers and power...

  7. 7 CFR 1730.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEM OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE General § 1730.1 Introduction. (a) This part contains the policies and procedures of the Rural Utilities Service (RUS) related to electric borrowers' operation and... included in this part apply to all electric borrowers (both distribution borrowers and power...

  8. 7 CFR 1730.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEM OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE General § 1730.1 Introduction. (a) This part contains the policies and procedures of the Rural Utilities Service (RUS) related to electric borrowers' operation and... included in this part apply to all electric borrowers (both distribution borrowers and power...

  9. 7 CFR 1730.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEM OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE General § 1730.1 Introduction. (a) This part contains the policies and procedures of the Rural Utilities Service (RUS) related to electric borrowers' operation and... included in this part apply to all electric borrowers (both distribution borrowers and power...

  10. 7 CFR 1730.1 - Introduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEM OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE General § 1730.1 Introduction. (a) This part contains the policies and procedures of the Rural Utilities Service (RUS) related to electric borrowers' operation and... included in this part apply to all electric borrowers (both distribution borrowers and power...

  11. Design of Biomass Gasification and Combined Heat and Power Plant Based on Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydary, Juma; Jelemenský, Ľudovít

    Three types of wooden biomass were characterized by calorimetric measurements, proximate and elemental analysis, thermogravimetry, kinetics of thermal decomposition and gas composition. Using the Aspen steady state simulation, a plant with the processing capacity of 18 ton/h of biomass was modelled based on the experimental data obtained under laboratory conditions. The gasification process has been modelled in two steps. The first step of the model describes the thermal decomposition of the biomass based on a kinetic model and in the second step, the equilibrium composition of syngas is calculated by the Gibbs free energy of the expected components. The computer model of the plant besides the reactor model includes also a simulation of other plant facilities such as: feed drying employing the energy from the process, ash and tar separation, gas-steam cycle, and hot water production heat exchangers. The effect of the steam to air ratio on the conversion, syngas composition, and reactor temperature was analyzed. Employment of oxygen and air for partial combustion was compared. The designed computer model using all Aspen simulation facilities can be applied to study different aspects of biomass gasification in a Combined Heat and Power plant.

  12. The small community solar thermal power experiment. Parabolic dish technology for industrial process heat application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzien, R. E.; Rodriguez, D.

    1981-01-01

    Aspects of incorporating a thermal energy transport system (ETS) into a field of parabolic dish collectors for industrial process heat (IPH) applications were investigated. Specific objectives are to: (1) verify the mathematical optimization of pipe diameters and insulation thicknesses calculated by a computer code; (2) verify the cost model for pipe network costs using conventional pipe network construction; (3) develop a design and the associated production costs for incorporating risers and downcomers on a low cost concentrator (LCC); (4) investigate the cost reduction of using unconventional pipe construction technology. The pipe network design and costs for a particular IPH application, specifically solar thermally enhanced oil recovery (STEOR) are analyzed. The application involves the hybrid operation of a solar powered steam generator in conjunction with a steam generator using fossil fuels to generate STEOR steam for wells. It is concluded that the STEOR application provides a baseline pipe network geometry used for optimization studies of pipe diameter and insulation thickness, and for development of comparative cost data, and operating parameters for the design of riser/downcomer modifications to the low cost concentrator.

  13. MIR Solar Array Return Experiment: Power Performance Measurements and Molecular Contamination Analysis Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, James; Kinard, William; Brinker, David; Scheiman, David; Banks, Bruce; Albyn, Keith; Hornung, Steve; See, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    A solar array segment was recently removed from the Mir core module and returned for ground-based analysis. The segment, which is similar to the ones the Russians have provided for the FGB and Service Modules, was microscopically examined and disassembled by US and Russian science teams. Laboratory analyses have shown the segment to he heavily contaminated by an organic silicone coating, which was converted to an organic silicate film by reactions with atomic oxygen within the. orbital flight environment. The source of the contaminant was a silicone polymer used by the Russians as an adhesive and bonding agent during segment construction. During its life cycle, the array experienced a reduction in power performance from approx. 12%, when it was new and first deployed, to approx. 5%, when it was taken out of service. However, current-voltage measurements of three contaminated cells and three pristine, Russian standard cells have shown that very little degradation in solar array performance was due to the silicate contaminants on the solar cell surfaces. The primary sources of performance degradation is attributed to "thermal hot-spotting" or electrical arcing; orbital debris and micrometeoroid impacts; and possibly to the degradation of the solar cells and interconnects caused by radiation damage from high energy protons and electrons.

  14. BNL ALARA Center experience with an information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.; Khan, T.A.

    1992-04-01

    The essential elements of an international information exchange system on dose control at nuclear power plants are summarized. Information was collected from literature abstracting services, by attending technical meetings, by circulating data collection forms, and through personal contacts. Data are assembled in various databases and periodically disseminated to several hundred interested participants through a variety of publications and at technical meetings. Immediate on-line access to the data is available to participants with modems, commercially available communications software, and a password that is provided by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center to authorized users of the system. Since January 1992, rapid access also has been provided to persons with fax machines. Some information is available for ``polling`` the BNL system at any time, and other data can be installed for polling on request. Most information disseminated to data has been through publications; however, new protocols, simplified by the ALARA Center staff, and the convenience of fax machines are likely to make the earlier availability of information through these mechanisms increasingly important.

  15. Ground testing of array modules for the photovoltaic array space power (PASP) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert K.; Grier, Norman T.

    1987-01-01

    One of the objectives of the PASP experiment is the verification of cost-effective ground simulations of high-voltage solar array/space-environment interactions by comparing the results with flight data. These ground tests consist of electrical characterization, thermal cycling, and plasma chamber simulations. The results of the latter tests are reported. Five array modules which are representative of the flight arrays were tested. The module types are planar silicon, planar gallium arsenide, planar silicon passivated with an integrally deposited cover glass, mini-Cassegrainian concentrator, and SLATS concentrator. The modules were biased to -1000 V in varying plasma densities from 4 x 103 to 2 x 105 e-/cu cm. Each array was tested in both dark and illuminated conditions with a load resistance. In addition to monitoring arcing during the plasma tests, the arrays were visually inspected and electrically characterized before and after exposure in the chamber. The electrical results are tabulated and briefly discussed.

  16. Computation and Experiment: A Powerful Combination to Understand and Predict Reactivities.

    PubMed

    Sperger, Theresa; Sanhueza, Italo A; Schoenebeck, Franziska

    2016-06-21

    Computational chemistry has become an established tool for the study of the origins of chemical phenomena and examination of molecular properties. Because of major advances in theory, hardware and software, calculations of molecular processes can nowadays be done with reasonable accuracy on a time-scale that is competitive or even faster than experiments. This overview will highlight broad applications of computational chemistry in the study of organic and organometallic reactivities, including catalytic (NHC-, Cu-, Pd-, Ni-catalyzed) and noncatalytic examples of relevance to organic synthesis. The selected examples showcase the ability of computational chemistry to rationalize and also predict reactivities of broad significance. A particular emphasis is placed on the synergistic interplay of computations and experiments. It is discussed how this approach allows one to (i) gain greater insight than the isolated techniques, (ii) inspire novel chemistry avenues, and (iii) assist in reaction development. Examples of successful rationalizations of reactivities are discussed, including the elucidation of mechanistic features (radical versus polar) and origins of stereoselectivity in NHC-catalyzed reactions as well as the rationalization of ligand effects on ligation states and selectivity in Pd- and Ni-catalyzed transformations. Beyond explaining, the synergistic interplay of computation and experiments is then discussed, showcasing the identification of the likely catalytically active species as a function of ligand, additive, and solvent in Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions. These may vary between mono- or bisphosphine-bound or even anionic Pd complexes in polar media in the presence of coordinating additives. These fundamental studies also inspired avenues in catalysis via dinuclear Pd(I) cycles. Detailed mechanistic studies supporting the direct reactivity of Pd(I)-Pd(I) with aryl halides as well as applications of air-stable dinuclear Pd(I) catalysts are

