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Sample records for power repetitively pulsed

  1. High power repetitive TEA CO2 pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guilong; Li, Dianjun; Xie, Jijiang; Zhang, Laiming; Chen, Fei; Guo, Jin; Guo, Lihong

    2012-07-01

    A high power repetitive spark-pin UV-preionized TEA CO2 laser system is presented. The discharge for generating laser pulses is controlled by a rotary spark switch and a high voltage pulsed trigger. Uniform glow discharge between two symmetrical Chang-electrodes is realized by using an auto-inversion circuit. A couple of high power axial-flow fans with the maximum wind speed of 80 m/s are used for gas exchange between the electrodes. At a repetitive operation, the maximum average output laser power of 10.4 kW 10.6 μm laser is obtained at 300 Hz, with an electro-optical conversion efficiency of 15.6%. At single pulsed operation, more pumping energy and higher gases pressures can be injected, and the maximum output laser energy of 53 J is achieved.

  2. Repetitive high energy pulsed power technology development for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, L.X.; Reed, K.R.; Kaye, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    The technology base for Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) was originally developed to support defense program applications. As RHEPP technology matures, its potential for use in commercial applications can be explored based on inherent strengths of high average power, high dose rate, cost efficient scaling with power, and potential for long life performance. The 300 kW, 2 MeV RHEPP II accelerator is now in operation as a designated DOE User Facility, exploring applications where high dose-rate (> 10{sup 8} Gy/s) may be advantageous, or very high average power is needed to meet throughput requirements. Material surface and bulk property modification, food safety, and large-scale timber disinfestation are applications presently under development. Work is also in progress to generate the reliability database required for the design of 2nd generation systems.

  3. A repetitive long-pulse power generator based on pulse forming network and linear transformer driver.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjia; Kang, Qiang; Tan, Jie; Zhang, Faqiang; Luo, Min; Xiang, Fei

    2016-06-01

    A compact module for long-pulse power generator, based on Blumlein pulse forming network (PFN), was designed. Two Blumlein PFNs with L-type configuration and 20 Ω characteristic impedance were connected symmetrically to the primary coil of the linear transformer driver (LTD) and driven by an identical high voltage spark switch to ensure two Blumlein PFNs synchronizing operation. The output pulse of the module connected with 10 Ω water load is about 135 kV in amplitude and 200 ns in duration with a rise time of ∼50 ns and a flat top of ∼100 ns. On this basis, a repetitive long-pulse power generator based on PFN-LTD has been developed, which was composed of four modules. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved on planar diode: output voltage amplitude of ∼560 kV, output current amplitude of ∼10 kA at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The generator operates stable and outputs more than 10(4) pulses. Meanwhile, the continuous operating time of the generator is up to 60 s.

  4. Power neodymium-glass amplifier of a repetitively pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Aleksandr V.; Gaganov, V. E.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Krotov, V. A.; Martynenko, S. P.; Pozdnyakov, E. V.; Solomatin, I. I.

    2011-11-01

    A neodymium-glass diode-pumped amplifier with a zigzag laser beam propagation through the active medium was elaborated; the amplifier is intended for operation in a repetitively pulsed laser. An amplifier unit with an aperture of 20 × 25 mm and a ~40-cm long active medium was put to a test. The energy of pump radiation amounts to 140 J at a wavelength of 806 nm for a pump duration of 550 μs. The energy parameters of the amplifier were experimentally determined: the small-signal gain per pass ~3.2, the linear gain ~0.031 cm-1 with a nonuniformity of its distribution over the aperture within 15%, the stored energy of 0.16 — 0.21 J cm-3. The wavefront distortions in the zigzag laser-beam propagation through the active element of the amplifier did not exceed 0.4λ (λ = 0.63 μm is the probing radiation wavelength).

  5. Superionic conductor repetitive opening switches for advanced pulse power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, James F.

    1987-06-01

    The initial phase of investigation has been completed to analyze an unusual photo-electric effect in the superionic conductor silver iodide tungstate (Ag13I9W2O8). This material exhibits a sharp decrease in electrical conductivity upon illumination with laser light (in contrast to the increase observed for all other known materials), which suggests its potential use as a very fast, repetitive opening switch. Work this year reveals a previously unknown aging process that may preclude commercial development of such an opening switch. This was independently discovered by Suthanthiraraj this year (Bull. Electrochem. 2, 553 (1986). In the dark, the power drops by 84% after 125 days, when utilized as a battery; similar degradation occurs for use as a switch. The presence of laser light greatly accelerates the aging. A very fast all-operational-amplifier circuit has been designed and fabricated to measure optical response of this material; however, the need to use fresh samples for reproducible results complicates the program.

  6. Single and repetitive short-pulse high-power microwave window breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Tang, C. X.; Shao, H.; Chen, C. H.; Huang, W. H.

    2010-05-15

    The mechanisms of high-power microwave breakdown for single and repetitive short pulses are analyzed. By calculation, multipactor saturation with electron density much higher than the critical plasma density is found not to result in microwave cutoff. It is local high pressure about Torr class that rapid plasma avalanche and final breakdown are realized in a 10-20 ns short pulse. It is found by calculation that the power deposited by saturated multipactor and the rf loss of protrusions are sufficient to induce vaporizing surface material and enhancing the ambient pressure in a single short pulse. For repetitive pulses, the accumulation of heat and plasma may respectively carbonize the surface material and lower the repetitive breakdown threshold.

  7. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    PubMed

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  8. Power scaling of supercontinuum seeded megahertz-repetition rate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Riedel, R; Stephanides, A; Prandolini, M J; Gronloh, B; Jungbluth, B; Mans, T; Tavella, F

    2014-03-15

    Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers with high average power are possible with novel high-power Yb:YAG amplifiers with kW-level output powers. We demonstrate a compact wavelength-tunable sub-30-fs amplifier with 11.4 W average power with 20.7% pump-to-signal conversion efficiency. For parametric amplification, a beta-barium borate crystal is pumped by a 140 W, 1 ps Yb:YAG InnoSlab amplifier at 3.25 MHz repetition rate. The broadband seed is generated via supercontinuum generation in a YAG crystal.

  9. High power high repetition rate VCSEL array side-pumped pulsed blue laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Robert; Zhao, Pu; Chen, Tong; Xu, Bing; Watkins, Laurence; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2013-03-01

    High power, kW-class, 808 nm pump modules based on the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) technology were developed for side-pumping of solid-state lasers. Two 1.2 kW VCSEL pump modules were implemented in a dual side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 946 nm. The laser output was frequency doubled in a BBO crystal to produce pulsed blue light. With 125 μs pump pulses at a 300 Hz repetition rate 6.1 W QCW 946 nm laser power was produced. The laser power was limited by thermal lensing in the Nd:YAG rod.

  10. Pulse repetition rate scaling from 5 to 100 GHz with a high-power semiconductor disk laser.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Mario; Zaugg, Christian A; Link, Sandro M; Golling, Matthias; Tilma, Bauke W; Keller, Ursula

    2014-03-10

    The high-power semiconductor laser studied here is a modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser (MIXSEL), which combines the gain of vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) with the saturable absorber of a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) in a single semiconductor layer stack. The MIXSEL concept allows for stable and self-starting fundamental passive modelocking in a simple straight cavity and the average power scaling is based on the semiconductor disk laser concept. Previously record-high average output power from an optically pumped MIXSEL was demonstrated, however the long pulse duration of 17 ps prevented higher pulse repetition rates and many interesting applications such as supercontinuum generation and broadband frequency comb generation. With a novel MIXSEL structure, the first femtosecond operation was then demonstrated just recently. Here we show that such a MIXSEL can also support pulse repetition rate scaling from ≈5 GHz to >100 GHz with excellent beam quality and high average output power, by mechanically changing the cavity length of the linear straight cavity and the output coupler. Up to a pulse repetition rate of 15 GHz we obtained average output power >1 W and pulse durations <4 ps. Furthermore we have been able to demonstrate the highest pulse repetition rate from any fundamentally modelocked semiconductor disk laser with 101.2 GHz at an average output power of 127 mW and a pulse duration of 570 fs.

  11. High Power, Repetitive, Stacked Blumlein Pulse Generators Commuted by a Single Switching Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawalkar, Jayant Dilip

    In this work, the stacked Blumlein pulsers developed at the University of Texas at Dallas were characterized and shown to be versatile sources of pulse power for a variety of applications. These devices consisted of several triaxial Blumleins stacked in series at one end. The lines were charged in parallel and synchronously commuted repetitively with a single switching element at the other end. In this way, relatively low charging voltages were multiplied to give a high discharge voltage across an arbitrary load without the need for complex Marx bank circuitry. Several pulser parameters such as the number of stacked Blumlein lines, line configuration, type of switching element, and the length of the lines, were varied and the waveform characteristics were observed and analyzed. It was shown that these devices are capable of generating fast rising waveforms with a wide range of peak voltage and current values. The generation of high power waveforms with pulse durations in the range of 80-600 ns was demonstrated without degradation of the voltage gains. The results of this work indicated that unlike generators based on stacked transmission lines, the effects of parasitic modes were not appreciable for the stacked Blumlein pulsers. Opportunities for tactically packaging these pulsers were also investigated and a significant reduction in their size and weight was demonstrated. For this, dielectric lifetime and Blumlein spacing studies were performed on small scale prototypes. In addition to production of intense X-ray pulses, the possible applications for these novel pulsers include driving magnetrons for high power microwave generation, pumping laser media, or powering e-beam diodes. They could also serve as compact, tabletop sources of high power pulses for various research experiments.

  12. High-power pulse repetitive HF(DF) laser with a solid-state pump generator

    SciTech Connect

    Velikanov, S D; Domazhirov, A P; Zaretskiy, N A; Kromin, A A; Sivachev, A A; Kharitonov, S V; Tsykin, V S; Shchurov, V V; Yutkin, I M; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Podlesnykh, S V; Firsov, K N

    2015-11-30

    Operation of a repetitively pulsed electric-discharge HF(DF) laser with an all-solid-state pump generator based on FID switches is demonstrated. The energy stored in the pump generator capacitors was 880 J at an open-circuit voltage of 240 kV and a discharge pulse repetition rate of 25 Hz. The specific energy extractions were 3.8 and 3.4 J L{sup -1} for the HF and DF lasers, respectively. The possibilities of improving the output laser characteristics are discussed. (lasers)

  13. NEO-LISP: Deflecting near-Earth objects using high average power, repetitively pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, C. R.; Michaelis, M. M.

    Several kinds of Near-Earth objects exist for which one would like to cause modest orbit perturbations, but which are inaccessible to normal means of interception because of their number, distance or the lack of early warning. For these objects, LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) is an appropriate technique for rapidly applying the required mechanical impulse from a ground-based station. In order of increasing laser energy required, examples are: (1) repositioning specially prepared geosynchronous satellites for an enhanced lifetime; (2) causing selected items of space junk to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere on a computed trajectory; and (3) safely deflecting Earth-directed comet nuclei and earth-crossing asteroids (ECA's) a few tens of meters in size (the most hazardous size). They will discuss each of these problems in turn and show that each application is best matched by its own matrix of LISP laser pulse width, pulse repetition rate, wavelength and average power. The latter ranges from 100W to 3GW for the cases considered. They will also discuss means of achieving the active beam phase error correction during passage through the atmosphere and very large exit pupil in the optical system which are required in each of these cases.

  14. NEO-LISP: Deflecting near-earth objects using high average power, repetitively pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.; Michaelis, M.M.

    1994-10-01

    Several kinds of Near-Earth objects exist for which one would like to cause modest orbit perturbations, but which are inaccessible to normal means of interception because of their number, distance or the lack of early warning. For these objects, LISP (Laser Impulse Space Propulsion) is an appropriate technique for rapidly applying the required mechanical impulse from a ground-based station. In order of increasing laser energy required, examples are: (1) repositioning specially prepared geosynchronous satellites for an enhanced lifetime, (2) causing selected items of space junk to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere on a computed trajectory, and (3) safely deflecting Earth-directed comet nuclei and earth-crossing asteroids (ECA`s) a few tens of meters in size (the most hazardous size). They will discuss each of these problems in turn and show that each application is best matched by its own matrix of LISP laser pulse width, pulse repetition rate, wavelength and average power. The latter ranges from 100W to 3GW for the cases considered. They will also discuss means of achieving the active beam phase error correction during passage through the atmosphere and very large exit pupil in the optical system which are required in each of these cases.

  15. High-Power fiber amplifier with widely tunable repetition rate, fixed pulse duration, and multiple output wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Paul E; Farrow, Roger L; Kliner, Dahv A V; Fève, Jean-Philippe; Landru, Nicolas

    2006-11-27

    We report a pulsed, fiber-amplified microchip laser providing widely tunable repetition rate (7.1 - 27 kHz) with constant pulse duration (1.0 ns), pulse energy up to 0.41 mJ, linear output polarization, diffraction-limited beam quality (M(2) < 1.2), and < 1% pulse-energy fluctuations. The pulse duration was shown to minimize nonlinear effects that cause temporal and spectral distortion of the amplified pulses. This source employs passive Q-switching, single-stage single-pass amplification, and cw pumping, thus offering high efficiency, simplicity, and compact, rugged packaging for use in practical applications. The high peak power and high beam quality make this system an ideal pump source for nonlinear frequency conversion, and we demonstrated efficient harmonic generation and optical parametric generation of wavelengths from 213 nm to 4.4 mum with Watt-level output powers.

  16. Influence of Pulse Repetition Frequency on 3-D Power Doppler Quantification.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos A M; Pavan, Theo Z; Miyague, Andre H; Kudla, Marek; Martins, Wellington P

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional power Doppler quantification has limited application because of its high dependency on attenuation. The purpose of the study described here was to assess if different degrees of attenuation, depending on pulse repetition frequency (PRF) adjustment, alter 3-D power Doppler quantification in a region of 100% moving blood when using vascularization index, flow index and vascularization flow index (VFI). A cubic-shaped gelatin phantom with a 1.8-mm-internal-diameter silicon tube was used. The tube, placed at 45° to the phantom's surface, was filled with blood-mimicking fluid with as constant maximum velocity of 30 cm/s. Two different attenuation blocks (low and high attenuation) were alternatively placed between the phantom and the transvaginal transducer. One single observer acquired 10 data sets for each PRF level from 0.3 to 7.5 kHz, using the high- and low-attenuation blocks, for a total of 200 3-D power Doppler data sets. We assessed VFI from 1.5-mm-diameter spherical samples, virtually placed inside the tube, always at the same position. No difference was noted between high- and low-attenuation VFI values when using a PRF of 0.3 kHz. As PRF increased, it was observed that VFI quantification progressively differed between low and high attenuation. Also, a slope on VFI values for both high- and low-attenuation models could be observed when increasing PRF, particularly above 4.0 kHz. We concluded that PRF adjustment is very relevant when using VFI to quantify 3-D power Doppler signal.

  17. 500 MW peak power degenerated optical parametric amplifier delivering 52 fs pulses at 97 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-09

    We present a high peak power degenerated parametric amplifier operating at 1030 nm and 97 kHz repetition rate. Pulses of a state-of-the art fiber chirped-pulse amplification (FCPA) system with 840 fs pulse duration and 410 microJ pulse energy are used as pump and seed source for a two stage optical parametric amplifier. Additional spectral broadening of the seed signal in a photonic crystal fiber creates enough bandwidth for ultrashort pulse generation. Subsequent amplification of the broadband seed signal in two 1 mm BBO crystals results in 41 microJ output pulse energy. Compression in a SF 11 prism compressor yields 37 microJ pulses as short as 52 fs. Thus, pulse shortening of more than one order of magnitude is achieved. Further scaling in terms of average power and pulse energy seems possible and will be discussed, since both concepts involved, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier have the reputation to be immune against thermo-optical effects.

  18. On the possibility of using a corner-cube reflector in resonators of high-power repetitively pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulaev, V. D.; Gusev, V. S.; Lysenko, S. L.; Morozov, Yu B.; Poznyshev, A. N.

    2012-08-01

    An optical cavity with a highly reflecting mirror in the form of a hollow corner-cube reflector (CCR) made of uncooled plane metal mirrors, which, in combination with a plane semitransparent output mirror, ensures complete filling of the output laser beam aperture, is studied. It is shown that, both in the pulsed and repetitively pulsed regimes of high-power far- and mid-IR lasers, it is possible to achieve beam divergence close to the diffraction limit (taking into account the drift of the radiation pattern axis) and dependent only on the quality of surfaces and accuracy of alignment of the hollow CCR mirrors and the resonator.

  19. High-average-power 2 μm few-cycle optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier at 100 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Yariv; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Demmler, Stefan; Tschernajew, Maxim; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Sources of long wavelengths few-cycle high repetition rate pulses are becoming increasingly important for a plethora of applications, e.g., in high-field physics. Here, we report on the realization of a tunable optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier at 100 kHz repetition rate. At a central wavelength of 2 μm, the system delivered 33 fs pulses and a 6 W average power corresponding to 60 μJ pulse energy with gigawatt-level peak powers. Idler absorption and its crystal heating is experimentally investigated for a BBO. Strategies for further power scaling to several tens of watts of average power are discussed.

  20. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, V M; El'tsov, A V; Khristoforov, O B

    2015-08-31

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse{sup -1}, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ ≤ 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system. (lasers)

  1. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, V. M.; El'tsov, A. V.; Khristoforov, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al2O3 ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse-1, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ <= 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system.

  2. High-power sub-two-cycle mid-infrared pulses at 100 MHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupeza, I.; Sánchez, D.; Zhang, J.; Lilienfein, N.; Seidel, M.; Karpowicz, N.; Paasch-Colberg, T.; Znakovskaya, I.; Pescher, M.; Schweinberger, W.; Pervak, V.; Fill, E.; Pronin, O.; Wei, Z.; Krausz, F.; Apolonski, A.; Biegert, J.

    2015-11-01

    Powerful coherent light with a spectrum spanning the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range is crucial for a number of applications in natural as well as life sciences, but so far has only been available from large-scale synchrotron sources. Here we present a compact apparatus that generates pulses with a sub-two-cycle duration and with an average power of 0.1 W and a spectral coverage of 6.8-16.4 μm (at -30 dB). The demonstrated source combines, for the first time in this spectral region, a high power, a high repetition rate and phase coherence. The MIR pulses emerge via difference-frequency generation (DFG) driven by the nonlinearly compressed pulses of a Kerr-lens mode-locked ytterbium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Yb:YAG) thin-disc oscillator. The resultant 100 MHz MIR pulse train is hundreds to thousands of times more powerful than state-of-the-art frequency combs that emit in this range, and offers a high dynamic range for spectroscopy in the molecular fingerprint region and an ideal prerequisite for hyperspectral imaging as well as for the time-domain coherent control of vibrational dynamics.

  3. Repetitively pulsed vacuum insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Buttram, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the flashover strength of various vacuum insulators under conditions of repetitive pulsing. The pulse duration was 30 ns, and the thickness of a typical insulator sample was 1.8 cm. Data were taken for 45 insulators from five different materials. An insulator was subjected to an extended series of pulses at a given repetition rate and field. If flashover was not detected, the field level was increased and the sequence repeated. At rates up to 50 pulses per second, there was no apparent dependence of flashover field on rate. In addition, some ''single shot'' data were taken, including various modifications of the geometries and surface textures of the insulators. Only two to the modifications increased the flashover strength significantly over that of a 45 sample: (1) annealing some plastics (roughly a 35% increase), and (2) extending the insulator to cover the surfaces of both electrodes (an increase of nearly a factor of two).

  4. MW peak-power, mJ pulse energy, multi-kHz repetition rate pulses from Yb-doped fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Teodoro, Fabio; Brooks, Christopher D.

    2006-02-01

    We report on pulsed fiber-based sources generating high peak and average powers in beams of excellent spectral/spatial quality. In the first setup, a ~10-kHz pulse repetition rate (PRR), 1ns-pulse, Q-switched microlaser seeded a dual-stage amplifier featuring a 40-μm-core Yb-doped photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) as the power amplifier. From this amplifier, we obtained diffraction-limited (M2 = 1.05), ~1ns pulses of 1.1mJ energy, ~1.1MW peak power, ~10.2W average-power, spectral linewidth ~9GHz, negligible nonlinearities, and slope efficiency >73%. In the second setup, we replaced the seed source with a shorter-pulse (<500ps) microchip laser of PRR ~13.4 kHz and obtained diffraction-limited (M2=1.05), ~450ps pulses of energy >0.7mJ, peak power in excess of 1.5 MW, average power ~9.5W, spectral linewidth <35 GHz. To show further power scaling, these pulses were amplified in a 140-μmcore Yb-doped fiber, which yielded multimode (M2 ~ 9), 2.2mJ-energy, 30-W average-power pulses of peak power in excess of 4.5MW, the highest ever obtained in a fiber source, to our knowledge. In the third setup, an Yb-doped, 70μmcore, intrinsically single-mode photonic-crystal rod was used to generate diffraction-limited (M2 ~ 1.1), ~10kHz PRR, ~1ns pulses of 2.05mJ energy, >2 MW peak-power (the highest ever reported in a diffraction-limited fiber source), ~20W average-power, ~13 GHz spectral linewidth, and spectral signal-to-noise ratio >50 dB. Finally, a single polarization large-core Yb-doped PCF was used to demonstrate high-peak-power harmonic generation. We obtained ~1ns pulses of peak powers >410 kW in the green (531nm) and >190kW in the UV (265.5 nm).

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Application of deformable mirrors in industrial CO2 lasers. II. Intracavity power control and repetitively pulsed modulation of output radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinevich, B. S.; Evdokimovich, L. N.; Safronov, A. G.; Smirnov, S. N.

    2004-04-01

    Industrial CO2 lasers of various types with stable cavities, which contain deformable mirrors with a controllable curvature of the reflecting surface, are studied experimentally. Stable and reproducible control of the output power of industrial CO2 lasers is achieved in both single-mode and multimode regimes until the complete lasing quenching. Stable repetitively pulsed lasing regimes with a pulse repetition rate varied from a few to several hundred hertz are obtained in cw CO2 lasers. The shapes of the output laser pulses and the dependence of the mean output power on the frequency — time parameters of the control voltage applied to the intracavity deformable mirror are studied.

  6. Octave-spanning OPCPA system delivering CEP-stable few-cycle pulses and 22 W of average power at 1 MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, Jan; Demmler, Stefan; Hädrich, Steffen; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2012-05-07

    We report on an OPCPA system delivering CEP-stable pulses with a pulse duration of only 1.7 optical cycles at 880 nm wavelength. This pulse duration is achieved by the generation, optical parametric amplification and compression of a full optical octave of bandwidth. The system is pumped by a high average power Yb-fiber laser system, which allows for operation of the OPCPA at up to 1 MHz repetition rate and 22 W of average output power. Further scaling towards single-cycle pulses, higher energy and output power is discussed.

  7. Numerical simulation of high-power virtual-cathode reflex triode driven by repetitive short pulse electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Yovchev, I.G.; Spassovsky, I.P.; Nikolov, N.A.; Dimitrov, D.P.; Messina, G.; Raimondi, P.; Barroso, J.J.; Correa, R.A.

    1996-06-01

    A virtual-cathode reflex triode is investigated by numerical simulations. A trapezoidal in shape voltage pulse with an amplitude of 300 kV is applied to the solid cathode of the device to drive the cathode negative. The electron beam-to-microwave power conversion efficiency {epsilon}, calculated for the pulse flat top with a duration {tau}{sub ft} = 1.2 ns is approximately the same (about 1.5--2%) as well as for a long flat top ({tau}{sub ft} = 4 ns). The simulations show a 10--15% increase of {epsilon} at {tau}{sub ft} shortening to 0.6 ns. However, this occurs when the anode mesh transparency is high (80--90%). Considerable enhancement of the efficiency (about four times) for {tau}{sub ft} = 0.6 ns has been calculated if the cathode side surface is brought near to the anode tube (from {approx}0.5% at cathode radius R{sub c} = 1.6 cm to {approx}2% at R{sub c} = 3.8 cm). The obtained results would find an application for the design of virtual-cathode reflex triode devices driven by a short pulse and high repetition rate electron gun.

  8. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R. Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  9. Tunable GHz pulse repetition rate operation in high-power TEM(00)-mode Nd:YLF lasers at 1047 nm and 1053 nm with self mode locking.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y J; Tzeng, Y S; Tang, C Y; Huang, Y P; Chen, Y F

    2012-07-30

    We report on a high-power diode-pumped self-mode-locked Nd:YLF laser with the pulse repetition rate up to several GHz. A novel tactic is developed to efficiently select the output polarization state for achieving the stable TEM(00)-mode self-mode-locked operations at 1053 nm and 1047 nm, respectively. At an incident pump power of 6.93 W and a pulse repetition rate of 2.717 GHz, output powers as high as 2.15 W and 1.35 W are generated for the σ- and π-polarization, respectively. We experimentally find that decreasing the separation between the gain medium and the input mirror not only brings in the pulse shortening thanks to the enhanced effect of the spatial hole burning, but also effectively introduces the effect of the spectral filtering to lead the Nd:YLF laser to be in a second harmonic mode-locked status. Consequently, pulse durations as short as 8 ps and 8.5 ps are obtained at 1053 nm and 1047 nm with a pulse repetition rate of 5.434 GHz.

  10. Investigation of a repetitive pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Fleischer, D.; Goldstein, S. A.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster with 1000:1 ratio nozzle is tested in a repetitive mode on water propellant. The thruster is driven by a 60J pulse forming network at repetition rates up to 10 Hz (600W). The pulse forming network has a .31 ohm impedance, well matched to the capillary discharge resistance of .40 ohm, and is directly coupled to the thruster electrodes without a switch. The discharge is initiated by high voltage breakdown, typically at 2500V, through the water vapor in the interelectrode gap. Water is injected as a jet through a .37 mm orifice on the thruster axis. Thruster voltage, current and impulse bit are recorded for several seconds at various power supply currents. Thruster to power ratio is typically T/P = .07 N/kW. Tank background pressure precludes direct measurement of exhaust velocity which is inferred from calculated pressure and temperature in the discharge to be about 14 km/sec. Efficiency, based on this velocity and measured T/P is .54 + or - .07. Thruster ablation is zero at the throat and becomes measurable further upstream, indicating that radiative ablation is occurring late in the pulse.

  11. Pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David H.

    Pulsed power systems are critical elements for such prospective weapons technologies as high-power microwaves, electrothermal and electromagnetic projectile launchers, neutral particle beams, space-based FELs, ground-based lasers, and charged particle beams. Pulsed power will also be essential for the development of nonweapon military systems such as lidars and ultrawideband radars, and could serve as the bases for nuclear weapon effect simulators. The pulsed power generation requirements for each of these systems is considered.

  12. 1 W average-power 100 MHz repetition-rate 259 nm femtosecond deep ultraviolet pulse generation from ytterbium fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Yoshitomi, Dai; Kobayashi, Yohei; Torizuka, Kenji

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate 1W average-power ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond (fs) ultrashort pulse generation at a wavelength of 259 nm and a repetition rate as high as 100 MHz by quadrupling a fs ytterbium-fiber laser. A cavity-enhanced design is employed for efficient frequency doubling to the UV region. The optical-to-optical efficiency of UV output to the pump diode is 2.6%.

  13. 1-MW peak power, 574-kHz repetition rate picosecond pulses at 515 nm from a frequency-doubled fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Ziwei; Wang, Zhaokun; Bai, Yang; Li, Qiurui; Zhou, Jun

    2016-11-01

    1-MW peak power picosecond, 574-kHz repetition rate green laser at 515-nm is generated from a frequency-doubled fiber amplifier. 12-ps pulses with 13.9-μJ energy at 515 nm are achieved with a noncritically phase-matched lithium triborate (LBO) crystal through second harmonic generation of a 1030 nm infrared source. The infrared source employs ultra-large-mode-area rod-type photonic crystal fiber (Rod-PCF) for direct picosecond amplification and delivers 20-W 11.6-ps 2.97-MW pulse train with near-diffraction-limited beam quality (M2 = 1.01).

  14. Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) temperature monitoring system utilizing Luxtron fluoroptic sensors and thermocouples technical reference manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laderach, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes the Temperature Monitoring System for the RHEPP project at Sandia National Laboratories. The system is designed to operate in the presence of severe repetitive high voltage and electromagnetic fields while providing real time thermal data on component behavior. The thermal data is used in the design and evaluation of the major RHEPP components such as the magnetically switched pulse compressor and the linear induction voltage adder. Particular attention is given to the integration of commercially available hardware and software components with a custom written control program. While this document is intended to be a reference guide, it may also serve as a template for similar applications.

  15. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  16. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  17. Effect of power density and pulse repetition on laser shock peening of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. R.; Shepard, M. J.; Prevéy, P. S.; Clauer, A. H.

    2000-02-01

    Laser shock peening (LSP) was applied to Ti-6Al-4V (wt. %) simulated airfoil specimens using a Nd:Glass laser. Laser shock peening processing parameters examined in the present study included power density (5.5, 7, and 9 GW/cm2) and number of laser pulses per spot (one and three pulses/spot). The LSP’d Ti-6Al-4V samples were examined using x-ray diffraction techniques to determine the residual stress distribution and percent cold work as a function of depth. It was found that the residual stress state and percent of cold work were relatively independent of LSP power density. However, the number of laser pulses per spot had a significant effect on both residual stress and percent of cold work for a given power density level. In addition, there was a strong correlation between the magnitude of residual compressive stresses generated and the percent cold work measured.

  18. Effect of power density and pulse repetition on laser shock peening of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Shepard, M.J.; Prevey, P.S. III; Clauer, A.H.

    2000-02-01

    Laser shock peening (LSP) was applied to Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) simulated airfoil specimens using a Nd:Glass laser. Laser shock peening processing parameters examined in the present study included power density (5.5, 7, and 9 GW/cm{sup 2}) and number of laser pulses per spot (one and three pulses/spot). The LSP's Ti-6Al-4V samples were examined using x-ray diffraction techniques to determine the residual stress distribution and percent cold work as a function of depth. It was found that the residual stress state and percent of cold work were relatively independent of LSP power density. However, the number of laser pulses per spot had a significant effect on both residual stress and percent of cold work for a given power density level. In addition, there was a strong correlation between the magnitude of residual compressive stresses generated and the percent cold work measured.

  19. Formation of the active medium in high-power repetitively pulsed gas lasers pumped by an electron-beam-controlled discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulaev, V. D.; Lysenko, S. L.

    2015-07-01

    A high-power repetitively pulsed e-beam-controlled discharge CO2 laser is simulated numerically; the simulation results are compared with experimental data. Optimal sizes and design of electrodes and configuration of the external magnetic field are found, which allow one to introduce no less than 90% electric pump energy into a specified volume of the active medium, including the active volume of a laser with an aperture of 110 × 110 cm. The results obtained can also be used to design other types of highpower gas lasers.

  20. Formation of the active medium in high-power repetitively pulsed gas lasers pumped by an electron-beam-controlled discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaev, V D; Lysenko, S L

    2015-07-31

    A high-power repetitively pulsed e-beam-controlled discharge CO{sub 2} laser is simulated numerically; the simulation results are compared with experimental data. Optimal sizes and design of electrodes and configuration of the external magnetic field are found, which allow one to introduce no less than 90% electric pump energy into a specified volume of the active medium, including the active volume of a laser with an aperture of 110 × 110 cm. The results obtained can also be used to design other types of highpower gas lasers. (lasers)

  1. Interaction of repetitively pulsed high energy laser radiation with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.

    1986-05-01

    Laser target interaction processes and methods of improving the overall energy balance are discussed. This can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 KW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminum for example are increased by more than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements are found for the overall absorptivities, that are increased by more than an order of magnitude.

  2. A gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Gao, Jing-Ming; Yang, Han-Wu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Li, Ze-Xin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor is investigated both numerically and experimentally. The device has advantages of high power level, high repetitive rate achievability, and long lifetime reliability. Importantly, dominate parameters including the saturation time, the peak voltage, and even the compression ratio can be potentially adjusted continuously and reliably, which significantly expands the applicable area of the device and generators based on it. Specifically, a two-stage adjustable magnetic pulse compressor, utilized for charging the pulse forming network of a high power pulse generator, is designed with different compression ratios of 25 and 18 through an optimized design process. Equivalent circuit analysis shows that the modification of compression ratio can be achieved by just changing the turn number of the winding. At the same time, increasing inductance of the grounded inductor will decrease the peak voltage and delay the charging process. Based on these analyses, an adjustable compressor was built and studied experimentally in both the single shot mode and repetitive rate mode. Pulses with peak voltage of 60 kV and energy per pulse of 360 J were obtained in the experiment. The rise times of the pulses were compressed from 25 μs to 1 μs and from 18 μs to 1 μs, respectively, at repetitive rate of 20 Hz with good repeatability. Experimental results show reasonable agreement with analyses.

  3. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarny, Vijay A.

    1982-01-01

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  4. Series-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOEpatents

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-06-05

    A high-power series-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, and a counterpulse capacitor. The local pulse is initiated simultaneously with the initiation of the counterpulse used to turn the opening switch off. There is no delay from command to output pulse. During the load pulse, the counterpulse capacitor is automatically charged with sufficient energy to accomplish the load counterpulse which terminates the load pulse and turns the load switch off. When the main opening switch is reclosed to terminate the load pulse, the counterpulse capacitor discharges through the load, causing a rapid, sharp cutoff of the load pulse as well as recovering any energy remaining in the load inductance. The counterpulse capacitor is recharged to its original condition by the main energy storage coil after the load pulse is over, not before it begins.

  5. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOEpatents

    Honig, E.M.

    1987-02-10

    A high-power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime. 10 figs.

  6. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOEpatents

    Honig, Emanuel M.

    1987-01-01

    A high-power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

  7. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOEpatents

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-06-05

    A high power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

  8. Conducted noise analysis and protection of 45 kJ/s, ±50 kV capacitor charging power supply when interfaced with repetitive Marx based pulse power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naresh, P.; Patel, Ankur; Sharma, Archana

    2015-09-01

    Pulse power systems with highly dynamic loads like klystron, backward wave oscillator (BWO), and magnetron generate highly dynamic noise. This noise leads to frequent failure of controlled switches in the inverter stage of charging power supply. Designing a reliable and compatible power supply for pulse power applications is always a tricky job when charging rate is in multiples of 10 kJ/s. A ±50 kV and 45 kJ/s capacitor charging power supply based on 4th order LCLC resonant topology has been developed for a 10 Hz repetitive Marx based system. Conditions for load independent constant current and zero current switching (ZCS) are derived mathematically. Noise generated at load end due to dynamic load is tackled effectively and reduction in magnitude noise voltage is achieved by providing shielding between primary and secondary of high voltage high frequency transformer and with LCLC low pass filter. Shielding scales down the ratio between coupling capacitance (Cc) and the collector-emitter capacitance of insulated gate bi-polar transistor switch, which in turn reduces the common mode noise voltage magnitude. The proposed 4th order LCLC resonant network acts as a low pass filter for differential mode noise in the reverse direction (from load to source). Power supply has been tested repeatedly with 5 Hz repetition rate with repetitive Marx based system connected with BWO load working fine without failure of single switch in the inverter stage.

  9. Conducted noise analysis and protection of 45 kJ/s, ±50 kV capacitor charging power supply when interfaced with repetitive Marx based pulse power system.

    PubMed

    Naresh, P; Patel, Ankur; Sharma, Archana

    2015-09-01

    Pulse power systems with highly dynamic loads like klystron, backward wave oscillator (BWO), and magnetron generate highly dynamic noise. This noise leads to frequent failure of controlled switches in the inverter stage of charging power supply. Designing a reliable and compatible power supply for pulse power applications is always a tricky job when charging rate is in multiples of 10 kJ/s. A ±50 kV and 45 kJ/s capacitor charging power supply based on 4th order LCLC resonant topology has been developed for a 10 Hz repetitive Marx based system. Conditions for load independent constant current and zero current switching (ZCS) are derived mathematically. Noise generated at load end due to dynamic load is tackled effectively and reduction in magnitude noise voltage is achieved by providing shielding between primary and secondary of high voltage high frequency transformer and with LCLC low pass filter. Shielding scales down the ratio between coupling capacitance (Cc) and the collector-emitter capacitance of insulated gate bi-polar transistor switch, which in turn reduces the common mode noise voltage magnitude. The proposed 4th order LCLC resonant network acts as a low pass filter for differential mode noise in the reverse direction (from load to source). Power supply has been tested repeatedly with 5 Hz repetition rate with repetitive Marx based system connected with BWO load working fine without failure of single switch in the inverter stage.

  10. Interaction of Repetitively Pulsed High Energy Laser Radiation With Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred

    1986-10-01

    The paper is concerned with laser target interaction processes involving new methods of improving the overall energy balance. As expected theoretically, this can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed by using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 kW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminium for example were thereby increased by lore than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements were found for the overall absorptivities that were increased by this method by more than an order of magnitude.

  11. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense- ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.; Reass, W.A.; Coates, D.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Schleinitz, H.M.; Lovberg, R.H.; Greenly, J.B.

    1996-07-01

    A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. We are developing a 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 {mu}s duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator to address these applications.

  12. Industrial Applications of Pulsed Power Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Koichi; Katsuki, Sunao

    Recent progress of the industrial applications of pulsed power is reviewed in this paper. Repetitively operated pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power have been developed for industrial applications. These generators are reliable and low maintenance. Development of the pulsed power generators helps promote industrial applications of pulsed power for such things as food processing, medical treatment, water treatment, exhaust gas treatment, ozone generation, engine ignition, ion implantation and others. Here, industrial applications of pulsed power are classified by application for biological effects, for pulsed streamer discharges in gases, for pulsed discharges in liquid or liquid-mixture, and for bright radiation sources.

  13. BANSHEE: High-voltage repetitively pulsed electron-beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    VanHaaften, F.

    1992-01-01

    BANSHEE (Beam Accelerator for a New Source of High-Energy Electrons) this is a high-voltage modulator is used to produce a high-current relativistic electron beam for high-power microwave tube development. The goal of the BANSHEE research is first to achieve a voltage pulse of 700--750 kV with a 1-{mu}s pulse width driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of a few hertz. The ensuing goal is to increase the pulse amplitude to a level approaching 1 MV. We conducted tests using half the modulator with an output load of 200 {Omega}, up to a level of {approximately}650 kV at a PRF of 1 Hz and 525 kV at a PRF of 5 Hz. We then conducted additional testing using the complete system driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}.

  14. BANSHEE: High-voltage repetitively pulsed electron-beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    VanHaaften, F.

    1992-08-01

    BANSHEE (Beam Accelerator for a New Source of High-Energy Electrons) this is a high-voltage modulator is used to produce a high-current relativistic electron beam for high-power microwave tube development. The goal of the BANSHEE research is first to achieve a voltage pulse of 700--750 kV with a 1-{mu}s pulse width driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of a few hertz. The ensuing goal is to increase the pulse amplitude to a level approaching 1 MV. We conducted tests using half the modulator with an output load of 200 {Omega}, up to a level of {approximately}650 kV at a PRF of 1 Hz and 525 kV at a PRF of 5 Hz. We then conducted additional testing using the complete system driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}.

  15. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters.

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  16. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator with Controllable Pulse Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10–310 μs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1–56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation by up to 82% and 57%, and decreases coil heating by up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3,000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications, and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency. PMID:21540487

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Murphy, David L.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  18. Theory of repetitively pulsed operation of diode lasers subject to delayed feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Napartovich, A P; Sukharev, A G

    2015-03-31

    Repetitively pulsed operation of a diode laser with delayed feedback has been studied theoretically at varying feedback parameters and pump power levels. A new approach has been proposed that allows one to reduce the system of Lang–Kobayashi equations for a steady-state repetitively pulsed operation mode to a first-order nonlinear differential equation. We present partial solutions that allow the pulse shape to be predicted. (lasers)

  19. Capillary underwater discharges in repetitive pulse regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baerdemaeker, F.; Monte, M.; Leys, C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study a capillary underwater discharge, that is sustained with AC (50 Hz) voltages up to 7.5 kV, is investigated. In a capillary discharge scheme, the current is, at some point along its path between two submerged electrodes, flowing through a narrow elongated bore in a dielectric material. When the current density is sufficiently high, local boiling and subsequent vapour breakdown results in the formation of a plasma within this capillary. At the same time the capillary emits an intense jet of vapour bubbles. Time-dependent electrical current, voltage and light emission curves are recorded for discharges in solutions of NaCl in distilled water and reveal different discharge regimes, depending on the conductivity and the excitation voltage, ranging from repetitive microsecond discharge pulses to a quasi-continuous discharge with a glow-like voltage-current characteristic.

  20. Series-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOEpatents

    Honig, Emanuel M.

    1986-01-01

    A high-power series-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive energy storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, and a counterpulse capacitor. The load pulse is initiated simultaneously with the initiation of the counterpulse which is used to turn the opening switch off. There is no delay from command to output pulse. During the load pulse, the counterpulse capacitor is first discharged and then recharged in the opposite polarity with sufficient energy to accomplish the load counterpulse which terminates the load pulse and turns the load switch off. When the main opening switch is triggered closed again to terminate the load pulse, the counterpulse capacitor discharges in the reverse direction through the load switch and through the load, causing a rapid, sharp cutoff of the load pulse as well as recovering any energy remaining in the load inductance. The counterpulse capacitor is recharged to its original condition by the main energy storage coil after the load pulse is over, not before it begins.

  1. Development of a strontium vapor laser with pulse repetition frequency up to 1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Yudin, N. A.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Vasilieva, A. V.; Chebotarev, G. D.; Latush, E. L.; Fesenko, A. A.

    2010-09-01

    The problem of obtaining high pulse repetition frequencies in metal vapor lasers is urgent from the viewpoint of laser application to various technologies, increase of productivity of industrial laser systems, study of transient processes, etc. In addition, the high pulse repetition frequency provides large average laser radiation power in spite of a rather low energy extracted from a single lasing pulse. In this work, the possibility of increasing the pulse repetition frequency of a laser on self-terminated strontium ion transitions was investigated. The double pulse method was used to demonstrate experimentally that a pulse repetition frequency of ~1 MHz could be achieved at wavelengths of 1.03 and 1.09 μm of the strontium vapor laser. To explain the results obtained, the kinetics of the active medium was modeled using the self-consistent mathematical model of a He- Sr+ laser.

  2. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Calculation of mass transfer in the remote cutting of metals by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladush, G. G.; Rodionov, N. B.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of remote cutting of steel plates by radiation of a high-power repetitively pulsed CO2 laser is theoretically studied. The models of melt removal by the gravity force and the recoil pressure of material vapour are proposed and the sufficient conditions for the initiation of cutting are determined. A numerical model of a thermally thin plate was employed to describe the cutting for large focal spots.

  3. Femtosecond and picosecond laser drilling of metals at high repetition rates and average powers.

    PubMed

    Ancona, A; Döring, S; Jauregui, C; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2009-11-01

    The influence of pulse duration on the laser drilling of metals at repetition rates of up to 1 MHz and average powers of up to 70 W has been experimentally investigated using an ytterbium-doped-fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with pulses from 800 fs to 19 ps. At a few hundred kilohertz particle shielding causes an increase in the number of pulses for breakthrough, depending on the pulse energy and duration. At higher repetition rates, the heat accumulation effect overbalances particle shielding, but significant melt ejection affects the hole quality. Using femtosecond pulses, heat accumulation starts at higher repetition rates, and the ablation efficiency is higher compared with picosecond pulses.

  4. Tunable repetitively pulsed flashlamp-pumped dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyubenko, M I; Maslov, V V; Pelipenko, V P; Shevchenko, V V

    1998-12-31

    An experimental investigation was made of the spatioangular and spectral-energy characteristics of high-power tunable repetitively pulsed flashlamp-pumped dye lasers. A high directionality of the output radiation was attained in a wide range of the concentrations of the active molecules when aqueous solutions of dyes, in particular an inclusion complex of coumarin-120 and {beta}-cyclodextrin, were used. Such high directionality was obtained for alcohol and water-alcohol solutions only when the concentrations of these molecules were low. Continuous variation of the tuning range of lasers of this class should be possible by the use of suitable mixtures of efficient donor and acceptor dyes. (lasers)

  5. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  6. Simple filtered repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Yu.; Zhirkov, I. S.; Delplancke-Ogletree, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    A very simple design of cathodic filtered vacuum arc plasma source is proposed. The source without filter has only four components and none of them require precise machining. The source operates in a repetitively pulsed regime, and for laboratory experiments it can be used without water cooling. Despite the simple construction, the source provides high ion current at the filter outlet reaching 2.5% of 400 A arc current, revealing stable operation in a wide pressure range from high vacuum to oxygen pressure up to more than 10-2 mbar. There is no need in complicated power supply system for this plasma source, only one power supply can be used to ignite the arc, to provide the current for the arc itself, to generate the magnetic field in the filter, and provide its positive electric biasing without any additional high power resistance.

  7. Induction linacs and pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1995-07-11

    Progress in electronic power conversion technology is making possible a new class of induction linacs that can operate at extremely high repetition rates. Advances in insulator technology, pulse forming line design and switching may also lead to a new type of high current accelerator with accelerating gradients at least an order of magnitude greater than those attainable today. The evolution of the induction accelerator pulsed power system will be discussed along with some details of these emerging technologies which are at the frontiers of accelerator technology.

  8. Laser nanoablation of diamond surface at high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Pashinin, V. P.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The chemical etching of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by subpicosecond laser pulses with a high repetition rate (f ≤slant 500 {\\text{kHz}}) in air is experimentally investigated. The irradiation has been performed by the second-harmonic (515 {\\text{nm}}) radiation of a disk Yb : YAG laser. Dependences of the diamond surface etch rate on the laser energy density and pulse repetition rate are obtained.

  9. Experiments on a repetitively pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Fleischer, D.; Goldstein, S. A.; Tidman, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results from an investigation of a pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster using water propellant. The PET thruster is operated on a calibrated thrust stand, and produces a thrust to power ratio of T/P = 0.07 + or - 0.01 N/kW. The discharge conditions are inferred from a numerical model which predicts pressure and temperature levels of 300-500 atm and 20,000 K, respectively. These values in turn correctly predict the measured values of impulse bit and discharge resistance. The inferred ideal exhaust velocity from these conditions is 17 km/sec, but the injection of water propellant produces a test tank background pressure of 10-20 Torr, which reduces the exhaust velocity to 14 km/sec. This value corresponds to a thrust efficiency of 54 + or - 7 percent when all experimental errors are taken into account.

  10. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang

    2014-05-01

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO.

  11. A long-pulse repetitive operation magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yu-Wei; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Zhang, Jian-De; Shu, Ting; Liu, Jin Liang

    2014-05-15

    The improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) is a gigawatt-class L-band high power microwave tube. It has allowed us to generate 3.1 GW pulse of 40 ns duration in the single-pulse operation and 500 MW pulse of 25 ns duration in the repetition rate operation. However, because of the severe impedance mismatch, the power conversion efficiency is only about 4% in the repetition rate operation. In order to eliminate the impedance mismatch and obtain repetitive long-pulse high-power microwave (HPM), a series of experiments are carried out and the recent progress is presented in this paper. In the single-pulse operation, when the diode voltage is 466 kV and current is 41.6 kA, the radiated microwave power is above 2.2 GW, the pulse duration is above 102 ns, the microwave frequency is about 1.74 GHz, and the power conversion efficiency is about 11.5%. In the repetition rate operation, under the condition of the diode voltage about 400 kV, beam current about 38 kA, the radiated microwave power is about 1.0 GW, the pulse duration is about 85 ns. Moreover, the radiated microwave power and the pulse duration decline little by little when the shot numbers increase gradually. The experimental results show that the impedance matching is a vital factor for HPM systems and one of the major technical challenges is to improve the cathode for the repetition rate operation MILO.

