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Sample records for power miniature neutron

  1. Battery powered tabletop pulsed neutron source based on a sealed miniature plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, R. K.; Mishra, P.; Rawool, A. M.; Kulkarni, L. V.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2008-10-01

    The development of a novel and portable tabletop pulsed neutron source is presented. It is a battery powered neutron tube based on a miniature plasma focus (PF) device having all metal-sealed components. The tube, fuelled with deuterium gas, generates neutrons because of D-D fusion reactions. The inner diameter and the length of the tube are 3.4 cm and 8 cm, respectively. A single capacitor (200 J, 4.0 µF, 10 nH) of compact size (17 cm × 15 cm × 13 cm, 6.5 kg) is used as the energy driver. A power supply system charges the capacitor to 10 kV in 10 s and also provides a 30 kV trigger pulse to the spark gap. An input of 24 V dc (7.5 A) to the power supply system is provided by two rechargeable batteries (each 12 V, 7.5 A, 20 h). The device has produced neutrons for 150 shots within a period of 120 days in a very reliable manner without purging the deuterium gas between the shots. For the first 50 shots, the average yield is (1.6 ± 0.3) × 106 neutrons/shot in 4π sr with a pulse width of 23.4 ± 3.3 ns. The estimated neutron energy is 2.47 ± 0.22 MeV. The neutron production reduces slowly and reaches the detection threshold value of 3 × 105 neutrons/shot towards the last shots. The device produces neutrons in a similar manner on evacuation and refilling. The height of the mounted PF tube with the capacitor and the spark gap is 35 cm. The complete setup comprising the capacitor with spark gap, the PF tube, the power supply system with two batteries and the control panel weighs only 23 kg.

  2. Miniature Neutron-Alpha Activation Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar; Holloway, James Paul; He, Zhong; Goldsten, John

    2002-10-01

    We are developing a miniature neutron-alpha activation spectrometer for in-situ analysis of chem-bio samples, including rocks, fines, ices, and drill cores, suitable for a lander or Rover platform for Mars or outer-planet missions. In the neutron-activation mode, penetrating analysis will be performed of the whole sample using a γ spectrometer and in the α-activation mode, the sample surface will be analyzed using Rutherford-backscatter and x-ray spectrometers. Novel in our approach is the development of a switchable radioactive neutron source and a small high-resolution γ detector. The detectors and electronics will benefit from remote unattended operation capabilities resulting from our NEAR XGRS heritage and recent development of a Ge γ detector for MESSENGER. Much of the technology used in this instrument can be adapted to portable or unattended terrestrial applications for detection of explosives, chemical toxins, nuclear weapons, and contraband.

  3. Miniaturized radioisotope solid state power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurial, J.-P.; Snyder, G. J.; Patel, J.; Herman, J. A.; Caillat, T.; Nesmith, B.; Kolawa, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical power requirements for the next generation of deep space missions cover a wide range from the kilowatt to the milliwatt. Several of these missions call for the development of compact, low weight, long life, rugged power sources capable of delivering a few milliwatts up to a couple of watts while operating in harsh environments. Advanced solid state thermoelectric microdevices combined with radioisotope heat sources and energy storage devices such as capacitors are ideally suited for these applications. By making use of macroscopic film technology, microgenrators operating across relatively small temperature differences can be conceptualized for a variety of high heat flux or low heat flux heat source configurations. Moreover, by shrinking the size of the thermoelements and increasing their number to several thousands in a single structure, these devices can generate high voltages even at low power outputs that are more compatible with electronic components. Because the miniaturization of state-of-the-art thermoelectric module technology based on Bi2Te3 alloys is limited due to mechanical and manufacturing constraints, we are developing novel microdevices using integrated-circuit type fabrication processes, electrochemical deposition techniques and high thermal conductivity substrate materials. One power source concept is based on several thermoelectric microgenerator modules that are tightly integrated with a 1.1W Radioisotope Heater Unit. Such a system could deliver up to 50mW of electrical power in a small lightweight package of approximately 50 to 60g and 30cm3. An even higher degree of miniaturization and high specific power values (mW/mm3) can be obtained when considering the potential use of radioisotope materials for an alpha-voltaic or a hybrid thermoelectric/alpha-voltaic power source. Some of the technical challenges associated with these concepts are discussed in this paper. .

  4. Power Electronics for a Miniaturized Arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1997-01-01

    A 0.3 kW Power Processing Unit (PPU) was designed, tested on resistive loads, and then integrated with a miniaturized arcjet. The main goal of the design was to minimize size and mass while maintaining reasonable efficiency. In order to obtain the desired reductions in mass, simple topologies and control methods were considered. The PPU design incorporates a 50 kHz, current-mode-control, pulse-width-modulated (PWM), push-pull topology. An input voltage of 28 +/- 4V was chosen for compatibility with typical unregulated low voltage busses anticipated for smallsats. An efficiency of 0.90 under nominal operating conditions was obtained. The component mass of the PPU was 0.475 kg and could be improved by optimization of the output filter design. The estimated mass for a flight PPU based on this design is less than a kilogram.

  5. High power neutron production targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  6. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Morse, J; Meyer, G; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Kerr, P; Park, H G; Rusnak, B; Sampayan, S; Schmid, G; Spadaccini, C; Wang, L

    2008-08-08

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled [1-4]. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of {approx}100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  7. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, V.; Morse, J.; Meyer, G.; Falabella, S.; Guethlein, G.; Kerr, P.; Park, H. G.; Rusnak, B.; Sampayan, S.; Schmid, G.; Spadaccini, C.; Wang, L.

    2009-03-01

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled [1-4]. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of ˜100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  8. Wirelessly powering miniature implants for optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Alexander J.; Ho, John S.; Tanabe, Yuji; Neofytou, Evgenios; Beygui, Ramin E.; Poon, Ada S. Y.

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for in vivo optogenetic stimulation require optical fibers or mounted prosthesis. We present an approach for wirelessly powering implantable stimulators using electromagnetic midfield. By exploiting the properties of the midfield, we demonstrate the ability to generate high intensity light pulses in a freely moving animal.

  9. Miniature Gas-Turbine Power Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiberg, Dean; Vargo, Stephen; White, Victor; Shcheglov, Kirill

    2003-01-01

    A proposed microelectromechanical system (MEMS) containing a closed- Brayton-cycle turbine would serve as a prototype of electric-power generators for special applications in which high energy densities are required and in which, heretofore, batteries have been used. The system would have a volume of about 6 cm3 and would operate with a thermal efficiency >30 percent, generating up to 50 W of electrical power. The energy density of the proposed system would be about 10 times that of the best battery-based systems now available, and, as such, would be comparable to that of a fuel cell. The working gas for the turbine would be Xe containing small quantities of CO2, O2, and H2O as gaseous lubricants. The gas would be contained in an enclosed circulation system, within which the pressure would typically range between 5 and 50 atm (between 0.5 and 5 MPa). The heat for the Brayton cycle could be supplied by any of a number of sources, including a solar concentrator or a combustor burning a hydrocarbon or other fuel. The system would include novel heat-transfer and heat-management components. The turbine would be connected to an electric power generator/starter motor. The system would include a main rotor shaft with gas bearings; the bearing surfaces would be made of a ceramic material coated with nanocrystalline diamond. The shaft could withstand speed of 400,000 rpm or perhaps more, with bearing-wear rates less than 10(exp -)4 those of silicon bearings and 0.05 to 0.1 those of SiC bearings, and with a coefficient of friction about 0.1 that of Si or SiC bearings. The components of the system would be fabricated by a combination of (1) three-dimensional xray lithography and (2) highly precise injection molding of diamond-compatible metals and ceramic materials. The materials and fabrication techniques would be suitable for mass production. The disadvantages of the proposed system are that unlike a battery-based system, it could generate a perceptible amount of sound, and

  10. A Miniature TES powered Stirling-cycle engine

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.A.; Holl, S.L.; Schalansky, C.P.

    1984-08-01

    Miniature Stirling-cycle engines are under development for use in powering implantable ventricular assist devices. Approaches which have been employed to drive these devices rely on the generation of either hydraulic or pneumatic power. This generated power is converted by hydraulic or pneumatic logic control to mechanical power which, in turn, actuates pusher-plate blood pumps. The logic control enables the blood pump to be cycled synchronously (counter-pulsatile mode) with the heart. Because Stirling-cycle engines are heated externally, a variety of energy sources can be used. Restrictions for this application are for the energy source to be small and self contained while suppling heat in the range of 500 to 850/sup 0/C. Historically these systems were designed to be powered by a radioisotope. More recently, thermal energy system utilizing the latent heat of fusion of fluoride eutectic salts are being developed to power the engine for 8 hours of tether free operation.

  11. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. The purpose of this paper is to report NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs. The paper will describe the data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems. The paper also describes how the systems were used and covers the challenges encountered to make them work. Examples of raw data and derived results will be shown as well. Finally, future plans for these systems will be discussed.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1962-12-25

    This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

  13. Circuits and Systems for Low-Power Miniaturized Wireless Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraju, Manohar

    The field of electronic sensors has witnessed a tremendous growth over the last decade particularly with the proliferation of mobile devices. New applications in Internet of Things (IoT), wearable technology, are further expected to fuel the demand for sensors from current numbers in the range of billions to trillions in the next decade. The main challenges for a trillion sensors are continued miniaturization, low-cost and large-scale manufacturing process, and low power consumption. Traditional integration and circuit design techniques in sensor systems are not suitable for applications in smart dust, IoT etc. The first part of this thesis demonstrates an example sensor system for biosignal recording and illustrates the tradeoffs in the design of low-power miniaturized sensors. The different components of the sensor system are integrated at the board level. The second part of the thesis demonstrates fully integrated sensors that enable extreme miniaturization of a sensing system with the sensor element, processing circuitry, a frequency reference for communication and the communication circuitry in a single hermetically sealed die. Design techniques to reduce the power consumption of the sensor interface circuitry at the architecture and circuit level are demonstrated. The principles are used to design sensors for two of the most common physical variables, mass and pressure. A low-power wireless mass and pressure sensor suitable for a wide variety of biological/chemical sensing applications and Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) respectively are demonstrated. Further, the idea of using high-Q resonators for a Voltage Controlled Oscillator (VCO) is proposed and a low-noise, wide bandwidth FBAR-based VCO is presented.

  14. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs is reported. The data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems are described. How the systems were used is described and the challenges encountered to make them work are covered. Examples of raw data and derived results are shown as well. Finally, future plans for these systems are discussed. For some flight research applications where miniaturized instrumentation is a requirement, the authors conclude that commercially available data loggers and sensors are viable alternatives. In fact, the data loggers and sensors make it possible to gather research-quality data in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  15. Flight experience with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamory, Philip J.; Murray, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility (NASA-Dryden) have conducted two flight research programs with lightweight, low-power miniaturized instrumentation systems built around commercial data loggers. One program quantified the performance of a radio-controlled model airplane. The other program was a laminar boundary-layer transition experiment on a manned sailplane. The purpose of this article is to report NASA-Dryden personnel's flight experience with the miniaturized instrumentation systems used on these two programs. This article will describe the data loggers, the sensors, and the hardware and software developed to complete the systems. It also describes how the systems were used and covers the challenges encountered to make them work. Examples of raw data and derived results will be shown as well. For some flight research applications where miniaturized instrumentation is a requirement, the authors conclude that commercially available data loggers and sensors are viable alternatives. In fact, the data loggers and sensors make it possible to gather research-quality data in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  16. Neutron responsive self-powered radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.; Cannon, Collins P.

    1978-01-01

    An improved neutron responsive self-powered radiation detector is disclosed in which the neutron absorptive central emitter has a substantially neutron transmissive conductor collector sheath spaced about the emitter and the space between the emitter and collector sheath is evacuated.

  17. Improving power density and efficiency of miniature radioisotopic thermoelectric generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Scott A.; Apblett, Christopher A.; Aselage, Terrence L.

    We have built and tested a prototype miniaturized thermoelectric power source that generates 450 μW of electrical power in a system volume of 4.3 cm 3. The measured power density of 104 μW cm -3 exceeds that of any previously reported thermoelectric power system of equivalent size. This improvement was achieved by implementing a novel thermopile design in which wagon wheel-shaped thermoelectric elements contact the entire circumference of the heat source whereas traditional approaches utilize only one heat source surface. The thermopile consists of 22 wagon wheel-shaped elements (11 P-N thermocouples) fabricated from 215-μm thick bismuth-telluride wafers having ZT = 0.97 at 30 °C. The power source operates on a 150 mW thermal input provided by an electrical resistance heater that simulates a capsule containing 0.4 g of 238PuO 2 located at the center of the device. Our primary research objective was to develop and demonstrate a prototype thermopile and radioisotopic thermoelectric generator (RTG) architecture with improved power density at small scales. Output power from this device, while optimized for efficiency, was not optimized for output voltage, and the maximum power was delivered at 41 mV. We also discuss modifications to our prototype design that result in significantly improved voltage and power. Numerical predictions show that a power output of 1.4 mW, power density of 329 μW cm -3, and voltage of 362 mV, is possible in the same package size.

  18. Design of a miniature wind turbine for powering wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F. J.; Yuan, F. G.; Hu, J. Z.; Qiu, Y. P.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a miniature wind turbine (MWT) system composed of commercially available off-the-shelf components was designed and tested for harvesting energy from ambient airflow to power wireless sensors. To make MWT operate at very low air flow rates, a 7.6 cm thorgren plastic Propeller blade was adopted as the wind turbine blade. A sub watt brushless DC motor was used as generator. To predict the performance of the MWT, an equivalent circuit model was employed for analyzing the output power and the net efficiency of the MWT system. In theory, the maximum net efficiency 14.8% of the MWT system was predicted. Experimental output power of the MWT versus resistive loads ranging from 5 ohms to 500 ohms under wind speeds from 3 m/s to 4.5 m/s correlates well with those from the predicted model, which means that the equivalent circuit model provides a guideline for optimizing the performance of the MWT and can be used for fulfilling the design requirements by selecting specific components for powering wireless sensors.

  19. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  20. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    ScienceCinema

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  1. On the Development of a Miniature Neutron Generator for the Brachytherapy Treatment of Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, L.

    2009-03-10

    Brachytherapy refers to application of an irradiation source within a tumor. {sup 252}Cf needles used in brachytherapy have been successfully applied to treatment of some of the most virulent cancers but it is doubtful that it will be widely used because of difficulty in dealing with unwanted dose (source cannot be turned off) and in adhering to stringent NRC regulations that have been exacerbated in our post 911 environment. We have been working on the development of a miniature neutron generator with the reaction target placed at the end of a needle (tube) for brachytherapy applications. Orifice geometries are most amenable, e.g. rectum and cervix, but interstitial use is possible with microsurgery. This paper dicusses the results of a 30 watt DD neutron generator SBU project that demonstrates that sufficient hydrogen isotope current can be delivered down a small diameter needle required for a DT neutron treatment device, and, will summarize the progress of building a commercial device pursued by the All Russian Institute for Automatics (VNIIA) supported by the DOE's Industrial Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP). It is known that most of the fast neutron (FN) beam cancer treatment facilities have been closed down. It appears that the major limitation in the use of FN beams has been damage to healthy tissue, which is relatively insensitive to photons, but this problem is alleviated by brachytherapy. Moreover, recent clinical results indicate that fast neutrons in the boost mode are most highly effective in treating large, hypoxic, and rapidly repopulating diseases. It appears that early boost application of FN may halt angiogenesis (development and repair of tumor vascular system) and shrink the tumor resulting in lower hypoxia. The boost brachytherapy application of a small, low cost neutron generator holds promise of significant contribution to the treatment of cancer.

  2. Low-power, miniature 171Yb ion clock using an ultra-small vacuum package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Partner, H.; Schwindt, P. D. D.; Prestage, J. D.; Kellogg, J. R.; Yu, N.

    2012-12-01

    We report a demonstration of a very small microwave atomic clock using the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of the trapped 171Yb ions inside a miniature, completely sealed-off 3 cm3 ion-trap vacuum package. In the ion clock system, all of the components are highly miniaturized with low power consumption except the 369 nm optical pumping laser still under development for miniaturization. The entire clock, including the control electronics, consumes <300 mW. The fractional frequency instability of the miniature Yb+ clock reaches the 10-14 range after a few days of integration.

  3. Low-power, miniature {sup 171}Yb ion clock using an ultra-small vacuum package

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Schwindt, P. D. D.; Partner, H.; Prestage, J. D.; Kellogg, J. R.; Yu, N.

    2012-12-17

    We report a demonstration of a very small microwave atomic clock using the 12.6 GHz hyperfine transition of the trapped {sup 171}Yb ions inside a miniature, completely sealed-off 3 cm{sup 3} ion-trap vacuum package. In the ion clock system, all of the components are highly miniaturized with low power consumption except the 369 nm optical pumping laser still under development for miniaturization. The entire clock, including the control electronics, consumes <300 mW. The fractional frequency instability of the miniature Yb{sup +} clock reaches the 10{sup -14} range after a few days of integration.

  4. Gamma compensated, self powered neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.

    1977-01-01

    An improved, self-powered, gamma compensated, neutron detector having two electrically conductive concentric cylindrical electrodes and a central rod emitter formed from a material which emits beta particles when bombarded by neutrons. The outer electrode and emitter are maintained at a common potential and the neutron representative current is furnished at the inner cylindrical electrode which serves as a collector. The two concentric cylindrical electrodes are designed to exhibit substantially equal electron emission induced by Compton scattering under neutron bombardment to supply the desired gamma compensation.

  5. Miniature Tractor Pull Helps Teach Mechanical Power Transmission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd C.

    1996-01-01

    A miniature tractor pull was developed as a high school activity, enabling students to assess a tractor's pulling capabilities and determine subsequent horsepower. The activity takes the textbook concept of horsepower and makes it come alive. (JOW)

  6. Development of a miniature phoswich-based detector for 1-10 MeV solar neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibben, R. Bruce; Connell, James; Bancroft, Christopher M.; Bravar, Ulisse; Pirard, Benoit; Wood, Joshua R.

    We report on the initial development and test of a simple miniaturized detector for 1-10 MeV neutrons using phoswich techniques to isolate neutrons from background caused by energetic charged particles. The basic concept consists of a small plastic scintillator completely surrounded by an inorganic scintillator (CsI(Tl)) and viewed by a single compact PM tube. An incident neutron usually passes through the CsI(Tl) without producing a signal and then, through elastic scattering with a proton in the plastic, can produce a scintillation signal in the plastic. An energetic charged particle, on the other hand, would always produce scintillation in both the plastic and CsI(Tl). Making use of the pronounced difference in scintillation speeds between the plastic scintillator (nano-seconds) and the CsI(Tl) scintillator (microseconds), we exclude energetic charged particles by rejecting any signal that lasts more than a few 10s of nanoseconds. The amplitude of the signal from the plastic provides information about the energy of the scattered neutron which, though not definitive event-by-event, can be used to derive information about the neutron spectrum by applying a fitting procedure to the distribution of pulse sizes. The ultimate goal is to develop a detector that will enable studies of low energy solar neutrons on severely mass and power constrained deep space missions that approach the Sun. At energies below 10 MeV, neutrons produced at the Sun do not survive in significant numbers to reach a radius of 1 AU, and are therefore measurable only from observation points well inside the orbit of Earth. These low energy neutrons provide unique information on fluxes of energetic protons and helium nuclei interacting with the denser regions of the lower corona and chromosphere, whether or not these accelerated particles escape the strong magnetic fields in the lower corona to reach interplanetary space. Our efforts to date have consisted of design and construction of a proto

  7. Determining Yankee Nuclear Power Station neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heider, K.J.; Morrissey, K.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is a determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. Included in this effort was determination of the extent of neutron activation of plant components. This paper describes the determination of the neutron activation of the Yankee reactor vessel, associated internals, and surrounding structures. The Yankee reactor vessel is a 600-MW(thermal) stainless steel-lined, carbon steel vessel with stainless steel internal components designed by Westinghouse. The reactor vessel is surrounded and supported by a carbon steel neutron shield tank that was filled with chromated water during plant operation. A 5-ft-thick concrete biological shield wall surrounds the neutron shield tank. A project is under way to remove the reactor vessel internals from the reactor vessel.

  8. Mechanical behavior of AISI 304SS determined by miniature test methods after neutron irradiation to 28 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Ellen M. Rabenberg; Brian J. Jaques; Bulent H. Sencer; Frank A. Garner; Paula D. Freyer; Taira Okita; Darryl P. Butt

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated for over a decade in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) were measured using miniature mechanical testing methods. The shear punch method was used to evaluate the shear strengths of the neutron-irradiated steel and a correlation factor was empirically determined to predict its tensile strength. The strength of the stainless steel slightly decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and significantly increased with increasing dose until it saturated above approximately 5 dpa. Ferromagnetic measurements were used to observe and deduce the effects of the stress-induced austenite to martensite transformation as a result of shear punch testing.

  9. Investigation of Miniaturized Radioisotope Thermionic Power Generation for General Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2016-01-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) running off the radioisotope Pu238 are the current standard in deep space probe power supplies. While reliable, these generators are very inefficient, operating at only approx.7% efficiency. As an alternative, more efficient radioisotope thermionic emission generators (RTIGs) are being explored. Like RTGs, current RTIGs concepts use exotic materials for the emitter, limiting applicability to space and other niche applications. The high demand for long-lasting mobile power sources would be satisfied if RTIGs could be produced inexpensively. This work focuses on exposing several common materials, such as Al, stainless steel, W, Si, and Cu, to elevated temperatures under vacuum to determine the efficiency of each material as inexpensive replacements for thermoelectric materials.

  10. A high power density miniaturized microbial fuel cell having carbon nanotube anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Pyo, Soonjae; Lee, Jae-Ik; Park, Tae-Jin; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Leung, Frederick C. C.; Kim, Jongbaeg; Taylor, André D.; Lee, Hyung-Sool; Chae, Junseok

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising technology capable of directly converting the abundant biomass on the planet into electricity. Prior studies have adopted a variety of nanostructured materials with high surface area to volume ratio (SAV), yet the current and power density of these nanostructured materials do not deliver a significant leap over conventional MFCs. This study presents a novel approach to implement a miniaturized MFC with a high SAV of 4000 m-1 using three different CNT-based electrode materials: Vertically Aligned CNT (VACNT), Randomly Aligned CNT (RACNT), and Spin-Spray Layer-by-Layer (SSLbL) CNT. These CNT-based electrodes show unique biofilm morphology and thickness. The study of performance parameters of miniaturized MFCs with these CNT-electrodes are conducted with respect to a control bare gold electrode. The results show that CNT-based materials attract more exoelectrogens, Geobacter sp., than bare gold, yielding thicker biofilm formation. Among CNT-based electrodes, low sheet resistance electrodes result in thick biofilm generation and high current/power density. The miniaturized MFC having an SSLbL CNT anode exhibits a high volumetric power density of 3320 W m-3. This research may help lay the foundation for future research involving the optimization of MFCS with 2D and 3D nanostructured electrodes.

  11. A miniaturized mW thermoelectric generator for nw objectives: continuous, autonomous, reliable power for decades.

    SciTech Connect

    Aselage, Terrence Lee; Siegal, Michael P.; Whalen, Scott; Frederick, Scott K.; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

    2006-10-01

    We have built and tested a miniaturized, thermoelectric power source that can provide in excess of 450 {micro}W of power in a system size of 4.3cc, for a power density of 107 {micro}W/cc, which is denser than any system of this size previously reported. The system operates on 150mW of thermal input, which for this system was simulated with a resistive heater, but in application would be provided by a 0.4g source of {sup 238}Pu located at the center of the device. Output power from this device, while optimized for efficiency, was not optimized for form of the power output, and so the maximum power was delivered at only 41mV. An upconverter to 2.7V was developed concurrently with the power source to bring the voltage up to a usable level for microelectronics.

  12. Power dissipated in a non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet measured by miniaturized electrical probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golda, Judith; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jets are used in bio-medicine, because they generate reactive species at a low gas temperature. Knowledge and control of plasma parameters is required for stable and reliable operation. Therefore, measuring dissipated power in these plasmas is necessary. However, this is challenging because the delivered sender power is often orders of magnitudes higher than the power dissipated in the discharge itself. To measure this dissipated power, we built miniaturized electrical probes directly attached to the jet device. We observed that the dissipated power is a more comprehensive parameter than the common parameter voltage: For example, gas temperature and emission line intensities rose exponentially with increasing voltage but linearly with increasing power. Our analyses further revealed that a substantial proportion of the dissipated power is transformed into heat. In conclusion, miniaturized electrical probes give a fundamental insight into the energy balance of atmospheric pressure plasmas. In the future, these probes can also be adapted to different types of atmospheric pressure plasmas. This work was supported by DFG within the frameworks of the Package Project PAK 816.

  13. Advanced Microbial Fuel Cell Development, Miniaturization and Energy and Power Density Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-30

    fuel cell development, miniaturization, and energy and power density enhancement. The anode is very important in the performance of a microbial fuel cell "MFC", and is often the limiting factor for a high power output. In present work, we used the CNT/PANI composite as the anode materials of MFCs for the first time and investigated the electrocatalytic properties of the composite associated with the bacterium biocatalyst. A method was developed to fabricate a nanostructured CNT/PANI composite anode for

  14. Study of a low power dissipation, miniature laser-pumped rubidium frequency standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo-Bin; Zhao, Feng; Gu, Si-Hong

    2009-09-01

    This paper studies a miniature low power consumption laser-pumped atom vapour cell clock scheme. Pumping 87Rb with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser diode pump and locking the laser frequency on a Doppler-broadened spectral line, it records a 5 × 10-11τ-1/2 (τ < 500 s) frequency stability with a table-top system in a primary experiment. The study reveals that the evaluated scheme is at the level of 2.7 watts power consumption, 90 cm3 volume and 10-12τ-1/2 short-term frequency stability.

  15. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, W. M.; Anderson, E.; Bass, T. D.; Dawkins, J. M.; Fry, J.; Haddock, C.; Horton, J. C.; Luo, D.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Walbridge, S. B.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Bass, C. D.; Crawford, B. E.; Crawford, C.; Esposito, D.; Gardiner, H.; Gan, K.; Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E. [University of Washington and others

    2015-05-15

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of dϕ/dz = 1 × 10{sup −7} rad/m.

  16. A flexible super-capacitive solid-state power supply for miniature implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chuizhou; Gall, Oren Z; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2013-12-01

    We present a high-energy local power supply based on a flexible and solid-state supercapacitor for miniature wireless implantable medical devices. Wireless radio-frequency (RF) powering recharges the supercapacitor through an antenna with an RF rectifier. A power management circuit for the super-capacitive system includes a boost converter to increase the breakdown voltage required for powering device circuits, and a parallel conventional capacitor as an intermediate power source to deliver current spikes during high current transients (e.g., wireless data transmission). The supercapacitor has an extremely high area capacitance of ~1.3 mF/mm(2), and is in the novel form of a 100 μm-thick thin film with the merit of mechanical flexibility and a tailorable size down to 1 mm(2) to meet various clinical dimension requirements. We experimentally demonstrate that after fully recharging the capacitor with an external RF powering source, the supercapacitor-based local power supply runs a full system for electromyogram (EMG) recording that consumes ~670 μW with wireless-data-transmission functionality for a period of ~1 s in the absence of additional RF powering. Since the quality of wireless powering for implantable devices is sensitive to the position of those devices within the RF electromagnetic field, this high-energy local power supply plays a crucial role in providing continuous and reliable power for medical device operations.

  17. Use of a miniature diamond-anvil cell in high-pressure single-crystal neutron Laue diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Binns, Jack; Kamenev, Konstantin V.; McIntyre, Garry J.; Moggach, Stephen A.; Parsons, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The first high-pressure neutron diffraction study in a miniature diamond-anvil cell of a single crystal of size typical for X-ray diffraction is reported. This is made possible by modern Laue diffraction using a large solid-angle image-plate detector. An unexpected finding is that even reflections whose diffracted beams pass through the cell body are reliably observed, albeit with some attenuation. The cell body does limit the range of usable incident angles, but the crystallographic completeness for a high-symmetry unit cell is only slightly less than for a data collection without the cell. Data collections for two sizes of hexamine single crystals, with and without the pressure cell, and at 300 and 150 K, show that sample size and temperature are the most important factors that influence data quality. Despite the smaller crystal size and dominant parasitic scattering from the diamond-anvil cell, the data collected allow a full anisotropic refinement of hexamine with bond lengths and angles that agree with literature data within experimental error. This technique is shown to be suitable for low-symmetry crystals, and in these cases the transmission of diffracted beams through the cell body results in much higher completeness values than are possible with X-rays. The way is now open for joint X-ray and neutron studies on the same sample under identical conditions. PMID:27158503

  18. Use of a miniature diamond-anvil cell in high-pressure single-crystal neutron Laue diffraction.

    PubMed

    Binns, Jack; Kamenev, Konstantin V; McIntyre, Garry J; Moggach, Stephen A; Parsons, Simon

    2016-05-01

    The first high-pressure neutron diffraction study in a miniature diamond-anvil cell of a single crystal of size typical for X-ray diffraction is reported. This is made possible by modern Laue diffraction using a large solid-angle image-plate detector. An unexpected finding is that even reflections whose diffracted beams pass through the cell body are reliably observed, albeit with some attenuation. The cell body does limit the range of usable incident angles, but the crystallographic completeness for a high-symmetry unit cell is only slightly less than for a data collection without the cell. Data collections for two sizes of hexamine single crystals, with and without the pressure cell, and at 300 and 150 K, show that sample size and temperature are the most important factors that influence data quality. Despite the smaller crystal size and dominant parasitic scattering from the diamond-anvil cell, the data collected allow a full anisotropic refinement of hexamine with bond lengths and angles that agree with literature data within experimental error. This technique is shown to be suitable for low-symmetry crystals, and in these cases the transmission of diffracted beams through the cell body results in much higher completeness values than are possible with X-rays. The way is now open for joint X-ray and neutron studies on the same sample under identical conditions.

  19. Method and apparatus for determination of temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power

    DOEpatents

    Vagelatos, Nicholas; Steinman, Donald K.; John, Joseph; Young, Jack C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear method and apparatus determines the temperature of a medium by injecting fast neutrons into the medium and detecting returning slow neutrons in three first energy ranges by producing three respective detection signals. The detection signals are combined to produce three derived indicia each systematically related to the population of slow neutrons returning from the medium in a respective one of three second energy ranges, specifically exclusively epithermal neutrons, exclusively substantially all thermal neutrons and exclusively a portion of the thermal neutron spectrum. The derived indicia are compared with calibration indicia similarly systematically related to the population of slow neutrons in the same three second energy ranges returning from similarly irradiated calibration media for which the relationships temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power to such calibration indicia are known. The comparison indicates the temperature at which the calibration indicia correspond to the derived indicia and consequently the temperature of the medium. The neutron absorption cross section and moderating power of the medium can be identified at the same time.

  20. In Vivo Demonstration of Addressable Microstimulators Powered by Rectification of Epidermically Applied Currents for Miniaturized Neuroprostheses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is used in order to restore nerve mediated functions in patients with neurological disorders, but its applicability is constrained by the invasiveness of the systems required to perform it. As an alternative to implantable systems consisting of central stimulation units wired to the stimulation electrodes, networks of wireless microstimulators have been devised for fine movement restoration. Miniaturization of these microstimulators is currently hampered by the available methods for powering them. Previously, we have proposed and demonstrated a heterodox electrical stimulation method based on electronic rectification of high frequency current bursts. These bursts can be delivered through textile electrodes on the skin. This approach has the potential to result in an unprecedented level of miniaturization as no bulky parts such as coils or batteries are included in the implant. We envision microstimulators designs based on application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) that will be flexible, thread-like (diameters < 0.5 mm) and not only with controlled stimulation capabilities but also with sensing capabilities for artificial proprioception. We in vivo demonstrate that neuroprostheses composed of addressable microstimulators based on this electrical stimulation method are feasible and can perform controlled charge-balanced electrical stimulation of muscles. We developed miniature external circuit prototypes connected to two bipolar probes that were percutaneously implanted in agonist and antagonist muscles of the hindlimb of an anesthetized rabbit. The electronic implant architecture was able to decode commands that were amplitude modulated on the high frequency (1 MHz) auxiliary current bursts. The devices were capable of independently stimulating the target tissues, accomplishing controlled dorsiflexion and plantarflexion joint movements. In addition, we numerically show that the high frequency current bursts comply with safety standards

  1. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance characteristics of high-power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  2. Neutron and gamma irradiation effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance characteristics of high power semiconductor switches subjected to high levels of neutron fluence and gamma dose must be known by the designer of the power conditioning, control and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. Location and the allowable shielding mass budget will determine the level of radiation tolerance required by the switches to meet performance and reliability requirements. Neutron and gamma ray interactions with semiconductor materials and how these interactions affect the electrical and switching characteristics of solid state power switches is discussed. The experimental measurement system and radiation facilities are described. Experimental data showing the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on the performance characteristics are given for power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), and Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). BJTs show a rapid decrease in gain, blocking voltage, and storage time for neutron irradiation, and MOSFETs show a rapid decrease in the gate threshold voltage for gamma irradiation.

  3. Low Power Consumption Lasers for Miniature Optical Spectrometers for Trace Gas Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forouhar, S.; Frez, C.; Franz, K. J.; Ksendzov, A.; Qiu, Y.; Soibel, K. A.; Chen, J.; Hosoda, T.; Kipshidze, G.; Shterengas, L.; Belenky, G.

    2011-01-01

    The air quality of any manned spacecraft needs to be continuously monitored in order to safeguard the health of the crew. Air quality monitoring grows in importance as mission duration increases. Due to the small size, low power draw, and performance reliability, semiconductor laser-based instruments are viable candidates for this purpose. Achieving a minimum instrument size requires lasers with emission wavelength coinciding with the absorption of the fundamental absorption lines of the target gases, which are mostly in the 3.0-5.0 micron wavelength range. In this paper we report on our progress developing high wall plug efficiency type-I quantum-well GaSb-based diode lasers operating at room temperatures in the spectral region near 3.0-3.5 micron and quantum cascade (QC) lasers in the 4.0-5.0 micron range. These lasers will enable the development of miniature, low-power laser spectrometers for environmental monitoring of the spacecraft.

  4. Rad-Hard, Miniaturized, Scalable, High-Voltage Switching Module for Power Applications Rad-Hard, Miniaturized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adell, Philippe C.; Mojarradi, Mohammad; DelCastillo, Linda Y.; Vo, Tuan A.

    2011-01-01

    A paper discusses the successful development of a miniaturized radiation hardened high-voltage switching module operating at 2.5 kV suitable for space application. The high-voltage architecture was designed, fabricated, and tested using a commercial process that uses a unique combination of 0.25 micrometer CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) transistors and high-voltage lateral DMOS (diffusion metal oxide semiconductor) device with high breakdown voltage (greater than 650 V). The high-voltage requirements are achieved by stacking a number of DMOS devices within one module, while two modules can be placed in series to achieve higher voltages. Besides the high-voltage requirements, a second generation prototype is currently being developed to provide improved switching capabilities (rise time and fall time for full range of target voltages and currents), the ability to scale the output voltage to a desired value with good accuracy (few percent) up to 10 kV, to cover a wide range of high-voltage applications. In addition, to ensure miniaturization, long life, and high reliability, the assemblies will require intensive high-voltage electrostatic modeling (optimized E-field distribution throughout the module) to complete the proposed packaging approach and test the applicability of using advanced materials in a space-like environment (temperature and pressure) to help prevent potential arcing and corona due to high field regions. Finally, a single-event effect evaluation would have to be performed and single-event mitigation methods implemented at the design and system level or developed to ensure complete radiation hardness of the module.

  5. Measurements of the reactor neutron power in absolute units

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V.

    2015-12-15

    The neutron power of the reactor of the Yenisei space nuclear power plant is measured in absolute units using the modernized method of correlation analysis during the ground-based tests of the Yenisei prototypes. Results of the experiments are given. The desired result is obtained in a series of experiments carried out at the stage of the plant preparation for tests. The acceptability of experimental data is confirmed by the results of measuring the reactor neutron power in absolute units at the nominal level by the thermal balance during the life cycle tests of the ground prototypes.

  6. Wirelessly powered micro-tracer enabled by miniaturized antenna and microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, G.; Zhao, X.; Seren, H. R.; Chen, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    A miniaturized antenna, 380μm by 380μm in size, was fabricated and integrated with a commercialized passive RFID chip to form a micro-tracer, whose size was 2mm by 1mm in total. The micro-tracer was wirelessly powered and interrogated by a single layer spiral reader antenna through near field coupling. To maximize the working distance, the resonant frequency of micro-tracer and reader antenna were matched at 840MHz. Due to the ultra small size of the tracer antenna, power transfer efficiency decreased dramatically as the distance between tracer antenna and reader antenna increased, thus the working distance of the microtracer was limited within 1mm. To achieve massive operation of the micro-tracer, a microfluidic platform was fabricated with in channel focusing and separation. Acrylic sheets were laser cut to define the channel and cover structure, then bonded together layer by layer with a glass substrate, on which reader antenna was integrated. Pump oil was used as the fluidic media carrying the micro-tracer flowing inside the microfluidic channel. The wireless power transfer and real-time communication was demonstrated with the micro-tracer flowing above the reader antenna, as the ID of the micro-tracer was retrieved and displayed on a computer screen.

  7. Low Power Consumption Laser for Next Generation Miniature Optical Spectrometers for Trace Gas Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forouhar, S.; Frez, C.; Franz, K. J.; Ksendzov, A.; Qiu, Y.; Soibel, K. A.; Chen, J.; Hosoda, T.; Kipshidze, G.; Shterengas, L.; Belenky, G.

    2011-01-01

    The air quality of any manned spacecraft needs to be continuously monitored in order to safeguard the health of the crew. Air quality monitoring grows in importance as mission duration increases. Due to the small size, low power draw, and performance reliability, semiconductor laser-based instruments are viable candidates for this purpose. Achieving a minimum instrument size requires lasers with emission wavelength coinciding with the absorption of the fundamental absorption lines of the target gases, which are mostly in the 3.0-5.0 mu m wavelength range. In this paper we report on our progress developing high wall plug efficiency type-I quantum-well GaSb-based diode lasers operating at room temperatures in the spectral region near 3.0-3.5 mu m and quantum cascade (QC) lasers in the 4.0-5.0 mu m range. These lasers will enable the development of miniature, low-power laser spectrometers for environmental monitoring of the spacecraft

  8. Low-Power Miniaturized Helium Dielectric Barrier Discharge Photoionization Detectors for Highly Sensitive Vapor Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbo; Zhou, Menglian; Lee, Jiwon; Nidetz, Robert; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2016-09-06

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a microhelium dielectric barrier discharge photoionization detector (μHDBD-PID) on chip with dimensions of only ∼15 mm × ∼10 mm × ∼0.7 mm and weight of only ∼0.25 g. It offers low power consumption (<400 mW), low helium consumption (5.8 mL/min), rapid response (up to ∼60 ms at a flow rate of 1.5 mL/min), quick warm-up time (∼5 min), an excellent detection limit (a few picograms), a large linear dynamic range (>4 orders of magnitude), and maintenance-free operation. Furthermore, the μHDBD-PID can be driven with a miniaturized (∼5 cm × ∼2.5 cm × ∼2.5 cm), light (22 g), and low cost (∼$2) power supply with only 1.5 VDC input. The dependence of the μHDBD-PID performance on bias voltage, auxiliary helium flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, and temperature was also systematically investigated. Finally, the μHDBD-PID was employed to detect permanent gases and a sublist of the EPA 8260 standard reagents that include 51 analytes. The μHDBD-PID developed here can have a broad range of applications in portable and microgas chromatography systems for in situ, real-time, and sensitive gas analysis.

  9. Remotely powered self-propelling particles and micropumps based on miniature diodes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Suk Tai; Paunov, Vesselin N; Petsev, Dimiter N; Velev, Orlin D

    2007-03-01

    Microsensors and micromachines that are capable of self-propulsion through fluids could revolutionize many aspects of technology. Few principles to propel such devices and supply them with energy are known. Here, we show that various types of miniature semiconductor diodes floating in water act as self-propelling particles when powered by an external alternating electric field. The millimetre-sized diodes rectify the voltage induced between their electrodes. The resulting particle-localized electro-osmotic flow propels them in the direction of either the cathode or the anode, depending on their surface charge. These rudimentary self-propelling devices can emit light or respond to light and could be controlled by internal logic. Diodes embedded in the walls of microfluidic channels provide locally distributed pumping or mixing functions powered by a global external field. The combined application of a.c. and d.c. fields in such devices allows decoupling of the velocity of the particles and the liquid and could be used for on-chip separations.

  10. Miniature MMIC Low Mass/Power Radiometer Modules for the 180 GHz GeoSTAR Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Tanner, Alan; Pukala, David; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Lim, Boon; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and demonstrated miniature 180 GHz Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) radiometer modules that have low noise temperature, low mass and low power consumption. These modules will enable the Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) of the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) Mission for atmospheric temperature and humidity profiling. The GeoSTAR instrument has an array of hundreds of receivers. Technology that was developed included Indium Phosphide (InP) MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and second harmonic MMIC mixers and I-Q mixers, surface mount Multi-Chip Module (MCM) packages at 180 GHz, and interferometric array at 180 GHz. A complete MMIC chip set for the 180 GHz receiver modules (LNAs and I-Q Second harmonic mixer) was developed. The MMIC LNAs had more than 50% lower noise temperature (NT=300K) than previous state-of-art and MMIC I-Q mixers demonstrated low LO power (3 dBm). Two lots of MMIC wafers were processed with very high DC transconductance of up to 2800 mS/mm for the 35 nm gate length devices. Based on these MMICs a 180 GHz Multichip Module was developed that had a factor of 100 lower mass/volume (16x18x4.5 mm3, 3g) than previous generation 180 GHz receivers.

  11. Neutron testing of high-power optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheeseman, M.; Bowden, M.; Akinci, A.; Knowles, S.; Webb, L.

    2012-11-01

    A selection of commercially available high-power optical fibres have been characterised for radiation susceptibility in Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). The fibres were subjected to a total gamma and neutron dose >2 Mrad(Si) in a 7 ms pulse. The neutron fluence was >1015 n/cm2. Changes in the transmission characteristics of optical fibres carrying high energy, short duration laser pulses (power densities of around 1.5 GW/cm2) were measured. All fibres survived at least two consecutive radiation exposures, showing typical transient transmission losses of around 20%. Post radiation exposure, the transmission characteristics returned to those of pristine fibres within one minute.

  12. Miniature, Low-Power, Waveguide Based Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer for Spacecraft Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewagama, TIlak; Aslam, Shahid; Talabac, Stephen; Allen, John E., Jr.; Annen, John N.; Jennings, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform spectrometers have a venerable heritage as flight instruments. However, obtaining an accurate spectrum exacts a penalty in instrument mass and power requirements. Recent advances in a broad class of non-scanning Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) devices, generally called spatial heterodyne spectrometers, offer distinct advantages as flight optimized systems. We are developing a miniaturized system that employs photonics lightwave circuit principles and functions as an FTS operating in the 7-14 micrometer spectral region. The inteferogram is constructed from an ensemble of Mach-Zehnder interferometers with path length differences calibrated to mimic scan mirror sample positions of a classic Michelson type FTS. One potential long-term application of this technology in low cost planetary missions is the concept of a self-contained sensor system. We are developing a systems architecture concept for wide area in situ and remote monitoring of characteristic properties that are of scientific interest. The system will be based on wavelength- and resolution-independent spectroscopic sensors for studying atmospheric and surface chemistry, physics, and mineralogy. The self-contained sensor network is based on our concept of an Addressable Photonics Cube (APC) which has real-time flexibility and broad science applications. It is envisaged that a spatially distributed autonomous sensor web concept that integrates multiple APCs will be reactive and dynamically driven. The network is designed to respond in an event- or model-driven manner or reconfigured as needed.

  13. Optically thick envelopes around ULXs powered by accreating neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtukov, Alexander A.; Suleimanov, Valery F.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Ingram, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Magnetized neutron stars power at least some ultra-luminous X-ray sources. The accretion flow in these cases is interrupted at the magnetospheric radius and then reaches the surface of a neutron star following magnetic field lines. Accreting matter moving along magnetic field lines forms the accretion envelope around the central object. We show that, in case of high mass accretion rates ≳ 1019 g s-1 the envelope becomes closed and optically thick, which influences the dynamics of the accretion flow and the observational manifestation of the neutron star hidden behind the envelope. Particularly, the optically thick accretion envelope results in a multi-color black-body spectrum originating from the magnetospheric surface. The spectrum and photon energy flux vary with the viewing angle, which gives rise to pulsations characterized by high pulsed fraction and typically smooth pulse profiles. The reprocessing of radiation due to interaction with the envelope leads to the disappearance of cyclotron scattering features from the spectrum. We speculate that the super-orbital variability of ultra-luminous X-ray sources powered by accreting neutron stars can be attributed to precession of the neutron star due to interaction of magnetic dipole with the accretion disc.

  14. Material issues relating to high power spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futakawa, M.

    2015-02-01

    Innovative researches using neutrons are being performed at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), in which a mercury target system is installed for MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. In order to produce neutrons by the spallation reaction, proton beams are injected into the mercury target. At the moment, when the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel, leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall, i.e. on the interface between liquid and solid metals. On the other hand, the structural materials are subjected to irradiation damage due to protons and neutrons, very high cycle fatigue damages and so-called "liquid metal embrittlement". That is, the structural materials must be said to be exposed to the extremely severe environments. In the paper, research and development relating to the material issues in the high power spallation neutron sources that has been performed so far at J-PARC is summarized.

  15. Neutron dose estimation in a zero power nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triviño, S.; Vedelago, J.; Cantargi, F.; Keil, W.; Figueroa, R.; Mattea, F.; Chautemps, A.; Santibañez, M.; Valente, M.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the characterization and contribution of neutron and gamma components to the absorbed dose in a zero power nuclear reactor. A dosimetric method based on Fricke gel was implemented to evaluate the separation between dose components in the mixed field. The validation of this proposed method was performed by means of direct measurements of neutron flux in different positions using Au and Mg-Ni activation foils. Monte Carlo simulations were conversely performed using the MCNP main code with a dedicated subroutine to incorporate the exact complete geometry of the nuclear reactor facility. Once nuclear fuel elements were defined, the simulations computed the different contributions to the absorbed dose in specific positions inside the core. Thermal/epithermal contributions of absorbed dose were assessed by means of Fricke gel dosimetry using different isotopic compositions aimed at modifying the sensitivity of the dosimeter for specific dose components. Clear distinctions between gamma and neutron capture dose were obtained. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results provided reliable estimations about neutron flux rate as well as dose rate during the reactor operation. Simulations and experimental results are in good agreement in every positions measured and simulated in the core.