  17. The CERTO Beacon on CASSIOPE/e-POP and Experiments Using High-Power HF Ionospheric Heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefring, Carl L.; Bernhardt, Paul A.; James, H. Gordon; Parris, Richard Todd

    2015-06-01

    A new Coherent Electromagnetic Radio Tomography (CERTO) beacon is on the CASSIOPE satellite and part of the enhanced-Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) suite of scientific instruments. CERTO signals can be used to measure ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) and radio scintillations along propagation paths between CERTO and receivers. The combination of CERTO and the array of e-POP in-situ diagnostics form a powerful tool for studying ionospheric plasma processes that have not been previously possible. Of note, the combination CERTO and the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI), a modern digital receiver, which measures between 10 Hz to 18 MHz in selectable bands allows for innovative High Frequency (HF) radio propagation experiments. The use of high-power HF ionospheric heating facilities for such experiments further allows for repeatable studies of a number of important plasma processes. The new CERTO beacon transmits un-modulated, phase-coherent waves at 150, 400, and 1067 MHz with either right-hand-circular or linear polarization and TEC is measured using either differential phase and/or Faraday rotation. With a linear array of CERTO receivers, TEC data can be used for tomographic imaging of the ionosphere yielding two-dimensional maps of the plasma below the satellite orbit. In addition, the three CERTO frequencies cover a wide range for determination of radio scintillation effects caused by diffraction from propagation through ionospheric irregularities. We will describe the CERTO beacon and several potential innovative experiments using HF heating facilities in conjunction with CERTO, the RRI and other e-POP instruments.

  18. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.; Bailey, J. E.; Rovang, D. C.

    2015-11-30

    ) simulations suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator’s capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.

  19. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bailey, J. E.; Bennett, N. L.; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Gomez, M. R.; Greiser, G. W.; Gruner, F. R.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hutsel, B. T.; Jennings, C. A.; Jobe, D. O.; Jones, B. M.; Jones, M. C.; Jones, P. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Lash, J. S.; LeChien, K. R.; Leckbee, J. J.; Leeper, R. J.; Lewis, S. A.; Long, F. W.; Lucero, D. J.; Madrid, E. A.; Martin, M. R.; Matzen, M. K.; Mazarakis, M. G.; McBride, R. D.; McKee, G. R.; Miller, C. L.; Moore, J. K.; Mostrom, C. B.; Mulville, T. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reisman, D. B.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Rose, D. V.; Rovang, D. C.; Savage, M. E.; Sceiford, M. E.; Schmit, P. F.; Schneider, R. F.; Schwarz, J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Thoma, C.; Vesey, R. A.; Wakeland, P. E.; Welch, D. R.; Wisher, M. L.; Woodworth, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator's capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.

  20. Conceptual designs of two petawatt-class pulsed-power accelerators for high-energy-density-physics experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stygar, W. A.; Awe, T. J.; Bennett, N L; Breden, E. W.; Campbell, E. M.; Clark, R. E.; Cooper, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ennis, J. B.; Fehl, D. L.; et al

    2015-11-30

    ) simulations suggest Z 300 will deliver 4.3 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 18 MJ. Z 800 is 52 m in diameter and stores 130 MJ. This accelerator generates 890 TW at the output of its LTD system, and delivers 65 MA in 113 ns to a MagLIF target. The peak electrical power at the MagLIF liner is 2500 TW. The principal goal of Z 800 is to achieve high-yield thermonuclear fusion; i.e., a yield that exceeds the energy initially stored by the accelerator’s capacitors. 2D MHD simulations suggest Z 800 will deliver 8.0 MJ to the liner, and achieve a yield on the order of 440 MJ. Z 300 and Z 800, or variations of these accelerators, will allow the international high-energy-density-physics community to conduct advanced inertial-confinement-fusion, radiation-physics, material-physics, and laboratory-astrophysics experiments over heretofore-inaccessible parameter regimes.« less

  1. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves. PMID:25062161

  2. Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum with the POLARBEAR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Leitch, E. M.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.; Polarbear Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ˜30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat +sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  3. Experiments with Uas Imagery for Automatic Modeling of Power Line 3d Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jóźków, G.; Vander Jagt, B.; Toth, C.

    2015-08-01

    The ideal mapping technology for transmission line inspection is the airborne LiDAR executed from helicopter platforms. It allows for full 3D geometry extraction in highly automated manner. Large scale aerial images can be also used for this purpose, however, automation is possible only for finding transmission line positions (2D geometry), and the sag needs to be estimated manually. For longer lines, these techniques are less expensive than ground surveys, yet they are still expensive. UAS technology has the potential to reduce these costs, especially if using inexpensive platforms with consumer grade cameras. This study investigates the potential of using high resolution UAS imagery for automatic modeling of transmission line 3D geometry. The key point of this experiment was to employ dense matching algorithms to appropriately acquired UAS images to have points created also on wires. This allowed to model the 3D geometry of transmission lines similarly to LiDAR acquired point clouds. Results showed that the transmission line modeling is possible with a high internal accuracy for both, horizontal and vertical directions, even when wires were represented by a partial (sparse) point cloud.

  4. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  5. Low-NOx burner and SNCR retrofit experience at New England Power Salem Harbor Station

    SciTech Connect

    Quartucy, G.; Sload, A.; Fynan, G.; Afonso, R.

    1996-01-01

    New England Power has recently installed Riley-Stoker low-NO{sub x} burners (LNB) and Nalco Fuel Tech urea-based selective non-catalytic NO{sub x} reduction (SNCR) systems on Units 1 and 3 at its Salem Harbor generating station. In addition, Unit 3 was also retrofit with a two-level overfire air (OFA) system. These two coal-fired units are front wall-fired with unequal burner spacing and have uncontrolled full-load NO{sub x} emissions of nominally 750 ppm (1.1 lb/MMBtu). Unit 1 is rated at 86 MW and has 12 burners, while Unit 3 is rated at 155 MW and has 16 burners. NO{sub x} reduction performance of the LNB, OFA and SNCR systems has been characterized both independently and in combination during the test programs while firing low-sulfur coals. Unit 1 tests showed that the LNBs provided NO{sub x} reductions of approximately 50 percent at loads above 60 MW using narrow angle coal spreaders. Corresponding ash carbon at these NO{sub x} levels varied between 16 and 35 percent. The SNCR system provided an additional 40 percent NO{sub x} reduction from the LNB baseline at a molar N/NO ratio of 1.2. The corresponding NH{sub 3} slip levels were less than 10 ppm. On Unit 3, LNB tests showed that NO{sub x} reductions of nominally 10 percent were achieved with the burners alone, using wide angle coal spreaders. The use of OFA, at design levels, provided additional NO{sub x} reductions ranging from 42 percent at full load to 4 percent a minimum load relative to the LNB baseline. Ash carbon levels doubled to levels above 30 percent when the OFA system was operated at design conditions at loads above 110 MW. The SNCR system provided NO{sub x} reductions of 33 percent relative to the LNB/OFA baseline of 0.55 lb/MMBtu, at a molar N/NO ratio of 1.3. Ammonia slip for these conditions was less than 5 ppm.