  12. Effect of pulse to pulse interactions on ultra-short pulse laser drilling of steel with repetition rates up to 10 MHz.

    PubMed

    Finger, Johannes; Reininghaus, Martin

    2014-07-28

    We report on the effect of pulse to pulse interactions during percussion drilling of steel using high power ps-laser radiation with repetition rates of up to 10 MHz and high average powers up to 80 W. The ablation rate per pulse is measured as a function of the pulse repetition rate for four fluences ranging from 500 mJ/cm2 up to 1500 mJ/cm2. For every investigated fluence an abrupt increase of the ablation rate per pulse is observed at a distinctive repetition rate. The onset repetition rate for this effect is strongly dependent on the applied pulse fluence. The origin of the increase of the ablation rate is attributed to the emergence of a melt based ablation processes, as Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) images show the occurrence of melt ejected material surrounding the drilling holes. A semi empirical model based on classical heat conduction including heat accumulation as well as pulse-particle interactions is applied to enable quantitative conclusions on the origin of the observed data. In agreement with previous studies, the acquired data confirm the relevance of these two effects for the fundamental description of materials processing with ultra-short pulsed laser radiation at high repetition rates and high average power.

  13. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Höppner, H.; Tanikawa, T.; Schulz, M.; Riedel, R.; Teubner, U.; Faatz, B.; Tavella, F.

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to many hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.

  14. High repetition rate tunable femtosecond pulses and broadband amplification from fiber laser pumped parametric amplifier.

    PubMed

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, O; Bruchmann, C; Limpert, J; Aguergaray, C; Cormier, E; Tünnermann, A

    2006-05-29

    We report on the generation of high energy femtosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate from a fiber laser pumped optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Nonlinear bandwidth enhancement in fibers provides the intrinsically synchronized signal for the parametric amplifier. We demonstrate large tunability extending from 700 nm to 1500 nm of femtosecond pulses with pulse energies as high as 1.2 muJ when the OPA is seeded by a supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Broadband amplification over more than 85 nm is achieved at a fixed wavelength. Subsequent compression in a prism sequence resulted in 46 fs pulses. With an average power of 0.5 W these pulses have a peak-power above 10 MW. In particular, the average power and pulse energy scalability of both involved concepts, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier, will enable easy up-scaling to higher powers.

  15. High-power supercontinuum generation using high-repetition-rate ultrashort-pulse fiber laser for ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography in 1600 nm spectral band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-02-01

    We describe the generation of a high-power, spectrally smooth supercontinuum (SC) in the 1600 nm spectral band for ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). A clean SC was achieved by using a highly nonlinear fiber with normal dispersion properties and a high-quality pedestal-free pulse obtained from a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser operating at 182 MHz. The center wavelength and spectral width were 1578 and 172 nm, respectively. The output power of the SC was 51 mW. Using the developed SC source, we demonstrated UHR-OCT imaging of biological samples with a sensitivity of 109 dB and an axial resolution of 4.9 µm in tissue.

  16. Generation of Shear Alfvén Waves by Repetitive High Power Microwave Pulses Near the Electron Plasma Frequency - A laboratory study of a ``Virtual Antenna''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhou; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; van Compernolle, Bart; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-11-01

    ELF / ULF waves are important in terrestrial radio communications but difficult to launch using ground-based structures due to their enormous wavelengths. In spite of this generation of such waves by field-aligned ionospheric heating modulation was first demonstrated using the HAARP facility. In the future heaters near the equator will be constructed and laboratory experiments on cross-field wave propagation could be key to the program's success. Here we report a detailed laboratory study conducted on the Large Plasma Device (LaPD) at UCLA. In this experiment, ten rapid pulses of high power microwaves (250 kW X-band) near the plasma frequency were launched transverse to the background field, and were modulated at a variable fraction (0.1-1.0) of fci. Along with bulk electron heating and density modification, the microwave pulses generated a population of fast electrons. The field-aligned current carried by the fast electrons acted as an antenna that radiated shear Alfvén waves. It was demonstrated that a controllable arbitrary frequency (f power dependence of the virtual antenna is also presented. This work is supported by an AFOSR MURI award, and conducted at the Basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA funded by DoE and NSF.

  17. Generation of low-timing-jitter femtosecond pulse trains with 2 GHz repetition rate via external repetition rate multiplication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Sickler, Jason W; Fendel, Peter; Ippen, Erich P; Kärtner, Franz X; Wilken, Tobias; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2008-05-01

    Generation of low-timing-jitter 150 fs pulse trains at 1560 nm with 2 GHz repetition rate is demonstrated by locking a 200 MHz fundamental polarization additive-pulse mode-locked erbium fiber laser to high-finesse external Fabry-Perot cavities. The timing jitter and relative intensity noise of the repetition-rate multiplied pulse train are investigated.

  18. Study of periodic surface profile on improving the window capacity at single and repetitive pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. S.; Zhang, X. W.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Shao, H.; Wang, Y.; Liu, W. Y.; Ke, C. F.; Chen, C. H.; Liang, Y. Q.; Wu, X. L.; Guo, L. T.; Chang, C.

    2015-09-15

    The surface breakdown of dielectric windows seriously limits the transmission of high power microwaves (HPM), and has blocked the development of microwave technology in recent decades. In this paper, X-band HPM experiments of window breakdown at the vacuum/dielectric interface and the atmosphere/dielectric interface at single and repetitive pulses were conducted. The cross-linked polystyrene (CLPS) dielectric window with a periodic surface profile can significantly improve the breakdown threshold at single and repetitive pulses. Furthermore, the flat surface layer of CLPS was discovered to be carbonized to a depth of several millimeters and filled with electrical trees at repetitive pulses. Theoretical models were built to understand the underlying physics behind the phenomena in experiments. With the analysis of the electron resonance process breaking the molecular bond and the temperature rise caused by the traversing current in the dielectric material, a microscopic explanation for the carbonization of the dielectric window was introduced.

  19. An Experiment on Repetitive Pulse Operation of Microwave Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Shibata, Teppei; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2008-04-28

    Microwave Rocket was operated with repetitive pulses. The microwave rocket model with forced breathing system was used. The pressure history in the thruster was measured and the thrust impulse was deduced. As a result, the impulse decreased at second pulse and impulses at latter pulses were constant. The dependence of the thrust performance on the partial filling rate of the thruster was compared to the thrust generation model based on the shock wave driven by microwave plasma. The experimental results showed good agreement to the predicted dependency.

  20. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-11-15

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  1. Variable pulse repetition frequency output from an optically injected solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Kane, D M; Toomey, J P

    2011-02-28

    An optically injected solid state laser (OISSL) system is known to generate complex nonlinear dynamics within the parameter space of varying the injection strength of the master laser and the frequency detuning between the master and slave lasers. Here we show that within these complex nonlinear dynamics, a system which can be operated as a source of laser pulses with a pulse repetition frequency (prf) that can be continuously varied by a single control, is embedded. Generation of pulse repetition frequencies ranging from 200 kHz up to 4 MHz is shown to be achievable for an optically injected Nd:YVO4 solid state laser system from analysis of prior experimental and simulation results. Generalizing this to other optically injected solid state laser systems, the upper bound on the repetition frequency is of order the relaxation oscillation frequency for the lasers. The system is discussed in the context of prf versatile laser systems more generally. Proposals are made for the next generation of OISSLs that will increase understanding of the variable pulse repetition frequency operation, and determine its practical limitations. Such variable prf laser systems; both low powered, and, higher powered systems achieved using one or more optical power amplifier stages; have many potential applications from interrogating resonance behaviors in microscale structures, through sensing and diagnostics, to laser processing.

  2. Yb:YAG Innoslab amplifier: efficient high repetition rate subpicosecond pumping system for optical parametric chirped pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Schulz, M; Riedel, R; Willner, A; Mans, T; Schnitzler, C; Russbueldt, P; Dolkemeyer, J; Seise, E; Gottschall, T; Hädrich, S; Duesterer, S; Schlarb, H; Feldhaus, J; Limpert, J; Faatz, B; Tünnermann, A; Rossbach, J; Drescher, M; Tavella, F

    2011-07-01

    We report on a Yb:YAG Innoslab laser amplifier system for generation of subpicsecond high energy pump pulses for optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) at high repetition rates. Pulse energies of up to 20 mJ (at 12.5 kHz) and repetition rates of up to 100 kHz were attained with pulse durations of 830 fs and average power in excess of 200 W. We further investigate the possibility to use subpicosecond pulses to derive a stable continuum in a YAG crystal for OPCPA seeding.

  3. Alternative approach for cavitation damage study utilizing repetitive laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation is a common phenomenon in fluid systems that can lead to dramatic degradation of solid materials surface in contact with the cavitating media. Study of cavitation damage has great significance in many engineering fields. Current techniques for cavitation damage study either require large scale equipments or tend to introduce damages from other mechanisms. In this project, we utilized the cavitation phenomenon induced by laser optical breakdown and developed a prototype apparatus for cavitation damage study. In our approach, cavitation was generated by the repetitive pressure waves induced by high-power laser pulses. As proof of principal study, stainless steel and aluminum samples were tested using the novel apparatus. Surface characterization via scanning electron microscopy revealed damages such as indentation and surface pitting, which were similar to those reported in literature using other state-of-the-art techniques. These preliminary results demonstrated the new device was capable of generating cavitation damages and could be used as an alternative method for cavitation damage study.

  4. Pulse repetition rate in a self-contained strontium ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, Anatolii N; Vasil'eva, Anna V; Polunin, Yurii P; Yudin, Nikolai A; Chebotarev, Gennady D; Latush, Evgeny L; Fesenko, A A

    2008-11-30

    The frequency and energy parameters of self-contained strontium ion laser ({lambda} = 1.033 and 1.091 {mu}m) are studied upon excitation by an additional pulse before each excitation pulse. The kinetics of processes in the active medium of this laser is numerically simulated. It is shown that the pulse repetition rate of the self-contained strontium laser can achieve {approx}1 MHz. It is found that the laser pulse energy in the first pulse and the average output power and efficiency increase in a certain range of time delays between the additional and excitation pulses, which is caused by the significant prepulse concentration of strontium ions which had no time to recombine. The outlook for the application of pulse trains to excite self-contained IR transitions in strontium ions is shown. (lasers)

  5. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse operating at high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhui; Uno, Kazuyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    A short-pulse longitudinally excited CO2 laser operating at a high repetition rate was developed. The discharge tube was made of a 45 cm-long or 60 cm-long dielectric tube with an inner diameter of 16 mm and two metallic electrodes at the ends of the tube. The optical cavity was formed by a ZnSe output coupler with a reflectivity of 85% and a high-reflection mirror. Mixed gas (CO2:N2:He = 1:1:2) was flowed into the discharge tube. A high voltage of about 33 kV with a rise time of about 200 ns was applied to the discharge tube. At a repetition rate of 300 Hz and a gas pressure of 3.4 kPa, the 45 cm-long discharge tube produced a short laser pulse with a laser pulse energy of 17.5 mJ, a spike pulse energy of 0.2 mJ, a spike width of 153 ns, and a pulse tail length of 90 μs. The output power was 5.3 W. The laser pulse waveform did not depend on the repetition rate, but the laser beam profile did. At a low repetition rate of less than 50 Hz, the laser beam had a doughnut-like shape. However, at a high repetition rate of more than 150 Hz, the discharge concentrated at the center of the discharge tube, and the intensity at the center of the laser beam was higher. The laser beam profile depended on the distribution of the discharge. An output power of 7.0 W was achieved by using the 60 cm-long tube.

  6. High voltage high repetition rate pulse using Marx topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Kashapov, N.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes Marx topology using MOSFET transistors. Marx circuit with 10 stages has been done, to obtain pulses about 5.5KV amplitude, and the width of the pulses was about 30μsec with a high repetition rate (PPS > 100), Vdc = 535VDC is the input voltage for supplying the Marx circuit. Two Ferrite ring core transformers were used to control the MOSFET transistors of the Marx circuit (the first transformer to control the charging MOSFET transistors, the second transformer to control the discharging MOSFET transistors).

  7. Repetitively pulsed cryogenically cooled quasi-sealed-off slab RF discharge first-overtone CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kozlov, A. Yu.; Rulev, O. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    A slab first-overtone CO laser of improved design excited by repetitively pulsed RF discharge was researched and developed. Its quasi-sealed-off operation appeared to be possible only by using active gas mixture composition with extremely high content of oxygen — up to 50 % with respect to CO concentration. Average output power of the first-overtone CO laser came up to ~2 W with the efficiency of ~2 %. The laser spectrum obtained by using three sets of output couplers consisted of more than 100 vibrational-rotational spectral lines in 28 vibrational first-overtone bands of CO molecule within 2.55÷3.90 μm wavelength range. The number of laser radiation pulses which could be produced by the laser in sealed-off mode of operation (without gas mixture renovation) reached ~5×105 at the averaged output power near its maximum, and ~106 at lower (near its half-maximum) averaged output power. Special features of laser radiation temporal behavior were discussed. Under repetitively pulse pump with repetition rate from 300 up to 7500 Hz, a temporal profile of the CO laser radiation changed from the train of time-separated laser pulses with high peak power to quasi-CW mode of operation.

  8. A smart repetitive-rate wideband high power microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Bao-liang; Yang, Han-wu; Zhang, Zi-cheng

    2016-01-15

    A smart repetitive-rate wideband High Power Microwave (HPM) source based on the A6 Magnetron with Diffraction Output is described in this paper. The length of the HPM source is 30 cm and its weight is 35 kg. Computer simulations show that the source can produce microwave with central frequency of 1.91 GHz and bandwidth of about 11%. Experimental measurements show that the output microwave power from the source reaches in maximum 110 MW when the input electric power from the pulsed driver is ∼500 MW, which gives the power conversion efficiency 22%. Central frequency of the output HPM in the experiment is 1.94 GHz with the bandwidth ranging from 1.82 GHz to 2.02 GHz. The jitter of the output HPM power is lower than 3 dB when the source operates in the repetition mode with 50 Hz rate.

  9. Power Enhancement Cavity for Burst-Mode Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical cavity scheme and locking method that can realize the power enhancement of picosecond UV laser pulses operating at a burst mode with arbitrary burst (macropulse) lengths and repetition rates.

  10. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  11. A repetitive S-band long-pulse relativistic backward-wave oscillator.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhenxing; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Jianhua; Zhong, Huihuang; Qian, Baoliang; Shu, Ting; Zhang, Jiande; Zhou, Shengyue; Xu, Liurong

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents both numerical and experimental studies of a repetitive S-band long-pulse relativistic backward-wave oscillator. The dispersion relation curve of the main slow-wave structure is given by the numerical calculation. Experimental results show that a 1 GW microwaves with pulse duration of about 100 ns (full width of half magnitude) under 10 Hz repetitive operation mode are obtained. The microwave frequency is 3.6 GHz with the dominant mode of TM(01), and power conversion efficiency is about 20%. The single pulse energy is about 100 J. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation ones. By analyzing the experimental phenomenon, we obtain the conclusion that the explosive emission on the surface of the electrodynamics structure in intense radio frequency field mainly leads to the earlier unexpected termination of microwave output.

  12. Pulse power linac

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    A linear acceleration for charged particles is constructed of a plurality of transmission line sections that extend between a power injection region and an accelerating region. Each line section is constructed of spaced plate-like conductors and is coupled to an accelerating gap located at the accelerating region. Each gap is formed between a pair of apertured electrodes, with all of the electrode apertures being aligned along a particle accelerating path. The accelerating gaps are arranged in series, and at the injection region the line sections are connected in parallel. At the injection region a power pulse is applied simultaneously to all line sections. The line sections are graduated in length so that the pulse reaches the gaps in a coordinated sequence whereby pulse energy is applied to particles as they reach each of the gaps along the accelerating path.

  13. Repetitively Pulsed Electric Laser Acoustic Studies. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    INGARD ET AL. SEP 83 UNCLASSIFIED APHAL-IR-83-2858-VOL-1 F336i5 86-C 2848 F/ 0/ 8, EEEmohEEEomhiE EohEEmhohEEEEE mhhhmmomhhlm...TR-83-2058, Vol 9, 0 REPETITIVELY PULSED ELECTRIC LASER ACOUSTIC STUDIES Volume I K. U. INGARD , CHARLES F. MCMILLAN uDEPARTMENT OF AERONAUTICS AND...CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) K.U. Ingard and Charles F. McMillan F33615.80-C-2040 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT

  14. Pulsed infrared laser irradiation of biological tissue: effect of pulse duration and repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, E. Duco; Chundru, Ravi K.; Samanani, Salim A.; Tibbetts, Todd A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-07-01

    Pulsed laser ablation is a trade off between minimizing thermal damage (for relatively long pulses) and mechanical damage (for relatively short pulses) to tissue adjacent to the ablation crater. Often it is not known what the optimal laser parameters are for a specific application, since clinically used parameters have at least partially been dictated by physical limitations of the laser devices. We recently obtained a novel type of cryogenic continuous wave holmium:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) with a galvanometric drive outcouple mirror that acts as a Q-switch. This unique device provides pulse repetition rates from a few Hz up to kHz and the pulse length is variable from microsecond(s) to ms. The effect of pulse duration and repetition rate on the thermal response of chicken breast is documented using temperature measurements with a thermal camera. We varied the pulse width from 10 microsecond(s) to 5 ms and fond that these pulse durations can be considered impulses of thermalized optical energy. In this paper some theoretical considerations of the pulse length will be described that support the experimental data. It was also found that even at 1 pulse per second thermal superposition occurs, indicating a much longer thermal relaxation time than predicted by a simple time constant model.

  15. 3.7 GHz repetition rate operated narrow-bandwidth picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with an all-fiber multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, K. H.; Wen, R. H.; Guo, Y.

    2016-04-01

    A high power picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with a pulse repetition rate of 3.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated. The seed is a gain switched distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) structured laser diode (LD) with a pulse duration of 130 ps and a repetition rate of 460 MHz. The pulse repetition rate is increased to 3.7 GHz by introducing an all-fiber multiplier, which is composed of four 2  ×  2 structured fiber couplers. The multiplied pulse train is amplified to 81 W through two stage Yb fiber amplifiers.

  16. Note: Emittance measurements of intense pulsed proton beam for different pulse length and repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Gobin, R.; Delferriere, O.; Adroit, G.; Senee, F.; Ciavola, G.

    2012-05-15

    The high intensity ion source (SILHI), in operation at CEA-Saclay, has been used to produce a 90 mA pulsed proton beam with pulse length and repetition rates suitable for the European Spallation Source (ESS) linac. Typical r-r{sup '} rms normalized emittance values smaller than 0.2{pi} mm mrad have been measured for operation in pulsed mode (0.01 < duty cycle < 0.15 and 1 ms < pulse duration < 10 ms) that are relevant for the design update of the Linac to be used at the ESS in Lund.

  17. PULSED POWER APPLICATIONS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Pulsed power technology has been applied in particle accelerators and storage rings for over four decades. It is most commonly used in injection, extraction, beam manipulation, source, and focusing systems. These systems belong to the class of repetitive pulsed power. In this presentation, we review and discuss the history, present status, and future challenge of pulsed power applications in high intensity proton accelerators and storage rings.

  18. Plasma-Assisted Flame Ignition and Stabilization using Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, Christophe

    2007-10-01

    Ever more stringent environmental regulations are providing impetus for reducing pollutant emissions, in particular nitric oxides and soot, in internal combustion and aircraft engines. Lean or diluted combustible mixtures are of particular interest because they burn at lower flame temperatures than stoichiometric mixtures and thus produce lesser amounts of thermal nitric oxides. Over the past decade, high voltage nanosecond pulsed discharges have been demonstrated as energy efficient way to ignite such mixtures. However, the practical application of these discharges for ignition purposes is limited by the very high electric fields required, especially in high pressure combustion chambers. Moreover, stabilization requires a steady-state addition of energy that cannot be achieved with single or low repetition frequency pulses. In the present work, we investigate the applicability and effectiveness of high voltage nanosecond discharges with high pulse repetition frequencies, typically up to 100 kHz. The high repetition frequencies are chosen to exceed the recombination rate of chemically active species. In this way, the concentration of active species can build up between consecutive pulses, thus yielding significantly higher concentrations than with low frequency pulses. These discharges are investigated for two applications, the ignition of diluted air/propane mixtures at pressures up to several bars in a constant volume chamber, and the stabilization of atmospheric pressure lean premixed air/propane flames. Time-resolved electric and spectroscopic measurements are presented to analyze the discharge regimes, the energy deposition, the gas temperature evolution, the electron number density, and the production of excited species. The results show that nanosecond repetitive pulses produce ultrafast gas heating and atomic oxygen generation, both on nanosecond time scales, via excitation of molecular nitrogen followed by dissociative quenching of molecular oxygen. These

  19. NOx diesel exhaust treatment using a pulsed corona discharge: the pulse repetition rate effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankelevich, Y.; Wolf, M.; Baksht, R.; Pokryvailo, A.; Vinogradov, J.; Rivin, B.; Sher, E.

    2007-05-01

    The pulsed corona offers real promise for degradation of pollutants in gas and water streams. This paper presents a study of NOx removal from diesel exhaust. Special emphasis is laid on the investigation of the dependence of the NO removal rate and efficiency on the pulse repetition rate (PRR). A nanosecond solid state power supply (45 kV, 60 ns, up to 1 kHz) was used for driving the corona reactor. A Mitsubishi 10 kW 3-cylinder diesel-generator engine with a total volume of 1300 cm3 was used as a source of exhaust gas. At an NO removal rate of 35% the NO removal efficiency was 53 g kW-1h-1 for PRR = 500 Hz and the initial NO concentration was 375 ppm. A semi-empirical expression for the corona reactor removal efficiency related both to PRR and to the residence time is presented. The removal efficiency decreases with increasing PRR at constant flow rate or constant residence time. This expression demonstrates reasonable agreement between the calculation results and the experimental data.

  20. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  1. High power, high repetition rate, few picosecond Nd:LuVO₄ oscillator with cavity dumping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Guo, Jie; Li, Jinfeng; Lin, Hua; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the potential use of Nd:LuVO4 in high average power, high repetition rate ultrafast lasers. Maximum mode-locked average power of 28 W is obtained at the repetition rate of 58 MHz. The shortest pulse duration is achieved at 4 ps without dispersion compensation. With a cavity dumping technique, the pulse energy is scaling up to 40.7 μJ at 300 kHz and 14.3 μJ at 1.5 MHz.

  2. Pulsed Power Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Weapons Laboratory the next day. Coordinators for the technical program are M. Kristiansen and A. Guenther , while the local coordinators are T... Guenther R. Gullickson S. Levy T. Martin R. Parker F. Rose P. Turchi I. Vitkovitsky Army Research Office Defense Advanced Research Project Agency...Present address: Physics Department Auburn University 729 1. "Introduction to Pulsed Power" A.H. Guenther -Air Force Weapons Laboratory 2.(P

  3. MW ps pulse generation at sub-MHz repetition rates from a phase conjugate Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifier.

    PubMed

    Omatsu, Takashige; Nawata, Kouji; Okida, Masahito; Furuki, Kenji

    2007-07-23

    We demonstrated high-repetition-rate (sub-MHz) MW pulse generation by combining a picosecond phase conjugate laser system based on a diode-side-pumped Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifier with a pulse selector based on a RbTiOPO(4) electro-optical modulator. Peak output powers in the range of 2.8-6.8 MW at a pulse repetition frequency range of 0.33-1.0 MHz were achieved at an extraction efficiency of 34-35%.

  4. Fast Rise Time and High Voltage Nanosecond Pulses at High Pulse Repetition Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth E.; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Picard, Julian; Hashim, Akel

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is conducting research to decrease the rise time and increase the output voltage of the EHT Nanosecond Pulser product line, which allows for independently, user-adjustable output voltage (0 - 20 kV), pulse width (20 - 500 ns), and pulse repetition frequency (0 - 100 kHz). The goals are to develop higher voltage pulses (50 - 60 kV), decrease the rise time from 20 to below 10 ns, and maintain the high pulse repetition capabilities. These new capabilities have applications to pseudospark generation, corona production, liquid discharges, and nonlinear transmission line driving for microwave production. This work is supported in part by the US Navy SBIR program.

  5. Wind velocity measurement accuracy with highly stable 12 mJ/pulse high repetition rate CO2 laser master oscillator power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, James W.; Johnson, Steven C.; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1987-01-01

    A coherent CO2 lidar operating in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration (MOPA) is described for both ground-based and airborne operation. Representative data taken from measurements against stationary targets in both the ground-based and airborne configurations are shown for the evaluation of the frequency stability of the system. Examples of data are also given which show the results of anomalous system operation. Overall results demonstrate that velocity measurements can be performed consistently to an accuracy of + or - 0.5 m/s and in some cases + or - 0.1 m/s.

  6. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Höppner, H.; Hage, A.; Tanikawa, T.; ...

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to manymore » hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.« less

  7. High-repetition-rate pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering on the MST reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, W. C.; Morton, L. A.; Parke, E.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2013-11-01

    A new, high-repetition-rate pulse-burst laser system for the MST Thomson scattering diagnostic has operated with 2 J pulses at repetition rates up to 75 kHz within a burst. The 1064 nm laser currently employs a q-switched, diode pumped Nd:YVO4 master oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifier stages, and a Nd:glass amplifier, with plans for an additional Nd:glass amplifier. The laser can maintain 1.5-2 J pulses in two operating modes: either at a uniform repetition rate of 5-10 kHz (sustained for 5-8 ms), or reach rates of up to 75 kHz in pulse-burst operation (for 10 bursts of 15 pulses each), limited by flashlamp explosion energy and wall loading. The full system, including an additional Nd:glass amplifier, is designed to produce bursts of 2 J pulses at a repetition rate of at least 250 kHz. Custom programmable square-pulse power supplies drive the amplifier flashlamps, providing fine control of pulse timing, duration, and repetition, and allow for pulse-burst operation. The new laser system integrates with the same collection optics and detectors as used by the previous MST Thomson laser: 21 spatial points across the MST minor radius, filter polychromators with 6 to 8 channels (10 eV-5 keV range), avalanche photodiode detectors, and 1 GSample/s/channel digitization. Use of the previous pulse-burst laser continues concurrently with new laser development. Additional notes on optimization of flashlamp simmering will also be covered, showing that an increase in simmer currents can improve pulse-to-pulse energy consistency on both the new and older lasers.

  8. Processing constraints resulting from heat accumulation during pulsed and repetitive laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne; Kononenko, Taras; Konov, Vitaly I

    2017-02-20

    In any pulsed and repetitive laser process a part of the absorbed laser energy is thermalized and stays in the material as residual heat. This residual heat is accumulating from pulse to pulse, continuously increasing the temperature, if the time between two pulses does not allow the material to sufficiently cool down. Controlling this so-called heat accumulation is one of the major challenges for materials processing with high average power pulsed lasers and repetitive processing. Heat accumulation caused by subsequent pulses (HAP) on the same spot and heat accumulation caused by subsequent scans (HAS) over the same spot can significantly reduce process quality, e.g., when the temperature increase caused by heat accumulation exceeds the melting temperature. In both cases, HAS and HAP, it is of particular interest to know the limiting number of pulses or scans after which the heat accumulation temperature exceeds a critical temperature and a pause has to be introduced. Approximation formulas for the case, where the duration of the heat input is short compared to the time between two subsequent heat inputs are derived in this paper, providing analytical scaling laws for the heat accumulation as a function of the processing parameters. The validity of these approximations is confirmed for HAP with an example of surface ablation of CrNi-steel and for HAS with multi-scan cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), both with a picosecond laser at an average power of up to 1.1 kW. It is shown that for the important case of 1-dimensional heat flow the limiting number of heat inputs decreases with the inverse of the square of the average laser power.

  9. A high voltage nanosecond pulser with independently adjustable output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Carscadden, John; Slobodov, Ilia

    2014-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT) is developing a high voltage nanosecond pulser capable of generating microwaves and non-equilibrium plasmas for plasma medicine, material science, enhanced combustion, drag reduction, and other research applications. The EHT nanosecond pulser technology is capable of producing high voltage (up to 60 kV) pulses (width 20-500 ns) with fast rise times (<10 ns) at high pulse repetition frequency (adjustable up to 100 kHz) for CW operation. The pulser does not require the use of saturable core magnetics, which allows for the output voltage, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency to be fully adjustable, enabling researchers to explore non-equilibrium plasmas over a wide range of parameters. A magnetic compression stage can be added to improve the rise time and drive lower impedance loads without sacrificing high pulse repetition frequency operation. Work supported in part by the US Navy under Contract Number N00014-14-P-1055 and the US Air Force under Contract Number FA9550-14-C-0006.

  10. Microwave and Pulsed Power

    SciTech Connect

    Freytag, E.K.

    1993-03-01

    The goals of the Microwave and Pulsed Power thrust area are to identify realizable research and development efforts and to conduct high-quality research in those pulse power and microwave technologies that support existing and emerging programmatic requirements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our main objective is to work on nationally important problems while enhancing our basic understanding of enabling technologies such as component design and testing, compact systems packaging, exploratory physics experiments, and advanced systems integration and performance. During FY-92, we concentrated our research efforts on the six project areas described in this report. (1) We are investigating the superior electronic and thermal properties of diamond that may make it an ideal material for a high-power, solid-state switch. (2) We are studying the feasibility of using advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar technology for reliable non-destructive evaluation of bridges and other high-value concrete structures. These studies include conceptual designs, modeling, experimental verifications, and image reconstruction of simulated radar data. (3) We are exploring the efficiency of pulsed plasma processing techniques used for the removal of NO{sub x} from various effluent sources. (4) We have finished the investigation of the properties of a magnetically delayed low-pressure gas switch, which was designed here at LLNL. (5) We are applying statistical electromagnetic theory techniques to help assess microwave effects on electronic subsystems, by using a mode stirred chamber as our measurement tool. (6) We are investigating the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in proposed CFC replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stresses and breakdown environments.

  11. Microwave and pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freytag, E. K.

    1993-03-01

    The goals of the Microwave and Pulsed Power thrust area are to identify realizable research and development efforts and to conduct high-quality research in those pulse power and microwave technologies that support existing and emerging programmatic requirements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our main objective is to work on nationally important problems while enhancing our basic understanding of enabling technologies such as component design and testing, compact systems packaging, exploratory physics experiments, and advanced systems integration and performance. During FY-92, we concentrated our research efforts on the six project areas described in this report. We are investigating the superior electronic and thermal properties of diamond that may make it an ideal material for a high-power, solid-state switch. We are studying the feasibility of using advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar technology for reliable non-destructive evaluation of bridges and other high-value concrete structures. These studies include conceptual designs, modeling, experimental verifications, and image reconstruction of simulated radar data. We are exploring the efficiency of pulsed plasma processing techniques used for the removal of NO(x) from various effluent sources. We have finished the investigation of the properties of a magnetically delayed low-pressure gas switch, which was designed here at LLNL. We are applying statistical electromagnetic theory techniques to help assess microwave effects on electronic subsystems, by using a mode stirred chamber as our measurement tool. We are investigating the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in proposed CFC replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stresses and breakdown environments.

  12. A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator for solid dielectric breakdown research.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang; Pan, Ya Feng; Su, Jian Cang; Zhang, Xi Bo; Wang, Li Min; Fang, Jin Peng; Sun, Xu; Lui, Rui

    2013-10-01

    A Tesla-type repetitive nanosecond pulse generator including a pair of electrode and a matched absorption resistor is established for the application of solid dielectric breakdown research. As major components, a built-in Tesla transformer and a gas-gap switch are designed to boost and shape the output pulse, respectively; the electrode is to form the anticipated electric field; the resistor is parallel to the electrode to absorb the reflected energy from the test sample. The parameters of the generator are a pulse width of 10 ns, a rise and fall time of 3 ns, and a maximum amplitude of 300 kV. By modifying the primary circuit of the Tesla transformer, the generator can produce both positive and negative pulses at a repetition rate of 1-50 Hz. In addition, a real-time measurement and control system is established based on the solid dielectric breakdown requirements for this generator. With this system, experiments on test samples made of common insulation materials in pulsed power systems are conducted. The preliminary experimental results show that the constructed generator is capable to research the solid dielectric breakdown phenomenon on a nanosecond time scale.

  13. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    DOE PAGES

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronicmore » states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.« less

  14. Technology of Pulse Power Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shanshan

    Polymer film of pulse discharge capacitors operated at high repetition rate dissipates substantial power. The thermal conductivity of biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) is measured as a function of metallization resistivity. The thermal conductivity in the plane of the film is about twice that of bulk polypropylene. Thermal design is optimized based on the measurement for large capacitors with multiple windings in a container. High discharge speed results in high current density at the wire arc sprayed end connections which tend to deteriorate gradually, resulting in capacitor failure during operation. To assure the end connection quality before assembly, a test procedure and apparatus for end connection integrity was developed based on monitoring the partial discharge pattern from end connection during discharge. The mechanism of clearing is analyzed which shows arc extinguishes due to the increased arc length and reduced energy so that capacitor can function normally after breakdown. In the case of a clearing discharge, the power dissipation appears to increase with time, although this is not a feature of previous models. Submicrosecond discharge requires minimizing inductance which can be achieved by optimizing the winding structure so that submicrosecond discharge becomes practical. An analysis of the inductance of multisection, very high voltage capacitors is carried out, which identifies low inductance structures for this type of capacitor.

  15. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  16. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  17. Modeling transient gain dynamics in a cladding-pumped Yb-doped fiber ampliefier pulsed at low repetition rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, G. C.; Wright, M.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of 1-50 kHz repetition rate, pulsed Yb-fiber amplifiers show peak powers to 10 kW with half-widths < 30 ns, consistent with commercial amplifier performance. This device is a potential source for deep space-communication.

  18. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  19. Spatial homogeneity criteria for active media of cataphoresis repetitively pulsed metal vapour lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chebotarev, Gennady D; Prutsakov, Oleg O; Latush, Evgeny L

    2005-07-31

    The formation of the transverse distribution of the metal vapour concentration in repetitively pulsed lasers is analysed. The criterion for the homogeneity of this distribution is found. The optimal conditions for excitation of the active media of cataphoresis repetitively pulsed metal vapour lasers are determined under which a high degree of both longitudinal and transverse homogeneity is achieved. (active media)

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters (cTMS).

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Murphy, David L; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2010-01-01

    We describe a novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy-storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) to generate near-rectangular electric field E-field) pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable-pulse-parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce E-field pulses with phase widths of 5-200 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-10. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation by 78-82% and 55-57% and decreases coil heating by 15-33% and 31-41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS (rTMS) trains of 3,000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with E-field pulse amplitude and width variability of less than 1.7% and 1%, respectively. The reduced power consumption and coil heating, and the flexible pulse parameter adjustment offered by cTMS could enhance existing TMS paradigms and could enable novel research and clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  1. Coupling effects of the number of pulses, pulse repetition rate and fluence during laser PMMA ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Feng, Y.; Yi, X.-S.

    2000-10-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was ablated using a 248-nm long-pulsed KrF excimer laser operating at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 2 and 10 Hz, and fluence varying from 0.4 to 2 J/cm 2. The coupling effects of multiple shots, PRR, and fluence are found and discussed on the etching depth data and topography of PMMA. An increase in either PRR, or fluence or the number of pulses can accelerate the etching efficiency in terms of ablation rate, as a result of strengthened thermal effects. Quality of the craters such as roughness, porosity and contamination is sensitively dependent on the specific laser operating conditions. Basically, increasing the PRR and the number of pulses gives rise to a crater with smoother and less porous bottom.

  2. Ultrafast XUV Pulses at High Repetition Rate for Time Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xinlong; Muraca, Amanda R.; Kershis, Matthew D.; White, Michael G.; Allison, Thomas K.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast photoelectron studies of surface dynamics are often limited by low repetition rates. At Stony Brook we have built a cavity-enhanced high-harmonic generation XUV source that delivers ultrafast pulses to a surface science apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy. We begin with a Ytterbium fiber laser at a repetition rate of 78 MHz and up to 90 W of average power. After compression the pulses have μJ's of energy with < 180 fs pulse width. We then use an enhancement cavity with a finesse of a few hundred to build up to the peak intensity required for high harmonic generation. The enhancement cavity is a six mirror double folded bow-tie geometry with a focus of 15 μm at a Krypton gas jet, followed by a Sapphire crystal at Brewster's angle for the fundamental to allow outcoupling of the harmonics. A single harmonic is selected using a time-preserving monochromator to maintain the short pulses, and is sent to an ultra high vacuum chamber with sample preparation and diagnostic tools as well as an electron energy spectrometer. This allows us to study the electronic dynamics of semiconductor surfaces and their interfaces with adsorbed molecules which enable various charge transfer effects. Supported by AFOSR.

  3. Pulsed power for particle beam accelerators in military applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, I.D.

    1980-06-20

    Techniques useful for generating and conditioning power for high energy pulsed accelerators with potential weapon applications are described. Pulsed electron accelerators are exemplified by ETA and ATA at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories and RADLAC at Sandia Laboratories Albuquerque. Pulse-power techniques used in other applications are briefly mentioned, including some that may be useful for collective ion accelerators. The limitations of pulse-power and the general directions of desirable development are illustrated. The main needs are to increase repetition rate and to decrease size.

  4. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, Kristian

    1983-01-01

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  5. Initial operation of a pulse-burst laser system for high-repetition-rate Thomson scatteringa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. S.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Hurst, N. C.

    2010-10-01

    A pulse-burst laser has been installed for Thomson scattering measurements on the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. The laser design is a master-oscillator power-amplifier. The master oscillator is a commercial Nd:YVO4 laser (1064 nm) which is capable of Q-switching at frequencies between 5 and 250 kHz. Four Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) amplifier stages are in place to amplify the Nd:YVO4 emission. Single pulses through the Nd:YAG amplifier stages gives energies up to 1.5 J and the gain for each stage has been measured. Repetitive pulsing at 10 kHz has also been performed for 2 ms bursts, giving average pulse energies of 0.53 J with ΔE /E of 4.6%, where ΔE is the standard deviation between pulses. The next step will be to add one of two Nd:glass (silicate) amplifier stages to produce final pulse energies of 1-2 J for bursts up to 250 kHz.

  6. Efficient high-peak-power and high-repetition-rate eye-safe laser using an intracavity KTP OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; He, G. Y.; Jiao, Z. X.; Wang, B.

    2015-03-01

    An efficient high-peak-power and high-repetition-rate intracavity KTP optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser is demonstrated. We achieved 1.5 W output power of 1.5 μm at 10 kHz repetition rate with the pulse duration of 6 ns. The maximum peak power of 25 kW and the maximum pulse energy of 150 μJ have been obtained. The maximum conversion efficiency of 9.5% is achieved with respect to a laser diode power of 10.5 W.

  7. Repetitive production of positron emitters using deuterons accelerated by multiterawatt laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Masatoshi; Matsukado, Koji; Takahashi, Hironori; Kawada, Yoichi; Ohsuka, Shinji; Aoshima, Shin-Ichiro

    2009-11-15

    Positron emitters {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, and {sup 15}O, which can be used in positron emission tomography, were produced using deuterons accelerated by irradiation of laser pulses {approx}70 TW in peak power and {approx}30 fs in duration with a repetition of 10 Hz during a period of as long as 200 s. Every laser pulse irradiates the fresh surface of a long strip of a solid-state thin film. Deuterons contained in the film are accelerated in the relativistic plasma induced by the pulse. The deuterons are repetitively incident on solid plates, which are placed near the film, to produce positron emitters by nuclear reactions. The radioactivities of the activated plates are measured after the termination of laser irradiation. In activation of graphite, boron-nitride, and melamine plates, the products had total activities of 64, 46, and 153 Bq, respectively. Contamination in the setup was negligible even after several thousands of laser shots. Our apparatus is expected to greatly contribute to the construction of a compact PET diagnostic system in the future.

  8. Sub-20-ps pulses from a passively Q-switched microchip laser at 1  MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Mehner, Eva; Bernard, Benjamin; Giessen, Harald; Kopf, Daniel; Braun, Bernd

    2014-05-15

    We present a 50 μm Nd3+:YVO4 microchip laser that is passively Q-switched by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. To reduce handling problems caused by the small crystal dimensions, the 50 μm Nd3+:YVO4 crystal is optically bonded to an undoped YVO4 crystal of a length of about 500 μm. By using a saturable absorber mirror with an effective modulation depth of >10% the system is able to deliver 16 ps pulses at a repetition rate of up to 1.0 MHz. The average laser power is 16 mW at 1064 nm. To our knowledge these are the shortest Q-switched pulses ever reported from a solid-state laser. The limits in terms of pulse width, repetition rate, output power, and system stability are discussed. Additionally, continuous-wave behavior is analyzed. Experimental data is compared with the simulation results of the coupled rate equations.

  9. The influence of the repetition rate on the nanosecond pulsed pin-to-pin microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2014-10-01

    The effect of repetition rate on a nanosecond atmospheric pressure discharge is investigated. The discharge is generated between two pins in a mixture of Ne and Ar. The voltage, current, power waveforms and the temporally and spatially resolved electron density and an ‘effective’ electron temperature are measured, with a pulse interval between 1.5 and 200 µs. It is found that not only does the repetition rate have a strong influence on the breakdown voltage and the peak discharge power, but it can also affect the rise rate of the volume averaged electron density and its peak value. Temporally and spatially resolved measurement of the electron density and the effective electron temperature show that the spatial distributions of both quantities are also influenced by the repetition rate. In the initial discharge period of all cases, the sharp rise of the electron density correlates with the drastic drop of the effective electron temperature. It is suggested that the residual charges have a strong impact on the axial distribution of the electric field and energetic electrons between the electrodes during the breakdown period, as illustrated by a simple sheath model.

  10. Recent developments in high-resolution optical diagnostics of repetitively pulsed laser-target effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, Manfred; Althaus, Marion

    1995-05-01

    High energy densities, as required both in research and in industry, are achieved by the use of lasers. Extremely highpower densities are obtained in the pulsed mode with short microsecond(s) -, ns-, or even ultrashort ps- to fs- pulses. The interaction of such powerful laser pulses with any type of solid state, liquid or gaseous materials is then causing rapidly developing, nonstationary, optically nonlinear processes. Experimental investigations of these effects are therefore requiring special measuring techniques with high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical and optronical methods have proven to be particularly useful. Methods based on laser diagnostics, including high speed photography, cinematography, speckle techniques, holography, videography, infrared techniques or arbitrary combinations of these, are therefore considered to be important tools in these laser effect studies. The investigations reported in the present paper are referring to carbon dioxide-laser effects in intensity ranges which are useful for many industrial applications, such as for example in the field of material processing. Basic interest is actually in pulsed, plasma sustained laser target interaction phenomena which occur above critical threshold power densities, specific for each type of material. Surface induced, highly ionized absorption waves are then determining the energy transfer from the coherent laser radiation field towards the targets. The experiments at ISL were aimed at investigating plasma parameters and their influence on the energy transfer rates, by fast optical, electrical and optronical techniques, such as mentioned above. The results to be discussed refer to target effects, basically observed on optically transparent materials, subject to high average power pulsed carbon dioxide-laser radiation, with repetition rates of several tens to hundred pps at multi-MW/cm2 to GW/cm2 peak power densities and average power densities in the multi-kW/cm2-range.

  11. Possible repetitive pulse operation of diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical study has been conducted for investigating the possibility of a diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) operating in repetitive pulsed mode. A one-dimensional, time-dependent rate-equation simulation of a Cs DPAL was developed to calculate the dynamic behavior of the active medium when Q-switching or cavity dumping was applied. The simulation modeled our small-scale experimental apparatus. In the continuous-wave (CW) mode, the calculated output power was in good agreement with the experimental value. Q-switching was shown to be ineffective because of the short spontaneous lifetime of the active medium, on the order of 10 ns. On the other hand, cavity dumping was proven to be effective. In typical operational conditions, a 54 times increase in peak power with respect to the CW power was predicted.

  12. Petawatt pulsed-power accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Stygar, William A.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Headley, Daniel I.; Ives, Harry C.; Ives, legal representative; Berry Cottrell; Leeper, Ramon J.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Olson, Craig L.; Porter, John L.; Wagoner; Tim C.

    2010-03-16

    A petawatt pulsed-power accelerator can be driven by various types of electrical-pulse generators, including conventional Marx generators and linear-transformer drivers. The pulsed-power accelerator can be configured to drive an electrical load from one- or two-sides. Various types of loads can be driven; for example, the accelerator can be used to drive a high-current z-pinch load. When driven by slow-pulse generators (e.g., conventional Marx generators), the accelerator comprises an oil section comprising at least one pulse-generator level having a plurality of pulse generators; a water section comprising a pulse-forming circuit for each pulse generator and a level of monolithic triplate radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, that have variable impedance profiles, for each pulse-generator level; and a vacuum section comprising triplate magnetically insulated transmission lines that feed an electrical load. When driven by LTD generators or other fast-pulse generators, the need for the pulse-forming circuits in the water section can be eliminated.

  13. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi-Jie; Yang, Dong-Xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Chen, Teng-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  14. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi-jie; Yang, Dong-xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-fei; Chen, Teng-yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  15. Excitation and relaxation of metastable atomic states in an active medium of a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P A; Zakrevskii, D E; Lavrukhin, M A; Lyabin, N A; Chursin, A D

    2016-02-28

    The influence of a pre-pulse population of copper atom metastable states and their sub-population at a current pulse edge on the copper vapour laser pulse energy is studied under optimal temperature conditions. Experiments have been performed with active elements of a commercial laser having an internal diameter of a discharge channel of 14 and 20 mm. It is found that at a pulse repetition frequency of 12 – 14 kHz, corresponding to a maximal output power, the reduction of the energy due to a residual population of metastable states is by an order of magnitude less than due to their sub-population at a current pulse edge. The modelling based on the experimental results obtained has shown that in the case of an active element with an internal diameter of 14 mm, a decrease in the pulse leading edge from ∼25 ns to 0.6 ns does not reduce the laser pulse energy up to the repetition frequency of ∼50 kHz at an average output power of 70 W m{sup -1} and efficiency of ∼11%. (lasers)

  16. 486nm blue laser operating at 500 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Blanchard, Jon; Pretorius, Herman; Limongelli, Julia; Setzler, Scott D.

    2016-03-01

    Compact, high power blue light in the 470-490nm region is difficult to generate due to the lack of laser sources which are easily convertible (through parametric processes) to those wavelengths. By using a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser as a pump source for a 2-stage second harmonic generation (SHG) scheme, we have generated ~2W of 486.5nm light at 500kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF). To our knowledge, this is the highest PRF and output power achieved in the blue region based on a frequency converted, monolithic fiber laser. This pump laser is a pulsed Tm-doped fiber laser/amplifier which generates 12.8W of 1946nm power at 500kHz PRF with diffraction-limited output from a purely single-mode fiber. The output from this laser is converted to 973nm through second harmonic generation (SHG). The 973nm is then converted to 486.5nm via another SHG stage. This architecture operates with very low peak power, which can be challenging from a nonlinear conversion standpoint. However, the low peak power enables the use of a single-mode monolithic fiber amplifier without undergoing nonlinear effects in the fiber. This also eliminates the need for novel fiber designs, large-mode area fiber, or free-space coupling to rod-type amplifiers, improving reliability and robustness of the laser source. Higher power and conversion efficiency are possible through the addition of Tm-doped fiber amplification stages as well as optimization of the nonlinear conversion process and nonlinear materials. In this paper, we discuss the laser layout, results, and challenges with generating blue light using a low peak power approach.