  16. Integrated and miniaturized endoscopic devices for use during high power infrared fiber laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher Ryan

    The Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) is currently being studied as a potential alternative to the conventional, solid-state Holmium:YAG laser (Ho:YAG) for the treatment of kidney stones. The TFL is an ideal candidate to replace the Ho:YAG for laser lithotripsy due to a higher absorption coefficient in water of the emitted wavelength, an ability to operate at high pulse rates, and a near single mode, Gaussian spatial beam profile. The higher absorption of the TFL wavelength by water translates to a decrease in ablation threshold by a factor of four. High pulse rate operation allows higher ablation rates than the Ho:YAG, thus decreasing operation time necessary to ablate the urinary stone. The Gaussian spatial beam profile allows the TFL to couple higher laser power into smaller optical fibers than those currently being used for Ho:YAG lithotripsy. This decrease in fiber diameter translates into a potential decrease in the size of ureteroscope working channel, higher saline irrigation rates for improved visibility and safety, and may also extend to a decrease in overall ureteroscope diameter. Furthermore, the improved spatial beam profile reduces the risk of damage to the input end of the fiber. Therefore, the trunk fiber, minus the distal fiber tip, may be preserved and re-used, resulting in significant cost savings. This thesis details rapid TFL lithotripsy at high pulse rates up to 500 Hz, both with and without the aid of a stone retrieval basket, in order to demonstrate the TFL's superior ablation rates over the Ho:YAG. Collateral damage testing of the TFL effect on the ureter wall and Nitinol stone baskets were conducted to ensure patient safety for future clinical use. Proximal fiber end damage testing was conducted to demonstrate fiber preservation, critical for permanent fiber integration. Optical fibers were fitted with fabricated hollow steel tips and integrated with stone retrieval baskets for testing. Ball tipped optical fibers were tested to maintain ablation

  17. The neutronics studies of fusion fission hybrid power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Youqi; Wu Hongchun; Zu Tiejun; Yang Chao; Cao Liangzhi

    2012-06-19

    In this paper, a series of neutronics analysis of hybrid power reactor is proposed. The ideas of loading different fuels in a modular-type fission blanket is analyzed, fitting different level of fusion developments, i.e., the current experimental power output, the level can be obtained in the coming future and the high-power fusion reactor like ITER. The energy multiplication of fission blankets and tritium breeding ratio are evaluated as the criterion of design. The analysis is implemented based on the D-type simplified model, aiming to find a feasible 1000MWe hybrid power reactor for 5 years' lifetime. Three patterns are analyzed: 1) for the low fusion power, the reprocessed fuel is chosen. The fuel with high plutonium content is loaded to achieve large energy multiplication. 2) For the middle fusion power, the spent fuel from PWRs can be used to realize about 30 times energy multiplication. 3) For the high fusion power, the natural uranium can be directly used and about 10 times energy multiplication can be achieved.

  18. Neutronic design studies for an unattended, low power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.G.; Durkee, J.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in the design and demonstrations of a small, long-lived nuclear heat and electric power source for potential applications at remote sites where alternate fossil energy systems would not be cost effective. This paper describes the neutronic design analysis that was performed to arrive at two conceptual designs, one using thermoelectric conversion, the other using an organic Rankine cycle. To meet the design objectives and constraints a number of scoping and optimization studies were carried out. The results of calculations of control worths, temperature coefficients of reactivity and fuel depletion effects are reported.

  19. Low Power Consumption Lasers for Next Generation Miniature Optical Spectrometers for Major Constituent and Trace Gas Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forouhar, Siamak; Soibel, Alexander; Frez, Clifford; Qiu, Yueming; Chen, J.; Hosoda, T.; Kipshidze, G.; Shterengas, L.; Tsvid, G.; Belenky, G.; Franz, Kale J.; Gmachl, Claire; Scherer, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    The air quality of any manned spacecraft needs to be continuously monitored in order to safeguard the health of the crew. Air quality monitoring grows in importance as mission duration increases. Due to the small size, low power draw, and performance reliability, semiconductor laser-based instruments are viable candidates for this purpose. The minimum instrument size requires lasers with emission wavelength coinciding with the absorption of the fundamental frequency of the target gases which are mostly in the 3.0-5.0 micrometers wavelength range. In this paper we report on our progress developing high wall plug efficiency type-I quantum-well GaSb-based diode lasers operating at room temperatures in the spectral region near 3.0-3.5 micrometers and quantum cascade (QC) lasers in the 4.0-5.0 micrometers range. These lasers will enable the development of miniature, low-power laser spectrometers for environmental monitoring of the spacecraft.

  20. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.; Zuppero, Anthony C.

    1997-06-24

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  1. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  2. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe; Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan

    2015-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  3. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  4. Miniature long-range light beam transmitter resorting to a high-power broad area laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Wenjing; Lee, Sang-Shin

    2014-08-01

    A miniature long-range light beam transmitter, which taps into a high-power broad area laser diode (BALD), was realized to exhibit a uniform detectable width. An effective model was proposed to practically emulate the multimode characteristics of the beam generated by the BALD. The model, solely based on the emitting region and far-field divergence angle pertaining to the LD, is established through an incoherent superposition of multiple normalized Hermit-Gaussian modes. The feasibility of the proposed model was successfully verified in terms of the calculated and observed irradiance distributions of the light beams. A long-range light beam transmitter was then designed and constructed taking advantage of the BALD source in conjunction with a beam shaper. The manufactured transmitter was corroborated to provide an infrared beam with a constant detectable width of ~1 m, over a distance ranging up to 400 m, for a predefined threshold level.

  5. A miniature, low-power scientific fluxgate magnetometer: A stepping-stone to cube-satellite constellation missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, D. M.; Mann, I. R.; Ciurzynski, M.; Barona, D.; Narod, B. B.; Bennest, J. R.; Pakhotin, I. P.; Kale, A.; Bruner, B.; Nokes, C. D. A.; Cupido, C.; Haluza-DeLay, T.; Elliott, D. G.; Milling, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    Difficulty in making low noise magnetic measurements is a significant challenge to the use of cube-satellite (CubeSat) platforms for scientific constellation class missions to study the magnetosphere. Sufficient resolution is required to resolve three-dimensional spatiotemporal structures of the magnetic field variations accompanying both waves and current systems of the nonuniform plasmas controlling dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. This paper describes the design, validation, and test of a flight-ready, miniature, low-mass, low-power, and low-magnetic noise boom-mounted fluxgate magnetometer for CubeSat applications. The miniature instrument achieves a magnetic noise floor of 150-200 pT/√Hz at 1 Hz, consumes 400 mW of power, has a mass of 121 g (sensor and boom), stows on the hull, and deploys on a 60 cm boom from a three-unit CubeSat reducing the noise from the onboard reaction wheel to less than 1.5 nT at the sensor. The instrument's capabilities will be demonstrated and validated in space in late 2016 following the launch of the University of Alberta Ex-Alta 1 CubeSat, part of the QB50 constellation mission. We illustrate the potential scientific returns and utility of using a CubeSats carrying such fluxgate magnetometers to constitute a magnetospheric constellation using example data from the low-Earth orbit European Space Agency Swarm mission. Swarm data reveal significant changes in the spatiotemporal characteristics of the magnetic fields in the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system, even when the spacecraft are separated by only approximately 10 s along track and approximately 1.4° in longitude.

  6. Neutron flux and power in RTP core-15

    SciTech Connect

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie Zin, Muhammad Rawi Md; Usang, Mark Dennis; Bayar, Abi Muttaqin Jalal; Hamzah, Na’im Syauqi Bin

    2016-01-22

    PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. This paper describes the reactor parameters calculation for the PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP); focusing on the application of the developed reactor 3D model for criticality calculation, analysis of power and neutron flux distribution of TRIGA core. The 3D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA reactor. The model represents in detailed all important components of the core with literally no physical approximation. The consistency and accuracy of the developed RTP MCNP model was established by comparing calculations to the available experimental results and TRIGLAV code calculation.

  7. Neutron flux and power in RTP core-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie; Zin, Muhammad Rawi Md; Usang, Mark Dennis; Bayar, Abi Muttaqin Jalal; Hamzah, Na'im Syauqi Bin

    2016-01-01

    PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. This paper describes the reactor parameters calculation for the PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP); focusing on the application of the developed reactor 3D model for criticality calculation, analysis of power and neutron flux distribution of TRIGA core. The 3D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA reactor. The model represents in detailed all important components of the core with literally no physical approximation. The consistency and accuracy of the developed RTP MCNP model was established by comparing calculations to the available experimental results and TRIGLAV code calculation.

  8. Neutron effects on the electrical and switching characteristics of NPN bipolar power transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasca, Albert J.; Schwarze, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactors to generate electrical power for future space missions will require the electrical components used in the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem to operate in the associated radiation environments. An initial assessment of neutron irradiation on the electrical and switching characteristics of commercial high power NPN bipolar transistors was investigated. The results clearly show the detrimental effects caused by neutron irradiation on the electrical and switching characteristics of the NPN bipolar power transistor.

  9. Radioactively Powered Emission from Black Hole-Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Wanajo, Shinya; Kiuchi, Kenta; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Shibata, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Detection of the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources is important to unveil the nature of compact binary coalescences. We perform three-dimensional, time-dependent, multi-frequency radiative transfer simulations for radioactively powered emission from the ejecta of black hole (BH)-neutron star (NS) mergers. Depending on the BH to NS mass ratio, spin of the BH, and equations of state of dense matter, BH-NS mergers can eject more material than NS-NS mergers. In such cases, radioactively powered emission from the BH-NS merger ejecta can be more luminous than that from NS-NS mergers. We show that, in spite of the expected larger distances to BH-NS merger events, the observed brightness of BH-NS mergers can be comparable to or even higher than that of NS-NS mergers. We find that, when the tidally disrupted BH-NS merger ejecta are confined to a small solid angle, the emission from BH-NS merger ejecta tends to be bluer than that from NS-NS merger ejecta for a given total luminosity. Thanks to this property, we might be able to distinguish BH-NS merger events from NS-NS merger events by multi-band observations of the radioactively powered emission. In addition to the GW observations, such electromagnetic observations can potentially provide independent information on the progenitors of GW sources and the nature of compact binary coalescences.

  10. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Jeongjin; Ryu, Mun-ho; Yang, Yoonseok

    2015-01-01

    The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM) and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg) and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply. PMID:26151204

  11. Energy Harvesting from Upper-Limb Pulling Motions for Miniaturized Human-Powered Generators.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jeongjin; Ryu, Mun-ho; Yang, Yoonseok

    2015-07-03

    The human-powered self-generator provides the best solution for individuals who need an instantaneous power supply for travel, outdoor, and emergency use, since it is less dependent on weather conditions and occupies less space than other renewable power supplies. However, many commercial portable self-generators that employ hand-cranking are not used as much as expected in daily lives although they have enough output capacity due to their intensive workload. This study proposes a portable human-powered generator which is designed to obtain mechanical energy from an upper limb pulling motion for improved human motion economy as well as efficient human-mechanical power transfer. A coreless axial-flux permanent magnet machine (APMM) and a flywheel magnet rotor were used in conjunction with a one-way clutched power transmission system in order to obtain effective power from the pulling motion. The developed prototype showed an average energy conversion efficiency of 30.98% and an average output power of 0.32 W with a maximum of 1.89 W. Its small form factor (50 mm × 32 mm × 43.5 mm, 0.05 kg) and the substantial electricity produced verify the effectiveness of the proposed method in the utilization of human power. It is expected that the developed generator could provide a mobile power supply.

  12. Miniature Low Power Submillimeter-Wave Spectrometer For Detection of Water in The Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Denning, Richard F.; Janssen, Michael A.; Frerking, Margaret A.

    1997-01-01

    Mass and power for the next generation of NASA's heterodyne spectrometers must be greatly reduced to satisfy the constraints of future small-spacecraft missions. Here we present a new receiver concept for remote sensing in the Solar System, with greatly reduced mass, power, and size compared to instruments implemented in current missions.

  13. Miniature Low Power Submillimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Detection of Water in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Denning, Richard F.; Janssen, Michael A.; Frerking, Margaret A.

    1997-01-01

    The mass and power of a heterodyne spectrometer must be greatly reduced to satisfy small space mission constraints. We report on a 220 GHz receiver, requiring less than 4.8 W, with a mass of 1.25 kg. The mass and power savings are achieved through reducing components to a minimum, while providing performance for a Martian atmospheric sounder.

  14. A miniaturized high-voltage integrated power supply for portable microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David; Sinton, David; Li, Dongqing

    2004-04-01

    In this work a portable microfluidic device with a reusable integrated high voltage power supply is presented, which allows for quick exchange of inexpensive disposable poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) microfluidic chips on a carrier only slightly larger than a microscope slide. The device is powered by an onboard MN21 cell battery (5 mm radius, 30 mm long) and is demonstrated through the rapid and controlled transport of a fluorescent dye through an expansion chamber geometry. Power consumption experiments demonstrate the device's ability to complete over 40 dispense-flushing cycles on a single battery.

  15. Miniature, low-power X-ray tube using a microchannel electron generator electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Wm. Timothy (Inventor); Kelliher, Warren C. (Inventor); Hershyn, William (Inventor); DeLong, David P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of the invention provide a novel, low-power X-ray tube and X-ray generating system. Embodiments of the invention use a multichannel electron generator as the electron source, thereby increasing reliability and decreasing power consumption of the X-ray tube. Unlike tubes using a conventional filament that must be heated by a current power source, embodiments of the invention require only a voltage power source, use very little current, and have no cooling requirements. The microchannel electron generator comprises one or more microchannel plates (MCPs), Each MCP comprises a honeycomb assembly of a plurality of annular components, which may be stacked to increase electron intensity. The multichannel electron generator used enables directional control of electron flow. In addition, the multichannel electron generator used is more robust than conventional filaments, making the resulting X-ray tube very shock and vibration resistant.

  16. Miniature amperometric self-powered continuous glucose sensor with linear response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zenghe; Cho, Brian; Ouyang, Tianmei; Feldman, Ben

    2012-04-03

    Continuous glucose measurement has improved the treatment of type 1 diabetes and is typically provided by externally powered transcutaneous amperometric sensors. Self-powered glucose sensors (SPGSs) could provide an improvement over these conventionally powered devices, especially for fully implanted long-term applications where implanted power sources are problematic. Toward this end, we describe a robust SPGS that may be built from four simple components: (1) a low-potential, wired glucose oxidase anode; (2) a Pt/C cathode; (3) an overlying glucose flux-limiting membrane; and (4) a resistor bridging the anode and cathode. In vitro evaluation showed that the sensor output is linear over physiologic glucose concentrations (2-30 mM), even at low O(2) concentrations. Output was independent of the connecting resistor values over the range from 0 to 10 MΩ. The output was also stable over 60 days of continuous in vitro operation at 37 °C in 30 mM glucose. A 5-day trial in a volunteer demonstrated that the performance of the device was virtually identical to that of a conventional amperometric sensor. Thus, this SPGS is an attractive alternative to conventionally powered devices, especially for fully implanted long-term applications.

  17. A low power miniaturized dielectric barrier discharge based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Divya Deepak, G; Joshi, N K; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Prakash, Ram

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a dielectric barrier discharge plasma based atmospheric pressure plasma jet has been generated in a floating helix and floating end ring electrode configuration using argon and helium gases. This configuration is subjected to a range of supply frequencies (10-25 kHz) and supply voltages (2-6 kV) at a fixed rate of gas flow rate (i.e., 1 l/min). The electrical characterization of the plasma jet has been carried out using a high voltage probe and current transformer. The current-voltage characteristics have been analyzed, and the consumed power has been estimated at different applied combinations for optimum power consumption at maximum jet length. The obtained optimum power and jet length for argon and helium gases are 12 mW and 32 mm, and 7.7 mW and 42 mm, respectively. It is inferred that besides the electrode configurations, the discharge gas is also playing a significant role in the low power operation of the cold plasma jet at maximum jet length. The obtained results are interpreted on the basis of penning processes.

  18. A low power miniaturized dielectric barrier discharge based atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya Deepak, G.; Joshi, N. K.; Pal, Dharmendra Kumar; Prakash, Ram

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a dielectric barrier discharge plasma based atmospheric pressure plasma jet has been generated in a floating helix and floating end ring electrode configuration using argon and helium gases. This configuration is subjected to a range of supply frequencies (10-25 kHz) and supply voltages (2-6 kV) at a fixed rate of gas flow rate (i.e., 1 l/min). The electrical characterization of the plasma jet has been carried out using a high voltage probe and current transformer. The current-voltage characteristics have been analyzed, and the consumed power has been estimated at different applied combinations for optimum power consumption at maximum jet length. The obtained optimum power and jet length for argon and helium gases are 12 mW and 32 mm, and 7.7 mW and 42 mm, respectively. It is inferred that besides the electrode configurations, the discharge gas is also playing a significant role in the low power operation of the cold plasma jet at maximum jet length. The obtained results are interpreted on the basis of penning processes.

  19. Miniaturized Power Processing Unit Study: A Cubesat Electric Propulsion Technology Enabler Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghassemieh, Shakib M.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates High Voltage Power Processing Unit (PPU) technology and driving requirements necessary to enable the Microfluidic Electric Propulsion technology research and development by NASA and university partners. This study provides an overview of the state of the art PPU technology with recommendations for technology demonstration projects and missions for NASA to pursue.

  20. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE [PowerPoint

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Hunter, James F.; Schirato, Richard C.; Vogel, Sven C.; Swift, Alicia L.; Ickes, Timothy Lee; Ward, William Carl; Losko, Adrian Simon; Tremsin, Anton; Sevanto, Sanna Annika; Espy, Michelle A.; Dickman, Lee Thoresen; Malone, Michael

    2015-10-29

    Thermal, epithermal, and high-energy neutrons are available from two spallation sources at the 800-MeV proton accelerator. Improvements in detectors and computing have enabled new capabilities that use the pulsed beam properties at LANSCE; these include amorphous Si (aSi) detectors, intensified charge-coupled device cameras, and micro-channel plates. Applications include water flow in living specimens, inclusions and fission products in uranium oxide, and high-energy neutron imaging using an aSi flat panel with ZnS(Ag) scintillator screen. images of a metal/plastic cylinder from photons, low-energy and high-energy neutrons are compared.

  1. Effects of antenna length and material on output power and detection of miniature radio transmitters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, J.W.; Bower, N.; Juhnke, S.; Dingmon, L.; Van Den, Tillaart; Thomas, T.

    2007-01-01

    The optimal antenna of transmitters used in small aquatic animals is often a compromise between efficient radio wave propagation and effects on animal behavior. Radio transmission efficiency generally increases with diameter and length of the conductor, but increased antenna length or weight can adversely affect animal behavior. We evaluated the effects of changing antenna length and material on the subsequent tag output power, reception, and detection of tagged fish. In a laboratory, we compared the relative signal strengths in water of 150 MHz transmitters over a range of antenna lengths (from 6 to 30 cm) and materials (one weighing about half of the other). The peak relative signal strengths were at 20 and 22 cm, which are approximately one wavelength underwater at the test frequency. The peak relative signal strengths at these lengths were approximately 50% greater than those of 30 cm antennas, a length commonly used in fisheries research. Few significant differences were present in distances for the operator to hear or the telemetry receiver to decode transmitters from a boat-mounted receiving system based on antenna length, but the percent of tagged fish detected passing a hydroelectric dam fitted with an array of receiving systems was significantly greater at the antenna length with peak output power in laboratory tests. This study indicates careful choice of antenna length and material of small transmitters can be used to reduce weight and possible antenna effects on animal behavior, to maximize tag output power and detection, or to balance these factors based on the needs of the application. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  2. Extremely-efficient, miniaturized, long-lived alpha-voltaic power source using liquid gallium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source converts .alpha.-particle energy to electricity for use in electrical systems. Liquid gallium or other liquid medium is subjected to .alpha.-particle emissions. Electrons are freed by collision from neutral gallium atoms to provide gallium ions. The electrons migrate to a cathode while the gallium ions migrate to an anode. A current and/or voltage difference then arises between the cathode and anode because of the work function difference of the cathode and anode. Gallium atoms are regenerated by the receiving of electrons from the anode enabling the generation of additional electrons from additional .alpha.-particle collisions.

  3. Powering autonomous sensors with miniaturized piezoelectric based energy harvesting devices operating at very low frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferin, G.; Bantignies, C.; Le Khanh, H.; Flesch, E.; Nguyen-Dinh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Harvesting energy from ambient mechanical vibrations is a smart and efficient way to power autonomous sensors and support innovative developments in IoT (Internet of Things), WSN (Wireless Sensor Network) and even implantable medical devices. Beyond the environmental operating conditions, efficiency of such devices is mainly related to energy source properties like the amplitude of vibrations and its spectral contain and some of these applications exhibit a quite low frequency spectrum where harvesting surrounding mechanical energy make sense, typically 5-50Hz for implantable medical devices or 50Hz-150Hz for industrial machines. Harvesting such low frequency vibrations is a challenge since it leads to adapt the resonator geometries to the targeted frequency or to use out-off band indirect harvesting strategies. In this paper we present a piezoelectric based vibrational energy harvesting device (PEH) which could be integrated into a biocompatible package to power implantable sensor or therapeutic medical devices. The presented architecture is a serial bimorph laminated with ultra-thinned (ranging from 15μm to 100μm) outer PZT “skins” that could operate at a “very low frequency”, below 25Hz typically. The core process flow is disclosed and performances highlighted with regards to other low frequency demonstrations.

  4. SIM200 miniaturized low-power electronics design and test results for an uncooled microbolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, James H.; Morico, Peter D.

    1999-07-01

    Lockheed Martin IR Imaging Systems is developing uncooled microbolometer-based imaging products for a wide range of military, industrial and commercial applications. All of these products employ image processing electronics to provide enhanced imagery and flexible control for different applications. Here we report on the second generation video signal processor architecture and the electronics of the SIM200 module. The first generation electronics utilized custom hardware for real-time image processing and a microcontroller for auxiliary processing and control. The SIM200 Module introduces a revolutionary second generation architecture based upon industry-standard DIgital Signal PRocessors and dramatically reduced interface electronics. This enables real time image processing to be performance in software resulting in a dramatic reduction in size, power, weight, and cost for the electronics, so critical to leading edge portable applications. The performance and produce advantages of the SIM200 and its video signal processors architecture will be discussed along with system level performance parameters.

  5. The Effect Of Neutron Attenuation On Power Deposition In Nuclear Pumped 3He-Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cetin, Fuesun

    2007-04-23

    Nuclear-pumped lasers (NPLs) are driven by the products of nuclear reactions and directly convert the nuclear energy to directed optical energy. Pumping gas lasers by nuclear reaction products has the advantage of depositing large energies per reaction. The need for high laser power output implies high operating pressure. In the case of volumetric excitation by 3He(n, p)3H reactions, however, operation at high pressure (more than a few atm) causes excessive neutron attenuation in the 3He gas. This fact adversely effects on energy deposition and, hence, laser output power and beam quality. Here, spatial and temporal variations of neutron flux inside a closed 3He -filled cylindrical laser tube have been numerically calculated for various tube radii and operating pressures by using a previously reported dynamic model for energy deposition. Calculations are made by using ITU TRIGA Mark II Reactor as the neutron source. The effects of neutron attenuation on power deposition are examined.

  6. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic NIF Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna

    2014-10-01

    Recent experiments in cryogenic DT capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) observed high-energy reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons via threshold (>15 MeV) neutron reactions on thulium foils. This represents the first measurements of RIF neutrons in inertial confinement fusion plasmas. RIF neutrons are produced by a two-step process. In the first step, a primary 14.1 MeV DT neutron knocks a triton or deuteron up to a spectrum of energies from 0 to more than 10 MeV. In the second step, the energetic knocked-on ion undergoes a DT reaction with a thermal ion, producing a neutron above the primary 14 MeV peak. Transport and energy loss of the knock-on ions inducing the RIF reactions directly affect the RIF production rate, and RIF measurements can be used to determine the stopping power for charged particles in the plasma. Here we present the formalism for extracting the stopping power from the measured RIF signals. We find that the stopping power extracted from these measurements is consistent with a strongly coupled quantum degenerate plasma for the high-density cold fuel surrounding the hotspot of the compressed capsule. These RIF measurements represent the first determination of stopping powers in strongly coupled plasmas.

  7. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy program for cancer treatment, Volume 4, No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses the monthly progress of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNLT) program for cancer treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during July 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support and PBF operations.

  8. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  9. Neutron Dosimetry in Edf Experimental Surveillance Programme for VVER-440 Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumovsky, Milan; Erben, Oldrich; Zerola, Ladislav; Hogel, Josef; Massoud, Jean-Paul; Trollat, Christophe

    2003-06-01

    Fourteen chains containing experimental surveillance material specimens of the VVER 440/213 nuclear power reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the surveillance channels of the Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany in the Czech Republic. The irradiation periods were one, two or three cycles. For the absolute fluence values evaluation account was taken of the time history of the reactor power and of local changes of the neutron flux along the reactor core height, and of correction factors due to the orientation of monitors with respect to the reactor core centre. Neutron fluence values above 0.5 MeV energy and above 1.0 MeV energy in the container axis at the axial positions of the sample centres and fluence values in the geometric centre of the samples were calculated making use the exponential attenuation model of the incident neutron beam.

  10. Neutron, gamma ray and post-irradiation thermal annealing effects on power semiconductor switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, G. E.; Frasca, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of neutron and gamma rays on the electrical and switching characteristics of power semiconductor switches must be known and understood by the designer of the power conditioning, control, and transmission subsystem of space nuclear power systems. The SP-100 radiation requirements at 25 m from the nuclear source are a neutron fluence of 10(exp 13) n/sq cm and a gamma dose of 0.5 Mrads. Experimental data showing the effects of neutrons and gamma rays on the performance characteristics of power-type NPN Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs), Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFETs), and Static Induction Transistors (SITs) are presented. These three types of devices were tested at radiation levels which met or exceeded the SP-100 requirements. For the SP-100 radiation requirements, the BJTs were found to be most sensitive to neutrons, the MOSFETs were most sensitive to gamma rays, and the SITs were only slightly sensitive to neutrons. Post-irradiation thermal anneals at 300 K and up to 425 K were done on these devices and the effectiveness of these anneals are also discussed.

  11. Miniature Earthmover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    International Machinery Corporation (IMC) developed a miniature earthmover, the 1/8 scale Caterpillar D11N Track-type Tractor, with trademark product approval and manufacturing/marketing license from Caterpillar, Inc. Through Marshall Space Flight Center assistance, the company has acquired infrared remote control technology, originally developed for space exploration. The technology is necessary for exports because of varying restrictions on radio frequency in foreign countries. The Cat D11N weighs only 340 pounds and has the world's first miniature industrial internal combustion engine. The earthmover's uses include mining, construction and demolition work, and hazardous environment work. IMC also has designs of various products for military use and other Caterpillar replicas.

  12. Delayed Neutrons Effect on Power Reactor with Variation of Fluid Fuel Velocity at MSR Fuji-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncoro Aji, Indarta; Pramuditya, Syeilendra; Novitrian; Irwanto, Dwi; Waris, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    As the nuclear reactor operate with liquid fuel, controlling velocity of the fuel flow on the Molten salt reactor very influence on the neutron kinetics in that reactor system. The effect of the pace fuel changes to the populations number of neutrons and power density on vertical direction (1 dimension) from the first until fifth year reactor operating had been analyzed on this research. This research had been conducted on MSR Fuji-12 with a two meters core high, and LiF-BeF2-ThF4-233UF4 as fuel composition respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section obtained from ouput of SRAC (neutronic calculation code has been developed by JAEA, with JENDL-4.0 as data library on the SRAC calculation) was being used for the calculation process of this research. The calculation process of this research had been performed numerically by SOR (successive over relaxation) and finite difference methode, as well as using C programing language. From the calculation, regarding to the value of power density resulting from delayed neutrons, concluded that 20 m/s is the optimum fuel flow velocity in all the years reactor had operated. Where the increases number of power are inversely proportional with the fuel flow speed.

  13. Miniaturized photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Okandan, Murat; Robinson, Alex; Nielson, Gregory N.; Resnick, Paul J.

    2016-08-09

    A low-power miniaturized photoacoustic sensor uses an optical microphone made by semiconductor fabrication techniques, and optionally allows for all-optical communication to and from the sensor. This allows integration of the photoacoustic sensor into systems with special requirements, such as those that would be reactive in an electrical discharge condition. The photoacoustic sensor can also be operated in various other modes with wide application flexibility.

  14. A miniature electronic nose system based on an MWNT-polymer microsensor array and a low-power signal-processing chip.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Shih-Wen; Wu, Hsiang-Chiu; Chou, Ting-I; Chen, Hsin; Tang, Kea-Tiong

    2014-06-01

    This article introduces a power-efficient, miniature electronic nose (e-nose) system. The e-nose system primarily comprises two self-developed chips, a multiple-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-polymer based microsensor array, and a low-power signal-processing chip. The microsensor array was fabricated on a silicon wafer by using standard photolithography technology. The microsensor array comprised eight interdigitated electrodes surrounded by SU-8 "walls," which restrained the material-solvent liquid in a defined area of 650 × 760 μm(2). To achieve a reliable sensor-manufacturing process, we used a two-layer deposition method, coating the MWNTs and polymer film as the first and second layers, respectively. The low-power signal-processing chip included array data acquisition circuits and a signal-processing core. The MWNT-polymer microsensor array can directly connect with array data acquisition circuits, which comprise sensor interface circuitry and an analog-to-digital converter; the signal-processing core consists of memory and a microprocessor. The core executes the program, classifying the odor data received from the array data acquisition circuits. The low-power signal-processing chip was designed and fabricated using the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company 0.18-μm 1P6M standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor process. The chip consumes only 1.05 mW of power at supply voltages of 1 and 1.8 V for the array data acquisition circuits and the signal-processing core, respectively. The miniature e-nose system, which used a microsensor array, a low-power signal-processing chip, and an embedded k-nearest-neighbor-based pattern recognition algorithm, was developed as a prototype that successfully recognized the complex odors of tincture, sorghum wine, sake, whisky, and vodka.

  15. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  16. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  17. A miniaturized microbial fuel cell with three-dimensional graphene macroporous scaffold anode demonstrating a record power density of over 10 000 W m-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hao; Tian, He; Gardner, Cameron L.; Ren, Tian-Ling; Chae, Junseok

    2016-02-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-inspired renewable energy converter which directly converts biomass into electricity. This is accomplished via the unique extracellular electron transfer (EET) of a specific species of microbe called the exoelectrogen. Many studies have attempted to improve the power density of MFCs, yet the reported power density is still nearly two orders of magnitude lower than other power sources/converters. Such a low performance can primarily be attributed to two bottlenecks: (i) ineffective electron transfer from microbes located far from the anode and (ii) an insufficient buffer supply to the biofilm. This work takes a novel approach to mitigate these two bottlenecks by integrating a three-dimensional (3D) macroporous graphene scaffold anode in a miniaturized MFC. This implementation has delivered the highest power density reported to date in all MFCs of over 10 000 W m-3. The miniaturized configuration offers a high surface area to volume ratio and improved mass transfer of biomass and buffers. The 3D graphene macroporous scaffold warrants investigation due to its high specific surface area, high porosity, and excellent conductivity and biocompatibility which facilitates EET and alleviates acidification in the biofilm. Consequently, the 3D scaffold houses an extremely thick and dense biofilm from the Geobacter-enriched culture, delivering an areal/volumetric current density of 15.51 A m-2/31 040 A m-3 and a power density of 5.61 W m-2/11 220 W m-3, a 3.3 fold increase when compared to its planar two-dimensional (2D) control counterparts.A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-inspired renewable energy converter which directly converts biomass into electricity. This is accomplished via the unique extracellular electron transfer (EET) of a specific species of microbe called the exoelectrogen. Many studies have attempted to improve the power density of MFCs, yet the reported power density is still nearly two orders of magnitude lower than

  18. Nuclear-powered millisecond pulsars and the maximum spin frequency of neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Morgan, Edward H; Muno, Michael P; Galloway, Duncan K; Wijnands, Rudy; Van Der Klis, Michiel; Markwardt, Craig B

    2003-07-03

    Millisecond pulsars are neutron stars that are thought to have been spun-up by mass accretion from a stellar companion. It is not known whether there is a natural brake for this process, or if it continues until the centrifugal breakup limit is reached at submillisecond periods. Many neutron stars that are accreting mass from a companion star exhibit thermonuclear X-ray bursts that last tens of seconds, caused by unstable nuclear burning on their surfaces. Millisecond-period brightness oscillations during bursts from ten neutron stars (as distinct from other rapid X-ray variability that is also observed) are thought to measure the stellar spin, but direct proof of a rotational origin has been lacking. Here we report the detection of burst oscillations at the known spin frequency of an accreting millisecond pulsar, and we show that these oscillations always have the same rotational phase. This firmly establishes burst oscillations as nuclear-powered pulsations tracing the spin of accreting neutron stars, corroborating earlier evidence. The distribution of spin frequencies of the 11 nuclear-powered pulsars cuts off well below the breakup frequency for most neutron-star models, supporting theoretical predictions that gravitational radiation losses can limit accretion torques in spinning up millisecond pulsars.

  19. A miniaturized microbial fuel cell with three-dimensional graphene macroporous scaffold anode demonstrating a record power density of over 10,000 W m(-3) .

    PubMed

    Ren, Hao; Tian, He; Gardner, Cameron L; Ren, Tian-Ling; Chae, Junseok

    2016-02-14

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-inspired renewable energy converter which directly converts biomass into electricity. This is accomplished via the unique extracellular electron transfer (EET) of a specific species of microbe called the exoelectrogen. Many studies have attempted to improve the power density of MFCs, yet the reported power density is still nearly two orders of magnitude lower than other power sources/converters. Such a low performance can primarily be attributed to two bottlenecks: (i) ineffective electron transfer from microbes located far from the anode and (ii) an insufficient buffer supply to the biofilm. This work takes a novel approach to mitigate these two bottlenecks by integrating a three-dimensional (3D) macroporous graphene scaffold anode in a miniaturized MFC. This implementation has delivered the highest power density reported to date in all MFCs of over 10,000 W m(-3). The miniaturized configuration offers a high surface area to volume ratio and improved mass transfer of biomass and buffers. The 3D graphene macroporous scaffold warrants investigation due to its high specific surface area, high porosity, and excellent conductivity and biocompatibility which facilitates EET and alleviates acidification in the biofilm. Consequently, the 3D scaffold houses an extremely thick and dense biofilm from the Geobacter-enriched culture, delivering an areal/volumetric current density of 15.51 A m(-2)/31,040 A m(-3) and a power density of 5.61 W m(-2)/11,220 W m(-3), a 3.3 fold increase when compared to its planar two-dimensional (2D) control counterparts.

  20. Miniaturized Environmental Monitoring Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Freidhoff

    1997-09-01

    The objective of the Mass Spectrograph on a Chip (MSOC) program is the development of a miniature, multi-species gas sensor fabricated using silicon micromachining technology which will be orders of magnitude smaller and lower power consumption than a conventional mass spectrometer. The sensing and discrimination of this gas sensor are based on an ionic mass spectrograph, using magnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The fields cause a spatial separation of the ions according to their respective mass-to-charge ratio. The fabrication of this device involves the combination of microelectronics with micromechanically built sensors and, ultimately, vacuum pumps. The prototype of a chemical sensor would revolutionize the method of performing environmental monitoring for both commercial and government applications. The portable unit decided upon was the miniaturized gas chromatograph with a mass spectrometer detector, referred to as a GC/MS in the analytical marketplace.

  1. Neutron and gamma sensitivities of self-powered detectors: Monte Carlo modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeeren, Ludo

    2015-07-01

    This paper deals with the development of a detailed Monte Carlo approach for the calculation of the absolute neutron sensitivity of SPNDs, which makes use of the MCNP code. We will explain the calculation approach, including the activation and beta emission steps, the gamma-electron interactions, the charge deposition in the various detector parts and the effect of the space charge field in the insulator. The model can also be applied for the calculation of the gamma sensitivity of self-powered detectors and for the radiation-induced currents in signal cables. The model yields detailed information on the various contributions to the sensor currents, with distinct response times. Results for the neutron sensitivity of various types of SPNDs are in excellent agreement with experimental data obtained at the BR2 research reactor. For typical neutron to gamma flux ratios, the calculated gamma induced SPND currents are significantly lower than the neutron induced currents. The gamma sensitivity depends very strongly upon the immediate detector surroundings and on the gamma spectrum. Our calculation method opens the way to a reliable on-line determination of the absolute in-pile thermal neutron flux. (authors)

  2. Testing Procedures and Results of the Prototype Fundamental Power Coupler for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbet, M; Campisi, I E; Daly, E F; Davis, G K; Drury, M; Kneisel, P; Myneni, G; Powers, T; Schneider, W J; Wilson, K M; Kang, Y; Cummings, K A; Hardek, T

    2001-06-01

    High-power RF testing with peak power in excess of 500 kW has been performed on prototype Fundamental Power Couplers (FPC) for the Spallation Neutron Source superconducting (SNS) cavities. The testing followed the development of procedures for cleaning, assembling and preparing the FPC for installation in the test stand. The qualification of the couplers has occurred for the time being only in a limited set of conditions (travelling wave, 20 pps) as the available RF system and control instrumentation are under improvement.

  3. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; Schulz, A. E.; Boswell, M.; Fowler, M. M.; Grim, G.; Klein, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, D.; Cerjan, C.; Schneider, D.; Sepke, S. M.; Tonchev, A.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-08-06

    We present the first measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons in an inertial confinement fusion system. The experiments were carried out at the National Ignition Facility, using both Low Foot and High Foot drives and cryogenic plastic capsules. In both cases, the high-energy RIF (En > 15 MeV) component of the neutron spectrum was found to be about 10–4 of the total. The majority of the RIF neutrons were produced in the dense cold fuel surrounding the burning hotspot of the capsule, and the data are consistent with a compressed cold fuel that is moderately to strongly coupled (Γ~ 0.6) and electron degenerate (θFermie~ 4). The production of RIF neutrons is controlled by the stopping power in the plasma. Thus, the current RIF measurements provide a unique test of stopping power models in an experimentally unexplored plasma regime. In conclusion, we find that the measured RIF data strongly constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions, and some models are ruled out by our analysis of these experiments.

  4. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; Schulz, A. E.; Boswell, M.; Fowler, M. M.; Grim, G.; Klein, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, D.; Cerjan, C.; Schneider, D.; Sepke, S. M.; Tonchev, A.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-08-01

    We present the first measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons in an inertial confinement fusion system. The experiments were carried out at the National Ignition Facility, using both Low Foot and High Foot drives and cryogenic plastic capsules. In both cases, the high-energy RIF ( En> 15 MeV) component of the neutron spectrum was found to be about 10-4 of the total. The majority of the RIF neutrons were produced in the dense cold fuel surrounding the burning hotspot of the capsule, and the data are consistent with a compressed cold fuel that is moderately to strongly coupled (Γ˜ 0.6) and electron degenerate (θFermi/θe˜ 4). The production of RIF neutrons is controlled by the stopping power in the plasma. Thus, the current RIF measurements provide a unique test of stopping power models in an experimentally unexplored plasma regime. We find that the measured RIF data strongly constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions, and some models are ruled out by our analysis of these experiments.

  5. Reaction-in-flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; Schulz, A. E.; ...

    2015-08-06

    We present the first measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons in an inertial confinement fusion system. The experiments were carried out at the National Ignition Facility, using both Low Foot and High Foot drives and cryogenic plastic capsules. In both cases, the high-energy RIF (En > 15 MeV) component of the neutron spectrum was found to be about 10–4 of the total. The majority of the RIF neutrons were produced in the dense cold fuel surrounding the burning hotspot of the capsule, and the data are consistent with a compressed cold fuel that is moderately to strongly coupled (Γ~ 0.6) andmore » electron degenerate (θFermi/θe~ 4). The production of RIF neutrons is controlled by the stopping power in the plasma. Thus, the current RIF measurements provide a unique test of stopping power models in an experimentally unexplored plasma regime. In conclusion, we find that the measured RIF data strongly constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions, and some models are ruled out by our analysis of these experiments.« less

  6. Proposed power upgrade of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility's neutron radiography reactor. [NRAD reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both non-destructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the non-destructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography. Neutron radiography is provided by the NRAD reactor facility, which is located beneath the HFEF hot cell. The NRAD reactor is a TRIGA reactor and is operated at a steady state power level of 250 kW solely for neutron radiography and the development of radiography techniques. When the NRAD facility was designed and constructed, an operating power level of 250 kW was considered to be adequate for obtaining radiographs of the type of specimens envisaged at that time. A typical radiograph required approximately a twenty-minute exposure time. Specimens were typically single fuel rods placed in an aluminum tray. Since that time, however, several things have occurred that have tended to increase radiography exposure times to as much as 90 minutes each. In order to decrease exposure times, the reactor power level is to be increased from 250 kw to 1 MW. This increase in power will necessitate several engineering and design changes. These changes are described.

  7. Waste to Energy Conversion by Stepwise Liquefaction, Gasification and "Clean" Combustion of Pelletized Waste Polyethylene for Electric Power Generation---in a Miniature Steam Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi Anaraki, Saber

    The amounts of waste plastics discarded in developed countries are increasing drastically, and most are not recycled. The small fractions of the post-consumer plastics which are recycled find few new uses as their quality is degraded; they cannot be reused in their original applications. However, the high energy density of plastics, similar to that of premium fuels, combined with the dwindling reserves of fossil fuels make a compelling argument for releasing their internal energy through combustion, converting it to thermal energy and, eventually, to electricity through a heat engine. To minimize the emission of pollutants this energy conversion is done in two steps, first the solid waste plastics undergo pyrolytic gasification and, subsequently, the pyrolyzates (a mixture of hydrocarbons and hydrogen) are blended with air and are burned "cleanly" in a miniature power plant. This plant consists of a steam boiler, a steam engine and an electricity generator.

  8. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  9. DOSIMETRIC response of a REM-500 in low energy neutron fields typical of nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Matysiak, W; Atanackovic, J; Waker, A J

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the response of a REM-500 to assess neutron quality factor and dose equivalent in low energy neutron fields, which are commonly encountered in the workplace environment of nuclear power stations. The McMaster University 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator facility was used to measure the response of the instrument in monoenergetic neutron fields in the energy range 51 to 727 keV by bombarding a thin LiF target with 1.93-2.50 MeV protons. The energy distribution of the neutron fields produced in the facility was measured by a (3)He filled gas ionization chamber. The MCA mode of the REM-500 instrument was used to collect lineal energy distributions at varying neutron energies and to calculate the frequency and dose-mean lineal energies. The effective quality factor, Q-, was also calculated using the values of Q(y)listed in the REM-500 operation manual and compared with those of ICRP 60. The authors observed a continuously increasing trend in y - F, y-D, and Q-with an increase in neutron energy. It is interesting to note that standard tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) filled with tissue equivalent(TE) gas give rise to a similar trend for these microdosimetric quantities of interest in the same energy range; however, the averages calculated in this study are larger by about 15%compared to a TEPC filled with propane-based TE gas probably because of the larger stopping power of protons in propane compared to TE gas. These somewhat larger event sizes did not result in any significant increase in the Q-compared to those obtained from a TEPC filled with TE gas and were found to be in good agreement with other measurements reported earlier at corresponding neutron energies. The instrument quality factor response, R(Q), defined as the ratio of measured quality factor to the calculated quality factor in an ICRU tissue sphere,was found to vary with neutron energy. The instrument response,R(Q), was ~0.6 at 727 keV, which deteriorates further to

  10. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I.; Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M.

    2013-12-15

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ∼200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ∼2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ∼4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  11. Diverse methods of analyzing neutron detector signal for power monitoring in commercial fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishna, M.; Nagaraj, C. P.; Madhusoodanan, K.

    2011-07-01

    In a fast reactor, the measurement of instantaneous power, accurately at any point of time is of prime importance. To control the reactor power within its design limit for safe operation, measurement of power and safety functions operated by different systems based on power is required. This is done with neutron detectors from which signal come as current pulses in random following Poisson distribution. Due to heavy overlap, individual pulse counting is extremely difficult beyond certain frequency. So to count pulses in the detector output in a given length of time, which will be measure of power in the reactor, indirect method of signal processing is applied here. After applying signal processing methods on the detector output, linear relation is established between maximum amplitude of absolute of FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) of the signal and no of pulses in a given length of time of the signal i.e. rate of arrival of pulses to the detector. This linear relation is verified in different ways i.e. with simulated fixed rate of arrival of the pulses, random rate of arrival of the pulses and with neutron detector simulator output. The paper explains various stages of development and testing. (authors)

  12. Miniaturized Broadband 3-dB / 90 deg and 180 deg Power Splitters for GPS/GNSS Anti-Jam Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    circularly polarized antennas . Principal results: A miniaturized two-section 180◦ hybrid using microstrip space-f lling curves has been designed and...design- ing antenna feeding circuits for GPS/GNSS anti-jam systems, but it can be used for other wideband applications. A miniaturized two-section...are miniaturization strategies employed to reduce the footprint of the microstrip rat-race hybrid. Using the same principle as of folded lines, an

  13. Miniature information displays: primary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvelda, Phillip; Lewis, Nancy D.

    1998-04-01

    Positioned to replace current liquid crystal display technology in many applications, miniature information displays have evolved to provide several truly portable platforms for the world's growing personal computing and communication needs. The technology and functionality of handheld computer and communicator systems has finally surpassed many of the standards that were originally established for desktop systems. In these new consumer electronics, performance, display size, packaging, power consumption, and cost have always been limiting factors for fabricating genuinely portable devices. The rapidly growing miniature information display manufacturing industry is making it possible to bring a wide range of highly anticipated new products to new markets.

  14. Mars Miniature Science Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soon Sam; Hayati, Samad; Lavery, David; McBrid, Karen

    2006-01-01

    For robotic Mars missions, all the science information is gathered through on-board miniature instruments that have been developed through many years of R&D. Compared to laboratory counterparts, the rover instruments require miniaturization, such as low mass (1-2 kg), low power (> 10 W) and compact (1-2 liter), yet with comparable sensitivity. Since early 1990's, NASA recognized the need for the miniature instruments and launched several instrument R&D programs, e.g., PIDDP (Planetary Instrument Definition and Development). However, until 1998, most of the instrument R&D programs supported only up to a breadboard level (TRL 3, 4) and there is a need to carry such instruments to flight qualifiable status (TU 5, 6) to respond to flight AOs (Announcement of Opportunity). Most of flight AOs have only limited time and financial resources, and can not afford such instrument development processes. To bridge the gap between instrument R&D programs and the flight instrument needs, NASA's Mars Technology Program (MTP) created advanced instrumentation program, Mars Instrument Development Project (MIDP). MIDP candidate instruments are selected through NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process [l]. For example, MIDP 161998-2000) selected and developed 10 instruments, MIDP II (2003-2005) 16 instruments, and MIDP III (2004-2006) II instruments.Working with PIs, JPL has been managing the MIDP tasks since September 1998. All the instruments being developed under MIDP have been selected through a highly competitive NRA process, and employ state-of-the-art technology. So far, four MIDP funded instruments have been selected by two Mars missions (these instruments have further been discussed in this paper).

  15. Neutron activation analysis of thermal power plant ash and surrounding area soils.

    PubMed

    Al-Masri, M S; Haddad, Kh; Alsomel, N; Sarhil, A

    2015-08-01

    Elemental concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, and Zn have been determined in fly and bottom ash collected from Syrian power plants fired by heavy oil and natural gas using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The results showed that all elements were more concentrated in fly ash than in the fly ash; there was a clear increasing trend of the elemental concentrations in the fly ash along the flue gas pathway. The annual emission of elements was estimated. Elemental concentrations were higher inside the campus area than in surrounding areas, and the lowest values were found in natural-gas-fired power plant. In addition, the levels have decreased as the distance from power plant campus increases. However, the levels in the surrounding villages were within the Syrian standard for agriculture soil.

  16. LOS ALAMOS NEUTRON SCIENCE CENTER CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE POWER REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    GAVRON, VICTOR I.; HILL, TONY S.; PITCHER, ERIC J.; TOVESSON, FREDERIK K.