  6. Identity, culture and shared experiences: The power of cogenerative dialogues in urban science classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayne, Gillian Ursula

    2007-05-01

    The research presented in this dissertation details four major examples of work that took place during a three-year longitudinal study in a small urban New York City public high school for high achieving youth. It aims to play a role in contributing to the understanding of the breakdown between and amongst those parties involved in urban science education. The work outlined herein responds to the calls for improvement within urban education, utilizing the experiences, knowledge and practices of its students, in order to help inform and improve science teaching and learning. Theoretical lenses upon which this critical ethnographic research is grounded primarily involve those that are socio-cultural in nature and examine the sociology of emotions. In this research, I address how urban students, who have been historically alienated by science, develop forms of culture, enact them in science classes and then make transitions from participating marginally toward participating more centrally, demonstrating increasing science and science-like practices with higher levels of expertise. This work involves investigating human agency and its expansion as it becomes increasingly incorporated and internalized into individual and collective habitus. The protocol utilized in this critical ethnography (videotapes of cogenerative dialogues, classroom practices and interviews; journal entries, field notes, student and teacher generated artifacts) facilitates the exploration and understanding of the ways by which aligning culture and expanding student roles, both inside and outside of the classroom can occur. The results of this study include concrete examples and interpretations of these expansions and, provide suggestions by which more adaptable forms of teaching and learning can be enacted. These practices ultimately benefit a wider variety of students who as result will become better at creating their own structures to succeed.

  7. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant Geometry using prototypic core materials, the U2 test

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-05-01

    A third Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments has been completed which utilizes prototypic core materials. The reactor material tests are a follow on to the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The IET series of tests primarily addressed the effect of scale on DCH phenomena. This was accomplished by completing a series of counterpart tests in 1/40 and 1/10th linear scale DCH facilities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), respectively. The IET experiments modeled the Zion Nuclear Power Plant Geometry. The scale models included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven at nominally 6.2 MPa. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt simulant in the IET experiments. While the IET experiments at ANL and SNL provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. A prototypic core melt was produced for the experiment by first mixing powders of uranium, zirconium, iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and chromium trioxide (CrO{sub 3}). When ignited the powders react exothermically to produce a molten mixture. The amounts of each powder were selected to produce the anticipated composition for a core melt following a station blackout: 57.8 mass% UO{sub 2} 10.5 mass% ZrO{sub 2} 14.3 mass% Fe, 13.7 mass% Zr, and 3.7 mass% Cr. Development tests measured the initial melt temperature to be in the range of 2600 - 2700 K. The total thermal specific energy content of the melt at 2700 K is 1.2 MJ/kg compared to 2.25 MJ/kg for the iron-alumina simulant at its measured initial temperature of 2500 K.

  8. Coastal zone wind energy. Part II: Validation of the coastal zone wind power potential. A summary of the field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Garstang, M.; Pielke, R.A.; Snow, J.W.

    1980-06-01

    Procedures have been developed to determine the wind power potential of the coastal region from Maine to Texas. The procedures are based upon a climatological analysis and a mesoscale numerical model. The results of this procedure are encouraging but need to be tested. In January to February 1980 a field measurement program was carried out over the Delmarva Peninsula centered on Wallops Island and extending into the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay to provide an observational basis on which to test our wind assessment methods. The field experiment is described. Listings of the measurements made by aircraft, tethered balloon, rawinsonde kites, tower mounted anemometry and surface thermometry are given together with sample results. The analysis of these data and the comparison between them and the model predicted fields are presented.

  9. Introduction to International Trade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Dan M.; Crummett, Jerrie

    This set of student and teacher guides is intended for use in a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in such occupational areas in international trade as business/finance, communications, logistics, and marketing. The following topics are covered in the course's five instructional units: introduction to careers in international…

  10. Introduction to HACCP.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction to HACCP Deana R. Jones, Ph.D. Egg Safety and Quality Research Unit USDA-Agricultural Research Service Russell Research Center Athens, GA Deana.Jones@ars.usda.gov HACCP is an acronym for Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point and was initially developed by the Pillsbury Company a...

  11. Introduction to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernacka, Monika; Bajan, Katarzyna; Stachowski, Greg; Flin, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Between 15-25 August 2015, Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce was the host of a Cosmological School, titled "Introduction to Cosmology". The main purpose of the School was to give the participants, mostly young astronomers and physicists, a basic idea of what, today, are some of the main problems in astronomy.

  12. 4.1 Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.1 Introduction' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  13. An Introduction to Psycholinguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodai, Hojat

    2011-01-01

    This paper is written to have a preliminary introduction about psycholinguistics. Psycholinguistics or psychology of language is the study of the interrelation between linguistic factors and psychological aspects. The main subject of research in psycholinguistics is the study of cognitive processes that underlie the comprehension and production of…

  14. Introduction to Childhood Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehily, Mary Jane, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Educationalists and social scientists are increasingly interested in childhood as a distinct social category, and Childhood Studies is now a recognized area of research and analysis. This book brings together the key themes of Childhood Studies in a broad and accessible introduction for students and practitioners working in this field.…

  15. Why SRS Matters - Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Paul

    2015-01-21

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode provides an introduction to the SRS mission and operations.

  16. Introduction to chiral symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.

    1996-01-08

    These lectures are an attempt to a pedagogical introduction into the elementary concepts of chiral symmetry in nuclear physics. Effective chiral models such as the linear and nonlinear sigma model will be discussed as well as the essential ideas of chiral perturbation theory. Some applications to the physics of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions will be presented.

  17. Introduction to Film Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert E.

    This booklet is intended for teachers who are now teaching units in film production as part of a program in communication or who wish to begin work with filmmaking in such a program. The first section is intended to serve as a brief introduction to film theory, while a major portion of the rest of the booklet is devoted to film projects which may…

  18. Introduction and Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Corinne

    2001-01-01

    Provides an introduction to articles in this special "Perspectives" issue of "Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology." The articles, taken collectively, contain significant elements of a research agenda in image indexing and retrieval for the next decade. Articles focus on user, representation, and system issues.…

  19. Introduction to Shakespeare: English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargraves, Richard

    The "Introduction to Shakespeare" course in the Quinmester Program involves the careful study of the tragedy "Romeo and Juliet" and the comedy "The Taming of the Shrew," emphasizing language, development of character and theme. The course also includes the study of biographical data relevant to the evolution of Shakespeare's literary genius, and…

  20. Introduction to LHC physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesello, Giacomo

    2006-11-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic features of experimentation at the LHC is given, with some emphasis on the detector requirements and on some basic experimental techniques. The experimental program is briefly introduced, and bibliographical indications are provided for a detailed study of the key physics topics.

  1. High-energy density experiments on planetary materials using high-power lasers and X-ray free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Norimasa

    2015-06-01

    Laser-driven dynamic compression allows us to investigate the behavior of planetary and exoplanetary materials at extreme conditions. Our high-energy density (HED) experiments for applications to planetary sciences began over five years ago. We measured the equation-of-state of cryogenic liquid hydrogen under laser-shock compression up to 55 GPa. Since then, various materials constituting the icy giant planets and the Earth-like planets have been studied using laser-driven dynamic compression techniques. Pressure-volume-temperature EOS data and optical property data of water and molecular mixtures were obtained at the planetary/exoplanetary interior conditions. Silicates and oxides data show interesting behaviors in the warm-dense matter regime due to their phase transformations. Most recently the structural changes of iron were observed for understanding the kinetics under the bcc-hcp transformation phenomena on a new HED science platform coupling power-lasers and the X-ray free electron laser (SACLA). This work was performed under the joint research project at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University. It was partially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 20654042, 22224012, 23540556, and 24103507) and also by grants from the Core-to-Core Program of JSPS on International Alliance for Material Science in Extreme States with High Power Laser and XFEL, and the X-ray Free Electron Laser Priority Strategy Program of MEXT.

  2. Closed cycle MHD power generation experiments using a helium-cesium working fluid in the NASA Lewis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    A MHD channel, which was previously operated for over 500 hours of thermal operation, ten thermal cycles, and 200 cesium injection tests, was removed from the facility and redesigned. The cross sectional dimensions of the channel were reduced to 5 by 16.5 cm to allow operation over a variety of conditions. The redesigned channel has been operated for well over 300 hours, 10 thermal cycles, and 150 cesium injection tests with no problems. Experiments have been run at temperatures of 1900-2100 K and Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.55 in argon and 0.2 in helium. The best results to date have been obtained in the helium tests. Power outputs of 2.2 kw for tests with 28 electrodes and 2.1 kw for tests with 17 electrodes were realized. Power densities of 0.6 MW/cu m and Hall fields of about 1,100 V/m were obtained in the tests with 17 electrodes.