  17. High power repetitive excimer lasers pumped by an all solid state magnetic exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Osamu; Noda, Koji; Shimada, Tsutomu; Obara, Minoru

    1986-01-01

    In a high repetition rate excimer laser operation, the lifetime of the exciter is one of the most important problems. To attain a nearly endless lifetime of the excimer laser exciter, an all-solid-state exciter has been developed which consists of a high-voltage transformer switched by a silicon-controlled rectifier, producing a pulse whose energy and duration are 11.2 J and 8 microns, respectively, and a three-stage magnetic compressor. With a 1.4-ohm dummy load, output peak power, energy/pulse, and pulse duration were 100 MW, 5.2 J, and 100 ns, respectively. The electrical efficiency of the exciter was 47 percent. The energy loss of 6 J in the exciter was due both to the core loss and the transfer loss. It should be noted that the time jitter between the SCR gate input pulse and the output voltage pulse was less than 12 ns.

  18. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  19. All solid-state high power microwave source with high repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, J.-W. B.; Sullivan, W. W.; Mauch, D.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    An all solid-state, megawatt-class high power microwave system featuring a silicon carbide (SiC) photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) and a ferrimagnetic-based, coaxial nonlinear transmission line (NLTL) is presented. A 1.62 cm2, 50 kV 4H-SiC PCSS is hard-switched to produce electrical pulses with 7 ns full width-half max (FWHM) pulse widths at 2 ns risetimes in single shot and burst-mode operation. The PCSS resistance drops to sub-ohm when illuminated with approximately 3 mJ of laser energy at 355 nm (tripled Nd:YAG) in a single pulse. Utilizing a fiber optic based optical delivery system, a laser pulse train of four 7 ns (FWHM) signals was generated at 65 MHz repetition frequency. The resulting electrical pulse train from the PCSS closely follows the optical input and is utilized to feed the NLTL generating microwave pulses with a base microwave-frequency of about 2.1 GHz at 65 MHz pulse repetition frequency (prf). Under typical experimental conditions, the NLTL produces sharpened output risetimes of 120 ps and microwave oscillations at 2-4 GHz that are generated due to damped gyromagnetic precession of the ferrimagnetic material's axially pre-biased magnetic moments. The complete system is discussed in detail with its output matched into 50 Ω, and results covering MHz-prf in burst-mode operation as well as frequency agility in single shot operation are discussed.

  20. A pulse-burst laser system for a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Den Hartog, D J; Jiang, N; Lempert, W R

    2008-10-01

    A "pulse-burst" laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. This laser is designed to produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition frequencies 5-250 kHz. This laser system will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier. The master oscillator is a compact diode-pumped Nd:YVO(4) laser, intermediate amplifier stages are flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG, and final stages will be flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass (silicate). Variable pulse width drive (0.3-20 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated-gate bipolar transistor switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of electron temperature (T(e)) and electron density (n(e)) dynamics in a single MST shot, and with ensembling, will enable correlation of T(e) and n(e) fluctuations with other fluctuating quantities.

  1. A pulse-burst laser system for a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Jiang, N.; Lempert, W. R.

    2008-10-15

    A ''pulse-burst'' laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. This laser is designed to produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition frequencies 5-250 kHz. This laser system will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier. The master oscillator is a compact diode-pumped Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser, intermediate amplifier stages are flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG, and final stages will be flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass (silicate). Variable pulse width drive (0.3-20 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated-gate bipolar transistor switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and electron density (n{sub e}) dynamics in a single MST shot, and with ensembling, will enable correlation of T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations with other fluctuating quantities.

  2. Surface damage characteristics of CFC and tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Nishijima, D.; Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Ueno, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Shoda, K.; Nagata, M.; Kawai, T.; Ueda, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Doerner, R. P.

    2011-08-01

    Surface damage of carbon fiber composite (CFC) and tungsten (W) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. CX2002U CFC and stress-relieved W samples were exposed to repetitive pulsed deuterium plasmas with duration of ˜0.5 ms, incident ion energy of ˜30 eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ˜0.3-0.7 MJ/m2. Bright spots on a CFC surface during pulsed plasma exposures were clearly observed with a high-speed camera, indicating a local surface heating. No melting of a W surface was observed under a single plasma pulse exposure at energy density of ˜0.7 MJ/m2, although cracks were formed. Cracking of the W surface grew with repetitive pulsed plasma exposures. Subsequently, the surface melted due to localized heat absorption.

  3. Electra: durable repetitively pulsed angularly multiplexed KrF laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolford, Matthew F.; Myers, Matthew C.; Giuliani, John L.; Sethian, John D.; Burns, Patrick M.; Hegeler, Frank; Jaynes, Reginald

    2008-02-01

    Electra is a repetitively pulsed, electron beam pumped Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser at the Naval Research Laboratory that is developing the technologies that can meet the Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) requirements for durability, efficiency, and cost. The technologies developed on Electra should be directly scalable to a full size fusion power plant beam line. As in a full size fusion power plant beam line, Electra is a multistage laser amplifier system which, consists of a commercial discharge laser (LPX 305i, Lambda Physik), 175 keV electron beam pumped (40 ns flat-top) preamplifier, and 530 keV (100 ns flat-top) main amplifier. Angular multiplexing is used in the optical layout to provide pulse length control and to maximize laser extraction from the amplifiers. Single shot yield of 452 J has been extracted from the initial shots of the Electra laser system using a relatively low energy preamplifier laser beam. In rep-rate burst of 5 Hz for durations of one second a total energy of 1.585 kJ (average 317 J/pulse) has been attained. Total energy of 2.5 kJ has been attained over a two second period. For comparison, the main amplifier of Electra in oscillator mode has demonstrated at 2.5 Hz rep-rate average laser yield of 270 J over a 2 hour period.

  4. Repetitively pulsed regime of Nd : glass large-aperture laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, A A; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A

    2012-04-30

    A repetitively pulsed operation regime of neodymium glass rod laser amplifiers with apertures of 4.5, 6, 8.5, and 10 cm is analysed using experimental data. The limits of an increase in the pulse repetition rates are determined. Universal dependences are obtained, which help finding a compromise between increasing the repetition rate and enhancing the gain for each particular case. In particular, it is shown that an amplifier 4.5-cm in diameter exhibits a five-fold safety factor with respect to a thermo-mechanical breakdown at a repetition rate of 1 pulse min{sup -1} and stored energy of above 100 J. A strong thermally induced birefringence in two such amplifiers is experimentally reduced to a 'cold' level by employing a 90 Degree-Sign optical rotator.

  5. Neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, A A; Kulagin, O V; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A

    2013-07-31

    A compact neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a record-high pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz (pulse duration 30 ns) is developed. Thermally induced phase distortions are compensated using wave phase conjugation. The integral depolarisation of radiation is decreased to 0.4% by using linear compensation schemes. The second harmonic of laser radiation can be used for pumping Ti : sapphire multipetawatt complexes. (letters)

  6. Thermal management in high average power pulsed compression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R.W.; Reed, K.W.; Harjes, H.C.; Weber, G.J.; Butler, M.; Penn, K.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1992-08-01

    High average power repetitively pulsed compression systems offer a potential source of electron beams which may be applied to sterilization of wastes, treatment of food products, and other environmental and consumer applications. At Sandia National Laboratory, the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) program is developing a 7 stage magnetic pulse compressor driving a linear induction voltage adder with an electron beam diode load. The RHEPP machine is being design to deliver 350 kW of average power to the diode in 60 ns FWHM, 2.5 MV, 3 kJ pulses at a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In addition to the electrical design considerations, the repetition rate requires thermal management of the electrical losses. Steady state temperatures must be kept below the material degradation temperatures to maximize reliability and component life. The optimum design is a trade off between thermal management, maximizing overall electrical performance of the system, reliability, and cost effectiveness. Cooling requirements and configurations were developed for each of the subsystems of RHEPP. Finite element models that combine fluid flow and heat transfer were used to screen design concepts. The analysis includes one, two, and three dimensional heat transfer using surface heat transfer coefficients and boundary layer models. Experiments were conducted to verify the models as well as to evaluate cooling channel fabrication materials and techniques in Metglas wound cores. 10 refs.

  7. Pulsed power molten salt battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that carbon cathodes with chlorine work well. Lithium alloy chlorine at 450 C, 1 atm given high power capability, high energy density, DC + pulsing yields 600 pulses, no initial peak, and can go to red heat without burn-up. Electrochemical performance at the cell and cell stack level out under demanding test regime. Engineering and full prototype development for advancing this technology is warranted.

  8. High pulse repetition frequency fiber-coupled laser-diode module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangyuan; Li, Song; Huang, Ke; Zheng, Guoxing

    2016-12-01

    A practical and simple approach of achieving a high pulse repetition frequency fiber-coupled laser-diode device is demonstrated both by experiment and TRACEPRO software simulation, which is obtained by beam collimating, spatial beam combining, and polarization beam combining based on multiple cycle-emitting pulsed laser-diode emitters. Using this method, fiber-coupled laser-diode module output pulse repetition frequency from the multimode fiber with 200-μm core diameter and 0.22 numerical aperture can reach 300 kHz, and the coupling efficiency is beyond 72%. This technique has superiors of great flexibility, low cost, and high reliability for wide applications.

  9. Agricultural and Food Processing Applications of Pulsed Power Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Koichi; Ihara, Satoshi

    Recent progress of agricultural and food processing applications of pulsed power is described in this paper. Repetitively operated compact pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power have been developed for the agricultural and the food processing applications. These applications are mainly based on biological effects and can be categorized as decontamination of air and liquid, germination promotion, inhabitation of saprophytes growth, extraction of juice from fruits and vegetables, and fertilization of liquid medium, etc. Types of pulsed power that have biological effects are caused with gas discharges, water discharges, and electromagnetic fields. The discharges yield free radicals, UV radiation, intense electric field, and shock waves. Biologically based applications of pulsed power are performed by selecting the type that gives the target objects the adequate result from among these agents or byproducts. For instance, intense electric fields form pores on the cell membrane, which is called electroporation, or influence the nuclei.

  10. Modeling of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Likhanskii, Alexandre V.; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Macheret, Sergey O.; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-07-15

    A detailed physical model for an asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air driven by repetitive nanosecond voltage pulses is developed. In particular, modeling of DBD with high voltage repetitive negative and positive nanosecond pulses combined with positive dc bias is carried out. Operation at high voltage is compared with operation at low voltage, highlighting the advantage of high voltages, however the effect of backward-directed breakdown in the case of negative pulses results in a decrease of the integral momentum transferred to the gas. The use of positive repetitive pulses with dc bias is demonstrated to be promising for DBD performance improvement. The effects of the voltage waveform not only on force magnitude, but also on the spatial profile of the force, are shown. The crucial role of background photoionization in numerical modeling of ionization waves (streamers) in DBD plasmas is demonstrated.

  11. Development of Miniature and High-repetition-rate Magnetic Pulse Compression Circuit for Production of Streamer-like Discharge Plasmas in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Takahisa; Kouno, Kanako; Akiyama, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidenori; Sakugawa, Takashi

    Pulsed power technology enables production of non-thermal plasmas with a large volume in gases by generating a high electric field at the tip of streamer discharge plasmas. Recently, all solid-state pulsed power generators which are operated with a high repetition rate, long lifetime and high reliability, have been developed aiming for industrial applications. Here, a new high-repetition-rate pulsed power generator for discharge plasmas in water is developed. The generator consists of semiconductor switches and saturable inductors. The semiconductor switches are thyristors in parallel and series circuits. An output peak voltage over 20kV is generated with a voltage rise time of 100ns, and streamer-like discharge plasmas in water are produced repetitively.

  12. Phase-stable, multi-µJ femtosecond pulses from a repetition-rate tunable Ti:Sa-oscillator-seeded Yb-fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saule, T.; Holzberger, S.; De Vries, O.; Plötner, M.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.; Pupeza, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present a high-power, MHz-repetition-rate, phase-stable femtosecond laser system based on a phase-stabilized Ti:Sa oscillator and a multi-stage Yb-fiber chirped-pulse power amplifier. A 10-nm band around 1030 nm is split from the 7-fs oscillator output and serves as the seed for subsequent amplification by 54 dB to 80 W of average power. The µJ-level output is spectrally broadened in a solid-core fiber and compressed to 30 fs with chirped mirrors. A pulse picker prior to power amplification allows for decreasing the repetition rate from 74 MHz by a factor of up to 4 without affecting the pulse parameters. To compensate for phase jitter added by the amplifier to the feed-forward phase-stabilized seeding pulses, a self-referencing feed-back loop is implemented at the system output. An integrated out-of-loop phase noise of less than 100 mrad was measured in the band from 0.4 Hz to 400 kHz, which to the best of our knowledge corresponds to the highest phase stability ever demonstrated for high-power, multi-MHz-repetition-rate ultrafast lasers. This system will enable experiments in attosecond physics at unprecedented repetition rates, it offers ideal prerequisites for the generation and field-resolved electro-optical sampling of high-power, broadband infrared pulses, and it is suitable for phase-stable white light generation.

  13. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  14. Development of a long-life, high-reliability, high-energy-density, repetitive-pulse, capacitor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauldin, G. H.; Nunnally, W. C.; Thompson, M. C.; Sarjeant, W. J.

    Evolving power conditioning system requirements in the areas of magnetic confinement fusion, inertial confinement fusion, ion propulsion engines, particle beam technology, radar, communications, and medical electronics will place severe demands upon repetitive pulse power system components. The energy storage capacitor is one principal system pacing component. A unique capacitor technology which is reliable and space efficient was developed. This technology is based upon impregnation of plastic film capacitor rolls with perfluorocarbon insulating liquids. A 300-kW capacitor discharge test facility was activated. This facility allows testing at high average powers and high repetition rates. It employs extensive diagnostic instrumentation which allows sophisticated analysis of the test results. The test facility and test results are described.

  15. Pulsed Power Fusion Program update

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Allshouse, G.O.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy has supported a substantial research program in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) since the early 1970s. Over the course of the ensuing 25 years, pulsed power energy, efficiency, and relatively low cost of the technology when compared to the mainline ICF approach involving large glass lasers. These compelling advantages of pulsed power, however, have been tempered with the difficulty that has been encountered in concentrating the energy in space and time to create the high energy and power density required to achieve temperatures useful in indirect drive ICF. Since the Beams `96 meeting two years ago, the situation has changed dramatically and extremely high x-ray power ({approximately}290 TW) and energy ({approximately}1.8 MJ) have been produced in fast x-pinch implosions on the Z accelerator. These sources have been utilized to heat hohlraums to >150 eV and have opened the door to important ICF capsule experiments.

  16. High-energy, high-repetition-rate picosecond pulses from a quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG system.

    PubMed

    Noom, Daniel W E; Witte, Stefan; Morgenweg, Jonas; Altmann, Robert K; Eikema, Kjeld S E

    2013-08-15

    We report on a high-power quasi-CW pumped Nd:YAG laser system, producing 130 mJ, 64 ps pulses at 1064 nm wavelength with a repetition rate of 300 Hz. Pulses from a Nd:YVO(4) oscillator are first amplified by a regenerative amplifier to the millijoule level and then further amplified in quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG modules. Pulsed diode pumping enables a high gain at repetition rates of several hundred hertz, while keeping thermal effects manageable. Birefringence compensation and multiple thermal-lensing-compensated relay-imaging stages are used to maintain a top-hat beam profile. After frequency doubling, 75 mJ pulses are obtained at 532 nm. The intensity stability is better than 1.1%, which makes this laser an attractive pump source for a high-repetition-rate optical parametric amplification system.

  17. KAPTURE-2. A picosecond sampling system for individual THz pulses with high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A.-S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel data acquisition system for continuous sampling of ultra-short pulses generated by terahertz (THz) detectors. Karlsruhe Pulse Taking Ultra-fast Readout Electronics (KAPTURE) is able to digitize pulse shapes with a sampling time down to 3 ps and pulse repetition rates up to 500 MHz. KAPTURE has been integrated as a permanent diagnostic device at ANKA and is used for investigating the emitted coherent synchrotron radiation in the THz range. A second version of KAPTURE has been developed to improve the performance and flexibility. The new version offers a better sampling accuracy for a pulse repetition rate up to 2 GHz. The higher data rate produced by the sampling system is processed in real-time by a heterogeneous FPGA and GPU architecture operating up to 6.5 GB/s continuously. Results in accelerator physics will be reported and the new design of KAPTURE be discussed.

  18. High-power, high repetition-rate, green-pumped, picosecond LBO optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Florian; Teh, Peh Siong; Lin, Dejiao; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Price, Jonathan H V; Hanna, D C; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2012-03-26

    We report on a picosecond, green-pumped, lithium triborate optical parametric oscillator with record-high output power. It was synchronously pumped by a frequency-doubled (530 nm), pulse-compressed (4.4 ps), high-repetition-rate (230 MHz), fiber-amplified gain-switched laser diode. For a pump power of 17 W, a maximum signal and idler power of 3.7 W and 1.8 W was obtained from the optical parametric oscillator. A signal pulse duration of ~3.2 ps was measured and wide tunability from 651 nm to 1040 nm for the signal and from 1081 nm to 2851 nm for the idler was achieved.

  19. Robust Short-Pulse, High-Peak-Power Laser Transmitter for Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Malcolm W.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a pulsed fiber based master oscillator power amplifier laser at 1550 nm to support moderate data rates with high peak powers in a compact package suitable for interplanetary optical communications. To accommodate pulse position modulation, the polarization maintaining laser transmitter generates pulses from 0.1 to 1 ns with variable duty cycle over a pulse repetition frequency range of 10 to 100 MHz.

  20. Drilling and cutting of thin metal plates in water with radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Glova, A F; Lysikov, A Yu

    2011-10-31

    The conditions of drilling and cutting of 0.15-mm-thick titanium and stainless steel plates in water with the radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser having the mean power up to 30 W are studied experimentally in the absence of water and gas jets. Dependences of the maximal cutting speed in water on the radiation power are obtained, the cutting efficiency is determined, and the comparison with the conditions of drilling and cutting of plates in air is carried out.

  1. Drilling and cutting of thin metal plates in water with radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glova, A. F.; Lysikov, A. Yu

    2011-10-01

    The conditions of drilling and cutting of 0.15-mm-thick titanium and stainless steel plates in water with the radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser having the mean power up to 30 W are studied experimentally in the absence of water and gas jets. Dependences of the maximal cutting speed in water on the radiation power are obtained, the cutting efficiency is determined, and the comparison with the conditions of drilling and cutting of plates in air is carried out.

  2. High power parallel ultrashort pulse laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillner, Arnold; Gretzki, Patrick; Büsing, Lasse

    2016-03-01

    The class of ultra-short-pulse (USP) laser sources are used, whenever high precession and high quality material processing is demanded. These laser sources deliver pulse duration in the range of ps to fs and are characterized with high peak intensities leading to a direct vaporization of the material with a minimum thermal damage. With the availability of industrial laser source with an average power of up to 1000W, the main challenge consist of the effective energy distribution and disposition. Using lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz region can cause thermal issues like overheating, melt production and low ablation quality. In this paper, we will discuss different approaches for multibeam processing for utilization of high pulse energies. The combination of diffractive optics and conventional galvometer scanner can be used for high throughput laser ablation, but are limited in the optical qualities. We will show which applications can benefit from this hybrid optic and which improvements in productivity are expected. In addition, the optical limitations of the system will be compiled, in order to evaluate the suitability of this approach for any given application.

  3. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of SrRuO3 thin-films: The role of the pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraknepper, H.; Bäumer, C.; Gunkel, F.; Dittmann, R.; De Souza, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    SrRuO3 thin-films were deposited with different pulse repetition rates, fdep, epitaxially on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition. The measurement of several physical properties (e.g., composition by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the out-of-plane lattice parameter, the electric conductivity, and the Curie temperature) consistently reveals that an increase in laser repetition rate results in an increase in ruthenium deficiency in the films. By the same token, it is shown that when using low repetition rates, approaching a nearly stoichiometric cation ratio in SrRuO3 becomes feasible. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism to explain the widely observed Ru deficiency of SrRuO3 thin-films. Our findings demand these theoretical considerations to be based on kinetic rather than widely employed thermodynamic arguments.

  5. Method and means for generating a synchronizing pulse from a repetitive wave of varying frequency

    DOEpatents

    DeVolpi, Alexander; Pecina, Ronald J.; Travis, Dale J.

    1976-01-01

    An event that occurs repetitively at continuously changing frequencies can be used to generate a triggering pulse which is used to synchronize or control. The triggering pulse is generated at a predetermined percentage of the period of the repetitive waveform without regard to frequency. Counts are accumulated in two counters, the first counting during the "on" fraction of the period, and the second counting during the "off" fraction. The counts accumulated during each cycle are compared. On equality the trigger pulse is generated. Count input rates to each counter are determined by the ratio of the on-off fractions of the event waveform and the desired phase relationship. This invention is of particular utility in providing a trigger or synchronizing pulse during the open period of the shutter of a high-speed framing camera during its acceleration as well as its period of substantially constant speed.

  6. Sub-100 fs pulses at watt-level powers from a dissipative-soliton fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Kieu, K.; Renninger, W. H.; Chong, A.; Wise, F. W.

    2011-01-01

    We report a mode-locked fiber laser that exploits dissipative-soliton pulse shaping along with cladding pumping for high average power. The laser generates 31 nJ chirped pulses at 70 MHz repetition rate, for an average power of 2.2 W. After dechirping outside the laser, 80 fs pulses, with 200 kW peak power, are obtained. PMID:19252562

  7. Elastomer dielectric for pulse power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradely, L. P.; Orham, E. L.; Stowers, I. F.; Braucht, J. R.

    1980-05-01

    Selected elastomer dielectrics are characterized as high voltage insulators for use in pulse power systems. Silicone, ethylene propylene rubber and polyurethene were tested, but most of the data is for silicone. The particular power system developed uses a formed silicone insulator 76 cm in dia. and 3 mm thick as the major insulator between capacitors, railgap switches, load, and return conductor. The capacitor array is dc charged to 50 kv. The use of an elastomer dielectric made possible the construction of a pulser one order of magnitude smaller than previously constructed pulsers having the same current characteristics. Also, use of the elastomer dielectrics in pulse powr systems leads to improved production techniques and system reliability.

  8. Accurate modeling of high-repetition rate ultrashort pulse amplification in optical fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Robert; Zeil, Peter; Malmström, Mikael; Laurell, Fredrik; Pasiskevicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model for amplification of ultrashort pulses with high repetition rates in fiber amplifiers is presented. The pulse propagation is modeled by jointly solving the steady-state rate equations and the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which allows accurate treatment of nonlinear and dispersive effects whilst considering arbitrary spatial and spectral gain dependencies. Comparison of data acquired by using the developed model and experimental results prove to be in good agreement. PMID:27713496

  9. Generation of picosecond laser pulses at 1030 nm with gigahertz range continuously tunable repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Aubourg, Adrien; Lhermite, Jérôme; Hocquet, Steve; Cormier, Eric; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2015-12-01

    We report on a watt range laser system generating picosecond pulses using electro-optical modulation of a 1030 nm single frequency low noise laser diode. Its repetition rate is continuously tunable between 11 and 18 GHz. Over this range, output spectra and pulse characteristics are measured and compared with a numerical simulation. Finally, amplitude and residual phase noise measurements of the source are also presented.

  10. Solid state pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Fengfeng; Saddoughi, Seyed Gholamali; Herbon, John Thomas

    2014-02-11

    A power generator includes one or more full bridge inverter modules coupled to a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) through an inductive resonant branch. Each module includes a plurality of switches that are switched in a fashion causing the one or more full bridge inverter modules to drive the semiconductor opening switch SOS through the resonant circuit to generate pulses to a load connected in parallel with the SOS.

  11. Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy with low-repetition-rate pulsed light source through phase-domain sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haomin; Wang, Le; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2016-10-01

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows spectroscopic imaging with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. With suitable light sources, s-SNOM is instrumental in numerous discoveries at the nanoscale. So far, the light sources have been limited to continuous wave or high-repetition-rate pulsed lasers. Low-repetition-rate pulsed sources cannot be used, due to the limitation of the lock-in detection mechanism that is required for current s-SNOM techniques. Here, we report a near-field signal extraction method that enables low-repetition-rate pulsed light sources. The method correlates scattering signals from pulses with the mechanical phases of the oscillating s-SNOM probe to obtain near-field signal, by-passing the apparent restriction imposed by the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem on the repetition rate. The method shall enable s-SNOM with low-repetition-rate pulses with high-peak-powers, such as femtosecond laser amplifiers, to facilitate investigations of strong light-matter interactions and nonlinear processes at the nanoscale.

  12. Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy with low-repetition-rate pulsed light source through phase-domain sampling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haomin; Wang, Le; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2016-01-01

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows spectroscopic imaging with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. With suitable light sources, s-SNOM is instrumental in numerous discoveries at the nanoscale. So far, the light sources have been limited to continuous wave or high-repetition-rate pulsed lasers. Low-repetition-rate pulsed sources cannot be used, due to the limitation of the lock-in detection mechanism that is required for current s-SNOM techniques. Here, we report a near-field signal extraction method that enables low-repetition-rate pulsed light sources. The method correlates scattering signals from pulses with the mechanical phases of the oscillating s-SNOM probe to obtain near-field signal, by-passing the apparent restriction imposed by the Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem on the repetition rate. The method shall enable s-SNOM with low-repetition-rate pulses with high-peak-powers, such as femtosecond laser amplifiers, to facilitate investigations of strong light–matter interactions and nonlinear processes at the nanoscale. PMID:27748360

  13. Effect of the pulse repetition rate on fiber-assisted tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the pulse repetition rate on ablation performance was evaluated ex vivo at various fiber sweeping speeds for an effective 532-nm laser prostatectomy. Three pulse repetition rates (7.5, 15, and 30 kHz) at 100 W were delivered to bovine liver tissue at three sweeping speeds (2, 4, and 6 mm/s) to achieve bulky tissue removal. Ablation performance was quantitatively compared in terms of the ablation volume and the coagulation thickness. The lowest pulse repetition rate of 7.5 kHz attained the highest ablation volume (101.5 ± 12.0 mm3) and the thinnest coagulation (0.7 ± 0.1 mm) along with superficial carbonization. The highest pulse repetition rate of 30 kHz was associated with the least tissue removal (65.8 ± 5.0 mm3) and the deepest thermal denaturation (1.1 ± 0.2 mm). Quantitative evaluations of laser parameters can be instrumental in facilitating ablation efficiency and maintaining hemostatic coagulation during treatment of large-sized benign prostate hyperplasia.

  14. Influence of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on the stability of a swirled propane/air burner representative of an aeronautical combustor

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, S.; Pilla, G.; Lacoste, D. A.; Scouflaire, P.; Ducruix, S.; Laux, C. O.; Veynante, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study of the influence of a nanosecond repetitively pulsed spark discharge on the stability domain of a propane/air flame. This flame is produced in a lean premixed swirled combustor representative of an aeronautical combustion chamber. The lean extinction limits of the flame produced without and with plasma are determined and compared. It appears that only a low mean discharge power is necessary to increase the flame stability domain. Lastly, the effects of several parameters (pulse repetition frequency, global flowrate, electrode location) are studied. PMID:26170424

  15. Characteristics of the evolution of a plasma generated by radiation from CW and repetitively pulsed CO2 lasers in different gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevskii, M. F.; Stepanova, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    The interaction between high-power CW and repetitively pulsed CO2 laser radiation and a low-threshold optical-breakdown plasma near a metal surface is investigated. The characteristics of the breakdown plasma are examined as functions of the experimental conditions. A qualitative analysis of the results obtained was performed using a simple one-dimensional model for laser combustion waves.

  16. Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons were studied experimentally in nitrogen. Intense emission lines of copper atoms, nitrogen atoms, and ions, as well as the first and the second positive systems of nitrogen, NO, and CN, were observed in the regime of repetitively pulsed excitation.

  17. Applied Physics Research for Innovation in Pulsed Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-30

    Calculate ionization rates, * Surface flashover fundamental limits breakdown for the various materials Efficient. Repetitive Pulsed Power Page 7 912&󈨢...GaAs devices, and an electron beam produced by the BLT is under development at USC for sub-micron microlithography of semiconductor chips. The...current and leads to a transition to the high-current phase. During this research period evidence for a microscopic cathode spot mechanism was

  18. Fiber-amplifier pumped high average power few-cycle pulse non-collinear OPCPA.

    PubMed

    Tavella, F; Willner, A; Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Seise, E; Düsterer, S; Tschentscher, T; Schlarb, H; Feldhaus, J; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A; Rossbach, J

    2010-03-01

    We report on the performance of a 60 kHz repetition rate sub-10 fs, optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier system with 2 W average power and 3 GW peak power. This is to our knowledge the highest average power sub-10 fs kHz-amplifier system reported to date. The amplifier is conceived for applications at free electron laser facilities and is designed such to be scalable in energy and repetition rate.

  19. Adjustable high-repetition-rate pulse trains in a passively-mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Fodil, Rachid; Amrani, Foued; Yang, Changxi; Kellou, Abdelhamid; Grelu, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate multipulse regimes obtained within a passively-mode-locked fiber laser that includes a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer. By adjusting the time delay imbalance of the MZ, ultrashort pulse trains at multi-GHz repetition rates are generated. We compare the observed dynamics with high-harmonic mode locking, and show that the multi-GHz pulse trains display an inherent instability, which has been overlooked. By using a recirculation loop containing the MZ, we demonstrate a significant improvement of the pulse train stability.

  20. High-power pulsed ytterbium fibre laser with 10{-}\\unicode{956} {\\text{J}} pulse energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trikshev, A. I.; Kamynin, V. A.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Egorova, O. N.

    2016-12-01

    An all-fibre pulsed fibre laser system emitting at a wavelength of 1093 {\\text{nm}} with an average output power up to 10 {\\text{W}} is presented. The system is assembled according to the master oscillator/fibre amplifier scheme. Pulses were generated with passive mode locking due to nonlinear polarisation rotation in a standard single-mode fibre. The main fibre amplifier was pumped by fibre-coupled semiconductor laser diodes at a wavelength of 976 {\\text{nm}} with a maximum total power up to 50 {\\text{W}}. The measured pump duration did not exceed 60 {\\text{ps}} at a pulse repetition rate of about 1 {\\text{MHz}}. The pulse energy was 10 \\unicode{956} {\\text{J}}.

  1. Tunable repetitively pulsed Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A S; Eremeikin, O N; Pavlenko, K Yu; Savikin, A P; Sharkov, V V

    2012-12-31

    Methods of wavelength tuning of a polycrystalline Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser pumped by a repetitively pulsed Tm : YLF laser (pulse duration {approx}100 ns, pulse repetition rate 3 KHz) are studied. With the use of a prism selector, the laser wavelength was tuned within the range of 2070 - 2400 nm at a linewidth of 11 nm for a SiO{sub 2} prism and 30 nm for a CaF{sub 2} prism. The use of a Lyot filter made it possible to tune the Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser wavelength (with replacement of the cavity mirrors) within the spectral ranges of 2130 - 2400 and 2530 - 2750 nm at a linewidth of 4 nm. (lasers)

  2. High-power pulsed thulium fiber oscillator modulated by stimulated Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yulong Xu, Jianqiu

    2014-01-06

    A pulsed ∼2-μm thulium-doped fiber laser passively modulated by distributed stimulated Brillouin scattering achieves 10.2 W average power and >100 kHz repetition rate with a very simple all-fiber configuration. The maximum pulse energy and peak power surpass 100 μJ and 6 kW, respectively. Another distinct property is that the pulse width is clamped around 17 ns at all power levels. All the average-power, pulse energy, and peak power show the highest values from passively modulated fiber lasers in all wavelength regions.

  3. High-power picosecond laser pulse recirculation.

    PubMed

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high-power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering-based light sources. We demonstrate up to 40x average power enhancement of frequency-doubled submillijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  4. High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

    SciTech Connect

    Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J; Shuttlesworth, R M; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.

  5. All-solid-state repetitive semiconductor opening switch-based short pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Liu, Guozhi

    2009-09-01

    The operating characteristics of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are determined by its pumping circuit parameters. SOS is still able to cut off the current when pumping current duration falls to the order of tens of nanoseconds and a short pulse forms simultaneously in the output load. An all-solid-state repetitive SOS-based short pulse generator (SPG100) with a three-level magnetic pulse compression unit was successfully constructed. The generator adopts magnetic pulse compression unit with metallic glass and ferrite cores, which compresses a 600 V, 10 mus primary pulse into short pulse with forward pumping current of 825 A, 60 ns and reverse pumping current of 1.3 kA, 30 ns. The current is sent to SOS in which the reverse pumping current is interrupted. The generator is capable of providing a pulse with the voltage of 120 kV and duration of 5-6 ns while output load being 125 Omega. The highest repetition rate is up to 1 kHz.

  6. Diffuse discharge produced by repetitive nanosecond pulses in open air, nitrogen, and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.; Zhang, Dongdong; Erofeev, Mikhail V.; Ren, Chengyan; Shutko, Yuliya V.; Yan, Ping

    2013-03-01

    Atmospheric-pressure gas discharge driven by high voltage pulses with fast rise-time and short duration has attracted significant attention for various plasma applications. In this paper, discharges were generated in a highly non-uniform electric field by point-plane gaps in open air by four repetitive nanosecond-pulse generators with repetition rate up to 1 kHz. The rise time of generators was 25 (generator #1), 15 (generator #2), 3 (generator #3), and 0.2 ns (generator #4) and a full width at half maximum was 40, 30-40, 5, and 1 ns, respectively. The experimental results show that there were typical discharge fashions, i.e., corona, diffuse, spark, or arc modes. The variables affecting the discharge characteristics, including the gap spacing and applied pulse parameters, were investigated. Especially, the diffuse discharges were investigated and discussed. With generator #1 at voltage 70-120 kV, characteristics of measured x-rays on the discharge modes were studied, and it indicates that counts of x-rays in a diffuse discharge are up to a peak value under the experimental conditions. With amplitude of voltage pulses in incident wave up to 18 (generator #3) and 12.5 kV (generator #4), runaway electron beam in low pressure helium, nitrogen, and air in a pulse-periodic mode of discharge with repetition rate up to 1 kHz was obtained. Electron beam was registered behind a thin foil in a pressure range from several to tens of Torr. X-ray radiation was obtained in a wide range of pressures, as well as at atmospheric pressure of helium, nitrogen, and air. Voltage pulses of positive and negative polarities were used. Generation of runaway electrons with pulses of positive polarity appeared because of reflected voltage pulses of reverse polarity.

  7. Enhanced Thermal Coupling by a Repetitively Pulsed Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    88 13. Energy Absorbed by the Target Per Unit Area as a Function of Radius .......................... 90 14. Depth of Laser Induced...Much work has been done in past years, primarily by researchers at the United States Air Force Weapons Laboratory, in studying the effects of high-power...the Boeing Aerospace Laboratory under contract to the the United States Air Force Weapons Laboratory. The laser used for the experiments was a Marx

  8. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1980-04-02

    The ideas that led to the successful construction and operation of large multibeam fusion lasers at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reviewed. These lasers are based on the use of Nd:glass laser materials. However, most of the concepts are applicable to any laser being designed for fusion experimentation. This report is a summary of lectures given by the author at the 20th Scottish University Summer School in Physics, on Laser Plasma Interaction. This report includes basic concepts of the laser plasma system, a discussion of lasers that are useful for short-pulse, high-power operation, laser design constraints, optical diagnostics, and system organization.

  9. Dual-comb coherent Raman spectroscopy with lasers of 1-GHz pulse repetition frequency.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Kathrin J; Bohn, Bernhard J; Yan, Ming; Mélen, Gwénaëlle; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2017-01-15

    We extend the technique of multiplex coherent Raman spectroscopy with two femtosecond mode-locked lasers to oscillators of a pulse repetition frequency of 1 GHz. We demonstrate a spectra of liquids, which span 1100  cm-1 of Raman shifts. At a resolution of 6  cm-1, their measurement time may be as short as 5 μs for a refresh rate of 2 kHz. The waiting period between acquisitions is improved 10-fold compared to previous experiments with two lasers of 100-MHz repetition frequencies.

  10. Transition from interpulse to afterglow plasmas driven by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shail; Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2012-08-15

    In the power-off phase, plasmas generated by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field show a transitive nature from interpulse to afterglow as a function of pulse duration t{sub w} = 20-200 {mu}s. The ionized medium can be driven from a highly non equilibrium to an equilibrium state inside the pulses, thereby dictating the behavior of the plasma in the power-off phase. Compared to afterglows, interpulse plasmas observed for t{sub w} < 50 {mu}s are characterized by a quasi-steady-state in electron density that persists for {approx} 20-40 {mu}s even after the end of the pulse and has a relatively slower decay rate ({approx} 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) of the electron temperature, as corroborated by optical measurements. The associated electron energy probability function indicates depletion in low energy electrons which appear at higher energies just after the end of the pulse. The transition occurs at t{sub w} {approx} 50 {mu}s as confirmed by time evolution of integrated electron numbers densities obtained from the distribution function.

  11. Tunable pulse width and multi-megawatt peak-power pulses from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Ryutarou; Maeda, Kazuo; Watanabe, Goro; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Enokidani, Jun; Sumida, Shin

    2016-03-01

    We report on tunable pulse width and high peak power pulse generation from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system. The master seed source employs a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator (MZIM). This seed source has operational flexibility with respect to pulse width, 90 ps to 2 ns and repetition rate, 200 kHz to 2 MHz. The seed pulses are amplified by a monolithic three-stage amplifier system based on polarization maintain Yb-doped fibers. The maximum output power was 32 W at the shortest pulse condition, the pulse width of 90 ps and the repetition rate of 750 kHz. A spectral width after amplification was broadened to 0.73 nm at RMS width. Both of ASE and SRS are not observed in the spectrum. After amplification, we also demonstrated pulse compression with a small piece of chirped volume Bragg-grating (CVBG) which has the dispersion rate of 81 ps/nm. As a result of pulse compression, the shortest pulse width was reduced from 90 ps to 3.5 ps, which brought an increase of the peak power up to 3.2 MW. The compressed pulses are clean with little structure in their wings. We can expand the operation range of the monolithic fiber MOPA system in pulse width, 3.5 ps to 2 ns.

  12. Nova pulse power design and operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, K.; Larson, D.; Merritt, B.; Christie, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nova is a 100 TW Nd++ solid state laser designed for experiments with laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The pulsed power for Nova includes a 58 MJ capacitor bank driving 5336 flashlamps with millisecond pulses and subnanosecond high voltages for electro optics. This paper summarizes the pulsed power designs and the operational experience to date.

  13. All-fiber high-average power nanosecond-pulsed master-oscillator power amplifier at 2  μm with mJ-level pulse energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong; Jin, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Hu; Liu, Zejin

    2016-03-10

    We present a high-power nanosecond-pulsed Tm-doped fiber amplifier at 1.971 μm based on a master-oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. When the repetition rate is 500 kHz and the pulse width is 63.3 ns, the average power reaches 238 W, the peak power reaches 7.06 kW, and the pulse energy is 0.477 mJ. When the pulse train's repetition rate is 300 kHz with a pulse width of 63.7 ns, the average power reaches 197 W, the peak power reaches 9.73 kW, and the pulse energy is 0.66 mJ. When the pulse train's repetition rate is 200 kHz with a pulse width of 58.2 ns, the average power reaches 150 W, the peak power reaches 12.1 kW, and the pulse energy is 0.749 mJ. The spectral linewidths of the pulse trains are 0.15, 0.14, and 0.10 nm for 500 kHz repetition rate, 300 kHz repetition rate, and 200 kHz repetition rate, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of high-power nanosecond-pulsed MOPA at 2 μm with the maximum average power reaching 238 W, the maximum peak power reaching 12.1 kW, and the maximum pulse energy reaching 0.749 mJ.

  14. Coordinated Research Program in Pulsed Power Physics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-20

    of different foil materials are listed ( Eninger , 1981). A severe constraint for long e-beam pulses and/or repetitive operation is foil heating. In...demonstration of state-to- state dissociative electron capture rate in 12," Opt. Comm., vol. 40, p. 425, 1982. 159J J. E. Eninger , "Broad area electron

  15. Ranchero Explosive Pulsed Power Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, J.H.; Atchison, W.L.; Deninger, W.J.; Fowler, C.M.; Herrera, D.H.; King, J.C.; Lopez, E.A.; Oona, H.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Stokes, J.L.; Sena, F.C.; Tabaka, L.J.; Tasker, D.G.; Torres, D.T.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Faehl, R.J.; Keinigs, R.K.; Taylor, A.J.; Rodriguez, G.; Oro, D.M.; Garcia, O.F.; parker, J.V.; Broste, W.B.

    1999-06-27

    The authors are developing the Ranchero high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system to power cylindrically imploding solid-density liners for hydrodynamics experiments. The near-term goal is to conduct experiments in the regime pertinent to the Atlas Capacitor bank. That is, they will attempt to implode liners of {approximately}50 g mass at velocities approaching 15 km/sec. The basic building block of the HEPP system is a coaxial generator with a 304.8 mm diameter stator, and an initial armature diameter of 152 mm. The armature is expanded by a high explosive (HE) charge detonated simultaneously along its axis. They have reported a variety of experiments conducted with generator modules 43 cm long and have presented an initial design for hydrodynamic liner experiments. In this paper they give a synopsis of their first system test, and a status report on the development of a generator module that is 1.4 m long.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond repetitively pulsed microplasmas generated in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orriere, Thomas; Moreau, Eric; Benard, Nicolas; Pai, David

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) microplasmas are generated in room temperature air at atmospheric pressure, in order to investigate the enhanced control of discharge properties via the combined effects of spatial confinement and nanosecond repetitive pulsing. Discharges were generated using high-voltage pulses of 15-ns duration applied to a tungsten pin-to-pin reactor, with inter-electrode gap distances (d) from 2 mm down to 0.2 mm. Optical emission spectroscopy and electrical characterization performed on the discharge indicate that heat transfer and plasma chemistry are influenced by the microplasma geometry. Ultrafast gas heating is observed upon deducing the rotational temperature of N2 from the measured emission spectrum of the N2 (C -->B) (0, 2) and (1, 3) transition bands, but use of the microplasma geometry (d = 0.2 mm) results in lower gas temperatures than in larger discharge gaps (d = 2 mm), including at high pulse repetition frequency (30 kHz) where substantial steady-state gas heating can occur. The measured Stark broadening of the Hα transition is significantly greater than for previously studied NRP discharges in air at atmospheric pressure, indicating that the maximum electron number density may be correspondingly much greater, up to 1018 cm-3. Furthermore, for NRP microplasmas, the intensities of emission from excited atomic ions (O+ and N+) are much higher than those of excited neutral atoms (O and N), in contrast to NRP discharges generated in larger discharge gaps.

  17. A Tesla-pulse forming line-plasma opening switch pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novac, B. M.; Kumar, R.; Smith, I. R.

    2010-10-01

    A pulsed power generator based on a high-voltage Tesla transformer which charges a 3.85 Ω/55 ns water-filled pulse forming line to 300 kV has been developed at Loughborough University as a training tool for pulsed power students. The generator uses all forms of insulation specific to pulsed power technology, liquid (oil and water), gas (SF6), and magnetic insulation in vacuum, and a number of fast voltage and current sensors are implemented for diagnostic purposes. A miniature (centimeter-size) plasma opening switch has recently been coupled to the output of the pulse forming line, with the overall system comprising the first phase of a program aimed at the development of a novel repetitive, table-top generator capable of producing 15 GW pulses for high power microwave loads. Technical details of all the generator components and the main experimental results obtained during the program and demonstrations of their performance are presented in the paper, together with a description of the various diagnostic tools involved. In particular, it is shown that the miniature plasma opening switch is capable of reducing the rise time of the input current while significantly increasing the load power. Future plans are outlined in the conclusions.

  18. High-peak-power, high-repetition-rate LD end-pumped Nd:YVO4 burst mode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hu; Yan, Renpeng; Fa, Xin; Yu, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Fan, Rongwei; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A compact high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate burst mode laser is achieved by an acousto-optical Q-switched Nd:YVO4 1064 nm laser directly pumped at 878.6 nm. Pulse trains with 10-100 pulses are obtained using acousto-optical Q-switch at repetition rates of 10-100 kHz under a pulsed pumping with a 1 ms duration. At the maximum pump energy of 108.5 mJ, the pulse energy of 10 kHz burst mode laser reaches 44 mJ corresponding to a single pulse energy of 4.4 mJ and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 40.5 %.The maximum peak power of ~468.1 kW at 10 kHz is obtained with a pulse width of 9.4 ns. The beam quality factor is measured to be M 2 ~1.5 and the pulse jitter is estimated to be less than 1 % in both amplitude and time region.

  19. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOEpatents

    Neev, J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Glinsky, M.E.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1998-02-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment. 8 figs.

  20. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOEpatents

    Neev, Joseph; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Glinsky, Michael E.; Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment.

  1. Single-pulse picking at kHz repetition rates using a Ge plasma switch at the free-electron laser FELBE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. Helm, M.; Winnerl, S.; Seidel, W.; Schneider, H.; Bauer, C.; Gensch, M.

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate a system for picking of mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) radiation pulses from the free-electron laser (FEL) FELBE operating at a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Single pulses are reflected by a dense electron-hole plasma in a Ge slab that is photoexcited by amplified near-infrared (NIR) laser systems operating at repetition rates of 1 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively. The peak intensity of picked pulses is up to 400 times larger than the peak intensity of residual pulses. The required NIR fluence for picking pulses at wavelengths in the range from 5 μm to 30 μm is discussed. In addition, we show that the reflectivity of the plasma decays on a time scale from 100 ps to 1 ns dependent on the wavelengths of the FEL and the NIR laser. The plasma switch enables experiments with the FEL that require high peak power but lower average power. Furthermore, the system is well suited to investigate processes with decay times in the μs to ms regime, i.e., much longer than the 77 ns long pulse repetition period of FELBE.

  2. Generation of high repetition rate femtosecond pulses from a CW laser by a time-lens loop.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yitang; Xu, Chris

    2009-04-13

    We demonstrate a novel method for femtosecond pulse generation based on a time-lens loop. Time division multiplexing in the loop is performed so that a high repetition rate can be achieved. Pulse width less than 500 fs is generated from a continuous wave (CW) laser without mode locking, and tunable repetition rate from 23 MHz to 400 MHz is demonstrated. Theoretical analysis shows that the repetition rate is ultimately limited by the in-loop interference. By using a 2 x 2 optical switch, such interference is further suppressed, and repetition rate as high as 1.1 GHz is demonstrated.

  3. Beamlet pulsed-power system

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.