    2007-01-09

    measurements in progress include {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu. The United States recently announced the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), with the goal of closing the commercial nuclear fuel cycle while minimizing proliferation risk. GNEP achieves these goals using fast-spectrum nuclear reactors powered by new transmutation fuels that contain significant quantities of minor actinides. The proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) will provide the GNEP with a cost-effective means of obtaining domestic fast-spectrum irradiations of advanced transmutation fuel forms and structural materials, which is an important step in the fuels qualification process. The MTS will be located at the LANSCE, and will be driven by a 1.08-MW proton beam. Th epeak neutron flux in the irradiation region is 1.67 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}/s, and the energy spectrum is similar to that of a fast reactor, with the addition of a high-energy tail. The facility is expected to operate at least 4,400 hours per year. Fuel burnup rates will exceed 4% per year, and the radiation damage rate in iron will be 18 dpa (displacements per atom) per year. The construction cost is estimated to be $73M (including 25% contingency), with annual operating costs in the range of $6M to $10M. Appropriately funded, the MTS could begin operation in 2010.

  17. Miniaturized optical wavelength sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Helen Ling-Ning

    Recently semiconductor processing technology has been applied to the miniaturization of optical wavelength sensors. Compact sensors enable new applications such as integrated diode-laser wavelength monitors and frequency lockers, portable chemical and biological detection, and portable and adaptive hyperspectral imaging arrays. Small sensing systems have trade-offs between resolution, operating range, throughput, multiplexing and complexity. We have developed a new wavelength sensing architecture that balances these parameters for applications involving hyperspectral imaging spectrometer arrays. In this thesis we discuss and demonstrate two new wavelength-sensing architectures whose single-pixel designs can easily be extended into spectrometer arrays. The first class of devices is based on sampling a standing wave. These devices are based on measuring the wavelength-dependent period of optical standing waves formed by the interference of forward and reflected waves at a mirror. We fabricated two different devices based on this principle. The first device is a wavelength monitor, which measures the wavelength and power of a monochromatic source. The second device is a spectrometer that can also act as a selective spectral coherence sensor. The spectrometer contains a large displacement piston-motion MEMS mirror and a thin GaAs photodiode flip-chip bonded to a quartz substrate. The performance of this spectrometer is similar to that of a Michelson in resolution, operating range, throughput and multiplexing but with the added advantages of fewer components and one-dimensional architecture. The second class of devices is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect. The Talbot effect occurs when a periodic object is illuminated with a spatially coherent wave. Periodically spaced self-images are formed behind the object. The spacing of the self-images is proportional to wavelength of the incident light. We discuss and demonstrate how this effect can be used for spectroscopy

  18. Miniature snapshot multispectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam; Ashe, Philip R.; Tan, Songsheng

    2011-03-01

    We present a miniature snapshot multispectral imager based on using a monolithic filter array that operates in the short wavelength infrared spectral region and has a number of defense and commercial applications. The system is low-weight, portable with a miniature platform, and requires low power. The imager uses a 4×4 Fabry-Pérot filter array operating from 1487 to 1769 nm with a spectral bandpass ~10 nm. The design of the filters is based on using a shadow mask technique to fabricate an array of Fabry-Pérot etalons with two multilayer dielectric mirrors. The filter array is installed in a commercial handheld InGaAs camera, replacing the imaging lens with a custom designed 4×4 microlens assembly with telecentric imaging performance in each of the 16 subimaging channels. We imaged several indoor and outdoor scenes. The microlens assembly and filter design is quite flexible and can be tailored for any wavelength region from the ultraviolet to the longwave infrared, and the spectral bandpass can also be customized to meet sensing requirements. In this paper we discuss the design and characterization of the filter array, the microlens optical assembly, and imager and present imaging results.

  19. A low-power and miniaturized electrocardiograph data collection system with smart textile electrodes for monitoring of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming; Xiao, Xueliang; Chen, Xin; Lin, Haoming; Wu, Wanqing; Chen, Siping

    2016-12-01

    With the increasing aging population as well as health concerns, chronic heart disease has become the focus of public attention. A comfortable, low-powered, and wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) system for continuously monitoring the elderly's ECG signals over several hours is important for preventing cardiovascular diseases. Traditional ECG monitoring apparatus is often inconvenient to carry, has many electrodes to attach to the chest, and has a high-power consumption. There is also a challenge to design an electrocardiograph that satisfies requirements such as comfort, confinement, and compactness. Based on these considerations, this study presents a biosensor acquisition system for wearable, ubiquitous healthcare applications using three textile electrodes and a recording circuit specialized for ECG monitoring. In addition, several methods were adopted to reduce the power consumption of the device. The proposed system is composed of three parts: (1) an ECG analog front end (AFE), (2) digital signal processing and micro-control circuits, and (3) system software. Digital filter methods were used to eliminate the baseline wander, skin contact noise, and other interfering signals. A comparative study was conducted using this system to observe its performance with two commercial Holter monitors. The experimental results demonstrated that the total power consumption of this proposed system in a full round of ECG acquisition was only 29.74 mW. In addition, this low-power system performed well and stably measured the heart rate with an accuracy of 98.55 %. It can also contain a real-time dynamic display with organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) and wirelessly transmit information via a Bluetooth 4.0 module.

  20. A physical interpretation of the variability power spectral components in accreting neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Adam; Done, Chris

    2010-07-01

    We propose a physical framework for interpreting the characteristic frequencies seen in the broad-band power spectra from black hole and neutron star binaries. We use the truncated disc/hot inner flow geometry, and assume that the hot flow is generically turbulent. Each radius in the hot flow produces fluctuations, and we further assume that these are damped on the viscous frequency. Integrating over radii gives broad-band continuum noise power between low- and high-frequency breaks which are set by the viscous time-scale at the outer and inner edge of the hot flow, respectively. Lense-Thirring (vertical) precession of the entire hot flow superimposes the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) on this continuum power. We test this model on the power spectra seen in the neutron star systems (atolls) as these have the key advantage that the (upper) kHz QPO most likely independently tracks the truncation radius. These show that this model can give a consistent solution, with the truncation radius decreasing from 20 to 8Rg while the inner radius of the flow remains approximately constant at ~4.5Rg i.e. 9.2 km. We use this very constrained geometry to predict the low-frequency QPO from Lense-Thirring precession of the entire hot flow from ro to ri. The simplest assumption of a constant surface density in the hot flow matches the observed QPO frequency to within 25 per cent. This match can be made even better by considering that the surface density should become increasingly centrally concentrated as the flow collapses into an optically thick boundary layer during the spectral transition. The success of the model opens up the way to use the broad-band power spectra as a diagnostic of accretion flows in strong gravity.

  1. Miniaturized autonomous robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Hidenori; Fukuda, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Many projects developing the miniaturized autonomous robot have been carried out in the whole world. This paper deals with our challenges developing a miniaturized autonomous robot. The miniaturized autonomous robot is defined as the miniaturized closed-loop system with micro processor, microactuators and microsensors. We have developed the micro autonomous robotic system (MARS) consisting of the microprocessor, microsensors, microactuators, communication units and batteries. The MARS controls itself by the downloaded program supplied through the IR communication system. In this paper, we demonstrate several performance of the MARS, and discuss the properties of the miniaturized autonomous robot.

  2. Design of an ultra low power CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Hu-Guo, C.; Husson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-01

    Despite a continuously increasing demand, neutron electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are still far from being completely established because their development is a very difficult task. A low-noise, ultra low power consumption CMOS pixel sensor for a future neutron personal dosimeter has been implemented in a 0.35 {mu}m CMOS technology. The prototype is composed of a pixel array for detection of charged particles, and the readout electronics is integrated on the same substrate for signal processing. The excess electrons generated by an impinging particle are collected by the pixel array. The charge collection time and the efficiency are the crucial points of a CMOS detector. The 3-D device simulations using the commercially available Synopsys-SENTAURUS package address the detailed charge collection process. Within a time of 1.9 {mu}s, about 59% electrons created by the impact particle are collected in a cluster of 4 x 4 pixels with the pixel pitch of 80 {mu}m. A charge sensitive preamplifier (CSA) and a shaper are employed in the frond-end readout. The tests with electrical signals indicate that our prototype with a total active area of 2.56 x 2.56 mm{sup 2} performs an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of less than 400 e - and 314 {mu}W power consumption, leading to a promising prototype. (authors)

  3. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  4. Triggering Mechanism for Neutron Induced Single-Event Burnout in Power Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Shuichi; Hamada, Kimimori

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic ray neutrons can trigger catastrophic failures in power devices. It has been reported that parasitic transistor action causes single-event burnout (SEB) in power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). However, power diodes do not have an inherent parasitic transistor. In this paper, we describe the mechanism triggering SEB in power diodes for the first time using transient device simulation. Initially, generated electron-hole pairs created by incident recoil ions generate transient current, which increases the electron density in the vicinity of the n-/n+ boundary. The space charge effect of the carriers leads to an increase in the strength of the electric field at the n-/n+ boundary. Finally, the onset of impact ionization at the n-/n+ boundary can trigger SEB. Furthermore, this failure is closely related to diode secondary breakdown. It was clarified that the impact ionization at the n-/n+ boundary is a key point of the mechanism triggering SEB in power devices.

  5. Very High Efficiency, Miniaturized, Long-Lived Alpha Particle Power Source Using Diamond Devices for Extreme Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, Elizabeth A. (Inventor); Patel, Jagdishbhai U. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A power source that converts a-particle energy into electricity by coulomb collision in doped diamond films is described. Alpha particle decay from curium-244 creates electron-hole pairs by free- ing electrons and holes inside the crystal lattice in N- and P-doped diamond films. Ohmic contacts provide electrical connection to an electronic device. Due to the built-in electric field at the rectifying junction across the hT- and P-doped diamond films, the free electrons are constrained to traveling in generally one direction. This one direction then supplies electrons in a manner similar to that of a battery. The radioactive curium layer may be disposed on diamond films for even distribution of a-particle radiation. The resulting power source may be mounted on a diamond substrate that serves to insulate structures below the diamond substrate from a-particle emission. Additional insulation or isolation may be provided in order to prevent damage from a-particle collision. N-doped silicon may be used instead of N-doped diamond.

  6. Miniature Latching Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. David; Benson, Glendon M.

    2008-01-01

    A miniature latching valve has been invented to satisfy a need for an electrically controllable on/off pneumatic valve that is lightweight and compact and remains in the most recently commanded open or closed state when power is not supplied. The valve includes a poppet that is moved into or out of contact with a seat to effect closure or opening, respectively, of the flow path. Motion of the poppet is initiated by electrical heating of one of two opposing pairs of nickel/titanium shape-memory alloy (SMA) wires above their transition temperature: heated wires contract to their remembered length, applying tension to pull the poppet toward or away from the seat. A latch consisting mainly of a bistable Belleville washer (a conical spring) made of a hardened stainless steel operates between two stable positions corresponding to the fully closed or fully open state, holding the poppet in one of these positions when power is not applied to either pair of SMA wires. To obtain maximum actuation force and displacement, the SMA wires must be kept in tension. The mounting fixtures at the ends of the wires must support large tensile stresses without creating stress concentrations that would limit the fatigue lives of the wires. An earlier design provided for each wire to be crimped in a conical opening with a conical steel ferrule that was swaged into the opening to produce a large, uniformly distributed holding force. In a subsequent design, the conical ferrule was replaced with a larger crimped cylindrical ferrule depicted in the figure. A major problem in designing the valve was to protect the SMA wires from a bake-out temperature of 300 C. The problem was solved by incorporating the SMA wires into an actuator module that is inserted into a barrel of the valve body and is held in place by miniature clip rings.

  7. Basis for the power supply reliability study of the 1 MW neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, D.G.; Fathizadeh, M.

    1993-07-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) upgrade to 1 MW requires new power supply designs. This paper describes the tools and the methodology needed to assess the reliability of the power supplies. Both the design and operation of the power supplies in the synchrotron will be taken into account. To develop a reliability budget, the experiments to be conducted with this accelerator are reviewed, and data is collected on the number and duration of interruptions possible before an experiment is required to start over. Once the budget is established, several accelerators of this type will be examined. The budget is allocated to the different accelerator systems based on their operating experience. The accelerator data is usually in terms of machine availability and system down time. It takes into account mean time to failure (MTTF), time to diagnose, time to repair or replace the failed components, and time to get the machine back online. These estimated times are used as baselines for the design. Even though we are in the early stage of design, available data can be analyzed to estimate the MTTF for the power supplies.

  8. Development and characterization of a high yield transportable pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rishi; Mishra, Ekansh; Dhang, Prosenjit; Sagar, Karuna; Meena, Manraj; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    The results of characterization experiments carried out on a newly developed dense plasma focus device based intense pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system are reported. Its high current sealed pseudospark switch based low inductance capacitor bank with maximum stored energy of ˜10 kJ is segregated into four modules of ˜2.5 kJ each and it cumulatively delivers peak current in the range of 400 kA-600 kA (corresponding to charging voltage range of 14 kV-18 kV) in a quarter time period of ˜2 μs. The neutron yield performance of this device has been optimized by discretely varying deuterium filling gas pressure in the range of 6 mbar-11 mbar at ˜17 kV/550 kA discharge. At ˜7 kJ/8.5 mbar operation, the average neutron yield has been measured to be in the order of ˜4 × 109 neutrons/pulse which is the highest ever reported neutron yield from a plasma focus device with the same stored energy. The average forward to radial anisotropy in neutron yield is found to be ˜2. The entire system is contained on a moveable trolley having dimensions 1.5 m × 1 m × 0.7 m and its operation and control (up to the distance of 25 m) are facilitated through optically isolated handheld remote console. The overall compactness of this system provides minimum proximity to small as well as large samples for irradiation. The major intended application objective of this high neutron yield dense plasma focus device development is to explore the feasibility of active neutron interrogation experiments by utilization of intense pulsed neutron sources.

  9. Development and characterization of a high yield transportable pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rishi; Mishra, Ekansh; Dhang, Prosenjit; Sagar, Karuna; Meena, Manraj; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-09-01

    The results of characterization experiments carried out on a newly developed dense plasma focus device based intense pulsed neutron source with efficient and compact pulsed power system are reported. Its high current sealed pseudospark switch based low inductance capacitor bank with maximum stored energy of ∼10 kJ is segregated into four modules of ∼2.5 kJ each and it cumulatively delivers peak current in the range of 400 kA-600 kA (corresponding to charging voltage range of 14 kV-18 kV) in a quarter time period of ∼2 μs. The neutron yield performance of this device has been optimized by discretely varying deuterium filling gas pressure in the range of 6 mbar-11 mbar at ∼17 kV/550 kA discharge. At ∼7 kJ/8.5 mbar operation, the average neutron yield has been measured to be in the order of ∼4 × 10(9) neutrons/pulse which is the highest ever reported neutron yield from a plasma focus device with the same stored energy. The average forward to radial anisotropy in neutron yield is found to be ∼2. The entire system is contained on a moveable trolley having dimensions 1.5 m × 1 m × 0.7 m and its operation and control (up to the distance of 25 m) are facilitated through optically isolated handheld remote console. The overall compactness of this system provides minimum proximity to small as well as large samples for irradiation. The major intended application objective of this high neutron yield dense plasma focus device development is to explore the feasibility of active neutron interrogation experiments by utilization of intense pulsed neutron sources.

  10. [A new correction method for radionuclide formation in neutron activation analysis using a reactor power meter coupled with a microcomputer].

    PubMed

    Hirai, S; Yoshino, Y; Suzuki, S; Horiuchi, N

    1982-05-01

    Neutron flux and irradiation time should be accurately known in neutron activation analysis using very short lived nuclides in which conventional monitoring methods i.e., a comparator method, flux monitor method and so on cannot be used satisfactorily. Especially, fluctuation of neutron flux has not been corrected. We noted a change of reactor power at a pneumatic operation, and found out a new correction method for its correction in activation analysis. In our small nuclear reactor, TRIGA-II, the reactor power increased rapidly a few % when a pneumatic-operated capsule arrived at a core of the reactor, and decreased when the capsule left from the core. If the duration between these two changes of the reactor power is equal to the irradiation time, and that the reactor power is proportional to the neutron flux, we can regard an activity formation as a time integration of the reactor power. Then, the correction system was made of a reactor power meter, a V-F converter (voltage to frequency converter), a clock time, a counter, a microcomputer, electric circuits and so on. The signal of the reactor power during the irradiation was counted through the V-F converter, and was accumulated in a memory of the microcomputer. The neutron fluence was calculated in this microcomputer. This method was examined by means of activation of copper and selenium standard samples by 9-11 sec irradiations. The observed activity involved +/- 10% error. However, the error in the corrected activity was decreased to a few % using this correction method. As a result, we found that this method can be used to obtain accurate value for radionuclide formation.

  11. Handheld interface for miniature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sunny; Samson, Scott A.; Farmer, Andrew; Smith, Matthew C.; Fries, David; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2005-02-01

    Miniaturization of laboratory sensors has been enabled by continued evolution of technology. Field portable systems are often desired, because they reduce sample handling, provide rapid feedback capability, and enhance convenience. Fieldable sensor systems should include a method for initiating the analysis, storing and displaying the results, while consuming minimal power and being compact and portable. Low cost will allow widespread usage of these systems. In this paper, we discuss a reconfigurable Personal Data Assistant (PDA) based control and data collection system for use with miniature sensors. The system is based on the Handspring visor PDA and a custom designed motherboard, which connects directly to the PDA microprocessor. The PDA provides a convenient and low cost graphical user interface, moderate processing capability, and integrated battery power. The low power motherboard provides the voltage levels, data collection, and input/output (I/O) capabilities required by many MEMS and miniature sensors. These capabilities are relayed to connectors, where an application specific daughterboard is attached. In this paper, two applications are demonstrated. First, a handheld nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) detection sensor consisting of a heated and optical fluorescence detection system is discussed. Second, an electrostatically actuated MEMS micro mirror controller is realized.

  12. Miniaturized g- and spin-activated Pb/HBF 4/PbO 2 reserve batteries as power sources for electronic fuzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sang-Hee; Son, Joong-Tak; Oh, Jong-Soo

    This paper discusses miniaturized Pb/HBF 4/PbO 2 reserve batteries (MRB) for military applications as in-flight power sources for small-caliber electronic fuzes, where the setback acceleration and high-spin force in firing environments are used to activate the MRB. The MRB is composed of a series configured 23 bipolar electrodes, an isolated glass ampoule filled with an electrolyte and an internal cutter for breaking the glass ampoule. The MRB is designed to furnish high-voltage electrical energy with a fast activation time in gunfire environments and must have a 20-year shelf life. The electrolyte volume is determined from the simulation results of a CFD program (FLUENT) for reduction in design time and cost. Two kinds of MRBs have been designed and fabricated: MRB-S with one narrow electrolyte-filling microchannel and MRB-D with two. In the experimental study, spin tests under 10,000 × g's and ∼20,000 rpm conditions and a fire test under 43,000 × g's and 57,000 rpm conditions have been made. The fabricated MRB with a diameter of 16 mm and a height of 13 mm has achieved a maximum voltage of 34.6 ± 0.4 V, an activation time of 8.6 ± 0.6 ms and a maximum capacity of 37.4 ± 0.4 W s at an optimized electrolyte volume of 180 mm 3. The test results have verified that the activation time of the MRB at a low temperature of -32 °C can be improved by decreasing the flow resistance of the electrolyte in spite of the decreased ion mobility.

  13. Miniature propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John G.

    1992-07-01

    Miniature solenoid valves, check valves and a hydrazine gas generator typify the miniaturization used in the liquid propulsion system for the Army Light Weight Exo-Atmospheric Projectile (LEAP). The pressure control subsystem uses a solenoid valve weighing 24 grams to control flow of helium to pressurize the propellant tanks. The attitude control subsystem uses a gas generator weighing 71 grams to produce decomposed hydrazine as the gaseous propellant for miniature 1 lbf ACS thrusters weighing 5.4 grams. The successful use of these miniature components in development tests and a hover test of the LEAP is described.

  14. Thermal and neutron-physical features of the nuclear reactor for a power pulsation plant for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordeev, É. G.; Kaminskii, A. S.; Konyukhov, G. V.; Pavshuk, V. A.; Turbina, T. A.

    2012-05-01

    We have explored the possibility of creating small-size reactors with a high power output with the provision of thermal stability and nuclear safety under standard operating conditions and in emergency situations. The neutron-physical features of such a reactor have been considered and variants of its designs preserving the main principles and approaches of nuclear rocket engine technology are presented.

  15. Formulation and experimental evaluation of closed-form control laws for the rapid maneuvering of reactor neutronic power

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, J.A. . Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    1989-09-01

    This report describes both the theoretical development and the experimental evaluation of a novel, robust methodology for the time-optimal adjustment of a reactor's neutronic power under conditions of closed-loop digital control. Central to the approach are the MIT-SNL Period-Generated Minimum Time Control Laws' which determine the rate at which reactivity should be changed in order to cause a reactor's neutronic power to conform to a specified trajectory. Using these laws, reactor power can be safely raised by five to seven orders of magnitude in a few seconds. The MIT-SNL laws were developed to facilitate rapid increases of neutronic power on spacecraft reactors operating in an SDI environment. However, these laws are generic and have other applications including the rapid recovery of research and test reactors subsequent to an unanticipated shutdown, power increases following the achievement of criticality on commercial reactors, power adjustments on commercial reactors so as to minimize thermal stress, and automated startups. The work reported here was performed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under contract to the Sandia National Laboratories. Support was also provided by the US Department of Energy's Division of University and Industry Programs. The work described in this report is significant in that a novel solution to the problem of time-optimal control of neutronic power was identified, in that a rigorous description of a reactor's dynamics was derived in that the rate of change of reactivity was recognized as the proper control signal, and in that extensive experimental trials were conducted of these newly developed concepts on actual nuclear reactors. 43 refs., 118 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Conceptual design of a neutron diagnostic for 2-D deuterium power density map reconstruction in MITICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebai, M.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Murtas, F.; Cavenago, M.; Gorini, G.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron diagnostic based on Gas Electron Multiplier is proposed for the MITICA beam injector test facility. The detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM) and aims at providing the beam intensity profile on the horizontal direction by measuring the neutron emission from the beam dump surface by placing a detector right behind the dump. CNESM uses Gas Electron Multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil, named nGEM. The cathode, made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film, is designed for detection of neutrons emitted with and angle between 30 and 70 degrees with respect to the deuterium beam axis. Neutron scattering in the dump and neutron detection with the nGEM were simulated with the MCNP6.1.1 code.

  17. An Investigation Into the Performance of a Miniature Diesel Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, P. W.

    1970-01-01

    Reports the procedures and results of a student investigation of the performance of a miniature diesel engine. The experiments include (1) torque measurement, (2) power measurement, and (3) variation of power output with applied load. Bibliography. (LC)

  18. The Status of Research Regarding Magnetic Mirrors as a Fusion Neutron Source or Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T

    2008-12-23

    Experimental results, theory and innovative ideas now point with increased confidence to the possibility of a Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) neutron source which would be on the path to an attractively simple Axisymmetric Tandem Mirror (ATM) power plant. Although magnetic mirror research was terminated in the US 20 years ago, experiments continued in Japan (Gamma 10) and Russia (GDT), with a very small US effort. This research has now yielded data, increased understanding, and generated ideas resulting in the new concepts described here. Early mirror research was carried out with circular axisymmetric magnets. These plasmas were MHD unstable due to the unfavorable magnetic curvature near the mid-plane. Then the minimum-B concept emerged in which the field line curvature was everywhere favorable and the plasma was situated in a MHD stable magnetic well (70% average beta in 2XII-B). The Ioffe-bar or baseball-coil became the standard for over 40 years. In the 1980's, driven by success with minimum-B stabilization and the control of ion cyclotron instabilities in PR6 and 2XII-B, mirrors were viewed as a potentially attractive concept with near-term advantages as a lower Q neutron source for applications such as a hybrid fission fuel factory or toxic waste burner. However there are down sides to the minimum-B geometry: coil construction is complex; restraining magnetic forces limit field strength and mirror ratios. Furthermore, the magnetic field lines have geodesic curvature which introduces resonant and neoclassical radial transport as observed in early tandem mirror experiments. So what now leads us to think that simple axisymmetric mirror plasmas can be stable? The Russian GDT experiment achieves on-axis 60% beta by peaking of the kinetic plasma pressure near the mirror throat (where the curvature is favorable) to counter-balance the average unfavorable mid-plane curvature. Then a modest augmentation of plasma pressure in the expander results in stability. The GDT

  19. An ultraluminous X-ray source powered by an accreting neutron star.

    PubMed

    Bachetti, M; Harrison, F A; Walton, D J; Grefenstette, B W; Chakrabarty, D; Fürst, F; Barret, D; Beloborodov, A; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Fabian, A C; Hailey, C J; Hornschemeier, A; Kaspi, V; Kulkarni, S R; Maccarone, T; Miller, J M; Rana, V; Stern, D; Tendulkar, S P; Tomsick, J; Webb, N A; Zhang, W W

    2014-10-09

    The majority of ultraluminous X-ray sources are point sources that are spatially offset from the nuclei of nearby galaxies and whose X-ray luminosities exceed the theoretical maximum for spherical infall (the Eddington limit) onto stellar-mass black holes. Their X-ray luminosities in the 0.5-10 kiloelectronvolt energy band range from 10(39) to 10(41) ergs per second. Because higher masses imply less extreme ratios of the luminosity to the isotropic Eddington limit, theoretical models have focused on black hole rather than neutron star systems. The most challenging sources to explain are those at the luminous end of the range (more than 10(40) ergs per second), which require black hole masses of 50-100 times the solar value or significant departures from the standard thin disk accretion that powers bright Galactic X-ray binaries, or both. Here we report broadband X-ray observations of the nuclear region of the galaxy M82 that reveal pulsations with an average period of 1.37 seconds and a 2.5-day sinusoidal modulation. The pulsations result from the rotation of a magnetized neutron star, and the modulation arises from its binary orbit. The pulsed flux alone corresponds to an X-ray luminosity in the 3-30 kiloelectronvolt range of 4.9 × 10(39) ergs per second. The pulsating source is spatially coincident with a variable source that can reach an X-ray luminosity in the 0.3-10 kiloelectronvolt range of 1.8 × 10(40) ergs per second. This association implies a luminosity of about 100 times the Eddington limit for a 1.4-solar-mass object, or more than ten times brighter than any known accreting pulsar. This implies that neutron stars may not be rare in the ultraluminous X-ray population, and it challenges physical models for the accretion of matter onto magnetized compact objects.

  20. Experimental and simulation studies of neutron-induced single-event burnout in SiC power diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Shuichi; Hamada, Kimimori; Tadano, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Neutron-induced single-event burnouts (SEBs) of silicon carbide (SiC) power diodes have been investigated by white neutron irradiation experiments and transient device simulations. It was confirmed that a rapid increase in lattice temperature leads to formation of crown-shaped aluminum and cracks inside the device owing to expansion stress when the maximum lattice temperature reaches the sublimation temperature. SEB device simulation indicated that the peak lattice temperature is located in the vicinity of the n-/n+ interface and anode contact, and that the positions correspond to a hammock-like electric field distribution caused by the space charge effect. Moreover, the locations of the simulated peak lattice temperature agree closely with the positions of the observed destruction traces. Furthermore, it was theoretically demonstrated that the period of temperature increase of a SiC power device is two orders of magnitude less than that of a Si power device, using a thermal diffusion equation.

  1. Some neutron and gamma radiation characteristics of plutonium cermet fuel for isotopic power sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, R. A.; Anderson, M. E.; Campbell, A. R.; Haas, F. X.

    1972-01-01

    Gamma and neutron measurements on various types of plutonium sources are presented in order to show the effects of O-17, O-18 F-19, Pu-236, age of the fuel, and size of the source on the gamma and neutron spectra. Analysis of the radiation measurements shows that fluorine is the main contributor to the neutron yields from present plutonium-molybdenum cermet fuel, while both fluorine and Pu-236 daughters contribute significantly to the gamma ray intensities.

  2. FLEXIBLE NEUTRON SHIELDING FOR A GLOVEBOX WITHIN THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie Walsh

    2007-07-01

    Neutron shielding was desired to reduce worker exposure during handling of plutonium-238 (Pu-238) in a glovebox at the Idaho National Laboratory. Due to the unusual shape of the glovebox, standard methods of neutron shielding were impractical and would have interfered with glovebox operations. A silicon-based, boron-impregnated material was chosen due to its flexibility. This paper discusses the material, the installation, and the results from neutron source testing.

  3. Miniature and Molecularly Specific Optical Screening Technologies for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    05-1-0363 TITLE: Miniature and Molecularly Specific Optical Screening Technologies for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...and Molecularly Specific Optical Screening Technologies for Breast Cancer Duke University Durham, NC 27705 Nirmala Ramanujam The goal of this...proposal is to harness the power of light to create “miniature and molecularly specific optical technologies” for breast cancer diagnosis and

  4. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  5. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  6. Reaction-in-Flight neutrons as a test of stopping power in degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.; Cerjan, C. J.; Jungman, G.; Fowler, M. M.; Gooden, M. E.; Grim, G. P.; Henry, E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Sepke, S. M.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Singleton, R. L.; Tonchev, A. P.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-05-01

    Cryogenically cooled inertial confinement fusion capsule designs are suitable for studies of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons. RIF neutrons occur when energetically up-scattered ions undergo DT reactions with a thermal ion in the plasma, producing neutrons in the energy range 9-30 MeV. The knock-on ions lose energy as they traverse the plasma, which directly affects the spectrum of the produced RIF neutrons. Here we present measurements from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of RIF neutrons produced in cryogenic capsules, with energies above 15 MeV. We show that the measured RIFs probe stopping under previously unexplored degenerate plasma conditions and constrain stopping models in warm dense plasma conditions.

  7. Lightweight, Miniature Inertial Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Liang; Crassidis, Agamemnon

    2012-01-01

    A miniature, lighter-weight, and highly accurate inertial navigation system (INS) is coupled with GPS receivers to provide stable and highly accurate positioning, attitude, and inertial measurements while being subjected to highly dynamic maneuvers. In contrast to conventional methods that use extensive, groundbased, real-time tracking and control units that are expensive, large, and require excessive amounts of power to operate, this method focuses on the development of an estimator that makes use of a low-cost, miniature accelerometer array fused with traditional measurement systems and GPS. Through the use of a position tracking estimation algorithm, onboard accelerometers are numerically integrated and transformed using attitude information to obtain an estimate of position in the inertial frame. Position and velocity estimates are subject to drift due to accelerometer sensor bias and high vibration over time, and so require the integration with GPS information using a Kalman filter to provide highly accurate and reliable inertial tracking estimations. The method implemented here uses the local gravitational field vector. Upon determining the location of the local gravitational field vector relative to two consecutive sensors, the orientation of the device may then be estimated, and the attitude determined. Improved attitude estimates further enhance the inertial position estimates. The device can be powered either by batteries, or by the power source onboard its target platforms. A DB9 port provides the I/O to external systems, and the device is designed to be mounted in a waterproof case for all-weather conditions.

  8. Neutronic design studies of a conceptual DCLL fusion reactor for a DEMO and a commercial power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, I.; Veredas, G.; Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Ibarra, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutronic analyses or, more widely, nuclear analyses have been performed for the development of a dual-coolant He/LiPb (DCLL) conceptual design reactor. A detailed three-dimensional (3D) model has been examined and optimized. The design is based on the plasma parameters and functional materials of the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) model C. The initial radial-build for the detailed model has been determined according to the dimensions established in a previous work on an equivalent simplified homogenized reactor model. For optimization purposes, the initial specifications established over the simplified model have been refined on the detailed 3D design, modifying material and dimension of breeding blanket, shield and vacuum vessel in order to fulfil the priority requirements of a fusion reactor in terms of the fundamental neutronic responses. Tritium breeding ratio, energy multiplication factor, radiation limits in the TF coils, helium production and displacements per atom (dpa) have been calculated in order to demonstrate the functionality and viability of the reactor design in guaranteeing tritium self-sufficiency, power efficiency, plasma confinement, and re-weldability and structural integrity of the components. The paper describes the neutronic design improvements of the DCLL reactor, obtaining results for both DEMO and power plant operational scenarios.

  9. Fast Neutron Spectrum Potassium Worth for Space Power Reactor Design Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, John D.; Marshall, Margaret A.; Briggs, J. Blair; Tsiboulia, Anatoli; Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy; Mihalczo, John T.

    2015-03-01

    A variety of critical experiments were constructed of enriched uranium metal (oralloy ) during the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. The purposes of these experiments included the evaluation of storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant and providing data for verification of calculation methods and cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included solid cylinders of various diameters, annuli of various inner and outer diameters, two and three interacting cylinders of various diameters, and graphite and polyethylene reflected cylinders and annuli. Of the hundreds of delayed critical experiments, one was performed that consisted of uranium metal annuli surrounding a potassium-filled, stainless steel can. The outer diameter of the annuli was approximately 13 inches (33.02 cm) with an inner diameter of 7 inches (17.78 cm). The diameter of the stainless steel can was 7 inches (17.78 cm). The critical height of the configurations was approximately 5.6 inches (14.224 cm). The uranium annulus consisted of multiple stacked rings, each with radial thicknesses of 1 inch (2.54 cm) and varying heights. A companion measurement was performed using empty stainless steel cans; the primary purpose of these experiments was to test the fast neutron cross sections of potassium as it was a candidate for coolant in some early space power reactor designs.The experimental measurements were performed on July 11, 1963, by J. T. Mihalczo and M. S. Wyatt (Ref. 1) with additional information in its corresponding logbook. Unreflected and unmoderated experiments with the same set of highly enriched uranium metal parts were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in the 1960s and are evaluated in the International Handbook for Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) with the identifier HEU MET FAST 051. Thin

  10. ORIGIN OF INTERMITTENT ACCRETION-POWERED X-RAY OSCILLATIONS IN NEUTRON STARS WITH MILLISECOND SPIN PERIODS

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Frederick K.; Boutloukos, Stratos; Van Wassenhove, Sandor; Chamberlain, Robert T.; Lo, Ka Ho; Coleman Miller, M.

    2009-11-01

    We have shown previously that many of the properties of persistent accretion-powered millisecond pulsars can be understood if their X-ray emitting areas are near their spin axes and move as the accretion rate and structure of the inner disk vary. Here, we show that this 'nearly aligned moving spot model' may also explain the intermittent accretion-powered pulsations that have been detected in three weakly magnetic accreting neutron stars. We show that movement of the emitting area from very close to the spin axis to approx10 deg. away can increase the fractional rms amplitude from approx<0.5%, which is usually undetectable with current instruments, to a few percent, which is easily detectable. The second harmonic of the spin frequency usually would not be detected, in agreement with observations. The model produces intermittently detectable oscillations for a range of emitting area sizes and beaming patterns, stellar masses and radii, and viewing directions. Intermittent oscillations are more likely in stars that are more compact. In addition to explaining the sudden appearance of accretion-powered millisecond oscillations in some neutron stars with millisecond spin periods, the model explains why accretion-powered millisecond oscillations are relatively rare and predicts that the persistent accretion-powered millisecond oscillations of other stars may become undetectable for brief intervals. It suggests why millisecond oscillations are frequently detected during the X-ray bursts of some neutron stars but not others and suggests mechanisms that could explain the occasional temporal association of intermittent accretion-powered oscillations with thermonuclear X-ray bursts.

  11. Perforated diode neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Walter J.

    A novel design of neutron sensor was investigated and developed. The perforated, or micro-structured, diode neutron sensor is a concept that has the potential to enhance neutron sensitivity of a common solid-state sensor configuration. The common thin-film coated diode neutron sensor is the only semiconductor-based neutron sensor that has proven feasible for commercial use. However, the thin-film coating restricts neutron counting efficiency and severely limits the usefulness of the sensor. This research has shown that the perforated design, when properly implemented, can increase the neutron counting efficiency by greater than a factor of 4. Methods developed in this work enable detectors to be fabricated to meet needs such as miniaturization, portability, ruggedness, and adaptability. The new detectors may be used for unique applications such as neutron imaging or the search for special nuclear materials. The research and developments described in the work include the successful fabrication of variant perforated diode neutron detector designs, general explanations of fundamental radiation detector design (with added focus on neutron detection and compactness), as well as descriptive theory and sensor design modeling useful in predicting performance of these unique solid-state radiation sensors. Several aspects in design, fabrication, and operational performance have been considered and tested including neutron counting efficiency, gamma-ray response, perforation shapes and depths, and silicon processing variations. Finally, the successfully proven technology was applied to a 1-dimensional neutron sensor array system.

  12. 46 CFR 52.25-5 - Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). 52.25... ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-5 Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). Miniature boilers must meet the applicable provisions in this part for the boiler type involved and...

  13. 46 CFR 52.25-5 - Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). 52.25... ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-5 Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). Miniature boilers must meet the applicable provisions in this part for the boiler type involved and...

  14. 46 CFR 52.25-5 - Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). 52.25... ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-5 Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). Miniature boilers must meet the applicable provisions in this part for the boiler type involved and...

  15. 46 CFR 52.25-5 - Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). 52.25... ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-5 Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). Miniature boilers must meet the applicable provisions in this part for the boiler type involved and...

  16. 46 CFR 52.25-5 - Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). 52.25... ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-5 Miniature boilers (modifies PMB-1 through PMB-21). Miniature boilers must meet the applicable provisions in this part for the boiler type involved and...

  17. Properties of Miniature Cantilever-Type Ultrasonic Motor Using Lead-Free Array-Type Multilayer Piezoelectric Ceramics of (Sr,Ca)2NaNb5O15 under High Input Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doshida, Yutaka; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Youich; Tamura, Hideki

    2012-07-01

    The properties of miniature cantilever-type ultrasonic motors using lead-free array-type multilayer piezoelectric ceramics of (Sr,Ca)2NaNb5O15 (SCNN) developed using the design rule were investigated under high input power by comparison with the high-power properties of SCNN ceramics. The frequency dependence of the revolution speed reflected the nonlinear behavior of SCNN ceramics with the hard-spring effect and showed a mirror-reversed image relative to that of the motor of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) ceramics. The output power increased linearly with increasing input power up to 110 mW without heat generation, and the driving properties were almost the same as the expectations under low input power. The output power density characteristics of the motors were high in comparison with those of the commercialized motors of PZT ceramics. It appeared that the motors have a high potential as an environmental friendly piezoelectric device with excellent properties, reflecting the high-power properties of SCNN ceramics.

  18. Compact, low power consumption methane sensor based on a novel miniature multipass gas cell and a CW, room temperature interband cascade laser emitting at 3.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Gluszek, Aleksander K.; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-02-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)-based methane sensor, employing a miniature dense-pattern multi-pass gas cell (MPGC) and a continuous wave, room temperature interband cascade laser (ICL), is reported. The optical integration based on an advanced folded optical path design and an efficient ICL control system with appropriate electrical power management results in a methane sensor with a small footprint (32 × 20 × 17 cm3) and low-power consumption (6W). The direct absorption measurement strategy allows absolute quantitative assessments without any calibration. Polynomial and least-squares fit algorithms are employed to remove the baseline of the spectral scan and retrieve CH4 concentrations, respectively. An Allan-Werle deviation analysis shows that the measurement precision can reach 1.4 ppb for a 60 s averaging time. Continuous measurements lasting seven days were performed to demonstrate the stability and robustness of the reported methane sensor.

  19. X-ray Flashes Powered by the Spindown of Long-lived Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciolfi, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    X-ray flashes (XRFs) are a class of high-energy transients whose nature is still open to question. Similar in many aspects to common gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), their strong X-ray emission is accompanied by very low or absent emission in the gamma-ray band. Despite this key difference, a number of indications have consolidated the idea that XRFs and GRBs share a common origin, including a number of potential XRF/supernova associations and the consistency of some XRFs with the Amati relation for long GRBs. However, the difficulties in explaining XRFs as off-axis or intrinsically weak GRBs still cast doubts on this interpretation. Here we explore the possibility that some XRFs are instead powered by the spindown of a long-lived neutron star (NS) formed in a binary NS (BNS) merger or, possibly, in a core-collapse supernova. Focusing on XRF 020903 and a few other cases observed by HETE-2, we show that their lack of gamma-ray emission, spectral properties, duration and X-ray luminosity find a natural explanation within our hypothesis. Moreover, we point out that the agreement of XRF 020903 with the Amati and Ghirlanda relations for long GRBs is respectively only marginal and problematic. Assuming a BNS merger origin for the long-lived NS, we use XRF observations to estimate a lower limit on the rate of BNS mergers accompanied by a potentially observable XRF signal. Within the reach of the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors, we find \\gt 0.02{--}0.05 {{yr}}-1. Finally, we discuss the implications of a supernova association for the XRF events considered.

  20. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-09-01

    This monthly bulletin describes activities in the following project areas during this reporting period: supporting technology development, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support, and PBF operations. (FI)

  1. Thermal analysis and neutron production characteristics of a low power copper beam dump-cum-target for LEHIPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Y. S.; Thomas, R. G.; Verma, V.; Agarwal, A.; Prasad, N. K.; Bhagwat, P. V.; Saxena, A.; Singh, P.

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of heat deposition and neutron production have been carried out for the low power beam dump-cum-target for the 20 MeV Low Energy High Intensity Proton Accelerator (LEHIPA) facility at BARC using GEANT4 and FLUKA. Thermal analysis and heat transfer calculations have also been carried out using the computational fluid dynamics code CFD ACE+. In this work we present the details of the analysis of the low power beam dump-cum-target designed for conditioning of the accelerator upto a maximum power of 600 kW with a duty cycle of 2% which corresponds to an average power of 12 kW in the first phase.

  2. A Low-Power and In Situ Annealing Mitigation Technique for Fast Neutrons Irradiation of Integrated Temperature Sensing Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Laurent A.; Andre, Nicolas; Gerard, Pierre; Flandre, Denis; Ali, S. Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin

    2015-07-01

    High doses of fast neutrons is detrimental to the performance of most common solid-state devices such as diodes and transistors. The ionizing effect is observed in particular for diodes used as simple integrated temperature sensors, or thermo-diodes, when their junction voltage is measured at constant current bias. In this work, we present a low-power and in situ mitigation technique based on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) micro-hot-plates to recover thermo-diodes. The basic operating principle consists in annealing the temperature-sensitive diodes integrated on the membrane during or after their irradiation in order to restore similar sensing characteristics over time. We measured thermo-diodes integrated to micro-hot-plates during their irradiation by fast neutrons (23 MeV peak) with total doses about 2.97±0.08 kGy. The membrane annealing is taking place at 450 deg. C using 40 mW of electrical power. Thanks to the annealing, the diode keeps a total measurement error below 0.5 deg. C. In this harsh radiation environment and beside the good tolerance of the thermo-diodes and the membrane materials to the total ionizing dose, the thermo-diode located on the heating membrane keeps a constant sensitivity. The demonstrated resistance of micro-hot-plates and the integrated thermo-diodes to fast neutron radiations can extend their use in nuclear plants and for radiation detectors. (authors)

  3. Advances in miniature spectrometer and sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Jouko; Rissanen, Anna; Saari, Heikki; Karioja, Pentti; Karppinen, Mikko; Aalto, Timo; Tukkiniemi, Kari

    2014-05-01

    Miniaturization and cost reduction of spectrometer and sensor technologies has great potential to open up new applications areas and business opportunities for analytical technology in hand held, mobile and on-line applications. Advances in microfabrication have resulted in high-performance MEMS and MOEMS devices for spectrometer applications. Many other enabling technologies are useful for miniature analytical solutions, such as silicon photonics, nanoimprint lithography (NIL), system-on-chip, system-on-package techniques for integration of electronics and photonics, 3D printing, powerful embedded computing platforms, networked solutions as well as advances in chemometrics modeling. This paper will summarize recent work on spectrometer and sensor miniaturization at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tunable filter technology has been developed in two technical versions: Piezoactuated FPIs have been applied in miniature hyperspectral imaging needs in light weight UAV and nanosatellite applications, chemical imaging as well as medical applications. Microfabricated MOEMS FPIs have been developed as cost-effective sensor platforms for visible, NIR and IR applications. Further examples of sensor miniaturization will be discussed, including system-on-package sensor head for mid-IR gas analyzer, roll-to-roll printed Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technology as well as UV imprinted waveguide sensor for formaldehyde detection.

  4. Study Neutronic of Small Pb-Bi Cooled Non-Refuelling Nuclear Power Plant Reactor (SPINNOR) with Hexagonal Geometry Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Krisna, Dwita; Su’ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear reactor technology is growing rapidly, especially in developing Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The utilization of nuclear energy in power generation systems has been progressing phase of the first generation to the fourth generation. This final project paper discusses the analysis neutronic one-cooled fast reactor type Pb-Bi, which is capable of operating up to 20 years without refueling. This reactor uses Thorium Uranium Nitride as fuel and operating on power range 100-500MWtNPPs. The method of calculation used a computer simulation program utilizing the SRAC. SPINNOR reactor is designed with the geometry of hexagonal shaped terrace that radially divided into three regions, namely the outermost regions with highest percentage of fuel, the middle regions with medium percentage of fuel, and most in the area with the lowest percentage. SPINNOR fast reactor operated for 20 years with variations in the percentage of Uranium-233 by 7%, 7.75%, and 8.5%. The neutronic calculation and analysis show that the design can be optimized in a fast reactor for thermal power output SPINNOR 300MWt with a fuel fraction 60% and variations of Uranium-233 enrichment of 7%-8.5%.

  5. Neutron Scattering Cross Section and Analyzing Power Measurements for LEAD-208 from 6 TO 10 Mev and Optical Model Analyses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Mark L.

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been obtained for the scattering of neutrons from the ground and first excited states of ^ {208}Pb. These new measurements include differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering at 8.0 MeV, and analyzing powers for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering at 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, and 10.0 MeV. These data complement earlier work performed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) for elastic scattering of neutrons from ^{208 }Pb at 10.0, 14.0, and 17.0 MeV. All data were obtained using the TUNL pulsed beam facility and time -of-flight spectrometer. The data have been corrected for the effects of finite geometry, flux attenuation, and multiple scattering. The present elastic scattering data have been combined with the previously measured TUNL data and data measured elsewhere in order to obtain a detailed and high accuracy data set for neutron elastic scattering from ^{208}Pb over the 4.0 to 40.0 MeV energy range. This comprehensive data set has been described using the spherical optical model in which constant geometry fits, energy-dependent geometry fits, and fits incorporating the dispersion relation were performed. Although the overall description of the elastic n+^ {208}Pb scattering data was reasonably good using the various optical potentials, small systematic discrepancies remained at the backward angles of both the cross section and analyzing power data, and no optical model solution based on conventional Woods-Saxon form factors was found which could describe all of the details seen in the scattering data. To relax the constraint of having a Woods-Saxon form factor, the real central part of the optical model potential was modified using a Fourier-Bessel expansion of the real central potential. Individual fits at 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, 9.0, and 10.0 MeV, and fits to the combined 6.0 to 10.0 MeV data set were obtained using a Fourier -Bessel expansion of the real central potential

  6. Chemistry "en Miniature"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesky, Herbert W.

    1997-04-01

    By using the video camera projector system we are improving the techniques which are employed in various schools. This is an important reason for employing "Chemistry en Miniature", as this method provides a new means of demonstrating chemical experiments in a lecture hall.