  3. Engineering development of a digital replacement protection system at an operating US PWR nuclear power plant: Installation and operational experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.H.

    1995-04-01

    The existing Reactor Protection Systems (RPSs) at most US PWRs are systems which reflect 25 to 30 year-old designs, components and manufacturing techniques. Technological improvements, especially in relation to modern digital systems, offer improvements in functionality, performance, and reliability, as well as reductions in maintenance and operational burden. The Nuclear power industry and the US nuclear regulators are poised to move forward with the issues that have slowed the transition to modern digital replacements for nuclear power plant safety systems. The electric utility industry is now more than ever being driven by cost versus benefit decisions. Properly designed, engineered, and installed digital systems can provide adequate cost-benefit and allow continued nuclear generated electricity. This paper describes various issues and areas related to an ongoing RPS replacement demonstration project which are pertinant for a typical US nuclear plant to consider cost-effective replacement of an aging analog RPS with a modern digital RPS. The following subject areas relative to the Oconee Nuclear Station ISAT{trademark} Demonstrator project are discussed: Operator Interface Development; Equipment Qualification; Validation and Verification of Software; Factory Testing; Field Changes and Verification Testing; Utility Operational, Engineering and Maintenance; Experiences with Demonstration System; and Ability to operate in parallel with the existing Analog RPS.

  4. Azimuthal Current Density Distribution Resulting from a Power Feed Vacuum Gap in Metallic Liner Experiments at 1 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon; Cordaro, S. W.; Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Atoyan, L.; Byvank, T.; Potter, W.; Kusse, B. R.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Jennings, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    We present a study investigating the initiation of plasma in solid, metallic liners where the liner thickness is large compared to the collisionless skin depth. A vacuum gap is introduced in the power feed and we investigate the effect of this on the azimuthal initiation of plasma in the liner. We present optical emission data from aluminum liners on the 1 MA, 100ns COBRA generator. We use radial and axial gated imaging and streak photography, which show a dependence of onset of emission with the size of a small power-feed vacuum gap. The evolution of ``hot-spots'' generated from breakdown vacuum gap evolves relatively slowly and azimuthal uniformity is not observed on the experimental time-scale. We also show measurements of the B-field both outside and inside the liner, using miniature Bdot probes, which show a dependence on the liner diameter and thickness, and a correlation to the details of the breakdown. These data will be compared to magneto-hydrodynamic simulations to infer how such non-uniformities may affect full liner implosion experiments.

  5. Low-power CO2 laser in the treatment of chronic pharyngitis: a five-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; Nicola, Jorge H.

    1994-09-01

    Spatial and temporal coherence are properties of laser light we studied for some time as responsible for biophysical phenomena, capable of significant contributions in the treatment of chronic inflammatory lesions. In this paper we present the results of five years experience in the application of CO2 low power laser (LPL) therapy as a new means of treating chronic pharyngitis. Based on our previous studies, we selected 85 patients with nonspecific chronic pharyngitis to be treated at our laser unit. The patients were grouped as follows: Group I, 40 patients, predominance of hyperemic aspect; and Group II, 45 patients, predominance of hypertrophied aspect. Both groups were submitted to low power irradiation of CO2 laser in eight to ten sessions, one week interval according to the evolution of symptoms. The good results obtained lead us to conclude that this new application for LPL is very suitable for systematic treatment of chronic pharyngitis: a very common and disturbing symptom for a great number of ear, nose, and throat patients, still lacking an effective form of therapy.

  6. Optical spectroscopy of plasma in high power microwave pulse shortening experiments driven by a microsecond electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, W.E.; Gilgenbach, R.M.; Hochman, J.M.; Jaynes, R.L.; Rintamaki, J.I.; Peters, C.W.; Vollers, D.E.; Lau, Y.Y.; Spencer, T.A.

    1998-12-31

    Spectroscopic measurements have been performed to characterize the undesired plasma in a multi-megawatt coaxial gyrotron and a rectangular-cross-section (RCS) gyrotron. These gyrotrons are driven by the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator (MELBA) at parameters: V = {minus}800 kV, I{sub tube} = 0.3 kA, and pulselengths of 0.5--1 {micro}s. Pulse shortening typically limits the highest ({approximately}10 MW) microwave power pulselength to 100--200 ns. Potential explanations of pulse shortening are being investigated, particularly plasma production inside the cavity and at the e-beam collector. The source of this plasma is believed to be due to water vapor absorbed on surfaces which is ejected, dissociated, and ionized by electron beam impact. Plasma H-{alpha} line radiation has been characterized in both time-integrated and temporally-resolved measurements and correlated with microwave power and microwave cutoff. Measurements from a residual gas analyzer (RGA) will be used to support this interpretation. Experiments involving RF plasma cleaning of the coaxial cavity are planned.

  7. Ocean thermal energy conversion gas desorption studies. Volume 1. Design of experiments. [Open-cycle power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

    1980-10-01

    Seawater deaeration is a process affecting almost all proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power systems. If the noncondensable dissolved air is not removed from a power system, it will accumulate in thecondenser, reduce the effectiveness of condensation, and result in deterioration of system performance. A gas desorption study is being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the goal of mitigating these effects; this study is designed to investigate the vacuum deaeration process for low-temperature OTEC conditions where conventional steam stripping deaeration may not be applicable. The first in a series describing the ORNL studies, this report (1) considers the design of experiments and discusses theories of gas desorption, (2) reviews previous relevant studies, (3) describes the design of a gas desorption test loop, and (4) presents the test plan for achieving program objectives. Results of the first series of verification tests and the uncertainties encountered are also discussed. A packed column was employed in these verification tests and test data generally behaved as in previous similar studies. Results expressed as the height of transfer unit (HTU) can be correlated with the liquid flow rate by HTU = 4.93L/sup 0/ /sup 25/. End effects were appreciable for the vacuum deaeration system, and a correlation of them to applied vacuum pressure was derived.

  8. Corrected Article: Measure of the impact of future dark energy experiments based on discriminating power among quintessence models [Phys. Rev. D 78, 043528 (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Michael; Abrahamse, Augusta; Albrecht, Andreas; Bozek, Brandon; Yashar, Mark

    2009-12-01

    We evaluate the ability of future data sets to discriminate among different quintessence dark energy models. This approach gives an alternative (and complementary) measure for assessing the impact of future experiments, as compared with the large body of literature that compares experiments in abstract parameter spaces (such as the well-known w0-wa parameters) and more recent work that evaluates the constraining power of experiments on individual parameter spaces of specific quintessence models. We use the Dark Energy Task Force (DETF) models of future data sets and compare the discriminative power of experiments designated by the DETF as stages 2, 3, and 4 (denoting increasing capabilities). Our work reveals a minimal increase in discriminating power when comparing stage 3 to stage 2, but a very striking increase in discriminating power when going to stage 4 (including the possibility of completely eliminating some quintessence models). We also see evidence that even modest improvements over DETF stage 4 (which many believe are realistic) could result in even more dramatic discriminating power among quintessence dark energy models. We develop and demonstrate the technique of using the independently measured modes of the equation of state (derived from principle component analysis) as a common parameter space in which to compare the different quintessence models, and we argue that this technique is a powerful one. We use the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, exponential, Albrecht-Skordis, and inverse tracker (or inverse power law) quintessence models for this work. One of our main results is that the goal of discriminating among these models sets a concrete measure on the capabilities of future dark energy experiments. Experiments have to be somewhat better than DETF stage 4 simulated experiments to fully meet this goal.