    1996-06-01

    The 13-MJ Beamlet pulsed-power system provides power to the 512 flash lamps in the cavity and booster amplifiers. Since the flash lamps pump all of the apertures in the 2 x 2 amplifier array, the capacitor bank provides roughly four times the energy required to pump the single active beam line. During the 40 s prior to the shot, the capacitors are charged by constant-current power supplies. Ignitron switches transfer the capacitor energy to the flash lamps via coaxial cables. A preionization system triggers the flash lamps and delivers roughly 1 % of the capacitor energy 200 {mu}s prior to the main discharge. This is the first time flash-lamp preionization has been used in a large facility. Preionization improves the amplifier efficiency by roughly 5% and increases the lifetime of the flash lamps. LabVIEW control panels provide an operator interface with the modular controls and diagnostics. To improve the reliability of the system, high-energy-density, self-healing, metallized dielectric capacitors are used. High-frequency, voltage-regulated switching power supplies are integrated into each module on Beamlet, allowing greater independence among the modules and improved charge voltage accuracy, flexibility, and repeatability.

  4. A study of high repetition rate pulse generation and all-optical add/drop multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongmin

    Ultra high-speed optical time-division-multiplexed (OTDM) transmission technologies are essential for the construction of ultra high-speed all-optical networks needed in the information era. In this Ph. D thesis dissertation, essential mechanisms associated with ultra high speed OTDM transmission systems, such as, high speed ultra short pulse generation, all optical demultiplexing and all optical add/drop multiplexing, have been studied. Both experimental demonstrations and numerical simulations have been performed. In order to realize high-speed optical TDM systems, high repetition rate, ultra short pulses are needed. A rational harmonic mode-locked ring fiber laser has been used to produce ultrashort pulses, the pulse jitter will be eliminated using a Phase-Locked-Loop (PLL), and the self-pulsation has been suppressed using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Sub pico-second pulses are very important for all optical sampling in the ultrahigh-speed OTDM transmission system. In this thesis, a two stage compression scheme utilizing the nonlinearity and dispersion of the optical fibers has been constructed and used to compress the gain switched DFB laser pulses. Also a nonlinear optical loop mirror has been constructed to suppress the wings associated with nonlinear compression. Pedestal free, transform-limited pulses with pulse widths in range of 0.2 to 0.4 ps have been generated. LiNbO3 modulators play a very important role in fiber optical communication systems. In this thesis, LiNbO3 modulators have been used to perform high repetition rate pulse generation, all optical demultiplexing and all optical add/drop for the TDM transmission system.

  5. Correction of refraction index based on adjacent pulse repetition interval lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Dong; Aketagawa, Masato

    2014-11-01

    Correction of refraction index is important for length measurement. The two-color method has been widely used for correction. The wavelengths of lasers have been used as a ruler of that. Based on the analogy between the wavelength and the adjacent pulse repetition interval length (APRIL), in this paper we investigate the possibility of two-color method based on adjacent pulse repetition interval lengths. Since the wavelength-based two-color method can eliminate the inhomogeneous disturbance of effects caused by the phase refractive index, therefore the APRIL-based two-color method can eliminate the air turbulence of errors induced by the group refractive index. Our analysis will contribute to high-precision length measurement.

  6. The impacts of magnetic field on repetitive nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yidi; Qi, Haicheng; Fan, Zhihui; Yan, Huijie; Ren, ChunSheng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the impacts of the parallel magnetic field on the repetitive nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) are experimentally investigated by optical and electrical measurements. The DBD is generated between two parallel-plate electrodes in the ambient air with the stationary magnetic field on the order of 1 T. The experimental results show that additional microdischarge channels are generated and the photocurrent intensity of the plasma is increased by the magnetic field. The microdischarge channels develop along the magnetic field lines and the diffuse background emission of the discharge is stronger in the DBD with the magnetic field. As the pulse repetition frequency decreases from 1200 Hz to 100 Hz, only the photocurrent intensity of the third discharge that occurred at about 500 ns is noticeably increased by the additional magnetic field. It is believed that the enhancement of the memory effect and the confinement of the magnetic field on electrons are the main reasons.

  7. Generation of 30 microJ single-cycle terahertz pulses at 100 Hz repetition rate by optical rectification.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Andrei G; Bonacina, Luigi; Chekalin, Sergei V; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2008-11-01

    We report the generation of 30 microJ single-cycle terahertz pulses at 100 Hz repetition rate by phase-matched optical rectification in lithium niobate using 28 mJ femtosecond laser pulses. The phase-matching condition is achieved by tilting the laser pulse intensity front. Temporal, spectral, and propagation properties of the generated terahertz pulses are presented. In addition, we discuss possibilities for further increasing the energy of single-cycle terahertz pulses obtained by optical rectification.

  8. Coherent THz Repetitive Pulse Generation in a GaSe Crystal by Dual-wavelength Nd:YLF Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezotosnyi, V. V.; Cheshev, E. A.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Koromyslov, A. L.; Krokhin, O. N.; Mityagin, Yu. A.; Popov, Yu. M.; Savinov, S. A.; Tunkin, V. G.

    We present modification of difference frequency generator of coherent THz radiation in a nonlinear GaSe crystal using dual-wavelength diode-pumped solid-state Nd:YLF laser. Generation at the two wavelengths (1.047 and 1.053 μm) was carried out by equalization of the gains at these wavelengths near the frequency degeneracy of the transverse modes in resonator cavity, Q-switched by acousto-optical modulator. The main parameters of the device were measured: angular synchronism (width 0.6 degrees), polarization ratio (1:100), conversion efficiency (10-7), pulse power (0.8 mW), frequency and width (53,8 сm-1, 0,6 сm-1), pulse width and repetition rate (10 ns,7 kHz). The method is promising for practical purposes.

  9. Search for Two-Photon Interaction with Axionlike Particles Using High-Repetition Pulsed Magnets and Synchrotron X Rays.

    PubMed

    Inada, T; Yamazaki, T; Namba, T; Asai, S; Kobayashi, T; Tamasaku, K; Tanaka, Y; Inubushi, Y; Sawada, K; Yabashi, M; Ishikawa, T; Matsuo, A; Kawaguchi, K; Kindo, K; Nojiri, H

    2017-02-17

    We report on new results of a search for a two-photon interaction with axionlike particles (ALPs). The experiment is carried out at a synchrotron radiation facility using a "light shining through a wall (LSW)" technique. For this purpose, we develop a novel pulsed-magnet system, composed of multiple racetrack magnets and a transportable power supply. It produces fields of about 10 T over 0.8 m with a high repetition rate of 0.2 Hz and yields a new method of probing a vacuum with high intensity fields. The data obtained with a total of 27 676 pulses provide a limit on the ALP-two-photon coupling constant that is more stringent by a factor of 5.2 compared to a previous x-ray LSW limit for the ALP mass ≲0.1  eV.

  10. Search for Two-Photon Interaction with Axionlike Particles Using High-Repetition Pulsed Magnets and Synchrotron X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, T.; Yamazaki, T.; Namba, T.; Asai, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Tamasaku, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Inubushi, Y.; Sawada, K.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Matsuo, A.; Kawaguchi, K.; Kindo, K.; Nojiri, H.

    2017-02-01

    We report on new results of a search for a two-photon interaction with axionlike particles (ALPs). The experiment is carried out at a synchrotron radiation facility using a "light shining through a wall (LSW)" technique. For this purpose, we develop a novel pulsed-magnet system, composed of multiple racetrack magnets and a transportable power supply. It produces fields of about 10 T over 0.8 m with a high repetition rate of 0.2 Hz and yields a new method of probing a vacuum with high intensity fields. The data obtained with a total of 27 676 pulses provide a limit on the ALP-two-photon coupling constant that is more stringent by a factor of 5.2 compared to a previous x-ray LSW limit for the ALP mass ≲0.1 eV .

  11. Management of thermal effects in high-repetition-rate pulsed optical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Godard, Antoine; Raybaut, Myriam; Schmid, Thomas; Lefebvre, Michel; Michel, Anne-Marie; Péalat, Michel

    2010-11-01

    We report on the investigation of thermal effects in high-repetition-rate pulsed optical parametric oscillators emitting in the mid-IR. We find that the thermal load induced by the nonresonant idler absorption plays a critical role in the emergence of thermally induced bistability. We then demonstrate a significant improvement of the conversion efficiency (more than 30%) when a proper axial temperature gradient is applied to the nonlinear crystal by use of a two-zone temperature-controlled oven.

  12. Changes in the emission properties of metallic targets upon exposure to repetitively pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, V. I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1988-02-01

    A scanning electron microscope and a repetitively pulsed CO2 laser are used to reveal the relationships which govern the correlation of the transforming metal surface microrelief with the emission of charged particles and the surface luminescence upon exposure to multipulse laser focusing. It is shown that the effect of sorption and laser-stimulated desorption on the emission signals can manifest itself in different ways depending on the current oscillation mode in the target-vacuum chamber circuit.

  13. Designs of pulsed power cryogenic transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Heyne, C.J.; Hackowrth, D.T.; Shestak, E.J.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.

    1988-03-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has completed designs of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These transformers will be configured to transfer their stored energy sequentially to an electro-magnetic launcher and form a three-stage power supply. The pulse transformers will act as two winding energy storage solenoids which provide a high current and energy pulse compression by transforming a 50 kA power supply into a megamp level power supply more appropriate for the electromagnetic launcher duty. This system differs from more traditional transformer applications in that significant current levels do not exists simultaneously in the two windings of the pulse transformer. This paper describes the designs of the pulsed power cryogenic transformers.

  14. Nova pulse power system description and status

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, R.W.; Whitham, K.; Merritt, B.T.; Gritton, D.G.; Oicles, J.A.

    1981-06-01

    The Nova laser system is designed to produce critical data in the nation's inertial confinement fusion effort. It is the world's largest peak power laser and presents various unique pulse power problems. In this paper, pulse power systems for this laser are described, the evolutionary points from prior systems are pointed out, and the current status of the hardware is given.

  15. High-repetition-rate ultrashort pulsed fiber ring laser using hybrid mode locking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Hu, Hongyu; Li, Wenbo; Dutta, Niloy K

    2016-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a hybrid mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser by combining the rational harmonic mode-locking technique and passive mode locking based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber. By carefully adjusting the modulation frequency and the polarization controllers in the cavity, a 30 GHz pulse train with improved stability and narrower pulse width is generated. The pulse width at 30 GHz using rational harmonic mode locking alone is 5.8 ps. This hybrid scheme narrows the pulse width to 1.9 ps at the repetition rate of 30 GHz. Numerical simulations are carried out that show good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. High speed laser drilling of metals using a high repetition rate, high average power ultrafast fiber CPA system.

    PubMed

    Ancona, A; Röser, F; Rademaker, K; Limpert, J; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-09

    We present an experimental study on the drilling of metal targets with ultrashort laser pulses at high repetition rates (from 50 kHz up to 975 kHz) and high average powers (up to 68 Watts), using an ytterbium-doped fiber CPA system. The number of pulses to drill through steel and copper sheets with thicknesses up to 1 mm have been measured as a function of the repetition rate and the pulse energy. Two distinctive effects, influencing the drilling efficiency at high repetition rates, have been experimentally found and studied: particle shielding and heat accumulation. While the shielding of subsequent pulses due to the ejected particles leads to a reduced ablation efficiency, this effect is counteracted by heat accumulation. The experimental data are in good qualitative agreement with simulations of the heat accumulation effect and previous studies on the particle emission. However, for materials with a high thermal conductivity as copper, both effects are negligible for the investigated processing parameters. Therefore, the full power of the fiber CPA system can be exploited, which allows to trepan high-quality holes in 0.5mm-thick copper samples with breakthrough times as low as 75 ms.

  17. Effect of laser pulse repetition frequency on the optical breakdown threshold of quartz glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, T V; Konov, V I; Schöneseiffen, S; Dausinger, F

    2013-08-31

    The thresholds of optical breakdown in the volume of quartz glass were measured in relation to the number of pulses under irradiation by ultrashort laser pulses with different pulse repetition frequencies (1 – 400 kHz). Increasing this frequency from 10 to 400 kHz was found to substantially lower the breakdown threshold for 500-fs long pulses (at a wavelength of 1030 nm) and to lower to a smaller degree for 5-ps long pulses (515 nm). A strong frequency dependence of the breakdown threshold is observed under the same conditions as a manifold decrease of the breakdown threshold with increase in the number of pulses in a pulse train. The dependence of the optical breakdown on the number of pulses is attributable to the accumulation of point defects under multiple subthreshold irradiation, which affects the mechanism of collisional ionisation. In this case, the frequency dependence of the breakdown threshold of quartz glass is determined by the engagement of shortlived defects in the ionisation mechanism. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  18. Extraction of pulse repetition intervals from sperm whale click trains for ocean acoustic data mining.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Serge; van der Schaar, Mike; Houégnigan, Ludwig; André, Michel

    2013-02-01

    The analysis of acoustic data from the ocean is a valuable tool to study free ranging cetaceans and anthropogenic noise. Due to the typically large volume of acquired data, there is a demand for automated analysis techniques. Many cetaceans produce acoustic pulses (echolocation clicks) with a pulse repetition interval (PRI) remaining nearly constant over several pulses. Analyzing these pulse trains is challenging because they are often interleaved. This article presents an algorithm that estimates a pulse's PRI with respect to neighboring pulses. It includes a deinterleaving step that operates via a spectral dissimilarity metric. The sperm whale (SW) produces trains with PRIs between 0.5 and 2 s. As a validation, the algorithm was used for the PRI-based identification of SW click trains with data from the NEMO-ONDE observatory that contained other pulsed sounds, mainly from ship propellers. Separation of files containing SW clicks with a medium and high signal to noise ratio from files containing other pulsed sounds gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.96. This study demonstrates that PRI can be used for the automated identification of SW clicks and that deinterleaving via spectral dissimilarity contributes to algorithm performance.

  19. Plastic Laminate Pulsed Power Development

    SciTech Connect

    ALEXANDER,JEFF A.; SHOPE,STEVEN L.; PATE,RONALD C.; RINEHART,LARRY F.; JOJOLA,JOHN M.; RUEBUSH,MITCHELL H.; CROWE,WAYNE; LUNDSTROM,J.; SMITH,T.; ZAGAR,D.; PRESTWICH,K.

    2000-09-01

    The desire to move high-energy Pulsed Power systems from the laboratory to practical field systems requires the development of compact lightweight drivers. This paper concerns an effort to develop such a system based on a plastic laminate strip Blumlein as the final pulseshaping stage for a 600 kV, 50ns, 5-ohm driver. A lifetime and breakdown study conducted with small-area samples identified Kapton sheet impregnated with Propylene Carbonate as the best material combination of those evaluated. The program has successfully demonstrated techniques for folding large area systems into compact geometry's and vacuum impregnating the laminate in the folded systems. The major operational challenges encountered revolve around edge grading and low inductance, low impedance switching. The design iterations and lessons learned are discussed. A multistage prototype testing program has demonstrated 600kV operation on a short 6ns line. Full-scale prototypes are currently undergoing development and testing.

  20. LD pumped high-repetition-rate high-power 532nm Nd:YAG/LBO solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Liu, Dongyu; Chi, Junjie; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Ziqiang; Hu, Haowei; Zhang, Guangju; Yao, Yifei

    2013-09-01

    Diode pumped solid state 532 nm green laser is widely required for many industrial, medical and scientific applications. Among most of these applications, high power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) green laser output is demanded. This can be efficiently achieved through a diode-side-pumped acoustic-optic Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with an intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG). In our experiment, LBO crystal is used for the second harmonic generation of high-average-power lasers of near infrared (NIR) range, though its effective NLO coefficient deff is relatively small. It is because of its high damage threshold (greater than 2.5 GW/cm2), large acceptance angle, small walk-off angle, and the nonhygroscopic characteristic. In this paper, we reported a high-repetition-rate high-power diode-side-pumped AO Q-switched Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. A plane-plane cavity with two rods, two AO Q-switches and the type II critical phase-matched LBO at room temperature were employed. Under the LD pump power of 480 W, 95.86 W at 1064 nm wavelength was achieved when the repetition rate was 15 kHz, and the 532 nm average output power of 44.77 W was obtained, with a pulse width of 111.7 ns, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 46.7% from 1064 nm to 532 nm. The 532 nm average output power was 40.10 W at a repetition rate of 10 kHz with a pulse width of 78.65 ns. The output characteristics of the SHG varying with the pumping current and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the laser were also investigated. Further improvement of the SHG is under study.

  1. High-power pulsed diode-pumped Er:ZBLAN fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Gorjan, Martin; Petkovšek, Rok; Marinček, Marko; Čopič, Martin

    2011-05-15

    We report on the operation and performance of a gain-switched Er:ZBLAN fiber laser based on an active pulsed diode pump system. The produced laser pulses offer high peak powers while retaining the high average powers and efficiency of the cw regime. The measured pulse duration was about 300 ns and nearly independent of the pump repetition frequency. The maximum obtained 68 W of peak power is the highest reported, to our knowledge, for diode-pumped Er:ZBLAN fiber lasers, and the 2 W of average power at the repetition frequency of 100 kHz is 2 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported average power in a pulsed regime. The obtained slope efficiency was 34%.

  2. Nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure—the spark regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-12-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) spark discharges have been studied in atmospheric pressure air preheated to 1000 K. Measurements of spark initiation and stability, plasma dynamics, gas temperature and current-voltage characteristics of the spark regime are presented. Using 10 ns pulses applied repetitively at 30 kHz, we find that 2-400 pulses are required to initiate the spark, depending on the applied voltage. Furthermore, about 30-50 pulses are required for the spark discharge to reach steady state, following initiation. Based on space- and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy, the spark discharge in steady state is found to ignite homogeneously in the discharge gap, without evidence of an initial streamer. Using measured emission from the N2 (C-B) 0-0 band, it is found that the gas temperature rises by several thousand Kelvin in the span of about 30 ns following the application of the high-voltage pulse. Current-voltage measurements show that up to 20-40 A of conduction current is generated, which corresponds to an electron number density of up to 1015 cm-3 towards the end of the high-voltage pulse. The discharge dynamics, gas temperature and electron number density are consistent with a streamer-less spark that develops homogeneously through avalanche ionization in volume. This occurs because the pre-ionization electron number density of about 1011 cm-3 produced by the high frequency train of pulses is above the critical density for streamer-less discharge development, which is shown to be about 108 cm-3.

  3. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  4. Micro-processing of polymers and biological materials using high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li

    High repetition rate femtosecond laser micro-processing has been applied to ophthalmological hydrogel polymers and ocular tissues to create novel refractive and diffractive structures. Through the optimization of laser irradiation conditions and material properties, this technology has become feasible for future industrial applications and clinical practices. A femtosecond laser micro-processing workstation has been designed and developed. Different experimental parameters of the workstation such as laser pulse duration, focusing lens, and translational stages have been described and discussed. Diffractive gratings and three-dimensional waveguides have been fabricated and characterized in hydrogel polymers, and refractive index modifications as large as + 0.06 have been observed within the laser-irradiated region. Raman spectroscopic studies have shown that our femtosecond laser micro-processing induces significant thermal accumulation, resulting in a densification of the polymer network and increasing the localized refractive index of polymers within the laser irradiated region. Different kinds of dye chromophores have been doped in hydrogel polymers to enhance the two-photon absorption during femtosecond laser micro-processing. As the result, laser scanning speed can be greatly increased while the large refractive index modifications remain. Femtosecond laser wavelength and pulse energy as well as water and dye concentration of the hydrogels are optimized. Lightly fixed ocular tissues such as corneas and lenses have been micro-processed by focused femtosecond laser pulses, and refractive index modifications without any tissue-breakdown are observed within the stromal layer of the corneas and the cortex of the lenses. Living corneas are doped with Sodium Fluorescein to increase the two-photon absorption during the laser micro-processing, and laser scanning speed can be greatly increased while inducing large refractive index modifications. No evidence of cell death

  5. Non-contact thrust stand calibration method for repetitively pulsed electric thrusters.

    PubMed

    Wong, Andrea R; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A; Pearson, J Boise

    2012-02-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoid to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasi-steady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or "zero" position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke's law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other. The overall error on the linear regression fit used to determine the calibration coefficient was roughly 1%.

  6. AN UPDATE ON NIF PULSED POWER

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; James, G F; Petersen, D E; Pendleton, D L; McHale, G B; Barbosa, F; Runtal, A S; Stratton, P L

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser fusion driver operating at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF relies on three large-scale pulsed power systems to achieve its goals: the Power Conditioning Unit (PCU), which provides flashlamp excitation for the laser's injection system; the Power Conditioning System (PCS), which provides the multi-megajoule pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers; and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC), which enables NIF to take advantage of a fourpass main amplifier. Years of production, installation, and commissioning of the three NIF pulsed power systems are now complete. Seven-day-per-week operation of the laser has commenced, with the three pulsed power systems providing routine support of laser operations. We present the details of the status and operational experience associated with the three systems along with a projection of the future for NIF pulsed power.

  7. Effect of Pulse Width on Ozone Yield using Inductive Energy Storage System Pulsed Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Ippei; Mukaigawa, Seiji; Takaki, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya; Go, Tomio

    Nanosecond pulse voltages of several pulse widths were applied to a cylindrical plasma reactor for ozone synthesis with high energy yield. Nanoseconds pulse voltages were produced by inductive energy storage system pulsed power generators using semiconductor opening switch (SOS) diodes. First recovery diodes were used as SOS diodes in the inductive energy storage system to produce short-pulsed high voltage with high-repetition rate. The short pulse voltage of 9.5 ns width and 33 kV peak voltage was produced at charging voltage of 15 kV and was applied to a 1 mm diameter center wire electrode in the plasma reactor. The copper cylinder of 19 mm inner diameter was used as outer electrode and was connected to a ground. The ozone yield of 271 g/kWh was obtained using the 9.5 ns width pulse voltage at synthesized 412 ppm of ozone concentration. The yield 271 g/kWh was more than twice as much as the yield 114 g/kWh at 401 ppm using a 60 ns pulse voltage.

  8. Non-chain pulsed DF laser with an average power of the order of 100 W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qikun; Xie, Jijiang; Wang, Chunrui; Shao, Chunlei; Shao, Mingzhen; Chen, Fei; Guo, Jin

    2016-07-01

    The design and performance of a closed-cycle repetitively pulsed DF laser are described. The Fitch circuit and thyratron switch are introduced to realize self-sustained volume discharge in SF6-D2 mixtures. The influences of gas parameters and charging voltage on output characteristics of non-chain pulsed DF laser are experimentally investigated. In order to improve the laser power stability over a long period of working time, zeolites with different apertures are used to scrub out the de-excitation particles produced in electric discharge. An average output power of the order of 100 W was obtained at an operating repetition rate of 50 Hz, with amplitude difference in laser pulses <8 %. And under the action of micropore alkaline zeolites, the average power fell by 20 % after the laser continuing working 100 s at repetition frequency of 50 Hz.

  9. ICAN as a new laser paradigm for high energy, high average power femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocklesby, W. S.; Nilsson, J.; Schreiber, T.; Limpert, J.; Brignon, A.; Bourderionnet, J.; Lombard, L.; Michau, V.; Hanna, M.; Zaouter, Y.; Tajima, T.; Mourou, Gérard

    2014-05-01

    The application of petawatt lasers to scientific and technological problems is advancing rapidly. The usefulness of these applications will depend on being able to produce petawatt pulses at much higher repetition rates than is presently possible. The International Coherent Amplification Network (ICAN) consortium seeks to design high repetition rate petawatt lasers using large scale coherent beam combination of femtosecond pulse amplifiers built from optical fibres. This combination of technologies has the potential to overcome many of the hurdles to high energy, high average power pulsed lasers, opening up applications and meeting societal challenges.

  10. Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser by sweeping the pulse repetition rate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Joohyung; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Han, Seongheum; Jang, Heesuk; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers allow for simultaneous detection of multiple absorption lines of a specimen over a broad spectral range of infrared or visible light with a single spectroscopic measurement. Here, we present an 8-THz bandwidth, 0.5-GHz resolution scheme of Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser. A resolving power of 1.6 × 104 about a 1560-nm center wavelength is achieved by sweeping the pulse repetition rate of the light source on a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer configured to capture interferograms with a 0.02-fs temporal sampling accuracy through a well-stabilized 60-m unbalance arm length. A dual-servo mechanism is realized by combining a mechanical linear stage with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) within the fiber laser cavity, enabling stable sweeping control of the pulse repetition rate over a 1.0-MHz scan range with 0.4-Hz steps with reference to the Rb clock. Experimental results demonstrate that the P-branch lines of the H13CN reference cell can be observed with a signal-to-noise ratio reaching 350 for the most intense line. PMID:26503257

  11. Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser by sweeping the pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Joohyung; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Han, Seongheum; Jang, Heesuk; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond lasers allow for simultaneous detection of multiple absorption lines of a specimen over a broad spectral range of infrared or visible light with a single spectroscopic measurement. Here, we present an 8-THz bandwidth, 0.5-GHz resolution scheme of Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser. A resolving power of 1.6 × 104 about a 1560-nm center wavelength is achieved by sweeping the pulse repetition rate of the light source on a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer configured to capture interferograms with a 0.02-fs temporal sampling accuracy through a well-stabilized 60-m unbalance arm length. A dual-servo mechanism is realized by combining a mechanical linear stage with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) within the fiber laser cavity, enabling stable sweeping control of the pulse repetition rate over a 1.0-MHz scan range with 0.4-Hz steps with reference to the Rb clock. Experimental results demonstrate that the P-branch lines of the H13CN reference cell can be observed with a signal-to-noise ratio reaching 350 for the most intense line.

  12. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies.

  13. Designs of pulsed power cryogenic transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Heyne, C.J.; Hackworth, D.T.; Shestak, E.J.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has completed designs of three pulsed power cryogenic transformers for the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These transformers will be configured to transfer their stored energy sequentially to an electromagnetic launcher and form a three-stage power supply. The pulse transformers will act as two winding energy storage solenoids which provide a high current and energy pulse compression by transforming a 50 kA power supply into a megamp level power supply more appropriate for the electromagnetic launcher duty. This system differs from more traditional transformer applications in that significant current levels do not exist simultaneously in the two windings of the pulse transformer. This paper describes the designs of the pulsed power cryogenic transformers.

  14. Control of Analyte Electrolysis in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Repetitively Pulsed High Voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    Analyte electrolysis using a repetitively pulsed high voltage ion source was investigated and compared to that using a regular, continuously operating direct current high voltage ion source in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The extent of analyte electrolysis was explored as a function of the length and frequency of the high voltage pulse using the model compound reserpine in positive ion mode. Using +5 kV as the maximum high voltage amplitude, reserpine was oxidized to its 2, 4, 6 and 8-electron oxidation products when direct current high voltage was employed. In contrast, when using a pulsed high voltage, oxidation of reserpine was eliminated by employing the appropriate high voltage pulse length and frequency. This effect was caused by inefficient mass transport of the analyte to the electrode surface during the duration of the high voltage pulse and the subsequent relaxation of the emitter electrode/ electrolyte interface during the time period when the high voltage was turned off. This mode of ESI source operation allows for analyte electrolysis to be quickly and simply switched on or off electronically via a change in voltage pulse variables.

  15. High-Power Picosecond Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Shverdin, Miro; Gibson, David; Brown, Curtis; Gronberg, Jeff

    2008-11-01

    In the next generation of linear colliders, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) of intense laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches will enable a mode of operation based on energetic γe and γγ collisions, with a significant complementary scientific potential. The efficiency of γ-ray generation via ICS is constrained by the Thomson scattering cross section, resulting in typical laser photon-to- γ efficiencies of <10 -9. Furthermore, repetition rates of the state-of-art high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative, non-interferometric method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J [ I. Jovanovic, M. Shverdin, D. Gibson, and C. Brown, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 578 160 (2007)]. ICS of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses is compatible with the proposed pulse structure for ILC and has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average γ-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  16. High average and peak power few-cycle laser pulses delivered by fiber pumped OPCPA system.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Seise, E; Krebs, M; Tavella, F; Willner, A; Düsterer, S; Schlarb, H; Feldhaus, J; Limpert, J; Rossbach, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-06-07

    We report on a high power optical parametric amplifier delivering 8 fs pulses with 6 GW peak power. The system is pumped by a fiber amplifier and operated at 96 kHz repetition rate. The average output power is as high as 6.7 W, which is the highest average power few-cycle pulse laser reported so far. When stabilizing the seed oscillator, the system delivered carrier-envelop phase stable laser pulses. Furthermore, high harmonic generation up to the 33(th) order (21.8 nm) is demonstrated in a Krypton gas jet. In addition, the scalability of the presented laser system is discussed.

  17. High power double-scale pulses from a gain-guided double-clad fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haitao; Gao, Gan; Li, Qinghua; Gong, Mali

    2017-03-01

    Generation of high power double-scale pulses from a gain-guided double-clad fiber laser is experimentally demonstrated. By employing the Yb-doped 10/130 double-clad fiber as the gain medium, the laser realizes an output power of 5.1 W and pulse energy of 0.175 µJ at repetition rate of 29.14 MHz. To the best of our knowledge, this average output power is the highest among the reported double-scale pulse oscillators. The autocorrelation trace of pulses contains the short (98 fs) and long (29.5 ps) components, and the spectral bandwidth of the pulse is 27.3 nm. Such double-scale pulses are well suited for seeding the high power MOPA (master oscillator power amplifier) systems, nonlinear frequency conversion and optical coherence tomography.

  18. Streamer properties in a repetitively pulsed plasma jet from 1 to 100 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian; Ganguly, Biswa; Scofield, James

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the properties of guided streamers in a nanosecond repetitively pulsed dielectric barrier plasma jet at repetition rates up to 100 kHz. In this regime, remnant ionization and neutral metastable concentrations are significant in the channel through which the streamer propagates. Both helium and a Penning mixture of helium and argon are investigated as feed gases for a plasma jet in a controlled pressure chamber with a flowing nitrogen background. The applied voltage pulse was set at 8 kV, with a risetime of 15 ns and falltime of 8.5 μs. Streamer dynamics were monitored using spatiotemporally-resolved emission spectroscopy with a PMT filtered at 706.5 nm He (33S - 23P) and 587.6 nm He (33D - 23P) to track the streamer head. Temporally-resolved ICCD imaging was also used to characterize discharge development. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was used to measure He (23S1) and Ar (3P2) metastable densities in the streamer channel, and streamer current was measured using an inductive current monitor. As the pulse rate is increased, the streamer dynamics are significantly altered, while production of He (23S1) and Ar (3P2) is enhanced with alternate production channels becoming important in the case of He (23S1). Work funded by Air Force Office of Scientific Research under program manager Jason Marshall.

  19. Optical parametric mid-IR HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} oscillator pumped by a repetitively pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Badikov, Valerii V; Don, A K; Mitin, Konstantin V; Seregin, Aleksandr M; Sinaiskii, V V; Shchebetova, N I; Shchetinkina, T A

    2007-04-30

    An efficient Q-switched optical parametric HgGa{sub 2}S{sub 4} crystal oscillator pumped by a Nd:YAG laser is developed. The oscillator can be continuously tuned in the region from 3.7 to 5.7 {mu}m. The average output power at 4 {mu}m was 67 mW for a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz. The energy conversion efficiency achieved 4.9%. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  20. Plasma relaxation mechanics of pulsed high power microwave surface flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, S.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2013-09-15

    Microwave transmission and reflection characteristics of pulsed radio frequency field generated plasmas are elucidated for air, N{sub 2}, and He environments under pressure conditions ranging from 10 to 600 torr. The pulsed, low temperature plasma is generated along the atmospheric side of the dielectric boundary between the source (under vacuum) and the radiating environment with a thickness on the order of 5 mm and a cross sectional area just smaller than that of the waveguide. Utilizing custom multi-standard waveguide couplers and a continuous low power probing source, the scattering parameters were measured before, during, and after the high power microwave pulse with emphasis on the latter. From these scattering parameters, temporal electron density estimations (specifically the longitudinal integral of the density) were calculated using a 1D plane wave-excited model for analysis of the relaxation processes associated. These relaxation characteristics ultimately determine the maximum repetition rate for many pulsed electric field applications and thus are applicable to a much larger scope in the plasma community than just those related to high power microwaves. This manuscript discusses the diagnostic setup for acquiring the power measurements along with a detailed description of the kinematic and chemical behavior of the plasma as it decays down to its undisturbed state under various gas type and pressure conditions.

  1. High average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1995-05-01

    Which current pulsed accelerator technology was developed during the late 60`s through the late 80`s to satisfy the needs of various military related applications such as effects simulators, particle beam devices, free electron lasers, and as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion devices. The emphasis in these devices is to achieve very high peak power levels, with pulse lengths on the order of a few 10`s of nanoseconds, peak currents of up to 10`s of MA, and accelerating potentials of up to 10`s of MV. New which average power systems, incorporating thermal management techniques, are enabling the potential use of high peak power technology in a number of diverse industrial application areas such as materials processing, food processing, stack gas cleanup, and the destruction of organic contaminants. These systems employ semiconductor and saturable magnetic switches to achieve short pulse durations that can then be added to efficiently give MV accelerating, potentials while delivering average power levels of a few 100`s of kilowatts to perhaps many megawatts. The Repetitive High Energy Puled Power project is developing short-pulse, high current accelerator technology capable of generating beams with kJ`s of energy per pulse delivered to areas of 1000 cm{sup 2} or more using ions, electrons, or x-rays. Modular technology is employed to meet the needs of a variety of applications requiring from 100`s of kV to MV`s and from 10`s to 100`s of kA. Modest repetition rates, up to a few 100`s of pulses per second (PPS), allow these machines to deliver average currents on the order of a few 100`s of mA. The design and operation of the second generation 300 kW RHEPP-II machine, now being brought on-line to operate at 2.5 MV, 25 kA, and 100 PPS will be described in detail as one example of the new high average power, high current pulsed accelerator technology.

  2. High Pulse Repetition Rate, Eye Safe, Visible Wavelength Lidar Systems: Design, Results and Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Berkoff, Timothy; Welton, Elsworth; Campbell, James; OCStarr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 1993 the first of the eye safe visible wavelength lidar systems known now as Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) became operational. Since that time there have been several dozen of these systems produced and applied for full time profiling of atmospheric cloud and aerosol structure. There is currently an observational network of MPL sites to support global climate research. In the course of application of these instruments there have been significant improvements in understanding, design and performance of the systems. There are addition potential and applications beyond current practice for the high repetition rate, eye safe designs. The MPL network and the current capability, design and future potential of MPL systems are described.

  3. Detector response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry at high pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulcicek, Erol E.; Boyle, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Dead time effects in chevron configured dual microchannel plates (MCPs) are investigated. Response times are determined experimentally for one chevron-configured dual MCP-type detector and two discrete dynode-type electron multipliers with 16 and 23 resistively divided stages. All of these detectors are found to be suitable for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), yielding 3-6-ns (FWHM) response times triggered on a single ion pulse. It is concluded that, unless there are viable solutions to overcome dead time disadvantages for continuous dynode detectors, suitable discrete dynode detectors for TOF MS appear to have a significant advantage for high repetition rate operation.

  4. Low-timing-jitter, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser with tunable repetition rate and high operation stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanshan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guofu; Zhao, Wei; Bai, Jing

    2010-09-01

    We design a low-timing-jitter, repetition-rate-tunable, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser by using a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM), a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and a tunable optical delay line in the laser configuration. Low-timing-jitter optical pulses are stably produced when a SESAM and a 0.16 m dispersion compensation fiber are employed in the laser cavity. By inserting a tunable optical delay line between NALM and SESAM, the variable repetition-rate operation of a self-starting, passively mode-locked fiber laser is successfully demonstrated over a range from 49.65 to 50.47 MHz. The experimental results show that the newly designed fiber laser can maintain the mode locking at the pumping power of 160 mW to stably generate periodic optical pulses with width less than 170 fs and timing jitter lower than 75 fs in the 1.55 µm wavelength region, when the fundamental repetition rate of the laser is continuously tuned between 49.65 and 50.47 MHz. Moreover, this fiber laser has a feature of turn-key operation with high repeatability of its fundamental repetition rate in practice.

  5. A fast pulsed power source applied to treatment of conducting liquids and air

    SciTech Connect

    Heesch, E.J.M. van; Pemen, A.J.M.; Huijbrechts, P.A.H.J.; Laan, P.C.T. van der; Ptasinski, K.J.; Zanstra, G.J.; Jong, P. de

    2000-02-01

    Two pilot pulsed power sources were developed for fundamental investigations and industrial demonstrations of treatment of conducting liquids. The developed heavy-duty power sources have an output voltage of 100 kV (rise time 10 ns, pulse duration 150 ns, pulse repetition rate maximum 1,000 pps). A pulse energy of 0.5--3 J/pulse and an average pulse power of 1.5 kW have been achieved with an efficiency of about 80%. In addition, adequate electromagnetic compatibility is achieved between the high-voltage pulse sources and the surrounding equipment. Various applications, such as the use of pulsed electric fields (PEF's) or pulsed corona discharges for inactivation of microorganisms in liquids or air, have been tested in the laboratory. For PEF treatment, homogeneous electric fields in the liquid of up to 70 kV/cm at a pulse repetition rate of 10--400 pps could be achieved. The inactivation is found to be 85 kJ/L per log reduction for Pseudomonas fluorescens and 500 kJ/L per log reduction for spores of Bacillus cereus. Corona directly applied to the liquid is found to be more efficient than PEF. With direct corona they achieve 25 kJ/L per log reduction for both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. For air disinfection using their corona pulse source, the measured efficiencies are excellent: 2 J/L per log reduction.

  6. Hierarchical classification of dynamically varying radar pulse repetition interval modulation patterns.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Martikainen, Kalle; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2010-12-01

    The central purpose of passive signal intercept receivers is to perform automatic categorization of unknown radar signals. Currently, there is an urgent need to develop intelligent classification algorithms for these devices due to emerging complexity of radar waveforms. Especially multifunction radars (MFRs) capable of performing several simultaneous tasks by utilizing complex, dynamically varying scheduled waveforms are a major challenge for automatic pattern classification systems. To assist recognition of complex radar emissions in modern intercept receivers, we have developed a novel method to recognize dynamically varying pulse repetition interval (PRI) modulation patterns emitted by MFRs. We use robust feature extraction and classifier design techniques to assist recognition in unpredictable real-world signal environments. We classify received pulse trains hierarchically which allows unambiguous detection of the subpatterns using a sliding window. Accuracy, robustness and reliability of the technique are demonstrated with extensive simulations using both static and dynamically varying PRI modulation patterns.

  7. Non-Contact Thrust Stand Calibration Method for Repetitively-Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively-pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoidal coil to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against the magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasisteady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or zero position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke s law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other as the constant relating average deflection and average thrust match within the errors on the linear regression curve fit of the data. Quantitatively, the error on the calibration coefficient is roughly 1% of the coefficient value.

  8. Ytterbium fiber-based, 270 fs, 100 W chirped pulse amplification laser system with 1 MHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    A 100 W Yb-doped, fiber-based, femtosecond, chirped pulse amplification laser system was developed with a repetition rate of 1 MHz, corresponding to a pulse energy of 100 µJ. Large-scale, fused-silica transmission gratings were used for both the pulse stretcher and compressor, with a compression throughput efficiency of ∼85%. A pulse duration of 270 fs was measured by second harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG). To the best of our knowledge, this is the shortest pulse duration ever achieved by a 100-W-level fiber chirped pulse amplification laser system at a repetition rate of few megahertz, without any special post-compression manipulation.

  9. Coordinated Research Program in Pulsed Power Physics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    by blaock number) Pulsed Power, Switching , Electromechanical Pulse Device, Laser Triggering , Electron Beam Triggering , Surface Physics, Electrode...density gradients in gas blown spark gaps; investigations of multichanneling, erosion, and triggering phenomena in surface discharge switches ...developing diagnostics, and investigating effects and physical processes which might be important for laser - triggered switching . Extensive studies of

  10. Schlieren Imaging and Pulsed Detonation Engine Testing of Ignition by a Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-16

    CHEMKIN II [31] are coupled together to efficiently model species evolution in 0-dimensional plasma-as- sisted combustion (PAC). Gas heating during the...of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, NJ 08544, USA bAerospace Systems Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433, USA c...quenched in-between pulses, resulting in a building up of heat and radicals in the center of the ignition kernel. Optical emission spectra revealed

  11. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  12. Power limitations and pulse distortions in an Yb : KGW chirped-pulse amplification laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G H; Yang, J; Kulik, A V; Sall, E G; Chizhov, S A; Kang, U; Yashin, V E

    2013-08-31

    We have studied self-action effects (self-focusing and self-phase modulation) and stimulated Raman scattering in an Yb : KGW chirped-pulse amplification laser system. The results demonstrate that self-focusing in combination with thermal lensing may significantly limit the chirped pulse energy in this system (down to 200 μJ) even at a relatively long pulse duration (50 ps). Nonlinear lenses in the laser crystals in combination with thermal lenses bring the regenerative amplifier cavity in the laser system to the instability zone and limit the average output power at pulse repetition rates under 50 kHz. Self-phase modulation, a manifestation of self-action, may significantly distort a recompressed femtosecond pulse at energies near the self-focusing threshold. Stimulated Raman scattering in such a laser has a weaker effect on output parameters than do self-focusing and thermal lensing, and Raman spectra are only observed in the case of pulse energy instability. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  13. Effect of therapeutic femtosecond laser pulse energy, repetition rate, and numerical aperture on laser-induced second and third harmonic generation in corneal tissue.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, William R; Ilev, Ilko K

    2015-05-01

    Clinical therapy incorporating femtosecond laser (FSL) devices is a quickly growing field in modern biomedical technology due to their precision and ability to generate therapeutic effects with substantially less laser pulse energy. FSLs have the potential to produce nonlinear optical effects such as harmonic generation (HG), especially in tissues with significant nonlinear susceptibilities such as the cornea. HG in corneal tissue has been demonstrated in nonlinear harmonic microscopy using low-power FSLs. Furthermore, the wavelength ranges of harmonic spectral emissions generated in corneal tissues are known to be phototoxic above certain intensities. We have investigated how the critical FSL parameters pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and numerical aperture influence both second (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) in corneal tissue. Experimental results demonstrated corresponding increases in HG intensity with increasing repetition rate and numerical aperture. HG duration decreased with increasing repetition rate and pulse energy. The data also demonstrated a significant difference in HG between FSL parameters representing the two most common classes of FSL therapeutic devices.

  14. Loss of echogenicity and onset of cavitation from echogenic liposomes: pulse repetition frequency independence.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Haworth, Kevin J; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2015-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are being developed for the early detection and treatment of atherosclerotic lesions. An 80% loss of echogenicity of ELIP has been found to be concomitant with the onset of stable and inertial cavitation. The ultrasound pressure amplitude at which this occurs is weakly dependent on pulse duration. It has been reported that the rapid fragmentation threshold of ELIP (based on changes in echogenicity) is dependent on the insonation pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The study described here evaluates the relationship between loss of echogenicity and cavitation emissions from ELIP insonified by duplex Doppler pulses at four PRFs (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 8.33 kHz). Loss of echogenicity was evaluated on B-mode images of ELIP. Cavitation emissions from ELIP were recorded passively on a focused single-element transducer and a linear array. Emissions recorded by the linear array were beamformed, and the spatial widths of stable and inertial cavitation emissions were compared with the calibrated azimuthal beamwidth of the Doppler pulse exceeding the stable and inertial cavitation thresholds. The inertial cavitation thresholds had a very weak dependence on PRF, and stable cavitation thresholds were independent of PRF. The spatial widths of the cavitation emissions recorded by the passive cavitation imaging system agreed with the calibrated Doppler beamwidths. The results also indicate that 64%-79% loss of echogenicity can be used to classify the presence or absence of cavitation emissions with greater than 80% accuracy.

  15. Pulse compression of a high-power thin disk laser using rod-type fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, C J; Heckl, O H; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2011-01-17

    We report on two pulse compressors for a high-power thin disk laser oscillator using rod-type fiber amplifiers. Both systems are seeded by a standard SESAM modelocked thin disk laser that delivers 16 W of average power at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz with a pulse energy of 1.5 μJ and a pulse duration of 1 ps. We discuss two results with different fiber parameters with different trade-offs in pulse duration, average power, damage and complexity. The first amplifier setup consists of a Yb-doped fiber amplifier with a 2200 μm2 core area and a length of 55 cm, resulting in a compressed average power of 55 W with 98-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz. The second system uses a shorter 36-cm fiber with a larger core area of 4500 μm2. In a stretcher-free configuration we obtained 34 W of compressed average power and 65-fs pulses. In both cases peak powers of > 30 MW were demonstrated at several μJ pulse energies. The power scaling limitations due to damage and self-focusing are discussed.

  16. Laser generation of XeCl exciplex molecules in a longitudinal repetitively pulsed discharge in a Xe – CsCl mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Boichenko, A M; Klenovskii, M S

    2015-12-31

    By using the previously developed kinetic model, we have carried out simulations to study the possibility of laser generation of XeCl exciplex molecules in the working medium based on a mixture of Xe with CsCl vapours, excited by a longitudinal repetitively pulsed discharge. The formation mechanism of exciplex molecules in this mixture is fundamentally different from the formation mechanisms in the traditional mixtures of exciplex lasers. The conditions that make the laser generation possible are discussed. For these conditions, with allowance for available specific experimental conditions of the repetitively pulsed discharge excitation, we have obtained the calculated dependences of the power and efficiency of generation on the reflectivity of mirrors in a laser cavity. (active media)

  17. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  18. Laser-induced retinal damage threshold for repetitive-pulse exposure to 100-microsecs pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-07

    exposure duration.1 The primary retinal damage mechanism for exposure to a single pulse in the range of 10 ns to 10 μs duration is micro cavitation , or...thermal denaturation injury mechanism dominates for PRF > ∼1000 Hz. At 1000 Hz, thermal denaturation occurs at near the same level that micro cavitation ...with the observation of micro cavitation for exposure durations < ∼50 μs, while for expo sures >100 to 200 μs, cell death occurs at radiant exposures

  19. High energy pulses generation with giant spectrum bandwidth and submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser in all normal dispersion cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-H.; Wang, D.; Lin, K.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Robust passively mode-locked pulse generation with low pulse repetition rate and giant spectrum bandwidth in an all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser has been experimentally demonstrated using nonlinear polarization evolution technique. The highest pulse energy over 20 nJ with spectrum bandwidth over 50 nm can be experimentally obtained at 175 mW pump power. The mode-locked pulses reveal broadened 3-dB pulsewidth about several nanosecond and widened pedestal in time trace that is resulted from enormous dispersion in laser cavity and gain dynamics. At certain mode-locking state, a spectrum gap around 1056 nm are observed between the three and four energy levels of Yb-doped fiber laser. By properly rotating the polarization controller, the gap can be eliminated due to four-wave mixing to produce more flattened spectrum output.