  7. High-power electron beam tests of a liquid-lithium target and characterization study of (7)Li(p,n) near-threshold neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Cohen, D; Eliyahu, I; Kijel, D; Mardor, I; Silverman, I

    2014-06-01

    A compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The target is intended to demonstrate liquid-lithium target capabilities to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals. The lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power >5kW generated by high-intensity proton beams, necessary for sufficient therapeutic neutron flux. In preliminary experiments liquid lithium was flown through the target loop and generated a stable jet on the concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power densities of more than 4kW/cm(2) and volumetric power density around 2MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4m/s, while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. These power densities correspond to a narrow (σ=~2mm) 1.91MeV, 3mA proton beam. A high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5MeV, 2mA) is being commissioned at the SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator. In order to determine the conditions of LiLiT proton irradiation for BNCT and to tailor the neutron energy spectrum, a characterization of near threshold (~1.91MeV) (7)Li(p,n) neutrons is in progress based on Monte-Carlo (MCNP and Geant4) simulation and on low-intensity experiments with solid LiF targets. In-phantom dosimetry measurements are performed using special designed dosimeters based on CR-39 track detectors.

  8. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  9. Status of the Ultracold neutron source upgrade at LANSCE [PowerPoint

    SciTech Connect

    Pattie Jr., Robert Wayne

    2015-10-31

    Several slides show the source and flux of ultracold neutrons produced. In summary, an upgraded UCN source has been designed, and parts are currently being fabricated. Nickel phosphorus-coated guides will improve transport to the experiment hall. The source will be installed in the spring of 2016 and commissioned in the fall of 2016.

  10. Miniaturization of a Hydrogen Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Jones, Evan O.; Dagle, Robert A.; Xia, Gordon; Cao, Chunshe; Wang, Yong

    2005-09-01

    The development of a miniaturized hydrogen plant is discussed. The micro-scale system is capable of producing 1-5 sccm hydrogen that could be used as a fuel supply in a small fuel cell to produce <1 W power. The paper describes the developmental approach, significant unit operations, material selection, and reactor design. The final microscale fuel processing system is composed of a catalytic combustor, catalytic methanol reformer, selective methanation reactor, and the necessary vaporizers and heat exchangers. The fuel processing system is less than 0.3 cm3 and less than 1 gram mass. Thermal efficiencies as high as 33% for hydrogen production were achieved. When a methanation reactor was incorporated into the system, a carbon monoxide level of less than 100 ppm was reached, but at a reduced system efficiency. Further development work includes increasing efficiency through improved system integration.

  11. Development of Californium-252 Miniature Source Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Notspecified, N. A.

    2007-06-26

    The purpose of this CRADA between ORNL and lsotron, Inc. is to develop miniature californium-252 sources configured for remote handling that can be used in neutron brachytherapy for treatment of cancer. Brachytherapy places the · radioactive source at or near the site of the tumor, using a catheter. The CRADA ran from late 1999 through November 2005. The heart of a Cf-252 source is the radioactive core wire, which is sealed inside a metallic source capsule. Previous Cf-252 medical sources were based on a cermet wire with californium oxide dispersed in palladium, typically >1-mm diameter and <0.1% Cf-252 by weight. Previously, the standard medical source in the U.S. was the Applicator Tube (AT) source. 23-mm long, 2.8-mm diameter, with ~30 {micro}g of Cf-252, and which required manual loading into patients by medical staff. The goal of this work was to develop capabilities and technology to fabricate higher-intensity Cf-252 sources attached to a positioning cable, with overall diameter approaching that of exist ing photon (iridium-192) brachytherapy sources (i.e., ~1.1 mm). This work was successful in developing and demonstrating new technologies and procedures for the fabrication of miniaturized Cf-252 sources. CRADA-designed equipment reduced the wire diameters significantly (patent pending). Short wire segments were cut and successfully welded inside capsules meeting the miniaturization goals. A batch of seven prototype sources was prepared that met fabrication specifications. Although their neutron emissions were not maximized, they were still several times more intense than the previous AT sources. Very robust source-to-cable attachment methods were demonstrated (patent issued). A shipping canister was designed and built to contain the completed source assembly. lsotron designed and built a computer-controlled remote afterloader system to deliver the new sources for treatments.

  12. Cross Sections and Analyzing Powers of Nitrogen -15(PROTON, NEUTRON)OXYGEN-15 at 200 Mev and 494 Mev.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciskowski, Douglas Edward

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers have been measured for the ^{15} N(p,n)^{15}O(g.s.) reaction at bombarding energies of 200 MeV and 494 MeV. The 494 MeV data were obtained at the LAMPF Neutron Time-Of -Flight Facility on an 82 m flight path with a resolution of about 2.7 MeV. The 200 MeV data were obtained at IUCF on a 76 m flight path with a resolution of about 1.1 MeV. At both energies, the measured analyzing power is small, the magnitude is less than.2 for momentum transfers of less than 1 fm^{-1}. In contrast, both Relativistic and standard DWIA calculations predict a maximum of A = -.7 near q = 0.7 fm ^{-1}.

  13. Miniaturization in Biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    The use of biocatalysts for the production of both consumer goods and building blocks for chemical synthesis is consistently gaining relevance. A significant contribution for recent advances towards further implementation of enzymes and whole cells is related to the developments in miniature reactor technology and insights into flow behavior. Due to the high level of parallelization and reduced requirements of chemicals, intensive screening of biocatalysts and process variables has become more feasible and reproducibility of the bioconversion processes has been substantially improved. The present work aims to provide an overview of the applications of miniaturized reactors in bioconversion processes, considering multi-well plates and microfluidic devices, update information on the engineering characterization of the hardware used, and present perspective developments in this area of research. PMID:20479988

  14. Miniature Airflow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershner, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature flow-angle and airspeed sensor quickly mounted on light aircraft wing with two-sided tape since conventional sensors are restricted to large aircraft. Sensor operates as free-trailing wind vane selfalineing in airstream through two independent axes. Vane attached to wing surface through hollow mounting boom that fits on mounting plate attached to wing with two-sided neoprene-foam tape. Method shown strong enough for loads of low-speed flight.

  15. A MEMS-based miniature DNA analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M.A.; Gonzalez, C.; Hadley, D.

    1995-04-25

    We detail the design and development of a miniature thermal cycling instrument for performing the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that uses microfabricated, silicon-based reaction chambers. The MEMS-based, battery-operated instrument shows significant improvements over commercial thermal cycling instrumentation. Several different biological systems have been amplified and verified with the miniature PCR instrument including the Human Immunodeficiency Virus; both cloned and genomic DNA templates of {beta} globin; and the genetic disease, Cystic Fibrosis from human DNA. The miniaturization of a PCR thermal cycler is the initial module of a fully-integrated portable, low-power, rapid, and highly efficient bioanalytical instrument.

  16. Neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear plants. Annual report of Subtask D: TEPC feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Endres, G.W.R.; McDonald, J.C.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1984-06-01

    This study was designed to observe the feasibility of the use by NRC licensees of the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) system as a neutron monitoring instrument. Laboratory tissue equivalent proportional counters were irradiated using /sup 252/Cf sources at NBS and PNL and were irradiated inside containment of four operating nuclear power plants (two boiling water reactors and two pressurized water reactors). On the average, neutron dose-equivalent rates determined using the TEPC were 1.05 times the calculated dose-equivalent rates for the bare and moderated /sup 252/Cf sources and 0.86 times the dose-equivalent rates determined using the multispheres inside containment of nuclear power plants. Further, neutron dose equivalent rates determined using portable remmeters were an average of 1.71 times the dose equivalent determined using the multispheres inside the containment of nuclear power plants. It was observed that while electronic noise from temperature and vibrational effects inside containment prohibited an adequate measure of absorbed dose from gammas, the measurement of neutron absorbed dose was unaffected by these environmental parameters. It is recommended that for use inside containment at nuclear power plants: (1) the laboratory scale TEPC is the superior technique for accurate determination of neutron dose equivalent, (2) for remmeters similar to the one evaluated in this study, neutron dose equivalent response should be corrected to account for dependence of response on neutron energy or the remmeters should be calibrated using a moderated neutron source, and (3) at present, the TEPC should not be used to measure absorbed dose from gammas. Upon the advent of a proven miniaturized TEPC, this instrument may prove to be a desirable replacement for current portable neutron monitoring devices for the determination of dose equivalent inside containment of commercial nuclear power plants.

  17. Miniaturizing RFID for magnamosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Chen, Shijie; Kish, Shad; Loh, Lokkee; Zhang, Junmin; Zhang, Xiaorong; Kwiat, Dillon; Harrison, Michael; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Anastomosis is a common surgical procedure using staples or sutures in an open or laparoscopic surgery. A more effective and much less invasive alternative is to apply the mechanical pressure on the tissue over a few days [1]. Since the pressure is produced by the attractive force between two permanent magnets, the procedure is called magnamosis[1]. To ensure the two magnets are perfectly aligned during the surgery, a miniaturized batteryless Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) tag is developed to wirelessly telemeter the status of a pressure sensitive mechanical switch. Using the multi-layer circular spiral coil design, the diameter of the RFID tag is shrunk to 10, 15, 19 and 27 mm to support the magnamosis for children as well as adults. With the impedance matching network, the operating distance of these four RFID tags are longer than 10 cm in a 20 × 22 cm(2) area, even when the tag's normal direction is 45° off the antenna's normal direction. Measurement results also indicate that there is no noticeable degradation on the operating distance when the tag is immersed in saline or placed next to the rare-earth magnet. The miniaturized RFID tag presented in this paper is able to support the magnamosis and other medical applications that require the miniaturized RFID tag.

  18. Accretion-powered Pulsations in an Apparently Quiescent Neutron Star Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, Anne M.; Bogdanov, Slavko; Patruno, Alessandro; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Deller, Adam T.; Bassa, Cees; Janssen, Gemma H.; Kaspi, Vicky M.; Lyne, Andrew G.; Stappers, Ben W.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; D'Angelo, Caroline R.; Wijnands, Rudy

    2015-07-01

    Accreting millisecond X-ray pulsars (AMXPs) are an important subset of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) in which coherent X-ray pulsations can be observed during occasional, bright outbursts (X-ray luminosity {L}{{X}}˜ {10}36 {erg} {{{s}}}-1). These pulsations show that matter is being channeled onto the neutron star’s magnetic poles. However, such sources spend most of their time in a low-luminosity, quiescent state ({L}{{X}}≲ {10}34 {erg} {{{s}}}-1), where the nature of the accretion flow onto the neutron star (if any) is not well understood. Here we report that the millisecond pulsar/LMXB transition object PSR J1023+0038 intermittently shows coherent X-ray pulsations at luminosities nearly 100 times fainter than observed in any other AMXP. We conclude that in spite of its low luminosity, PSR J1023+0038 experiences episodes of channeled accretion, a discovery that challenges existing models for accretion onto magnetized neutron stars.

  19. SMARBot: a modular miniature mobile robot platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yan; Johnson, Kerry; Simms, Brian; Conforth, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Miniature robots have many advantages over their larger counterparts, such as low cost, low power, and easy to build a large scale team for complex tasks. Heterogeneous multi miniature robots could provide powerful situation awareness capability due to different locomotion capabilities and sensor information. However, it would be expensive and time consuming to develop specific embedded system for different type of robots. In this paper, we propose a generic modular embedded system architecture called SMARbot (Stevens Modular Autonomous Robot), which consists of a set of hardware and software modules that can be configured to construct various types of robot systems. These modules include a high performance microprocessor, a reconfigurable hardware component, wireless communication, and diverse sensor and actuator interfaces. The design of all the modules in electrical subsystem, the selection criteria for module components, and the real-time operating system are described. Some proofs of concept experimental results are also presented.

  20. Design and fabrication of a novel self-powered solid-state neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LiCausi, Nicholas

    There is a strong interest in intercepting special nuclear materials (SNM) at national and international borders and ports for homeland security applications. Detection of SNM such as U and Pu is often accomplished by sensing their natural or induced neutron emission. Such detector systems typically use thermal neutron detectors inside a plastic moderator. In order to achieve high detection efficiency gas filled detectors are often used; these detectors require high voltage bias for operation, which complicates the system when tens or hundreds of detectors are deployed. A better type of detector would be an inexpensive solid-state detector that can be mass-produced like any other computer chip. Research surrounding solid-state detectors has been underway since the late 1990's. A simple solid-state detector employs a planar solar-cell type p-n junction and a thin conversion material that converts incident thermal neutrons into detectable alpha-particles and 7Li ions. Existing work has typically used 6LiF or 10B as this conversion layer. Although a simple planar detector can act as a highly portable, low cost detector, it is limited to relatively low detection efficiency (˜10%). To increase the efficiency, 3D perforated p-i-n silicon devices were proposed. To get high efficiency, these detectors need to be biased, resulting in increased leakage current and hence detector noise. In this research, a new type of detector structure was proposed, designed and fabricated. Among several detector structures evaluated, a honeycomb-like silicon p-n structure was selected, which is filled with natural boron as the neutron converter. A silicon p+-n diode formed on the thin silicon wall of the honeycomb structure detects the energetic alpha-particles emitted from the boron conversion layer. The silicon detection layer is fabricated to be fully depleted with an integral step during the boron filling process. This novel feature results in a simplified fabrication process. Three

  1. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I. Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-15

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  2. Determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor from the results of measurements of the reactivity effects and the neutron importance function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kapitonova, A. V.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nosov, V. I.; Petrushenko, R. P.; Smirnov, O. N.

    2012-12-01

    A method for experimental determination of the relative power density distribution in a heterogeneous reactor based on measurements of fuel reactivity effects and importance of neutrons from a californium source is proposed. The method was perfected on two critical assembly configurations at the NARCISS facility of the Kurchatov Institute, which simulated a small-size heterogeneous nuclear reactor. The neutron importance measurements were performed on subcritical and critical assemblies. It is shown that, along with traditionally used activation methods, the developed method can be applied to experimental studies of special features of the power density distribution in critical assemblies and reactors.

  3. Miniaturized biological and electrochemical fuel cells: challenges and applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Ghobadian, Sasan; Goodrich, Payton J; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2013-09-14

    This paper discusses the fundamentals and developments of miniaturized fuel cells, both biological and electrochemical. An overview of microfluidic fuel cells, miniaturized microbial fuel cells, enzymatic biofuel cells, and implanted biofuel cells in an attempt to provide green energy and to power implanted microdevices is provided. Also, the challenges and applications of each type of fuel cell are discussed in detail. Most recent developments in fuel cell technologies such as novel catalysts, compact designs, and fabrication methods are reviewed.

  4. Miniature Heat Transport System for Nanosatellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M,

    1999-01-01

    The scientific understanding of key physical processes between the Sun and the Earth require simultaneous measurements from many vantage points in space. Nano-satellite technologies will enable a class of constellation missions for the NASA Space Science Sun-Earth Connections. This recent emphasis on the implementation of smaller satellites leads to a requirement for development of smaller subsystems in several areas. Key technologies under development include: advanced miniaturized chemical propulsion; miniaturized sensors; highly integrated, compact electronics; autonomous onboard and ground operations; miniatures low power tracking techniques for orbit determination; onboard RF communications capable of transmitting data to the ground from far distances; lightweight efficient solar array panels; lightweight, high output battery cells; lightweight yet strong composite materials for the nano-spacecraft and deployer-ship structures. These newer smaller systems may have higher power densities and higher thermal transport requirements than seen on previous small satellites. Furthermore, the small satellites may also have a requirement to maintain thermal control through extended earth shadows, possibly up to 8 hours long. Older thermal control technology, such as heaters, thermostats, and heat pipes, may not be sufficient to meet the requirements of these new systems. Conversely, a miniature two-phase heat transport system (Mini-HTS) such as a Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) or Loop Heat Pipe (LBP) is a viable alternative. A Mini-HTS can provide fine temperature control, thermal diode action, and a highly efficient means of heat transfer. The Mini-HTS would have power capabilities in the range of tens of watts or less and provide thermal control over typical spacecraft ranges. The Mini-HTS would allow the internal portion of the spacecraft to be thermally isolated from the external radiator, thus protecting the internal components from extreme cold temperatures during an

  5. Miniaturization of planar horn motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-04-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of a stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2×2×2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of 3 × 3 × 0.2 cm.

  6. Miniaturization of Planar Horn Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Ostlund, Patrick N.; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Widholm, Scott E.; Badescu, Mircea

    2012-01-01

    There is a great need for compact, efficient motors for driving various mechanisms including robots or mobility platforms. A study is currently underway to develop a new type of piezoelectric actuators with significantly more strength, low mass, small footprint, and efficiency. The actuators/motors utilize piezoelectric actuated horns which have a very high power density and high electromechanical conversion efficiency. The horns are fabricated using our recently developed novel pre-stress flexures that make them thermally stable and increases their coupling efficiency. The monolithic design and integrated flexures that pre-stresses the piezoelectric stack eliminates the use of stress bolt. This design allows embedding solid-state motors and actuators in any structure so that the only macroscopically moving parts are the rotor or the linear translator. The developed actuator uses a stack/horn actuation and has a Barth motor configuration, which potentially generates very large torque and speeds that do not require gearing. Finite element modeling and design tools were investigated to determine the requirements and operation parameters and the results were used to design and fabricate a motor. This new design offers a highly promising actuation mechanism that can potentially be miniaturized and integrated into systems and structures. It can be configured in many shapes to operate as multi-degrees of freedom and multi-dimensional motors/actuators including unidirectional, bidirectional, 2D and 3D. In this manuscript, we are reporting the experimental measurements from a bench top design and the results from the efforts to miniaturize the design using 2x2x2 mm piezoelectric stacks integrated into thin plates that are of the order of3 x 3x 0.2 cm.

  7. Miniature Scroll Pumps Fabricated by LIGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiberg, Dean; Shcheglov, Kirill; White, Victor; Bae, Sam

    2009-01-01

    Miniature scroll pumps have been proposed as roughing pumps (low - vacuum pumps) for miniature scientific instruments (e.g., portable mass spectrometers and gas analyzers) that depend on vacuum. The larger scroll pumps used as roughing pumps in some older vacuum systems are fabricated by conventional machining. Typically, such an older scroll pump includes (1) an electric motor with an eccentric shaft to generate orbital motion of a scroll and (2) conventional bearings to restrict the orbital motion to a circle. The proposed miniature scroll pumps would differ from the prior, larger ones in both design and fabrication. A miniature scroll pump would include two scrolls: one mounted on a stationary baseplate and one on a flexure stage (see figure). An electromagnetic actuator in the form of two pairs of voice coils in a push-pull configuration would make the flexure stage move in the desired circular orbit. The capacitance between the scrolls would be monitored to provide position (gap) feedback to a control system that would adjust the drive signals applied to the voice coils to maintain the circular orbit as needed for precise sealing of the scrolls. To minimize power consumption and maximize precision of control, the flexure stage would be driven at the frequency of its mechanical resonance. The miniaturization of these pumps would entail both operational and manufacturing tolerances of <1 m. Such tight tolerances cannot be achieved easily by conventional machining of high-aspect-ratio structures like those of scroll-pump components. In addition, the vibrations of conventional motors and ball bearings exceed these tight tolerances by an order of magnitude. Therefore, the proposed pumps would be fabricated by the microfabrication method known by the German acronym LIGA ( lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung, which means lithography, electroforming, molding) because LIGA has been shown to be capable of providing the required tolerances at large aspect ratios.

  8. Miniature Laser Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert; Brown, Andy

    2011-01-01

    A conceptual design has been developed for a miniature laser magnetometer (MLM) that will measure the scalar magnitude and vector components of near-Earth magnetic fields. The MLM incorporates a number of technical innovations to achieve high-accuracy and high-resolution performance while significantly reducing the size of the laser-pumped helium magnetometer for use on small satellites and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). and electronics sections that has the capability of measuring both the scalar magnetic field magnitude and the vector magnetic field components. Further more, the high-accuracy scalar measurements are used to calibrate and correct the vector component measurements in order to achieve superior vector accuracy and stability. The correction algorithm applied to the vector components for calibration and the same cell for vector and scalar measurements are major innovations. The separate sensor and electronics section of the MLM instrument allow the sensor to be installed on a boom or otherwise located away from electronics and other noisy magnetic components. The MLM s miniaturization will be accomplished through the use of advanced miniaturized components and packaging methods for the MLM sensor and electronics. The MLM conceptual design includes three key innovations. The first is a new non-magnetic laser package that will allow the placement of the laser pump source near the helium cell sensing elements. The second innovation is the design of compact, nested, triaxial Braunbek coils used in the vector measurements that reduce the coil size by a factor of two compared to existing Helmholtz coils with similar field-generation performance. The third innovation is a compact sensor design that reduces the sensor volume by a factor of eight compared to MLM s predecessor.

  9. Miniature electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Casper, Robert F.

    1976-01-01

    A miniature coaxial cable electrical connector includes an annular compressible gasket in a receptacle member, the gasket having a generally triangular cross section resiliently engaging and encircling a conically tapered outer surface of a plug member to create an elongated current leakage path at their interface; means for preventing rotation of the plug relative to the receptacle; a metal sleeve forming a portion of the receptacle and encircling the plug member when interconnected; and a split ring in the plug having outwardly and rearwardly projecting fingers spaced from and encircling a portion of a coaxial cable and engageable with the metal sleeve to interlock the receptacle and plug.

  10. Miniature cold gas thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzibziak, R. J., Sr.

    1992-07-01

    Cold gas thrusters provide a safe, inexpensive, lightweight and reliable means of propulsive control for small satellites, projectiles and maneuvering control systems. Moog Inc. has designed and developed a family of miniature cold gas thrusters for use on Strategic Defense Iniative flight simulation experiments, sounding rockets, small satellite applications, astronaut control systems, and close proximity maneuvering systems for Space System. Construction features such as coil assembly, core assembly, armature assembly, external housing and valve body are discussed. The design approach, performance characteristics and functional description of cold gas thrusters designed for various applications are presented.

  11. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOEpatents

    Umbarger, C. John; Wolf, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  12. A numerical simulation package for analysis of neutronics and thermal fluids of space nuclear power and propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anghaie, S.; Feller, G.J. ); Peery, S.D.; Parsley, R.C. )

    1993-01-20

    A system of computer codes for engineering simulation and in-depth analysis of nuclear and thermal fluid design of nuclear thermal rockets is developed. The computational system includes a neutronic solver package, a thermal fluid solver package and a propellant and materials property package. The Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system code is incorporated with computational modules specific to nuclear powered engines. ROCETS features a component based performance architecture that interfaces component modules into the user designed configuration, interprets user commands, creates an executable FORTRAN computer program, and executes the program to provide output to the user. Basic design features of the Pratt Whitney XNR2000 nuclear rocket concept and its operational performance are analyzed and simulated.

  13. NEUTRON-STAR MERGER EJECTA AS OBSTACLES TO NEUTRINO-POWERED JETS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Just, O.; Janka, H.-T.; Schwarz, N.; Obergaulinger, M.

    2016-01-10

    We present the first special relativistic, axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations of black hole-torus systems (approximating general relativistic gravity) as remnants of binary-neutron star (NS–NS) and neutron star–black hole (NS–BH) mergers, in which the viscously driven evolution of the accretion torus is followed with self-consistent energy-dependent neutrino transport and the interaction with the cloud of dynamical ejecta expelled during the NS–NS merging is taken into account. The modeled torus masses, BH masses and spins, and the ejecta masses, velocities, and spatial distributions are adopted from relativistic merger simulations. We find that energy deposition by neutrino annihilation can accelerate outflows with initially high Lorentz factors along polar low-density funnels, but only in mergers with extremely low baryon pollution in the polar regions. NS–BH mergers, where polar mass ejection during the merging phase is absent, provide sufficiently baryon-poor environments to enable neutrino-powered, ultrarelativistic jets with terminal Lorentz factors above 100 and considerable dynamical collimation, favoring short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs), although their typical energies and durations might be too small to explain the majority of events. In the case of NS–NS mergers, however, neutrino emission of the accreting and viscously spreading torus is too short and too weak to yield enough energy for the outflows to break out from the surrounding ejecta shell as highly relativistic jets. We conclude that neutrino annihilation alone cannot power sGRBs from NS–NS mergers.

  14. Novel Low-Cost, Low-Power Miniature Thermionic Cathode Developed for Microwave/Millimeter Wave Tube and Cathode Ray Tube Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1999-01-01

    A low cost, small size and mass, low heater power, durable high-performance barium dispenser thermionic cathode has been developed that offers significant advancements in the design, manufacture, and performance of the electron sources used in vacuum electronic devices--such as microwave (and millimeter wave) traveling-wave tubes (TWT's)--and in display devices such as high-brightness, high-resolution cathode ray tubes (CRT's). The lower cathode heater power and the reduced size and mass of the new cathode are expected to be especially beneficial in TWT's for deep space communications, where future missions are requiring smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. Also expected to benefit are TWT's for commercial and government communication satellites, for both low and geosynchronous Earth orbit, with additional benefits offered by lower cost and potentially higher cathode current loading. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (MPM), which is a hybrid microwave (or millimeter wave) amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid state driver, a vacuum power booster (small TWT), and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package. The attributes of compactness and potentially high electrical efficiency make the MPM very attractive for many commercial and government (civilian and defense) applications in communication and radar systems. The MPM is already finding application in defense electronic systems and is under development by NASA for deep space communications. However, for the MPM to become competitive and commercially successful, a major reduction in cost must be achieved.

  15. The power distribution and neutron fluence measurements and calculations in the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kostal, M.; Juricek, V.; Rypar, V.; Svadlenkova, M.; Cvachovec, F.

    2011-07-01

    The power density distribution in a reactor has significant influence on core structures and pressure vessel mechanical resistance, as well as on the physical characteristics of nuclear fuel. This quantity also has an effect on the leakage neutron and photon field. This issue has become of increasing importance, as it touches on actual questions of the VVER nuclear power plant life time extension. This paper shows the comparison of calculated and experimentally determined pin by pin power distributions. The calculation has been performed with deterministic and Monte Carlo approaches. This quantity is accompanied by the neutron and photon flux density calculation and measurements at different points of the light water zero-power (LR-0) research reactor mock-up core, reactor built-in component (core barrel), and reactor pressure vessel and model. The effect of the different data libraries used for calculation is discussed. (authors)

  16. Miniature electrically operated diaphragm valve

    DOEpatents

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Spletzer, Barry L.; Wong, Chungnin C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Fischer, Gary J.; Hesketh, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a miniature electrically operated valve that can stand off significant pressures, that can be inexpensively produced, and that can be made to operate without continuous electrical power. A valve according to the present invention comprises a housing and a beam mounted with the housing. A diaphragm mounted with the housing forms a sealed fluid volume. An electromagnetic energy source, such as an electromagnetic coil, mounts with the housing and when energized urges the beam in one direction. The beam can be urged in the opposing direction by passive means or by reversing the polarity of the electromagnetic energy source or by a second electromagnetic energy source. Two fluid ports mount with the housing. A first fluid port mounts so that, as the beam is urged in one direction or the opposite, the beam urges the diaphragm to move between engaging and substantially sealing the fluid port and disengaging and not substantially sealing the fluid port. A seat can be mounted with the diaphragm to aid in sealing the fluid port. Latching mechanisms such as permanent magnets can be mounted so that the valve remains in the open or closed positions without continuous electrical power input. Fluid can flow through the housing between the two fluid ports when the diaphragm does not seal the first fluid port, but can be prevented from flowing by urging the beam so that the diaphragm seals the first fluid port. Various embodiments accommodate various latching mechanisms, electromagnetic energy sources, number of fluid ports, and diaphragm design considerations.

  17. Miniature Microwave Frequency Standard with Trapped 171Yb+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Peter; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Casias, Adrian; Serkland, Darwin; Manginell, Ronald; Moorman, Matthew; Prestage, John; Yu, Nan; Kellogg, James; Boschen, Dan; Kosvin, Igor

    2014-05-01

    We report the development of a low-power, miniature 171Yb trapped ion clock at Sandia National Laboratories. The ultimate goal of this development effort is to construct a frequency standard that has a frequency stability comparable to a commercial Cs beam standard, but with 100 to 1000 times smaller size and power consumption. The 171Yb ion has a ground state hyperfine splitting of 12.6 GHz that we use as the ``clock'' transition, and the linewidth of the clock resonance is expected to be less than 10-3 Hz, which leads to a very high-Q clock resonance. An atomic clock using trapped ions is an excellent candidate for miniaturization because ions are well isolated from the environment independent of the size of the trap. We have successfully developed miniature ion-trap vacuum packages with sizes ranging from 1 to 10 cubic centimeters. A few microTorr of He buffer gas is introduced into each of our miniature vacuum packages for collisional cooling of the trapped ions. The vacuum packages are sealed and passively pumped by non-evaporable getters. Using a sealed 3 cm3 ion-trap vacuum package in combination with miniaturized lasers, optics, and electronics, we constructed a miniature clock prototype that demonstrated excellent long-term stability reaching the 10-14 range after a few days of integration.

  18. Miniature EVA Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozhidaev, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    As NASA embarks upon developing the Next-Generation Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) Radio for deep space exploration, the demands on EVA battery life will substantially increase. The number of modes and frequency bands required will continue to grow in order to enable efficient and complex multi-mode operations including communications, navigation, and tracking applications. Whether conducting astronaut excursions, communicating to soldiers, or first responders responding to emergency hazards, NASA has developed an innovative, affordable, miniaturized, power-efficient software defined radio that offers unprecedented power-efficient flexibility. This lightweight, programmable, S-band, multi-service, frequency- agile EVA software defined radio (SDR) supports data, telemetry, voice, and both standard and high-definition video. Features include a modular design, an easily scalable architecture, and the EVA SDR allows for both stationary and mobile battery powered handheld operations. Currently, the radio is equipped with an S-band RF section. However, its scalable architecture can accommodate multiple RF sections simultaneously to cover multiple frequency bands. The EVA SDR also supports multiple network protocols. It currently implements a Hybrid Mesh Network based on the 802.11s open standard protocol. The radio targets RF channel data rates up to 20 Mbps and can be equipped with a real-time operating system (RTOS) that can be switched off for power-aware applications. The EVA SDR's modular design permits implementation of the same hardware at all Network Nodes concept. This approach assures the portability of the same software into any radio in the system. It also brings several benefits to the entire system including reducing system maintenance, system complexity, and development cost.

  19. High torque miniature rotary actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbandian, Ruben

    2005-07-01

    This paper summarizes the design and the development of a miniature rotary actuator (36 mm diameter by 100 mm length) used in spacecraft mechanisms requiring high torques and/or ultra-fine step resolution. This actuator lends itself to applications requiring high torque but with strict volume limitations which challenge the use of conventional rotary actuators. The design challenge was to develop a lightweight (less than 500 grams), very compact, high bandwidth, low power, thermally stable rotary actuator capable of producing torques in excess of 50 N.m and step resolutions as fine as 0.003 degrees. To achieve a relatively high torsional stiffness in excess of 1000 Nm/radian, the design utilizes a combination of harmonic drive and multistage planetary gearing. The unique design feature of this actuator that contributes to its light weight and extremely precise motion capability is a redundant stepper motor driving the output through a multistage reducing gearbox. The rotary actuator is powered by a high reliability space-rated stepper motor designed and constructed by Moog, Inc. The motor is a three-phase stepper motor of 15 degree step angle, producing twenty-four full steps per revolution. Since micro-stepping is not used in the design, and un-powered holding torque is exhibited at every commanded step, the rotary actuator is capable of reacting to torques as high as 35 Nm by holding position with the power off. The output is driven through a gear transmission having a total train ratio of 5120:1, resulting in a resolution of 0.003 degrees output rotation per motor step. The modular design of the multi-stage output transmission makes possible the addition of designs having different output parameters, such as lower torque and higher output speed capability. Some examples of an actuator family based on this growth capability will be presented in the paper.

  20. Miniature, Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilski, Steve; Kline-Schoder, Robert; Sorensen, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Miniature Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscope (MVS-CMG) was designed for small satellites (mass from less than 1 kg up to 500 kg). Currently available CMGs are too large and heavy, and available miniature CMGs do not provide sufficient control authority for use on practical satellites. This primarily results from the need to greatly increase the speed of rotation of the flywheel in order to reduce the flywheel size and mass. This goal was achieved by making use of a proprietary, space-qualified, high-speed (100,000 rpm) motor technology to spin the flywheel at a speed ten times faster than other known miniature CMGs under development. NASA is supporting innovations in propulsion, power, and guidance and navigation systems for low-cost small spacecraft. One of the key enabling technologies is attitude control mechanisms. CMGs are particularly attractive for spacecraft attitude control since they can achieve higher torques with lower mass and power than reaction wheels, and they provide continuous torque capability that enables precision pointing (in contrast to on-off thruster control). The aim of this work was to develop a miniature, variable-speed CMG that is sized for use on small satellites. To achieve improved agility, these spacecraft must be able to slew at high rate, which requires attitude control actuators that can apply torques on the order of 5 N-m. The MVS-CMG is specifically designed to achieve a high-torque output with a minimum flywheel and system mass. The flywheel can be run over a wide range of speeds, which is important to help reduce/eliminate potential gimbal lock, and can be used to optimize the operational envelope of the CMG.

  1. Miniature Fixed-Point Cell Approaches for Monitoring of Thermocouple Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Failleau, G.; Elliott, C. J.; Deuzé, T.; Pearce, J. V.; Machin, G.; Sadli, M.

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of the European Metrology Research Project ENG08 "MetroFission," LNE-Cnam and NPL have undertaken cooperative research into the development of temperature measurement solutions for the next generation of nuclear fission power plants. Currently, in-pile temperature monitoring is usually performed with nickel-based (Type K or N) thermocouples. When these thermocouples are exposed to a neutron flux, the thermoelements transmute, leading to large and unknown drifts in output. In addition, it is impossible to routinely recalibrate the thermocouples after irradiation for obvious reasons of safety. To alleviate this problem, both LNE-Cnam and NPL have developed, via differing approaches, in situ calibration methods for the thermocouples. The self-validating thermocouple methodologies are based on the principle of a miniature fixed-point cell to be co-located with the thermocouple measurement junction in use. The drift of the thermocouple can be monitored and corrected for by regular determination of the output at the phase transition of the fixed-point material: in effect performing regular in situ calibration checks. The two institutes have constructed miniature fixed-point cells for use at three different temperatures; the freezing point of silver ; LNE-Cnam), the freezing point of copper ; LNE-Cnam and NPL), and the melting point of Fe-C (; NPL). This paper introduces the construction and validation of the miniature fixed-point cells prior to use, to ensure traceability to the ITS-90. A comparison of the performance of the two cell designs is discussed, where typical industrial Type N thermocouples have been used for measurement of the fixed-point cells. Such initial measurements demonstrate the feasibility of each of these two approaches.

  2. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  3. Miniaturized diode laser module emitting green light at 532 nm with a power of more than 900 mW for next-generation holographic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Julian; Blume, Gunnar; Jedrzejczyk, Daniel; Eppich, Bernd; Feise, David; Kreutzmann, Sabrina; Sahm, Alexander; Paschke, Katrin

    2016-02-01

    We present a micro-integrated laser module based on an amplified diode laser and second harmonic generation which is a promising candidate for a green light source in next-generation 3D holographic displays. The light emitted by the amplified laser has a wavelength of 1064 nm, reaches a power up to 8.2 W and has a long coherence length of >400 m. For second harmonic generation, we tested two geometries of periodically poled lithium niobate crystals in single pass: a bulk crystal and a planar waveguide crystal. With the planar waveguide crystal, we achieve an output power >900 mW and a coherence length >20 m at a wavelength of 532 nm.

  4. Multiprobe in-situ measurement of magnetic field in a minefield via a distributed network of miniaturized low-power integrated sensor systems for detection of magnetic field anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Hamid H. S.; Bendrihem, David; Blaes, B.; Boykins, Kobe; Cardone, John; Cruzan, C.; Gibbs, J.; Goodman, W.; Lieneweg, U.; Michalik, H.; Narvaez, P.; Perrone, D.; Rademacher, Joel D.; Snare, R.; Spencer, Howard; Sue, Miles; Weese, J.

    1998-09-01

    Based on technologies developed for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Free-Flying-Magnetometer (FFM) concept, we propose to modify the present design of FFMs for detection of mines and arsenals with large magnetic signature. The result will be an integrated miniature sensor system capable of identifying local magnetic field anomaly caused by a magnetic dipole moment. Proposed integrated sensor system is in line with the JPL technology road-map for development of autonomous, intelligent, networked, integrated systems with a broad range of applications. In addition, advanced sensitive magnetic sensors (e.g., silicon micromachined magnetometer, laser pumped helium magnetometer) are being developed for future NASA space plasma probes. It is envisioned that a fleet of these Integrated Sensor Systems (ISS) units will be dispersed on a mine-field via an aerial vehicle (a low-flying airplane or helicopter). The number of such sensor systems in each fleet and the corresponding in-situ probe-grid cell size is based on the strength of magnetic anomaly of the target and ISS measurement resolution of magnetic field vector. After a specified time, ISS units will transmit the measured magnetic field and attitude data to an air-borne platform for further data processing. The cycle of data acquisition and transmission will be continued until batteries run out. Data analysis will allow a local deformation of the Earth's magnetic field vector by a magnetic dipole moment to be detected. Each ISS unit consists of miniaturized sensitive 3- axis magnetometer, high resolution analog-to-digital converter (ADC), Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based data subsystem, Li-batteries and power regulation circuitry, memory, S-band transmitter, single-patch antenna, and a sun angle sensor. ISS unit is packaged with non-magnetic components and the electronic design implements low-magnetic signature circuits. Care is undertaken to guarantee no corruption of magnetometer sensitivity as a result

  5. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. R.; MacConochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1980-10-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  6. Miniature drag force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilevered beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like that of a second order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  7. Miniature, ruggedized data collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Scott; Calcutt, Wade; Knobler, Ron; Jones, Barry; Klug, Robert

    2009-05-01

    McQ has developed a miniaturized, programmable, ruggedized data collector intended for use in weapon testing or data collection exercises that impose severe stresses on devices under test. The recorder is designed to survive these stresses which include acceleration and shock levels up to 100,000 G. The collector acquires and stores up to four channels of signal data to nonvolatile memory for later retrieval by a user. It is small (< 7 in3), light weight (< 1 lb), and can operate from various battery chemistries. A built-in menuing system, accessible via a USB interface, allows the user to configure parameters of the recorder operation, such as channel gain, filtering, and signal offsets, and also to retrieve recorded data for analysis. An overview of the collector, its features, performance, and potential uses, is presented.

  8. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  9. Miniaturized fundus camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Flynn, John T.; Pratisto, Hans S.; Niederer, Peter F.

    2003-07-01

    We present a miniaturized version of a fundus camera. The camera is designed for the use in screening for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). There, but also in other applications a small, light weight, digital camera system can be extremely useful. We present a small wide angle digital camera system. The handpiece is significantly smaller and lighter then in all other systems. The electronics is truly portable fitting in a standard boardcase. The camera is designed to be offered at a compatible price. Data from tests on young rabbits' eyes is presented. The development of the camera system is part of a telemedicine project screening for ROP. Telemedical applications are a perfect application for this camera system using both advantages: the portability as well as the digital image.

  10. Spallation Neutron Source high-power Rf transmitter design for high availablility, ease of installation and cost containment

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, J. T. , III; Rees, D. E.; Hardek, T. W.; Lynch, M. T.; Roybal, W. T.; Tallerico, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The availability goals and installation schedule for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have driven the availability and installation of the SNS linac's high-power RF systems. This paper discusses how the high-power RF systems' availability and installation goals have been addressed in the RF transmitter design and procurement. Design features that allow R1; component failures to be quickly diagnosed and repaired are also presented. Special attention has been given lo interlocks, PLC fault logging and real-time interfaces to thc accelerator's Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) archive system. The availability and cost motivations for the use of different RF transmitter designs in the normalconducting and super-conducting sections of the linac are reviewed. Factory iicceptance tests used to insure fully functional equipment and thereby reduce the time spent on installation and cotnmissioning of the RF transmitters are discussed. Transmitter installation experience and klystron conditioning experience is used to show how these design features have helped and will continue to help the SNS linac to meet its availability and schedule goals.

  11. Effects of an RTG power source on neutron spectroscopy measurements on the martian surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David J. ,; Elphic, R. C.; Wiens, R. C.

    2003-01-01

    A continuing goal of Mars science is to identify the exact locations of near-surface water and/or hydrated minerals using in situ measurements. Recent data from the Mars Odyssey mission has used both neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy to measure large amounts of water ice near both polar regions . Furthermore, these data have also determined that in the mid-latitude regions, there likely exist relatively large amounts of hydrogen (-4-7 equivalent H2O wt.%), although it is not certain in which form this hydrogen exists . While these are exciting results, one drawback of these measurements is that they are averaged over a large (-400 km) footp ri nt and do not reflect any small (<1 km) inhomogenieties in hydrogen abundance that likely exist on the Martian surface. For any future in situ mission (e g, Mars Smart Lander (MSL)) that seeks to measure and characterize nearsurface H 2O, especially in the mid-latitude regions, is will be necessary to know th e locati ons of the H20.

  12. Measurement of the free neutron-proton analyzing power and spin transfer parameters in the charge exchange region at 790 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ransome, R.D.

    1981-07-01

    The free neutron-proton analyzing power and the spin transfer parameters (K/sub NN/, K/sub SS/, K/sub SL/, and K/sub LL/) were measured at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility at 790 MeV between 165/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ center of mass. A 40% polarized neutron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target was used. The recoil protons were momentum analyzed with a magnetic spectrometer to isolate elastic scatters. A large solid angle carbon polarimeter was used to measure the proton polarization. The measurements are the first at this energy and are in basic agreement with pre-existing phase shift solutions. The proton-carbon analyzing power was measured between 500 and 750 MeV. An empirical fit to the proton-carbon analyzing power between 100 and 750 MeV was done.

  13. Miniature Robotic Spacecraft for Inspecting Other Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven; Abbott, Larry; Duran, Steve; Goode, Robert; Howard, Nathan; Jochim, David; Rickman, Steve; Straube, Tim; Studak, Bill; Wagenknecht, Jennifer; Lemke, Matthew; Wade, Randall; Wheeler, Scott; Baggerman, Clinton

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the Miniature Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)-- a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. The Mini AERCam is a successor to the AERCam Sprint -- a prior miniature robotic inspection spacecraft that was demonstrated in a space-shuttle flight experiment in 1997. The prototype of the Mini AERCam is a demonstration unit having approximately the form and function of a flight system. The Mini AERCam is approximately spherical with a diameter of about 7.5 in. (.19 cm) and a weight of about 10 lb (.4.5 kg), yet it has significant additional capabilities, relative to the 14-in. (36-cm), 35-lb (16-kg) AERCam Sprint. The Mini AERCam includes miniaturized avionics, instrumentation, communications, navigation, imaging, power, and propulsion subsystems, including two digital video cameras and a high-resolution still camera. The Mini AERCam is designed for either remote piloting or supervised autonomous operations, including station keeping and point-to-point maneuvering. The prototype has been tested on an air-bearing table and in a hardware-in-the-loop orbital simulation of the dynamics of maneuvering in proximity to the International Space Station.

  14. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes

    PubMed Central

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L’Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories. PMID:23690574

  15. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-04

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories.

  16. Miniature Ion Optics Towards a Micro Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ashish

    This PhD dissertation reports the development of miniature ion optics components of a mass spectrometer (MS) with the ultimate goal to lay the foundation for a compact low-power micromachined MS (microMS) for broad-range chemical analysis. Miniaturization of two specific components a) RF ion traps and b) an ion funnel have been investigated and miniature low-power versions of these components have been developed and demonstrated successfully in lab experiments. Power savings, simpler electronics and packaging schemes required to operate the micro-scale RF cylindrical ion traps have been the key motivation driving this research. Microfabricated cylindrical ion traps (microCITs) and arrays in silicon, silicon-on-insulator and stainless steel substrates have been demonstrated and average power of as low as 55 mW for a low mass range (28 to 136 amu) and mass spectra with better than a unit-mass-resolution have been recorded. For the ion funnel miniaturization effort, simple assembly, small form factor and ease of integration have been emphasized. A simplification of the conventional 3D ion funnel design, called the planar ion funnel, has been developed in a single plate and has been tested to demonstrate ion funneling at medium vacuum levels (1E-5 Torr) using DC voltages and power less than 0.5 W. Miniaturization of these components also enables use of other novel ion optics components, packaging and integration, which will allow a new class of microMS architectures amenable for radical miniaturization.

  17. An optically powered single-channel stimulation implant as test system for chronic biocompatibility and biostability of miniaturized retinal vision prostheses.

    PubMed

    Schanze, Thomas; Hesse, Lutz; Lau, Carsten; Greve, Nina; Haberer, Werner; Kammer, Sascha; Doerge, Thomas; Rentzos, Andreas; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    A microsystem based microimplant with an optically powered single-channel stimulator was designed and developed as test system for an epi-retinal vision implant. Biostability of the hybrid assembly and the encapsulation materials were evaluated in pilot experiments in chronic implantations in a cat animal model. The implant was fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate with integrated platinum electrode, interconnection lines, and contact pads for hybrid integration of electronic components. The receiver part was realized with four photodiodes connected in series. A parylene C coating was deposited on the electronic components as insulation layer. Silicone rubber was used to encapsulate the electronics in the shape of an artificial intraocular lens to allow proper implantation in the eye. Pilot experiments showed the biostability of the encapsulation approach and full electric functionality of the microimplant to generate stimulation currents over the implantation period of three months in two cats. In one cat, electrical stimulation of the retina evoked neuronal responses in the visual cortex and indicated the feasibility of the system approach for chronic use.

  18. Calibration of a stopping power model for silicon based on analysis of neutron depth profiling and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, K. J.; Chen-Mayer, H. H.; Lamaze, G. P.; Simons, D. S.; Thompson, P. E.

    2002-06-01

    We measure the boron concentration versus depth profile within a silicon sample with four delta-doped planes by secondary ion mass spectrometry. In a neutron depth profiling (NDP) experiment, we illuminate the sample with a neutron beam. Nuclear reactions between the boron nuclei and neutrons produce alpha particles. Based on the measured boron concentration profile and models for the stopping power of the silicon sample, energy straggling, multiple scattering, and the observed energy resolution of the alpha particle detector, we predict the observed energy spectrum of the detected alpha particles. We predict the stopping power of silicon using the stopping and range of ions in matter code SRIM-2000. The predicted locations of the NDP energy peaks are consistently at lower energies than the locations of the observed peaks. This discrepancy is consistent with the claim that SRIM-2000 overestimates the actual stopping power of silicon. Empirically, we estimate a stopping power reduction factor to be 5.06%±1.06%. When we reduce the SRIM-2000 prediction by this factor, we get good agreement between the observed and predicted NDP measurements.

  19. The Whole new world of miniature technology

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-07-01

    In the past ten years, miniaturization of both electrical and mechanical parts has significantly increased. Documentation of the design and production capabilities of miniaturization in the electronics industry is well-defined. Literature on the subject of miniaturization of metal piece parts, however, is hard to find. Some of the current capabilities in the manufacture of miniature metal piece parts or miniature features in larger piece parts are discussed.

  20. Neutron-proton final-state interaction in. pi. d breakup: Vector analyzing power

    SciTech Connect

    List, W.; Boschitz, E.T.; Garcilazo, H.; Gyles, W.; Ottermann, C.R.; Tacik, R.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Smith, G.R.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured for the ..pi..d breakup reaction in a kinematically complete experiment. The dependence of iT/sub 11/ on the momentum of the proton has been obtained for 36 pion-proton angle pairs at T/sub ..pi../ = 134 and 228 MeV. The data are compared with predictions from the new relativistic Faddeev theory of Garcilazo. The sensitivity of the observable iT/sub 11/, in particular in the np final-state interaction region, to details of the theory is investigated.