  9. Earth System Monitoring, Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, John

    This section provides sensing and data collection methodologies, as well as an understanding of Earth's climate parameters and natural and man-made phenomena, to support a scientific assessment of the Earth system as a whole, and its response to natural and human-induced changes. The coverage ranges from climate change factors and extreme weather and fires to oil spill tracking and volcanic eruptions. This serves as a basis to enable improved prediction and response to climate change, weather, and natural hazards as well as dissemination of the data and conclusions. The data collection systems include satellite remote sensing, aerial surveys, and land- and ocean-based monitoring stations. Our objective in this treatise is to provide a significant portion of the scientific and engineering basis of Earth system monitoring and to provide this in 17 detailed articles or chapters written at a level for use by university students through practicing professionals. The reader is also directed to the closely related sections on Ecological Systems, Introduction and also Climate Change Modeling Methodology, Introduction as well as Climate Change Remediation, Introduction to. For ease of use by students, each article begins with a glossary of terms, while at an average length of 25 print pages each, sufficient detail is presented for use by professionals in government, universities, and industries. The chapters are individually summarized below.

  10. A Smart Cage With Uniform Wireless Power Distribution in 3D for Enabling Long-Term Experiments With Freely Moving Animals.

    PubMed

    Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Bahrami, Hadi; Sawan, Mohamad; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel experimental chamber with uniform wireless power distribution in 3D for enabling long-term biomedical experiments with small freely moving animal subjects. The implemented power transmission chamber prototype is based on arrays of parallel resonators and multicoil inductive links, to form a novel and highly efficient wireless power transmission system. The power transmitter unit includes several identical resonators enclosed in a scalable array of overlapping square coils which are connected in parallel to provide uniform power distribution along x and y. Moreover, the proposed chamber uses two arrays of primary resonators, facing each other, and connected in parallel to achieve uniform power distribution along the z axis. Each surface includes 9 overlapped coils connected in parallel and implemented into two layers of FR4 printed circuit board. The chamber features a natural power localization mechanism, which simplifies its implementation and ease its operation by avoiding the need for active detection and control mechanisms. A single power surface based on the proposed approach can provide a power transfer efficiency (PTE) of 69% and a power delivered to the load (PDL) of 120 mW, for a separation distance of 4 cm, whereas the complete chamber prototype provides a uniform PTE of 59% and a PDL of 100 mW in 3D, everywhere inside the chamber with a size of 27×27×16 cm(3). PMID:26011866

  11. A Smart Cage With Uniform Wireless Power Distribution in 3D for Enabling Long-Term Experiments With Freely Moving Animals.

    PubMed

    Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Bahrami, Hadi; Sawan, Mohamad; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel experimental chamber with uniform wireless power distribution in 3D for enabling long-term biomedical experiments with small freely moving animal subjects. The implemented power transmission chamber prototype is based on arrays of parallel resonators and multicoil inductive links, to form a novel and highly efficient wireless power transmission system. The power transmitter unit includes several identical resonators enclosed in a scalable array of overlapping square coils which are connected in parallel to provide uniform power distribution along x and y. Moreover, the proposed chamber uses two arrays of primary resonators, facing each other, and connected in parallel to achieve uniform power distribution along the z axis. Each surface includes 9 overlapped coils connected in parallel and implemented into two layers of FR4 printed circuit board. The chamber features a natural power localization mechanism, which simplifies its implementation and ease its operation by avoiding the need for active detection and control mechanisms. A single power surface based on the proposed approach can provide a power transfer efficiency (PTE) of 69% and a power delivered to the load (PDL) of 120 mW, for a separation distance of 4 cm, whereas the complete chamber prototype provides a uniform PTE of 59% and a PDL of 100 mW in 3D, everywhere inside the chamber with a size of 27×27×16 cm(3).

  12. Power and Politics in the Classroom: The Effect of Student Roles in Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranowski, Michael; Weir, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    We argue that power roles can make a significant difference in how students experience in-class simulations. To test this, students who participated in Congressional simulations in one of the author's introduction to American politics classes were surveyed concerning their views of Congress, the legislative process, and the simulation experience.…

  13. A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF with co-axial cable transmitting energy for material dynamics experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiji; Chen, Xuemiao; Cai, Jintao; Zhang, Xuping; Chong, Tao; Luo, Binqiang; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Liu, Cangli; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF (Multi-Modules Assembly Facility, MMAF) was developed for material dynamics experiments under ramp wave and shock loadings at the Institute of Fluid Physics (IFP), which can deliver 3 MA peak current to a strip-line load. The rise time of the current is 470 ns (10%-90%). Different from the previous CQ-4 at IFP, the CQ-3-MMAF energy is transmitted by hundreds of co-axial high voltage cables with a low impedance of 18.6 mΩ and low loss, and then hundreds of cables are reduced and converted to tens of cables into a vacuum chamber by a cable connector, and connected with a pair of parallel metallic plates insulated by Kapton films. It is composed of 32 capacitor and switch modules in parallel. The electrical parameters in short circuit are with a capacitance of 19.2 μF, an inductance of 11.7 nH, a resistance of 4.3 mΩ, and working charging voltage of 60 kV-90 kV. It can be run safely and stable when charged from 60 kV to 90 kV. The vacuum of loading chamber can be up to 10(-2) Pa, and the current waveforms can be shaped by discharging in time sequences of four groups of capacitor and switch modules. CQ-3-MMAF is an adaptive machine with lower maintenance because of its modularization design. The COMSOL Multi-physics® code is used to optimize the structure of some key components and calculate their structural inductance for designs, such as gas switches and cable connectors. Some ramp wave loading experiments were conducted to check and examine the performances of CQ-3-MMAF. Two copper flyer plates were accelerated to about 3.5 km/s in one shot when the working voltage was charged to 70 kV. The velocity histories agree very well. The dynamic experiments of some polymer bonded explosives and phase transition of tin under ramp wave loadings were also conducted. The experimental data show that CQ-3-MMAF can be used to do material dynamics experiments in high rate and low cost shots. Based on this design concept, the peak

  14. High velocity flyer plates launched by magnetic pressure on pulsed power generator CQ-4 and applied in shock Hugoniot experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Guiji; Zhao, Jianheng; Tan, Fuli; Luo, Binqiang; Sun, Chengwei

    2014-05-01

    High velocity flyer plates with good flatness and some thickness have being widely used to the field of shock physics for characterizations of materials under dynamical loading. The techniques of magnetically driven high-velocity flyer plates are further researched based on our pulsed power generators CQ-4 and some good results got on Sandia's Z machine. With large current of several mega-amperes, the loading surface of electrode panel will suffer acute phase transitions caused from magnetic diffusion and Joule heating, and the thickness and flatness of the flyer plates will change with time. In order to obtain the flyer plates with high performances for shock physics, some researches on electrode panels were done by means of LS-DYNA980 software with electro-magnetic package. Two typical configurations for high velocity flyer plates were compared from distribution uniformity of magnetic field in simulation. The results show that the configuration with counter-bore with "notch" and "ear" is better than the other. Then, with the better configuration panels, some experiments were designed and done to validate the simulation results and obtain high velocity flyer plates with good flatness for one-dimensional strain shock experiments on CQ-4. The velocity profiles of the flyer plates were measured by displacement interferometer systems for any reflectors. And the planarity of flyer plates was measured by using the optical fiber pins array for recording the flyer arrival time. The peak velocities of 8.7 km/s with initial dimension of 10 × 7.2 × 0.62 mm for aluminum flyer plates have been achieved. And the flyer plate with initial size of 12 × 9.2 × 0.73 mm was accelerated to velocity of 6.5 km/s with the flatness of less than 11 ns in the central region of 6 mm in diameter and the effective thickness of about 0.220 mm. Based on these work, the symmetrical impact experiments were performed to obtain the high accuracy Hugoniot data of OFHC (oxygen free high conductance