  20. A low power pulsed arcjet thruster for spacecraft propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, Gary Francis

    1997-11-01

    An electrothermal thruster that operates in a pulsed mode at low power (<200 W) is investigated. The thruster, called a pulsed arcjet, uses a capacitor and a pulse- forming electrical circuit to transfer stored electrical energy to a helium propellant gas in 3-10 μsec arc discharges at repetition rates of 550 to 2600 pulses-per- second with pulse energies from 24 to 130 mJ. The arc discharges occur in a cylindrical capillary upstream of a converging-diverging nozzle, and all the energy addition occurs in the subsonic region. Peak currents in the arc are 110 to 270 amps. Pulsed arcjet performance at thermal steady state is measured for two 20 degree half angle conical nozzles with area ratios of 20 and 230. Thrust levels from 10 to 30 mN are measured on an inverted pendulum-type thrust stand, and input power levels from 24 to 119 watts are determined from measurements of pulse rate and breakdown voltage. A maximum specific impulse of 305 seconds is achieved with 38% efficiency. A time-dependent, quasi-1D numerical model is developed to evaluate energy losses in the pulsed arcjet. The numerical model uses a time-marching procedure and the MacCormack predictor-corrector algorithm. Viscous and heat transfer effects are incorporated though a friction factor and an average heat transfer coefficient. A numerical study of nozzle parameters, capillary geometry, wall temperature, and pulse energy shows that the performance is insensitive to capillary and nozzle geometry and that thermal characteristics are the dominant factor affecting performance. The specific impulse and efficiency of the pulsed arcjet are found to be sensitive to wall temperature due to heat transfer losses in the subsonic region. A pulse-forming electrical circuit is developed to reduce energy losses in the storage capacitor, and greater than 85% of the initial stored energy is transferred to the arc in a unipolar pulse. A high current diode installed across the capacitor terminals is used to eliminate

  1. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Brendon; Berrill, Mark A; Wernsing, Keith; Baumgarten, Cory; Woolston, Mark; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  2. Effects of paired-pulse and repetitive stimulation on neurons in the rat medial geniculate body.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, E L; Smith, P H

    2002-01-01

    Many behaviorally relevant sounds, including language, are composed of brief, rapid, repetitive acoustic features. Recent studies suggest that abnormalities in producing and understanding spoken language are correlated with abnormal neural responsiveness to such auditory stimuli at higher auditory levels [Tallal et al., Science 271 (1996) 81-84; Wright et al., Nature 387 (1997) 176-178; Nagarajan et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 96 (1999) 6483-6488] and with abnormal anatomical features in the auditory thalamus [Galaburda et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91 (1994) 8010-8013]. To begin to understand potential mechanisms for normal and abnormal transfer of sensory information to the cortex, we recorded the intracellular responses of medial geniculate body thalamocortical neurons in a rat brain slice preparation. Inferior colliculus or corticothalamic axons were excited by pairs or trains of electrical stimuli. Neurons receiving only excitatory collicular input had tufted dendritic morphology and displayed strong paired-pulse depression of their large, short-latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials. In contrast, geniculate neurons receiving excitatory and inhibitory collicular inputs could have stellate or tufted morphology and displayed much weaker depression or even paired-pulse facilitation of their smaller, longer-latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Depression was not blocked by ionotropic glutamate, GABA(A) or GABA(B) receptor antagonists. Facilitation was unaffected by GABA(A) receptor antagonists but was diminished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blockade. Similar stimulation of the corticothalamic input always elicited paired-pulse facilitation. The NMDA-independent facilitation of the second cortical excitatory postsynaptic potential lasted longer and was more pronounced than that seen for the excitatory collicular inputs. Paired-pulse stimulation of isolated collicular inhibitory postsynaptic potentials generated little change in the

  3. Species and temperature measurements of methane oxidation in a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K; Guo, Peng; Rousso, Aric; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-01-01

    Speciation and temperature measurements of methane oxidation during a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in a low-temperature flow reactor have been performed. Measurements of temperature and formaldehyde during a burst of pulses were made on a time-dependent basis using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and measurements of all other major stable species were made downstream of a continuously pulsed discharge using gas chromatography. The major species for a stoichiometric methane/oxygen/helium mixture with 75% dilution are H2O, CO, CO2, H2, CH2O, CH3OH, C2H6, C2H4 and C2H2. A modelling tool to simulate homogeneous plasma combustion kinetics is assembled by combining the ZDPlasKin and CHEMKIN codes. In addition, a kinetic model for plasma-assisted combustion (HP-Mech/plasma) of methane, oxygen and helium mixtures has been assembled to simulate the measurements. Predictions can accurately capture reactant consumption as well as production of the major product species. However, significant disagreement is found for minor species, particularly CH2O and CH3OH. Further analysis revealed that the plasma-activated low-temperature oxidation pathways, particularly those involving CH3O2 radical reactions and methane reactions with O(1D), are responsible for this disagreement. PMID:26170433

  4. Shielding analyses for repetitive high energy pulsed power accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jow, H. N.; Rao, D. V.

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs, tests and operates a variety of accelerators that generate large amounts of high energy Bremsstrahlung radiation over an extended time. Typically, groups of similar accelerators are housed in a large building that is inaccessible to the general public. To facilitate independent operation of each accelerator, test cells are constructed around each accelerator to shield it from the radiation workers occupying surrounding test cells and work-areas. These test cells, about 9 ft. high, are constructed of high density concrete block walls that provide direct radiation shielding. Above the target areas (radiation sources), lead or steel plates are used to minimize skyshine radiation. Space, accessibility and cost considerations impose certain restrictions on the design of these test cells. SNL Health Physics division is tasked to evaluate the adequacy of each test cell design and compare resultant dose rates with the design criteria stated in DOE Order 5480.11. In response, SNL Health Physics has undertaken an intensive effort to assess existing radiation shielding codes and compare their predictions against measured dose rates. This paper provides a summary of the effort and its results.

  5. Low power arcjet thruster pulse ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarmiento, Charles J.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the pulse ignition characteristics of a 1 kW class arcjet using an inductive energy storage pulse generator with a pulse width modulated power converter identified several thruster and pulse generator parameters that influence breakdown voltage including pulse generator rate of voltage rise. This work was conducted with an arcjet tested on hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine. Over all ranges of thruster and pulser parameters investigated, the mean breakdown voltages varied from 1.4 to 2.7 kV. Ignition tests at elevated thruster temperatures under certain conditions revealed occasional breakdowns to thruster voltages higher than the power converter output voltage. These post breakdown discharges sometimes failed to transition to the lower voltage arc discharge mode and the thruster would not ignite. Under the same conditions, a transition to the arc mode would occur for a subsequent pulse and the thruster would ignite. An automated 11 600 cycle starting and transition to steady state test demonstrated ignition on the first pulse and required application of a second pulse only two times to initiate breakdown.

  6. A Real-Time Terahertz Time-Domain Polarization Analyzer with 80-MHz Repetition-Rate Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Yasumatsu, Naoya; Oguchi, Kenichi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Tachizaki, Takehiro

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer by using 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is based on the spinning electro-optic sensor method, which we recently proposed and demonstrated by using a regenerative amplifier laser system; here we improve the detection scheme in order to be able to use it with a femtosecond laser oscillator with laser pulses of a much higher repetition rate. This improvement brings great advantages for realizing broadband, compact and stable real-time terahertz time-domain polarization measurement systems for scientific and industrial applications. PMID:23478599

  7. Laser plasma cryogenic target on translating substrate for generation of continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Amano, Sho

    2014-06-01

    To generate continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses with various wavelengths from laser-produced plasmas, a one-dimensionally translating substrate system with a closed He gas cryostat that can continuously supply various cryogenic targets for ~10 Hz laser pulses has been developed. The system was successfully operated at a lowest temperature of 15 K and at a maximum up-down speed of 12 mm/s. Solid Ar, Kr, and Xe layers were formed, and their growth rates and the laser crater sizes on them were studied. By optimization of the operational parameters in accordance with our design rule, it was shown that stable output power was achieved continuously from the plasma emission at frequencies of 1-10 Hz. The average soft X-ray and EUV powers obtained were 19 mW at 3.2 nm, 33 mW at 10.0 nm, and 66 mW at 10.8 nm, with 10% bandwidths, from the Ar, Kr, and Xe solid targets, respectively, with a laser power of 1 W. We will be able to achieve higher frequencies using a high beam quality laser that produces smaller craters, and can expect higher powers. Although only Ar, Kr, and Xe gases were tested in this study, the target system achieved a temperature of 15 K and can thus solidify almost all target gases, apart from H and He, and can continuously supply the solid target. The use of various target materials will enable expansion of the EUV and soft X-ray emission wavelength range.

  8. Compact inductive energy storage pulse power system.

    PubMed

    K, Senthil; Mitra, S; Roy, Amitava; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D P

    2012-05-01

    An inductive energy storage pulse power system is being developed in BARC, India. Simple, compact, and robust opening switches, capable of generating hundreds of kV, are key elements in the development of inductive energy storage pulsed power sources. It employs an inductive energy storage and opening switch power conditioning techniques with high energy density capacitors as the primary energy store. The energy stored in the capacitor bank is transferred to an air cored storage inductor in 5.5 μs through wire fuses. By optimizing the exploding wire parameters, a compact, robust, high voltage pulse power system, capable of generating reproducibly 240 kV, is developed. This paper presents the full details of the system along with the experimental data.

  9. Generation of Streamer Discharge Plasma in Water by All Solid-State Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakugawa, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Kunihiro; Choi, Jaegu; Kiyan, Tsuyoshi; Namihira, Takao; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori

    Pulsed power has been used to produce non-thermal plasmas in gases that generate a high electric field at the tip of streamer discharges, where high energy electrons, free radicals, and ozone are produced. Recently, all solid-state pulsed power generators, which are operated with high repetition rate, long lifetime and high reliability, have been developed for industrial applications, such as high repetition rate pulsed gas lasers, high energy density plasma (EUV sources) and water discharges. We have studied and developed repetitive all solid-state pulsed power system for discharge in water. The developed system consists of a photo-voltaic generator, a Pb battery, an inverter, a controller, a command charger, a high-speed thyristor, a magnetic pulse compression circuit and a pulse transformer, and has mobility. This system can generate an output peak voltage of over 100 kV with voltage rise time of 200 ns. In this work, large volume streamer like discharges in water were produced by the developed system and this discharge plasma used to treat algae (Microcystis) with point-to-plane simple electrodes.

  10. Fixed lag smoothing target tracking in clutter for a high pulse repetition frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Uzair; Shi, Yi Fang; Song, Taek Lyul

    2015-12-01

    A new method to smooth the target hybrid state with Gaussian mixture measurement likelihood-integrated track splitting (GMM-ITS) in the presence of clutter for a high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF) radar is proposed. This method smooths the target state at fixed lag N and considers all feasible multi-scan target existence sequences in the temporal window of scans in order to smooth the target hybrid state. The smoothing window can be of any length N. The proposed method to smooth the target hybrid state at fixed lag is also applied to the enhanced multiple model (EMM) tracking algorithm. Simulation results indicate that the performance of fixed lag smoothing GMM-ITS significantly improves false track discrimination and root mean square errors (RMSEs).

  11. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  12. Pulsed UV-C disinfection of Escherichia coli with light-emitting diodes, emitted at various repetition rates and duty cycles.

    PubMed

    Wengraitis, Stephen; McCubbin, Patrick; Wade, Mary Margaret; Biggs, Tracey D; Hall, Shane; Williams, Leslie I; Zulich, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    A 2010 study exposed Staphylococcus aureus to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and thermal heating from pulsed xenon flash lamps. The results suggested that disinfection could be caused not only by photochemical changes from UV radiation, but also by photophysical stress damage caused by the disturbance from incoming pulses. The study called for more research in this area. The recent advances in light-emitting diode (LED) technology include the development of LEDs that emit in narrow bands in the ultraviolet-C (UV-C) range (100-280 nm), which is highly effective for UV disinfection of organisms. Further, LEDs would use less power, and allow more flexibility than other sources of UV energy in that the user may select various pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs), pulse irradiances, pulse widths, duty cycles and types of waveform output (e.g. square waves, sine waves, triangular waves, etc.). Our study exposed Escherichia coli samples to square pulses of 272 nm radiation at various PRFs and duty cycles. A statistically significant correlation was found between E. coli's disinfection sensitivity and these parameters. Although our sample size was small, these results show promise and are worthy of further investigation. Comparisons are also made with pulsed disinfection by LEDs emitting at 365 nm, and pulsed disinfection by xenon flash lamps.

  13. Experimental investigation and theoretical analysis of pulse repetition rate adjustable deep ultraviolet picosecond radiation by second harmonic generation in KBe2BO3F2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi; Zhang, Fengfeng; Zhang, Shenjin; Wang, Zhimin; Yang, Feng; Xu, Fengliang; Peng, Qinjun; Cui, Dafu; Zhang, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan

    2014-06-01

    We reported on an experimental investigation and theoretical analysis of pulse repetition rate (PRR) adjustable deep ultraviolet (DUV) picosecond (ps) radiation by second harmonic generation (SHG) in KBe2BO3F2 (KBBF) crystal. Third harmonic radiation at 355 nm of a ps Nd:YVO4 laser output with PRR of 200 kHz-1 MHz was employed as the pump source. The dependence of the 177.3 nm output power on the 355 nm pump power was measured at different PRRs, and the maximum 177.3 nm average output power of 695 μW was obtained at the PRR of 200 kHz. The measured data agreed well with the results of the ps KBBF SHG theoretical simulations. Using simulations, the pulse width and the spectral bandwidth of the generated radiation at 177.3 nm were estimated to be 5.88 ps and 7.84 pm, respectively.

  14. Electromagnetic pulse and the electric power network

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, K.W.; Barnes, P.R.; Zaininger, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines the nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) - electric power system interaction problem. A description of high altitude EMP (HEMP) characteristics, source region EMP (SREMP) characteristics, and magnetohydrodynamics EMP (MHD-EMP) characteristics are presented. The results of initial calculations of EMP induced surges on electric power transmission and distribution lines are presented and compared with lightning induced surges. Potential EMP impacts on electric power systems are discussed, and an overview of the Department of Energy (DOE) EMP research program is presented.

  15. High-power widely tunable sub-20 fs Gaussian laser pulses for ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Bernd; Steinmann, Andy; Giessen, Harald

    2011-11-21

    We demonstrate the generation of widely tunable sub-20 fs Gaussian-shaped laser pulses using a grating-based 4-f pulse shaper and a liquid crystal spatial light modulator. Our pump source is an Yb:KGW solitary mode-locked oscillator at 44 MHz repetition rate which is coupled into a large mode area microstructured fiber to generate a broad spectrum from below 900 nm to above 1150 nm. These pulses are precompressed by a prism sequence and subsequently sent into the pulse shaper. We use the multiphoton intrapulse interference phase scan (MIIPS) for phase shaping and iterative amplitude optimization to achieve Gaussian-like tunable sub-20 fs pulses with output powers of up to 142 mW as well as nontunable pulses with 310 mW output power as short as 11.5 fs.

  16. Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2006-02-01

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was ˜100ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

  17. Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2006-02-20

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was {approx}100 ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

  18. Pulsed power molten salt battery development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argade, S. D.; Boos, D. L.; Ryan, D. M.

    The authors describe a program aimed at developing a primary-reserve pulse-power battery design. The program focus at the present time is on developing high-rate chlorine cathodes for the lithium-aluminum/chlorine system. A novel activation treatment has been developed to use porous carbon and graphite materials as chlorine cathodes in this battery system. Results obtained with these electrodes in molten-salt cells are discussed. In molten LiCl-KCl at 450 C, these chlorine electrodes deliver remarkable pulse-power performance, 20-25 W/cm2. The IR-free cell polarization with Li-Al/chlorine cells appears to be ohmic, which is desirable for the pulse power application.

  19. Loads for pulsed power cylindrical implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.E.; Armijo, E.V.; Barthell, B.L.; Bartos, J.J.; Bush, H.; Foreman, L.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Gobby, P.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Gurule, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Pulse power can be used to generate high energy density conditions in convergent hollow cylindrical geometry through the use of appropriate electrode configuration and cylindrical loads. Cylindrically symmetric experiments are conducted with the Pegasus-H inductive store, capacitor energized pulse power facility at Los Alamos using both precision machined cylindrical liner loads and low mass vapor deposited cylindrical foil loads. The liner experiments investigate solid density hydrodynamic topics. Foil loads vaporize from Joule heating to generate an imploding cylindrical plasma which can be used to simulate some fluxes associated with fusion energy processes. Similar experiments are conducted with {open_quotes}Procyon{close_quotes} inductive store pulse power assemblies energized by explosively driven magnetic flux compression.

  20. Ultrashort Two-Photon-Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Nanosecond-Duration, Repetitively Pulsed Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob Brian

    Absolute number densities of atomic species produced by nanosecond duration, repetitively pulsed electric discharges are measured by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). Relatively high plasma discharge pulse energies (=1 mJ/pulse) are used to generate atomic hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen in a variety of discharge conditions and geometries. Unique to this work is the development of femtosecond-laser-based TALIF (fs-TALIF). Fs-TALIF offers a number of advantages compared to more conventional ns-pulse-duration laser systems, including better accuracy of direct quenching measurements in challenging environments, significantly reduced photolytic interference including photo-dissociation and photo-ionization, higher signal and increased laser-pulse bandwidth, the ability to collect two-dimensional images of atomic species number densities with far greater spatial resolution compared with more conventional diagnostics, and much higher laser repetition rates allowing for more efficient and accurate measurements of atomic species number densities. In order to fully characterize the fs-TALIF diagnostic and compare it with conventional ns-TALIF, low pressure (100 Torr) ns-duration pulsed discharges are operated in mixtures of H2, O2, and N2 with different buffer gases including argon, helium, and nitrogen. These discharge conditions are used to demonstrate the capability for two-dimensional imaging measurements. The images produced are the first of their kind and offer quantitative insight into spatially and temporally resolved kinetics and transport in ns-pulsed discharge plasmas. The two-dimensional images make possible comparison with high-fidelity plasma kinetics models of the presented data. The comparison with the quasi-one-dimensional kinetic model show good spatial and temporal agreement. The same diagnostics are used at atmospheric pressure, when atomic oxygen fs-TALIF is performed in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ). Here, the

  1. Compact, high-pulse-energy, high-power, picosecond master oscillator power amplifier.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ho-Yin; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Xu, Lin; Bateman, James; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2014-09-08

    We report a compact, stable, gain-switched-diode-seeded master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA), employing direct amplification via conventional Yb(3+)-doped fibers, to generate picosecond pulses with energy of 17.7 μJ and 97-W average output power (excluding amplified spontaneous emission) at 5.47-MHz repetition frequency in a diffraction-limited and single-polarization beam. A maximum peak power of 197 kW is demonstrated. Such a high-energy, high-power, MHz, picosecond MOPA is of great interest for high-throughput material processing. With 13.8-μJ pulse energy confined in the 0.87-nm 3-dB spectral bandwidth, this MOPA is also a promising source for nonlinear frequency conversion to generate high-energy pulses in other spectral regions. We have explored the pulse energy scaling until the stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) becomes significant (i.e. spectral peak intensity exceeds 1% of that of the signal).

  2. Efficient femtosecond pulse generation in an all-normal-dispersion Yb:fiber ring laser at 605 MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyu; Wang, Aimin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We report a 1030 nm-wavelength Yb:fiber laser that produces the shortest/direct output pulse duration (502 fs) among all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers at the highest repetition rate (605 MHz) among the passively fundamentally mode-locked fiber lasers. The laser also exhibits an optical efficiency of 70% at CW and 65% at mode-locking modes.

  3. REVIEW ARTICLE: Harmonically mode-locked semiconductor-based lasers as high repetition rate ultralow noise pulse train and optical frequency comb sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, F.; Ozharar, S.; Gee, S.; Delfyett, P. J.

    2009-10-01

    Recent experimental work on semiconductor-based harmonically mode-locked lasers geared toward low noise applications is reviewed. Active, harmonic mode-locking of semiconductor-based lasers has proven to be an excellent way to generate 10 GHz repetition rate pulse trains with pulse-to-pulse timing jitter of only a few femtoseconds without requiring active feedback stabilization. This level of timing jitter is achieved in long fiberized ring cavities and relies upon such factors as low noise rf sources as mode-lockers, high optical power, intracavity dispersion management and intracavity phase modulation. When a high finesse etalon is placed within the optical cavity, semiconductor-based harmonically mode-locked lasers can be used as optical frequency comb sources with 10 GHz mode spacing. When active mode-locking is replaced with regenerative mode-locking, a completely self-contained comb source is created, referenced to the intracavity etalon.

  4. Generation of pulsed ion beams by an inductive storage pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Maeda, Sadao

    1990-10-01

    A pulsed power generator by an inductive energy storage system is extremely compact and light in comparison with a conventional pulsed power generator, which consists of a Marx bank and a water pulse forming line. A compact and light pulse power generator is applied to the generation of pulsed ion beams. A thin copper fuse is used an an opening switch, which is necessary in the inductive storage pulsed power generator. A magnetically insulated diode is used for the generation of ion beams. The pulsed ion beams are successfully generated by the inductive storage pulsed power generator for the first time.

  5. High-power LD side-pump Nd: YAG regenerative amplifier at 1 kHz repetition rate with volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for broadening and compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ming-Liang; Chen, Li-Yuan; Chen, Meng; Li, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Pulse width of 8.7 ps was broadened to 102.2, 198 ps with single and double pass the VBG respectively. When the 102.2 ps pulse was injected into 1 kHz repetition rate of LD side-pump Nd: YAG regenerative amplifier (RA), pulse width of 87.5 ps at 1 kHz was obtained with the pulse energy of 9.4 mJ, the beam quality of M^2 factor was 1.2. The pulse width was compressed to 32.7 ps with a single pass VBG and the pulse energy reduced to 8.8 mJ, and the power density was up to 15.2 GW/cm2, the stability for pulse to pulse rms is about 0.6 %, beam pointing was about 35 μrad. In addition, when 198 ps pulse was injected into RA, pulse width of 156 ps was obtained which energy was 9.6 mJ, the pulse width was compressed to 38 ps by double passing the VBG, the pulse energy decreased to 8.5 mJ. Chirped VBG is a new way to obtain high-intensity picosecond pulse laser system simple and smaller.

  6. High-throughput machining using high average power ultrashort pulse lasers and ultrafast polygon scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Streek, André; Kloetzer, Sascha; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, high-throughput ultrashort pulse laser machining is investigated on various industrial grade metals (Aluminium, Copper, Stainless steel) and Al2O3 ceramic at unprecedented processing speeds. This is achieved by using a high pulse repetition frequency picosecond laser with maximum average output power of 270 W in conjunction with a unique, in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner. Initially, different concepts of polygon scanners are engineered and tested to find out the optimal architecture for ultrafast and precision laser beam scanning. Remarkable 1,000 m/s scan speed is achieved on the substrate, and thanks to the resulting low pulse overlap, thermal accumulation and plasma absorption effects are avoided at up to 20 MHz pulse repetition frequencies. In order to identify optimum processing conditions for efficient high-average power laser machining, the depths of cavities produced under varied parameter settings are analyzed and, from the results obtained, the characteristic removal values are specified. The maximum removal rate is achieved as high as 27.8 mm3/min for Aluminium, 21.4 mm3/min for Copper, 15.3 mm3/min for Stainless steel and 129.1 mm3/min for Al2O3 when full available laser power is irradiated at optimum pulse repetition frequency.

  7. A repetitively pulsed xenon chloride excimer laser with all ferrite magnetic cores (AFMC) based all solid state exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benerji, N. S.; Varshnay, N. K.; Ghodke, D. V.; Singh, A.

    2016-10-01

    Performance of repetitively pulsed xenon chloride excimer laser (λ~308 nm) with solid state pulser consisting of magnetic pulse compression circuit (MPC) using all ferrite magnetic cores (AFMC) is reported. Laser system suitable for 100 Hz operation with inbuilt pre-ionizer, compact gas circulation and cooling has been developed and presented. In this configuration, high voltage pulses of ~8 μs duration are compressed to ~100 ns by magnetic pulse compression circuit with overall compression factor of ~80. Pulse energy of ~18 J stored in the primary capacitor is transferred to the laser head with an efficiency of ~85% compared to ~70% that is normally achieved in such configurations using annealed met-glass core. This is a significant improvement of about 21%. Maximum output laser pulse energy of ~100 mJ was achieved at repetition rate of 100 Hz with a typical pulse to pulse energy stability of ±5% and laser pulse energy of 150 mJ was generated at low rep-rate of ~40 Hz. This exciter uses a low current and low voltage solid state switch (SCR) that replaces high voltage and high current switch i. e, thyratron completely. The use of solid state exciter in turn reduces electromagnetic interference (EMI) effects particularly in excimer lasers where high EMI is present due to high di/dt. The laser is focused on a thin copper sheet for generation of micro-hole and the SEM image of the generated micro hole shows the energy stability of the laser at high repetition rate operation. Nearly homogeneous, regular and well developed xenon chloride (XeCl) laser beam spot was achieved using the laser.

  8. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  9. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOEpatents

    Mims, James; Buden, David; Williams, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometeorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length.

  10. BICMOS power detector for pulsed Rf power amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Bridge, Clayton D.

    2016-10-01

    A BiCMOS power detector for pulsed radio-frequency power amplifiers is proposed. Given the pulse waveform and a fraction of the power amplifier's input or output signal, the detector utilizes a low-frequency feedback loop to perform a successive approximation of the amplitude of the input signal. Upon completion of the successive approximation, the detector returns 9-bits representing the amplitude of the RF input signal. Using the pulse waveform from the power amplifier, the detector can dynamically adjust the rate of the binary search operation in order to return the updated amplitude information of the RF input signal at least every 1ms. The detector can handle pulse waveform frequencies from 50kHz to 10MHz with duty cycles in the range of 5- 50% and peak power levels of -10 to 10dBm. The signal amplitude measurement can be converted to a peak power measurement accurate to within ±0.6dB of the input RF power.

  11. Generation of 220 mJ nanosecond pulses at a 10 Hz repetition rate with excellent beam quality in a diode-pumped Yb:YAG MOPA system.

    PubMed

    Wandt, Christoph; Klingebiel, Sandro; Siebold, Mathias; Major, Zsuzsanna; Hein, Joachim; Krausz, Ferenc; Karsch, Stefan

    2008-05-15

    A novel all-diode-pumped master oscillator power amplifier system based on Yb:YAG crystal rods has been developed. It consists of a Q-switched oscillator delivering 3 mJ, 6.4 ns pulses at a 10 Hz repetition rate and an additional four-pass amplifier, which boosts the output energy to 220 mJ, while a close to TEM(00) beam quality could be observed. Additionally a simulation of the amplification was written that allows for further scaling considerations.

  12. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  13. Sub 25 fs pulses from solid-core nonlinear compression stage at 250 W of average power.

    PubMed

    Jocher, Christoph; Eidam, Tino; Hädrich, Steffen; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    We report on a highpower femtosecond fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with an excellent beam quality (M(2)=1.2) operating at 250 MHz repetition rate. We demonstrate nonlinear compression in a solid-core photonic crystal fiber at unprecedented average power levels. By exploiting self-phase modulation with subsequent chirped-mirror compression we achieve pulse shortening by more than one order of magnitude to 23 fs pulses. The use of circular polarization allows higher than usual peak powers in the broadening fiber resulting in compressed 0.9 μJ pulse energy and a peak power of 34 MW at 250 W of average power (M(2)=1.3). This system is well suited for driving cavity-enhanced high-repetition rate high-harmonic generation.

  14. Effect of pulse repetition frequency of high-intensity focused ultrasound on in vitro thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Zhou, Yufeng

    2017-03-01

    Vascular occlusion by the thrombi is the main reason for ischemic stroke and deep vein thrombosis. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and histotripsy or microtripsy pulses can effectively dissolve the blood clot with no use of thrombolytic agent and ultrasound contrast agent (microbubbles). In this study, HIFU bursts at the same duty cycle (2%) but varied pulse repetition frequency (PRF) from 1Hz to 1000Hz were delivered to in vitro porcine blood clot for 30s. Thrombolysis efficiency initially increases slightly with the PRF, 86.4±10.3%, 89.9±11.9, and 92.9±12.8% at the PRF of 1Hz, 10Hz, and 100Hz, respectively, without significant difference (p>0.05), but then drops dramatically to 37.9±6.9% at the PRF of 1000Hz (p<0.05). The particle size in the supernatant of dissolution is 547.1±129.5nm, which suggests the disruption of thrombi into the subcellular level. Thrombi motion during HIFU exposure shows violent motion and significant curling at the low PRF, rotation about its axis with occasional curling at the moderate PRF, and localized vibration at the high PRF due to the generation of acoustic radiation force and streaming. Quantitative analysis of recorded motion shows the axial displacement decreases with the PRF of delivered HIFU bursts, from 3.9±1.5mm at 1Hz to 0.7±0.4mm at 1000Hz. Bubble cavitation during HIFU exposure to the blood clot was also monitored. The increase of PRF led to the increase of inertial cavitation but the decrease of stable cavitation. In summary, the PRF of delivered HIFU bursts at the same output energy has a significant effect on the thrombi motion, bubble cavitation activities, and subsequently thrombolysis efficiencies.

  15. Repetitively pulsed, high energy KrF lasers for inertial fusion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, M. C.; Sethian, J. D.; Giuliani, J. L.; Lehmberg, R.; Kepple, P.; Wolford, M. F.; Hegeler, F.; Friedman, M.; Jones, T. C.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weidenheimer, D.; Rose, D.

    2004-12-01

    Krypton fluoride (KrF) lasers produce highly uniform beams at 248 nm, allow the capability of 'zooming' the spot size to follow an imploding pellet, naturally assume a modular architecture and have been developed into a pulsed-power-based industrial technology that readily scales to a fusion power plant sized system. There are two main challenges for the fusion power plant application: to develop a system with an overall efficiency of greater than 6% (based on target gains of 100) and to achieve a durability of greater than 3 × 108 shots (two years at 5 Hz). These two issues are being addressed with the Electra (700 J, 5 Hz) and Nike (3000 J, single shot) KrF lasers at the Naval Research Laboratory. Based on recent advances in pulsed power, electron beam generation and transport, hibachi (foil support structure) design and KrF physics, wall plug efficiencies of greater than 7% should be achievable. Moreover, recent experiments show that it may be possible to realize long lived electron beam diodes using ceramic honeycomb cathodes and anode foils that are convectively cooled by periodically deflecting the laser gas. This paper is a summary of the progress in the development of the critical KrF technologies for laser fusion energy.

  16. Experimental study of plume induced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed spark microdischarges in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orriere, Thomas; Benard, Nicolas; Moreau, Eric; Pai, David

    2016-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) spark discharges have been widely studied due to their high chemical reactivity, low gas temperature, and high ionization efficiency. They are useful in many research areas: nanomaterials synthesis, combustion, and aerodynamic flow control. In all of these fields, particular attention has been devoted to chemical species transport and/or hydrodynamic and thermal effects for applications. The aim of this study is to generate an electro-thermal plume by combining an NRP spark microdischarge in a pin-to-pin configuration with a third DC-biased electrode placed a few centimeters away. First, electrical characterization and optical emission spectroscopy were performed to reveal important plasma processes. Second, particle image velocimetry was combined with schlieren photography to investigate the main characteristics of the generated flow. Heating processes are measured by using the N2(C ->B) (0,2) and (1,3) vibrational bands, and effects due to the confinement of the discharge are described. Moreover, the presence of atomic ions N+ and O+ is discussed. Finally, the electro-thermal plume structure is characterized by a flow velocity around 1.8 m.s-1, and the thermal kernel has a spheroidal shape.

  17. The COMET: A 6-MV, 400-kJ, magnetically-switched pulse-power module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neau, E. L.

    The Inertial Confinement Fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is based on the use of large, economical, multi-module, multimegavolt accelerators to drive ion beam generating diodes or imploding plasma loads. This type of accelerator uses several stages of pulse time compression to raise the peak power to the multi-terrawatt level. Pulsed power accelerators have traditionally relied on the ionization of a gaseous, liquid, or solid material, through one or several channels, to connect one pulse compression stage to a succeeding stage. The large change in inductance of a region enclosing a saturable ferri or ferromagnetic material can, with proper design, be substituted for the more conventional switching techniques in certain applications. The use of amorphous METGLAS 2606SC saturable cores, based on earlier system studies, as a possible low-loss repetitive substitute for the self-closing water switches used in the final stages of one class of the pulse power accelerators was investigated.

  18. Study of filamentation with a high power high repetition rate ps laser at 1.03 µm.

    PubMed

    Houard, A; Jukna, V; Point, G; André, Y-B; Klingebiel, S; Schultze, M; Michel, K; Metzger, T; Mysyrowicz, A

    2016-04-04

    We study the propagation of intense, high repetition rate laser pulses of picosecond duration at 1.03 µm central wavelength through air. Evidence of filamentation is obtained from measurements of the beam profile as a function of distance, from photoemission imaging and from spatially resolved sonometric recordings. Good agreement is found with numerical simulations. Simulations reveal an important self shortening of the pulse duration, suggesting that laser pulses with few optical cycles could be obtained via double filamentation. An important lowering of the voltage required to induce guided electric discharges between charged electrodes is measured at high laser pulse repetition rate.

  19. Pulsed power performance of PBFA Z

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Stygar, W.A.; Seamen, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    PBFA Z is a new 60-TW/5-MJ electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories. The authors use PBFA Z to drive z pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator, water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn and PBFA II accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ in a 60-TW/105-ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers 3.0 MJ and 50 TW of electrical energy to the z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, the authors attain peak currents of 16-20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the z-pinch load through self magnetically-insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electric fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV/cm. The current from the four independent conical-disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. The authors achieved x-ray powers of 200 TW and x-ray energies of 1.9 MJ from tungsten wire-array z-pinch loads.

  20. Peak power tunable mid-infrared oscillator pumped by a high power picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier with bunch output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kaihua; Guo, Yan; Lai, Xiaomin; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-07-01

    A high power mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with picosecond pulse bunch output is experimentally demonstrated. The pump source was a high power master oscillation power amplifier (MOPA) picosecond pulsed fiber amplifier. The seed of the MOPA was a gain-switched distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode (LD) with picosecond pulse operation at a high repetition rate. The seed laser was amplified to 50 W by two-stage pre-amplifiers and a large mode area (LMA) Yb fiber based power-amplifier. A fiber-pigtailed acousto-optic modulator with the first order diffraction transmission was inserted into the second pre-amplifier to form a picosecond pulse bunch train and to change the peak power simultaneously. The power-amplified pulse bunches were focused to pump a wavelength-tunable OPO for emitting high power mid-infrared laser. By adjusting the OPO cavity length, the maximum average idler powers obtained at 3.1, 3.3 and 3.5 μm were 7, 6.6 and 6.4 W respectively.

  1. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, D. B.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Stygar, W. A.; Austin, K. N.; Waisman, E. M.; Hickman, R. J.; Davis, J.-P.; Haill, T. A.; Knudson, M. D.; Seagle, C. T.; Brown, J. L.; Goerz, D. A.; Spielman, R. B.; Goldlust, J. A.; Cravey, W. R.

    2015-09-01

    We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM), circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  2. Modern Pulsed Power: Charlie Martin and Beyond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    surface flashover physics, and explosive-driven pulsed power. Dr. Neuber has served in various capacities on the organizing commit- tees of numerous...cathode discharge is formed, leading to a self-heating (resulting from the field and plasma) of a thin cathode surface layer. This cathode layer reaches...bipolar transistor (IGBT), and metal–oxide– semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). (See a recent Special Issue of the PROCEEDINGS OF THE IEEE

  3. Coordinated Research Program in Pulsed Power Physics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-20

    plasma arc switch triggered by the surface Different types of candidate solid-state switches are dis- flashover mechanism [231. cussed :n [16]. These...ue m Pulsed Power, Diffuse Discharges, Opening Switches , * 1 : US~ P.~ Laser TIriggering, Surface Discharges, Field D iStor- - - T1 tion, Streak...of novel opening switch concepts. TRANSIENT PROCESSES IN TRIGGERED ELECTRICAL BREAKDOWN IN GASES 1. A facility for investigating triggering in

  4. Characterization of power IGBTs under pulsed power conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Vangordon, James; Kovaleski, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) is used in many types of applications. Although the use of the power IGBT has been well characterized for many continuous operation power electronics applications, little published information is available regarding the performance of a given IGBT under pulsed power conditions. Additionally, component libraries in circuit simulation software packages have a finite number of IGBTs. This paper presents a process for characterizing the performance of a given power IGBT under pulsed power conditions. Specifically, signals up to 3.5 kV and 1 kA with 1-10 {micro}s pulse widths have been applied to a Powerex QIS4506001 IGBT. This process utilizes least squares curve fitting techniques with collected data to determine values for a set of modeling parameters. These parameters were used in the Oziemkiewicz implementation of the Hefner model for the IGBT that is utilized in some circuit simulation software packages. After the nominal parameter values are determined, they can be inserted into the Oziemkiewicz implementation to simulate a given IGBT.

  5. Pulsed power peer review committee report.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    As part of meeting the GRPA (Government Performance and Results Act) requirements and to provide input to Sandia's annual Performance Evaluation Assessment Report (PEAR) to the National Nuclear Security Administration in FY2004, a 14-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 4-6, 2004 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs. The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding.

  6. High-energy laser pulse with a submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaolong; Tang, Ming; Shum, Perry Ping; Gong, Yandong; Lin, Chinlon; Fu, Songnian; Zhang, Taishi

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate an ultralong cavity, all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser that is passively mode locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). Without any discrete dispersion-compensation components or conventional spectral filters, the SESAM works together with the strongly chirped pulse and the nonlinearity induced spectrum broadening to perform a filtering-equivalent function, thus stabilizing the mode locking. The laser generates 4.3 nJ stable mode-locked pulses with a 397 kHz fundamental repetition rate at a 1068 nm central wavelength.

  7. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Walter, J. W.; Kristiansen, M.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  8. Pulse Detonation Rocket Magnetohydrodynamic Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Jones, J. E.; Dobson, C. C.; Cole, J. W.; Thompson, B. R.; Plemmons, D. H.; Turner, M. W.

    2003-01-01

    The production of onboard electrical power by pulse detonation engines is problematic in that they generate no shaft power; however, pulse detonation driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation represents one intriguing possibility for attaining self-sustained engine operation and generating large quantities of burst power for onboard electrical systems. To examine this possibility further, a simple heat-sink apparatus was developed for experimentally investigating pulse detonation driven MHD generator concepts. The hydrogen oxygen fired driver was a 90 cm long stainless steel tube having a 4.5 cm square internal cross section and a short Schelkin spiral near the head end to promote rapid formation of a detonation wave. The tube was intermittently filled to atmospheric pressure and seeded with a CsOH/methanol prior to ignition by electrical spark. The driver exhausted through an aluminum nozzle having an area contraction ratio of A*/A(sub zeta) = 1/10 and an area expansion ratio of A(sub zeta)/A* = 3.2 (as limited by available magnet bore size). The nozzle exhausted through a 24-electrode segmented Faraday channel (30.5 cm active length), which was inserted into a 0.6 T permanent magnet assembly. Initial experiments verified proper drive operation with and without the nozzle attachment, and head end pressure and time resolved thrust measurements were acquired. The exhaust jet from the nozzle was interrogated using a polychromatic microwave interferometer yielding an electron number density on the order of 10(exp 12)/cm at the generator entrance. In this case, MHD power generation experiments suffered from severe near-electrode voltage drops and low MHD interaction; i.e., low flow velocity, due to an inherent physical constraint on expansion with the available magnet. Increased scaling, improved seeding techniques, higher magnetic fields, and higher expansion ratios are expected to greatly improve performance.

  9. Wakefield-acceleration of relativistic electrons with few-cycle laser pulses at kHz-repetition-rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenot, Diego; Gustas, Dominykas; Vernier, Aline; Boehle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoit; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Faure, Jerome; Appli Team

    2016-10-01

    The generation of relativistic electron beams using laser wakefield acceleration has become a standard technique, providing low emittance electron bunches with femtosecond durations. However, this technique usually requires multi-ten-terawatt lasers and is thus limited to low repetition-rate (typically 10 Hz or less). We have recently demonstrated the generation of few MeV electrons using 2.5-mJ, 4-fs, 1-kHz repetition-rate laser pulses, focused to relativistic intensity onto a gas jet with electron density 1020 cm-3. We have investigated the influence of the pulse duration, the gas density. We demonstrated that an electron beam with a charge in the range of 10-fC/shot, with a divergence of 20-mrad and a peaked spectrum with energies between 2 and 4 MeV can be generated at kHz repetition-rate. These results confirm the possibility of using few-cycle laser pulses with very low energy for exciting wakefields in the bubble regime and for trapping electrons, as predicted by PIC simulations. This kHz electron source is ideally suited for performing electron diffraction experiments with very high temporal resolution. Our results also open the way to other applications, such as the generation of a kHz ultrafast X-ray source. ERC femtoelec.

  10. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-05-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determined, with the notable result that there exists a minimum and maximum gap distance for its existence at a given ambient gas temperature. The minimum gap distance increases with decreasing gas temperature, whereas the maximum does not vary appreciably. To explain the experimental results, an analytical model is developed to explain the corona-to-glow (C-G) and glow-to-spark (G-S) transitions. The C-G transition is analyzed in terms of the avalanche-to-streamer transition and the breakdown field during the conduction phase following the establishment of a conducting channel across the discharge gap. The G-S transition is determined by the thermal ionization instability, and we show analytically that this transition occurs at a certain reduced electric field for the NRP discharges studied here. This model shows that the electrode geometry plays an important role in the existence of the NRP glow regime at a given gas temperature. We derive a criterion for the existence of the NRP glow regime as a function of the ambient gas temperature, pulse repetition frequency, electrode radius of curvature, and interelectrode gap distance.

  11. Active cooling of pulse compression diffraction gratings for high energy, high average power ultrafast lasers.

    PubMed

    Alessi, David A; Rosso, Paul A; Nguyen, Hoang T; Aasen, Michael D; Britten, Jerald A; Haefner, Constantin

    2016-12-26

    Laser energy absorption and subsequent heat removal from diffraction gratings in chirped pulse compressors poses a significant challenge in high repetition rate, high peak power laser development. In order to understand the average power limitations, we have modeled the time-resolved thermo-mechanical properties of current and advanced diffraction gratings. We have also developed and demonstrated a technique of actively cooling Petawatt scale, gold compressor gratings to operate at 600W of average power - a 15x increase over the highest average power petawatt laser currently in operation. Combining this technique with low absorption multilayer dielectric gratings developed in our group would enable pulse compressors for petawatt peak power lasers operating at average powers well above 40kW.

  12. Hybrid fuel cell for pulse power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, L.P.; Atwater, T.B.; Cygan, P.J.

    1997-12-01

    A hybrid fuel cell demonstrated pulse power capability. It successfully ran a pulse power load simulation synonymous with electronics and communications equipment. The hybrid consisted of a 25 W Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) stack in parallel with a 70 farad capacitor assembly. A cyclic regime of 18.0 W for 2 minutes followed by 2.5 W for 18 minutes was chosen as the basic test regime. The operating potential cut-off voltage for pass/failure was set to 3.0 V. At room temperature (23--25 C), the PEMFC alone could not successfully power the baseline regime previously described. The PEMFC operating potential dropped below 3.0 V within 10 seconds. The hybrid continuously powered the cyclic regime for 25 hours. The hybrid`s operating potential never reached the voltage cut-off, even during the high load of 18.0 W. The tests were aborted after 25 hours of operation with no signs of output degradation, suggesting that continuous operation is possible.

  13. High-power, variable repetition rate, picosecond optical parametric oscillator pumped by an amplified gain-switched diode.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Florian; Chen, Kang K; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Gawith, Corin B E; Mackenzie, Jacob I; Hanna, David C; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a picosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that is synchronously pumped by a fiber-amplified gain-switched laser diode. At 24W of pump power, up to 7.3W at 1.54microm and 3.1W at 3.4microm is obtained in separate output beams. The periodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO(3) OPO operates with ~17ps pulses at a fundamental repetition rate of 114.8MHz but can be switched to higher repetition rates up to ~1GHz. Tunabilty between 1.4microm and 1.7microm (signal) and 2.9microm and 4.4microm (idler) is demonstrated by translating the nonlinear crystal to access different poling-period gratings and typical M(2) values of 1.1 by 1.2 (signal) and 1.6 by 3.2 (idler) are measured at high power for the singly resonant oscillator.

  14. Update on PHELIX Pulsed-Power Hydrodynamics Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousculp, Christopher; Reass, William; Oro, David; Griego, Jeffery; Turchi, Peter; Reinovsky, Robert; Devolder, Barbara

    2013-10-01

    The PHELIX pulsed-power driver is a 300 kJ, portable, transformer-coupled, capacitor bank capable of delivering 3-5 MA, 10 μs pulse into a low inductance load. Here we describe further testing and hydrodynamics experiments. First, a 4 nH static inductive load has been constructed. This allows for repetitive high-voltage, high-current testing of the system. Results are used in the calibration of simple circuit models and numerical simulations across a range of bank charges (+/-20 < V0 < +/-40 kV). Furthermore, a dynamic liner-on-target load experiment has been conducted to explore the shock-launched transport of particulates (diam. ~ 1 μm) from a surface. The trajectories of the particulates are diagnosed with radiography. Results are compared to 2D hydro-code simulations. Finally, initial studies are underway to assess the feasibility of using the PHELIX driver as an electromagnetic launcher for planer shock-physics experiments. Work supported by United States-DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  15. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  16. High power UV and VUV pulsed excilamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V.; Erofeev, M.; Lomaev, M.; Rybka, D.

    2008-07-01

    Emission characteristics of a nanosecond discharge in inert gases and its halogenides without preionization of the gap from an auxiliary source have been investigated. A volume discharge, initiated by an avalanche electron beam (VDIAEB) was realized at pressures up to 12 atm. In xenon at pressure of 1.2 atm, the energy of spontaneous radiation in the full solid angle was sim 45 mJ/cm^3, and the FWHM of a radiation pulse was sim 110 ns. The spontaneous radiation power rise in xenon was observed at pressures up to 12 atm. Pulsed radiant exitance of inert gases halogenides excited by VDIAEB was sim 4.5 kW/cm^2 at efficiency up to 5.5 %.

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Schecklmann, Martin; Lehner, Astrid; Gollmitzer, Judith; Schmidt, Eldrid; Schlee, Winfried; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About 10 years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity). Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1 Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil) served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol 5 min of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with 1 week interval in between. Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS. This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be

  18. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has

  19. High average power coherent vuv generation at 10 MHz repetition frequency by intracavity high harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Akira; Zhao, Zhigang; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2015-06-15

    Intracavity high harmonic generation was utilized to generate high average-power coherent radiation at vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) wavelengths. A ytterbium-doped fiber-laser based master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) system with a 10 MHz repetition frequency was developed and used as a driving laser for an external cavity. A series of odd-order harmonic radiations was generated extending down to ∼ 30 nm (41 eV in photon energy). The 7th harmonic radiation generated was centered at 149 nm and had an average output power of up to 0.5 mW. In this way, we developed a sub-mW coherent vuv-laser with a 10 MHz repetition frequency, which, if used as an excitation laser source for photo-electron spectroscopy, could improve the signal count-rate without deterioration of the spectral-resolution caused by space-charge effects.

  20. Development of Compact Ozonizer with High Ozone Output by Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Fumiaki; Ueda, Satoru; Kouno, Kanako; Sakugawa, Takashi; Akiyama, Hidenori; Kinoshita, Youhei

    Conventional ozonizer with a high ozone output using silent or surface discharges needs a cooling system and a dielectric barrier, and therefore becomes a large machine. A compact ozonizer without the cooling system and the dielectric barrier has been developed by using a pulsed power generated discharge. The wire to plane electrodes made of metal have been used. However, the ozone output was low. Here, a compact and high repetition rate pulsed power generator is used as an electric source of a compact ozonizer. The ozone output of 6.1 g/h and the ozone yield of 86 g/kWh are achieved at 500 pulses per second, input average power of 280 W and an air flow rate of 20 L/min.