  1. Analyzing Powers and Differential Cross Sections for Polarized Proton Neutron Going to Negative Pion Proton Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Fraser Andrew

    There is considerable interest in the pn to pi^-pp reaction which can proceed by a nonresonant channel from the isospin 0 pn initial state (an NDelta intermediate state cannot be formed). This thesis describes a measurement of analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections for a subset of this reaction, pn to pi^-pp(^1S_0) by isolating the quasifree process in pd to pi^-ppp_{s}. The experimental arrangement selects the relative S-wave component of the outgoing "diproton". The experiment was done on TRIUMF beam line 1B using a LD_2 target; the pion was detected in a magnetic spectrometer, the two outgoing protons in a scintillator bar array. The spectator proton was undetected. Data were taken in August 1989 at 353, 403 and 440 MeV beam energies. Of these the 403 and 440 MeV data are analysed in this thesis and analyzing powers and triple differential cross sections as a function of pion scattering angle extracted at centre of mass kinetic energies, T_{CM}, of 55 and 70 MeV (corresponding to the 403 and 440 MeV beam energies respectively). Partial wave analysis of the data shows that, while the isospin 0 channel dominates the reaction, contributing approximately 75% of the cross section at the energies studied here, there are significant contributions from the s and d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels. Of particular importance is the contribution from the s-wave pion, isospin 1, channel whose interference with the isospin 0 channels produces the characteristic shapes of the cross sections and analyzing powers observed in the data. The d-wave pion, isospin 1 channels, are also required to fully explain the observed analyzing power distributions, and are essential for the T_{CM} = 70MeV data. Comparisons of the pion production data measured in this experiment with pion absorption measurements on ^3He, where the absorption process is pi^-pp(^1S_0) to pn, show a shift in the shape of the differential cross section which can be interpreted as due to differences in

  2. A miniature tactical Rb frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, T. M.; Dagle, R.; Debley, W.; Dellamano, H.; Hahn, T.; Horste, J.; Lam, L. K.; Magnuson, R.; Mcclelland, T.

    1984-01-01

    Work on an innovative design for miniature rubidium frequency standards has reached the pre-production demonstration stage at Litton Guidance and Control Systems. Pre-production units were built and tested under contract to the Rome Air Development Center of the U.S. Air Force Systems Command. The units, which are designed for use in tactical military applications, feature fast warm-up, low power consumption, and vibration insensitivity. The output stability under vibration is maintained without the need for external shock-mounts. The design objectives and test results are discussed.

  3. Miniature interferometer terminals for earth surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counselman, C. C., III; Shapiro, I. I.

    1978-01-01

    A system of miniature radio interferometer terminals was proposed for the measurement of vector baselines with uncertainties ranging from the millimeter to the centimeter level for baseline lengths ranging, respectively, from a few to a few hundred kilometers. Each terminal would have no moving parts, could be packaged in a volume of less than 0.1 cu m, and would operate unattended. These units would receive radio signals from low-power (10 w) transmitters on earth-orbiting satellites. The baselines between units could be determined virtually instantaneously and monitored continuously as long as at least four satellites were visible simultaneously.

  4. A Miniaturized Class IV Flextensional Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, Andrew; Tweedie, Andrew; Mathieson, Andrew; Lucas, Margaret

    The class V transducer has found popularity in a diverse range of applications such as surgical and underwater projection systems, where high vibration amplitude for relatively low piezoceramic volume is generated. The class IV transducer offers the potential to attain even higher performance per volume than the class V. In this research, a miniaturized class IV power ultrasonic flextensional transducer is proposed. Simulations were performed using PZFlex finite element analysis, and electrical impedance analysis and experimental modal analysis were conducted for validation, where a high correlation between simulation and experiment has been demonstrated.

  5. Miniaturized detection system for handheld PCR assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, James B.; Benett, William J.; Stratton, Paul; Hadley, Dean R.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    2000-12-01

    We have developed and delivered a four chamber, battery powered, handheld instrument referred to as the HANAA which monitors the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process using a TaqMan based fluorescence assay. The detection system differs form standard configurations in two essential ways. First, the size is miniaturized, with a combined cycling and optics plug-in module for a duplex assay begin about the size of a small box of matches. Second, the detection/analysis system is designed to call a positive sample in real time.

  6. Miniature Chemical Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew C. R. Pipino

    2004-12-13

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages.

  7. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  8. Miniature Incandescent Lamps as Fiber-Optic Light Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret; Collura, Joe; Helvajian, Henry; Pocha, Michael; Meyer, Glenn; McConaghy, Charles F.; Olsen, Barry L.

    2008-01-01

    Miniature incandescent lamps of a special type have been invented to satisfy a need for compact, rapid-response, rugged, broadband, power-efficient, fiber-optic-coupled light sources for diverse purposes that could include calibrating spectrometers, interrogating optical sensors, spot illumination, and spot heating.

  9. Reducing Unsteady Loads on a Piggyback Miniature Submarine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John

    2009-01-01

    A small, simple fixture has been found to be highly effective in reducing destructive unsteady hydrodynamic loads on a miniature submarine that is attached in piggyback fashion to the top of a larger, nuclear-powered, host submarine. The fixture, denoted compact ramp, can be installed with minimal structural modification, and the use of it does not entail any change in submarine operations.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of novel boron and gadolinium rich power generation and real-time neutron detection materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, Marcus L.

    In this work, the neutron capture capabilities of two naturally occurring isotopes, gadolinium-157 (157Gd) and boron-10 (10B), were investigated for use as neutron detecting diodes. The appeal of using 157Gd and 10B is due to their large thermal neutron absorption cross sections: gadolinium (on average ˜46,000 barns) and boron-10 (˜3800 barns). Boron carbide (B4C) films were grown on nickel, copper, silver, and aluminum substrates using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques forming p-n junctions using various configurations of two isomers: closo-1,7-dicarbadodecaborane (metacarborane) or closo-1,7-phosphacaborane (phosphacarborane) for the n-type layers and closo-1,2-dicarbadodecaborane (orthocarborane) for the p-type layer. These all-boron carbide heterojunction diodes were investigated experimentally, with highly sensitive current voltage measurements in light and dark and under alpha, beta, and neutron irradiation. The heteroisomeric diodes exhibited photovoltaic and alphavoltaic behavior and successfully functioned as neutron detectors. Preliminary results of beta radiation response of these heteroisomeric diodes is also presented. The high-kappa dielectric oxide, hafnium oxide (HfO2), was doped with gadolinium and grown on silicon using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to form a novel semiconducting diode. Three levels of Gd-doping (3%, 10%, and 15%) were explored. A shift from the unstable monoclinic phase to the stable cubic phase is seen with increased Gd-doping concentrations, which may possibly serve as a better semiconductor. The detection of charge pulses created by neutron capture was explored using neutron sources from Nebraska Wesleyan University and The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) neutron sources. The 10% and 15% doped diodes exhibited pulse height spectra in the presence of neutrons. Electronic signal processing remains the most significant challenge for these latter detectors.

  11. On-chip Hot Spot Remediation with Miniaturized Thermoelectric Coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Cohen, Avram; Wang, Peng

    2009-08-01

    The rapid emergence of nanoelectronics, with the consequent rise in transistor density and switching speed, has led to a steep increase in chip heat flux and growing concern over the emergence of on-chip "hot spots" in microprocessors, along with such high flux regions in power electronic chips and LED's. Miniaturized thermoelectric coolers (μ-TEC's) are a most promising cooling technique for the remediation of such hot spots. This paper presents a comprehensive review of recent advances in novel applications of superlattice, mini-contact, and silicon-based miniaturized thermoelectric coolers in reducing the severity of on-chip hot spots.

  12. Mini Mass Spectrometer Integrated with a Miniature Ion Funnel.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanbing; Zhang, Xiaohua; Xu, Hualei; Zheng, Yongchang; Yuan, Tao; Xu, Wei

    2017-03-14

    Previously, a continuous atmospheric pressure interfaced miniature mass spectrometer was developed in our lab. The continuous atmospheric pressure interface improves system robustness, stability, and scan speed, but it also results in limited ion transfer efficiency and reduced mass resolution. To solve these problems, a miniature ion funnel was designed and integrated into the miniature mass spectrometer for the first time. Besides ion transfer efficiency, dimension and power consumption of the ion funnel also need to be considered throughout the design process. After a systematic optimization, the designed miniature ion funnel could increase ion transfer efficiency by more than 10 times, while lowering the background pressure of ion trap by ∼2 times. As a result, sensitivity and mass resolution of the second generation miniature mass spectrometer were improved by 20 times and ∼2 times, respectively, while maintaining its high scan speed and stability. A sensitive and robust mini-MS, capable of coupling with ambient ionization sources would meet the needs of many on-site chemical analysis applications, such as in food, drug, and agricultural administrations, forensic science, homeland security, and etc.

  13. Miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator concept demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, R. E.; Rauschenbach, H. S.

    High concentration ratio photovoltaic systems for space applications have generally been considered impractical because of perceived difficulties in controlling solar cell temperatures to reasonably low values. A miniaturized concentrator system is now under development which surmounts this objection by providing acceptable solar cell temperatures using purely passive cell cooling methods. An array of identical miniaturized, rigid Cassegrainian optical systems having a low f-number with resulting short dimensions along their optical axes are rigidly mounted into a frame to form a relatively thin concentrator solar array panel. A number of such panels, approximately 1.5 centimeters thick, are wired as an array and are folded against one another for launch in a stowed configuration. Deployment on orbit is similar to the deployment of conventional planar honeycomb panel arrays or flexible blanket arrays. The miniaturized concept was conceived and studied in the 1978-80 time frame. Progress in the feasibility demonstration to date is reported.

  14. Miniaturization in x ray and gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents advances in two new sensor technologies and a miniaturized associated electronics technology which, when combined, can allow for very significant miniaturization and for the reduction of weight and power consumption in x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems: (1) Mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray technology, which allows for the first time the construction of truly portable, high-energy resolution, non-cryogenic x-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analyzer systems, with parameters approaching those of laboratory quality cryogenic instruments; (2) the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD), which is a solid-state light sensitive device with internal amplification, capable of uniquely replacing the vacuum photomultiplier tube in scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer applications, and offering substantial improvements in size, ruggedness, low power operation and energy resolution; and (3) miniaturized (hybridized) low noise, low power amplification and processing electronics, which take full advantage of the favorable properties of these new sensors and allow for the design and fabrication of advanced, highly miniaturized x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. The paper also presents experimental results and examples of spectrometric systems currently under construction. The directions for future developments are discussed.

  15. Neutron radiographic viewing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leysath, W.; Brown, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Neutron radiographic viewing system consisting of camera head and control processor is developed for use in nondestructive testing applications. Camera head consists of neutron-sensitive image intensifier system, power supply, and SEC vidicon camera head. Both systems, with their optics, are housed on test mount.

  16. Analysis of nonlinear elastic behavior in miniature pneumatic artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Erica G.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) are well known for their excellent actuator characteristics, including high specific work, specific power, and power density. Recent research has focused on miniaturizing this pneumatic actuator technology in order to develop PAMs for use in small-scale mechanical systems, such as those found in robotic or aerospace applications. The first step in implementing these miniature PAMs was to design and characterize the actuator. To that end, this study presents the manufacturing process, experimental characterization, and analytical modeling of PAMs with millimeter-scale diameters. A fabrication method was developed to consistently produce low-cost, high performance, miniature PAMs using commercially available materials. The quasi-static behavior of these PAMs was determined through experimentation on a single actuator with an active length of 39.16 mm (1.54 in) and a diameter of 4.13 mm (0.1625 in). Testing revealed the PAM’s full evolution of force with displacement for operating pressures ranging from 207 to 552 kPa (30-80 psi in 10 psi increments), as well as the blocked force and free contraction at each pressure. Three key nonlinear phenomena were observed: nonlinear PAM stiffness, hysteresis of the force versus displacement response for a given pressure, and a pressure deadband. To address the analysis of the nonlinear response of these miniature PAMs, a nonlinear stress versus strain model, a hysteresis model, and a pressure bias are introduced into a previously developed force balance analysis. Parameters of these nonlinear model refinements are identified from the measured force versus displacement data. This improved nonlinear force balance model is shown to capture the full actuation behavior of the miniature PAMs at each operating pressure and reconstruct miniature PAM response with much more accuracy than previously possible.

  17. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability is disclosed. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three. 6 figs.

  18. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.; Dietrich, Daniel D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three.

  19. Miniature reciprocating heat pumps and engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiesen, Jack H. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention discloses a miniature thermodynamic device that can be constructed using standard micro-fabrication techniques. The device can be used to provide cooling, generate power, compress gases, pump fluids and reduce pressure below ambient (operate as a vacuum pump). Embodiments of the invention relating to the production of a cooling effect and the generation of electrical power, change the thermodynamic state of the system by extracting energy from a pressurized fluid. Energy extraction is attained using an expansion process, which is as nearly isentropic as possible for the appropriately chosen fluid. An isentropic expansion occurs when a compressed gas does work to expand, and in the disclosed embodiments, the gas does work by overcoming either an electrostatic or a magnetic force.

  20. Influence of the gamma-ray fraction in the reactor radiation on the total signal of a self-powered neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurchenkov, A. Yu.; Kulakov, A. S.; Alekseev, N. I.; Kalinushkin, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    For controlling the linear power density in the reactor core, the Khortitsa-M software program as a part of the in-core instrumentation system (ICIS) employs only self-powered neutron detector (SPND) data with the neutronic calculation for the consistent determination of the power density in unmeasurable fuel assemblies (FAs). The confidence of the interpretation of the SPND data essentially determines the safe and efficient operation of a reactor. Previously, it was assumed that the gamma-ray fraction in the reactor radiation does not exceed one percent and is independent of the fuel enrichment and the FA and SPND burnups. Since it is difficult to estimate the contribution of the reactor gamma radiation to the SPND current experimentally, in this work, we present a calculated estimate using modern software and libraries of constants. On the basis of the results of this study, the question is discussed whether it is appropriate to take into account the reactor gamma radiation in the transfer function from the SPND current to the power density of six fuel elements surrounding the SPND with allowance for both the type of FA and the FA and SPND burnups.

  1. Miniature sonar fish tag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Self-powered sonar device may be implanted in body of fish. It transmits signal that can be detected with portable tracking gear or by automatic detection-and-tracking system. Operating life of over 4000 hours may be expected. Device itself may be used almost indefinitely.

  2. Modeling and testing miniature torsion specimens for SiC joining development studies for fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Henager, Jr., C. H.; Nguyen, Ba N.; Kurtz, Richard J.; ...

    2015-08-05

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. For this research, miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti3SiC2 + SiC joints with SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated strengths to determine irradiation effects. Finite elementmore » elastic damage and elastic–plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is more likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti3SiC2 + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. Finally, the implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed.« less

  3. Modeling and Testing Miniature Torsion Specimens for SiC Joining Development Studies for Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, Andrea; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-08-19

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. Miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti3SiC2 + SiC joints with CVD-SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many of these miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the CVD-SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated joint strengths to determine the effects of the irradiation. Finite element elastic damage and elastic-plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated joint test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti3SiC2 + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. The implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed.

  4. Modeling and testing miniature torsion specimens for SiC joining development studies for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henager, C. H.; Nguyen, B. N.; Kurtz, R. J.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Borlaug, B. A.; Ferraris, M.; Ventrella, A.; Katoh, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. Miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti3SiC2 + SiC joints with SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated strengths to determine irradiation effects. Finite element elastic damage and elastic-plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is more likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti3SiC2 + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. The implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed.

  5. Visual thread quality for precision miniature mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-04-01

    Threaded features have eight visual appearance factors which can affect their function in precision miniature mechanisms. The Bendix practice in deburring, finishing, and accepting these conditions on miniature threads is described as is their impact in assemblies of precision miniature electromechanical assemblies.

  6. Pocket neutron REM meter

    SciTech Connect

    Quam, W.; Del Duca, T.; Plake, W.; Graves, G.; DeVore, T.; Warren, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a pocket-calculator-sized, neutron-sensitive, REM-responding personnel dosimeter that uses three tissue-equivalent cylindrical proportional counters as neutron-sensitive detectors. These are conventionally called Linear Energy Transfer (LET) counters. Miniaturized hybrid circuits are used for the linear pulse handling electronics, followed by a 256-channel ADC. A CMOS microprocessor is used to calculate REM exposure from the basic rads-tissue data supplied by the LET counters and also to provide timing and display functions. The instrument is used to continuously accumulate time in hours since reset, total counts accumulated, rads-tissue, and REM. At any time the user can display any one of these items or a channel number (an aid in calibration). The instrument provides such data with a precision of +- 3% for a total exposure of 1 mREM over 8 hours.

  7. Pocket neutron REM meter

    SciTech Connect

    Quam, W.; Del Duca, T.; Plake, W.; Graves, G.; DeVore, T.; Warren, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes a pocket-calculator-sized, neutron-sensitive, REM-responding personnel dosimeter that uses three tissue-equivalent cylindrical proportional counters as neutron-sensitive detectors. These are conventionally called Linear Energy Transfer (LET) counters. Miniaturized hybrid circuits are used for the linear pulse handling electronics, followed by a 256-channel ADC. A CMOS microprocessor is used to calculate REM exposure from the basic rads-tissue data supplied by the LET counters and also to provide timing and display functions. The instrument is used to continuously accumulate time in hours since reset, total counts accumulated, rads-tissue, and REM. The user can display any one of these items or a channel number (an aid in calibration) at any time. Such data are provided with a precision of +- 3% for a total exposure of 1 mREM over eight hours.

  8. Neutron Scattering Stiudies

    SciTech Connect

    Kegel, Gunter H.R.; Egan, James J

    2007-04-18

    This project covers four principal areas of research: Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering studies in odd-A terbium, thulium and other highly deformed nuclei near A=160 with special regard to interband transitions and to the investigation of the direct-interaction versus the compound-nucleus excitation process in these nuclei. Examination of new, fast photomultiplier tubes suitable for use in a miniaturized neutron-time-of-flight spectrometer. Measurement of certain inelastic cross sections of 238U. Determination of the multiplicity of prompt fission gamma rays in even-A fissile actinides. Energies and mean lives of fission isomers produced by fast fission of even-Z, even-A actinides. Study of the mean life of 7Be in different host matrices and its possible astro-physical significance.

  9. Miniaturization in sample treatment for environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L; Ramos, J J; Brinkman, U A Th

    2005-01-01

    The increasing demand for faster, more cost-effective and environmentally friendly analytical methods is a major incentive to improve the classical procedures used for sample treatment in environmental analysis. In most classical procedures, the use of rapid and powerful instrumental techniques for the final separation and detection of the analytes contrasts with the time-consuming and usually manual methods used for sample preparation, which slows down the total analytical process. The efforts made in this field in the past ten years have led to the adaptation of existing methods and the development of new techniques to save time and chemicals, and improve overall performance. One route has been to develop at-line or on-line and, frequently, automated systems. In these approaches, miniaturization has been a key factor in designing integrated analytical systems to provide higher sample throughput and/or unattended operation. Selected examples of novel developments in the field of miniaturized sample preparation for environmental analysis are used to evaluate the merits of the various techniques on the basis of published data on real-life analyses of trace-level organic pollutants. Perspectives and trends are briefly discussed.

  10. NEUTRON DENSITY CONTROL IN A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.J.

    1959-06-30

    The method and means for controlling the neutron density in a nuclear reactor is described. It describes the method and means for flattening the neutron density distribution curve across the reactor by spacing the absorbing control members to varying depths in the central region closer to the center than to the periphery of the active portion of the reactor to provide a smaller neutron reproduction ratio in the region wherein the members are inserted, than in the remainder of the reactor thereby increasing the over-all potential power output.

  11. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Dudovitch, O.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Hazenshprung, N.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z.; Paul, M. Tessler, M.

    2014-05-15

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (∼2 × 10{sup 10} n/s having a peak energy of ∼27 keV) from the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  12. Electrochemical evaluation of sensitization in austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized specimens*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inazumi, T.; Bell, G. E. C.; Kiuchi, K.

    1991-03-01

    An electrochemical testing system was developed to evaluate the sensitization of neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized disk-type specimens, 3 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm thick. The system consists of a specimen holder in which a miniaturized specimen is mounted as the working electrode, a test cell designed to handle radioactive materials and waste, a computer-controlled potentiostat/galvanostat and a surface preparation equipment. Sensitization of a thermally-aged Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel was successfully detected by the single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (SL-EPR) method.

  13. High power accelerator-based boron neutron capture with a liquid lithium target and new applications to treatment of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Steinberg, D; Nagler, A; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Polacheck, I; Srebnik, M

    2009-07-01

    A new conceptual design for an accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT) facility based on the high-current low-energy proton beam driven by the linear accelerator at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) incident on a windowless forced-flow liquid-lithium target, is described. The liquid-lithium target, currently in construction at Soreq NRC, will produce a neutron field suitable for the BNCT treatment of deep-seated tumor tissues, through the reaction (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be. The liquid-lithium target is designed to overcome the major problem of solid lithium targets, namely to sustain and dissipate the power deposited by the high-intensity proton beam. Together with diseases conventionally targeted by BNCT, we propose to study the application of our setup to a novel approach in treatment of diseases associated with bacterial infections and biofilms, e.g. inflammations on implants and prosthetic devices, cystic fibrosis, infectious kidney stones. Feasibility experiments evaluating the boron neutron capture effectiveness on bacteria annihilation are taking place at the Soreq nuclear reactor.

  14. The depolarization of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 ferroelectrics by cylindrical radially expanding shock waves and its utilization for miniature pulsed power.

    PubMed

    Shkuratov, Sergey I; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F

    2011-05-01

    The effects of depolarization of Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O(3) (PZT 52∕48) poled ferroelectrics by cylindrical radially expanding shock waves propagated along and across the polarization vector P(0) were experimentally detected. Miniature (total volume 100 cm(3)) autonomous generators based on these effects were capable of producing output voltage pulses with amplitudes up to 25 kV and output energies exceeding 1 J.

  15. Miniature 100-kV Explosively Driven Prime Power Sources Based on Transverse Shock-Wave Depolarization of Pb(Zr0.95Ti0.05)O3 Ferroelectric Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Loki Incorporated, Rolla, MO 65409, U.S.A. 8...patented by Loki Incorporated [7]) contain no moving metallic parts and are capable of producing output voltage pulses with amplitudes exceeding 125 kV [6...were designed, constructed and experimentally studied. These miniature generators (diameter 38 mm) patented by Loki Incorporated [7] are capable

  16. The depolarization of Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} ferroelectrics by cylindrical radially expanding shock waves and its utilization for miniature pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratov, Sergey I.; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F.

    2011-05-15

    The effects of depolarization of Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} (PZT 52/48) poled ferroelectrics by cylindrical radially expanding shock waves propagated along and across the polarization vector P{sub 0} were experimentally detected. Miniature (total volume 100 cm{sup 3}) autonomous generators based on these effects were capable of producing output voltage pulses with amplitudes up to 25 kV and output energies exceeding 1 J.

  17. Miniature aerosol lidar for automated airborne application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthey, Renaud; Mitev, Valentin; Mileti, Gaetano; Makarov, Vladislav S.; Turin, Alexander V.; Morandi, Marco; Santacesaria, Vincenzo

    2000-09-01

    The Russian Mjasishchev 55 (M-55) <> high altitude aircraft is dedicated to atmospheric science research. It carries onboard a set of mutually complementary instruments for in- situ and remote sensing. The Green Miniature Aerosol Lidar (GMAL) has been developed to operate automatically on this platform. It is a short-range, zenith-looking, depolarization elastic-backscatter lidar based on a 532 nm micro-chip Nd-YAG laser. Compact, low-power consuming, it stands in a 27-litre isolating and warmed hermetic box. The device participated successfully to an extended test campaign in Italy during December 1998 and January 1999, and to the APE/THESEO campaign in the Indian Ocean during February-March 1999. It also showed capabilities for unattended measurement of the low troposphere from the ground. Description of the instrument and preliminary results are presented.

  18. Laser direct marking applied to rasterizing miniature Data Matrix Code on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia-Shuang; He, Wei-Ping; Lei, Lei; Wang, Jian; Guo, Gai-Fang; Zhang, Teng-Yun; Yue, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Precise miniaturization of 2D Data Matrix (DM) Codes on Aluminum alloy formed by raster mode laser direct part marking is demonstrated. The characteristic edge over-burn effects, which render vector mode laser direct part marking inadequate for producing precise and readable miniature codes, are minimized with raster mode laser marking. To obtain the control mechanism for the contrast and print growth of miniature DM code by raster laser marking process, the temperature field model of long pulse laser interaction with material is established. From the experimental results, laser average power and Q frequency have an important effect on the contrast and print growth of miniature DM code, and the threshold of laser average power and Q frequency for an identifiable miniature DM code are respectively 3.6 W and 110 kHz, which matches the model well within normal operating conditions. In addition, the empirical model of correlation occurring between laser marking parameters and module size is also obtained, and the optimal processing parameter values for an identifiable miniature DM code of different but certain data size are given. It is also found that an increase of the repeat scanning number effectively improves the surface finish of bore, the appearance consistency of modules, which has benefit to reading. The reading quality of miniature DM code is greatly improved using ultrasonic cleaning in water by avoiding the interference of color speckles surrounding modules.

  19. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  20. Toward a miniaturized fundus camera.

    PubMed

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie; Flynn, John T; Pratisto, Hans; Niederer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) describes a pathological development of the retina in prematurely born children. In order to prevent severe permanent damage to the eye and enable timely treatment, the fundus of the eye in such children has to be examined according to established procedures. For these examinations, our miniaturized fundus camera is intended to allow the acquisition of wide-angle digital pictures of the fundus for on-line or off-line diagnosis and documentation. We designed two prototypes of a miniaturized fundus camera, one with graded refractive index (GRIN)-based optics, the other with conventional optics. Two different modes of illumination were compared: transscleral and transpupillary. In both systems, the size and weight of the camera were minimized. The prototypes were tested on young rabbits. The experiments led to the conclusion that the combination of conventional optics with transpupillary illumination yields the best results in terms of overall image quality.

  1. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Stone, Gary F.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.; Chornenky, Victor I.

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  2. Organic photodiodes for biosensor miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Jason R; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Yamaguchi, Mariko Y; Füreder, Erwin; Pieler, Roland; Schamesberger, Martin; Winder, Christoph; Prall, Hans Jürgen; Sonnleitner, Max; Ligler, Frances S

    2009-05-01

    Biosensors have successfully demonstrated the capability to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously at very low levels. Miniaturization of biosensors is essential for use in the field or at the point of care. While microfluidic systems reduce the footprint for biochemical processing devices and electronic components are continually becoming smaller, optical components suitable for integration--such as LEDs and CMOS chips--are generally still too expensive for disposable components. This paper describes the integration of polymer diodes onto a biosensor chip to create a disposable device that includes both the detector and the sensing surface coated with immobilized capture antibody. We performed a chemiluminescence immunoassay on the OPD substrate and measured the results using a hand-held reader attached to a laptop computer. The miniaturized biosensor with the disposable slide including the organic photodiode detected Staphylococcal enterotoxin B at concentrations as low as 0.5 ng/mL.

  3. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  4. Organic Photodiodes for Biosensor Miniaturization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    1 pW/mm2. Using this system, sandwich immunoassays were performed on the OPD substrate for detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Results...demonstrated the capability to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously at very low levels. Miniaturization of biosensors is essential for use in the field or...the sensing surface coated with immobilized capture antibody. We performed a chemiluminescence immunoassay on the OPD substrate and measured the results

  5. Miniaturized X-ray Generation by Pyroelectric Effect using Short Pulse Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-30

    1 Report of AOARD Program CONTRACT NO: FA23861014160 Miniaturized X-ray Generation by Pyroelectric Effect using Short Pulse Laser...induced currents by short- pulse high-power laser irradiation II-1: Experiments and results II-2: Theoretical calculations ~Analysis of currents...effect using short pulse laser aiming at miniaturized X-ray generator 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA23861014160 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  6. Solid state neutron detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  7. Autonomous stair-climbing with miniature jumping robots.

    PubMed

    Stoeter, Sascha A; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos

    2005-04-01

    The problem of vision-guided control of miniature mobile robots is investigated. Untethered mobile robots with small physical dimensions of around 10 cm or less do not permit powerful onboard computers because of size and power constraints. These challenges have, in the past, reduced the functionality of such devices to that of a complex remote control vehicle with fancy sensors. With the help of a computationally more powerful entity such as a larger companion robot, the control loop can be closed. Using the miniature robot's video transmission or that of an observer to localize it in the world, control commands can be computed and relayed to the inept robot. The result is a system that exhibits autonomous capabilities. The framework presented here solves the problem of climbing stairs with the miniature Scout robot. The robot's unique locomotion mode, the jump, is employed to hop one step at a time. Methods for externally tracking the Scout are developed. A large number of real-world experiments are conducted and the results discussed.

  8. Miniaturization of flight deflection measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodale, Robert (Inventor); Hampton, Herbert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A flight deflection measurement system is disclosed including a hybrid microchip of a receiver/decoder. The hybrid microchip decoder is mounted piggy back on the miniaturized receiver and forms an integral unit therewith. The flight deflection measurement system employing the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be used in a wind tunnel. In particular, the miniaturized receiver/decoder can be employed in a spin measurement system due to its small size and can retain already established control surface actuation functions.

  9. An investigation into the accuracy of the albedo dosimeter DVGN-01 in measuring personnel irradiation doses in the fields of neutron radiation at nuclear power installations of the joint institute for nuclear research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskrovnaya, L. G.; Goroshkova, E. A.; Mokrov, Yu. V.

    2010-05-01

    The calculated results of research into the accuracy of an individual albedo dosimeter DVGN-01 as it corresponds to the personal equivalent dose for neutrons H p (10) and to the effective dose for neutrons E eff in the neutron fields at Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Nuclear Power Installations (JNPI) upon different geometries of irradiations are presented. It has been shown that correction coefficients are required for the specific estimation of doses by the dosimeter. These coefficients were calculated using the energy sensitivity curve of the dosimeter and the known neutron spectra at JNPI. By using the correction factors, the uncertainties of both doses will not exceed the limits given to the personnel according to the standards.

  10. Miniaturized Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Engineering Directorate is developing the Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (AERCam), a low-volume, low-mass free-flying camera system . AERCam project team personnel recently initiated development of a miniaturized version of AERCam known as Mini AERCam. The Mini AERCam target design is a spherical "nanosatellite" free-flyer 7.5 inches in diameter and weighing 1 0 pounds. Mini AERCam is building on the success of the AERCam Sprint STS-87 flight experiment by adding new on-board sensing and processing capabilities while simultaneously reducing volume by 80%. Achieving enhanced capability in a smaller package depends on applying miniaturization technology across virtually all subsystems. Technology innovations being incorporated include micro electromechanical system (MEMS) gyros, "camera-on-a-chip" CMOS imagers, rechargeable xenon gas propulsion system , rechargeable lithium ion battery, custom avionics based on the PowerPC 740 microprocessor, GPS relative navigation, digital radio frequency communications and tracking, micropatch antennas, digital instrumentation, and dense mechanical packaging. The Mini AERCam free-flyer will initially be integrated into an approximate flight-like configuration for demonstration on an airbearing table. A pilot-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop simulation to simulate on-orbit navigation and dynamics will complement the airbearing table demonstration. The Mini AERCam lab demonstration is intended to form the basis for future development of an AERCam flight system that provides beneficial on-orbit views unobtainable from fixed cameras, cameras on robotic manipulators, or cameras carried by EVA crewmembers.

  11. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  12. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  13. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology.

  14. Fabrication of Miniature Thermoelectric Generators Using Bulk Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sung-Jae; Ryu, Byungki; Min, Bok-Ki; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Bong-Seo; Park, Su-Dong; Lee, Hee-Woong

    2016-07-01

    Miniature thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are required for micro power generation as well as local cooling, and they should have small size and high performance. However, conventional bulk TEMs generally have in-plane dimensions of a few centimeters, and empty space between the legs for electrical isolation makes efficient miniaturization difficult. In this study, a miniature TEM with footprint of about 0.35 cm2 and leg height of 0.97 mm was fabricated by reducing the dimensions of the legs and attaching them together to form a closely packed assembly, without using microelectromechanical processes. First, Bi0.4Sb1.6Te3 (BST) and Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 (BTS) ingots were made by ball milling and spark plasma sintering, and the ingots were cut into thin plates. These BST and BTS plates were then attached alternately using polyimide tapes, and the attached plates were sliced vertically to produce thin sheets. This process was repeated once again to make chessboard-like assemblies having 20 p- n pairs in an area of 0.35 cm2, and electrical contacts were formed by Ni sputtering and Ag paste coating. Finally, thermally conductive silicone pads (~500 μm) were attached on both sides of the assembly using electrically insulating interface thermal tapes (˜180 μm). The maximum output power ( P max) from the miniature module was about 28 μW and 2.0 mW for temperature difference (Δ T) of 5.6°C and 50.5°C, respectively. Reducing the contact resistance was considered to be the key to increase the output power.

  15. Miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-Transceiver) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Lopatin, Craig

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes recent progress conducted towards the development of a miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-Transceiver TM) system based on multi-channel integrated optic sensor (InOSense TM) microchip technology. The hybrid InOSense TM microchip technology enables the integration of all of the functionalities, both passive and active, of conventional bench top FBG sensor interrogator systems, packaged in a miniaturized, low power operation, 2-cm x 5-cm package suitable for the long-term structural health monitoring in applications where size, weight, and power are critical for operation. The FBG-Transceiver system uses active optoelectronic components monolithically integrated to the InOSense TM microchip, a microprocessor controlled signal processing electronics board capable of processing the FBG sensors signals related to stress-strain and temperature as well as vibration and acoustics. The FBG-Transceiver TM system represents a new, reliable, highly robust technology that can be used to accurately monitor the status of an array of distributed fiber optic Bragg grating sensors installed in critical infrastructures. Its miniature package, low power operation, and state-of-the-art data communications architecture, all at a very affordable price makes it a very attractive solution for a large number of SHM/NDI applications in aerospace, naval and maritime industry, civil structures like bridges, buildings and dams, the oil and chemical industry, and for homeland security applications. The miniature, cost-efficient FBG-Transceiver TM system is poised to revolutionize the field of structural health monitoring and nondestructive inspection market. The sponsor of this program is NAVAIR under a DOD SBIR contract.

  16. Novel Materials and Devices for Solid-State Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    2015-11-01

    There is a need in many fields, such as nuclear medicine, non-proliferation, energy exploration, national security, homeland security, nuclear energy, etc, for miniature, thermal neutron detectors. Until recently, thermal neutron detection has required physically large devices to provide sufficient neutron interaction and transduction signal. Miniaturization would allow broader use in the fields just mentioned and open up other applications potentially. Recent research shows promise in creating smaller neutron detectors through the combination of high-neutron-cross-section converter materials and solid-state devices. Yet, till recently it is difficult to measure low neutron fluxes by solidstate means given the need for optimized converter materials (purity, chemical composition and thickness) and a lack of designs capable of efficient transduction of the neutron conversion products (x-rays, electrons, gamma rays). Gadolinium-based semiconductor heterojunctions have detected electrons produced by Gd-neutron reactions but only at high neutron fluxes. One of the main limitations to this type of approach is the use of thin converter layers and the inability to utilize all the conversion products. In this LDRD we have optimized the converter material thickness and chemical composition to improve capture of conversion electrons and have detected thermal neutrons with high fidelity at low flux. We are also examining different semiconductor materials and converter materials to attempt to capture a greater percentage of the conversion electrons, both low and higher energy varieties. We have studied detector size and bias scaling, and cross-sensitivity to xrays and shown that we can detect low fluxes of thermal neutrons in less than 30 minutes with high selectivity by our approach. We are currently studying improvements in performance with direct placement of the Gd converter on the detector. The advancement of sensitive, miniature neutron detectors will have benefits in

  17. Miniature Autonomous Robotic Vehicle (MARV)

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Kwok, K.S.; Driessen, B.J.; Spletzer, B.L.; Weber, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has recently developed a 16 cm{sup 3} (1 in{sup 3}) autonomous robotic vehicle which is capable of tracking a single conducting wire carrying a 96 kHz signal. This vehicle was developed to assess the limiting factors in using commercial technology to build miniature autonomous vehicles. Particular attention was paid to the design of the control system to search out the wire, track it, and recover if the wire was lost. This paper describes the test vehicle and the control analysis. Presented in the paper are the vehicle model, control laws, a stability analysis, simulation studies and experimental results.

  18. FY 2007 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2008-02-20

    Miniature spherical retroreflectors, less than 8 millimeters in diameter, are currently being developed to enhance remote optical detection of nuclear proliferation activities. These retroreflecting spheres resemble small, sand-colored marbles that have the unique optical property of providing a strong reflection directly back to the source (i.e., retroreflecting) when illuminated with a laser. The addition of specific coatings, sensitive to specific chemicals or radioactive decay in the environment, can be applied to the surface of these retroreflectors to provide remote detection of nuclear proliferation activities. The presence of radioactive decay (e.g., alpha, gamma, neutron) or specific chemicals in the environment (e.g., TBP, acids) will change the optical properties of the spheres in a predictable fashion, thus indicating the presence or absence of the target materials. One possible scenario might employ an airborne infrared laser system (e.g., quantum-cascade lasers) to illuminate a section of ground littered with these retroreflective spheres. Depending on the coating and the presence of a specific chemical or radioisotope in the environment, the return signal would be modified in some predictable fashion because of fluorescence, frequency shifting, intensity attenuation/enhancement, or change in polarization. Research conducted in FY 2007 focused on developing novel optical fabrication processes and exploiting the unique material properties of chalcogenide infrared-transparent glass (germanium-arsenic-sulfur-tellurium compounds) to produce highly efficient retroreflectors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s approach provides comparable performance to the ideal graded index sphere concept, developed by R. K. Luneburg in 1944 (Luneburg 1944), while greatly reducing the complexity in fabrication by utilizing chalcogenide glass materials and compression-molding processes.

  19. Evaluation of miniature vacuum ultraviolet lamps for stability and operating characteristics, Lyman-Alpha task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    Modifications required to change the near ultraviolet source in the Optical Contamination Monitor to a source with output at or near the Lyman-Alpha hydrogen line are discussed. The effort consisted of selecting, acquiring and testing candidate miniature ultraviolet lamps with significant output in or near 121.6 nm. The effort also included selection of a miniature dc high-voltage power supply capable of operating the lamp. The power supply was required to operate from available primary power supplied by the Optical Effect Module (DEM) and it should be flight qualified or have the ability to be qualified by the user.

  20. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  1. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  2. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  3. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  4. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  5. Development of thermoelectric fibers for miniature thermoelectric devices

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Fei; Menchhofer, Paul A.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; ...

    2016-09-23

    Miniature thermoelectric (TE) devices may be used in a variety of applications such as power sources of small sensors, temperature regulation of precision electronics, etc. Reducing the size of TE elements may also enable design of novel devices with unique form factor and higher device efficiency. Current industrial practice of fabricating TE devices usually involves mechanical removal processes that not only lead to material loss but also limit the geometry of the TE elements. In this project, we explored a powder-processing method for the fabrication of TE fibers with large length-to-area ratio, which could be potentially used for miniature TEmore » devices. Powders were milled from Bi2Te3-based bulk materials and then mixed with a thermoplastic resin dissolved in an organic solvent. Through an extrusion process, flexible, continuous fibers with sub-millimeter diameters were formed. The polymer phase was then removed by sintering. Sintered fibers exhibited similar Seebeck coefficients to the bulk materials. Moreover, their electrical resistivity was much higher, which might be related to the residual porosity and grain boundary contamination. Prototype miniature uni-couples fabricated from these fibers showed a linear I-V behavior and could generate millivolt voltages and output power in the nano-watt range. Further development of these TE fibers requires improvement in their electrical conductivities, which needs a better understanding of the causes that lead to the low conductivity in the sintered fibers.« less

  6. Development of thermoelectric fibers for miniature thermoelectric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Menchhofer, Paul A.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Wang, Hsin

    2016-09-23

    Miniature thermoelectric (TE) devices may be used in a variety of applications such as power sources of small sensors, temperature regulation of precision electronics, etc. Reducing the size of TE elements may also enable design of novel devices with unique form factor and higher device efficiency. Current industrial practice of fabricating TE devices usually involves mechanical removal processes that not only lead to material loss but also limit the geometry of the TE elements. In this project, we explored a powder-processing method for the fabrication of TE fibers with large length-to-area ratio, which could be potentially used for miniature TE devices. Powders were milled from Bi2Te3-based bulk materials and then mixed with a thermoplastic resin dissolved in an organic solvent. Through an extrusion process, flexible, continuous fibers with sub-millimeter diameters were formed. The polymer phase was then removed by sintering. Sintered fibers exhibited similar Seebeck coefficients to the bulk materials. Moreover, their electrical resistivity was much higher, which might be related to the residual porosity and grain boundary contamination. Prototype miniature uni-couples fabricated from these fibers showed a linear I-V behavior and could generate millivolt voltages and output power in the nano-watt range. Further development of these TE fibers requires improvement in their electrical conductivities, which needs a better understanding of the causes that lead to the low conductivity in the sintered fibers.

  7. Development of Thermoelectric Fibers for Miniature Thermoelectric Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fei; Menchhofer, Paul; Kiggans, James; Wang, Hsin

    2016-03-01

    Miniature thermoelectric (TE) devices may be used in a variety of applications such as power sources of small sensors, temperature regulation of precision electronics, etc. Reducing the size of TE elements may also enable design of novel devices with unique form factor and higher device efficiency. Current industrial practice of fabricating TE devices usually involves mechanical removal processes that not only lead to material loss but also limit the geometry of the TE elements. In this project, we explored a powder-processing method for the fabrication of TE fibers with large length-to-area ratio, which could be potentially used for miniature TE devices. Powders were milled from Bi2Te3-based bulk materials and then mixed with a thermoplastic resin dissolved in an organic solvent. Through an extrusion process, flexible, continuous fibers with sub-millimeter diameters were formed. The polymer phase was then removed by sintering. Sintered fibers exhibited similar Seebeck coefficients to the bulk materials. However, their electrical resistivity was much higher, which might be related to the residual porosity and grain boundary contamination. Prototype miniature uni-couples fabricated from these fibers showed a linear I- V behavior and could generate millivolt voltages and output power in the nano-watt range. Further development of these TE fibers requires improvement in their electrical conductivities, which needs a better understanding of the causes that lead to the low conductivity in the sintered fibers.

  8. Development of Miniaturized Optimized Smart Sensors (MOSS) for space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    The cost of space plasma sensors is high for several reasons: (1) Most are one-of-a-kind and state-of-the-art, (2) the cost of launch to orbit is high, (3) ruggedness and reliability requirements lead to costly development and test programs, and (4) overhead is added by overly elaborate or generalized spacecraft interface requirements. Possible approaches to reducing costs include development of small 'sensors' (defined as including all necessary optics, detectors, and related electronics) that will ultimately lead to cheaper missions by reducing (2), improving (3), and, through work with spacecraft designers, reducing (4). Despite this logical approach, there is no guarantee that smaller sensors are necessarily either better or cheaper. We have previously advocated applying analytical 'quality factors' to plasma sensors (and spacecraft) and have begun to develop miniaturized particle optical systems by applying quantitative optimization criteria. We are currently designing a Miniaturized Optimized Smart Sensor (MOSS) in which miniaturized electronics (e.g., employing new power supply topology and extensive us of gate arrays and hybrid circuits) are fully integrated with newly developed particle optics to give significant savings in volume and mass. The goal of the SwRI MOSS program is development of a fully self-contained and functional plasma sensor weighing 1 lb and requiring 1 W. MOSS will require only a typical spacecraft DC power source (e.g., 30 V) and command/data interfaces in order to be fully functional, and will provide measurement capabilities comparable in most ways to current sensors.

  9. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  10. A new miniaturized atomic magnetic gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Dong; Perry, Abigail; Krzyzewski, Sean; Geller, Shawn; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2016-05-01

    We report the development of a new miniaturized magnetic gradiometer using alkali atoms. The gradiometer, with the length of 5 cm and cross section diameter of 11 mm, is made of two chip-scale atomic magnetometers placed on a printed optical bench with a defined separation. Both magnetometers work in the spin-exchange relaxation free regime, share the same beam for pumping and probing to reduce the common mode noises from the lasers, and atom temperature is independently controlled by heating beams at telecom wavelength. With 2 cm baseline, 1 mW pumping beam power, and less than 400 mW input heating beam power, we measure a noise level of 15 fT/ Hz1/2 from the subtraction of two magnetometer outputs, which corresponds to a gradient field sensitivity of 7.5 fT/ Hz1/2/cm. The maximum common mode magnetic field noise rejection is up to 1000 within the gradiometer bandwidth. This device is useful in many fields that require both sensitive gradient field information and high common mode noise cancellation. We are also developing a new hybrid system based on this device to improve its dynamical range.

  11. Miniature pulsed magnet system for synchrotron x-ray measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Peter J. E. M. van der; Mathon, Olivier; Strohm, Cornelius; Sikora, Marcin

    2008-07-15

    We have developed a versatile experimental apparatus for synchrotron x-ray measurements in pulsed high magnetic fields. The apparatus consists of a double cryostat incorporating a liquid nitrogen bath to cool the miniature pulsed coil and an independent helium flow cryostat allowing sample temperatures from 4 up to 250 K. The high duty cycle miniature pulsed coils can generate up to 38 T. During experiments at 30 T a repetition rate of 6 pulses/min was routinely reached. Using a 4 kJ power supply, the pulse duration was between 500 {mu}s and 1 ms. The setup was used for nuclear forward scattering measurements on {sup 57}Fe up to 25 T on the ESRF beamline ID18. In another experiment, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism was measured up to 30 T on the ESRF energy dispersive beamline ID24.

  12. Miniature pulsed magnet system for synchrotron x-ray measurements.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Peter J E M; Mathon, Olivier; Strohm, Cornelius; Sikora, Marcin

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a versatile experimental apparatus for synchrotron x-ray measurements in pulsed high magnetic fields. The apparatus consists of a double cryostat incorporating a liquid nitrogen bath to cool the miniature pulsed coil and an independent helium flow cryostat allowing sample temperatures from 4 up to 250 K. The high duty cycle miniature pulsed coils can generate up to 38 T. During experiments at 30 T a repetition rate of 6 pulsesmin was routinely reached. Using a 4 kJ power supply, the pulse duration was between 500 mus and 1 ms. The setup was used for nuclear forward scattering measurements on 57Fe up to 25 T on the ESRF beamline ID18. In another experiment, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism was measured up to 30 T on the ESRF energy dispersive beamline ID24.

  13. Ultra-Miniature Lidar Scanner for Launch Range Data Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geng, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The most critical component in lidar is its laser scanner, which delivers pulsed or CW laser to target with desirable field of view (FOV). Most existing lidars use a rotating or oscillating mirror for scanning, resulting in several drawbacks. A lidar scanning technology was developed that could achieve very high scanning speed, with an ultra-miniature size and much lighter weight. This technology promises at least a 10x performance improvement in these areas over existing lidar scanners. Features of the proposed ultra-miniature lidar scanner include the ability to make the entire scanner <2 mm in diameter; very high scanning speed (e.g. 5 - 20 kHz, in contrast to several hundred Hz in existing scanners); structure design to meet stringent requirements on size, weight, power, and compactness for various applications; and the scanning speed and FOV can be altered for obtaining high image resolutions of targeted areas and for diversified uses.