  15. A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF with co-axial cable transmitting energy for material dynamics experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiji; Chen, Xuemiao; Cai, Jintao; Zhang, Xuping; Chong, Tao; Luo, Binqiang; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Liu, Cangli; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF (Multi-Modules Assembly Facility, MMAF) was developed for material dynamics experiments under ramp wave and shock loadings at the Institute of Fluid Physics (IFP), which can deliver 3 MA peak current to a strip-line load. The rise time of the current is 470 ns (10%-90%). Different from the previous CQ-4 at IFP, the CQ-3-MMAF energy is transmitted by hundreds of co-axial high voltage cables with a low impedance of 18.6 mΩ and low loss, and then hundreds of cables are reduced and converted to tens of cables into a vacuum chamber by a cable connector, and connected with a pair of parallel metallic plates insulated by Kapton films. It is composed of 32 capacitor and switch modules in parallel. The electrical parameters in short circuit are with a capacitance of 19.2 μF, an inductance of 11.7 nH, a resistance of 4.3 mΩ, and working charging voltage of 60 kV-90 kV. It can be run safely and stable when charged from 60 kV to 90 kV. The vacuum of loading chamber can be up to 10(-2) Pa, and the current waveforms can be shaped by discharging in time sequences of four groups of capacitor and switch modules. CQ-3-MMAF is an adaptive machine with lower maintenance because of its modularization design. The COMSOL Multi-physics® code is used to optimize the structure of some key components and calculate their structural inductance for designs, such as gas switches and cable connectors. Some ramp wave loading experiments were conducted to check and examine the performances of CQ-3-MMAF. Two copper flyer plates were accelerated to about 3.5 km/s in one shot when the working voltage was charged to 70 kV. The velocity histories agree very well. The dynamic experiments of some polymer bonded explosives and phase transition of tin under ramp wave loadings were also conducted. The experimental data show that CQ-3-MMAF can be used to do material dynamics experiments in high rate and low cost shots. Based on this design concept, the peak

  16. A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF with co-axial cable transmitting energy for material dynamics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; Chen, Xuemiao; Cai, Jintao; Zhang, Xuping; Chong, Tao; Luo, Binqiang; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei; Tan, Fuli; Liu, Cangli; Wu, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A high current pulsed power generator CQ-3-MMAF (Multi-Modules Assembly Facility, MMAF) was developed for material dynamics experiments under ramp wave and shock loadings at the Institute of Fluid Physics (IFP), which can deliver 3 MA peak current to a strip-line load. The rise time of the current is 470 ns (10%-90%). Different from the previous CQ-4 at IFP, the CQ-3-MMAF energy is transmitted by hundreds of co-axial high voltage cables with a low impedance of 18.6 mΩ and low loss, and then hundreds of cables are reduced and converted to tens of cables into a vacuum chamber by a cable connector, and connected with a pair of parallel metallic plates insulated by Kapton films. It is composed of 32 capacitor and switch modules in parallel. The electrical parameters in short circuit are with a capacitance of 19.2 μF, an inductance of 11.7 nH, a resistance of 4.3 mΩ, and working charging voltage of 60 kV-90 kV. It can be run safely and stable when charged from 60 kV to 90 kV. The vacuum of loading chamber can be up to 10-2 Pa, and the current waveforms can be shaped by discharging in time sequences of four groups of capacitor and switch modules. CQ-3-MMAF is an adaptive machine with lower maintenance because of its modularization design. The COMSOL Multi-physics® code is used to optimize the structure of some key components and calculate their structural inductance for designs, such as gas switches and cable connectors. Some ramp wave loading experiments were conducted to check and examine the performances of CQ-3-MMAF. Two copper flyer plates were accelerated to about 3.5 km/s in one shot when the working voltage was charged to 70 kV. The velocity histories agree very well. The dynamic experiments of some polymer bonded explosives and phase transition of tin under ramp wave loadings were also conducted. The experimental data show that CQ-3-MMAF can be used to do material dynamics experiments in high rate and low cost shots. Based on this design concept, the peak

  17. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  18. New IES Scheme for Power Conditioning at Ultra-High Currents: from Concept to MHD Modeling and First Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvatin, Alexandre S.; Rudakov, Leonid I.; Kokshenev, Vladimir A.; Aranchuk, Leonid E.; Huet, Dominique; Gasilov, Vladimir A.; Krukovskii, Alexandre Yu.; Kurmaev, Nikolai E.; Fursov, Fiodor I.

    2002-12-01

    This work introduces an inductive energy storage (IES) scheme which aims pulsed-power conditioning at multi- MJ energies. The key element of the scheme represents an additional plasma volume, where a magnetically accelerated wire array is used for inductive current switching. This plasma acceleration volume is connected in parallel to a microsecond capacitor bank and to a 100-ns current ruse-time useful load. Simple estimates suggest that optimized scheme parameters could be reachable even when operating at ultra-high currents. We describe first proof-of-principle experiments carried out on GIT12 generator [1] at the wire-array current level of 2 MA. The obtained confirmation of the concept consists in generation of a 200 kV voltage directly at an inductive load. This load voltage value can be already sufficient to transfer the available magnetic energy into kinetic energy of a liner at this current level. Two-dimensional modeling with the radiational MHD numerical tool Marple [2] confirms the development of inductive voltage in the system. However, the average voltage increase is accompanied by short-duration voltage drops due to interception of the current by the low-density upstream plasma. Upon our viewpoint, this instability of the current distribution represents the main physical limitation to the scheme performance.

  19. High-power (1)H composite pulse decoupling provides artifact free exchange-mediated saturation transfer (EST) experiments.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S; Ban, David; Pratihar, Supriya; Reddy, Jithender G; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Lee, Donghan

    2016-08-01

    Exchange-mediated saturation transfer (EST) provides critical information regarding dynamics of molecules. In typical applications EST is studied by either scanning a wide range of (15)N chemical shift offsets where the applied (15)N irradiation field strength is on the order of hundreds of Hertz or, scanning a narrow range of (15)N chemical shift offsets where the applied (15)N irradiation field-strength is on the order of tens of Hertz during the EST period. The (1)H decoupling during the EST delay is critical as incomplete decoupling causes broadening of the EST profile, which could possibly result in inaccuracies of the extracted kinetic parameters and transverse relaxation rates. Currently two different (1)H decoupling schemes have been employed, intermittently applied 180° pulses and composite-pulse-decoupling (CPD), for situations where a wide range, or narrow range of (15)N chemical shift offsets are scanned, respectively. We show that high-power CPD provides artifact free EST experiments, which can be universally implemented regardless of the offset range or irradiation field-strengths. PMID:27240144

  20. High-power 1H composite pulse decoupling provides artifact free exchange-mediated saturation transfer (EST) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Ban, David; Pratihar, Supriya; Reddy, Jithender G.; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Lee, Donghan

    2016-08-01

    Exchange-mediated saturation transfer (EST) provides critical information regarding dynamics of molecules. In typical applications EST is studied by either scanning a wide range of 15N chemical shift offsets where the applied 15N irradiation field strength is on the order of hundreds of Hertz or, scanning a narrow range of 15N chemical shift offsets where the applied 15N irradiation field-strength is on the order of tens of Hertz during the EST period. The 1H decoupling during the EST delay is critical as incomplete decoupling causes broadening of the EST profile, which could possibly result in inaccuracies of the extracted kinetic parameters and transverse relaxation rates. Currently two different 1H decoupling schemes have been employed, intermittently applied 180° pulses and composite-pulse-decoupling (CPD), for situations where a wide range, or narrow range of 15N chemical shift offsets are scanned, respectively. We show that high-power CPD provides artifact free EST experiments, which can be universally implemented regardless of the offset range or irradiation field-strengths.