  1. Electra: Repetitively Pulsed Angularly Multiplexed KrF Laser System Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolford, Matthew; Myers, Matthew; Giuliani, John; Sethian, John; Burns, Patrick; Hegeler, Frank; Jaynes, Reginald

    2008-11-01

    As in a full size fusion power plant beam line, Electra is a multistage laser amplifier system. The multistage amplifier system consists of a commercial discharge laser and two doubled sided electron beam pumped amplifiers. Angular multiplexing is used in the optical layout to provide pulse length control and to maximize laser extraction from the amplifiers. Two angularly multiplexed beams have extracted 30 J of KrF laser light with an aperture 8 x 10 cm^2, which is sufficient to extract over 500 J from the main amplifier and models agree. The main amplifier of Electra in oscillator mode has demonstrated single shot and rep-rate laser energies exceeding 700 J with 100 ns pulsewidth at 248 nm with an aperture 29 x 29 cm^2. Continuous operation of the KrF electron beam pumped oscillator has lasted for more than 2.5 hours without failure at 1 Hz and 2.5 Hz. The measured intensity and pulse energy for durations greater than thousand shots are consistent at measurable rep-rates of 1 Hz, 2.5 Hz and 5 Hz.

  2. Circadian Period Modulation and Masking Effects Induced by Repetitive Light Pulses in Locomotor Rhythms of the Cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Germ, M; Tomioka, K

    1998-06-01

    Effects of 15 min light pulses given at various intervals (every 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 hr) under constant darkness on the locomotor rhythm were investigated in the adult male cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. A single pulse per 24 hr induced period modulation in a circadian phase dependent manner, yielding a period modulation curve (PMC): the 15 min light pulse lengthened the period in the early subjective night (CT11-16) and shortened it during the late subjective night to the early subjective day (CT20-5). Frequent light pulses modulated the freerunning period of the rhythm dependent on the interval of the pulses: when compared with the freerunning period in DD (23.74 +/- 0.03 hr) the period was significantly shorter in intervals of 2 and 4 hr, but lengthened when the interval was 1 and 12 hr. Frequent light pulses also resulted in entrainment of the rhythm to run with the period of 24 hr and the ratio of the entrained animals varied from 12% to 72% depending on the interval of the light pulses. The period modulation and the entrainment by the repetitive light pulses could be interpreted according to the PMC. In about 15% of animals, the light pulses induced a rhythm dissociation, suggesting that the bilaterally paired circadian pacemakers have their own sensitivity to the entraining photic information. The light pulse caused a masking effect, i.e., an intense burst of activity. The magnitude of the light induced responses was dependent on the circadian phase. The strongest masking effect was observed in the subjective night. The phase of the prominent period modulation and of the marked masking effects well coincides with the previously reported sensitive phase of the photoreceptive system.

  3. Westinghouse programs in pulsed homopolar power supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litz, D. C.; Mullan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This document details Westinghouse's ongoing study of homopolar machines since 1929 with the major effort occurring in the early 1970's to the present. The effort has enabled Westinghouse to develop expertise in the technology required for the design, fabrication and testing of such machines. This includes electrical design, electromagnetic analysis, current collection, mechanical design, advanced cooling, stress analysis, transient rotor performance, bearing analysis and seal technology. Westinghouse is using this capability to explore the use of homopolar machines as pulsed power supplies for future systems in both military and commercial applications.

  4. High Pulsed Power, Self Excited Magnetohydrodynamic Power Generation Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-27

    Degree of Ionization of Cesium on Performance 72 3.5.7. Effect of Channel Area Ratio on Performance 73 3.5.8. Comparison of Helium vs Argon Generator...EXPLOSIVE PULSED SYSTEM WEIGHTS,REF.2 32 TABLE 5: POWER DENSITY & ENTHALPY EXTRACTION OF CLOSED CYCLE GENERATORS 35 TABLE 6: ENTHALPY EXTRACTION VS PRESSURE...OF ALUMINUM PARTICLES 50 TABLE 11. ALUMINUM PARTICLE BURNING TIMES vs OPERATING CONDITIONS 52 TABLE 12. TOTAL COMBUSTION TIME OF Al. PARTICLES vs

  5. Copper bromide vapor brightness amplifiers with 100 kHz pulse repetition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigub, M. V.; Evtushenko, G. S.; Torgaev, S. N.; Shiyanov, D. V.; Evtushenko, T. G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents a laser monitor with 10 μs time-resolution based on a high-frequency copper bromide vapor brightness amplifier. A sync circuit has been designed for single-pulse imaging. The analysis of amplifying characteristics of the active elements and active optical system (laser monitor) parameters allowed to determine the optimal concentration of HBr at which the images can be obtained with minimum distortions. For the active element operating at high frequencies (more than 50 kHz) as a brightness amplifier, the concentration of HBr must be lower than that needed for obtaining the maximum output power. The limiting brightness temperature of the background radiation which does not affect the image quality is determined. The potential feasibility of using a proposed brightness amplifier for visualizing processes blocked from viewing by the background radiation with the brightness temperature up to 8000 K is demonstrated.

  6. 948 kHz repetition rate, picosecond pulse duration, all-PM 1.03 μm mode-locked fiber laser based on nonlinear polarization evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivinet, S.; Lecourt, J.-B.; Hernandez, Y.; Fotiadi, A.; Mégret, P.

    2014-05-01

    We present in this study a PM all-fiber laser oscillator passively mode-locked (ML) at 1.03 μm. The laser is based on Nonlinear Polarization Evolution (NPE) in polarization maintaining (PM) fibers. In order to obtain the mode-locking regime, a nonlinear reflective mirror including a fibered polarizer, a long fiber span and a fibered Faraday mirror (FM) is inserted in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity. In this work we explain the principles of operation of this original laser design that permits to generate ultrashort pulses at low repetition (lower that 1MHz) rate with a cavity length of 100 m of fiber. In this experiment, the measured pulse duration is about 6 ps. To our knowledge this is the first all-PM mode-locked laser based on the NPE with a cavity of 100m length fiber and a delivered pulse duration of few picosecondes. Furthermore, the different mode-locked regimes of the laser, i.e. multi-pulse, noise-like mode-locked and single pulse, are presented together with the ways of controlling the apparition of these regimes. When the single pulse mode-locking regime is achieved, the laser delivers linearly polarized pulses in a very stable way. Finally, this study includes numerical results which are obtained with the resolution of the NonLinear Schrodinger Equations (NLSE) with the Split-Step Fourier (SSF) algorithm. This modeling has led to the understanding of the different modes of operation of the laser. In particular, the influence of the peak power on the reflection of the nonlinear mirror and its operation are studied.

  7. Explosive pulse power for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinovsky, R. E.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Marsh, S. P.; Lopez, E. A.

    Explosive pulse power systems, powered by flux compression generators and including a variety of high current power conditioning components, such as high current opening switches, are attractive for powering fusion physics experiments which require 10's MJ of electrical energy. Such systems are economical when compared to other high energy sources and require little capital investment to enable initial experiments. They are flexible and readily reconfigurable to accommodate changing experimental requirements and can be designed, assembled, and fielded in relatively short periods of time. Several configurations of very high energy flux compressors have been explored at Los Alamos and recently Russian researchers at the All Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) have reported notable results from modular systems based on disk concepts. A phenomenological model of disk flux compressors is described. The performance predicted by these models is in sufficiently good agreement with the results reported by VNIIEF researchers to allow the model to be applied, in the future, to the design of power conditions systems for use in conjunction with these high performance generators.

  8. High Repetition-Rate Neutron Generation by Several-mJ, 35 fs pulses interacting with Free-Flowing D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, Jungmoo; Petrov, George; Nees, John; He, Zhaohan; Hammig, Mark; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Recent advance in ultra-high power laser technology allows a development of laser-based neutron sources. Here we demonstrate heavy-water based neutron source. Using several-mJ energy pulses from a high-repetition rate (½kHz), ultrashort (35 fs) pulsed laser interacting with a 10 μm diameter stream of free-flowing heavy water (D2O), we get a 2.45 MeV neutron flux of 105/s. In the intentionally generated pre-plasma, laser pulse energy is efficiently absorbed, and energetic deuterons are generated. As a convertor, the bulk heavy water stream target and the large volume of low density D2O vapor near the target are collided with accelerated deuterons, generating neutron through d(d,n)3He reactions. As laser pulse energy increased from 6mJ to 12mJ, the neutron flux increased. From the 2D particle-in-cell simulation, comparable neutron fluxes are shown at the similar laser characteristics to the experiment. Also, simulation shows forward and backward moving deuterons, which are main distributing ions impinging upon D2O stream and vapor, respectively. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scien- tific Research under Award Numbers FA9550-12-1-0310 (Young Investigator Program) and FA9550-14-1-0282.

  9. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  10. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  11. Dynamic absorption and scattering of water and hydrogel during high-repetition-rate (>100 MHz) burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zuoming; Covarrubias, Andrés; Grindal, Alexander W.; Akens, Margarete K.; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    High-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation and disruption of biological tissues depends on interaction of each pulse with the sample, but under those particular conditions which persist from previous pulses. This work characterizes and compares the dynamics of absorption and scattering of a 133-MHz repetition-rate, burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser, in agar hydrogel targets and distilled water. The differences in energy partition are quantified, pulse-by-pulse, using a time-resolving integrating-sphere-based device. These measurements reveal that high-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation is a highly dynamical process affected by the persistence of ionization, dissipation of plasma plume, neutral material flow, tissue tensile strength, and the hydrodynamic oscillation of cavitation bubbles. PMID:27375948

  12. Agricultural and Food Processing Applications of Pulsed Power and Plasma Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Koichi

    Agricultural and food processing applications of pulsed power and plasma technologies are described in this paper. Repetitively operated compact pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power are developed for the agricultural and the food processing applications. These applications are mainly based on biological effects and can be categorized as germination control of plants such as Basidiomycota and arabidopsis inactivation of bacteria in soil and liquid medium of hydroponics; extraction of juice from fruits and vegetables; decontamination of air and liquid, etc. Types of pulsed power that have biological effects are caused with gas discharges, water discharges, and electromagnetic fields. The discharges yield free radicals, UV radiation, intense electric field, and shock waves. Biologically based applications of pulsed power and plasma are performed by selecting the type that gives the target objects the adequate result from among these agents or byproducts. For instance, intense electric fields form pores on the cell membrane, which is called electroporation, or influence the nuclei. This paper mainly describes the application of the pulsed power for the germination control of Basidiomycota i.e. mushroom, inactivation of fungi in the soil and the liquid medium in hydroponics, and extraction of polyphenol from skins of grape.

  13. High average power picosecond pulse and supercontinuum generation from a thulium-doped, all-fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Xu, Jia; Liu, Kun; Tan, Fangzhou; Wang, Pu

    2013-10-15

    We demonstrate a high-power, picosecond, thulium-doped, all-fiber master oscillator power amplifier with average power of 120.4 W. The compact fiber oscillator is carefully designed with high repetition rate for the purpose of overcoming the detrimental effects of fiber nonlinearity in the later fiber amplifiers. The pulse duration of 16 ps at 333.75 MHz repetition rate results in a peak power of 22.5 kW in the final fiber power amplifier. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of average power exceeding 100 W from an ultrashort pulse laser at 2 μm wavelength. On the other hand, by decreasing the fiber oscillator repetition rate and pulse duration for enhancing the fiber nonlinearity effects, we also demonstrate a high-power supercontinuum source with average power of 36 W from 1.95 μm to beyond 2.4 μm in the final fiber power amplifier.

  14. High power microwave generation using a repetitive electron gun with a ferroelectric cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.; Ivers, J.D.; Nation, J.A.; Wang, P. Golkowski, C.; Flechtner, D.; Schaechter, L.

    1999-07-01

    An electron gun using a ferroelectric cathode driven by a ferrite core transformer-pulse line system produces a 500kV, 50--200A, 250ns long beam. The beam is used to drive an X-band amplifier. The amplifier consists of a single stage disk loaded type structure. At the end of the amplifier, a coaxial mode converter is used to decouple the beam from the microwave radiation. The amplifier operates at a repetition rate of 0.1Hz. The beam emission is controlled by a voltage pulse applied to the back of the ferroelectric. Results will be reported on the amplifier performance characteristics with a 50A beam and the results compared with simulation data. An improved gun design, which gives a uniform cross section 200A beam is being built, and early results obtained, using the high current gun, will also be presented.

  15. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Baksht, E Kh; Burachenko, A G; Lomaev, M I; Panchenko, A N; Tarasenko, V F

    2015-04-30

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ∼4 ns and a rise time of ∼2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 – 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Repetitively pulsed UV radiation source based on a run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge in nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Panchenko, A. N.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-04-01

    An extended repetitively pulsed source of spontaneous UV radiation is fabricated, which may also be used for producing laser radiation. Voltage pulses with an incident wave amplitude of up to 30 kV, a half-amplitude duration of ~4 ns and a rise time of ~2.5 ns are applied to a gap with a nonuniform electric field. For an excitation region length of 35 cm and a nitrogen pressure of 30 - 760 Torr, a diffusive discharge up to a pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz is produced without using an additional system for gap preionisation. An investigation is made of the plasma of the run-away electron preionised diffuse discharge. Using a CCD camera it is found that the dense diffused plasma fills the gap in a time shorter than 1 ns. X-ray radiation is recorded from behind the foil anode throughout the pressure range under study; a supershort avalanche electron beam is recorded by the collector electrode at pressures below 100 Torr.

  17. Earthquake Triggering by High Power Electric Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Victor; Konev, Yuri; Zeigarnik, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The study carried out by the Joint Institute for High Temperatures in cooperation with the Institute of Physics of the Earth and the Research Station in Bishkek of Russian Academy of Sciences in 1999-2008 showed a response of weak seismicity at field experiments with electric pulsed power systems, as well as acoustic emission of rock specimens under laboratory conditions on high-power electric current pulses applied to the rocks. It was suggested that the phenomenon discovered may be used in practice for partial release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust for earthquake hazard mitigation. Nevertheless, the mechanism of the influence of man-made electromagnetic field on the regional seismicity is not clear yet. One of possible cause of the phenomenon may be pore fluid pressure increase in the rocks under stressed conditions due to Joule heat generation by electric current injected into the Earth crust. It is known that increase of pore fluid pressure in the fault zone over a critical pressure of about 0.05 MPa is sufficient to trigger an earthquake if the fault is near the critical state due to accumulated tectonic deformations. Detailed 3D-calculaton of electric current density in the Earth crust of the Northern Tien Shan provided by pulsed electric high-power system connected to grounded electric dipole showed that at the depth of earthquake epicenters (over 5 km) the electric current density is lower than 10-7 A/m2 that is not sufficient for increase of pressure in the fluid-saturated porous geological medium due to Joule heat generation, which may provide formation of cracks resulting in the fault propagation and release of tectonic stresses in the Earth crust. Nevertheless, under certain conditions, when electric current will be injected into the fault through the casing pipes of two deep wells with preliminary injection of conductive fluid into the fault, the current density may be high enough for significant increase of mechanic pressure in the porous two

  18. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, R. J.; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p(sub 2)/p(sub 1) approx. 34 and D approx. 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (=6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front. In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T. and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Ohm. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the MHD interaction exerted a

  19. Integrated Pulse Detonation Propulsion and Magnetohydrodynamic Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for realizing an integrated pulse detonation propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power system are examined. First, energy requirements for direct detonation initiation of various fuel-oxygen and fuel-air mixtures are deduced from available experimental data and theoretical models. Second, the pumping power requirements for effective chamber scavenging are examined through the introduction of a scavenging ratio parameter and a scavenging efficiency parameter. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the basic engineering performance characteristics of a pulse detonation-driven MHD electric power generator. In these experiments, stoichiometric oxy-acetylene mixtures seeded with a cesium hydroxide/methanol spray were detonated at atmospheric pressure in a 1-m-long tube having an i.d. of 2.54 cm. Experiments with a plasma diagnostic channel attached to the end of the tube confirmed the attainment of detonation conditions (p2/p1 approximately 34 and D approximately 2,400 m/sec) and enabled the direct measurement of current density and electrical conductivity (approximately = 6 S/m) behind the detonation wave front, In a second set of experiments, a 30-cm-long continuous electrode Faraday channel, having a height of 2.54 cm and a width of 2 cm, was attached to the end of the tube using an area transition duct. The Faraday channel was inserted in applied magnetic fields of 0.6 and 0.95 T, and the electrodes were connected to an active loading circuit to characterize power extraction dependence on load impedance while also simulating higher effective magnetic induction. The experiments indicated peak power extraction at a load impedance between 5 and 10 Omega. The measured power density was in reasonable agreement with a simple electrodynamic model incorporating a correction for near-electrode potential losses. The time-resolved thrust characteristics of the system were also measured, and it was found that the NM interaction

  20. Pulse transmission transceiver architecture for low power communications

    DOEpatents

    Dress, Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-08-05

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A method of pulse transmission communications includes: generating a modulated pulse signal waveform; transforming said modulated pulse signal waveform into at least one higher-order derivative waveform; and transmitting said at least one higher-order derivative waveform as an emitted pulse. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  1. Stack and dump: Peak-power scaling by coherent pulse addition in passive cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitkopf, S.; Eidam, T.; Klenke, A.; Carstens, H.; Holzberger, S.; Fill, E.; Schreiber, T.; Krausz, F.; Tünnermann, A.; Pupeza, I.; Limpert, J.

    2015-10-01

    During the last decades femtosecond lasers have proven their vast benefit in both scientific and technological tasks. Nevertheless, one laser feature bearing the tremendous potential for high-field applications, delivering extremely high peak and average powers simultaneously, is still not accessible. This is the performance regime several upcoming applications such as laser particle acceleration require, and therefore, challenge laser technology to the fullest. On the one hand, some state-of-the-art canonical bulk amplifier systems provide pulse peak powers in the range of multi-terawatt to petawatt. On the other hand, concepts for advanced solid-state-lasers, specifically thin disk, slab or fiber systems have shown their capability of emitting high average powers in the kilowatt range with a high wall-plug-efficiency while maintaining an excellent spatial and temporal quality of the output beam. In this article, a brief introduction to a concept for a compact laser system capable of simultaneously providing high peak and average powers all along with a high wall-plug efficiency will be given. The concept relies on the stacking of a pulse train emitted from a high-repetitive femtosecond laser system in a passive enhancement cavity, also referred to as temporal coherent combining. In this manner, the repetition rate is decreased in favor of a pulse energy enhancement by the same factor while the average power is almost preserved. The key challenge of this concept is a fast, purely reflective switching element that allows for the dumping of the enhanced pulse out of the cavity. Addressing this challenge could, for the first time, allow for the highly efficient extraction of joule-class pulses at megawatt average power levels and thus lead to a whole new area of applications for ultra-fast laser systems.

  2. Computational Simulation of Explosively Generated Pulsed Power Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION OF EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED PULSED POWER DEVICES THESIS Mollie C. Drumm, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENY-13-M-11 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENY-13-M-11 COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION OF EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED PULSED POWER DEVICES THESIS Presented to the...OF EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED PULSED POWER DEVICES Mollie C. Drumm, BS Captain, USAF Approved: Dr. Robert B. Greendyke (Chairman) Date Capt. David Liu

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Microstructures produced on spatially confined substrates exposed to repetitively pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgaev, Sergei I.; Kirichenko, N. A.; Simakin, Aleksandr V.; Shafeev, Georgii A.

    2007-07-01

    The formation of microstructures is studied on metal substrates with characteristic dimensions of tens of micrometers that are comparable with the period of structures produced on extended substrates. Experiments were performed with nickel and nichrome targets composed of wires or a foil. Targets were irradiated in air by 510-nm, 20-ns pulses from a copper vapour laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 7.5 kHz. Irradiation produced microcones and circular microstructures on substrates. The influence of the target geometry on the morphology and ordering of microstructures formed on it is demonstrated experimentally. The specific features of structures produced on spatially restricted targets are explained by the influence of boundary conditions on their development. A mathematical model of the initial phase of formation of the inhomogeneous profile of the surface of spatially restricted substrates exposed to laser radiation is proposed.

  4. An all solid state pulse power source for high PRF induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing a flexible, all solid-state pulsed power source that will enable an induction accelerator to produce mulitkiloampere electron beams at a maximum pulse repetition frequency (prf) of 2 MHz. The prototype source consists of three, 15-kV, 4.8-kA solid-state modulators stacked in an induction adder configuration. Each modulator contains over 1300 field-effect transistors (FETs) that quickly connect and disconnect four banks of energy storage capacitors to a magnetic induction core. The FETs are commanded on and off by an optical signal that determines the duration of the accelerating pulse. Further electronic circuitry is provided that resets the magnetic cores in each modulator immediately after the accelerating pulse. The system produces bursts of five or more pulses with an adjustable pulse width that ranges from 200 ns to 2 {micro}s The pulse duty factor within a burst can be as high as 25% while still allowing time for the induction core to reset. The solid-state modulator described above is called ARM-II and is named for the Advanced Radiographic Machine (ARM)-a powerful radiographic accelerator that will be the principal diagnostic device for the future Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF).

  5. Dependence of Initial Oxygen Concentration on Ozone Yield Using Inductive Energy Storage System Pulsed Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Tomio; Tanaka, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Nobuyuki; Mukaigawa, Seiji; Takaki, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    Dependence of initial oxygen concentration on ozone yield using streamer discharge reactor driven by an inductive energy storage system pulsed power generator is described in this paper. Fast recovery type diodes were employed as semiconductor opening switch to interrupt a circuit current within 100 ns. This rapid current change produced high-voltage short pulse between a secondary energy storage inductor. The repetitive high-voltage short pulse was applied to a 1 mm diameter center wire electrode placed in a cylindrical pulse corona reactor. The streamer discharge successfully occurred between the center wire electrode and an outer cylinder ground electrode of 2 cm inner diameter. The ozone was produced with the streamer discharge and increased with increasing pulse repetition rate. The ozone yield changed in proportion to initial oxygen concentration contained in the injected gas mixture at 800 ns forward pumping time of the current. However, the decrease of the ozone yield by decreasing oxygen concentration in the gas mixture at 180 ns forward pumping time of the current was lower than the decrease at 800 ns forward pumping time of the current. This dependence of the initial oxygen concentration on ozone yield at 180 ns forward pumping time is similar to that of dielectric barrier discharge reactor.

  6. Enhanced multi-colour gating for the generation of high-power isolated attosecond pulses

    PubMed Central

    Haessler, S.; Balčiūnas, T.; Fan, G.; Chipperfield, L. E.; Baltuška, A.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated attosecond pulses (IAP) generated by high-order harmonic generation are valuable tools that enable dynamics to be studied on the attosecond time scale. The applicability of these IAP would be widened drastically by increasing their energy. Here we analyze the potential of using multi-colour driving pulses for temporally gating the attosecond pulse generation process. We devise how this approach can enable the generation of IAP with the available high-energy kHz-repetition-rate Ytterbium-based laser amplifiers (delivering 180-fs, 1030-nm pulses). We show theoretically that this requires a three-colour field composed of the fundamental and its second harmonic as well as a lower-frequency auxiliary component. We present pulse characterization measurements of such auxiliary pulses generated directly by white-light seeded OPA with the required significantly shorter pulse duration than that of the fundamental. This, combined with our recent experimental results on three-colour waveform synthesis, proves that the theoretically considered multi-colour drivers for IAP generation can be realized with existing high-power laser technology. The high-energy driver pulses, combined with the strongly enhanced single-atom-level conversion efficiency we observe in our calculations, thus make multi-colour drivers prime candidates for the development of unprecedented high-energy IAP sources in the near future. PMID:25997917

  7. Influence of air flow parameters on nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in a pin-annular electrode configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitz, Sylvain A.; Moeck, Jonas P.; Schuller, Thierry; Veynante, Denis; Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of various air flow parameters on the plasma regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges is investigated at atmospheric pressure. The two electrodes are in a pin-annular configuration, transverse to the mean flow. The voltage pulses have amplitudes up to 15 kV, a duration of 10 ns and a repetition frequency ranging from 15 to 30 kHz. The NRP corona to NRP spark (C-S) regime transition and the NRP spark to NRP corona (S-C) regime transition are investigated for different steady and harmonically oscillating flows. First, the strong effect of a transverse flow on the C-S and S-C transitions, as reported in previous studies, is verified. Second, it is shown that the azimuthal flow imparted by a swirler does not affect the regime transition voltages. Finally, the influence of low frequency harmonic oscillations of the air flow, generated by a loudspeaker, is studied. A strong effect of frequency and amplitude of the incoming flow modulation on the NRP plasma regime is observed. Results are interpreted based on the cumulative effect of the NRP discharges and an analysis of the residence times of fluid particles in the inter-electrode region.

  8. Derivation of a formula describing the saturation correction of plane-parallel ionization chambers in pulsed fields with arbitrary repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard

    2016-04-21

    Gas-filled ionization chambers are widely used radiation detectors in radiotherapy. A quantitative description and correction of the recombination effects exists for two cases, for continuous radiation exposure and for pulsed radiation fields with short single pulses. This work gives a derivation of a formula for pulsed beams with arbitrary pulse rate for which the prerequisites of the two existing descriptions are not fulfilled. Furthermore, an extension of the validity of the two known cases is investigated. The temporal evolution of idealized charge density distributions within a plane parallel chamber volume is described for pulsed beams of vanishing pulse duration and arbitrary pulse repetition rate. First, the radiation induced release, movement and collection of the charge carriers without recombination are considered. Then, charge recombination is calculated basing on these simplified charge distributions and the time dependent spatial overlap of positive and negative charge carrier distributions. Finally, a formula for the calculation of the saturation correction factor is derived by calculation and simplification of the first two terms of a Taylor expansion for small recombination. The new formula of saturation correction contains the two existing cases, descriptions for exposure by single pulses and continuous irradiation, as limiting cases. Furthermore, it is possible to determine the pulse rate range for which each of the three descriptions is applicable by comparing the dependencies of the new formula with the two existing cases. As long as the time between two pulses is lower than one third of the collection time of the chamber, the formalism for a continuous exposure can be used. The known description for single pulse irradiation is only valid if the repetition rate is less than 1.2 times the inverse collection time. For all other repetition rates in between the new formula should be used. The experimental determination by Jaffe diagrams can be

  9. Picosecond pulses of variable duration from a high-power passively mode-locked Nd:YVO(4) laser free of spatial hole burning.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Marie-Christine; Petit, Stéphane; Balcou, Philippe; Czarny, Romain; Montant, Sébastien; Simon-Boisson, Christophe

    2010-05-15

    We report on a high-power passively mode-locked TEM(00)Nd:YVO(4) oscillator, 888 nm diode-pumped, with pulse durations adjustable between 46 ps and 12 ps. The duration tunability was obtained by varying the output coupler (OC) transmission while avoiding resorting to spatial hole burning (SHB) for pulse shortening. At a repetition rate of 91 MHz and for an output power ranging from 15 Wto45 W, we produced SHB-free 12-ps-to32-ps-long pulses. Within this range of power, these are the shortest pulse durations obtained directly from Nd:YVO(4) oscillators.

  10. Pulsed Yb:fiber system capable of >250kW peak power with tunable pulses in the 50ps to 1.5ns range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, Timothy S.; Lowder, Tyson L.; Leadbetter, Vickie; Reynolds, Mitch; Saracco, Matthieu J.; Hutchinson, Joel; Green, Jared; McCal, Dennis; Burkholder, Gary; Kutscha, Tim; Dittli, Adam; Hamilton, Chuck; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Randall, Matthew; Fanning, Geoff; Bell, Jake

    2013-03-01

    We have demonstrated a pulsed 1064 nm PM Yb:fiber laser system incorporating a seed source with a tunable pulse repetition rate and pulse duration and a multistage fiber amplifier, ending in a large core (>650 μm2 mode field area), tapered fiber amplifier. The amplifier chain is all-fiber, with the exception of the final amplifier's pump combiner, allowing robust, compact packaging. The air-cooled laser system is rated for >60 W of average power and beam quality of M2 < 1.3 at repetition rates below 100 kHz to 10's of MHz, with pulses discretely tunable over a range spanning 50 ps to greater than 1.5 ns. Maximum pulse energies, limited by the onset of self phase modulation and stimulated Raman scattering, are greater than 12.5 μJ at 50 ps and 375 μJ at 1.5 ns , corresponding to >250 kW peak power across the pulse tuning range. We present frequency conversion to 532 nm with efficiency greater than 70% and conversion to UV via frequency tripling, with initial feasibility experiments showing >30% UV conversion efficiency. Application results of the laser in scribing, thin film removal and micro-machining will be discussed.

  11. Pulse Detonation Rocket MHD Power Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse detonation research engine (MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) Model PDRE (Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine) G-2) has been developed for the purpose of examining integrated propulsion and magnetohydrodynamic power generation applications. The engine is based on a rectangular cross-section tube coupled to a converging-diverging nozzle, which is in turn attached to a segmented Faraday channel. As part of the shakedown testing activity, the pressure wave was interrogated along the length of the engine while running on hydrogen/oxygen propellants. Rapid transition to detonation wave propagation was insured through the use of a short Schelkin spiral near the head of the engine. The measured detonation wave velocities were in excess of 2500 m/s in agreement with the theoretical C-J velocity. The engine was first tested in a straight tube configuration without a nozzle, and the time resolved thrust was measured simultaneously with the head-end pressure. Similar measurements were made with the converging-diverging nozzle attached. The time correlation of the thrust and head-end pressure data was found to be excellent. The major purpose of the converging-diverging nozzle was to configure the engine for driving an MHD generator for the direct production of electrical power. Additional tests were therefore necessary in which seed (cesium-hydroxide dissolved in methanol) was directly injected into the engine as a spray. The exhaust plume was then interrogated with a microwave interferometer in an attempt to characterize the plasma conditions, and emission spectroscopy measurements were also acquired. Data reduction efforts indicate that the plasma exhaust is very highly ionized, although there is some uncertainty at this time as to the relative abundance of negative OH ions. The emission spectroscopy data provided some indication of the species in the exhaust as well as a measurement of temperature. A 24-electrode-pair segmented Faraday channel and 0.6 Tesla permanent

  12. Surface modifications on toughened, fine-grained, recrystallized tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Ueda, Y.; Kurishita, H.

    2015-08-01

    Surface modifications of toughened, fine-grained, recrystallized tungsten (TFGR W) materials with 1.1 wt.% TiC and 3.3 wt.% TaC dispersoids due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (∼0.15 ms) helium plasma irradiation have been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. No surface cracking at the center part of the TFGR W samples exposed to 20 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m-2 was observed. The suppression of surface crack formation due to the increase of the grain boundary strength by addition of TiC and TaC dispersoids was confirmed in comparison with a pure W material. On the other hand, surface cracks and small pits appeared at the edge part of the TFGR W sample after the pulsed plasma irradiation. Erosion of the TiC and TaC dispersoids due to the pulsed plasma irradiation could cause the small pits on the surface, resulting in the surface crack formation.

  13. 4.0 μm, high repetition rate periodically poled magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator pumped by steep leading edge pulsed fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Liu, Qiang; Ji, Encai; Chen, Hailong; Gong, Mali

    2014-10-10

    A high repetition rate optical parametric oscillator (OPO) generating an idler laser with a wavelength as long as 4.0 μm at 200 and 400 kHz was demonstrated in this paper. The OPO was pumped by a master oscillator power amplifier structure fiber laser with excellent characteristics. The pump pulse from the fiber laser had a steep leading edge, which was theoretically proved to improve the OPO's performance, compared with the Gaussian pump pulse. A homemade periodically poled magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate crystal with a grating period of 29 μm was employed in our experiment. By optimizing the resonator, 2.75 and 1.67 W idler lasers were finally achieved at repetition rates as high as 200 and 400 kHz, respectively, with a wavelength as long as 4.0 μm. The conversion efficiencies were 12.03% and 7.31%, respectively.

  14. Comparison of two high-repetition-rate pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser discharge geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Faszer, W.; Tulip, J.; Seguin, H.

    1980-11-01

    Two discharge geometries are commonly used for pumping high-repetition-rate transversely excited atmosphere (TEA) lasers. One uses solid electrodes with preionization provided by downstream spark pins. The other uses a solid electrode and a screen electrode with preionization provided by an auxiliary discharge behind the screen. In this study the performance of the two systems was compared. The repetition rate at which arcing occurs was found to increase linearly with flow velocity but decrease with increasing energy density. It was also dependent on system geometry and the spark pin preionized system performed better than the auxiliary discharge preionized system. Data are given for discharges in N/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, He, and a CO/sub 2/ laser mixture.

  15. Generation of stable Ps, mJ pulses at high repetition rate for ultrafast diagnostic experiments: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mourou, G.

    1986-10-01

    Nd:Glass amplifiers have very good energy storage capabilities (5 J/cm/sup 2/), but, the energy extraction is extremely inefficient for short-pulse amplification. At relatively high peak intensities of approx. 10 GW/cm/sup 2/, nonlinear phase shifts occur, leading to beam wavefront distortion which can result in filamentation and irreversible damage. In order that the peak intensity in the amplifier remain below this damage level, a picosecond pulse can be amplified only to an energy density of approx. 10 mJ/cm/sup 2/, two orders of magnitude less than the stored energy level of 5 J/cm/sup 2/. We have developed an amplification system, which uses an optical pulse compression technique to circumvent this peak power limitation. This technique is analogous to a method developed over forty years ago for the amplification of radar pulses. Briefly: a long optical pulse is deliberately produced by stretching a short, low-energy pulse, amplified and then compressed. The frequency chirp and the temporal broadening are produced by propagating a high-intensity pulse along a single-mode fiber. At the beginning of the fiber, the pulse undergoes self-phase modulation which produces a frequncy chirp. The chirp is then linearized by the group-velocity dispersion of the fiber. This long, frequency-chirped, pulse is amplified, and then compressed to a pulsewidth approximately equal to 1/..delta..f, where ..delta..f is the chirped bandwidth. With this system, short pulses can reach the high saturation energy levels, with moderately low peak power levels being maintained in the amplifying medium.

  16. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Pei, X.; Hasnain, Q.; Nie, L.; Lu, X.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6 mm discharge gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using dry air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-Streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBD. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and discharge develops in streamer, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initial electron density by pre-ionization may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also found that the dependence of homogeneity upon PRF is a non-monotonic one.

  17. Study on the mode-transition of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge between uniform and filamentary by controlling pressures and pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sizhe; Lu, Xinpei

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the temporally resolved evolution of the nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a moderate 6mm gap under various pressures and pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) by intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) images, using synthetic air and its components oxygen and nitrogen. It is found that the pressures are very different when the DBD mode transits between uniform and filamentary in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. The PRFs can also obviously affect the mode-transition. The transition mechanism in the pulsed DBD is not Townsend-to-streamer, which is dominant in the traditional alternating-voltage DBDs. The pulsed DBD in a uniform mode develops in the form of plane ionization wave, due to overlap of primary avalanches, while the increase in pressure disturbs the overlap and DBD develops in streamer instead, corresponding to the filamentary mode. Increasing the initiatory electron density by pre-ionization methods may contribute to discharge uniformity at higher pressures. We also find that the dependence of uniformity upon PRF is non-monotonic.

  18. Computer Controlled MHD Power Consolidation and Pulse Generation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    4465 Publication Date: Aug 01,1990 Title: Computer Controlled MHD Power Consolidation and Pulse Generation System Personal Author: Johnson, R...of Copies In Library: 000001 Record ID: 26725 : Computer Controlled MHD Power Consolidation and Pulse Generation System Final Technical Progress...Four-pulse CI System For A Diagonally Connected MHD Generator 14 9 Diagonal Output Voltage for Rsource =10 ohms, Rload = 1 ohm 16 10 Diagonal

  19. Pulsed High Power Microwave (HPM) Oscillator with Phasing Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pulsed High Power Microwave (HPM) Oscillator with Phasing Capability 5a. CONTRACT...public release, distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES See also ADM002371. 2013 IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Digest of Technical Papers 1976

  20. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 1: Invited papers, pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  1. All-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences by employing power coupler and equalizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenchao; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Wang, Fu; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    A scheme for all-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBS) is demonstrated with a precision delay feedback loop cascaded with a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD)-based power equalizer. Its feasibility has been verified by experiments, which show a multiplication for PRBS at cycle 2^7-1 from 2.5 to 10 Gb/s. This scheme can be employed for the rate multiplication of a much longer cycle PRBS at a much higher bit rate over 40 Gb/s if the time-delay, the loss, and the dispersion of an optical delay line are all precisely managed.

  2. Maximal power at different percentages of one repetition maximum: influence of resistance and gender.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Kraemer, William J; Spiering, Barry A; Volek, Jeff S; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Maresh, Carl M

    2007-05-01

    National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes were tested to determine the load at which maximal mechanical output is achieved. Athletes performed power testing at 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70% of individual 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the squat jump, bench press, and hang pull exercises. Additionally, hang pull power testing was performed using free-form (i.e., barbell) and fixed-form (i.e., Smith machine) techniques. There were differences between genders in optimal power output during the squat jump (30-40% of 1RM for men; 30-50% of 1RM for women) and bench throw (30% of 1RM for men; 30-50% of 1RM for women) exercises. There were no gender or form interactions during the hang pull exercise; maximal power output during the hang pull occurred at 30-60% of 1RM. In conclusion, these results indicate that (a) gender differences exist in the load at which maximal power output occurs during the squat jump and bench throw; and (b) although no gender or form interactions occurred during the hang pull exercise, greater power could be generated during fixed-form exercise. In general, 30% of 1RM will elicit peak power outputs for both genders and all exercises used in this study, allowing this standard percentage to be used as a starting point in order to train maximal mechanical power output capabilities in these lifts in strength trained athletes.

  3. Microsecond gain-switched master oscillator power amplifier (1958 nm) with high pulse energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ke Yin; Weiqiang Yang; Bin Zhang; Ying Li; Jing Hou

    2014-02-28

    An all-fibre master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) emitting high-energy pulses at 1958 nm is presented. The seed laser is a microsecond gain-switched thulium-doped fibre laser (TDFL) pumped with a commercial 1550-nm pulsed fibre laser. The TDFL operates at a repetition rate f in the range of 10 to 100 kHz. The two-stage thulium-doped fibre amplifier is built to scale the energy of the pulses generated by the seed laser. The maximum output pulse energy higher than 0.5 mJ at 10 kHz is achieved which is comparable with the theoretical maximum extractable pulse energy. The slope efficiency of the second stage amplifier with respect to the pump power is 30.4% at f = 10 kHz. The wavelength of the output pulse laser is centred near 1958 nm at a spectral width of 0.25 nm after amplification. Neither nonlinear effects nor significant amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) is observed in the amplification experiments. (lasers)

  4. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  5. The Ranchero explosive pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, J.H.; Atchison, W.L.; Bartram, D.E.

    1997-09-01

    The authors are currently developing a high explosive pulsed power system concept that they call Ranchero. Ranchero systems consist of series-parallel combinations of simultaneously initiated coaxial magnetic flux compression generators, and are intended to operate in the range from 50 MA to a few hundred MA currents. One example of a Ranchero system is shown here. The coaxial modules lend themselves to extracting the current output either from one end or along the generator midplane. They have previously published design considerations related to the different module configurations, and in this paper they concentrate on the system that they will use for their first imploding liner tests. A single module with end output. The module is 1.4-m long and expands the armature by a factor of two to reach the 30-cm OD stator. The first heavy liner implosion experiments will be conducted in the range of 40--50 MA currents. Electrical tests, to date, have employed high explosive (HE) charges 43-cm long. They have performed tests and related 1D MHD calculations at the 45-MA current level with small loads. From these results, they determine that they can deliver currents of approximately 50 MA to loads of 8 nH.

  6. Megagauss technology and pulsed power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Fowler, C.M.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a 3-year LDRD project at LANL. Because of recent changes in Russia, there are opportunities to acquire and evaluate technologies for ultrahigh-magnetic-field flux compressors and ultrahigh-energy, ultrahigh-current pulsed-power generators that could provide inexpensive access to various extreme matter conditions and high-energy-density physics regimes. Systems developed by the All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) at Arzamas-16 (Sarova) have the potential of creating new thrusts in several areas of high-magnetic-field and high-energy-density R&D, including high-field and high-temperature superconductivity, Faraday effect, cyclotron resonance, isentropic compression, magneto-optical properties, plasma physics, astrophysics, energy research, etc. Through a formal collaboration supported and encouraged by high-ranking DOE officials and senior laboratory management, we have gained access to unique Russian technology, which substantially exceeds US capabilities in several areas, at a small fraction of the cost which would be incurred in an intensive and lengthy US development program.

  7. Design and testing of 45 kV, 50 kHz pulse power supply for dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Surender Kumar; Shyam, Anurag

    2016-10-01

    The design, construction, and testing of high frequency, high voltage pulse power supply are reported. The purpose of the power supply is to generate dielectric barrier discharges for industrial applications. The power supply is compact and has the advantage of low cost, over current protection, and convenient control for voltage and frequency selection. The power supply can generate high voltage pulses of up to 45 kV at the repetitive frequency range of 1 kHz-50 kHz with 1.2 kW input power. The output current of the power supply is limited to 500 mA. The pulse rise time and fall time are less than 2 μs and the pulse width is 2 μs. The power supply is short circuit proof and can withstand variable plasma load conditions. The power supply mainly consists of a half bridge series resonant converter to charge an intermediate capacitor, which discharges through a step-up transformer at high frequency to generate high voltage pulses. Semiconductor switches and amorphous cores are used for power modulation at higher frequencies. The power supply is tested with quartz tube dielectric barrier discharge load and worked stably. The design details and the performance of the power supply on no load and dielectric barrier discharge load are presented.

  8. Coordinated Research Program in Pulsed Power Physics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Laser Triggering , Electron Beam Triggering , Surface Physics, Electrode Erosion, Spark Gap, Discharge, Spectroscopy, Opening Switches 20. ABSTRACT...of UV radiation to insulator surface flashover and to determine the best available insulator for a repetitive surface discharge switch . * In Project No...date. We have briefly investigated the utility of other electrode materials in laser - triggered switching . As discussed in Sec.

  9. Bystander Effect Induced by Electroporation is Possibly Mediated by Microvesicles and Dependent on Pulse Amplitude, Repetition Frequency and Cell Type.

    PubMed

    Prevc, Ajda; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Cemazar, Maja; Kloboves-Prevodnik, Veronika; Stimac, Monika; Todorovic, Vesna; Strojan, Primoz; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-10-01

    Bystander effect, a known phenomenon in radiation biology, where irradiated cells release signals which cause damage to nearby, unirradiated cells, has not been explored in electroporated cells yet. Therefore, our aim was to determine whether bystander effect is present in electroporated melanoma cells in vitro, by determining viability of non-electroporated cells exposed to medium from electroporated cells and by the release of microvesicles as potential indicators of the bystander effect. Here, we demonstrated that electroporation of cells induces bystander effect: Cells exposed to electric pulses mediated their damage to the non-electroporated cells, thus decreasing cell viability. We have shown that shedding microvesicles may be one of the ways used by the cells to mediate the death signals to the neighboring cells. The murine melanoma B16F1 cell line was found to be more electrosensitive and thus more prone to bystander effect than the canine melanoma CMeC-1 cell line. In B16F1 cell line, bystander effect was present above the level of electropermeabilization of the cells, with the threshold at 800 V/cm. Furthermore, with increasing electric field intensities and the number of pulses, the bystander effect also increased. In conclusion, electroporation can induce bystander effect which may be mediated by microvesicles, and depends on pulse amplitude, repetition frequency and cell type.

  10. A reliable, compact, and repetitive-rate high power microwave generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Li, Zhi-qiang; Sun, Xiao-liang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A compact high power microwave (HPM) generation system is described in this paper. The main parts of the HPM system are a Marx generator with a pulse forming line and a magnetron with diffraction output. The total weight and length of the system are 250 kg and 120 cm, respectively. The output microwave power of the HPM system at 550 kV of applied voltage and 0.33 T of magnetic field reaches 1 GW at 2.32 GHz of central frequency with 38 ns of pulse duration, 23% of power conversion efficiency, and Gaussian radiation pattern. In the bursts operation, both time and amplitude jitters are less than 4 ns and lower than 1.5 dB, respectively.

  11. A reliable, compact, and repetitive-rate high power microwave generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Li, Zhi-qiang; Sun, Xiao-liang; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-15

    A compact high power microwave (HPM) generation system is described in this paper. The main parts of the HPM system are a Marx generator with a pulse forming line and a magnetron with diffraction output. The total weight and length of the system are 250 kg and 120 cm, respectively. The output microwave power of the HPM system at 550 kV of applied voltage and 0.33 T of magnetic field reaches 1 GW at 2.32 GHz of central frequency with 38 ns of pulse duration, 23% of power conversion efficiency, and Gaussian radiation pattern. In the bursts operation, both time and amplitude jitters are less than 4 ns and lower than 1.5 dB, respectively.

  12. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  13. Multirail electromagnetic launcher powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Butov, V. G.; Panchenko, V. P.; Sinyaev, S. V.; Solonenko, V. A.; Shvetsov, G. A.; Yakushev, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The operation of an electromagnetic multirail launcher of solids powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is studied. The plasma flow in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the possibility of launching solids in a rapid-fire mode of launcher operation are considered. It is shown that this mode of launcher operation can be implemented by matching the plasma flow dynamics in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the launching conditions. It is also shown that powerful pulsed MHD generators can be used as a source of electrical energy for rapid-fire electromagnetic rail launchers operating in a burst mode.

  14. X-ray and runaway electron generation in repetitive pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air with a point-to-plane gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Tao; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Shut'ko, Yuliya V.; Zhang Cheng

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, using two repetitive nanosecond generators, x-rays were detected in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a point-to- plane gap. The rise times of the generators were about 15 and 1 ns. The x-rays were directly measured by various dosimeters and a NaI scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. X-rays were detected in the continuous mode at pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz and a voltage pulse rise time of {approx}15 ns. It is shown that the maximum x-ray intensity is attainable at different pulse repetition frequencies depending on the voltage pulse parameters and cathode design. In atmospheric pressure air the x-ray intensity is found to increase with increasing the pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz. It is confirmed that the maximum x-ray intensity is attained in a diffuse discharge in a point-to-plane gap.

  15. Power enhancement of burst-mode ultraviolet pulses using a doubly resonant optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-12-01

    We report a doubly resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed, and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (1064 nm) and its frequency-tripled ultraviolet (355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber-optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique enables novel applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrary macropulse width and repetition rate.

  16. A long pulse high-power diode based on a microelectronic emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Marder, B.; Clark, C.; Walko, R.; Fleming, J.

    1995-11-01

    Microelectronic cathode emitter technology being developed at Sandia for supplying continuous low current for flat panel displays appears to be a promising technology for providing high currents when operated in a pulsed, higher voltage mode. If currents in excess of one amp per square centimeter could be produced for tens of microseconds at several kilohertz repetition rate, important applications in such as large volume food or waste sterilization in situ detection, and high power microwave production could be achieved. A testbed was built to perform the experiments. The desired current densities have been demonstrated using small emitter arrays.

  17. Power enhancement of burst-mode UV pulses using a doubly-resonant optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Rahkman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    We report a doubly-resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (IR, 1064 nm) and its frequency tripled ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique opens a new paradigm in the applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrary macropulse width and repetition rate.

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser microprocessing in a gas environment at a high repetition rate of ablative pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Pivovarov, Pavel A.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Breitling, D.; Dausinger, F.