  14. Design Parameters of a Miniaturized Piezoelectric Underwater Acoustic Transmitter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    PZT ceramics have been widely used in underwater acoustic transducers. However, literature available discussing the design parameters of a miniaturized PZT-based low-duty-cycle transmitter is very limited. This paper discusses some of the design parameters—the backing material, driving voltage, PZT material type, power consumption and the transducer length of a miniaturized acoustic fish tag using a PZT tube. Four different types of PZT were evaluated with respect to the source level, energy consumption and bandwidth of the transducer. The effect of the tube length on the source level is discussed. The results demonstrate that ultralow-density closed-cell foam is the best backing material for the PZT tube. The Navy Type VI PZTs provide the best source level with relatively low energy consumption and that a low transducer capacitance is preferred for high efficiency. A 35% reduction in the transducer length results in 2 dB decrease in source level. PMID:23012534

  15. Environmental study of miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnik, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Investigation studied the long term operation of miniature slip ring assembles in high vacuum of space and included the influence of ring, brush, and insulator materials on electrical noise and mechanical wear. Results show that soft metal vapor plating and niobium diselenide miniature slip rings are beneficial.

  16. Anthrax vaccine associated deaths in miniature horses.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, Bruce K

    2015-04-01

    During a widespread anthrax outbreak in Canada, miniature horses were vaccinated using a live spore anthrax vaccine. Several of these horses died from an apparent immune-mediated vasculitis temporally associated with this vaccination. During the course of the outbreak, other miniature horses from different regions with a similar vaccination history, clinical signs, and necropsy findings were found.

  17. Miniature reaction chamber and devices incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2000-10-17

    The present invention generally relates to miniaturized devices for carrying out and controlling chemical reactions and analyses. In particular, the present invention provides devices which have miniature temperature controlled reaction chambers for carrying out a variety of synthetic and diagnostic applications, such as PCR amplification, nucleic acid hybridization, chemical labeling, nucleic acid fragmentation and the like.

  18. Pneumatically Actuated Miniature Peristaltic Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Sabrina; Feldman, Jason; Svehla, Danielle

    2003-01-01

    Pneumatically actuated miniature peristaltic vacuum pumps have been proposed for incorporation into advanced miniature versions of scientific instruments that depend on vacuum for proper operation. These pumps are expected to be capable of reaching vacuum-side pressures in the torr to millitorr range (from .133 down to .0.13 Pa). Vacuum pumps that operate in this range are often denoted roughing pumps. In comparison with previously available roughing pumps, these pumps are expected to be an order of magnitude less massive and less power-hungry. In addition, they would be extremely robust, and would operate with little or no maintenance and without need for oil or other lubricants. Portable mass spectrometers are typical examples of instruments that could incorporate the proposed pumps. In addition, the proposed pumps could be used as roughing pumps in general laboratory applications in which low pumping rates could be tolerated. The proposed pumps could be designed and fabricated in conventionally machined and micromachined versions. A typical micromachined version (see figure) would include a rigid glass, metal, or plastic substrate and two layers of silicone rubber. The bottom silicone layer would contain shallow pump channels covered by silicone arches that could be pushed down pneumatically to block the channels. The bottom silicone layer would be covered with a thin layer of material with very low gas permeability, and would be bonded to the substrate everywhere except in the channel areas. The top silicone layer would be attached to the bottom silicone layer and would contain pneumatic- actuation channels that would lie crosswise to the pump channels. This version is said to be micromachined because the two silicone layers containing the channels would be fabricated by casting silicone rubber on micromachined silicon molds. The pneumatic-actuation channels would be alternately connected to a compressed gas and (depending on pump design) either to atmospheric

  19. Advances in Miniaturized Instruments for Genomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of demonstrations of the miniaturized instruments were reported for genomic applications. They provided the advantages of miniaturization, automation, sensitivity, and specificity for the development of point-of-care diagnostics. The aim of this paper is to report on recent developments on miniaturized instruments for genomic applications. Based on the mature development of microfabrication, microfluidic systems have been demonstrated for various genomic detections. Since one of the objectives of miniaturized instruments is for the development of point-of-care device, impedimetric detection is found to be a promising technique for this purpose. An in-depth discussion of the impedimetric circuits and systems will be included to provide total consideration of the miniaturized instruments and their potential application towards real-time portable imaging in the “-omics” era. The current excellent demonstrations suggest a solid foundation for the development of practical and widespread point-of-care genomic diagnostic devices. PMID:25114919

  20. ATRC Neutron Detector Testing Quick Look Report

    SciTech Connect

    Troy C. Unruh; Benjamin M. Chase; Joy L. Rempe

    2013-08-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) program, a joint Idaho State University (ISU) / French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project was initiated in FY-10 to investigate the feasibility of using neutron sensors to provide online measurements of the neutron flux and fission reaction rate in the ATR Critical Facility (ATRC). A second objective was to provide initial neutron spectrum and flux distribution information for physics modeling and code validation using neutron activation based techniques in ATRC as well as ATR during depressurized operations. Detailed activation spectrometry measurements were made in the flux traps and in selected fuel elements, along with standard fission rate distribution measurements at selected core locations. These measurements provide additional calibration data for the real-time sensors of interest as well as provide benchmark neutronics data that will be useful for the ATR Life Extension Program (LEP) Computational Methods and V&V Upgrade project. As part of this effort, techniques developed by Prof. George Imel will be applied by Idaho State University (ISU) for assessing the performance of various flux detectors to develop detailed procedures for initial and follow-on calibrations of these sensors. In addition to comparing data obtained from each type of detector, calculations will be performed to assess the performance of and reduce uncertainties in flux detection sensors and compare data obtained from these sensors with existing integral methods employed at the ATRC. The neutron detectors required for this project were provided to team participants at no cost. Activation detectors (foils and wires) from an existing, well-characterized INL inventory were employed. Furthermore, as part of an on-going ATR NSUF international cooperation, the CEA sent INL three miniature fission chambers (one for detecting fast flux and two for

  1. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  2. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  3. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  4. The study of physics and thermal characteristics for in-hospital neutron irradiator (IHNI).

    PubMed

    Ke, Guotu; Sun, Ziyong; Shen, Feng; Liu, Tiancai; Li, Yiguo; Zhou, Yongmao

    2009-07-01

    The IHNI is designed for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) based on miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR). The reactor with thermal power 30 kW is an undermoderated reactor of pool-tank type, and UO(2) as fuel, light water as coolant and moderator, and metallic beryllium as reflector. The fission heat produced by the reactor is removed by the natural convection. The paper gives the calculating results of critical mass and the worths of central control rod, auxiliary control rod, reactivity regulator and neutron beam equipments. The parameters at thermal and small thermal ports and at epithermal port were calculated by optimizing combination of kinds of material by MCNP code. The dynamic feature research was done by RELAP5 code when the reactivities of 3, 4.5 and 6 mK were inserted, respectively. The results show that the reactor power can be limited to safe level by itself owing to the Doppler effect of fuel element and moderator negative temperature effect when the 6 mK reactivity was inserted into the reactor.

  5. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  6. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, Jr., David N.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

  7. Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens

    DOEpatents

    Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-10-21

    A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

  8. Overview of the miniaturization technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, Robert O., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This overview paper will cover the miniaturization technologies as applied to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) or micromanufacturing. Technologies reviewed will include bulk and surface micromachining of silicon, the high-aspect ratio technologies including deep X-ray lithography (LIGA) and photo sensitive polyimide, and the complementary processes which include micro-drilling, milling, turning, and electrical discharge machining, laser based micromachining and focussed ion beam micromachining. Examples of each of the process technologies will be given and a capabilities comparison among the technologies will be presented. A historical comparison of MEMS with the vlsi industry will be made and the current status and market forecast for these technologies will be presented. A brief comparison of US research with current research in Japan and Europe will be made along with comments about the status of US research, including current research projects at the Institute for Micromanufacturing.

  9. Miniature drag-force anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Fralick, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature drag-force anemometer is described which is capable of measuring dynamic velocity head and flow direction. The anemometer consists of a silicon cantilever beam 2.5 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, and 0.25 mm thick with an integrated diffused strain-gage bridge, located at the base of the beam, as the force measuring element. The dynamics of the beam are like those of a second-order system with a natural frequency of about 42 kHz and a damping coefficient of 0.007. The anemometer can be used in both forward and reversed flow. Measured flow characteristics up to Mach 0.6 are presented along with application examples including turbulence measurements.

  10. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, J.A.

    1997-07-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

  11. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  12. Miniature laser ignited bellows motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renfro, Steven L.; Beckman, Tom M.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature optically ignited actuation device has been demonstrated using a laser diode as an ignition source. This pyrotechnic driven motor provides between 4 and 6 lbs of linear force across a 0.090 inch diameter surface. The physical envelope of the device is 1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch diameter. This unique application of optical energy can be used as a mechanical link in optical arming systems or other applications where low shock actuation is desired and space is limited. An analysis was performed to determine pyrotechnic materials suitable to actuate a bellows device constructed of aluminum or stainless steel. The aluminum bellows was chosen for further development and several candidate pyrotechnics were evaluated. The velocity profile and delivered force were quantified using an non-intrusive optical motion sensor.

  13. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    DOEpatents

    Abel, Philip [Overland Park, KS; Watterson, Carl [Kansas City, MO

    2011-02-15

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  14. Modeling and testing miniature torsion specimens for SiC joining development studies for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Jr., C. H.; Nguyen, Ba N.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Borlaug, B. A.; Ferraris, Monica; Ventrella, A.; Katoh, Yutai

    2015-08-05

    The international fusion community has designed a miniature torsion specimen for neutron irradiation studies of joined SiC and SiC/SiC composite materials. For this research, miniature torsion joints based on this specimen design were fabricated using displacement reactions between Si and TiC to produce Ti3SiC2 + SiC joints with SiC and tested in torsion-shear prior to and after neutron irradiation. However, many miniature torsion specimens fail out-of-plane within the SiC specimen body, which makes it problematic to assign a shear strength value to the joints and makes it difficult to compare unirradiated and irradiated strengths to determine irradiation effects. Finite element elastic damage and elastic–plastic damage models of miniature torsion joints are developed that indicate shear fracture is more likely to occur within the body of the joined sample and cause out-of-plane failures for miniature torsion specimens when a certain modulus and strength ratio between the joint material and the joined material exists. The model results are compared and discussed with regard to unirradiated and irradiated test data for a variety of joint materials. The unirradiated data includes Ti3SiC2 + SiC/CVD-SiC joints with tailored joint moduli, and includes steel/epoxy and CVD-SiC/epoxy joints. Finally, the implications for joint data based on this sample design are discussed.

  15. Disposable Fluidic Actuators for Miniature In-Vivo Surgical Robotics.

    PubMed

    Pourghodrat, Abolfazl; Nelson, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Fusion of robotics and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created new opportunities to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Surgical robotics is advancing from externally actuated systems to miniature in-vivo robotics. However, with miniaturization of electric-motor-driven surgical robots, there comes a trade-off between the size of the robot and its capability. Slow actuation, low load capacity, sterilization difficulties, leaking electricity and transferring produced heat to tissues, and high cost are among the key limitations of the use of electric motors in in-vivo applications. Fluid power in the form of hydraulics or pneumatics has a long history in driving many industrial devices and could be exploited to circumvent these limitations. High power density and good compatibility with the in-vivo environment are the key advantages of fluid power over electric motors when it comes to in-vivo applications. However, fabrication of hydraulic/pneumatic actuators within the desired size and pressure range required for in-vivo surgical robotic applications poses new challenges. Sealing these types of miniature actuators at operating pressures requires obtaining very fine surface finishes which is difficult and costly. The research described here presents design, fabrication, and testing of a hydraulic/pneumatic double-acting cylinder, a limited-motion vane motor, and a balloon-actuated laparoscopic grasper. These actuators are small, seal-less, easy to fabricate, disposable, and inexpensive, thus ideal for single-use in-vivo applications. To demonstrate the ability of these actuators to drive robotic joints, they were modified and integrated in a robotic arm. The design and testing of this surgical robotic arm are presented to validate the concept of fluid-power actuators for in-vivo applications.

  16. Procedure of calculation of the spatial distribution of temperatures and heat fluxes in the steam generator of a nuclear power installation with an RBEC fast-neutron reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, A. A.; Sedov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    A method for combined 3D/1D-modeling of thermohydraulics of a once-through steam generator (SG) based on the joint analysis of three-dimensional thermo- and hydrodynamics of a single-phase heating coolant in the intertube space and one-dimensional thermohydraulics of steam-generating channels (tubes) with the use of well-known friction and heat-transfer correlations under various boiling conditions is discussed. This method allows one to determine the spatial distribution of temperatures and heat fluxes of heat-exchange surfaces of SGs with a single-phase heating coolant in the intertube space and with steam generation within tubes. The method was applied in the analytical investigation of typical operation of a once-through SG of a nuclear power installation with an RBEC fast-neutron heavy-metal reactor that is being designed by Kurchatov Institute in collaboration with OKB GIDROPRESS and Leipunsky Institute of Physics and Power Engineering. Flow pattern and temperature fields were obtained for the heavy-metal heating coolant in the intertube space. Nonuniformities of heating of the steam-water coolant in different heat-exchange tubes and nonuniformities in the distribution of heat fluxes at SG heat-exchange surfaces were revealed.

  17. Miniature Wireless BioSensor for Remote Endoscopic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Brown, Keith; Issadore, David; Westervelt, Robert; Thompson, Chris; Obstein, Keith; Laine, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We have built a miniature wireless biosensor with fluorescence detection capability that explores the miniaturization limit for a self-powered sensor device assembled from the latest off-the-shelf technology. The device is intended as a remote medical sensor to be inserted endoscopically and remainin a patient's gastrointestinal tract for a period of weeks, recording and transmitting data as necessary. A sensing network may be formed by using multiple such devices within the patient, routing information to an external receiver that communicates through existing mobilephone networks to relay data remotely. By using a monolithic IC chip with integrated processor, memory, and 2.4 GHz radio,combined with a photonic sensor and miniature battery, we have developed a fully functional computing device in a form factorcompliantwith insertion through the narrowest endoscopic channels (less than 3mm x 3mm x 20mm). We envision similar devices with various types of sensors to be used in many different areas of the human body.

  18. Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering: Powerful Tools for Studying the Structure of Drug-Loaded Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Di Cola, Emanuela; Grillo, Isabelle; Ristori, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Nanovectors, such as liposomes, micelles and lipid nanoparticles, are recognized as efficient platforms for delivering therapeutic agents, especially those with low solubility in water. Besides being safe and non-toxic, drug carriers with improved performance should meet the requirements of (i) appropriate size and shape and (ii) cargo upload/release with unmodified properties. Structural issues are of primary importance to control the mechanism of action of loaded vectors. Overall properties, such as mean diameter and surface charge, can be obtained using bench instruments (Dynamic Light Scattering and Zeta potential). However, techniques with higher space and time resolution are needed for in-depth structural characterization. Small-angle X-ray (SAXS) and neutron (SANS) scattering techniques provide information at the nanoscale and have therefore been largely used to investigate nanovectors loaded with drugs or other biologically relevant molecules. Here we revise recent applications of these complementary scattering techniques in the field of drug delivery in pharmaceutics and medicine with a focus to liposomal carriers. In particular, we highlight those aspects that can be more commonly accessed by the interested users. PMID:27043614

  19. Computational investigation of miniature trailing edge effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Tae

    Miniature trailing edge effectors (MiTEs) are small flaps (typically 1% to 5% chord) actuated with deflection angles of up to 90 degrees. The small size, combined with little required power and good control authority, enables the device to be used for high bandwidth control as well as conventional attitude control. However, some of the aerodynamic characteristics of these devices are complex and poorly understood. This research investigated the aerodynamics of MiTEs using incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solvers, INS2D and INS3D. To understand the flow structure and establish a parametric database, two dimensional steady-state computations were performed for MiTEs with various geometries and flow conditions. Time accurate computations were used to resolve the unsteady characteristics including transient response and vortex shedding phenomena. The frequency response was studied to fully identify the dynamics of MiTEs. Three dimensional computations show the change in control effectiveness with respect to the spanwise length of MiTEs as well as the spanwise lift distribution induced by these devices. Based on the CFD results, an approximate vortex panel model was developed for design purposes that reproduces the key characteristics of MiTEs. Two application areas for MiTEs were explored. Flutter suppression was demonstrated by combining a finite element structural model with the vortex panel model. The application of MiTEs to augment maximum lift and improve the post stall behavior of an airfoil was also investigated.

  20. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-11-25

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m.

  1. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.

    1997-11-18

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump is described for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a {Delta}T=100 C characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5{times}10{sup {minus}4} Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1{times}10{sup {minus}7} to 3{times}10{sup {minus}9} Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2{times}10{sup {minus}7} Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5{degree}, and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof. 2 figs.

  2. Miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature thermo-electric cooled cryogenic pump for removing residual water molecules from an inlet sample prior to sample analysis in a mass spectroscopy system, such as ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectroscopy. The cryogenic pump is a battery operated, low power (<1.6 watts) pump with a .DELTA.T=100.degree. C. characteristic. The pump operates under vacuum pressures of 5.times.10.sup.-4 Torr to ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions in the range of 1.times.10.sup.-7 to 3.times.10.sup.-9 Torr and will typically remove partial pressure, 2.times.10.sup.-7 Torr, residual water vapor. The cryogenic pump basically consists of an inlet flange piece, a copper heat sink with a square internal bore, four two tier Peltier (TEC) chips, a copper low temperature square cross sectional tubulation, an electronic receptacle, and an exit flange piece, with the low temperature tubulation being retained in the heat sink at a bias angle of 5.degree., and with the TECs being positioned in parallel to each other with a positive potential being applied to the top tier thereof.

  3. Development of a miniaturized deformable mirror controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Lynch, Dana; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Belikov, Ruslan; Klamm, Benjamin; Hyde, Elizabeth; Mumm, Katherine

    2016-07-01

    High-Performance Adaptive Optics systems are rapidly spreading as useful applications in the fields of astronomy, ophthalmology, and telecommunications. This technology is critical to enable coronagraphic direct imaging of exoplanets utilized in ground-based telescopes and future space missions such as WFIRST, EXO-C, HabEx, and LUVOIR. We have developed a miniaturized Deformable Mirror controller to enable active optics on small space imaging mission. The system is based on the Boston Micromachines Corporation Kilo-DM, which is one of the most widespread DMs on the market. The system has three main components: The Deformable Mirror, the Driving Electronics, and the Mechanical and Heat management. The system is designed to be extremely compact and have lowpower consumption to enable its use not only on exoplanet missions, but also in a wide-range of applications that require precision optical systems, such as direct line-of-sight laser communications, and guidance systems. The controller is capable of handling 1,024 actuators with 220V maximum dynamic range, 16bit resolution, and 14bit accuracy, and operating at up to 1kHz frequency. The system fits in a 10x10x5cm volume, weighs less than 0.5kg, and consumes less than 8W. We have developed a turnkey solution reducing the risk for currently planned as well as future missions, lowering their cost by significantly reducing volume, weight and power consumption of the wavefront control hardware.

  4. The allometry of brain miniaturization in ants.

    PubMed

    Seid, Marc A; Castillo, Armando; Wcislo, William T

    2011-01-01

    Extensive studies of vertebrates have shown that brain size scales to body size following power law functions. Most animals are substantially smaller than vertebrates, and extremely small animals face significant challenges relating to nervous system design and function, yet little is known about their brain allometry. Within a well-defined monophyletic taxon, Formicidae (ants), we analyzed how brain size scales to body size. An analysis of brain allometry for individuals of a highly polymorphic leaf-cutter ant, Atta colombica, shows that allometric coefficients differ significantly for small (<1.4 mg body mass) versus large individuals (b = 0.6003 and 0.2919, respectively). Interspecifically, allometric patterns differ for small (<0.9 mg body mass) versus large species (n = 70 species). Using mean values for species, the allometric coefficient for smaller species (b = 0.7961) is significantly greater than that for larger ones (b = 0.669). The smallest ants had brains that constitute ∼15% of their body mass, yet their brains were relatively smaller than predicted by an overall allometric coefficient of brain to body size. Our comparative and intraspecific studies show the extent to which nervous systems can be miniaturized in taxa exhibiting behavior that is apparently comparable to that of larger species or individuals.

  5. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Suzette M; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A; Burfeindt, Matthew J; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C

    2013-12-18

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems.

  6. Multi-Band Miniaturized Patch Antennas for a Compact, Shielded Microwave Breast Imaging Array

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Suzette M.; Al-Joumayly, Mudar A.; Burfeindt, Matthew J.; Behdad, Nader; Hagness, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of a class of multi-band miniaturized patch antennas designed for use in a 3D enclosed sensor array for microwave breast imaging. Miniaturization and multi-band operation are achieved by loading the antenna with non-radiating slots at strategic locations along the patch. This results in symmetric radiation patterns and similar radiation characteristics at all frequencies of operation. Prototypes were fabricated and tested in a biocompatible immersion medium. Excellent agreement was obtained between simulations and measurements. The trade-off between miniaturization and radiation efficiency within this class of patch antennas is explored via a numerical analysis of the effects of the location and number of slots, as well as the thickness and permittivity of the dielectric substrate, on the resonant frequencies and gain. Additionally, we compare 3D quantitative microwave breast imaging performance achieved with two different enclosed arrays of slot-loaded miniaturized patch antennas. Simulated array measurements were obtained for a 3D anatomically realistic numerical breast phantom. The reconstructed breast images generated from miniaturized patch array data suggest that, for the realistic noise power levels assumed in this study, the variations in gain observed across this class of multi-band patch antennas do not significantly impact the overall image quality. We conclude that these miniaturized antennas are promising candidates as compact array elements for shielded, multi-frequency microwave breast imaging systems. PMID:25392561

  7. Biological neutron scattering: Now and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    1996-06-01

    Neutrons have an important role to play in structural biology. Neutron crystallography, small-angle neutron scattering and inelastic neutron scattering techniques can all contribute unique information on biomolecular structures. In particular, solution scattering techniques can give critical information on the conformations an dispositions of the components of complex assemblies under a wide variety of relevant conditions. The power of these methods are demonstrated for examples by protein/DNA complexes, and Ca{sup 2+}- binding proteins complexed with their regulatory targets. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of a new structural approach suing neutron resonance scattering. The impact of biological neutron scattering to date has been constrained principally by the available fluxes at neutron sources and the true potential of these approaches will only be realized with the development of new more powerful neutron sources.

  8. Miniaturized Airborne Imaging Central Server System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, some remote-sensing applications require advanced airborne multi-sensor systems to provide high performance reflective and emissive spectral imaging measurement rapidly over large areas. The key or unique problem of characteristics is associated with a black box back-end system that operates a suite of cutting-edge imaging sensors to collect simultaneously the high throughput reflective and emissive spectral imaging data with precision georeference. This back-end system needs to be portable, easy-to-use, and reliable with advanced onboard processing. The innovation of the black box backend is a miniaturized airborne imaging central server system (MAICSS). MAICSS integrates a complex embedded system of systems with dedicated power and signal electronic circuits inside to serve a suite of configurable cutting-edge electro- optical (EO), long-wave infrared (LWIR), and medium-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras, a hyperspectral imaging scanner, and a GPS and inertial measurement unit (IMU) for atmospheric and surface remote sensing. Its compatible sensor packages include NASA s 1,024 1,024 pixel LWIR quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) imager; a 60.5 megapixel BuckEye EO camera; and a fast (e.g. 200+ scanlines/s) and wide swath-width (e.g., 1,920+ pixels) CCD/InGaAs imager-based visible/near infrared reflectance (VNIR) and shortwave infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. MAICSS records continuous precision georeferenced and time-tagged multisensor throughputs to mass storage devices at a high aggregate rate, typically 60 MB/s for its LWIR/EO payload. MAICSS is a complete stand-alone imaging server instrument with an easy-to-use software package for either autonomous data collection or interactive airborne operation. Advanced multisensor data acquisition and onboard processing software features have been implemented for MAICSS. With the onboard processing for real time image development, correction, histogram-equalization, compression, georeference, and

  9. Low-energy neutron flux measurement using a resonance absorption filter surrounding a lithium glass scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Koohi-Fayegh, R.; Hamidi, S.

    2007-06-01

    The resonance absorption filter technique has been used to determine the thermal/epithermal neutron flux. The main idea in this technique is to use an element with a high and essentially singular resonance in the neutron absorption cross section as a filter surrounding a miniature-type lithium glass scintillator. The count with and without the filter surrounding the detector gives the number of resonance-energy neutrons. Some preliminary results and a comparison with the MCNP code are shown.

  10. In-Pile Sub-Miniature Fission Chambers Testing in BR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeeren, L.; Wéber, M.; Blandin, Ch.; Breaud, S.

    2003-06-01

    Three innovative sub-miniature fission chambers (SMFC), designed and manufactured at the Nuclear Measurement Systems Laboratory (LSMN) of CEA/Cadarache, were extensively tested in the BR2 research reactor at SCK•CEN, Mol. We present the experimental results for the (thermal) neutron sensitivity, the gamma-induced signal, the signal due to activation, the current picked up by the signal cable, the global current/voltage characteristics and the long term behaviour up to a thermal neutron fluence of 2.7·1021 n/cm2. We also compare the data with results from calculations with our FCD computer code. The onset of the saturation domain is well predicted by FCD; the neutron sensitivities can be accounted for perfectly after a refinement of the FCD model.

  11. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  12. Contact stresses calculated for miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, F. G.; Domerest, K. E.; Horton, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Using mathematical formulations to plot the graphs of the contact preload versus the Hertzian load, calculations of unit loading of the preloaded brushes on slip rings can be made. This optimizes the design of contact brushes and miniature slip rings.

  13. Using Miniature Landforms in Teaching Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, James F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores the uses of true landform miniatures and small-scale analogues and suggests ways to teach geomorphological concepts using small-scale relief features as illustrative examples. (JDH)

  14. Miniature infrared data acquisition and telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. H.; Ward, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Miniature Infrared Data Acquisition and Telemetry (MIRDAT) Phase 1 study was performed to determine the technical and commercial feasibility of producing a miniaturized electro-optical telemetry system. This system acquires and transmits experimental data from aircraft scale models for realtime monitoring in wind tunnels. During the Phase 1 study, miniature prototype MIRDAT telemetry devices were constructed, successfully tested in the laboratory and delivered to the user for wind tunnel testing. A search was conducted for commercially available components and advanced hybrid techniques to further miniaturize the system during Phase 2 development. A design specification was generated from laboratory testing, user requirements and discussions with component manufacturers. Finally, a preliminary design of the proposed MIRDAT system was documented for Phase 2 development.

  15. Miniature robots can assist in laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Oleynikov, D; Rentschler, M; Hadzialic, A; Dumpert, J; Platt, S R; Farritor, S

    2005-04-01

    Laparoscopy reduces patient trauma but eliminates the surgeon's ability to directly view and touch the surgical environment. Although current robot-assisted laparoscopy improves the surgeon's ability to manipulate and visualize the target organs, the instruments and cameras remain constrained by the entry incision. This limits tool tip orientation and optimal camera placement. This article focuses on developing miniature in vivo robots to assist surgeons during laparoscopic surgery by providing an enhanced field of view from multiple angles and dexterous manipulators not constrained by the abdominal wall fulcrum effect. Miniature camera robots were inserted through a small incision into the insufflated abdominal cavity of an anesthetized pig. Trocar insertion and other laparoscopic tool placements were then viewed with these robotic cameras. The miniature robots provided additional camera angles that improved surgical visualization during a cholecystectomy. These successful prototype trials have demonstrated that miniature in vivo robots can provide surgeons with additional visual information that can increase procedural safety.

  16. Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potember, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    Major advances must occur to protect astronauts from prolonged periods in near-zero gravity and high radiation associated with extended space travel. The dangers of living in space must be thoroughly understood and methods developed to reverse those effects that cannot be avoided. Six of the seven research teams established by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) are studying biomedical factors for prolonged space travel to deliver effective countermeasures. To develop effective countermeasures, each of these teams require identification of and quantitation of complex pharmacological, hormonal, and growth factor compounds (biomarkers) in humans and in experimental animals to develop an in-depth knowledge of the physiological changes associated with space travel. At present, identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol. Many of these procedures are complicated and the identification of each biomarker requires a separate protocol and associated laboratory equipment. To carry all of this equipment and chemicals on a spacecraft would require a complex clinical laboratory; and it would occupy much of the astronauts time. What is needed is a small, efficient, broadband medical diagnostic instrument to rapidly identify important biomarkers for human space exploration. The Miniature Time-Of- Flight Mass Spectrometer Project in the Technology Development Team is developing a small, high resolution, time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) to quantitatively measure biomarkers for human space exploration. Virtues of the JHU/APL TOFMS technologies reside in the promise for a small (less than one cubic ft), lightweight (less than 5 kg), low-power (less than 50 watts), rugged device that can be used continuously with advanced signal processing diagnostics. To date, the JHU/APL program has demonstrated mass capability from under 100 to beyond 10,000 atomic mass units (amu) in a very small, low power prototype for biological analysis. Further

  17. Miniaturized Plasma and Neutral Diagnostics for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Enloe, C. L.; Krause, L. A.; Herrero, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a miniaturized suite of instruments which provides both bulk energy resolved plasma properties and coarse neutral mass spectroscopy suitable for measurements on the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO). The suite is comprised of two instruments; the Miniaturized Electro-Static Analyzer (MESA), and the Flat Plasma Spectrometer (FLAPS), designed to measure the near earth environment on the Air Force Academy small satellite missions Falconsat-2 and 3.

  18. Metamaterials for Miniaturization of Optical Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0226 METAMATERIALS FOR MINIATURIZATION OF OPTICAL COMPONENTS Aleksandr Figotin UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA IRVINE Final Report 09/24...8-98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 10/09/2014 Final 30/06/2011-30/06/2014 METAMATERIALS FOR MINIATURIZATION OF OPTICAL COMPONENTS FA9550-11-1...relativistic and spinorial aspects of our neoclassical electromagnetic theory. Metamaterials , fundamentals of electromagnetic theory, dissipation, magnetic

  19. Miniature Electrostatic Ion Thruster With Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A miniature electrostatic ion thruster is proposed that, with one exception, would be based on the same principles as those of the device described in the previous article, "Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster". The exceptional feature of this thruster would be that, in addition to using electric fields for linear acceleration of ions and electrons, it would use a magnetic field to rotationally accelerate slow electrons into the ion stream to neutralize the ions.

  20. Miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    This invention documents the efforts on the research and development of a miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system. A miniaturized GPS/MEMS IMU integrated navigation system is presented; Laser Dynamic Range Imager (LDRI) based alignment algorithm for space applications is discussed. Two navigation cameras are also included to measure the range and range rate which can be integrated into the GPS/MEMS IMU system to enhance the navigation solution.

  1. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  2. Battery-driven miniature LDA system with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damp, S.

    1988-06-01

    A one-component miniature system with dimensions of 11 by 4 by 4 cubic centimeters for laser-Doppler anemometry (LDA) is described. As power supply a 12V battery or any other source with the capability to drive a current up to 200mA can be used. The system contains the whole electronics to drive the used laser diode is a safe way. The electronics to amplify and buffer the LDA-signal which is received by a PIN-diode is included. The output of the system can directly fit a filterbank for example. Possible applications in rough environments are mentioned. Measurements show the reliability of the system.

  3. Miniature Ion-Array Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    A figure is shown that depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would share many features of design and operation of the instrument described in another article. The main differences between that instrument and this one would lie in the configuration and mode of operation of the filter and detector electrodes. A filter electrode and detector electrodes would be located along the sides of a drift tube downstream from the accelerator electrode. These electrodes would apply a combination of (1) a transverse AC electric field that would effect differential transverse dispersal of ions and (2) a transverse DC electric field that would drive the dispersed ions toward the detector electrodes at different distances along the drift tube. The electric current collected by each detector electrode would be a measure of the current, and thus of the abundance of the species of ions impinging on that electrode. The currents collected by all the detector electrodes could be measured simultaneously to obtain continuous readings of abundances of species. The downstream momentum of accelerated ions would be maintained through neutralization on the electrodes; the momentum of the resulting neutral atoms would serve to expel gases from spectrometer, without need for a pump.

  4. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  5. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  6. The neutron star zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2013-12-01

    Neutron stars are a very diverse population, both in their observational and their physical properties. They prefer to radiate most of their energy at X-ray and gamma-ray wavelengths. But whether their emission is powered by rotation, accretion, heat, magnetic fields or nuclear reactions, they are all different species of the same animal whose magnetic field evolution and interior composition remain a mystery. This article will broadly review the properties of inhabitants of the neutron star zoo, with emphasis on their high-energy emission.

  7. Miniature Ion-Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure depicts a proposed miniature ion-mobility spectrometer that would be fabricated by micromachining. Unlike prior ion-mobility spectrometers, the proposed instrument would not be based on a time-of-flight principle and, consequently, would not have some of the disadvantageous characteristics of prior time-of-flight ion-mobility spectrometers. For example, one of these characteristics is the need for a bulky carrier-gas-feeding subsystem that includes a shutter gate to provide short pulses of gas in order to generate short pulses of ions. For another example, there is need for a complex device to generate pulses of ions from the pulses of gas and the device is capable of ionizing only a fraction of the incoming gas molecules; these characteristics preclude miniaturization. In contrast, the proposed instrument would not require a carrier-gas-feeding subsystem and would include a simple, highly compact device that would ionize all the molecules passing through it. The ionization device in the proposed instrument would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several megavolts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. Ionization (but not avalanche arcing) would occur because the distance between the ionizing electrodes would be less than the mean free path of gas molecules at the operating pressure of instrument. An accelerating grid would be located inside the instrument, downstream from the ionizing membrane. The electric potential applied to this grid would be negative relative to the potential on the inside electrode of the ionizing membrane and would be of a magnitude sufficient to

  8. Neutron Technologies for Bioenergy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that can be used to probe the structures and dynamics of complex systems. It can provide a fundamental understanding of the processes involved in the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. A variety of neutron scattering technologies are available to elucidate both the organization and deconstruction of this complex composite material and the associations and morphology of the component polymers and the enzymes acting on them, across multiple length scales ranging from Angstroms to micrometers and time scales from microseconds to picoseconds. Unlike most other experimental techniques, neutron scattering is uniquely sensitive to hydrogen (and its isotope deuterium), an atom abundantly present throughout biomass and a key effector in many biological, chemical, and industrial processes for producing biofuels. Sensitivity to hydrogen, the ability to replace hydrogen with deuterium to alter scattering levels, the fact that neutrons cause little or no direct radiation damage, and the ability of neutrons to exchange thermal energies with materials, provide neutron scattering technologies with unique capabilities for bioenergy research. Further, neutrons are highly penetrating, making it possible to employ sample environments that are not suitable for other techniques. The true power of neutron scattering is realized when it is combined with computer simulation and modeling and contrast variation techniques enabled through selective deuterium labeling.

  9. Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure presents a concept of a bipolar miniature electrostatic ion thruster for maneuvering a small spacecraft. The ionization device in the proposed thruster would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several mega-volts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. In a thruster-based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into such a membrane ionizer. Unlike in larger prior ion thrusters, all of the propellant molecules would be ionized. This thruster would be capable of bipolar operation. There would be two accelerator grids - one located forward and one located aft of the membrane ionizer. In one mode of operation, which one could denote the forward mode, positive ions leaving the ionizer on the backside would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid. Electrons leaving the ionizer on the front side would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In another mode of operation, which could denote the reverse mode, the polarities of the voltages applied to the accelerator grids and to the electrodes of the membrane ionizer would be the reverse of those of the forward mode. The reversal of electric fields would cause the ion and electrons to be ejected in the reverse of their forward mode directions, thereby giving rise to thrust in the direction opposite that of the forward mode.

  10. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  11. Experimental determination of neutron lifetimes through macroscopic neutron noise in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2013-05-01

    The neutron lifetimes of the core, reflector, and global were experimentally obtained through macroscopic neutron noise in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor for five levels of subcriticality. The theoretical Auto Power Spectral Densities were derived by point kinetic equations taking the reflector effect into account, and one of the approaches consider an additional group of delayed neutrons.

  12. Prospects for fusion neutron NPLs

    SciTech Connect

    Petra, M.; Miley, G.H.; Batyrbekov, E.; Jassby, D.L.; McArthur, D.

    1996-05-01

    To date, nuclear pumped lasers (NPLs) have been driven by neutrons from pulsed research fission reactors. However, future applications using either a Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) neutron source or an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) source appear attractive. One unique combination proposed earlier would use a neutron feedback NPL driver in an ICF power plant. 14-MeV D-T neutrons (and 2.5-MeV D-D neutrons) provide a unique opportunity for a neutron recoil pumped NPL. Alternatively, these neutrons can be thermalized to provide thermal-neutron induced reactions for pumping. Initial experience with a fusion-pumped NPL can possibly be obtained using the D-T burn experiments in progress/planning at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak devices or at the planned National Ignition Facility (NIF) high-gain ICF target experimental facility. With neutron fluxes presently available, peak thermalized fluxes at a test laser in the shield region could exceed 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}/sec. Several low-threshold NPLs might be utilized in such an experiment, including the He-Ne-H{sub 2} NPL and the Ar-Xe NPL. Experimental set-ups for both the tokamak and the NIF will be described. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. ACCELERATOR BASED CONTINUOUS NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; LUDEWIG,H.

    2003-03-25

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate protons impinging on a heavy metal target. There do not appear to be any major technical challenges to the building of such a facility since a continuous spallation source has been operating in Switzerland for several years.

  14. Calibration issues for neutron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, G.J.; Adams, J.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1997-12-01

    The performance of diagnostic systems are limited by their weakest constituents, including their calibration issues. Neutron diagnostics are notorious for problems encountered while determining their absolute calibrations, due mainly to the nature of the neutron transport problem. In order to facilitate the determination of an accurate and precise calibration, the diagnostic design should be such as to minimize the scattered neutron flux. ITER will use a comprehensive set of neutron diagnostics--comprising radial and vertical neutron cameras, neutron spectrometers, a neutron activation system and internal and external fission chambers--to provide accurate measurements of fusion power and power densities as a function of time. The calibration of such an important diagnostic system merits careful consideration. Some thoughts have already been given to this subject during the conceptual design phase in relation to the time-integrated neutron activation and time-dependent neutron yield monitors. However, no overall calibration strategy has been worked out so far. This paper represents a first attempt to address this vital issue. Experience gained from present large tokamaks (JET, TFTR and JT60U) and proposals for ITER are reviewed. The need to use a 14-MeV neutron generator as opposed to radioactive sources for in-situ calibration of D-T diagnostics will be stressed. It is clear that the overall absolute determination of fusion power will have to rely on a combination of nuclear measuring techniques, for which the provision of accurate and independent calibrations will constitute an ongoing process as ITER moves from one phase of operation to the next.

  15. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  17. Neutron tubes

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  18. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  19. A Compact Neutron Source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a neutron generator scheme based on a high-current ion source with electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation. The most promising application of this neutron generator is a medical one, namely, boron neutron capture therapy of oncological diseases. A possibility for using a multi-aperture extraction system for high-current ion beam generation to increase the total current is studied. It is shown that the parameters of the plasma flow leaving a magnetic trap permit the effective use of multi-aperture systems without a significant loss in the ion beam current density. Thus, the use of multi-aperture systems in the ion source of a neutron generator can significantly increase the total neutron yield.

  20. Neutronics analysis of a spherical torus based volume neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Cerbone, R. J.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    1998-01-01

    A spherical torus based volumetric neutron source (ST-VNS) concept has been developed as a possible intermediate step to develop the necessary technology for reactor components of future fusion power plants. Such a VNS would complement ITER in testing, developing and qualifying nuclear technology components. Two recently designconcepts for a spherical torus based VNS have been investigated. The initial design operated at 39 MW fusion power with a 0.8 m major radius yielding an average neutron wall loading of 1 MW/ m '. A higher fusion power (326 MW) ST-VNS design was conceived by increasing the major radius to 1.07 m yielding an average neutron wall loading of 5 MW/ m '. In this paper, we report the results of the neutronics analyses of this high power design along with several design modifications including the effects of using ITER materials in the key components. The results of a feasibility study of using the ST-VNS with suitably designed blankets to provide an intense neutron source for neutron science applications is also reported.

  1. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science

  2. A Laser Interferometric Miniature Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Dustin W., PhD.; Baldwin, Patrick C.; Milburn, Howard; Robinson, David

    2011-09-12

    This is the second year of a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract geared towards the development of a new seismic sensor. Ground-based seismic monitoring systems have proven to be very capable in identifying nuclear tests, and can provide somewhat precise information on the location and yield of the explosive device. Making these measurements, however, currently requires very expensive and bulky seismometers that are difficult to deploy in places where they are most needed. A high performance, compact device can enable rapid deployment of large scale arrays, which can in turn be used to provide higher quality data during times of critical need. The use of a laser interferometer-based device has shown considerable promise, while also presenting significant challenges. The greatest strength of this optical readout technique is the ability to decouple the mechanical design from the transducer, thus enabling a miniaturized design that is not accessible with conventional sensing techniques. However, the nonlinearity in the optical response must be accounted for in the sensor output. Previously, we had proposed using a force-feedback approach to position the sensor at a point of maximum linearity. However, it can be shown that the combined nonlinearities of the optical response and the force-feedback curve necessarily results in a significant amount of unwanted noise at low frequencies. Having realized this, we have developed a new approach that eliminates force feedback, allowing the proof mass to move freely at all times. This takes advantage of some advanced optical spatial filtering that was developed at Symphony Acoustics for other types of sensors, and was recently adapted to this work. After processing the signals in real time, the digital output of the device is intrinsically linear, and the sensor can operate at any orientation with the same level of resolution, while instantly adapting to significant changes in orientation. Ultimately, we

  3. Development of the wireless ultra-miniaturized inertial measurement unit WB-4: preliminary performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhuohua; Zecca, Massimiliano; Sessa, Salvatore; Bartolomeo, Luca; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary performance evaluation of our new wireless ultra-miniaturized inertial measurement unit (IMU) WB-4 by compared with the Vicon motion capture system. The WB-4 IMU primarily contains a mother board for motion sensing, a Bluetooth module for wireless data transmission with PC, and a Li-Polymer battery for power supply. The mother board is provided with a microcontroller and 9-axis inertial sensors (miniaturized MEMS accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer) to measure orientation. A quaternion-based extended Kalman filter (EKF) integrated with an R-Adaptive algorithm for automatic estimation of the measurement covariance matrix is implemented for the sensor fusion to retrieve the attitude. The experimental results showed that the wireless ultra-miniaturized WB-4 IMU could provide high accuracy performance at the angles of roll and pitch. The yaw angle which has reasonable performance needs to be further evaluated.

  4. Microsupercapacitors as miniaturized energy-storage components for on-chip electronics.

    PubMed

    Kyeremateng, Nana Amponsah; Brousse, Thierry; Pech, David

    2017-01-01

    The push towards miniaturized electronics calls for the development of miniaturized energy-storage components that can enable sustained, autonomous operation of electronic devices for applications such as wearable gadgets and wireless sensor networks. Microsupercapacitors have been targeted as a viable route for this purpose, because, though storing less energy than microbatteries, they can be charged and discharged much more rapidly and have an almost unlimited lifetime. In this Review, we discuss the progress and the prospects of integrated miniaturized supercapacitors. In particular, we discuss their power performances and emphasize the need of a three-dimensional design to boost their energy-storage capacity. This is obtainable, for example, through self-supported nanostructured electrodes. We also critically evaluate the performance metrics currently used in the literature to characterize microsupercapacitors and offer general guidelines to benchmark performances towards prospective applications.

  5. A miniaturized adaptive microphone array under directional constraint utilizing aggregated microphones.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a miniaturized microphone array using the Directionally Constrained Minimization of Power (DCMP) method, which utilizes the transfer functions of microphones located at the same place, namely aggregated microphones. The phased microphone array realizes a noise reduction and direction of arrival (DOA) estimation system according to differences in the arrival time, phase shift, and/or the level of the sound wave for each microphone. Hence it is difficult to miniaturize the microphone array. The objective of our research is to miniaturize the system size using aggregated microphones. In this paper, we first show that the phased microphone array system and the proposed aggregated microphone system can be described within the same framework. We then apply a microphone array under directional constraint to the aggregated microphones and compare the proposed method with the microphone array. We show the directional pattern of the aggregated microphones. We also show the experimental results regarding DOA estimation.

  6. Microsupercapacitors as miniaturized energy-storage components for on-chip electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyeremateng, Nana Amponsah; Brousse, Thierry; Pech, David

    2017-01-01

    The push towards miniaturized electronics calls for the development of miniaturized energy-storage components that can enable sustained, autonomous operation of electronic devices for applications such as wearable gadgets and wireless sensor networks. Microsupercapacitors have been targeted as a viable route for this purpose, because, though storing less energy than microbatteries, they can be charged and discharged much more rapidly and have an almost unlimited lifetime. In this Review, we discuss the progress and the prospects of integrated miniaturized supercapacitors. In particular, we discuss their power performances and emphasize the need of a three-dimensional design to boost their energy-storage capacity. This is obtainable, for example, through self-supported nanostructured electrodes. We also critically evaluate the performance metrics currently used in the literature to characterize microsupercapacitors and offer general guidelines to benchmark performances towards prospective applications.

  7. Effect of Variable Emittance Coatings on the Operation of a Miniature Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Donya M.; Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Swanson, Theodore; Hess, Steve; Darrin, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. As the size of spacecraft shrink to accommodate small and more efficient instruments, smaller launch vehicles, and constellation missions, all subsystems must also be made smaller. Under NASA NFL4 03-OSS-02, Space Technology-8 (ST 8), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory jointly conducted a Concept Definition study to develop a miniature loop heat pipe (MLHP) thermal management system design suitable for future small spacecraft. The proposed MLHP thermal management system consists of a miniature loop heat pipe (LHP) and deployable radiators that are coated with variable emittance coatings (VECs). As part of the Phase A study and proof of the design concept, variable emittance coatings were integrated with a breadboard miniature loop heat pipe. The miniature loop heat pipe was supplied by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PL), while the variable emittance technology were supplied by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and Sensortex, Inc. The entire system was tested under vacuum at various temperature extremes and power loads. This paper summarizes the results of this testing and shows the effect of the VEC on the operation of a miniature loop heat pipe.

  8. Goniometry and Limb Girth in Miniature Dachshunds

    PubMed Central

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A.; Chen, Annie V.; Kiszonas, Alecia M.; Lutskas, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report the mean and median pelvic limb joint angles and girth measurements in miniature Dachshunds presenting with varying degrees of pelvic limb weakness secondary to thoracolumbar intervertebral disc extrusion. Methods. 15 miniature Dachshunds who presented to WSU-VTH for thoracolumbar disc extrusion. Dachshunds varied in neurologic status from ambulatory paraparetic to paraplegic at the time of measurements. Results. There were no significant differences in joint angles or girth among the three groups (ambulatory paraparetic, nonambulatory paraparetic, or paraplegic) (P > 0.05). When group was disregarded and values for extension, flexion, and girth combined, no differences existed. Conclusions. Goniometry and limb girth measurements can successfully be made in the miniature Dachshund; however, the shape of the Dachshund leg makes obtaining these values challenging. There were no differences in joint angle or girth measurements between dogs with varying neurologic dysfunction at the time of measurement. PMID:27403455

  9. Superamphiphobic miniature boat fabricated by laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kai; Dong, Xinran; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Cong; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-03-01

    We fabricated a superamphiphobic miniature boat with marked drag reduction and excellent loading capacity using femtosecond laser direct writing technology. The as-prepared superamphiphobic surface of the boat exhibited apparent contact angles larger than 150° toward both water and oil. Miniature boats with the superamphiphobic surface slid effortlessly on both water and oil-polluted water surfaces, with an increase in sliding distance by up to 52% and load increase of up to 27% compared with those of a boat with an untreated surface. A potential mechanism that explains the excellent performance of the superamphiphobic miniature boat was also discussed. This work provides a simple and economically viable strategy to obtain advanced surfaces for use in microfluidics and marine engineering.