  1. Power Coupling of the Rotating Magnetic Field to the Plasma in the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Stephen; Schrank, Louis; Wurden, Glen; Brooks, Bob; Crawford, Ed; Guo, Houyang; Hoffman, Alan; Lotz, Dan; Slough, John; Votroubek, George

    2000-10-01

    Experimental results utilizing the rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive system at TCS are presented. The procedure at TCS is to form a hot, FRC (RFTP method); translate it to the confinement chamber; then drive a poloidal current in it with a RMF so that the magnetic flux is sustained. The goal is to sustain the flux so that the lifetime of the FRC becomes limited by particle inventory rather that resistive flux losses, as is presently the case. In addition, the RMF can form FRCs from a pre-ionized gas fill. Experiments to date have been conducted with the following properties: RMF field strengths of about 25 G (1 mWb flux), densities of about 0.5x10^19 m-3, electron temperatures of about 100 eV, and external fields of 150 G. This poster will address the coupling of the RMF power to the plasma, in particular, how this coupling varies with density and RMF properties (field strength, frequency, pulse width and relative phasing).

  2. High-power (1)H composite pulse decoupling provides artifact free exchange-mediated saturation transfer (EST) experiments.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S; Ban, David; Pratihar, Supriya; Reddy, Jithender G; Becker, Stefan; Griesinger, Christian; Lee, Donghan

    2016-08-01

    Exchange-mediated saturation transfer (EST) provides critical information regarding dynamics of molecules. In typical applications EST is studied by either scanning a wide range of (15)N chemical shift offsets where the applied (15)N irradiation field strength is on the order of hundreds of Hertz or, scanning a narrow range of (15)N chemical shift offsets where the applied (15)N irradiation field-strength is on the order of tens of Hertz during the EST period. The (1)H decoupling during the EST delay is critical as incomplete decoupling causes broadening of the EST profile, which could possibly result in inaccuracies of the extracted kinetic parameters and transverse relaxation rates. Currently two different (1)H decoupling schemes have been employed, intermittently applied 180° pulses and composite-pulse-decoupling (CPD), for situations where a wide range, or narrow range of (15)N chemical shift offsets are scanned, respectively. We show that high-power CPD provides artifact free EST experiments, which can be universally implemented regardless of the offset range or irradiation field-strengths.

  3. A characterization of check valve degradation and failure experience in the nuclear power industry: 1984-1990. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.A.; Todd, M.D.

    1993-09-01

    Check valve operating problems in recent years have resulted in significant operating transients, increased cost and decreased system availability. As a result, additional attention has beau given to check valves by utilities (resulting in the formation of the Nuclear Industry Check Valve Group), as well as the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Operation and Maintenance Committee. All these organizations have the fundamental goal of ensuring reliable operation of check valves. A key ingredient to an engineering-oriented reliability improvement effort is a thorough understanding of relevant historical experience. A detailed review of historical failure data, available through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operation`s Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System, has been conducted. The focus of the review is on check valve failures that have involved significant degradation of the valve internal parts. A variety of parameters are considered, including size, age, system of service, method of failure discovery, the affected valve parts, attributed causes, and corrective actions.

  4. Neurolaw: A brief introduction

    PubMed Central

    Petoft, Arian

    2015-01-01

    Neurolaw, as an interdisciplinary field which links the brain to law, facilitates the pathway to better understanding of human behavior in order to regulate it accurately through incorporating neuroscience achievements in legal studies. Since 1990’s, this emerging field, by study on human nervous system as a new dimension of legal phenomena, leads to a more precise explanation for human behavior to revise legal rules and decision-makings. This paper strives to bring about significantly a brief introduction to neurolaw so as to take effective steps toward exploring and expanding the scope of law and more thorough understanding of legal issues in the field at hand. PMID:25874060

  5. Introduction to biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. PMID:27365030

  6. Introduction to Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. NCTS 21070-15. Course Description: This course will present operating principles of the heat pipe with emphases on the underlying physical processes and requirements of pressure and energy balance. Performance characterizations and design considerations of the heat pipe will be highlighted. Guidelines for thermal engineers in the selection of heat pipes as part of the spacecraft thermal control system, testing methodology, and analytical modeling will also be discussed.

  7. Introduction to Econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, Rosario N.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1999-12-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Efficient market hypothesis; 3. Random walk; 4. Lévy stochastic processes and limit theorems; 5. Scales in financial data; 6. Stationarity and time correlation; 7. Time correlation in financial time series; 8. Stochastic models of price dynamics; 9. Scaling and its breakdown; 10. ARCH and GARCH processes; 11. Financial markets and turbulence; 12. Correlation and anti-correlation between stocks; 13. Taxonomy of a stock portfolio; 14. Options in idealized markets; 15. Options in real markets; Appendix A: notation guide; Appendix B: martingales; References; Index.

  8. Introduction to Econophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, Rosario N.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-08-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Efficient market hypothesis; 3. Random walk; 4. Lévy stochastic processes and limit theorems; 5. Scales in financial data; 6. Stationarity and time correlation; 7. Time correlation in financial time series; 8. Stochastic models of price dynamics; 9. Scaling and its breakdown; 10. ARCH and GARCH processes; 11. Financial markets and turbulence; 12. Correlation and anti-correlation between stocks; 13. Taxonomy of a stock portfolio; 14. Options in idealized markets; 15. Options in real markets; Appendix A: notation guide; Appendix B: martingales; References; Index.

  9. An introduction to webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. D.

    2016-04-01

    Webs are sets of Feynman diagrams that contribute to the exponents of scattering amplitudes, in the kinematic limit in which emitted radiation is soft. As such, they have a number of phenomenological and formal applications, and offer tantalizing glimpses into the all-order structure of perturbative quantum field theory. This article is based on a series of lectures given to graduate students, and aims to provide a pedagogical introduction to webs. Topics covered include exponentiation in (non-)abelian gauge theories, the web mixing matrix formalism for non-abelian gauge theories, and recent progress on the calculation of web diagrams. Problems are included throughout the text, to aid understanding.

  10. Introduction to drilling research

    SciTech Connect

    Hamblin, J. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a brief introduction to research projects in the area of drilling technology. A technical panel, composed of representatives of geothermal operators, drilling contractors, and service companies, met in Albuquerque, and heard presentations on various drilling related projects which are ongoing or planned. These projects are fairly small scale, partially funded by DOE, administered through Sandia National Laboratory, and generally cooperative in nature between industry and the laboratory. The author briefly discusses the seven highest rated projects, both by the researchers and the conferees. They are: hard rock bits, slimhole drilling, memory logging tools, lost circulation, the Geothermal Drilling Organization, the Long Valley Exploratory Well, and acoustic telemetry.

  11. Introduction to biosensors.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-06-30

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. PMID:27365030

  12. Apoptosis-an introduction.

    PubMed

    Lawen, Alfons

    2003-09-01

    Apoptosis has become a major research area in the biomedical sciences. As there are more than 13,000 papers published annually on the topic, it is impossible to keep track on all developments in the area. The individual aspects of molecular control of apoptosis are well reviewed, but more general, introductory recent reviews into the field are lacking. This review aims to give a brief overview of the field, providing an introduction into the literature for students and newcomers; as it is written for the un-initiated, wherever possible, review articles will be cited rather than original papers.

  13. Introduction to Concepts in Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebur, Dagmar

    1995-01-01

    This introduction to artificial neural networks summarizes some basic concepts of computational neuroscience and the resulting models of artificial neurons. The terminology of biological and artificial neurons, biological and machine learning and neural processing is introduced. The concepts of supervised and unsupervised learning are explained with examples from the power system area. Finally, a taxonomy of different types of neurons and different classes of artificial neural networks is presented.

  14. Beliefs about power and its relation to emotional experience: a comparison of Japan, France, Germany, and the United States.