    2004-06-01

    The parameters of laser ablation of channels in steel are studied in a wide range of nanosecond pulse repetition rates f (5 Hz <= f <= 200 kHz). It is found that for f >= 4 kHz, the results of ablation in air are identical to those obtained under the action of single laser pulses in vacuum. The experimental data as well as the estimates of the parameters of laser plasma and the gas environment in the region of the laser action lead to the conclusion that there exists a long-lived region of hot rarefied gas, known as a fire ball in the theory of explosions. The emerging rarefaction reduces the screening effect of the surface plasma formed under the action of subsequent pulses. This makes it possible to use lasers with a high pulse repetition rate for attaining ablation conditions close to the conditions in vacuum without complicating the technology of microprocessing by using vacuum chambers and evacuating pumps.

  19. Gigahertz repetition rate, sub-femtosecond timing jitter optical pulse train directly generated from a mode-locked Yb:KYW laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heewon; Kim, Hyoji; Shin, Junho; Kim, Chur; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-01-01

    We show that a 1.13 GHz repetition rate optical pulse train with 0.70 fs high-frequency timing jitter (integration bandwidth of 17.5 kHz-10 MHz, where the measurement instrument-limited noise floor contributes 0.41 fs in 10 MHz bandwidth) can be directly generated from a free-running, single-mode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser mode-locked by single-wall carbon nanotube-coated mirrors. To our knowledge, this is the lowest-timing-jitter optical pulse train with gigahertz repetition rate ever measured. If this pulse train is used for direct sampling of 565 MHz signals (Nyquist frequency of the pulse train), the jitter level demonstrated would correspond to the projected effective-number-of-bit of 17.8, which is much higher than the thermal noise limit of 50 Ω load resistance (~14 bits).

  20. High-power, high-repetition-rate performance characteristics of β-BaB₂O₄ for single-pass picosecond ultraviolet generation at 266 nm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Chaitanya; Casals, J Canals; Wei, Junxiong; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2015-10-19

    We report a systematic study on the performance characteristics of a high-power, high-repetition-rate, picosecond ultraviolet (UV) source at 266 nm based on β-BaB2O4 (BBO). The source, based on single-pass fourth harmonic generation (FHG) of a compact Yb-fiber laser in a two-crystal spatial walk-off compensation scheme, generates up to 2.9 W of average power at 266 nm at a pulse repetition rate of ~80 MHz with a single-pass FHG efficiency of 35% from the green to UV. Detrimental issues such as thermal effects have been studied and confirmed by performing relevant measurements. Angular and temperature acceptance bandwidths in BBO for FHG to 266 nm are experimentally determined, indicating that the effective interaction length is limited by spatial walk-off and thermal gradients under high-power operation. The origin of dynamic color center formation due to two-photon absorption in BBO is investigated by measurements of intensity-dependent transmission at 266 nm. Using a suitable theoretical model, two-photon absorption coefficients as well as the color center densities have been estimated at different temperatures. The measurements show that the two-photon absorption coefficient in BBO at 266 nm is ~3.5 times lower at 200°C compared to that at room temperature. The long-term power stability as well as beam pointing stability is analyzed at different output power levels and focusing conditions. Using cylindrical optics, we have circularized the generated elliptic UV beam to a circularity of >90%. To our knowledge, this is the first time such high average powers and temperature-dependent two-photon absorption measurements at 266 nm are reported at repetition rates as high as ~80 MHz.

  1. Numerical analysis of repetitive pulsed-discharge de-NOx process with ammonia injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Kazuo; Kusunoki, Hironobu; Ito, Kohei; Ibaraki, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Due to its relatively high-performance and compactness, the pulsed-discharge de-NOx process is expected to be an advanced technology to suppress air pollution. Adequate guidelines for optimum operation of the pulsed-discharge de-NOx process have not yet been established however. In this study, we numerically analyze the process subjected to several hundred high-voltage pulses and investigate the effects of by-products and ammonia injection on the de-NOx performance. The electron collision process to produce OH and N radicals to remove NOx is analyzed by the Boltzmann equation for the energy distribution of discharge electrons. The chemical reaction process between the unstable radicals and NOx including combustion flue gas is calculated by considering a total of 1004 rate equations for electron collision and chemical reaction processes and a total of 101 chemical species. In a case without ammonia injection, both the NxOy removal efficiency and the de-NOx energy consumption rate to remove NxOy change with an increase in repeated pulse number because electrons produced by the discharge attach to accumulated by-products, such as H3O+(H2O)2, followed by a decrease in radical concentration, i.e., a decrease in oxidative and reductive removal reaction rates. In the case with ammonia injection, the removal efficiency increases and the electric energy consumption rate decreases with an increase in ammonia concentration because removal reactions such as NO→NO2→HNO3→NH4NO3 and NO→N2 are promoted. When excess ammonia is injected, the de-NOx performance declines because the NH2 radical produced by electron collision with ammonia reacts with NO2 and forms relatively stable N2O. In a case where HNO2 is considered NxOy, the de-NOx performance is also assessed.

  2. Pulsed Power: Sandia's Plans for the New Millenium

    SciTech Connect

    QUINTENZ,JEFFREY P.

    2000-07-20

    Pulsed power science and engineering activities at Sandia National Laboratories grew out of a programmatic need for intense radiation sources to advance capabilities in radiographic imaging and to create environments for testing and certifying the hardness of components and systems to radiation in hostile environments. By the early 1970s, scientists in laboratories around the world began utilizing pulsed power drivers with very short (10s of nanoseconds) pulse lengths for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. In the United States, Defense Programs within the Department of Energy has sponsored this research. Recent progress in pulsed power, specifically fast-pulsed-power-driven z pinches, in creating temperatures relevant to ICF has been remarkable. Worldwide developments in pulsed power technologies and increased applications in both defense and industry are contrasted with ever increasing stress on research and development tiding. The current environment has prompted us at Sandia to evaluate our role in the continued development of pulsed power science and to consider options for the future. This presentation will highlight our recent progress and provide an overview of our plans as we begin the new millennium.

  3. Development of Inductive Storage Pulsed Power Generators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-06

    in the capacitor bank is transferred to a vacuum storage inductor in 20 A. Wire fuses provide the first stage of pulse compression. Further pulse ...Introduction contained within a pressurized gas enclosure, a vacuum flashover closing switch that can be Inductive energy storage in combination command or self...contains the vacuum accomplished by a sequence of opening switches flashover switch (VFS), the vacuum opening svitcn electrically in parallel with each

  4. High average power picosecond pulse generation from a thulium-doped all-fiber MOPA system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Pu

    2012-09-24

    We report a stable highly-integrated high power picosecond thulium-doped all-fiber MOPA system without using conventional chirped pulse amplification technique. The master oscillator was passively mode-locked by a SESAM to generate average power of 15 mW at a fundamental repetition rate of 103 MHz in a short linear cavity, and a uniform narrow bandwidth FBG is employed to stabilize the passively mode-locked laser operation. Two-stage double-clad thulium-doped all-fiber amplifiers were used directly to boost average power to 20.7 W. The laser center wavelength was 1962.8 nm and the pulse width was 18 ps. The single pulse energy and peak-power after the amplication were 200 nJ and 11.2 kW respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average power ever reported for a picosecond thulium-doped all-fiber MOPA system.

  5. Repetitively pulsed TEA CO2 laser and its application for second harmonic generation in ZnGeP2 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval'chuk, L. V.; Grezev, A. N.; Niz'ev, V. G.; Yakunin, V. P.; Mezhevov, V. S.; Goryachkin, D. A.; Sergeev, V. V.; Kalintsev, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    Experimental results are presented on the development of a radiation source emitting at a wavelength of 4.775 μm with a pulse energy up to 50 mJ and an average power up to several watts in short pulse trains. A TEA CO2 laser and a nonlinear converter based on a ZnGeP2 crystal, which are specially designed for these experiments, are described. The main limitations of nonlinear conversion and possible ways to overcome these limitations are considered.

  6. RELIABILITY OF THE ONE REPETITION-MAXIMUM POWER CLEAN TEST IN ADOLESCENT ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; McFarland, James E.; Herman, Robert; Naclerio, Fernando; Ratamess, Nicholas A.; Kang, Jie; Myer, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Although the power clean test is routinely used to assess strength and power performance in adult athletes, the reliability of this measure in younger populations has not been examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the one repetition maximum (1 RM) power clean in adolescent athletes. Thirty-six male athletes (age 15.9 ± 1.1 yrs, body mass 79.1 ± 20.3 kg, height 175.1 ±7.4 cm) who had more than 1 year of training experience with weightlifting exercises performed a 1 RM power clean on two nonconsecutive days in the afternoon following standardized procedures. All test procedures were supervised by a senior level weightlifting coach and consisted of a systematic progression in test load until the maximum resistance that could be lifted for one repetition using proper exercise technique was determined. Data were analyzed using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC [2,k]), Pearson correlation coefficient (r), repeated measures ANOVA, Bland-Altman plot, and typical error analyses. Analysis of the data revealed that the test measures were highly reliable demonstrating a test-retest ICC of 0.98 (95% CI = 0.96–0.99). Testing also demonstrated a strong relationship between 1 RM measures on trial 1 and trial 2 (r=0.98, p<0.0001) with no significant difference in power clean performance between trials (70.6 ± 19.8 vs. 69.8 ± 19.8 kg). Bland Altman plots confirmed no systematic shift in 1 RM between trial 1 and trial 2. The typical error to be expected between 1 RM power clean trials is 2.9 kg and a change of at least 8.0 kg is indicated to determine a real change in lifting performance between tests in young lifters. No injuries occurred during the study period and the testing protocol was well-tolerated by all subjects. These findings indicate that 1 RM power clean testing has a high degree of reproducibility in trained male adolescent athletes when standardized testing procedures are followed and qualified instruction

  7. Reliability of the one-repetition-maximum power clean test in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; McFarland, James E; Herman, Robert E; Naclerio, Fernando; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Kang, Jie; Myer, Gregory D

    2012-02-01

    Although the power clean test is routinely used to assess strength and power performance in adult athletes, the reliability of this measure in younger populations has not been examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM) power clean in adolescent athletes. Thirty-six male athletes (age 15.9 ± 1.1 years, body mass 79.1 ± 20.3 kg, height 175.1 ±7.4 cm) who had >1 year of training experience in weightlifting exercises performed a 1RM power clean on 2 nonconsecutive days in the afternoon following standardized procedures. All test procedures were supervised by a senior level weightlifting coach and consisted of a systematic progression in test load until the maximum resistance that could be lifted for 1 repetition using proper exercise technique was determined. Data were analyzed using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC[2,k]), Pearson correlation coefficient (r), repeated measures analysis of variance, Bland-Altman plot, and typical error analyses. Analysis of the data revealed that the test measures were highly reliable demonstrating a test-retest ICC of 0.98 (95% confidence interval = 0.96-0.99). Testing also demonstrated a strong relationship between 1RM measures in trials 1 and 2 (r = 0.98, p < 0.0001) with no significant difference in power clean performance between trials (70.6 ± 19.8 vs. 69.8 ± 19.8 kg). Bland-Altman plots confirmed no systematic shift in 1RM between trials 1 and 2. The typical error to be expected between 1RM power clean trials is 2.9 kg, and a change of at least 8.0 kg is indicated to determine a real change in lifting performance between tests in young lifters. No injuries occurred during the study period, and the testing protocol was well tolerated by all the subjects. These findings indicate that 1RM power clean testing has a high degree of reproducibility in trained male adolescent athletes when standardized testing procedures are followed and qualified

  8. Applications of pulsed power in advanced oxidation and reduction processes for pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Rosocha, L.A.; Coogan, J.J.; Secker, D.A.; Smith, J.D.

    1993-08-01

    A growing social awareness of the adverse impact of pollutants on our environment and the promulgation of environmental laws and regulations has recently stimulated the development of technologies for pollution abatement and hazardous waste destruction. Pulsed power shows strong promise for contributing to the development of innovative technologies aimed at these applications. At Los Alamos we are engaged in two projects which apply pulsed power technology to the environment: the use of relativistic electron beams and nonequilibrium plasmas for the destruction of hazardous organic compounds in aqueous-based and gaseous-based medial, respectively. Electron beams and nonequilibrium plasmas have also been applied to the treatment of flue gases such as SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} by other researchers. In this paper, we will describe our electron-beam and plasma experiments carried out on hazardous waste destruction. Additionally, we will describe the scaling of electron-beam and nonequilibrium plasma systems to industrial sizes, including discussions of electron accelerator architecture, comparison of continuous-duty versus repetitively pulsed accelerators, plasma-discharge modulators, and needed pulsed power technology development.

  9. Experimental investigation of an explosive-driven pulse power system

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, T.J.; Hanson, D.L.; Cnare, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The results obtained in the test of a pulse-power system composed of an explosively driven compressed magnetic-field current generator driving an explosive opening switch and a 20 nH inductive load are presented. It is shown that microsecond risetime, multimegampere current pulses can be produced by this technique.

  10. Explosive Pulsed Power Experiments At The Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    Weapons and Survivability Directorate Phillips Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 J. Graham, W. Sornrnars Albuquerque Division Maxwell Technologies... Phillips Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10...pulse shaping/impedance matching systems are discussed. Introduction Air Force missions utilizing pulsed power technology increasingly require the

  11. Approaches to solar cell design for pulsed laser power receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a laser to beam power from Earth to a photovoltaic receiver in space could be a technology with applications to many space missions. Extremely high average-power lasers would be required in a wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. However, high-power lasers inherently operate in a pulsed format. Existing solar cells are not well designed to respond to pulsed incident power. To better understand cell response to pulsed illumination at high intensity, the PC-1D finite-element computer model was used to analyze the response of solar cells to continuous and pulsed laser illumination. Over 50 percent efficiency was calculated for both InP and GaAs cells under steady-state illumination near the optimum wavelength. The time-dependent response of a high-efficiency GaAs concentrator cell to a laser pulse was modeled, and the effect of laser intensity, wavelength, and bias point was studied. Three main effects decrease the efficiency of a solar cell under pulsed laser illumination: series resistance, L-C 'ringing' with the output circuit, and current limiting due to the output inductance. The problems can be solved either by changing the pulse shape or designing a solar cell to accept the pulsed input. Cell design possibilities discussed are a high-efficiency, light-trapping silicon cell, and a monolithic, low-inductance GaAs cell.

  12. Picosecond to femtosecond pulses from high power self mode-locked ytterbium rod-type fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Pierre; Perrin, Mathias; Saby, Julien; Sangla, Damien; Salin, François; Freysz, Eric

    2013-05-06

    We have designed an ytterbium rod-type fiber laser oscillator with tunable pulse duration. This system that delivers more than 10 W of average power is self mode-locked. It yields femtosecond to picosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate of 74 MHz. The pulse duration is adjusted by changing the spectral width of a band pass filter that is inserted in the laser cavity. Using volume Bragg gratings of 0.9 nm and 0.07 nm spectrum bandwidth, this oscillator delivers nearly Fourier limited 2.8 ps and 18.5 ps pulses, respectively. With a 4 nm interference filter, one obtains picosecond pulses that have been externally dechirped down to 130 fs.

  13. Effect of repetitive laser pulses on the electrical conductivity of intervertebral disc tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, A I; Sobol', E N

    2009-03-31

    The thermomechanical effect of 1.56-{mu}m fibre laser pulses on intervertebral disc cartilage has been studied using ac conductivity measurements with coaxial electrodes integrated with an optical fibre for laser radiation delivery to the tissue. The observed time dependences of tissue conductivity can be interpreted in terms of hydraulic effects and thermomechanical changes in tissue structure. The laserinduced changes in the electrical parameters of the tissue are shown to correlate with the structural changes, which were visualised using shadowgraph imaging. Local ac conductivity measurements in the bulk of tissue can be used to develop a diagnostic/monitoring system for laser regeneration of intervertebral discs. (laser biology and medicine)

  14. Si nanostructures grown by picosecond high repetition rate pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.; Athanasopoulos, G. I.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2013-08-01

    One-step growth of n-doped Si nanostructures by picosecond ultra fast pulsed laser deposition at 1064 nm is reported for the first time. The structure and morphology of the Si nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the shape of the Si nanostructures depends on the ambient argon pressure. Fibrous networks, cauliflower formations and Si rectangular crystals grew when argon pressure of 300 Pa, 30 Pa and vacuum (10-3 Pa) conditions were used, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistance of the vacuum made material was investigated.

  15. Low jitter spark gap switch for repetitively pulsed parallel capacitor banks

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    A two-section air insulated spark gap has been developed for switching multi-kilojoule plus-minus charged parallel capacitor banks which operate continuously at pulse rates up to 20 pps. The switch operates with less than 2 ns jitter, recovers its dielectric strength within 2 to 5 ms and has not shown degraded performance in sequential test runs totaling over a million shots. Its estimated life with copper electrodes is > 10/sup 7/ shots. All preliminary tests indicate that the switch is suitable for continuous running multi-kilojoule systems operating to at least 20 pps.

  16. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  17. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  18. Effect of the stimulus frequency and pulse number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the inter-reversal time of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Kazuhisa; Ge, Sheng; Katayama, Yoshinori; Ueno, Shoogo; Iramina, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the stimulus frequency and pulses number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the inter-reversal time (IRT) of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule (SPL). The spinning wheel illusion was used as the ambiguous figures stimulation in this study. To investigate the rTMS effect over the right SPL during perceptual reversal, 0.25 Hz 60 pulse, 1 Hz 60 pulse, 0.5 Hz 120 pulse, 1 Hz 120 pulse, and 1 Hz 240 pulse biphasic rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold was applied over the right SPL and the right posterior temporal lobe (PTL), respectively. As a control, a no TMS was also conducted. It was found that rTMS on 0.25 Hz 60 pulse and 1 Hz 60 pulse applied over the right SPL caused shorter IRT. In contrast, it was found that rTMS on 1 Hz 240-pulse applied over the right SPL caused longer IRT. On the other hand, there is no significant difference between IRTs when the rTMS on 0.5 Hz 120 pulse and 1 Hz 120 pulse were applied over the right SPL. Therefore, the applying of rTMS over the right SPL suggests that the IRT of perceptual reversal is effected by the rTMS conditions such as the stimulus frequency and the number of pulses.

  19. Influence of pulse duration on the plasma characteristics in high-power pulsed magnetron discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, S.; Dauchot, J.P.; Ganciu, M.; Ricard, A.; Hecq, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-power pulsed magnetron discharges have drawn an increasing interest as an approach to produce highly ionized metallic vapor. In this paper we propose to study how the plasma composition and the deposition rate are influenced by the pulse duration. The plasma is studied by time-resolved optical emission and absorption spectroscopies and the deposition rate is controlled thanks to a quartz microbalance. The pulse length is varied between 2.5 and 20 {mu}s at 2 and 10 mTorr in pure argon. The sputtered material is titanium. For a constant discharge power, the deposition rate increases as the pulse length decreases. With 5 {mu}s pulse, for an average power of 300 W, the deposition rate is {approx}70% of the deposition rate obtained in direct current magnetron sputtering at the same power. The increase of deposition rate can be related to the sputtering regime. For long pulses, self-sputtering seems to occur as demonstrated by time-resolved optical emission diagnostic of the discharge. In contrary, the metallic vapor ionization rate, as determined by absorption measurements, diminishes as the pulses are shortened. Nevertheless, the ionization rate is in the range of 50% for 5 {mu}s pulses while it lies below 10% in the case of a classical continuous magnetron discharge.

  20. Pulsed Beamless High Power Microwave (HPM) Source with Integrated Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    gral part of t utilized for source ope d. The peak asured to be 2 ns. SS HIGH IN kach Institu .Mironenk iv 04073, U SA; Ya. T 1 er Microwave W...Pulsed Beamless High Power Microwave (HPM) Source With Integrated Antenna 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...NOTES See also ADM002371. 2013 IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Digest of Technical Papers 1976-2013, and Abstracts of the 2013 IEEE International

  1. Solid-state resistor for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltzfus, Brian; Savage, Mark E.; Hutsel, Brian Thomas; Fowler, William E.; MacRunnels, Keven Alan; Justus, David; Stygar, William A.

    2016-12-06

    A flexible solid-state resistor comprises a string of ceramic resistors that can be used to charge the capacitors of a linear transformer driver (LTD) used in a pulsed power machine. The solid-state resistor is able to absorb the energy of a switch prefire, thereby limiting LTD cavity damage, yet has a sufficiently low RC charge time to allow the capacitor to be recharged without disrupting the operation of the pulsed power machine.

  2. The Role of Pulsed Power in International Security and Counterterrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1 . REPORT DATE JUN 2003 ... IEEE Pulsed Power Conference, Digest of Technical Papers 1976-2013, and Abstracts of the 2013 IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science. IEEE ...advancements in solid-state switching and high- energy -density components [3]. Ultra-compact pulsed power may be light enough to transport but to be truly

  3. Pulsed pyroelectric crystal-powered gamma source

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.; Raber, T. N.; Morse, D. H.

    2013-04-19

    A compact pulsed gamma generator is being developed to replace radiological sources used in commercial, industrial and medical applications. Mono-energetic gammas are produced in the 0.4 - 1.0 MeV energy range using nuclear reactions such as {sup 9}Be(d,n{gamma}){sup 10}B. The gamma generator employs an RF-driven inductively coupled plasma ion source to produce deuterium ion current densities up to 2 mA/mm{sup 2} and ampere-level current pulses can be attained by utilizing an array extraction grid. The extracted deuterium ions are accelerated to approximately 300 keV via a compact stacked pyroelectric crystal system and then bombard the beryllium target to generate gammas. The resulting microsecond pulse of gammas is equivalent to a radiological source with curie-level activity.

  4. Power-scalable subcycle pulses from laser filaments

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, A.A.; Zheltikov, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Compression of optical pulses to ultrashort pulse widths using methods of nonlinear optics is a well-established technology of modern laser science. Extending these methods to pulses with high peak powers, which become available due to the rapid progress of laser technologies, is, however, limited by the universal physical principles. With the ratio P/Pcr of the peak power of an ultrashort laser pulse, P, to the critical power of self-focusing, Pcr, playing the role of the fundamental number-of-particles integral of motion of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, keeping this ratio constant is a key principle for the power scaling of laser-induced filamentation. Here, we show, however, that, despite all the complexity of the underlying nonlinear physics, filamentation-assisted self-compression of ultrashort laser pulses in the regime of anomalous dispersion can be scaled within a broad range of peak powers against the principle of constant P/Pcr. We identify filamentation self-compression scaling strategies whereby subcycle field waveforms with almost constant pulse widths can be generated without a dramatic degradation of beam quality within a broad range of peak powers, varying from just a few to hundreds of Pcr. PMID:28367980

  5. 1400, +/- 900V PEAK PULSE SWITCH MODE POWER SUPPLIES FOR SNS INJECTION KICKERS.

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBIASE,R.ENG,W.SANDBERG,J.DEWAN,S.HOLMES,R.RUST,K.ZENG,J.

    2004-03-10

    This paper describes simulation and experimental results for a 1400A, {+-} 900V peak rated, switch mode power supply for SNS Injection Kicker Magnets. For each magnet (13 m{Omega}, 160{micro}H), the power supply must supply controlled pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate. The pulse current must rise from zero to maximum in less than 1 millisec in a controlled manner, flat top for up to 2 millisec, and should fall in a controlled manner to less than 4A within 500{micro}s. The low current performance during fall time is the biggest challenge in this power supply. The simulation results show that to meet the controlled fall of the current and the current ripple requirements, voltage loop bandwidth of at least 10 kHz and switching frequency of at least 100 kHz are required. To achieve high power high frequency switching with IGBT switches, a series connected topology with three phase shifted (O{sup o}, 60{sup o} & 120{sup o}) converters each with 40 kHz switching frequency (IGBT at 20kHz), has been achieved. In this paper, the circuit topology, relevant system specifications and experimental results that meet the requirements of the power supply are described in detail. A unique six pulse SCR rectifier circuit with capacitor storage has been implemented to achieve minimum pulse width to meet required performance during current fall time below 50A due to the very narrow pulse width and non-linearity from IGBT turn-on/off times.

  6. Electra: A Repetitively Pulsed, Electron Beam Pumped KrF Laser to Develop the Technologies for Fusion Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    primary source of beam electrons comes from the inside of the capillary wall, and not explosive emission from the cathode material itself. This should...emitted from a field emission cathode driven by a fast pulsed power system. The electron beam propagates through a thin foil, which serves as the...pressure after the shot was reduced about five fold. In the case of the carbon fiber cathode , the RMS non-uniformity of the electron beam dropped

  7. Pulsed Power Bibliography. Volume 2. Annotated Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    ENEAG? POEV SOJECES with varatle resonant frequencies is transprred to a load renovator .5 Cir.d, D.J. Fricksn. W.B. Gaps a-n CM. PowLer who the... energiaed transformer h.h frequency response in conparison to conventional from a do source end contain ontrolled suitches. Advantages of pulse

  8. Efficient spectral broadening in the 100-W average power regime using gas-filled kagome HC-PCF and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Emaury, Florian; Saraceno, Clara J; Debord, Benoit; Ghosh, Debashri; Diebold, Andreas; Gèrôme, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2014-12-15

    We present nonlinear pulse compression of a high-power SESAM-modelocked thin-disk laser (TDL) using an Ar-filled hypocycloid-core kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The output of the modelocked Yb:YAG TDL with 127 W average power, a pulse repetition rate of 7 MHz, and a pulse duration of 740 fs was spectrally broadened 16-fold while propagating in a kagome HC-PCF containing 13 bar of static argon gas. Subsequent compression tests performed using 8.4% of the full available power resulted in a pulse duration as short as 88 fs using the spectrally broadened output from the fiber. Compressing the full transmitted power through the fiber (118 W) could lead to a compressed output of >100  W of average power and >100  MW of peak power with an average power compression efficiency of 88%. This simple laser system with only one ultrafast laser oscillator and a simple single-pass fiber pulse compressor, generating both high peak power >100  MW and sub-100-fs pulses at megahertz repetition rate, is very interesting for many applications such as high harmonic generation and attosecond science with improved signal-to-noise performance.

  9. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Jitter and the minimal pulse repetition rate of a diode-pumped passively Q-switched solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belovolov, M. I.; Shatalov, A. F.

    2008-10-01

    The jitter of radiation pulses from diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd3+:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and Nd3+:Ca3Ga2Ge3O12 (Nd:CGGG) crystal lasers is studied. It is found that the jitter j depends on the laser pulse repetition rate f as j = A/fγ. It is shown that the minimal pulse repetition rate fL of the laser is determined by the jitter parameters A and γ and is equal to A1/(γ-1). For the Nd:YAG and Nd:CGGG lasers, fL was 14 Hz and 5 Hz, respectively.

  10. Development of Lightweight Prime Power Source Components for Pulsed Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    lbs, 22 11 long, 18" diameter, 7 lbsjsec mass flow rate, 1, 700 degree F turbine inlet temperature. (1] ALTERNATOR CONSIDERATIONS The choice of...provides an overview of system integration for the 1 MW power source components and power source integration with the pulsed load . This will...indicated that peak power flow into the capacitor occurs about midway through the charge cycle. The varying power flow gives rise to cyclic

  11. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, P K; Singh, S K; Sanyasi, A K; Awasthi, L M; Mattoo, S K

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  12. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  13. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette M.; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier setup. It provided 22ps pulses with a maximum average power of 95W, 40MHz repetition rate at 1032nm (~2.4μJ pulse energy), with M2 <1.3. We determined the facet damage threshold for a 7-cells hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and showed up to 59W average power output for a 5 meters fiber. The damage threshold for a 19-cell hollow core photonic bandgap fiber exceeded the maximum power provided by the light source and up to 76W average output power was demonstrated for a 1m fiber. In both cases, no special attention was needed to mitigate bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber.

  14. High power burst-mode optical parametric amplifier with arbitrary pulse selection.

    PubMed

    Pergament, M; Kellert, M; Kruse, K; Wang, J; Palmer, G; Wissmann, L; Wegner, U; Lederer, M J

    2014-09-08

    We present results from a unique burst-mode femtosecond non-collinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) under development for the optical - x-ray pump-probe experiments at the European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Facility. The NOPA operates at a burst rate of 10 Hz, a duty cycle of 2.5% and an intra-burst repetition rate of up to 4.5 MHz, producing high fidelity 15 fs pulses at a center wavelength of 810 nm. Using dispersive amplification filtering of the super-continuum seed pulses allows for selectable pulse duration up to 75 fs, combined with a tuning range in excess of 100 nm whilst remaining nearly transform limited. At an intra-burst rate of 188 kHz the single pulse energy from two sequential NOPA stages reached 180 µJ, corresponding to an average power of 34W during the burst. Acousto- and electro-optic switching techniques enable the generation of transient free bursts of required length and the selection of arbitrary pulse sequences inside the burst.

  15. A source of high-power pulses of elliptically polarized ultrawideband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu. A. Efremov, A. M.; Koshelev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, B. M.; Petkun, A. A.; Sukhushin, K. N.; Zorkaltseva, M. Yu.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we describe a source of high-power ultrawideband radiation with elliptical polarization. The source consisting of a monopolar pulse generator, a bipolar pulse former, and a helical antenna placed into a radioparent container may be used in tests for electromagnetic compatibility. In the source, the helical antenna with the number of turns N = 4 is excited with a high-voltage bipolar pulse. Preliminary, we examined helical antennas at a low-voltage source aiming to select an optimal N and to estimate a radiation center position and boundary of a far-field zone. Finally, characteristics of the source in the operating mode at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz are presented in the paper as well. Energy efficiency of the antenna is 0.75 at the axial ratio equal to 1.3. The effective potential of radiation of the source at the voltage amplitudes of the bipolar pulse generator equal to -175/+200 kV reaches 280 kV.

  16. Conversion of CH4 /CO2 by a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapinello, M.; Martini, L. M.; Dilecce, G.; Tosi, P.

    2016-02-01

    A possible way to store both renewable energy and CO2 in chemical energy is to produce value-added chemicals and fuels starting from CO2 and green electricity. This can be done by exploiting the non-equilibrium properties of gaseous electrical discharges. Discharges, in addition, can be switched on and off quickly, thus being suitable to be coupled with an intermittent energy source. In this study, we have used a nanosecond pulsed discharge to dissociate CO2 and CH4 in a 1:1 mixture at atmospheric pressure, and compared our results with literature data obtained by other discharges. The main products are CO, H2, C2H2, water and solid carbon. We estimate an energy efficiency of 40% for syngas (CO and H2) production, higher if other products are also considered. Such values are among the highest compared to other discharges, and, although not very high on an absolute scale, are likely improvable via possible routes discussed in the paper and by coupling to the discharge a heterogeneous catalysis stage.

  17. PBFA II, the Pulsed Power Characterization Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    pulsed voltages above 10 MV resulting in a compact accelerator. Thirty-six Marx generators constituting 13 MJ stored energy were repeatably fired...with less 40 ns total spread. The prefire rate of this large Marx system is very low, below .05 per charge cycle. of than The gas switch laser...oil, water, and vacuum. First the energy storage section, which consists of the Marx generators and their trigger systems, are insulated using a 33

  18. High average power nonlinear compression to 4  GW, sub-50  fs pulses at 2  μm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, M; Gaida, C; Stutzki, F; Hädrich, S; Jauregui, C; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2017-02-15

    The combination of high-repetition-rate ultrafast thulium-doped fiber laser systems and gas-based nonlinear pulse compression in waveguides offers promising opportunities for the development of high-performance few-cycle laser sources at 2 μm wavelength. In this Letter, we report on a nonlinear pulse compression stage delivering 252 μJ, sub-50 fs-pulses at 15.4 W of average power. This performance level was enabled by actively mitigating ultrashort pulse propagation effects induced by the presence of water vapor absorptions.

  19. Periodic disruptions induced by high repetition rate femtosecond pulses on magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuanggen; Kan, Hongli; Zhai, Kaili; Ma, Xiurong; Luo, Yiming; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Qingyue

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the periodic disruption formation on magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate surfaces by a femtosecond fiber laser system with wavelength and repetition rate of 1040 nm and 52 MHz, respectively. Three main experimental conditions, laser average power, scanning speed, and orientation of sample were systematically studied. In particular, the ablation morphologies of periodic disruptions under different crystal orientations were specifically researched. The result shows that such disruptions consisting of a bamboo-like inner structure appears periodically for focusing on the surface of X-, Y- and Z-cut wafers, which are formed by a rapid quenching of the material. Meanwhile, due to the anisotropic property, the bamboo-like inner structures consist of a cavity only arise from X- and Z-cut orientation.

  20. Ultrafast laser with an average power of 120 W at 515 nm and a highly dynamic repetition rate in the MHz range for novel applications in micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, F.; Piontek, M. C.; Herrmann, T.; L'huillier, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new generation of resonant scanners in the kHz-range shows ultra-high deflection speeds of more than 1000m/s but suffer from an inherent nonlinear mirror oscillation. If this oscillation is not compensated, a typical bitmap, written point by point, would be strongly distorted because of the decreasing spot distance at the turning point of the scanning mirror. However, this can be avoided by a dynamic adaption of the repetition rate (RR) of the ultrafast laser. Since resonant scanners are operated in the 10 kHz-range, this means that the RR has to be continuously swept up to several 10 000 times per second between e.g. 5MHz and 10 MHz. High-speed continuous adaption of the RR could also optimize laser micromachining of narrow curved geometries, where nowadays a time consuming approximation with numerous vectors is required. We present a laser system, which is capable of sweeping the RR more than 32 000 times per second between 5MHz and 10MHz at an average output power of more than 120W at 515nm with a pulse duration of about 40 ps. The laser consists of a semiconductor oscillator, a 3-stage fiber pre-amplifier, a solid state InnoSlab power amplifier and a SHG stage. We systematically analyzed the dynamic of the laser system as well as the spectral and temporal behavior of the optical pulses. Switching the repetition rate typically causes a varying pulse energy, which could affect the machining quality over one scanning line. This effect will be analyzed and discussed. Possible techniques to compensate or avoid this effect will be considered.

  1. Pulsed Power Applications in Basic Research and Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, , Jr.

    1996-05-01

    Pulsed power science, with its unique capability to generate high particle flux and radiation density, is largely a result of nuclear weapons development. Starting in the 1960s, research support by the Department of Defense, Department of Energy and counterparts abroad has created an extensive technology base. The recent dramatic changes in the world political makeup has spurred the pursuit of new directions in pulsed power research. This symposium gathers a cross section of experts from industry, universities and national laboratories to look beyond nuclear weapons simulation to the range of opportunities - from industrial processing to interdisciplinary physics research. The talks emphasize two major motivations for the pulsed power approach. First, it can lead to compact and inexpensive systems for generating high voltages and large-volume plasmas. Second, pulsed power technology yields power levels unattainable by any other approach. This advantage is evident in several talks on industrial processes that benefit strongly on dose rate effects. The presentations summarize the current state of applications and present a vision of the future in pulsed power research.

  2. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time.

  3. Design and development of a prototype 25 kV, 10 A long pulse Marx modulator for high power klystron.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Mahesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2016-02-01

    Research, design, and development of high average power modulators for the proposed Indian Spallation Neutron Source are in progress at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology. With this objective, a prototype of 25 kV, 10 A, 1 ms Marx modulator at repetition rate of 1 Hz has been designed and developed which serves as a proof of principle and technology assessment stage for further development of high repetition rate high voltage high average power modulators. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) based modules of 2.8 kV switching capability have been used as main modules. The modulator had 8.2% droop in output voltage pulse without any droop compensation circuit. A droop compensation involving 15 corrector modules has been used to reduce the droop up to 1%. We have used IGBT based 250 V switches to realize the corrector module. A microcontroller based control unit was designed and developed for triggering the main and corrector modules. With this control unit, programmable output pulse has been achieved. Electrical isolation between high voltage circuits and control circuit has been achieved by the use of fiber optic based control signal transmission. Output pulses of 1 ms pulse width, 800 ns rise time, and 5 μs fall time have been achieved. The modulator has advantages of modular design, adjustable pulse width, adjustable rise time, and fall time.

  4. Laser ablation efficiency during the production of Ag nanoparticles in ethanol at a low pulse repetition rate (1-10 Hz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde-Alva, M. A.; García-Fernández, T.; Esparza-Alegría, E.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; de la Mora, M. B.; Márquez-Herrera, C. E.; Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of the repetition rate of laser pulses (RRLP) in the range from 1-10 Hz in the production of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) by laser ablation in ethanol. Laser pulses with a duration of 7 ns, a wavelength of 1064 nm and an energy of 60 mJ were used to ablate a 99.99% pure silver target immersed in 10 ml of ethanol. Transmittance analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy were used to study the silver concentration in the colloidal solutions. The ablation process was studied by measuring the transmission of the laser pulses through the colloid. It is shown that for a fixed number of laser pulses (NLP) the ablation efficiency, in terms of the ablated silver mass per laser pulse, increases with the RRLP. This result contradicts what had previously been established in the literature.

  5. Pulsed power systems for environmental and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neau, E. L.

    1994-10-01

    The development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, free electron lasers, and Inertial Confinement Fusion drivers is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of performing new roles in environmental cleanup and industrial manufacturing processes. We discuss a new class of short-pulse, high average power accelerator that achieves megavolt electron and ion beams with 10's of kiloamperes of current and average power levels in excess of 100 kW. Large treatment areas are possible with these systems because kilojoules of energy are available in each output pulse. These systems can use large area x-ray converters for applications requiring grater depth of penetration such as food pasteurization and waste treatment. The combined development of this class of accelerators and applications, and Sandia National Laboratories, is called Quantum Manufacturing.

  6. Note: All solid-state high repetitive sub-nanosecond risetime pulse generator based on bulk gallium arsenide avalanche semiconductor switches.

    PubMed

    Hu, Long; Su, Jiancang; Ding, Zhenjie; Hao, Qingsong; Fan, Yajun; Liu, Chunliang

    2016-08-01

    An all solid-state high repetitive sub-nanosecond risetime pulse generator featuring low-energy-triggered bulk gallium arsenide (GaAs) avalanche semiconductor switches and a step-type transmission line is presented. The step-type transmission line with two stages is charged to a potential of 5.0 kV also biasing at the switches. The bulk GaAs avalanche semiconductor switch closes within sub-nanosecond range when illuminated with approximately 87 nJ of laser energy at 905 nm in a single pulse. An asymmetric dipolar pulse with peak-to-peak amplitude of 9.6 kV and risetime of 0.65 ns is produced on a resistive load of 50 Ω. A technique that allows for repetition-rate multiplication of pulse trains experimentally demonstrated that the parallel-connected bulk GaAs avalanche semiconductor switches are triggered in sequence. The highest repetition rate is decided by recovery time of the bulk GaAs avalanche semiconductor switch, and the operating result of 100 kHz of the generator is discussed.

  7. Experimental investigation of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators driven by repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulses with dc or low frequency sinusoidal bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opaits, Dmitry F.; Likhanskii, Alexandre V.; Neretti, Gabriele; Zaidi, Sohail; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.; Macheret, Sergey O.

    2008-08-01

    Experimental studies were conducted of a flow induced in an initially quiescent room air by a single asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge driven by voltage waveforms consisting of repetitive nanosecond high-voltage pulses superimposed on dc or alternating sinusoidal or square-wave bias voltage. To characterize the pulses and to optimize their matching to the plasma, a numerical code for short pulse calculations with an arbitrary impedance load was developed. A new approach for nonintrusive diagnostics of plasma actuator induced flows in quiescent gas was proposed, consisting of three elements coupled together: the schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and two-dimensional numerical fluid modeling. The force and heating rate calculated by a plasma model was used as an input to two-dimensional viscous flow solver to predict the time-dependent dielectric barrier discharge induced flow field. This approach allowed us to restore the entire two-dimensional unsteady plasma induced flow pattern as well as characteristics of the plasma induced force. Both the experiments and computations showed the same vortex flow structures induced by the actuator. Parametric studies of the vortices at different bias voltages, pulse polarities, peak pulse voltages, and pulse repetition rates were conducted experimentally. The significance of charge buildup on the dielectric surface was demonstrated. The charge buildup decreases the effective electric field in the plasma and reduces the plasma actuator performance. The accumulated surface charge can be removed by switching the bias polarity, which leads to a newly proposed voltage waveform consisting of high-voltage nanosecond repetitive pulses superimposed on a high-voltage low frequency sinusoidal voltage. Advantages of the new voltage waveform were demonstrated experimentally.

  8. A data review and performance analysis of repetitively pulsed DF and DF-CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazny, S. W.; Patterson, K. E.; Walters, J. M., Jr.

    1984-06-01

    Results are presented from a theoretical study of the performance potential of deuterium fluoride (DF) and DF-CO2 lasers using solid gas generators as a fuel supply and a chemical pump to absorb laser effluents and maintain a low laser cavity pressure. The data base on DF and DF-CO2 lasers is reviewed, including existing performance models. The volumetric efficiency and molar efficiency are selected as figures of merit. More than 30 different variations of gas compositions and pressure regimes were examined to identify the highest efficiencies. A CO2/F2 ratio of unity offered the largest payoff potential. An NF3 mixture showed good promise if power losses at 10.6 microns could be avoided. The lack of performance falloff in molar efficiency with increasing cavity pressure suggests performance gains can be had using systems at higher-than-atmospheric pressures.

  9. High energy cable development for pulsed power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, K.A.; Stearns, R.E. ); Klug, R.B. ); Ford, R.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Commercially available coaxial cables have been used successfully to deliver current from a power supply to small electromagnetic launchers. As launchers become more energetic, and as repetitive fire becomes more important, the shear number of parallel cables required, becomes impractical. This paper presents a new cable design, outlines the development of terminal connectors for the cable, and describes the characterization tests of a first run sample of high power cable. This work was performed for the Air Force Armament Laboratory, Electromagnetic Launcher Technology Branch (AFATL/SAH) and was funded by SDIO. All experimental work was performed in AFATL's Site A-15 Basic Research Facility.

  10. Repetitively pumped electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, L.G.

    1979-07-24

    Disclosed is an apparatus for producing fast, repetitive pulses of controllable length of an electron beam by phased energy storage in a transmission line of length matched to the number of pulses and specific pulse lengths desired. 12 figs.

  11. High-power all-fiber femtosecond chirped pulse amplification based on dispersive wave and chirped-volume Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruoyu; Jin, Dongchen; Tan, Fangzhou; Wei, Shouyu; Hong, Chang; Xu, Jia; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Pu

    2016-10-03

    We report a high-power all-fiber-integrated femtosecond chirped pulse amplification system operating at 1064 nm, which consists of a dispersive wave source, a fiber stretcher, a series of ytterbium-doped amplifiers and a chirped volume Bragg grating (CVBG) compressor. The dispersive wave is generated by an erbium-doped mode-locked fiber laser with frequency shifted to the 1 μm region in a highly nonlinear fiber. With three stages of ytterbium-doped amplification, the average output power is scaled up to 125 W. Through CVBG, the pulse duration is compressed from 525 ps to 566 fs, the average output power of 107 W with a high compression efficiency of 86% is achieved, and the measured repetition rate is 17.57 MHz, corresponding to the peak power of 10.8 MW.

  12. Update on Phelix Pulsed-Power Hydrodynamics Experiments and Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    toroidal transformer where their inner conductor forms the primary winding. The whole system resides on a transportable palette that is enclosed within...an EMI shielding box. Figure 1. Schematic of the PHELIX portable pulsed- power system. II. TOROIDAL TRANSFORMER The key technology to...achieving high-current pulses with a small footprint is a toroidal current step-up transformer. The toroidal geometry confines magnetic flux self

  13. Evaluation of Pulsed Power Architectures for Active Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    strongest responses of the fissile material, prompt and delayed neutrons and delayed gammas . Based on a notional detection scenario, the...EVALUATION OF PULSED POWER ARCHITECTURES FOR ACTIVE DETECTION* I.D. Smith, P.A. Corcoran, R. Altes, D. Morton, R. Stevens and B. Whitney L-3...Abstract: Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD, [1]; also see presentations at this conference by B.V. Weber, et al., D.P Murphy et al

  14. Characteristics of pulsed power generator by versatile inductive voltage adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Shimiya, Kouichi; Masugata, Katsumi; Shigeta, Masao; Shibata, Kazuhiko

    2005-10-01

    A pulsed power generator by inductive voltage adder, versatile inductive voltage adder (VIVA-I), which features a high average potential gradient (2.5 MV/m), was designed and is currently in operation,. It was designed to produce an output pulse of 4 MV/60 ns by adding 2 MV pulses in two-stages of induction cells, where amorphous cores are installed. As a pulse forming line, we used a Blumlein line with the switching reversed, where cores are automatically biased due to the presence of prepulse. Good reproducibility was obtained even in the absence of the reset pulse. Within [similar]40% of full charge voltage, pulsed power characteristics of Marx generator, pulse forming line (PFL), transmission line (TL), and induction cells were tested for three types of loads; open-circuit, dummy load of liquid (CuSO4) resistor, and electron beam diode. In the open-circuit test, [similar]2.0 MV of output voltage was obtained with good reproducibility. Dependences of output voltage on diode impedances were evaluated by using various dummy loads, and the results were found as expected. An electron-beam diode was operated successfully, and [similar]18 kA of beam current was obtained at the diode voltage of [similar]1 MV.

  15. Low power pulsed MPD thruster system analysis and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.; Domonkos, Matthew; Gilland, James H.

    1993-01-01

    Pulsed magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster systems were analyzed for application to solar-electric orbit transfer vehicles at power levels ranging from 10 to 40 kW. Potential system level benefits of pulsed propulsion technology include ease of power scaling without thruster performance changes, improved transportability from low power flight experiments to operational systems, and reduced ground qualification costs. Required pulsed propulsion system components include a pulsed applied-field MPD thruster, a pulse-forming network, a charge control unit, a cathode heater supply, and high speed valves. Mass estimates were obtained for each propulsion subsystem and spacecraft component using off-the-shelf technology whenever possible. Results indicate that for payloads of 1000 and 2000 kg pulsed MPD thrusters can reduce launch mass by between 1000 and 2500 kg over those achievable with hydrogen arcjets, which can be used to reduce launch vehicle class and the associated launch cost. While the achievable mass savings depends on the trip time allowed for the mission, cases are shown in which the launch vehicle required for a mission is decreased from an Atlas IIAS to an Atlas I or Delta 7920.

  16. Adaptive pulse width control and sampling for low power pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Gubbi, Sagar Venkatesh; Amrutur, Bharadwaj

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing of physiological parameters could be a cost effective approach to improving health care, and low-power sensors are essential for remote sensing because these sensors are often energy constrained. This paper presents a power optimized photoplethysmographic sensor interface to sense arterial oxygen saturation, a technique to dynamically trade off SNR for power during sensor operation, and a simple algorithm to choose when to acquire samples in photoplethysmography. A prototype of the proposed pulse oximeter built using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components is tested on 10 adults. The dynamic adaptation techniques described reduce power consumption considerably compared to our reference implementation, and our approach is competitive to state-of-the-art implementations. The techniques presented in this paper may be applied to low-power sensor interface designs where acquiring samples is expensive in terms of power as epitomized by pulse oximetry.

  17. Lithium/cobalt sulfide pulse power battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiger, Harvey N.

    The author describes a bipolar battery having a Li alloy anode, CoS2 cathode material, and electrolyte of mixed Li halides. The system is semi-dry because the amount of electrolyte is limited. Fundamental investigations to determine operating voltage limits, active material utilizations, capacity ratios, states of charge, and capacity reserves need to be determined in semi-dry conditions to be unequivocal. This requirement precludes a reference electrode and, instead, the function of a counter-electrode and reference electrodes were combined. The author describes methods and shows comparisons with literature voltammetry data and use of galvanostatic procedures. The results obtained with several Li alloys and with CoS2 electrodes are discussed along with application of these electrochemical design of pulse batteries.