  10. FY 2006 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2006-12-28

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  11. Compact Miniaturized Antenna for 210 MHz RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Chun, Kue

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and simulation of a miniaturized square-ring antenna. The miniaturized antenna, with overall dimensions of approximately one tenth of a wavelength (0.1 ), was designed to operate at around 210 MHz, and was intended for radio-frequency identification (RFID) application. One unique feature of the design is the use of a parasitic element to improve the performance and impedance matching of the antenna. The use of parasitic elements to enhance the gain and bandwidth of patch antennas has been demonstrated and reported in the literature, but such use has never been applied to miniaturized antennas. In this work, we will present simulation results and discuss design parameters and their impact on the antenna performance.

  12. Acral mutilation syndrome in a miniature pinscher.

    PubMed

    Bardagí, M; Montoliu, P; Ferrer, L; Fondevila, D; Pumarola, M

    2011-01-01

    Acral mutilation syndrome (AMS) is a rare canine hereditary sensory neuropathy that results in progressive mutilation of the distal extremities and which has been reported only in German short-haired pointers, English pointers, English springer spaniels and French spaniels. The present report describes a case of AMS in an 18-month-old female miniature pinscher with progressive self-mutilation of the hind feet. The dog did not respond to any treatment and was humanely destroyed at the age of 30 months. Microscopical findings post mortem were restricted to the nervous system and were compatible with AMS. This is the first case of AMS described in a miniature pinscher. It is not known if the disease was the result of a point mutation in this particular dog or if the miniature pinscher breed will evolve to become a breed predisposed to AMS.

  13. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1998-07-21

    A miniature plastic gripper is described actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  14. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, Milton A.; Folta, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  15. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, Milton A.; Folta, James A.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  16. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1997-03-11

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same are disclosed. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  17. Method and system for assembling miniaturized devices

    DOEpatents

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Klingmann, Jeffrey L.; Seugling, Richard M.

    2013-03-12

    An apparatus for assembling a miniaturized device includes a manipulator system including six manipulators operable to position and orient components of the miniaturized device with submicron precision and micron-level accuracy. The manipulator system includes a first plurality of motorized axes, a second plurality of manual axes, and force and torque and sensors. Each of the six manipulators includes at least one translation stage, at least one rotation stage, tooling attached to the at least one translation stage or the at least one rotation stage, and an attachment mechanism disposed at a distal end of the tooling and operable to attach at least a portion of the miniaturized device to the tooling. The apparatus also includes an optical coordinate-measuring machine (OCMM) including a machine-vision system, a laser-based distance-measuring probe, and a touch probe. The apparatus also includes an operator control system coupled to the manipulator system and the OCMM.

  18. FY 2005 Miniature Spherical Retroreflectors Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Sliger, William A.

    2005-12-01

    Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing miniature spherical retroreflectors using the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass to reduce both performance limiting spherical and chromatic aberrations. The optimized optical performance will provide efficient signal retroreflection that enables a broad range of remote detection scenarios for mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensing applications. Miniature spherical retroreflectors can be developed to aid in the detection of signatures of nuclear proliferation or other chemical vapor or radiation signatures. Miniature spherical retroreflectors are not only well suited to traditional bistatic LIDAR methods for chemical plume detection and identification, but could enable remote detection of difficult semi-volatile chemical materials or low level radiation sources.

  19. Presynaptic miniature GABAergic currents in developing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Bouhours, Brice; Rostaing, Philippe; Papageorgiou, George; Corrie, John E T; Triller, Antoine; Ogden, David; Marty, Alain

    2010-04-29

    Miniature synaptic currents have long been known to represent random transmitter release under resting conditions, but much remains to be learned about their nature and function in central synapses. In this work, we describe a new class of miniature currents ("preminis") that arise by the autocrine activation of axonal receptors following random vesicular release. Preminis are prominent in gabaergic synapses made by cerebellar interneurons during the development of the molecular layer. Unlike ordinary miniature postsynaptic currents in the same cells, premini frequencies are strongly enhanced by subthreshold depolarization, suggesting that the membrane depolarization they produce belongs to a feedback loop regulating neurotransmitter release. Thus, preminis could guide the formation of the interneuron network by enhancing neurotransmitter release at recently formed synaptic contacts.

  20. Design and Performance of a Miniature Radar L-Band Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, D.; Price, D.; Edelstein, W.

    2004-01-01

    Radar electronics developed for past JPL space missions historically had been custom designed and as such, given budgetary, time, and risk constraints, had not been optimized for maximum flexibility or miniaturization. To help reduce cost and risk of future radar missions, a generic radar module was conceived. The module includes a 1.25-GHz (L-band) transceiver and incorporates miniature high-density packaging of integrated circuits in die/chip form. The technology challenges include overcoming the effect of miniaturization and high packaging density to achieve the performance, reliability, and environmental ruggedness required for space missions. The module was chosen to have representative (generic) functionality most likely required from an L-band radar. For very large aperture phased-array spaceborne radar missions, the large dimensions of the array suggest the benefit of distributing the radar electronics into the antenna array. For such applications, this technology is essential in order to bring down the cost, mass, and power of the radar electronics module replicated in each panel of the array. For smaller sized arrays, a single module can be combined with the central radar controller and still provide the bene.ts of configuration .exibility, low power, and low mass. We present the design approach for the radar electronics module and the test results for its radio frequency (RF) portion: a miniature, low-power, radiation-hard L-band transceiver.

  1. NEUTRON SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bernander, N.K. et al.

    1960-10-18

    An apparatus is described for producing neutrons through target bombardment with deuterons. Deuterium gas is ionized by electron bombardment and the deuteron ions are accelerated through a magnetic field to collimate them into a continuous high intensity beam. The ion beam is directed against a deuteron pervious metal target of substantially the same nnaterial throughout to embed the deuterous therein and react them to produce neutrons. A large quantity of neutrons is produced in this manner due to the increased energy and quantity of ions bombarding the target.

  2. Miniature electron microscope beam column optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, Jody Stuart

    This investigation is in the area of electrostatic lens design with the overarching goal of contributing to the creation of a miniaturized scanning electron microscope (SEM) for use in mineralogical analysis or detection of signs of life on the surface of Mars. Such an instrument could also have application in the exploration of Earth's moon, planetary moons, asteroids, or comets. Other embodiments could include tabletop or field portable SEMs for use on Earth. The scope of this research is in the design of a beam column that attains focusing, demagnification, and aberration control within the smallest achievable package. The goals of planetary exploration and of spaceflight in general impose severe constraints on the instrument's mass and electrical power consumption, while favoring a robust design of small size and high rigidity that is also simple to align. To meet these requirements a design using electrostatic lenses was favored because of the lower power requirement and mass of electrostatic versus magnetic lenses, their relatively simple construction, as well as inherently easier shielding from extraneous fields. In modeling the lens field, a hybrid of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) and a Fourier series solution was employed, whereby an initial solution from the BEM is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain for the subsequent Fourier series solution. The approach is applicable to many problems in physics and combines the inherent precision of this series solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized electrode shapes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. A significant speed increase in tracing rays is also observed. The modeling technique has been validated by reproducing example ray-traces through

  3. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  4. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  5. Jarvik 2000 pump technology and miniaturization.

    PubMed

    Jarvik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Blood-pump miniaturization has made amazing progress, reducing the pump diameter to one-tenth of the size of previous positive displacement pumps. In particular, axial-flow-pump technology allows tiny pumps running at high speeds to deliver from 2 to 10 L/min. A review of the background inventions of the Jarvik 2000 technology is presented, together with the reason that making pumps smaller than demanded by the particular application for which they are designed is counterproductive. Pump miniaturization is nearing its practical limit. The optimization of performance and patient outcomes should remain our primary design goal.

  6. Batch fabrication of precision miniature permanent magnets

    DOEpatents

    Christenson, Todd R.; Garino, Terry J.; Venturini, Eugene L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes for fabrication of precision miniature rare earth permanent magnets is disclosed. Such magnets typically have sizes in the range 0.1 to 10 millimeters, and dimensional tolerances as small as one micron. Very large magnetic fields can be produced by such magnets, lending to their potential application in MEMS and related electromechanical applications, and in miniature millimeter-wave vacuum tubes. This abstract contains simplifications, and is supplied only for purposes of searching, not to limit or alter the scope or meaning of any claims herein.

  7. Miniature rotating transmissive optical drum scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert (Inventor); Parrington, Lawrence (Inventor); Rutberg, Michael (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature rotating transmissive optical scanner system employs a drum of small size having an interior defined by a circumferential wall rotatable on a drum axis, an optical element positioned within the interior of the drum, and a light-transmissive lens aperture provided at an angular position in the circumferential wall of the drum for scanning a light beam to or from the optical element in the drum along a beam azimuth angle as the drum is rotated. The miniature optical drum scanner configuration obtains a wide scanning field-of-view (FOV) and large effective aperture is achieved within a physically small size.

  8. Miniature biotelemeter gives multichannel wideband biomedical data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A miniature biotelemeter was developed for sensing and transmitting multiple channels of biomedical data over a radio link. The design of this miniature, 10-channel, wideband (5 kHz/channel), pulse amplitude modulation/ frequency modulation biotelemeter takes advantage of modern device technology (e.g., integrated circuit operational amplifiers, complementary symmetry/metal oxide semiconductor logic, and solid state switches) and hybrid packaging techniques. The telemeter is being used to monitor 10 channels of neuron firings from specific regions of the brain in rats implanted with chronic electrodes. Design, fabrication, and testing of an engineering model biotelemeter are described.

  9. A miniature flexible sampler for subsurface lunar exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yun; Lu, Wei; Xiong, Pengwen; Song, Aiguo

    2016-06-01

    Lunar subsurface sampling is one of the critical technologies in the advancement of space exploration, and a lunar sampler with low weight, small volume, and low power consumption would significantly reduce the cost of space exploration. Thus, this paper proposes a novel miniature lunar sampler which adopts a flexible tape spring as its sampling arm. Compared with existing rigid-arm samplers, the proposed sampler has the merits of very low weight, reduced volume, and little power consumption. The mechanical design is illustrated in detail, the corresponding flexible kinematics model is built by considering flexibility compensation, and the working space of the sampler is depicted. The performance, e.g. the maximum acceleration, the maximum load capacity, and the sampling depth of the flexible arm, is analyzed through experiments, and each limit is established. In addition, the sampling process is demonstrated with the lab-based experiments, and the feasibility of the sampler is verified.

  10. A Miniaturized Transcutaneous System for Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Robert A.; Vaddiraju, SanthiSagar; Kondo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Zuo, Liang; Zhu, Kai; Islam, Syed K.; Burgess, Diane; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Jain, Faquir C.

    2012-01-01

    Implantable sensors for continuous glucose monitoring hold great potential for optimal diabetes management. This is often undermined by a variety of issues associated with: (1) negative tissue response; (2) poor sensor performance; and (3) lack of device miniaturization needed to reduce implantation trauma. Herein, we report our initial results towards constructing an implantable device that simultaneously address all three aforementioned issues. In terms of device miniaturization, a highly miniaturized CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) potentiostat and signal processing unit was employed (with a combined area of 0.665 mm2). The signal processing unit converts the current generated by a transcutaneous, Clark-type amperometric sensor to output frequency in a linear fashion. The Clark-type amperometric sensor employs stratification of five functional layers to attain a well-balanced mass transfer which in turn yields a linear sensor response from 0 to 25 mM of glucose concentration, well beyond the physiologically observed (2 to 22 mM) range. In addition, it is coated with a thick polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel with embedded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres intended to provide continuous, localized delivery of dexamethasone to suppress inflammation and fibrosis. In vivo evaluation in rat model has shown that the transcutaneous sensor system reproducibly tracks repeated glycemic events. Clarke’s error grid analysis on the as –obtained glycemic data has indicated that all of the measured glucose readings fell in the desired Zones A & B and none fell in the erroneous Zones C, D and E. Such reproducible operation of the transcutaneous sensor system, together with low power (140 μW) consumption and capability for current-to-frequency conversion renders this a versatile platform for continuous glucose monitoring and other biomedical sensing devices. PMID:22992979

  11. A miniaturized transcutaneous system for continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Croce, Robert A; Vaddiraju, SanthiSagar; Kondo, Jun; Wang, Yan; Zuo, Liang; Zhu, Kai; Islam, Syed K; Burgess, Diane J; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Jain, Faquir C

    2013-02-01

    Implantable sensors for continuous glucose monitoring hold great potential for optimal diabetes management. This is often undermined by a variety of issues associated with: (1) negative tissue response; (2) poor sensor performance; and (3) lack of device miniaturization needed to reduce implantation trauma. Herein, we report our initial results towards constructing an implantable device that simultaneously address all three aforementioned issues. In terms of device miniaturization, a highly miniaturized CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) potentiostat and signal processing unit was employed (with a combined area of 0.665 mm(2)). The signal processing unit converts the current generated by a transcutaneous, Clark-type amperometric sensor to output frequency in a linear fashion. The Clark-type amperometric sensor employs stratification of five functional layers to attain a well-balanced mass transfer which in turn yields a linear sensor response from 0 to 25 mM of glucose concentration, well beyond the physiologically observed (2 to 22 mM) range. In addition, it is coated with a thick polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel with embedded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres intended to provide continuous, localized delivery of dexamethasone to suppress inflammation and fibrosis. In vivo evaluation in rat model has shown that the transcutaneous sensor system reproducibly tracks repeated glycemic events. Clarke's error grid analysis on the as-obtained glycemic data has indicated that all of the measured glucose readings fell in the desired Zones A & B and none fell in the erroneous Zones C, D and E. Such reproducible operation of the transcutaneous sensor system, together with low power (140 μW) consumption and capability for current-to-frequency conversion renders this a versatile platform for continuous glucose monitoring and other biomedical sensing devices.

  12. Natural optical design concepts for highly miniaturized camera systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    1999-08-01

    Microcameras for computers, mobile phones, watches, security system and credit cards is a very promising future market. Semiconductor industry is now able to integrate light reception, signal amplification and processing in a low- power-consuming microchip of a few mm2 size. Active pixel sensors supply each pixel in an image sensor with an individually programmable functionality. Beside the electronic receptor chip, a highly miniaturized lens system is required. Compared to the progress in microelectronics, optics has not yet made a significant step. Today's microcamera lenses are usually a downscaled version of a classical lens system and rarely smaller than 3 mm X 3 mm X 3 mm. This lagging of optics is quite surprising. Biologists have systematically studied all types of natural eye sensors since the 18th Century. Mother Nature provides a variety of highly effective examples for miniaturized imaging system. Single-aperture systems are the appropriate solution if the size is a free design parameter. If the budget is tight and optics limited to size, nature prefers multiple-aperture systems, the so-called compound eyes. As compound eyes are limited in resolution and night view, a cluster of single-aperture eyes, as jumping spiders use, is probably a better solution. The recent development in micro- optics offers the chance to imitate such natural design concepts. We have investigated miniaturized imaging systems based on microlens array and natural optical design concepts. Practical limitations for system design, packaging and assembling are given. Examples for micro-optical components and imaging systems are presented.

  13. The unique opportunity to determine the mass of an accreting neutron star: the eclipsing accretion powered X-ray pulsar SWIFTJ1749.4-2807

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonker, Peter; Eikenberry, Steve; Torres, Manuel; Steeghs, Daniel; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2014-02-01

    In 2010 it was discovered that the peculiar transient SWIFT J1749.4-2807 exhibits pulsations at 518 Hz. Furthermore, it turned out that the source was eclipsing in a 8.8 hr orbit thereby holding the promise of a model independent neutron star mass determination. Optical or near-infrared dynamical studies offer the best prospects for constraining the neutron star equation of state, as they do not rely on any specific models concerning the neutron star itself. Using Gemini NIRI observations we identified the NIR counterpart to the pulsar. Here, we propose for Gemini near-infrared spectroscopy with FLAMINGOS-2 to obtain spectra over the orbit to measure the radial velocity semi-amplitude of the mass donor star, which will lead to a model independent mass measurement of the neutron star.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  15. Neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice; Menelle, Alain

    2015-10-01

    The specular neutron reflectivity is a technique enabling the measurement of neutron scattering length density profile perpendicular to the plane of a surface or an interface, and thereby the profile of chemical composition. The characteristic sizes that are probed range from around 5 Å up 5000 Å. It is a scattering technique that averages information on the entire surface and it is therefore not possible to obtain information within the plane of the interface. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the contrast by isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) makes it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics and magnetic thin films. This course is a basic introduction to the technique and does not address the magnetic reflectivity. It is composed of three parts describing respectively its principle and its formalism, the experimental aspects of the method (spectrometers, samples) and two examples related to the materials for energy.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-11-22

    A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

  17. Time and Energy Characterization of a Neutron time of Flight Detector for Re-designing Line of Sight 270 at the Z Pulsed Power Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Styron, Jedediah D.

    2016-11-01

    This work will focus on the characterization of NTOF detectors fielded on ICF experiments conducted at the Z-experimental facility with emphasis on the MagLif and gas puff campaigns. Three experiments have been proposed. The first experiment will characterize the response of the PMT with respect to the amplitude and width of signals produced by single neutron events. A second experiment will characterize the neutron transit time through the scintillator and the third is to characterize the pulse amplitude for a very specific range of neutron induced charged particle interactions within the scintillator. These experiments will cover incident neutron energies relevant to D-D and D-T fusion reactions. These measurements will be taken as a function of detector bias to cover the entire dynamic range of the detector. Throughout the characterization process, the development of a predictive capability is desired. A new post processing code has been proposed that will calculate a neutron time-of-flight spectrum in units of MeVee. This code will couple the experimentally obtained values and the results obtained with the Monte Carlo code MCNP6. The motivation of this code is to correct for geometry issues when transferring the calibration results from a light lab setting to the Zenvironment. This capability will be used to develop a hypothetical design of LOS270 such that more favorable neutron measurements, requiring less correction, can be made in the future.

  18. Stellar 30-keV neutron capture in 94, 96Zr and the 90Zr (γ , n)89Zr photonuclear reaction with a high-power liquid-lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessler, M.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Feinberg, G.; Friedman, M.; Halfon, S.; Kijel, D.; Weissman, L.; Aviv, O.; Berkovits, D.; Eisen, Y.; Eliyahu, I.; Haquin, G.; Kreisel, A.; Mardor, I.; Shimel, G.; Shor, A.; Silverman, I.; Yungrais, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A high-power Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) was used for the first time for neutron production via the thick-target 7Li (p , n)7Be reaction and quantitative determination of neutron capture cross sections. Bombarded with a 1-2 mA proton beam at 1.92 MeV from the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), the setup yields a 30-keV quasi-Maxwellian neutron spectrum with an intensity of 3- 5 ×1010 n /s, more than one order of magnitude larger than present near-threshold 7Li (p , n) neutron sources. The setup was used here to determine the 30-keV Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS) of 94Zr and 96Zr as 28.0 ± 0.6 mb and 12.4 ± 0.5 mb respectively, based on activation measurements. The precision of the cross section determinations results both from the high neutron yield and from detailed simulations of the entire experimental setup. We plan to extend our experimental studies to low-abundance and radioactive targets. In addition, we show here that the setup yields intense high-energy (17.6 and 14.6 MeV) prompt capture γ rays from the 7Li (p , γ)8Be reaction with yields of ∼ 3 ×108 γs-1mA-1 and ∼ 4 ×108 γs-1mA-1, respectively, evidenced by the 90Zr (γ , n)89Zr photonuclear reaction.

  19. NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

    1963-01-15

    A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  1. Miniature personal UV solar dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Small light-powered meter measures accumulated radiation in ultraviolet or other selected regions. Practical advantages are device's low cost, small size, accuracy, and adaptability to specific wave-band measurements. Medical applications include detection of skin cancer, vitamin D production, and jaundice. Dosimeter also measures sunlight for solar energy designs, agriculture and meteorology, and monitors stability of materials and environmental and occupational lighting.

  2. Miniature Arcs for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    Although many methods are available for producing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. In the carbon arc, SWNTs are catalytically synthesized by rapidly evaporating a graphite anode impregnated with NiN metal catalyst from which the nanotubes grow in an inert atmosphere. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow has a large effect on the growth and morphology of the SWNTs. To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from these strong convective flows. The reactor was operated for either 2.2 or 5 seconds during free-fall in the drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Two apparatus designs differing mainly in their production rate and power capacity were investigated. The first consisted of a miniaturized carbon arc employing a 1 mm diameter graphite anode and powered by a 0.54 F capacitor bank charged to 65 V. The second, larger apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 amps at 30 volts to the arc for the duration of a 5 second drop. Initial results indicated that transient heating is a very large effect in the short-duration drop tower carbon arcs, and thermal equilibrium of the arc plasma, buffer gas, and apparatus was not attained during the short microgravity periods. In addition, removal of the buoyant convection by the microgravity now allowed clear observation of large jets of evaporated carbon vapor streaming from the anode and mixing with the inert buffer gas. The initial mixing of these jets with the cold buffer gas combined with the thermal transient made it difficult to establish a uniform high temperature

  3. A miniature origami biofuel cell based on a consumed cathode.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Han, Yujie; Lou, Baohua; Zhang, Lingling; Han, Lei; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-11-10

    Considerable interest has been focused on miniature biofuel cells (BFCs) because of their portability and possibility to be implantable. Origami devices with hollow channels will provide novel insight into the assembly methods of miniature BFCs. Herein a miniature origami BFC has been fabricated from a MnO2-graphite flake consumed solid-state cathode. For further practical applications, miniature origami BFCs can directly generate energy from soft drinks.

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  5. FOREWORD: Neutron metrology Neutron metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Nolte, Ralf; Gressier, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    The International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) has consultative committees covering various areas of metrology. The Consultative Committee for Ionizing Radiation (CCRI) differs from the others in having three sections: Section (I) deals with radiation dosimetry, Section (II) with radionuclide metrology and Section (III) with neutron metrology. In 2003 a proposal was made to publish special issues of Metrologia covering the work of the three Sections. Section (II) was the first to complete their task, and their special issue was published in 2007, volume 44(4). This was followed in 2009 by the special issue on radiation dosimetry, volume 46(2). The present issue, volume 48(6), completes the trilogy and attempts to explain neutron metrology, the youngest of the three disciplines, the neutron only having been discovered in 1932, to a wider audience and to highlight the relevance and importance of this field. When originally approached with the idea of this special issue, Section (III) immediately saw the value of a publication specifically on neutron metrology. It is a topic area where papers tend to be scattered throughout the literature in journals covering, for example, nuclear instrumentation, radiation protection or radiation measurements in general. Review articles tend to be few. People new to the field often ask for an introduction to the various topics. There are some excellent older textbooks, but these are now becoming obsolete. More experienced workers in specific areas of neutron metrology can find it difficult to know the latest position in related areas. The papers in this issue attempt, without presenting a purely historical outline, to describe the field in a sufficiently logical way to provide the novice with a clear introduction, while being sufficiently up-to-date to provide the more experienced reader with the latest scientific developments in the different topic areas. Neutron radiation fields obviously occur throughout the nuclear

  6. Two Views of Islam: Ceramic Tile Design and Miniatures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macaulay, Sara Grove

    2001-01-01

    Describes an art project focusing on Islamic art that consists of two parts: (1) ceramic tile design; and (2) Islamic miniatures. Provides background information on Islamic art and step-by-step instructions for designing the Islamic tile and miniature. Includes learning objectives and resources on Islamic tile miniatures. (CMK)

  7. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section... Miniature pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A miniature pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure the pressure between a device and soft tissue by converting mechanical...

  8. 21 CFR 890.1615 - Miniature pressure transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Miniature pressure transducer. 890.1615 Section... Miniature pressure transducer. (a) Identification. A miniature pressure transducer is a device intended for medical purposes to measure the pressure between a device and soft tissue by converting mechanical...

  9. Design of a miniaturized integrated spectrometer for spectral tissue sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belay, Gebirie Yizengaw; Hoving, Willem; Ottevaere, Heidi; van der Put, Arthur; Weltjens, Wim; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    Minimally-invasive image-guided procedures become increasingly used by physicians to obtain real-time characterization feedback from the tissue at the tip of their interventional device (needle, catheter, endoscopic or laparoscopic probes, etc…) which can significantly improve the outcome of diagnosis and treatment, and ultimately reduce cost of the medical treatment. Spectral tissue sensing using compact photonic probes has the potential to be a valuable tool for screening and diagnostic purposes, e.g. for discriminating between healthy and tumorous tissue. However, this technique requires a low-cost broadband miniature spectrometer so that it is commercially viable for screening at point-of-care locations such as physicians' offices and outpatient centers. Our goal is therefore to develop a miniaturized spectrometer based on diffractive optics that combines the functionalities of a visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) spectrometer in one very compact housing. A second goal is that the hardware can be produced in high volume at low cost without expensive time consuming alignment and calibration steps. We have designed a miniaturized spectrometer which operates both in the visible/near-infrared and shortwave-infrared wavelength regions ranging from 400 nm to 1700 nm. The visible/near-infrared part of the spectrometer is designed for wavelengths from 400 nm to 800 nm whereas the shortwave-infrared segment ranges from 850 nm to 1700 nm. The spectrometer has a resolution of 6 nm in the visible/near-infrared wavelength region and 10 nm in the shortwave-infrared. The minimum SNR of the spectrometer for the intended application is about 151 in the VIS/NIR range and 6000 for SWIR. In this paper, the modelling and design, and power budget analysis of the miniaturized spectrometer are presented. Our work opens a door for future affordable micro- spectrometers which can be integrated with smartphones and tablets, and used for point

  10. Miniature Housings for Electronics With Standard Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.; Alhorn, Dean C.

    2006-01-01

    A family of general-purpose miniature housings has been designed to contain diverse sensors, actuators, and drive circuits plus associated digital electronic readout and control circuits. The circuits contained in the housings communicate with the external world via standard RS-485 interfaces.

  11. The technology of miniature acoustic element arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bom, N.; Lancee, C. T.; Ridder, J.; Ligtvoet, C.; Roelandt, J.

    1975-01-01

    Various aspects of miniature element array construction are discussed. Some initial results on optimization of lateral resolution with a special focusing technique in linear array design is presented, together with the constructional details. Furthermore the construction of a catheter tip array is treated in detail.

  12. Miniaturization of a biomedical gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Mirtaheri, Peyman; Omtveit, Tore; Klotzbuecher, Thomas; Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Orjan G; Tønnessen, Tor Inge

    2004-12-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that a conductivity based PCO2 sensor is an attractive solution for early detection of ischemia and presented two design geometries. For organ surface measurements, the planar design was suitable but it was difficult to insert the sensor into the tissue. A cylindrical design solution was favored for insertion due to the large membrane contact area and easy placement in a medical catheter. Since the previous cylindrical prototype was large and could damage the tissue, a more miniaturized sensor was needed. In the current paper, we present a miniaturized sensor with an outer diameter of 1 mm. The applied technology for manufacturing the sensor was a combination of mechanical turning, excimer laser drilling and conventional molding technique. The materials applied were PEEK (polyetherether ketone), PI (polyimide) with gold layers and polysiloxane. The membrane had to be gas permeable while acting as a barrier for ion transport, and was made of polysiloxane and had a thickness of 100-150 microm. The miniaturized sensor was tested for calibration, response time, drifting and pressure sensitivity. The results show that the miniaturized PCO2 sensor is capable of rapid and stable measurements both in vitro and ex vivo. The result from this study will be applied for the industrial manufacturing of such a biomedical sensor as a clinical product.

  13. A miniature mass spectrometer for hydrazine detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.; Sinha, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    A Miniature Mass Spectrometer (MMS) with a focal plane (Mattauch-Herzog) geometry has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The MMS has the potential to meet the NASA requirements of 10 parts per billion sensitivity for Hydrazine detection, as well as the requirements for instant response, portability, and low maintenance.

  14. Miniature Paintings: Small Size, Big Impact!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Bill

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a miniature painting project that allows students to research a master painter and then replicate the work on a smaller scale. This lesson focuses on the students' ability to learn to identify style, subject matter, themes, and content in painting through the study of historical paintings, and the application of various…

  15. Miniature Marimbas: Migrant Workers' Memories of Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jayne

    1995-01-01

    Three Mexican migrant workers attending classes at Geneseo (New York) Migrant Center used leftover art materials to represent their home village in miniature. A spontaneous artistic expression, the objects allowed the men an opportunity to reminisce and reinforce cultural and interpersonal ties, and gave insight about their background and culture…

  16. Pixelated neutron image plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  17. Design of a miniature explosive isentropic compression experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, Douglas G

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this design study is to adapt the High Explosive Pulsed Power Isentropic Compression Experiment (HEPP-ICE) to milligram quantities of materials at stresses of {approx}100 GPa. For this miniature application we assume that a parallel plate stripline of {approx}2.5 mm width is needed to compress the samples. In any parallel plate load, the rising currents flow preferentially along the outside edges of the load where the specific impedance is a minimum [1]. Therefore, the peak current must be between 1 and 2 MA to reach a stress of 100 GPa in the center of a 2.5 mm wide parallel plate load; these are small relative to typical HEPP-ICE currents. We show that a capacitor bank alone exceeds the requirements of this miniature ICE experiment and a flux compression generator (FCG) is not necessary. The proposed circuit will comprise one half of the 2.4-MJ bank, i.e., the 6-mF, 20-kV, 1.2 MJ capacitor bank used in the original HEPP-ICE circuit. Explosive opening and closing switches will still be required because the rise time of the capacitor circuit would be of the order of 30 {micro}s without them. For isentropic loading in these small samples, stress rise times of {approx}200 ns are required.

  18. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Neutron sources: present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500+ MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-production efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: (i) fundamental neutron-nuclear research, (ii) nuclear-data acquisition, (iii) materials-damage studies, (iv) engineering test, and (v) biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections.

  20. Miniature Grating for Spectrally-Encoded Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongkyun; Martinez, Ramses V.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is an ultraminiature endoscopy technology that acquires high-definition images of internal organs through a sub-mm endoscopic probe. In SEE, a grating at the tip of the imaging optics diffracts the broadband light into multiple beams, where each beam with a distinctive wavelength is illuminated on a unique transverse location of the tissue. By encoding one transverse coordinate with the wavelength, SEE can image a line of the tissue at a time without using any beam scanning devices. This feature of the SEE technology allows the SEE probe to be miniaturized to sub-mm dimensions. While previous studies have shown that SEE has the potential to be utilized for various clinical imaging applications, the translation of SEE for medicine has been hampered by challenges in fabricating the miniature grating inherent to SEE probes. This paper describes a new fabrication method for SEE probes. The new method uses a soft lithographic approach to pattern a high-aspect-ratio grating at the tip of the miniature imaging optics. Using this technique, we have constructed a 500-μm-diameter SEE probe. The miniature grating at the tip of the probe had a measured diffraction efficiency of 75%. The new SEE probe was used to image a human finger and formalin fixed mouse embryos, demonstrating the capability of this device to visualize key anatomic features of tissues with high image contrast. In addition to providing high quality imaging SEE optics, the soft lithography method allows cost-effective and reliable fabrication of these miniature endoscopes, which will facilitate the clinical translation of SEE technology. PMID:23503940

  1. POWER GENERATING NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1958-03-01

    This patent relates to reactor systems of the type wherein the cooiing medium is a liquid which is converted by the heat of the reaction to steam which is conveyed directly to a pnime mover such as a steam turbine driving a generatore after which it is condensed and returred to the coolant circuit. In this design, the reactor core is disposed within a tank for containing either a slurry type fuel or an aggregation of solid fuel elements such as elongated rods submerged in a liquid moderator such as heavy water. The top of the tank is provided with a nozzle which extends into an expansion chamber connected with the upper end of the tank, the coolant being maintained in the expansion chamber at a level above the nozzle and the steam being formed in the expansion chamber.

  2. Ultra-low noise miniaturized neural amplifier with hardware averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dweiri, Yazan M.; Eggers, Thomas; McCallum, Grant; Durand, Dominique M.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Peripheral nerves carry neural signals that could be used to control hybrid bionic systems. Cuff electrodes provide a robust and stable interface but the recorded signal amplitude is small (<3 μVrms 700 Hz-7 kHz), thereby requiring a baseline noise of less than 1 μVrms for a useful signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) contacts alone generate thermal noise of at least 0.5 μVrms therefore the amplifier should add as little noise as possible. Since mainstream neural amplifiers have a baseline noise of 2 μVrms or higher, novel designs are required. Approach. Here we apply the concept of hardware averaging to nerve recordings obtained with cuff electrodes. An optimization procedure is developed to minimize noise and power simultaneously. The novel design was based on existing neural amplifiers (Intan Technologies, LLC) and is validated with signals obtained from the FINE in chronic dog experiments. Main results. We showed that hardware averaging leads to a reduction in the total recording noise by a factor of 1/√N or less depending on the source resistance. Chronic recording of physiological activity with FINE using the presented design showed significant improvement on the recorded baseline noise with at least two parallel operation transconductance amplifiers leading to a 46.1% reduction at N = 8. The functionality of these recordings was quantified by the SNR improvement and shown to be significant for N = 3 or more. The present design was shown to be capable of generating <1.5 μVrms total recording baseline noise when connected to a FINE placed on the sciatic nerve of an awake animal. An algorithm was introduced to find the value of N that can minimize both the power consumption and the noise in order to design a miniaturized ultralow-noise neural amplifier. Significance. These results demonstrate the efficacy of hardware averaging on noise improvement for neural recording with cuff electrodes, and can accommodate the

  3. A neutron detector based on microchannel plates

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D.W.

    1987-06-01

    We propose a large-area neutron detector design based on microchannel plates (MCPs). Two characteristics of the MCP make it ideal as a high-rate neutron detector: (1) its signals can have a very fast rise time, and (2) it can count at a high rate. The MCP-based detector could use both the high-voltage power supplies and the readout electronics designed for a neutron detector based on the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC).

  4. Neutron Reflectivity and Grazing Angle Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Ankner, J. F.; Majkrzak, C. F.; Satija, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, neutron reflectivity has emerged as a powerful technique for the investigation of surface and interfacial phenomena in many different fields. In this paper, a short review of some of the work on neutron reflectivity and grazing-angle diffraction as well as a description of the current and planned neutron rcflectometers at NIST is presented. Specific examples of the characterization of magnetic, superconducting, and polymeric surfaces and interfaces are included. PMID:28053457

  5. Neutron therapy of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Nellans, H. N.; Shaw, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Reports relate applications of neutrons to the problem of cancer therapy. The biochemical and biophysical aspects of fast-neutron therapy, neutron-capture and neutron-conversion therapy with intermediate-range neutrons are presented. Also included is a computer program for neutron-gamma radiobiology.

  6. Fast neutron nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrillat, M. Th.; Lions, N.

    1985-01-08

    The invention relates to a fast neutron nuclear reactor of the integrated type comprising a cylindrical inner vessel. The inner vessel comprises two concentric ferrules and the connection between the hot collector defined within this vessel and the inlet port of the exchangers is brought about by a hot structure forming a heat baffle and supported by the inner ferrule and by a cold structure surrounding the hot structure, supported by the outer ferrule and sealingly connected to the exchanger. Application to the generation of electric power in nuclear power stations.

  7. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  9. New sources and instrumentation for neutron science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Alina

    2011-04-01

    Neutron-scattering research has a lot to do with our everyday lives. Things like medicine, food, electronics, cars and airplanes have all been improved by neutron-scattering research. Neutron research also helps scientists improve materials used in a multitude of different products, such as high-temperature superconductors, powerful lightweight magnets, stronger, lighter plastic products etc. Neutron scattering is one of the most effective ways to obtain information on both, the structure and the dynamics of condensed matter. Most of the world's neutron sources were built decades ago, and although the uses and demand for neutrons have increased throughout the years, few new sources have been built. The new construction, accelerator-based neutron source, the spallation source will provide the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and industrial development. In this paper it will be described what neutrons are and what unique properties make them useful for science, how spallation source is designed to produce neutron beams and the experimental instruments that will use those beams. Finally, it will be described how past neutron research has affected our everyday lives and what we might expect from the most exciting future applications.

  10. Miniature Extreme Ultraviolet Solar Radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, D. R.; Seely, J. F.; Bremer, J.; Jones, A. R.; Vest, R.; Sakdinawat, A.

    2015-12-01

    Free-standing zone plates for use in EUV solar radiometers have been fabricated using electron beam lithography and calibrated at the NIST SURF synchrotron facility. The radiometers that we are developing use zone plates (ZPs) to focus the total solar irradiance in narrow EUV spectral bands and measure it with negligible sensitivity to field angle and polarization, and with greater accuracy and greater long-term stability than radiometers that have alternative architectures. These radiometers are easy to accommodate on spacecraft due to their small size, low mass, low power requirements, low data rates, and modest pointing requirements. A proto-type instrument will be presented with performance characteristics and spacecraft resource requirements for hosting these new instruments. The compact size of the optical train make these zone plates attractive for small CubeSats. The robustness of the compact design makes these radiometers available for a large variety of applications.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1957-09-24

    Reactors of the type employing plates of natural uranium in a moderator are discussed wherein the plates are um-formly disposed in parallel relationship to each other thereby separating the moderator material into distinct and individual layers. Each plate has an uninterrupted sunface area substantially equal to the cross-sectional area of the active portion of the reactor, the particular size of the plates and the volume ratio of moderator to uranium required to sustain a chain reaction being determinable from the known purity of these materials and other characteristics such as the predictable neutron losses due to the formation of radioactive elements of extremely high neutron capture cross section.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  13. Supercontinuum as a light source for miniaturized endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Lu, M K; Lin, H Y; Hsieh, C C; Kao, F J

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we have successfully implemented supercontinuum based illumination through single fiber coupling. The integration of a single fiber illumination with a miniature CMOS sensor forms a very slim and powerful camera module for endoscopic imaging. A set of tests and in vivo animal experiments are conducted accordingly to characterize the corresponding illuminance, spectral profile, intensity distribution, and image quality. The key illumination parameters of the supercontinuum, including color rendering index (CRI: 72%~97%) and correlated color temperature (CCT: 3,100K~5,200K), are modified with external filters and compared with those from a LED light source (CRI~76% & CCT~6,500K). The very high spatial coherence of the supercontinuum allows high luminosity conduction through a single multimode fiber (core size~400μm), whose distal end tip is attached with a diffussion tip to broaden the solid angle of illumination (from less than 10° to more than 80°).

  14. Supercontinuum as a light source for miniaturized endoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, M. K.; Lin, H. Y.; Hsieh, C. C.; Kao, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we have successfully implemented supercontinuum based illumination through single fiber coupling. The integration of a single fiber illumination with a miniature CMOS sensor forms a very slim and powerful camera module for endoscopic imaging. A set of tests and in vivo animal experiments are conducted accordingly to characterize the corresponding illuminance, spectral profile, intensity distribution, and image quality. The key illumination parameters of the supercontinuum, including color rendering index (CRI: 72%~97%) and correlated color temperature (CCT: 3,100K~5,200K), are modified with external filters and compared with those from a LED light source (CRI~76% & CCT~6,500K). The very high spatial coherence of the supercontinuum allows high luminosity conduction through a single multimode fiber (core size~400μm), whose distal end tip is attached with a diffussion tip to broaden the solid angle of illumination (from less than 10° to more than 80°). PMID:27699102

  15. Miniature cryocooler developments for high operating temperatures at Thales Cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arts, R.; Martin, J.-Y.; Willems, D.; Seguineau, C.; Van Acker, S.; Mullié, J. C.; Göbel, A.; Tops, M.; Le Bordays, J.; Etchanchu, T.; Benschop, A. A. J.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years there has been a drive towards miniaturized cooled IDCA solutions for low-power, low-mass, low-size products (SWaP). To support this drive, coolers are developed optimized for high-temperature, low heat load dewar-detector assemblies. In this paper, Thales Cryogenics development activities supporting SWaP are presented. Design choices are discussed and compared to various key requirements. Trade-off analysis results are presented on drive voltage, cold finger definition (length, material, diameter and sealing concept), and other interface considerations, including cold finger definition. In parallel with linear and rotary cooler options, designs for small-size high-efficiency drive electronics based on state-of-the-art architectures are presented.

  16. Wearable devices for blood purification: principles, miniaturization, and technical challenges.

    PubMed

    Armignacco, Paolo; Lorenzin, Anna; Neri, Mauro; Nalesso, Federico; Garzotto, Francesco; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The prevalences of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and renal replacement therapy (RRT) continue to increase across the world imposing staggering costs on providers. Therefore, strategies to optimize the treatment and improve survival are of fundamental importance. Despite the benefits of daily dialysis, its implementation is difficult and wearable hemodialysis might represent an alternative by which frequent treatments can be delivered to ESRD patients with much less interference in their routines promoting better quality of life. The development of the wearable artificial kidney (WAK) requires incorporation of basic components of a dialysis system into a wearable device that allows mobility, miniaturization, and above all, patient-oriented management. The technical requirements necessary for WAK can be divided into the following broad categories: dialysis membranes, dialysis regeneration, vascular access, patient monitoring systems, and power sources. Pumping systems for blood and other fluids are the most critical components of the entire device.

  17. Miniaturized high-temperature superconductor microstrip patch antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaloupka, Heinz; Piel, Helmut; Pischke, Arndt; Klein, Norbert; Peiniger, Michael; Splitt, Georg

    1991-09-01

    Experimental as well as computational results are presented for 2.4 GHz microstrip antennas which are miniaturized (total length, 6 mm) by both a new, stepped impedance patch shape and a relatively high substrate permittivity. The antennas investigated were fabricated from YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films epitaxially grown on single-crystalline LaAlO3 substrates by pulsed excimer laser ablation or by high-pressure oxygen DC sputtering and, for comparison, from copper on the same substrate material. It is shown that the radiation efficiency of this antenna structure is only about 1 percent to 6 percent for copper at 77 K but is increased to values between 35 percent and 65 percent for HTS films. From experimental investigations of the power dependence of the antenna gain at 77 K, nonlinearities, especially a sharp drop at a current density of about 2 x 10 to the 6th A/sq cm, were observed.

  18. Chemically modified graphene based supercapacitors for flexible and miniature devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debasis; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-09-01

    Rapid progress in the portable and flexible electronic devises has stimulated supercapacitor research towards the design and fabrication of high performance flexible devices. Recent research efforts for flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are highly focusing on graphene and chemically modified graphene owing to the unique properties, including large surface area, high electrical and thermal conductivity, excellent mechanical flexibility, and outstanding chemical stability. This invited review article highlights current status of the flexible electrode material research based on chemically modified graphene for supercapacitor application. A variety of electrode architectures prepared from chemically modified graphene are summarized in terms of their structural dimensions. Novel prototypes for the supercapacitor aiming at flexible miniature devices, i.e. microsupercapacitor with high energy and power density are highlighted. Future challenges relevant to graphene-based flexible supercapacitors are also suggested. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Miniature biotelemeter giving 10 channels of wideband biomedical data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J.

    1972-01-01

    A miniature biotelemeter has been developed for sensing and transmitting multiple channels of wideband biomedical data over a radio link. Its small size and weight make it capable of being carried by free-moving laboratory animals as small as rats. Ten data channels each of 5-kHz data bandwidth are provided to permit monitoring of a wide variety of physiological signals. Multichannel telemetry of electroencephalograms, electrocardiograms, electromyograms, state functions, and dynamic processes such as blood flow and body chemistry are possible applications. Utilization of newly available monolithic chip components, low-power COS/MOS MSI digital logic, and state-of-the-art hybrid mounting techniques makes this novel device useful for both research and clinical bioinstrumentation.

  20. Miniature interferometer for refractive index measurement in microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghui; Geiser, Martial; Truffer, Frederic; Song, Chengli

    2012-12-01

    The design and development of the miniaturized interferometer for measurement of the refractive index or concentration of sub-microliter volume aqueous solution in microfludic chip is presented. It is manifested by a successful measurement of the refractive index of sugar-water solution, by utilizing a laser diode for light source and the small robust instrumentation for practical implementation. Theoretically, the measurement principle and the feasibility of the system are analyzed. Experimental device is constructed with a diode laser, lens, two optical plate and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS). Through measuring the positional changes of the interference fringes, the refractive index change are retrieved. A refractive index change of 10-4 is inferred from the measured image data. The entire system is approximately the size of half and a deck of cards and can operate on battery power for long time.

  1. Miniaturized ionization gas sensors from single metal oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Ramirez, Francisco; Prades, Juan Daniel; Hackner, Angelika; Fischer, Thomas; Mueller, Gerhard; Mathur, Sanjay; Morante, Joan Ramon

    2011-02-01

    Gas detection experiments were performed with individual tin dioxide (SnO2) nanowires specifically configured to observe surface ion (SI) emission response towards representative analyte species. These devices were found to work at much lower temperatures (T≈280 °C) and bias voltages (V≈2 V) than their micro-counterparts, thereby demonstrating the inherent potential of individual nanostructures in building functional nanodevices. High selectivity of our miniaturized sensors emerges from the dissimilar sensing mechanisms of those typical of standard resistive-type sensors (RES). Therefore, by employing this detection principle (SI) together with RES measurements, better selectivity than that observed in standard metal oxide sensors could be demonstrated. Simplicity and specificity of the gas detection as well as low-power consumption make these single nanowire devices promising technological alternatives to overcome the major drawbacks of solid-state sensor technologies.

  2. Characteristics and Applications of a High Performance, Miniaturized, Infrasound Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, J. L.; Marriott, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Infrasound Sensors have been used for many years to monitor a large number of geophysical phenomena and manmade sources. Due to their large size and power consumption these sensors have typically been deployed in fixed arrays, portable arrays have required trucks to transport the sensors and support equipment. A high performance, miniaturized, infrasound microphone has been developed to enable mobile infrasound measurements that would otherwise be impractical. The new device is slightly larger than a hockey puck, weighs 200g, and consumes less than 150mW. The sensitivity is 0.4V/Pa and self noise at 1Hz is less than 0.63μPa²/Hz. The characteristics were verified using a calibrator tracable to the Los Alamos calibration chamber. Field tests have demonstrated the performance is comparable to a Chaparral model 25. Applications include man portable arrays, mobile installations, and UAV based measurements.

  3. Miniaturized module for the wireless transmission of measurements with Bluetooth.

    PubMed

    Roth, H; Schwaibold, M; Moor, C; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    The wiring of patients for obtaining medical measurements has many disadvantages. In order to limit these, a miniaturized module was developed which digitalizes analog signals and sends the signal wirelessly to the receiver using Bluetooth. Bluetooth is especially suitable for this application because distances of up to 10 m are possible with low power consumption and robust transmission with encryption. The module consists of a Bluetooth chip, which is initialized in such a way by a microcontroller that connections from other bluetooth receivers can be accepted. The signals are then transmitted to the distant end. The maximum bit rate of the 23 mm x 30 mm module is 73.5 kBit/s. At 4.7 kBit/s, the current consumption is 12 mA.