    PubMed

    Mondillon, Laurie; Niedenthal, Paula M; Brauer, Markus; Rohmann, Anette; Dalle, Nathalie; Uchida, Yukiko

    2005-08-01

    This research examined the concept of power in Japan, France, Germany, and the United States, as well as beliefs about the emotions persons in power tend to elicit in others and about powerful people's regulation (specifically, inhibition) of certain emotions. Definitions of power were assessed by examining the importance of two main components: control over self versus other and freedom of action vis-à-vis social norms. Beliefs about both positive (pride, admiration) and negative (jealousy, contempt) emotions were measured. Analyses revealed that the concept of power differed across countries and that the definitions of power as well as country of origin significantly predicted beliefs about the emotions that are elicited in others by powerful people and also the regulation of expression of emotion by powerful people. PMID:16000271

  15. Cosmic ray composition between 10 to the 15th power - 10 to the 17th power eV obtained by air shower experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the air shower data, the chemical composition of the primary cosmic rays in the energy range 10 to the 15th power - 10 to the 17th power eV was obtained. The method is based on a well known N sub e-N sub mu and N sub e-N sub gamma. The simulation is calibrated by the CERN SPS pp collider results.

  16. "Sometimes I Can be Anything." Power, Gender, and Identity in a Primary Classroom. The Practitioner Inquiry Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallas, Karen

    This book examines research on young children's experiences with and understanding of gender, race, and power, highlighting interactions within first and second grade classrooms. The introduction explains gender, race, and power issues. Chapter 1, "Teacher Research: Texts and Subtexts," describes the research project. Chapter 2, "The Gender…

  17. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    service management' by Gregor v Bochmann and Abdelhakim Hafid offers lessons in QoS management learned during the implementation of a prototype News-on-Demand application. Some general principles are extracted from this experience. In particular, a novel QoS adaptation technique is highlighted: transparent automatic reconfiguration of the components involved in a communication (e.g. choice of an alternative network or server at run time). An algorithm which attempts to choose optimal configurations is discussed. `Quality of service management using generic modelling and monitoring techniques', by Leonard Franken and Boudewijn Haverkort investigates the use of Petri nets as the basis of generic QoS monitoring of distributed applications. A distributed application is exploded into finegrained component parts and interactions between these parts are instrumented. The paper offers a case study of the instrumentation of a videophone application using this technique. Simulation is used to evaluate the scheme. The final two papers in the special issue are more focused and pragmatic in nature. These papers explore QoS provision in particular environments (the World Wide Web and ATM networks respectively) through reported implementation experience. `QoS management in a World Wide Web environment which supports continuous media' by Michael Fry, Aruna Seneviratne, Andreas Vogel and Varuni Witana looks at the practical provision of end to end QoS management in the World Wide Web. The paper looks beyond currently available tools such as RealAudio and StreamWorks and presents a QoS managed RTP based solution featuring an adjunct QoS management protocol. This work offers QoS management functions (e.g. QoS negotiation, adaptation and control of QoS degradation paths) directly to the user via the usual Web GUI. `A QoS adaptive multimedia transport system: design, implementation and experiences' by Andrew Campbell and Geoff Coulson offers further practical experience of QoS management

  18. Primary cosmic ray spectrum in the 10 to the 12th power - 10 to the 16th power eV energy range from the NUSEX experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battistoni, G.; Bellotti, E.; Bloise, C.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Castagnoli, C.; Castellina, A.; Chiarella, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cundy, D.

    1985-01-01

    A primary cosmic ray spectrum was derived which fits both experimental multiple muon rates and the all-nucleon flux derived from the single muon intensities underground. In the frame of the interaction model developed by Gaisser, Elbert and Stanev, it is possible to reproduce NUSEX muon data with a primary composition in which the iron spectrum is only slightly flatter than the proton one. This result rules out the popular idea that the primary composition varies drastically with increasing energy, leading to the dominance of heavier nuclei at energies 10 to the 15th power to 10 to the 16th power eV.

  19. Determination of the emissions from an aircraft auxiliary power unit (APU) during the Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX).

    PubMed

    Kinsey, John S; Timko, Michael T; Herndon, Scott C; Wood, Ezra C; Yu, Zhenhong; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Lobo, Prem; Whitefield, Philip; Hagen, Donald; Wey, Changlie; Anderson, Bruce E; Beyersdorf, Andreas J; Hudgins, Charles H; Thornhill, K Lee; Winstead, Edward; Howard, Robert; Bulzan, Dan I; Tacina, Kathleen B; Knighton, W Berk

    2012-04-01

    The emissions from a Garrett-AiResearch (now Honeywell) Model GTCP85-98CK auxiliary power unit (APU) were determined as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX) using both JP-8 and a coal-derived Fischer Tropsch fuel (FT-2). Measurements were conducted by multiple research organizations for sulfur dioxide (SO2, total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), speciated gas-phase emissions, particulate matter (PM) mass and number, black carbon, and speciated PM. In addition, particle size distribution (PSD), number-based geometric mean particle diameter (GMD), and smoke number were also determined from the data collected. The results of the research showed PM mass emission indices (EIs) in the range of 20 to 700 mg/kg fuel and PM number EIs ranging from 0.5 x 10(15) to 5 x 10(15) particles/kg fuel depending on engine load and fuel type. In addition, significant reductions in both the SO2 and PM EIs were observed for the use of the FT fuel. These reductions were on the order of approximately 90% for SO2 and particle mass EIs and approximately 60% for the particle number EI, with similar decreases observed for black carbon. Also, the size of the particles generated by JP-8 combustion are noticeably larger than those emitted by the APU burning the FT fuel with the geometric mean diameters ranging from 20 to 50 nm depending on engine load and fuel type. Finally, both particle-bound sulfate and organics were reduced during FT-2 combustion. The PM sulfate was reduced by nearly 100% due to lack of sulfur in the fuel, with the PM organics reduced by a factor of approximately 5 as compared with JP-8. PMID:22616284

  20. Determination of the emissions from an aircraft auxiliary power unit (APU) during the Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX).

    PubMed

    Kinsey, John S; Timko, Michael T; Herndon, Scott C; Wood, Ezra C; Yu, Zhenhong; Miake-Lye, Richard C; Lobo, Prem; Whitefield, Philip; Hagen, Donald; Wey, Changlie; Anderson, Bruce E; Beyersdorf, Andreas J; Hudgins, Charles H; Thornhill, K Lee; Winstead, Edward; Howard, Robert; Bulzan, Dan I; Tacina, Kathleen B; Knighton, W Berk

    2012-04-01

    The emissions from a Garrett-AiResearch (now Honeywell) Model GTCP85-98CK auxiliary power unit (APU) were determined as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Alternative Aviation Fuel Experiment (AAFEX) using both JP-8 and a coal-derived Fischer Tropsch fuel (FT-2). Measurements were conducted by multiple research organizations for sulfur dioxide (SO2, total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), speciated gas-phase emissions, particulate matter (PM) mass and number, black carbon, and speciated PM. In addition, particle size distribution (PSD), number-based geometric mean particle diameter (GMD), and smoke number were also determined from the data collected. The results of the research showed PM mass emission indices (EIs) in the range of 20 to 700 mg/kg fuel and PM number EIs ranging from 0.5 x 10(15) to 5 x 10(15) particles/kg fuel depending on engine load and fuel type. In addition, significant reductions in both the SO2 and PM EIs were observed for the use of the FT fuel. These reductions were on the order of approximately 90% for SO2 and particle mass EIs and approximately 60% for the particle number EI, with similar decreases observed for black carbon. Also, the size of the particles generated by JP-8 combustion are noticeably larger than those emitted by the APU burning the FT fuel with the geometric mean diameters ranging from 20 to 50 nm depending on engine load and fuel type. Finally, both particle-bound sulfate and organics were reduced during FT-2 combustion. The PM sulfate was reduced by nearly 100% due to lack of sulfur in the fuel, with the PM organics reduced by a factor of approximately 5 as compared with JP-8.