  4. Miniature Focusing Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanik, Isik; Srivastava, Santosh

    2005-01-01

    An improved miniature time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been developed in a continuing effort to minimize the sizes, weights, power demands, and costs of mass spectrometers for such diverse applications as measurement of concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere, detecting poisonous gases in mines, and analyzing exhaust gases of automobiles. Advantageous characteristics of this mass spectrometer include the following: It is simple and rugged. Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it is inexpensive to build. There is no need for precise alignment of its components. Its mass range is practically unlimited Relative to prior mass spectrometers, it offers high sensitivity (ability to measure relative concentrations as small as parts per billion). Its resolution is one dalton (one atomic mass unit). An entire mass spectrum is recorded in a single pulse. (In a conventional mass spectrometer, a spectrum is recorded mass by mass.) The data-acquisition process takes only seconds. It is a lightweight, low-power, portable instrument. Although time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) have been miniaturized previously, their performances have not been completely satisfactory. An inherent adverse effect of miniaturization of a TOF-MS is a loss of resolution caused by reduction of the length of its flight tube. In the present improved TOF-MS, the adverse effect of shortening the flight tube is counteracted by (1) using charged-particle optics to constrain ion trajectories to the flight-tube axis while (2) reducing ion velocities to increase ion flight times. In the present improved TOF-MS, a stream of gas is generated by use of a hypodermic needle. The stream of gas is crossed by an energy-selected, pulsed beam of electrons (see Figure 1). The ions generated by impingement of the electrons on the gas atoms are then focused by three cylindrical electrostatic lenses, which constitute a segmented flight tube. After traveling along the flight tube, the ions enter a charged

  5. Miniature L-Band Radar Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, Dalia; Price, Douglas; Edelstein, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    A miniature L-band transceiver that operates at a carrier frequency of 1.25 GHz has been developed as part of a generic radar electronics module (REM) that would constitute one unit in an array of many identical units in a very-large-aperture phased-array antenna. NASA and the Department of Defense are considering the deployment of such antennas in outer space; the underlying principles of operation, and some of those of design, also are applicable on Earth. The large dimensions of the antennas make it advantageous to distribute radio-frequency electronic circuitry into elements of the arrays. The design of the REM is intended to implement the distribution. The design also reflects a requirement to minimize the size and weight of the circuitry in order to minimize the weight of any such antenna. Other requirements include making the transceiver robust and radiation-hard and minimizing power demand. Figure 1 depicts the functional blocks of the REM, including the L-band transceiver. The key functions of the REM include signal generation, frequency translation, amplification, detection, handling of data, and radar control and timing. An arbitrary-waveform generator that includes logic circuitry and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) generates a linear-frequency-modulation chirp waveform. A frequency synthesizer produces local-oscillator signals used for frequency conversion and clock signals for the arbitrary-waveform generator, for a digitizer [that is, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC)], and for a control and timing unit. Digital functions include command, timing, telemetry, filtering, and high-rate framing and serialization of data for a high-speed scientific-data interface. The aforementioned digital implementation of filtering is a key feature of the REM architecture. Digital filters, in contradistinction to analog ones, provide consistent and temperature-independent performance, which is particularly important when REMs are distributed throughout a large

  6. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  7. On the development of co-axial miniature pulse tube coolers for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Liang, J. T.; Zhu, W. Q.; Cai, J. H.; Ju, Y. L.

    2002-05-01

    Cryocoolers for cooling infrared sensors in space applications require high reliability, long lifetime, low power and minimum weight. In this paper we report work on a miniature pulse tube cooler specifically designed for such applications. A series of engineering model co-axial miniature pulse tube coolers with a flexure bearing linear compressor of 1 cc swept volume have been designed and fabricated in our laboratory. A theoretical model is established based on the analyses of thermodynamic and hydrodynamic behaviors of oscillatory flows in regenerator, for performance prediction, optimization and as a rough guide in the early stages of system design. An experimental apparatus, including a hot wire anemometer, has been set up to study the flow resistance of regenerators under oscillatory flow conditions. The co-axial, multi-bypass, and symmetric nozzle structure has been used in the coolers. We will present here the performance of two sizes of coolers with 9 mm and 8 mm diameter of cold fingers. The 9 mm cooler currently provides 500 mW net cooling power at 80 K with input power of 47 W, and the 8 mm cooler, provides 450 mW at 80 K with 51 W input power with a 65% efficient compressor. The cold fingers of our co-axial pulse tube coolers have the similar size of miniature Stirling coolers and are the only one that could meet the geometry specifications of the Standard Advance Dewar Assembly (SADA) for thermal imaging systems in most military applications.

  8. Miniature sensor suitable for electronic nose applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Allman, Steve L.; Johansson, Alicia; Boisen, Anja

    2007-05-01

    A major research effort has been devoted over the years for the development of chemical sensors for the detection of chemical and explosive vapors. However, the deployment of such chemical sensors will require the use of multiple sensors (probably tens of sensors) in a sensor package to achieve selective detection. In order to keep the overall detector unit small, miniature sensors with sufficient sensitivity of detection will be needed. We report sensitive detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a stimulant for the nerve agents, using a miniature sensor unit based on piezoresistive microcantilevers. The sensor can detect parts-per-trillion concentrations of DMMP within 10s exposure times. The small size of the sensor makes it ideally suited for electronic nose applications.

  9. Study on miniature pulse tube cryocooler for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, W.; Sun, W.; Yang, J.; Li, S.

    2000-03-01

    Pulse tube refrigerator (PTR) is a new type of mechanical cryocooler with the potential of long-term operation in space. Theoretical and experimental studies are currently on the way in the Cryogenic Laboratory of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CL/CAS) in order to develop a 85 K/250 mW class pulse tube cryocooler to be used to cool space-borne infrared devices. A theoretical model is established based on the analyses of the thermodynamic behavior of gas parcels in oscillating flow regenerators. It helps us to understand the cooler and can be used to study the influence of DC flow on the refrigeration performance. The flow resistance of the regenerator is an important factor for the cooler performance. A test bench, including a hot-wire anemometer has been set up to investigate the flow resistance characteristics of regenerators with oscillating flow. The results of measurement are correlated and served for practical design. The Oxford type linear pressure wave generator with flexure bearings is also under development in CL/CAS. The prototype miniature pulse tube cryocooler, driven by a linear pressure wave generator of 1.06 cm3 maximum swept volume, provides at present 200 mW net cooling power at 81 K with 28.4 W input power. Improvements are being made to further increase the cooling power and reduce the input power.

  10. A miniaturized neuroprosthesis suitable for implantation into the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Binkley, David; Blalock, Benjamin; Andersen, Richard; Ulshoefer, Norbert; Johnson, Travis; Del Castillo, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents current research on a miniaturized neuroprosthesis suitable for implantation into the brain. The prosthesis is a heterogeneous integration of a 100-element microelectromechanical system (MEMS) electrode array, front-end complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit for neural signal preamplification, filtering, multiplexing and analog-to-digital conversion, and a second CMOS integrated circuit for wireless transmission of neural data and conditioning of wireless power. The prosthesis is intended for applications where neural signals are processed and decoded to permit the control of artificial or paralyzed limbs. This research, if successful, will allow implantation of the electronics into the brain, or subcutaneously on the skull, and eliminate all external signal and power wiring. The neuroprosthetic system design has strict size and power constraints with each of the front-end preamplifier channels fitting within the 400 x 400-microm pitch of the 100-element MEMS electrode array and power dissipation resulting in less than a 1 degree C temperature rise for the surrounding brain tissue. We describe the measured performance of initial micropower low-noise CMOS preamplifiers for the neuroprosthetic.

  11. Miniature Reversal Electron-Attachment Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara

    1994-01-01

    Miniature reversal electron-attachment detector (miniREAD) enables direct injection of air or vapor at atmospheric pressure from monitored area into mass-spectrometric instrument to detect explosives, narcotics, or other substances, vapors of which suspected of being present in low concentrations. In comparison with older reversal electron-attachment detector, miniREAD simpler in design; more rugged; and easier to build, repair, and maintain. In addition, probably more sensitive.

  12. Degenerative myelopathy in an adult miniature poodle.

    PubMed

    Matthews, N S; de Lahunta, A

    1985-06-01

    Degenerative myelopathy was diagnosed at necropsy of an adult Miniature Poodle with a 33-month history of progressive pelvic limb ataxia and proprioceptive deficit. Microscopic examination of the cord revealed diffuse degenerative myelopathy. Degenerative myelopathy is usually seen in adult, large-breed dogs and progresses over a period of months. In this case, the myelopathy progressed slowly and the degree of paralysis became more extensive than usually seen.

  13. A miniature tilting pad gas lubricated bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sixsmith, H.; Swift, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a miniature tilting pad gas bearing developed for use in very small turbomachines. The bearings have been developed for cryogenic turboexpanders with shaft diameters down to about 0.3 cm and rotational speeds up to one million rpm. Cryogenic expansion turbines incorporating this type of bearing should be suitable for refrigeration rates down to about 10 w.

  14. Sub miniaturized laser doppler velocimeter sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gharib, Morteza (Inventor); Modaress, Darius (Inventor); Taugwalder, Frederic (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A miniaturized laser Doppler velocimeter is formed in a housing that is preferably 3 mm in diameter or less. A laser couples light to a first diffractive optical element that is formed on the fiber end. The light is coupled to a lens that also includes a diffractive optical element. The same lens is also used to collect receive light, and receives includes another diffractive optical element to collect that received light.

  15. High Q Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Tjoelker, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated high Q measurements in a room temperature Miniature Sapphire Acoustic Resonator (MSAR). Initial measurements of bulk acoustic modes in room temperature sapphire at 39 MHz have demonstrated a Q of 8.8 x 10(exp 6). The long term goal of this work is to integrate such a high Q resonator with small, low noise quartz oscillator electronics, providing a fractional frequency stability better than 1 x 10(exp -14) @ 1s.

  16. Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Rout, R. K.; Niranjan, Ram; Srivastava, R.; Rawool, A. M.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.; Mishra, P.

    2013-06-15

    Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} neutrons/pulse into 4{pi} steradians with a pulse width of 15 {+-} 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 {mu}F capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US$ 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 {mu}F, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of {sup 3}He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling.

  17. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1958-10-01

    The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

  19. Strain controlled cyclic tests on miniaturized specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, R.; Džugan, J.

    2017-02-01

    The paper is dealing with strain controlled cyclic tests using a non-contact strain measurement based on digital image correlation techniques on proportional sizes of conventional specimens. The cyclic behaviour of 34CrNiMo6 high-strength steel was investigated on miniaturized round specimens with diameter of 2mm that were compared with specimens in accordance with ASTM E606 standards. The cycle asymmetry coefficient was R= -1. This application is intended to be used for life time assessment of in service components in future work which enables to carried out a group of mechanical tests from a limited amount of the experimental material. The attention was paid to confirm the suitability of the proposed size miniaturization geometry, testing set up and procedure. The test results obtained enabled to construct Manson-Coffin curves and assess fatigue parameters. The purpose of this study is to present differences between cyclic curves and cyclic parameters which have been evaluated based on conventional and miniaturized specimens.

  20. Stability-Augmentation Devices for Miniature Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, RIchard M.

    2005-01-01

    Non-aerodynamic mechanical devices are under consideration as means to augment the stability of miniature autonomous and remotely controlled aircraft. Such aircraft can be used for diverse purposes, including military reconnaissance, radio communications, and safety-related monitoring of wide areas. The need for stability-augmentation devices arises because adverse meteorological conditions generally affect smaller aircraft more strongly than they affect larger aircraft: Miniature aircraft often become uncontrollable under conditions that would not be considered severe enough to warrant grounding of larger aircraft. The need for the stability-augmentation devices to be non-aerodynamic arises because there is no known way to create controlled aerodynamic forces sufficient to counteract the uncontrollable meteorological forces on miniature aircraft. A stability-augmentation device of the type under consideration includes a mass pod (a counterweight) at the outer end of a telescoping shaft, plus associated equipment to support the operation of the aircraft. The telescoping shaft and mass pod are stowed in the rear of the aircraft. When deployed, they extend below the aircraft. Optionally, an antenna for radio communication can be integrated into the shaft. At the time of writing this article, the deployment of the telescoping shaft and mass pod was characterized as passive and automatic, but information about the deployment mechanism(s) was not available. The feasibility of this stability-augmentation concept was demonstrated in flights of hand-launched prototype aircraft.

  1. Miniature standoff Raman probe for neurosurgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Oliver A. C.; Hutchings, Joanne; Gray, William; Vincent, Rosa Louise; Day, John C.

    2016-08-01

    Removal of intrinsic brain tumors is a delicate process, where a high degree of specificity is required to remove all of the tumor tissue without damaging healthy brain. The accuracy of this process can be greatly enhanced by intraoperative guidance. Optical biopsies using Raman spectroscopy are a minimally invasive and lower-cost alternative to current guidance methods. A miniature Raman probe for performing optical biopsies of human brain tissue is presented. The probe allows sampling inside a conventional stereotactic brain biopsy system: a needle of length 200 mm and inner diameter of 1.8 mm. By employing a miniature stand-off Raman design, the probe removes the need for any additional components to be inserted into the brain. Additionally, the probe achieves a very low internal silica background while maintaining good collection of Raman signal. To illustrate this, the probe is compared with a Raman probe that uses a pair of optical fibers for collection. The miniature stand-off Raman probe is shown to collect a comparable number of Raman scattered photons, but the Raman signal to background ratio is improved by a factor of five at Raman shifts below ˜500 cm-1. The probe's suitability for use on tissue is demonstrated by discriminating between different types of healthy porcine brain tissue.

  2. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  3. Illuminating the Past: The Neutron as a Tool in Archaeology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kockelmann, W.; Kirfel, A.; Siano, S.; Frost, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Neutrons can be produced in nuclear reactions and used as very versatile probes for condensed matter research. Since their introduction in the 1950s neutron scattering techniques have evolved to be very powerful tools for investigating the properties of condensed matter. Here we present the concept of neutron diffraction and how this technique can…

  4. Recent Advances in Neutron Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Herman; Sheldon, Eric

    1977-01-01

    Discusses new studies in neutron physics within the last decade, such as ultracold neutrons, neutron bottles, resonance behavior, subthreshold fission, doubly radiative capture, and neutron stars. (MLH)

  5. Miniature swept source for point of care Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brian D.; Nezam, S.M. Reza Motaghian; Jillella, Priyanka; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    Point of care (POC) medical technologies require portable, small, robust instrumentation for practical implementation. In their current embodiment, optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) systems employ large form-factor wavelength-swept lasers, making them impractical in the POC environment. Here, we describe a first step toward a POC OFDI system by demonstrating a miniaturized swept-wavelength source. The laser is based on a tunable optical filter using a reflection grating and a miniature resonant scanning mirror. The laser achieves 75 nm of bandwidth centered at 1340 nm, a 0.24 nm instantaneous line width, a 15.3 kHz repetition rate with 12 mW peak output power, and a 30.4 kHz A-line rate when utilizing forward and backward sweeps. The entire laser system is approximately the size of a deck of cards and can operate on battery power for at least one hour. PMID:19259202

  6. Chemicapacitors as a versatile platform for miniature gas and vapor sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blue, Robert; Uttamchandani, Deepak

    2017-02-01

    Recent years have seen the rapid growth in the need for sensors throughout all areas of society including environmental sensing, health-care, public safety and manufacturing quality control. To meet this diverse need, sensors have to evolve from specialized and bespoke systems to miniaturized, low-power, low-cost (almost disposable) ubiquitous platforms. A technology that has been developed which gives a route to meet these challenges is the chemicapacitor sensor. To date the commercialization of these sensors has largely been restricted to humidity sensing, but in this review we examine the progress over recent years to expand this sensing technology to a wide range of gases and vapors. From sensors interrogated with laboratory instrumentation, chemicapacitor sensors have evolved into miniaturized units integrated with low power readout electronics that can selectively detect target molecules to ppm and sub-ppm levels within vapor mixtures.

  7. Totally Implantable Wireless Ultrasonic Doppler Blood Flowmeters: Toward Accurate Miniaturized Chronic Monitors.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, Michael A; Unadkat, Jignesh V; Gimbel, Michael L; Mickle, Marlin H; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-03-01

    Totally implantable wireless ultrasonic blood flowmeters provide direct-access chronic vessel monitoring in hard-to-reach places without using wired bedside monitors or imaging equipment. Although wireless implantable Doppler devices are accurate for most applications, device size and implant lifetime remain vastly underdeveloped. We review past and current approaches to miniaturization and implant lifetime extension for wireless implantable Doppler devices and propose approaches to reduce device size and maximize implant lifetime for the next generation of devices. Additionally, we review current and past approaches to accurate blood flow measurements. This review points toward relying on increased levels of monolithic customization and integration to reduce size. Meanwhile, recommendations to maximize implant lifetime should include alternative sources of power, such as transcutaneous wireless power, that stand to extend lifetime indefinitely. Coupling together the results will pave the way for ultra-miniaturized totally implantable wireless blood flow monitors for truly chronic implantation.

  8. Use of a miniature infrared COTS sensor in a several military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrzewa, Joseph; Meyer, William H.; Terre, William A.; Laband, Stanley; Newsome, Gwendolyn W.

    2002-08-01

    The proliferation of small infrared cameras in high-volume commercial applications (e.g. firefighting, law-enforcement, and automotive) presents a tremendous opportunity for truly low-cost military micro-sensors. Indigo Systems Corporation's UL3 OmegaTM camera is a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) thermal imager that offers ultra-small size, light weight, and low power. It employs a 164×120 microbolometer focal plane array (FPA) and is currently entering full-scale production. Furthermore, a 324×240 upgrade is in development. While aimed primarily at the commercial market, small size and low-power consumption make UL3 well-suited for other applications, including miniature unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) weapon-sights, and unattended ground sensors (UGS). This paper focuses on the key features of the UL3 family of miniature IR cameras and their utility in soldier systems.

  9. Laser-induced forward transfer direct-write of miniature sensor and microbattery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pique, Alberto; Arnold, Craig B.; Wartena, Ryan C.; Weir, David W.; Pratap, Bhanu; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.; Kant, Richard A.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2003-02-01

    Direct-Write techniques have the potential to revolutionize the way miniature sensor devices and microbattery systems are designed and fabricated. The Naval Research Laboratory has developed an advanced laser-based forward transfer process for direct writing novel structures and devices comprising of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites under ambient conditions on both ceramic and plastic substrates. Using this forward transfer technique, we have demonstrated the ability to rapidly prototype various types of physical and chemical sensor devices, and microbatteries. The laser forward transfer process is computer controlled which allows the design of the devices to be easily modified and adapted to any specific application. Furthermore, the same process enables the fabrication of complete sensor or power-source systems by incorporating the passive electronic components required for sensor readout or power management. Examples are provided of various types of miniature sensors, and prototype alkaline and Li-ion microbatteries fabricated using this technique.

  10. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  11. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  12. Aerial Neutron Detection: Neutron Signatures for Nonproliferation and Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, Richard J.; Stampahar, Thomas G.; Smith, Ethan X.; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wolff, Ronald S.; Rourke, Timothy J.; LeDonne, Jeffrey P.; Avaro, Emanuele; Butler, D. Andre; Borders, Kevin L.; Stampahar, Jezabel; Schuck, William H.; Selfridge, Thomas L.; McKissack, Thomas M.; Duncan, William W.; Hendricks, Thane J.

    2012-10-17

    From 2007 to the present, the Remote Sensing Laboratory has been conducting a series of studies designed to expand our fundamental understanding of aerial neutron detection with the goal of designing an enhanced sensitivity detection system for long range neutron detection. Over 35 hours of aerial measurements in a helicopter were conducted for a variety of neutron emitters such as neutron point sources, a commercial nuclear power reactor, nuclear reactor spent fuel in dry cask storage, depleted uranium hexafluoride and depleted uranium metal. The goals of the project were to increase the detection sensitivity of our instruments such that a 5.4 × 104 neutron/second source could be detected at 100 feet above ground level at a speed of 70 knots and to enhance the long-range detection sensitivity for larger neutron sources, i.e., detection ranges above 1000 feet. In order to increase the sensitivity of aerial neutron detection instruments, it is important to understand the dynamics of the neutron background as a function of altitude. For aerial neutron detection, studies have shown that the neutron background primarily originates from above the aircraft, being produced in the upper atmosphere by galactic cosmic-ray interactions with air molecules. These interactions produce energetic neutrons and charged particles that cascade to the earth’s surface, producing additional neutrons in secondary collisions. Hence, the neutron background increases as a function of altitude which is an impediment to long-range neutron detection. In order to increase the sensitivity for long range detection, it is necessary to maintain a low neutron background as a function of altitude. Initial investigations show the variation in the neutron background can be decreased with the application of a cosmic-ray shield. The results of the studies along with a representative data set are presented.

  13. Miniature probes for use in gas turbine testing. [component reliability measuring instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    Several examples of miniature probes (null type as well as fixed position) are presented which have proved useful in aircraft and space power systems component testing and are applicable to automotive gas turbine testing. These probes are used to determine component or system performance from the measurement of gas temperature as well as total and static pressure, and flow direction. Detailed drawings of the sensors are presented along with experimental data covering the flow characteristics over the range of intended use.

  14. Neutron Crystallography for Macromolecular Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Ryota

    Hydrogen atoms in proteins as well as protein-bound water molecules play a significant role in many chemical reaction processes in living systems, such as catalytic reaction and molecular recognition. Neutron crystallography is a powerful tool to identify locations of light atoms like hydrogen. In the field of neutron crystallography, the development of diffractometers and techniques for preparation and crystallization of target samples has been developed to complement the low flux of neutron sources. In Japan, single-crystal diffractometers named BIX-3 and BIX-4 have been developed, and contribute to the effective collection of neutron diffraction data. Recent developments on the complementary use of neutron and X-ray diffraction data have begun solving previously undetermined problems of protein function. Further efforts to acquire higher measurement performance are now in progress to increase the application of neutron crystallographic studies.

  15. ^3He neutron spin filters for polarized neutron scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wangchun; Borchers, Julie; Chen, Ying; O'Donovan, Kevin; Erwin, Ross; Lynn, Jeffrey; Majkrzak, Charles; McKenney, Sarah; Gentile, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Polarized neutron scattering (PNS) is a powerful tool that probes the magnetic structures in a wide variety of magnetic materials. Polarized ^3He gas, produced by optical pumping, can be used to polarize or analyze neutron beams because of the strong spin dependence of the neutron absorption cross section for ^3He. Polarized ^3He neutron spin filters (NSF) have been of great interest in PNS community due to recent significant improvement of their performance. Here I will discuss successful applications using ^3He NSFs in polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) and triple-axis spectrometry (TAS). In PNR, a ^3He NSF in conjunction with a position-sensitive detector allows for efficient polarization analysis of off-specular scattering over a broad range of reciprocal space. In TAS, a ^3He NSF in combination with a double focusing pyrolytic graphite monochromator provides greater versatility and higher intensity compared to a Heusler polarizer. Finally I will present the results from patterned magnetically-coupled thin films in PNR and our first ``proof-of-principle'' experiment in TAS, both of which were performed using ^3He NSF(s) at the NIST Center for Neutron Research.

  16. Scintillating Fiber Technology for a High Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Adams, James, Jr.; Christl, Mark; Norwood, Joseph; Watts, John

    2014-01-01

    Develop a compact low-power neutron spectrometer that uniquely identifies neutrons in the mixed radiation field expected on crewed deep-space missions. Secondary neutrons are generated by cosmic rays striking heavy crewed spacecraft as well as lunar and planetary surfaces1,2. It has been shown that secondary neutrons can account for up to 50% if the total dose-equivalent received by the crew.

  17. Conformal Ultracapacitor Power Source Technology for the Miniature Kill Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    extract the nanotubes by dissolution of Al2O3 and iron particles. The nanotubes were then collected by filtration , washed with distilled water and...Nearly rectangular shape loops indicate that internal, interfacial and contact resistances are extremely small in the test sample. Higher resistance of...corresponding discharge counterparts, and no IR drop was observed, indicating that electrical series resistance (ESR) of the electrodes is small. 0

  18. Miniature NMR spectrometer to analyse minerals at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    There are some equipments and apparatuses for the study of interesting astrobiological places as planet Mars and moons Europa, Titan and Enceladus. As for Mars, some robotic missions have already analyzed its atmosphere and surface, using equipment with resolution down to milimetric scale. The NASA's Opportunity and Spirit rovers used microscope to study the sub-surface of the red planet at milimetric depth in drilled holes on rocks. In 1996, a NASA team announced the finding of organic molecules and morphological structures at nanometric scale, inside a meteorite which came from Mars. These possibly could be derived from an ancient Martian signature of biochemical activity, hypothetically, a fossilized `Archae-type' microorgan-ism. . In order to be acquired better resolutions for the mineralogical study of samples of its surface, it is necessary the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers, with which one can obtain detailed astrobiological information below micrometer scale. NMR spectrome-ters are big equipment, but there are already miniature, lightweight, NMR spectrometers being developed which do not contain permanent magnets -they are designed to operate without applied magnetic fields; instead, they exploit the natural magnetic fields of the mineral phases (that contain iron) to be studied. These fields give rise to nuclear magnetic resonance of the isotope 57Fe at frequencies in the approximate range of 60 to 74 MHz. Such instrument has a mass of only 65 g (battery included) and consumes a power of only 0.2 W. It will be interesting the use of NMR spectroscopy at Mars. So, here in this paper, with the objective of the search for hypothetical extinct or extant life on Mars, I propose that in future robotic missions and a possible manned research at Mars, to be used miniature NMR spectrometers -rovers can have at the end of their robotic arms such those spectrometers and also astronauts can use those miniature NMR spectrometers to in-situ do very

  19. Autonomous chemical and biological miniature wireless-sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Bar-Giora

    2005-05-01

    The presentation discusses a new concept and a paradigm shift in biological, chemical and explosive sensor system design and deployment. From large, heavy, centralized and expensive systems to distributed wireless sensor networks utilizing miniature platforms (nodes) that are lightweight, low cost and wirelessly connected. These new systems are possible due to the emergence and convergence of new innovative radio, imaging, networking and sensor technologies. Miniature integrated radio-sensor networks, is a technology whose time has come. These network systems are based on large numbers of distributed low cost and short-range wireless platforms that sense and process their environment and communicate data thru a network to a command center. The recent emergence of chemical and explosive sensor technology based on silicon nanostructures, coupled with the fast evolution of low-cost CMOS imagers, low power DSP engines and integrated radio chips, has created an opportunity to realize the vision of autonomous wireless networks. These threat detection networks will perform sophisticated analysis at the sensor node and convey alarm information up the command chain. Sensor networks of this type are expected to revolutionize the ability to detect and locate biological, chemical, or explosive threats. The ability to distribute large numbers of low-cost sensors over large areas enables these devices to be close to the targeted threats and therefore improve detection efficiencies and enable rapid counter responses. These sensor networks will be used for homeland security, shipping container monitoring, and other applications such as laboratory medical analysis, drug discovery, automotive, environmental and/or in-vivo monitoring. Avaak"s system concept is to image a chromatic biological, chemical and/or explosive sensor utilizing a digital imager, analyze the images and distribute alarm or image data wirelessly through the network. All the imaging, processing and communications

  20. Miniaturized Lab System for Future Cold Atom Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulas, Sascha; Vogt, Christian; Resch, Andreas; Hartwig, Jonas; Ganske, Sven; Matthias, Jonas; Schlippert, Dennis; Wendrich, Thijs; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Maria Rasel, Ernst; Damjanic, Marcin; Weßels, Peter; Kohfeldt, Anja; Luvsandamdin, Erdenetsetseg; Schiemangk, Max; Grzeschik, Christoph; Krutzik, Markus; Wicht, Andreas; Peters, Achim; Herrmann, Sven; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2017-02-01

    We present the technical realization of a compact system for performing experiments with cold 87Rb and 39K atoms in microgravity in the future. The whole system fits into a capsule to be used in the drop tower Bremen. One of the advantages of a microgravity environment is long time evolution of atomic clouds which yields higher sensitivities in atom interferometer measurements. We give a full description of the system containing an experimental chamber with ultra-high vacuum conditions, miniaturized laser systems, a high-power thulium-doped fiber laser, the electronics and the power management. In a two-stage magneto-optical trap atoms should be cooled to the low μK regime. The thulium-doped fiber laser will create an optical dipole trap which will allow further cooling to sub- μK temperatures. The presented system fulfills the demanding requirements on size and power management for cold atom experiments on a microgravity platform, especially with respect to the use of an optical dipole trap. A first test in microgravity, including the creation of a cold Rb ensemble, shows the functionality of the system.

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, H.C.

    1959-01-13

    A neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, fluid cooled tvpe is described. The reactor is comprised of a pressure vessel containing the moderator and a plurality of vertically disposed channels extending in spaced relationship through the moderator. Fissionable fuel material is placed within the channels in spaced relationship thereto to permit circulation of the coolant fluid. Separate means are provided for cooling the moderator and for circulating a fluid coolant thru the channel elements to cool the fuel material.

  2. Neutron Imaging Developments at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Ron; Hunter, James; Schirato, Richard; Vogel, Sven; Swift, Alicia; Ickes, Tim; Ward, Bill; Losko, Adrian; Tremsin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging because of its sensitivity to light elements and greater penetration of high-Z materials. Energy-resolved neutron imaging can provide contrast enhancements for elements and isotopes due to the variations with energy in scattering cross sections due to nuclear resonances. These cross section differences exist due to compound nuclear resonances that are characteristic of each element and isotope, as well as broader resonances at higher energies. In addition, multi-probe imaging, such as combined photon and neutron imaging, is a powerful tool for discerning properties and features in materials that cannot be observed with a single probe. Recently, we have demonstrated neutron imaging, both radiography and computed tomography, using the moderated (Lujan Center) and high-energy (WNR facility) neutron sources at LANSCE. Flat panel x-ray detectors with suitable scintillator-converter screens provide good sensitivity for both low and high neutron energies. Micro-Channel-Plate detectors and iCCD scintillator camera systems that provide the fast time gating needed for energy-resolved imaging have been demonstrated as well. Examples of recent work will be shown including fluid flow in plants and imaging through dense thick objects. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, and performed by Los Alamos National Security LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  3. Miniaturized day/night sight in Soldato Futuro program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, Alberto; Cocchi, Alessandro; Bardazzi, Riccardo; Sardelli, Mauro; Puntri, Stefano

    2013-06-01

    The market of the sights for the 5.56 mm assault rifles is dominated by mainly three types of systems: TWS (Thermal Weapon Sight), the Pocket Scope with Weapon Mount and the Clip-on. The latter are designed primarily for special forces and snipers use, while the TWS design is triggered mainly by the DRI (Detection, Recognition, Identification) requirements. The Pocket Scope design is focused on respecting the SWaP (Size, Weight and Power dissipation) requirements. Compared to the TWS systems, for the last two years there was a significant technological growth of the Pocket Scope/Weapon Mount solutions, concentrated on the compression of the overall dimensions. The trend for the assault rifles is the use of small size/light weight (SWaP) IR sights, suitable mainly for close combat operations but also for extraordinary use as pocket scopes - handheld or helmet mounted. The latest developments made by Selex ES S.p.A. are responding precisely to the above-mentioned trend, through a miniaturized Day/Night sight embedding state-of-the art sensors and using standard protocols (USB 2.0, Bluetooth 4.0) for interfacing with PDAs, Wearable computers, etc., while maintaining the "shoot around the corner" capability. Indeed, inside the miniaturized Day/Night sight architecture, a wireless link using Bluetooth technology has been implemented to transmit the video streaming of the rifle sight to an helmet mounted display. The video of the rifle sight is transmitted only to the eye-piece of the soldier shouldering the rifle.

  4. Miniature Mass Spectrometers on Space and Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinckerhoff, William

    2008-01-01

    Space flight mass spectrometers contribute our understanding of the origin and evolution of our solar system and even of life itself. This fundamental role has motivated increasing interest in miniature mass spectrometry for planetary missions. Several remarkable new instruments are en route or under development to investigate the composition of planetary bodies such as Mars and comets. For instance, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) suite on the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission includes a quadrupole mass spectrometer with a sophisticated gas processing system as well as pyrolysis and chemical derivatization protocols for solid samples. Future missions will require even lighter, lower power, and yet more capable mass spectrometers, particularly to analyze samples in situ on planetary surfaces. We have been developing laser-based mass spectrometers for elemental and organic/molecular analysis of rock, ice, or fine particle samples. These typically use time-of-flight (TOF) mass analyzers, which are readily miniaturized and can detect both atomic species and complex organics that occur in a variety of planetary materials. For example, nonvolatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and kerogen-like macromolecular carbon are found in some carbonaceous meteorites, which derived from asteroid parent bodies. A single focused laser pulse is able to volatilize and ionize some of these compounds for direct TOF analysis. While this is possible without any sample preparation or contact, sensitivity and quantitative performance can improve significantly with some sample handling. As such we have also been examining robotic mechanisms and protocols to accompany space flight mass spectrometers. In addition, sensors in early development may significantly improve these capabilities, via use of techniques such as switchable polarity, ambient pressure, or resonant ionization; tandem mass spectrometry (TOF or ion trap); and chemical imaging.

  5. Miniature Microwave Applicator for Murine Bladder Hyperthermia Studies

    PubMed Central

    Salahi, Sara; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rodrigues, Dario B.; Etienne, Wiguins; Landon, Chelsea D.; Inman, Brant A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Novel combinations of heat with chemotherapeutic agents are often studied in murine tumor models. Currently, no device exists to selectively heat small tumors at depth in mice. In this project, we modelled, built and tested a miniature microwave heat applicator, the physical dimensions of which can be scaled to adjust the volume and depth of heating to focus on the tumor volume. Of particular interest is a device that can selectively heat murine bladder. Materials and Methods Using Avizo® segmentation software, we created a numerical mouse model based on micro-MRI scan data. The model was imported into HFSS™ simulation software and parametric studies were performed to optimize the dimensions of a water-loaded circular waveguide for selective power deposition inside a 0.15ml bladder. A working prototype was constructed operating at 2.45GHz. Heating performance was characterized by mapping fiber-optic temperature sensors along catheters inserted at depths of 0-1mm (subcutaneous), 2-3mm (vaginal), and 4-5mm (rectal) below the abdominal wall, with the mid-depth catheter adjacent to the bladder. Core temperature was monitored orally. Results Thermal measurements confirm the simulations which demonstrate that this applicator can provide local heating at depth in small animals. Measured temperatures in murine pelvis show well-localized bladder heating to 42-43°C while maintaining normothermic skin and core temperatures. Conclusions Simulation techniques facilitate the design optimization of microwave antennas for use in pre-clinical applications such as localized tumor heating in small animals. Laboratory measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of a new miniature water-coupled microwave applicator for localized heating of murine bladder. PMID:22690856

  6. Neutron transport simulation (selected topics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, P.

    2009-10-01

    Neutron transport simulation is usually performed for criticality, power distribution, activation, scattering, dosimetry and shielding problems, among others. During the last fifteen years, innovative technological applications have been proposed (Accelerator Driven Systems, Energy Amplifiers, Spallation Neutron Sources, etc.), involving the utilization of intermediate energies (hundreds of MeV) and high-intensity (tens of mA) proton accelerators impinging in targets of high Z elements. Additionally, the use of protons, neutrons and light ions for medical applications (hadrontherapy) impose requirements on neutron dosimetry-related quantities (such as kerma factors) for biologically relevant materials, in the energy range starting at several tens of MeV. Shielding and activation related problems associated to the operation of high-energy proton accelerators, emerging space-related applications and aircrew dosimetry-related topics are also fields of intense activity requiring as accurate as possible medium- and high-energy neutron (and other hadrons) transport simulation. These applications impose specific requirements on cross-section data for structural materials, targets, actinides and biologically relevant materials. Emerging nuclear energy systems and next generation nuclear reactors also impose requirements on accurate neutron transport calculations and on cross-section data needs for structural materials, coolants and nuclear fuel materials, aiming at improved safety and detailed thermal-hydraulics and radiation damage studies. In this review paper, the state-of-the-art in the computational tools and methodologies available to perform neutron transport simulation is presented. Proton- and neutron-induced cross-section data needs and requirements are discussed. Hot topics are pinpointed, prospective views are provided and future trends identified.

  7. Miniature loops in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barczynski, K.; Peter, H.; Savage, S. L.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Magnetic loops filled with hot plasma are the main building blocks of the solar corona. Usually they have lengths of the order of the barometric scale height in the corona that is 50 Mm. Aims: Previously it has been suggested that miniature versions of hot loops exist. These would have lengths of only 1 Mm barely protruding from the chromosphere and spanning across just one granule in the photosphere. Such short loops are well established at transition region temperatures (0.1 MK), and we investigate if such miniature loops also exist at coronal temperatures (>1 MK). Methods: We used extreme UV (EUV) imaging observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of 0.3'' to 0.4''. Together with EUV imaging and magnetogram data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) data from Hinode we investigated the spatial, temporal and thermal evolution of small loop-like structures in the solar corona above a plage region close to an active region and compared this to a moss area within the active region. Results: We find that the size, motion and temporal evolution of the loop-like features are consistent with photospheric motions, suggesting a close connection to the photospheric magnetic field. Aligned magnetograms show that one of their endpoints is rooted at a magnetic concentration. Their thermal structure, as revealed together with the X-ray observations, shows significant differences to moss-like features. Conclusions: Considering different scenarios, these features are most probably miniature versions of hot loops rooted at magnetic concentrations at opposite sides of a granule in small emerging magnetic loops (or flux tubes).

  8. Fabrication of miniaturized electrostatic deflectors using LIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.H.; Khan-Malek, C.; Muray, L.P.

    1997-04-01

    Miniaturized electron beam columns ({open_quotes}microcolumns{close_quotes}) have been demonstrated to be suitable candidates for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), e-beam lithography and other high resolution, low voltage applications. In the present technology, microcolumns consist of {open_quotes}selectively scaled{close_quotes} micro-sized lenses and apertures, fabricated from silicon membranes with e-beam lithography, reactive ion beam etching and other semiconductor thin-film techniques. These miniaturized electron-optical elements provide significant advantages over conventional optics in performance and ease of fabrication. Since lens aberrations scale roughly with size, it is possible to fabricate simple microcolumns with extremely high brightness sources and electrostatic objective lenses, with resolution and beam current comparable to conventional e-beam columns. Moreover since microcolumns typically operate at low voltages (1 KeV), the proximity effects encountered in e-beam lithography become negligible. For high throughput applications, batch fabrication methods may be used to build large parallel arrays of microcolumns. To date, the best reported performance with a 1 keV cold field emission cathode, is 30 nm resolution at a working distance of 2mm in a 3.5mm column. Fabrication of the microcolumn deflector and stigmator, however, have remained beyond the capabilities of conventional machining operations and semiconductor processing technology. This work examines the LIGA process as a superior alternative to fabrication of the deflectors, especially in terms of degree of miniaturization, dimensional control, placement accuracy, run-out, facet smoothness and choice of suitable materials. LIGA is a combination of deep X-ray lithography, electroplating, and injection molding processes which allow the fabrication of microstructures.

  9. Miniaturized Mid-Infrared Sensor Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Young, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2007-08-16

    Fundamental vibrational and rotational modes associated with most inorganic and organic molecules are spectroscopically accessible within the mid-infrared (MIR; 3-20 {micro}m) regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The interaction between MIR photons and organic molecules provides particularly sharp transitions, which - despite the wide variety of organic molecules - provide unique MIR absorption spectra reflecting the molecularly characteristic arrangement of chemical bonds within the probed molecules via the frequency position of the associated vibrational and rotational transitions. Given the inherent molecular selectivity and achievable sensitivity, MIR spectroscopy provides an ideal platform for optical sensing applications. Despite this potential, early MIR sensing applications were limited to localized applications due to the size of the involved instrumentation, and limited availability of appropriately compact MIR optical components including light sources, detectors, waveguides, and spectrometers. During the last decades, engineering advances in photonics and optical engineering have facilitated the translation of benchtop-style MIR spectroscopy into miniaturized optical sensing schemes providing a footprint compatible with portable instrumentation requirements for field deployable analytical tools. In this trend article, we will discuss recent advances and future strategies for miniaturizing MIR sensor technology. The Beer-Lambert law implies that achievable limit of detection (LOD) for any optical sensor system improves by increasing the interaction length between photons and target analyte species such as e.g., folding the optical path multiple times as in multi-pass gas phase sensing; however, this governing paradigm naturally leads to an increase in system dimensions. Hence, miniaturization of optical sensing system requires scaling down of each optical component, yet improving the performance of each optical element within a smaller form factor for

  10. Neutron instrumentation for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    In the October 1994 round of proposals at the ILL, the external biology review sub- committee was asked to allocate neutron beam time to a wide range of experiments, on almost half the total number of scheduled neutron instruments: on 3 diffractometers, on 3 small angle scattering instruments, and on some 6 inelastic scattering spectrometers. In the 3.5 years since the temporary reactor shutdown, the ILL`s management structure has been optimized, budgets and staff have been trimmed, the ILL reactor has been re-built, and many of the instruments up-graded, many powerful (mainly Unix) workstations have been introduced, and the neighboring European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has established itself as the leading synchrotron radiation source and has started its official user program. The ILL reactor remains the world`s most intense dedicated neutron source. In this challenging context, it is of interest to review briefly the park of ILL instruments used to study the structure and energetics of small and large biological systems. A brief summary will be made of each class of experiments actually proposed in the latest ILL proposal round.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, W.B.; Corbin, A. Jr.

    1961-07-18

    An improved core for a gas-cooled power reactor which admits gas coolant at high temperatures while affording strong integral supporting structure and efficient moderation of neutrons is described. The multiplicities of fuel elements constituting the critical amassment of fissionable material are supported and confined by a matrix of metallic structure which is interspersed therebetween. Thermal insulation is interposed between substantially all of the metallic matrix and the fuel elements; the insulation then defines the principal conduit system for conducting the coolant gas in heat-transfer relationship with the fuel elements. The metallic matrix itseif comprises a system of ducts through which an externally-cooled hydrogeneous liquid, such as water, is circulated to serve as the principal neutron moderant for the core and conjointly as the principal coolant for the insulated metallic structure. In this way, use of substantially neutron transparent metals, such as aluminum, becomes possible for the supporting structure, despite the high temperatures of the proximate gas. The Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion program's "R-1" reactor design is a preferred embodiment.

  12. Miniature Robotic Submarine for Exploring Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Bruhn, Fredrik; Carsey, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The miniature autonomous submersible explorer (MASE) has been proposed as a means of scientific exploration -- especially, looking for signs of life -- in harsh, relatively inaccessible underwater environments. Basically, the MASE would be a small instrumented robotic submarine (see figure) that could launch itself or could be launched from another vehicle. Examples of environments that might be explored by use of the MASE include subglacial lakes, deep-ocean hydrothermal vents, acidic or alkaline lakes, brine lenses in permafrost, and ocean regions under Antarctic ice shelves.

  13. Endocrine alopecia in a miniature poodle.

    PubMed

    Allan, F J; Jones, B R; Purdie, E C

    1995-06-01

    Hypothyroidism and concurrent sex hormone imbalance associated with alopecia was diagnosed in a 5 year-old entire male Miniature Poodle. The dog had a 3-year history of alopecia, seborrhoea and recurrent superficial pyoderma. Abnormal thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test results supported a diagnosis of hypothyroidism. Partial hair regrowth occurred after interstitial cell tumours, which were present in both testicles, were removed by castration. Complete hair regrowth, however, occurred only after thyroid hormone supplementation. This case highlighted difficulties which may be encountered when interpreting serum hormone concentrations and endocrine function tests.

  14. Miniaturized bendable 400 MHz artificial magnetic conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presse, Anthony; Tarot, Anne-Claude

    2016-04-01

    A bendable artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) with a resonant frequency of 400 MHz is proposed. The dimensions of the unit cell are 50 × 50 mm2 or 0.07 × 0.07 λ0. The miniaturization is achieved with closely coupled patches printed on each side of a 0.127-mm-thick dielectric substrate. This last one is stacked on a flexible 3-mm-thick silicone over a ground plane. An AMC prototype is simulated and manufactured. Also, a printed inverted-F antenna is used to highlight the bandwidth of the AMC.

  15. Miniature ruggedized optical correlator for flight testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karins, James P.; Mills, Stuart A.; Szegedi, N. J.; Ryan, James R.; Kelly, Louis G., Jr.; Goldstein, Dennis H.; Augustus, Eric P.; Wangler, Richard J.

    1994-03-01

    An electro-optic processor (EOP) incorporating a miniature ruggedized optical correlator (MROC) has been fabricated for use on a remotely piloted vehicle (RPV). The EOP consists of a single-board computer for system control, a MaxVideo 20 card for interfacing to the sensor and performing image processing functions, and an MROC module. The MROC and associated electronics (SLM drive electronics, CCD readout electronics, laser controller, preprocessor, and controller) are configured in a chassis that is placed into an RPV with a visible camera for signal input and a telemetry system for output of the optical processor to the ground.

  16. Surface-micromachined miniature rf switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fangmin; Lai, Zongsheng; Zhu, Ziqiang; Fan, Zhong; Long, Yongfu; Yang, Gen Q.; Ge, Xiaohong; Chen, Siqin; Xie, Jianfang

    2001-09-01

    A surface micromachined miniature switch has been made on silicon substrate using an electroplated gold micro-beam as the cantilevered arm, a chromium-to-gold electrical contact, and electrostatic actuation as the switching mechanism. The switch has an electrical isolation of -30dB in the 'off' state and an insertion loss of 4-7dB form 1 to 10 Ghz with a return loss of -15dB in the 'on' state. The high insertion loss has attributed to generation of parasitic current in low resistivity of the silicon substrate.

  17. A plasma-shielded, miniature Rogowski probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, E.; Furno, I.; Intrator, T.; Hemsing, E.

    2003-12-01

    The design and first results from an electrically isolated and plasma-shielded Rogowski probe, used in the reconnection scaling experiment (RSX), are presented. The probe is designed to withstand extreme thermal shock, plasma corrosion, and be vacuum sanitary, which is accomplished with a machinable boron nitride shell. The novel miniature design, with an inner detecting area of 0.79 cm2, allows accurate position detection of plasma current channels with ≈2 cm radius and to measure local current density profiles. The temporal resolution (<1 μs) is sufficiently high to resolve the dynamic evolution of RSX plasma current channels.

  18. A miniature solid propellant rocket motor

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C.; Hagan, M.; Mulligan, E.

    1997-08-01

    A miniature solid-propellant rocket motor has been developed to impart a specific motion to an object deployed in space. This rocket motor effectively eliminated the need for a cold-gas thruster system or mechanical spin-up system. A low-energy igniter, an XMC4397, employing a semiconductor bridge was used to ignite the rocket motor. The rocket motor was ground-tested in a vacuum tank to verify predicted space performance and successfully flown in a Sandia National Laboratories flight vehicle program.

  19. A miniature chemiresistor sensor for carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Srinives, Sira; Sarkar, Tapan; Hernandez, Raul; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-05-18

    A carpet-like nanostructure of polyaniline (PANI) nanothin film functionalized with poly(ethyleneimine), PEI, was used as a miniature chemiresistor sensor for detection of CO2 at room temperature. Good sensing performance was observed upon exposing the PEI-PANI device to 50-5000 ppm CO2 in presence of humidity with negligible interference from ammonia, carbon monoxide, methane and nitrogen dioxide. The sensing mechanism relied on acid-base reaction, CO2 dissolution and amine-catalyzed hydration that yielded carbamates and carbonic acid for a subsequent pH detection. The sensing device showed reliable results in detecting an unknown concentration of CO2 in air.

  20. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.