  18. Low-pump-power, low-phase-noise, and microwave to millimeter-wave repetition rate operation in microcombs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Lee, Hansuek; Chen, Tong; Vahala, Kerry J

    2012-12-07

    Microresonator-based frequency combs (microcombs or Kerr combs) can potentially miniaturize the numerous applications of conventional frequency combs. A priority is the realization of broadband (ideally octave spanning) spectra at detectable repetition rates for comb self-referencing. However, access to these rates involves pumping larger mode volumes and hence higher threshold powers. Moreover, threshold power sets both the scale for power per comb tooth and also the optical pump. Along these lines, it is shown that a class of resonators having surface-loss-limited Q factors can operate over a wide range of repetition rates with minimal variation in threshold power. A new, surface-loss-limited resonator illustrates the idea. Comb generation on mode spacings ranging from 2.6 to 220 GHz with overall low threshold power (as low as 1 mW) is demonstrated. A record number of comb lines for a microcomb (around 1900) is also observed with pump power of 200 mW. The ability to engineer a wide range of repetition rates with these devices is also used to investigate a recently observed mechanism in microcombs associated with dispersion of subcomb offset frequencies. We observe high-coherence phase locking in cases where these offset frequencies are small enough so as to be tuned into coincidence. In these cases, a record-low microcomb phase noise is reported at a level comparable to an open-loop, high-performance microwave oscillator.

  19. Evaluation of Light-Triggered Thyristors for Pulsed Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Fulkerson, E S; Goerz, D A; Speer, R D

    2008-05-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has many needs for high reliability, high peak current, high di/dt switches. Solid-state switch technology offers the demonstrated advantage of reliability under a variety of conditions. Light-triggered switches operate with a reduced susceptibility to electromagnetic interference commonly found within pulsed power environments. Despite the advantages, commercially available solid-state switches are not typically designed for the often extreme pulsed power requirements. Testing was performed to bound the limits of devices for pulsed power applications beyond the manufacturers specified ratings. To test the applicability of recent commercial light-triggered solid-state designs, an adjustable high current switch test stand was assembled. Results from testing and subsequent selected implementations are presented.

  20. Exploring new frontiers in the pulsed power laboratory: Recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamenko, S.; Esaulov, A.; Ulmen, B.; Novikov, V.; Ponomarev, S.; Adamenko, A.; Artyuh, V.; Gurin, A.; Prokopenko, V.; Kolomiyets, V.; Belous, V.; Kim, K.-J.; Miley, G.; Bassuney, A.; Novikov, D.

    One of the most fundamental processes in the Universe, nucleosynthesis of elements drives energy production in stars as well as the creation of all atoms heavier than hydrogen. To harness this process and open new ways for energy production, we must recreate some of the extreme conditions in which it occurs. We present results of experiments using a pulsed power facility to induce collective nuclear interactions producing stable nuclei of virtually every element in the periodic table. A high-power electron beam pulse striking a small metallic target is used to create the extreme dynamic environment. Material analysis studies detect an anomalously high presence of new chemical elements in the remnants of the exploded target supporting theoretical conjectures of the experiment. These results provide strong motivation to continue our research looking for additional proofs that heavy element nucleosynthesis is possible in pulsed power laboratory.

  1. The VELOCE pulsed power generator for isentropic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ao, Tommy; Asay, James Russell; Chantrenne, Sophie J.; Hickman, Randall John; Willis, Michael David; Shay, Andrew W.; Grine-Jones, Suzi A.; Hall, Clint Allen; Baer, Melvin R.

    2007-12-01

    Veloce is a medium-voltage, high-current, compact pulsed power generator developed for isentropic and shock compression experiments. Because of its increased availability and ease of operation, Veloce is well suited for studying isentropic compression experiments (ICE) in much greater detail than previously allowed with larger pulsed power machines such as the Z accelerator. Since the compact pulsed power technology used for dynamic material experiments has not been previously used, it is necessary to examine several key issues to ensure that accurate results are obtained. In the present experiments, issues such as panel and sample preparation, uniformity of loading, and edge effects were extensively examined. In addition, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the ALEGRA code were performed to interpret the experimental results and to design improved sample/panel configurations. Examples of recent ICE studies on aluminum are presented.

  2. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  3. Pulsed power requirements for the Sandia recirculating electron beam linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, W.K.; Shope, S.L.; Hasti, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Compact, high gradient, linear induction accelerators may be achieved by recirculating the electron beam in phase with a repeating accelerating voltage. A two-cavity recirculating accelerator has been designed and operated in a single-pass mode. The prototype accelerator uses a 2.5-MV, 20-kA, 25-ns duration injector and an accelerating cavity that will produce a total accelerating voltage of 5.3 MV for four passes. The design of this machine involved key areas of development in pulsed power, specifically, low-jitter spark gaps and vacuum-liquid interfaces for bipolar electric fields. The extension of this technology to multiple-pulse machines will require advances in liquid dielectric breakdown strength and switch surface flashover, as well as additional improvements in lower inductance switching and vacuum-liquid interface flashover. This paper will discuss the recirculation concept, pulsed-power design parameters, machine scaling relationships that are valid for state-of-the-art and near-term pulsed-power parameters, and summarize the pulsed-power and beam transport experiments.

  4. Investigation of Input Signal Curve Effect on Formed Pulse of Hydraulic-Powered Pulse Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoseltseva, M. V.; Masson, I. A.; Pashkov, E. N.

    2016-04-01

    Well drilling machines should have as high efficiency factor as it is possible. This work proposes factors that are affected by change of input signal pulse curve. A series of runs are conducted on mathematical model of hydraulic-powered pulse machine. From this experiment, interrelations between input pulse curve and construction parameters are found. Results of conducted experiment are obtained with the help of the mathematical model, which is created in Simulink Matlab. Keywords - mathematical modelling; impact machine; output signal amplitude; input signal curve.

  5. [Dependence of anti-inflammatory effects of high peak-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequency on exposure parameters].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Mikhaĭlik, E N; Rubanik, A V; Cheremis, N K

    2007-01-01

    A pronounced anti-inflammatory effect of high peak-power pulsed electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequency was shown for the first time in a model of zymosan-induced footpad edema in mice. Exposure to radiation of specific parameters (35, 27 GHz, peak power 20 kW, pulse widths 400-600 ns, pulse repetition frequency 5-500 Hz) decreased the exudative edema and local hyperthermia by 20% compared to the control. The kinetics and the magnitude of the anti-inflammatory effect were comparable with those induced by sodium diclofenac at a dose of 3 mg/kg. It was found that the anti-inflammatory effect linearly increased with increasing pulse width at a fixed pulse repetition frequency and had threshold dependence on the average incident power density of the radiation at a fixed pulse width. When animals were whole-body exposed in the far-field zone of radiator, the optimal exposure duration was 20 min. Increasing the average incident power density upon local exposure of the inflamed paw accelerated both the development of the anti-inflammatory effect and the reactivation time. The results obtained will undoubtedly be of great importance in the hygienic standardization of pulsed electromagnetic radiation and in further studies of the mechanisms of its biological action.

  6. Pulsed operation of low-power plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugrova, A. I.; Desyatskov, A. V.; Korobkin, Yu. V.; Lipatov, A. S.; Kharchevnikov, V. K.

    2010-10-01

    Integral and local characteristics of the laboratory model of a low-power plasma thruster operating in a pulsed regime have been experimentally studied. Rectangular pulses of discharge current with the leading and trailing fronts not exceeding 1 ms have been obtained. At an average supplied electric power of ˜150 W, the propulsion efficiency amounted to 35%. The plasma concentration, electron temperature, and potential distributions in the output plasma jet have been measured using an electric probe. These measurements showed that a well formed plasma jet with a small divergence angle exists behind the thruster edge.

  7. Pulsed power -- Research and technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-31

    Over the past 15 years, steady and sometimes exciting progress has been made in the hybrid technology called Pulsed Power. Based on both electrical engineering and physics, pulsed power involves the generation, modification, and use of electrical pulses up to the multitrillion-watt and multimillion-volt ranges. The final product of these powerful pulses can take diverse forms--hypervelocity projectiles or imploding liners, energetic and intense particle beams, X-ray and gamma-ray pulses, laser light beams that cover the spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared, or powerful microwave bursts. At first, the needs of specific applications largely shaped research and technology in this field. New the authors are beginning to see the reverse--new applications arising from technical capabilities that until recently were though impossible. Compressing and heating microscopic quantities of matter until they reach ultra-high energy density represents one boundary of their scientific exploration. The other boundary might be a defensive weapon that can project vast amounts of highly directed energy over long distances. Other applications of the technology may range from the use of electron beams to sterilize sewage, to laboratory simulation of radiation effects on electronics, to electromagnetic launchings of projectiles into earth or into solar orbits. Eventually the authors hope to use pulsed power to produce an inexhaustible supply of energy by means of inertial confinement fusion (ICF)--a technique for heating and containing deuterium-tritium fuel through compression. Topics covered here are: (1) inertial confinement fusion; (2) simulation technology; (3) development of new technology; and (4) application to directed energy technologies.

  8. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  9. Airborne/Spaceborne Pulsed Power Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    along the surfaces of such insulators or interfaces (referred to as surface flashover ) no matter what medium the 0 39 0 DIELECTRIC CONSTANT 90 W 80 70...0 45 S insulator may be in. For the gas side of the insulators of the PFN, the gas pressure can be increased to prevent surface flashover (Refs. 19...Power Conf., Arlington, VA, p. 339, 1985. 19. Laghari, J. R., and A. H. Qureshi, " Surface Flashover of Spacers in Compressed Gas Insulated Systems," IEEE

  10. High pulse power rf sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1983-09-01

    RF sources with high peak power output and relatively short pulse lengths will be required for future high gradient e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The required peak power and pulse length depend on the operating frequency, energy gradient and geometry of the collider linac structure. The frequency and gradient are in turn constrained by various parameters which depend on the beam-beam collision dynamics, and on the total ac wall-plug power that has been committed to the linac rf system. Various rf sources which might meet these requirements are reviewed. Existing source types (e.g., klystrons, gyrotrons) and sources which show future promise based on experimental prototypes are first considered. Finally, several proposals for high peak power rf sources based on unconventional concepts are discussed. These are an FEL source (two beam accelerator), rf energy storage cavities with switching, and a photocathode device which produces an rf current by direct emission modulation of the cathode.

  11. Environmental and industrial applications of pulsed power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neau, E.L.

    1993-10-01

    The technology base formed by the development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, free electron lasers (FEL`s), and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) drivers from the early 60`s through the late 80`s is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of performing new roles in environmental cleanup applications and in supporting new types of industrial manufacturing processes. Some of these processes will require very high average beam power levels of hundreds of kilowatts to perhaps megawatts. In this paper we briefly discuss new technology capabilities and then concentrate on specific application areas that may benefit from the high specific energies and high average powers attainable with short-pulse machines.

  12. Technology and engineering aspects of high power pulsed single longitudinal mode dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, V. S.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L. M.

    2015-09-01

    Tunable single mode pulsed dye lasers are capable of generating optical radiations in the visible range having very small bandwidths (transform limited), high average power (a few kW) at a high pulse repetition rate (a few tens of kHz), small beam divergence and relatively higher efficiencies. These dye lasers are generally utilized laser dyes dissolved in solvents such as water, heavy water, ethanol, methanol, etc. to provide a rapidly flowing gain medium. The dye laser is a versatile tool, which can lase either in the continuous wave (CW) or in the pulsed mode with pulse duration as small as a few tens of femtoseconds. In this review, we have examined the several cavity designs, various types of gain mediums and numerous types of dye cell geometries for obtaining the single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser. Different types of cavity configuration, such as very short cavity, short cavity with frequency selective element and relatively longer cavity with multiple frequency selective elements were reviewed. These single mode lasers have been pumped by all kinds of pumping sources such as flash lamps, Excimer, Nitrogen, Ruby, Nd:YAG, Copper Bromide and Copper Vapor Lasers. The single mode dye lasers are either pumped transversely or longitudinally to the resonator axis. The pulse repletion rate of these pump lasers were ranging from a few Hz to a few tens of kHz. Physics technology and engineering aspects of tuning mechanism, mode hop free scanning and dye cell designs are also presented in this review. Tuning of a single mode dye laser with a resolution of a few MHz per step is a technologically challenging task, which is discussed here.

  13. Warm dense mater: another application for pulsed power hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics (PPH) is an application of low-impedance pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology to the study of advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties. PPH can potentially be applied to the study of the properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties of warm dense matter such as equation of state, viscosity, conductivity is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to slightly above solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Conditions characteristic of WDM are difficult to obtain, and even more difficult to diagnose. One approach to producing WDM uses laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers are applying these techniques. Pulsed power hydrodynamic techniques, such as large convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through multiple shock compression and heating of normal density material between a massive, high density, energetic liner and a high density central 'anvil' are possible ways to reach relevant conditions. Another avenue to WDM conditions is through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. In this paper we will examine the challenges to pulsed power technology and to pulsed power systems presented by the opportunity to explore this interesting region of parameter space.

  14. POWER RECYCLING OF BURST-MODE LASER PULSES FOR LASER PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    A number of laser-particle interaction experiments such as the laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping or X-/ -ray generations via inverse-Compton scattering involve light sources operating in a burst mode to match the tem-poral structure of the particle beam. To mitigate the laser power challenge, it is important to make the interaction inside an optical cavity to recycle the laser power. In many cases, conventional cavity locking techniques will not work since the burst normally has a very small duty factor and low repetition rate and it is impossible to gen-erate an effective control signal. This work reports on the development of a doubly-resonant optical cavity scheme and its locking techniques that enables a simultaneous resonance of two laser beams with different spectra and/or temporal structures. We demonstrate that such a cavity can be used to recycle burst-mode ultra-violet laser pulses with arbitrary burst lengths and repetition rates.

  15. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    SciTech Connect

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that {approx}10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit {approx}1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm{sup 3}), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described.

  16. Plasma regimes in high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Los Arcos, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    High Power Pulsed Magnetron Sputtering (HPPMS) is a relatively recent variation of magnetron sputtering where high power is applied to the magnetron in short pulses. The result is the formation of dense transient plasmas with a high fraction of ionized species, ideally leading to better control of film growth through substrate bias. However, the broad range of experimental conditions accessible in pulsed discharges results in bewildering variations in current and voltage pulse shapes, pulse power densities, etc, which represent different discharge behaviors, making it difficult to identify relevant deposition conditions. The complexity of the plasma dynamics is evident. Within each pulse, plasma characteristics such as plasma composition, density, gas rarefaction, spatial distribution, degree of self-sputtering, etc. vary with time. A recent development has been the discovery that the plasma emission can self-organize into well-defined regions of high and low plasma emissivity above the racetrack (spokes), which rotate in the direction given by the E ×B drift and that significantly influence the transport mechanisms in HPPMS. One seemingly universal characteristic of HPPMS plasmas is the existence of well defined plasma regimes for different power ranges. These regimes are clearly differentiated in terms of plasma conductivity, plasma composition and spatial plasma self-organization. We will discuss the global characteristics of these regimes in terms of current-voltage characteristics, energy-resolved QMS and OES analysis, and fast imaging. In particular we will discuss how the reorganization of the plasma emission into spokes is associated only to specific regimes of high plasma conductivity. We will also briefly discuss the role of the target in shaping the characteristics of the HPPMS plasma, since sputtering is a surface-driven process. This work was supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) within the framework of the SFB-TR87.

  17. Frequency-Domain Methods for Characterization of Pulsed Power Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    White, A D; Anderson, R A; Ferriera, T J; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    This paper discusses methods of frequency-domain characterization of pulsed power sensors using vector network analyzer and spectrum analyzer techniques that offer significant simplification over time-domain methods, while mitigating or minimizing the effect of the difficulties present in time domain characterization. These methods are applicable to characterization of a wide variety of sensors.

  18. Review of Literature on High Power Microwave Pulse Biological Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    AFRL-RH-BR-TR-2009-0068 Review of Literature on High Power Microwave Pulse Biological Effects Ronald L. Seaman General...2009 Air Force Research Laboratory 711 Human Performance Wing Human Effectiveness Directorate Directed Energy Bioeffects...Performance Wing Human Effectiveness Directorate This report is published in the interest of scientific and technical information exchange

  19. General Atomics Pulsed Power Capacitor Comparison Test Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Comparison Test Report by Richard L Thomas Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL Approved for public release...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE General Atomics Pulsed Power Capacitor Comparison Test Report 5a. CONTRACT

  20. Magnetically insulated electron flows in pulsed power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawconnell, Robert I.

    1989-08-01

    Magnetic insulation is crucial in the operation of large pulsed power systems. Particular attention will be paid to describing magnetic insulation in realistic pulsed power systems. A theoretical model is developed that allows the production of self consistent magnetically insulated laminar flows in perturbed cylindrical systems given only the electron density profile. The theory is checked and justified by detailed comparisons with results from a 2-dimensional electromagnetic code, MASK. The procedure followed in the theoretical development is to use the relativistic Vlasov equation, Ampere's law and Gauss' law, to obtain a relation between the density profile and the velocity profile for insulated flows. Given the density profile and the corresponding derived velocity profile, a self consistent flow solution is obtained by means of Maxwell's equations. It is checked by taking a special case (corresponding to no perturbations) which results in the well known Brillouin flow theory. Emphasis is placed on determining the magnetic insulation threshold of a pulsed power system employing a plasma erosion opening switch. The procedure employed in the computational study is to vary critical aspects of the pulsed power system and then note whether magnetic insulation breaks down. The point at which magnetic insulation breaks down (as a function of geometry, load impedance, and applied voltage) is the magnetic insulation threshold for the system.

  1. Low duty-cycle pulsed power actuation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merryman, Stephen A.; Owens, W. Todd

    1995-01-01

    Electrical actuator systems are being pursued as alternatives to hydraulic systems to reduce maintenance time, weight, and costs while increasing reliability. Additionally, safety and environmental hazards associated with the hydraulic fluids can be eliminated. For most actuation systems, the actuation process is typically pulsed with high peak power requirements but with relatively modest average power levels. For example, the peak power requirements for the shuttle solid rocket booster actuators are approximately 40 kW for one or two seconds, but the average power over the 130 second burn time is on the order of 7 kW. The power-time requirements for electrical actuators are characteristic of pulsed power technologies where the source can be sized for the average power levels while providing the capability to achieve the peak requirements. Among the options for the power source are battery systems, capacitor systems or battery-capacitor hybrid systems. Battery technologies are energy dense but deficient in power density; capacitor technologies are power dense but limited by energy density. The battery-capacitor hybrid system uses the battery to supply the average power and the capacitor to meet the peak demands. In this research effort, Chemical Double Layer (CDL) capacitor technology is being applied in the design and development of power sources for electrical actuators. CDL capacitors have many properties that make them well-suited for actuator applications. They have the highest demonstrated energy density for capacitive storage (about a factor of 5-10 less than NiCd batteries), have power densities 50 times greater than NiCd batteries, are capable of 500,000 charge-discharge cycles, can be charged at extremely high rates, and have non-explosive failure modes. Thus, CDL capacitors exhibit a combination of desirable battery and capacitor characteristics. Specifically, electrode technology patented by Auburn University is being used in the development of CDL

  2. Process optimization in high-average-power ultrashort pulse laser microfabrication: how laser process parameters influence efficiency, throughput and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Loeschner, Udo

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser processing of technical grade stainless steel and copper using high-average-power ultrashort pulse lasers is studied in order to gain deeper insight into material removal for microfabrication. A high-pulse repetition frequency picosecond and femtosecond laser is used in conjunction with high-performance galvanometer scanners and an in-house developed two-axis polygon scanner system. By varying the processing parameters such as wavelength, pulse length, fluence and repetition rate, cavities of standardized geometry are fabricated and analyzed. From the depths of the cavities produced, the ablation rate and removal efficiency are estimated. In addition, the quality of the cavities is evaluated by means of scanning electron microscope micrographs or rather surface roughness measurements. From the results obtained, the influence of the machining parameters on material removal and machining quality is discussed. In addition, it is shown that both material removal rate and quality increase by using femtosecond compared to picosecond laser pulses. On stainless steel, a maximum throughput of 6.81 mm3/min is achieved with 32 W femtosecond laser powers; if using 187 W picosecond laser powers, the maximum is 15.04 mm3/min, respectively. On copper, the maximum throughputs are 6.1 mm3/min and 21.4 mm3/min, obtained with 32 W femtosecond and 187 W picosecond laser powers. The findings indicate that ultrashort pulses in the mid-fluence regime yield most efficient material removal. In conclusion, from the results of this analysis, a range of optimum processing parameters are derived feasible to enhance machining efficiency, throughput and quality in high-rate micromachining. The work carried out here clearly opens the way to significant industrial applications.

  3. Acousto-optical imaging using a powerful long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2008-06-01

    Acousto-optical imaging is an emerging biodiagnostic technique which provides an optical spectroscopic signature and a spatial localization of an optically absorbing target embedded in a strongly scattering medium. The transverse resolution of the technique is determined by the lateral extent of ultrasound beam focal zone while the axial resolution is obtained by using short ultrasound pulses. Although very promising for medical diagnostic, the practical application of this technique is presently limited by its poor sensitivity. Moreover, any method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio must obviously satisfy the in vivo safety limits regarding the acceptable power level of both the ultrasonic pressure wave and the laser beam. In this paper, we propose to improve the sensitivity by using a pulsed single-frequency laser source to raise the optical peak power applied to the scattering medium and to collect more ultrasonically tagged photons. Such a laser source also allows illuminating the tissues mainly during the transit time of the ultrasonic wave to maintain the average optical power below the maximum permissible exposure. In our experiment, a single-frequency Nd:YAG laser emitting 500-μs pulses with a peak power superior to 100 W was used. Photons were tagged in few-cm thick optical phantoms with tone bursts generated by an ultrasonic transducer. Tagged photons were detected with a GaAs photorefractive interferometer characterized by a large optical etendue to process simultaneously a large number of speckle grains. When pumped by high intensity laser pulses, such an interferometer also provides the fast response time essential to obtain an apparatus insensitive to the speckle decorrelation due to mechanical vibrations or tissues movements. The use of a powerful long pulse laser appears promising to enhance the signal level in ultrasound modulated optical imaging. When combined with a photorefractive interferometer of large optical etendue, such a source could

  4. Power enhancement of burst-mode UV pulses using a doubly-resonant optical cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Rahkman, Abdurahim; Notcutt, Mark; Liu, Yun

    2015-11-24

    We report a doubly-resonant enhancement cavity (DREC) that can realize a simultaneous enhancement of two incoming laser beams at different wavelengths and different temporal structures. The double-resonance condition is theoretically analyzed and different DREC locking methods are experimentally investigated. Simultaneous locking of a Fabry-Perot cavity to both an infrared (IR, 1064 nm) and its frequency tripled ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) pulses has been demonstrated by controlling the frequency difference between the two beams with a fiber optic frequency shifter. The DREC technique opens a new paradigm in the applications of optical cavities to power enhancement of burst-mode lasers with arbitrarymore » macropulse width and repetition rate.« less

  5. Pulsed power corona discharges for air pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Smulders, E.H.W.M.; Heesch, B.E.J.M. van; Paasen, S.S.V.B. van

    1998-10-01

    Successful introduction of pulsed corona for industrial purposes very much depends on the reliability of high-voltage and pulsed power technology and on the efficiency of energy transfer. In addition, it is of the utmost importance that adequate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is achieved between the high-voltage pulse source and the surrounding equipment. Pulsed corona is generated in a pilot unit that produces narrow 50 MW pulses at 1000 pps (net average corona power 1.5 kW). The pilot unit can run continuously for use in industrial applications such as cleaning of gases (100 m{sup 3}/h) containing NO or volatile organic compounds (VOC`s) or fluids (e.g., waste water). Simultaneous removal of NO and ethylene to obtain clean CO{sub 2} from the exhaust of a combustion engine was tested at an industrial site. Various chemical processes, such as removal of toluene or styrene from an airflow are tested in the laboratory. The authors developed a model to analyze the conversion of these pollutants. To examine the discharges in the reactor they use current, voltage, and E-field sensors as well as a fast charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Detailed energy input measurements are compared with CCD movies to investigate the efficiency of different streamer phases. EMC techniques incorporated in the pilot unit are based on the successful concept of constructing a low transfer impedance between common mode currents induced by pulsed power and differential mode voltages in signal lines and external main lines.

  6. Design and testing of a 320 MW pulsed power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Schillig, J.B.; Boenig, H.J.; Ferner, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    For a 60 Tesla, 100 millisecond long pulse magnet five 64 MW (87.6 MVA) power converter modules have been installed. Each module provides a no-load voltage of 4.18 kV and a full load voltage of 3.20 kV at the rated current of 20 kA. The modules are connected to a 1,430 MVA/650 MJ inertial energy storage generator set, which is operated at 21 kV and frequencies between 60 and 42 Hz. They are designed to provide the rated power output for 2 seconds once every hour. Each module consists of two 21 kV/3.1 kV cast coil transformers and two 6-pulse rectifiers connected in parallel without an interphase reactor, forming a 12-pulse converter module. As far as possible standard high power industrial converter components were used, operated closer to their allowable limits. The converters are controlled by three programmable high speed controllers. In this paper the design of the pulsed converters, including control and special considerations for protection schemes with the converters supplying a mutually coupled magnet system, is detailed. Test results of the converters driving an ohmic-inductive load for 2 seconds at 20 kA and 3.2 kV are presented.

  7. New Pulsed Power Technology for High Current Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-06-27

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  8. Front end for high-repetition rate thin disk-pumped OPCPA beamline at ELI-beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jonathan T.; Novák, Jakub; Antipenkov, Roman; Batysta, František; Zervos, Charalampos; Naylon, Jack A.; Mazanec, TomáÅ.¡; Horáček, Martin; Bakule, Pavel; Rus, Bedřich

    2015-02-01

    The ELI-Beamlines facility, currently under construction in Prague, Czech Republic, will house multiple high power laser systems with varying pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates. Here we present the status of a high repetition rate beamline currently under construction with target parameters of 20 fs pulse duration, 100 mJ pulse energy, and 1 kHz repetition rate. Specifically we present the Yb:YAG thin disk lasers which are intended to pump picosecond OPCPA, synchronization between pump and signal pulses in the OPCPA, and the first stages of OPCPA.

  9. Effects of picosecond terawatt UV laser beam filamentation and a repetitive pulse train on creation of prolonged plasma channels in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.

    2013-08-01

    Amplitude-modulated UV laser pulse of up to 30 J energy was produced at hybrid Ti:Sapphire/KrF GARPUN-MTW laser facility when a preliminary amplified train of short pulses was injected into unstable resonator cavity of the main e-beam-pumped KrF amplifier. The combined radiation consisted of regeneratively amplified picosecond pulses with subTW peak power overlapped with 100-ns pulse of a free-running lasing. The advantages of combined radiation for production of long-lived prolonged plasma channels in air and HV discharge triggering were demonstrated: photocurrent sustained by modulated pulse is two orders of magnitude higher and HV breakdown distance is twice longer than for a smooth UV pulse. It was found that in contrast to IR radiation multiple filamentation of high-power UV laser beam does not produce extended nonlinear focusing of UV radiation.

  10. LISK-BROOM: Clearing near-Earth space debris in 4 years using a 20-kW, 530-nm repetitively pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.; Michaelis, M.M.

    1994-10-01

    When space debris forced a change of plan for a recent US Space Shuttle mission, it finally reached the point of broad awareness. Almost a million pieces of debris have been generated by 35 years of spaceflight, and now threaten some long-term space missions. This problem can best a be solved by causing space debris items to re-enter and burn up in the atmosphere on a computed trajectory. Illumination of the objects by a repetitively-pulsed laser will easily produce a laser-ablation jet providing the impulse to de-orbit the object. For reasons we will discuss, we propose the use of a ground-based laser system, atmospheric-turbulence compensating beam director, computer and high resolution detection system to solve this problem. A laser of just 2OkW average power and state-of-the-art detection capabilities could clear near-Earth space below 1100km altitude of all space debris larger than 1 cm but less massive than 100kg in about 4 years. The LISK-BROOM laser would be located near the Equator above 5km elevation [e.g., the Uhuru site on Kilimanjarol, minimizing turbulence correction and absorption of the 530-nm wavelength laser beam. LISK-BROOM is a special case of Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP), by which objects are propelled in space by the ablation jet due to a distant laser. We will also discuss active beam phase error correction during passage through the atmosphere and the object detection system which are necessary.

  11. Topics in high voltage pulsed power plasma devices and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao

    Pulsed power technology is one of the tools that is used by scientists and engineers nowadays to produce gas plasmas. The transient ultra high power is able to provide a huge pulse of energy which is sometimes greater than the ionization energy of the gas, and therefore separates the ions and electrons to form the plasma. Sometimes, the pulsed power components themselves are plasma devices. For example, the gas type switches can "turn on" the circuit by creating the plasma channel between the switch electrodes. Mini Back Lighted Thyratron, or as we call it, mini-BLT, is one of these gas type plasma switches. The development of the reduced size and weight "mini-BLT" is presented in this dissertation. Based on the operation characteristics testing of the mini-BLT, suggestions of optimizing the design of the switch are proposed. All the factors such as the geometry of the hollow electrodes and switch housing, the gas condition, the optical triggering source, etc. are necessary to consider when we design and operate the mini-BLT. By reducing the diameter of the cylindrical gas path between the electrodes in the BLT, a novel high density plasma source is developed, producing the plasma in the "squeezed" capillary. The pulsed power generator, of course, is inevitably used to provide the ionization energy for hydrogen gas sealed in the capillary. Plasma diagnostics are necessarily analyzed and presented in detail to properly complete and understand the capillary plasma. This high density plasma source (1019 cm-3) has the potential applications in the plasma wakefield accelerator. The resonant oscillation behavior of the particles in plasmas allows for dynamically generated accelerating electric fields that have orders of magnitude larger than those available in the conventional RF accelerators. Finally, the solid state switches are introduced as a comparison to the gas type switch. Pulsed power circuit topologies such as the Marx Bank, magnetic pulse compression and diode

  12. Ruthenium Oxide Electrochemical Super Capacitor Optimization for Pulse Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merryman, Stephen A.; Chen, Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Electrical actuator systems are being pursued as alternatives to hydraulic systems to reduce maintenance time, weight and costs while increasing reliability. Additionally, safety and environmental hazards associated with the hydraulic fluids can be eliminated. For most actuation systems, the actuation process is typically pulsed with high peak power requirements but with relatively modest average power levels. The power-time requirements for electrical actuators are characteristic of pulsed power technologies where the source can be sized for the average power levels while providing the capability to achieve the peak requirements. Among the options for the power source are battery systems, capacitor systems or battery-capacitor hybrid systems. Battery technologies are energy dense but deficient in power density; capacitor technologies are power dense but limited by energy density. The battery-capacitor hybrid system uses the battery to supply the average power and the capacitor to meet the peak demands. It has been demonstrated in previous work that the hybrid electrical power source can potentially provide a weight savings of approximately 59% over a battery-only source. Electrochemical capacitors have many properties that make them well-suited for electrical actuator applications. They have the highest demonstrated energy density for capacitive storage (up to 100 J/g), have power densities much greater than most battery technologies (greater than 30kW/kg), are capable of greater than one million charge-discharge cycles, can be charged at extremely high rates, and have non-explosive failure modes. Thus, electrochemical capacitors exhibit a combination of desirable battery and capacitor characteristics.

  13. High average/peak power linearly polarized all-fiber picosecond MOPA seeded by mode-locked noise-like pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. L.; Ma, P. F.; Tao, R. M.; Wang, X. L.; Zhou, P.; Chen, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of mode-locked noise-like pulses generated from a passively mode-locked fiber oscillator are experimentally investigated. By carefully adjusting the two polarization controllers, stable mode-locked noise-like pulse emission with a high radio frequency signal/noise ratio of  >55 dB is successfully achieved, ensuring the safety and possibility of high power amplification. To investigate the amplification characteristics of such pulses, one all-fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) is built to boost the power and energy of such pulses. Amplified noise-like pulses with average output power of 423 W, repetition rate of 18.71 MHz, pulse energy of 22.61 μJ, pulse duration of 72.1 ps and peak power of 314 kW are obtained. Near diffraction-limited beam is also demonstrated with M2 factor measured at full power operation of ~1.2 in the X and Y directions. The polarization extinction ratio at output power of 183 W is measured to be ~13 dB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of high-power amplification of noise-like pulses and the highest peak power ever reported in all-fiber picosecond MOPAs. The temporal self-compression process of such pulses and high peak power when amplified make it an ideal pump source for generation of high-power supercontinuum. Other potential applications, such as material processing and optical coherent tomography, could also be foreseen.

  14. INPIStron switched pulsed power for dense plasma pinches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1993-01-01

    The inverse plasma switch INPIStron was employed for 10kJ/40kV capacitor bank discharge system to produce focused dense plasmas in hypocycloidal-pinch (HCP) devices. A single unit and an array of multiple HCP's were coupled as the load of the pulsed power circuit. The geometry and switching plasma dynamics were found advantageous and convenient for commutating the large current pulse from the low impedance transmission line to the low impedance plasma load. The pulse power system with a single unit HCP, the system A, was used for production of high temperature plasma focus and its diagnostics. The radially running down plasma dynamics, revealed in image converter photographs, could be simulated by a simple snow-plow model with a correction for plasma resistivity. The system B with an array of 8-HCP units which forms a long coaxial discharge chamber was used for pumping a Ti-sapphire laser. The intense UV emission from the plasma was frequency shifted with dye-solution jacket to match the absorption band of the Ti crystal laser near 500 nm. An untuned laser pulse energy of 0.6 J/pulse was obtained for 6.4 kJ/40 kV discharge, or near 103 times of the explosion limit of conventional flash lamps. For both systems the advantages of the INPIStron were well demonstrated: a single unit is sufficient for a large current (greater than 50 kA) without increasing the system impedance, highly reliable and long life operation and implied scalability for the high power ranges above I(sub peak) = 1 MA and V(sub hold) = 100 kV.

  15. Design and development of repetitive capacitor charging power supply based on series-parallel resonant converter topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ankur; Nagesh, K. V.; Kolge, Tanmay; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2011-04-01

    LCL resonant converter based repetitive capacitor charging power supply (CCPS) is designed and developed in the division. The LCL converter acts as a constant current source when switching frequency is equal to the resonant frequency. When both resonant inductors' values of LCL converter are same, it results in inherent zero current switching (ZCS) in switches. In this paper, ac analysis with fundamental frequency approximation of LCL resonant tank circuit, frequency dependent of current gain converter followed by design, development, simulation, and practical result is described. Effect of change in switching frequency and resonant frequency and change in resonant inductors ratio on CCPS will be discussed. An efficient CCPS of average output power of 1.2 kJ/s, output voltage 3 kV, and 300 Hz repetition rate is developed in the division. The performance of this CCPS has been evaluated in the laboratory by charging several values of load capacitance at various repetition rates. These results indicate that this design is very feasible for use in capacitor-charging applications.

  16. Design and development of repetitive capacitor charging power supply based on series-parallel resonant converter topology.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankur; Nagesh, K V; Kolge, Tanmay; Chakravarthy, D P

    2011-04-01

    LCL resonant converter based repetitive capacitor charging power supply (CCPS) is designed and developed in the division. The LCL converter acts as a constant current source when switching frequency is equal to the resonant frequency. When both resonant inductors' values of LCL converter are same, it results in inherent zero current switching (ZCS) in switches. In this paper, ac analysis with fundamental frequency approximation of LCL resonant tank circuit, frequency dependent of current gain converter followed by design, development, simulation, and practical result is described. Effect of change in switching frequency and resonant frequency and change in resonant inductors ratio on CCPS will be discussed. An efficient CCPS of average output power of 1.2 kJ/s, output voltage 3 kV, and 300 Hz repetition rate is developed in the division. The performance of this CCPS has been evaluated in the laboratory by charging several values of load capacitance at various repetition rates. These results indicate that this design is very feasible for use in capacitor-charging applications.

  17. A 16 MJ compact pulsed power system for electromagnetic launch.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ling; Zhang, Qin; Zhong, Heqing; Lin, Fuchang; Li, Hua; Wang, Yan; Su, Cheng; Huang, Qinghua; Chen, Xu

    2015-07-01

    This paper has established a compact pulsed power system (PPS) of 16 MJ for electromagnetic rail gun. The PPS consists of pulsed forming network (PFN), chargers, monitoring system, and current junction. The PFN is composed of 156 pulse forming units (PFUs). Every PFU can be triggered simultaneously or sequentially in order to obtain different total current waveforms. The whole device except general control table is divided into two frameworks with size of 7.5 m × 2.2 m × 2.3 m. It is important to estimate the discharge current of PFU accurately for the design of the whole electromagnetic launch system. In this paper, the on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor have been researched to improve the estimation accuracy. The on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor are expressed as a logarithmic function based on experimental data. The circuit current waveform of the single PFU agrees with the simulating one. On the other hand, the coaxial discharge cable is a quick wear part in PFU because the discharge current will be up to dozens of kA even hundreds of kA. In this article, the electromagnetic field existing in the coaxial cable is calculated by finite element method. On basis of the calculation results, the structure of cable is optimized in order to improve the limit current value of the cable. At the end of the paper, the experiment current wave of the PPS with the load of rail gun is provided.

  18. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  19. A 16 MJ compact pulsed power system for electromagnetic launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ling; Zhang, Qin; Zhong, Heqing; Lin, Fuchang; Li, Hua; Wang, Yan; Su, Cheng; Huang, Qinghua; Chen, Xu

    2015-07-01

    This paper has established a compact pulsed power system (PPS) of 16 MJ for electromagnetic rail gun. The PPS consists of pulsed forming network (PFN), chargers, monitoring system, and current junction. The PFN is composed of 156 pulse forming units (PFUs). Every PFU can be triggered simultaneously or sequentially in order to obtain different total current waveforms. The whole device except general control table is divided into two frameworks with size of 7.5 m × 2.2 m × 2.3 m. It is important to estimate the discharge current of PFU accurately for the design of the whole electromagnetic launch system. In this paper, the on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor have been researched to improve the estimation accuracy. The on-state characteristics of pulse thyristor are expressed as a logarithmic function based on experimental data. The circuit current waveform of the single PFU agrees with the simulating one. On the other hand, the coaxial discharge cable is a quick wear part in PFU because the discharge current will be up to dozens of kA even hundreds of kA. In this article, the electromagnetic field existing in the coaxial cable is calculated by finite element method. On basis of the calculation results, the structure of cable is optimized in order to improve the limit current value of the cable. At the end of the paper, the experiment current wave of the PPS with the load of rail gun is provided.

  20. Nuclear electromagnetic pulse and the electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Legro, J.R.; Reed, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A single, high-altitude nuclear detonation over the continental United States can expose large geographic areas to transient, electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The initial electromagnetic fields produced by this event have been defined as high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP). Later-time, low frequency fields have been defined as magnetohydrodynamic-electromagnetic pulse (MHD-EMP). Nuclear detonations at, or near the surface of the earth can also produce transient EMP. These electromagnetic phenomena have been defined as source region electromagnetic pulse (SREMP). The Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has formulated and implemented a Program Plan to assess the possible effects of the above nuclear EMP on civilian electric power systems. This unclassified research effort is under the technical leadership of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper presents a brief perspective of EMP phenomenology and important interaction issues for power systems based on research performed by Westinghouse Advanced Systems Technology as a principal subcontractor in the research effort.

  1. A Large-Bandwidth, Cylindrical Offner Pulse Stretcher for a High-Average-Power, 15 Femtosecond Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Molander, W A; Bayramian, A J; Campbell, R; Cross, R R; Huete, G; Schenkel, N; Ebbers, C; Caird, J; Barty, C J; Siders, C W

    2008-09-24

    We have designed and built an all-reflective pulse stretcher based on an Offner telescope. It uses cylindrical optics to simplify alignment and reduce aberrations. The stretch is {approx}1x10{sup 5} with a bandwidth of 200 nm. The stretcher is to be part of a 10 Hz repetition rate, high-average-power, femtosecond laser. This new design compensates for dispersion in the laser by using gratings of different groove spacing in the stretcher and compressor and a spectral phase corrector plate, made by magneto-rheological finishing, within the stretcher.

  2. Final design of the control and auxiliary systems for the Balcones 60 MJ homopolar pulse power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildenbrand, D. J.; Pichot, M. A.; Price, J. H.

    1986-11-01

    Design criteria and features of a 60 MJ pulse power supply to be operated at the Center for Electromechanics at the University of Texas are described. The system is driven by six 10 MJ homopolar generators (HPG) which can be operated in series, in parallel, or in combination configurations. Component modularity, operational dependability, repetition rate, maintainability, drive train simplicity and failsafe operation criteria were met in the final design. The generators have removable brush assemblies and water cooled field coil assemblies and hydrostatic bearings. A block diagram is provided of the control I-O architecture and back-up systems and operational procedures are outlined.

  3. High power and short pulse RF-excited CO II laser MOPA system for LLP EUV light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Hideo; Miura, Taisuke; Endo, Akira

    2006-02-01

    Laser produced plasma EUV source is the candidate for high quality, 115 W EUV light source for the next generation lithography. Cost effective laser driver is the key requirement for the realization of the concept as a viable scheme. A CO II laser driven LPP system with a Xenon droplet target is therefore a promising light source alternative for EUV. We are developing a high power and high repetition rate CO II laser system to achieve 10 W intermediate focus EUV power. High conversion efficiency (CE) from the laser energy to EUV in-band energy is the primarily important issue for the concept to be realized. Numerical simulation analysis of a Xenon plasma target shows that a short laser pulse less than 15 ns is necessary to obtain a high CE by a CO II laser. This paper describes on the development of a CO II laser system with a short pulse length less than 15 ns, a nominal average power of a few kW, and a repetition rate of 100 kHz, based on RF-excited, axial flow CO II laser amplifiers. Output power of 1 kW has been achieved with a pulse length 15 ns at 100 kHz repletion rate in a small signal amplification condition with P(20) single line. The CO II laser system is reported on the conceptual design for a LPP EUV light source, and amplification performance in CW and short pulse using RF-excited axial flow lasers as amplifiers. Additional approach to increase the amplification efficiency is discussed.

  4. LED power reduction trade-offs for ambulatory pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Eduardo Aguilar; Villegas, Esther Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    The development of ambulatory arterial pulse oximetry is key to longer term monitoring and treatment of cardiovascular and respiratory conditions. The investigation presented in this paper will assist the designer of an ambulatory pulse oximetry monitor in minimizing the overall LED power consumption (P LED,TOT) levels by analyzing the lowest achievable limit as constrained by the optical components, circuitry implementation and final SpO2 reading accuracy required. LED duty cycle (D LED) reduction and light power (P LED,ON) minimization are proposed as methods to reduce P LED,TOT. Bandwidth and signal quality calculations are carried out in order to determine the required P LED,TOT as a function of the different noise sources.

  5. High-power sources with smoothly adjustable pulse duration for powering gas-discharge tubes of laser pumping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulenko, V. M.; Ivanov, L. P.; Ganshin, Y. A.; Karpyshev, I. L.; Korneyev, V. A.

    1985-10-01

    A series of power supplies for gas-discharge tubes in laser pumping systems has been developed on the basis of the same circuit but with different levels of partial discharge of the capacitive energy storing device. The charger converts the a.c. network voltage into a constant current, very efficiently and at the same charging rate regardless of the discharge level. An overall size and weight reduction is made possible by an intermediate frequency conversion from 50 Hz to 1 kHz, which also allows raising the repetition rate of output pulses. The charger consists of an inverter and a rectifier. The parallel-type inverter includes a thyristor-diode bridge with capacitors and a transformer, and a choke coil, for converting the sine-wave a.c. network voltage into a higher-frequency (1 kHz) square-wave alternating one after the first rectifying it. An important feature here is stiff overvoltage suppression, especially across the switching capacitors, during wide swings such as from no load to full load. The rectifier includes a 300/1000 V step-up transformer with another thyristor-diode bridge and a choke coil in series. A discharge commutator across the rectifier output shunted by a filter-capacitance ensures proper cutoff of the charge discharge current and corresponding control of the pulse duration.

  6. Terahertz metrology on power, frequency, spectroscopy, and pulse parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Ying, Cheng Ping; Wang, Heng Fei; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Hong Yuan; Jiang, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Terahertz metrology is becoming more and more important along with the fast development of terahertz technology. This paper reviews the research works of the groups from the physikalisch-technische bundesanstalt (PTB), National institute of standards and technology (NIST), National physical laboratory (NPL), National institute of metrology (NIM) and some other research institutes. The contents mainly focus on the metrology of parameters of power, frequency, spectrum and pulse. At the end of the paper, the prospect of terahertz metrology is predicted.

  7. Development of a linear piston-type pulse power electric generator for powering electric guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, Martin

    1993-01-01

    The development of a linear piston-type electric pulse-power generator capable of powering electric guns and EM (rail and coil) guns and ET guns, presently under development, is discussed. The pulse-power generator consists of a cylindrical armature pushed by gases from the combustion of fuel or propellant through an externally produced magnetic field. An arrangement of electrodes and connecting straps serves to extract current from the moving armature and to send it to an external load (the electric gun).

  8. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-12-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H&CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  9. Determination of modeling parameters for power IGBTs under pulsed power conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Van Gordon, Jim A; Kovaleski, Scott D

    2010-01-01

    While the power insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGRT) is used in many applications, it is not well characterized under pulsed power conditions. This makes the IGBT difficult to model for solid state pulsed power applications. The Oziemkiewicz implementation of the Hefner model is utilized to simulate IGBTs in some circuit simulation software packages. However, the seventeen parameters necessary for the Oziemkiewicz implementation must be known for the conditions under which the device will be operating. Using both experimental and simulated data with a least squares curve fitting technique, the parameters necessary to model a given IGBT can be determined. This paper presents two sets of these seventeen parameters that correspond to two different models of power IGBTs. Specifically, these parameters correspond to voltages up to 3.5 kV, currents up to 750 A, and pulse widths up to 10 {micro}s. Additionally, comparisons of the experimental and simulated data will be presented.

  10. Computer controlled MHD power consolidation and pulse generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.; Marcotte, K.; Donnelly, M.

    1990-01-01

    The major goal of this research project is to establish the feasibility of a power conversion technology which will permit the direct synthesis of computer programmable pulse power. Feasibility has been established in this project by demonstration of direct synthesis of commercial frequency power by means of computer control. The power input to the conversion system is assumed to be a Faraday connected MHD generator which may be viewed as a multi-terminal dc source and is simulated for the purpose of this demonstration by a set of dc power supplies. This consolidation/inversion (CI), process will be referred to subsequently as Pulse Amplitude Synthesis and Control (PASC). A secondary goal is to deliver a controller subsystem consisting of a computer, software, and computer interface board which can serve as one of the building blocks for a possible phase II prototype system. This report period work summarizes the accomplishments and covers the high points of the two year project. 6 refs., 41 figs.

  11. Investigation of a high power electromagnetic pulse source.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwei; Chen, Dongqun; Zhang, Jiande; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2012-09-01

    A high power electromagnetic pulse source with a resonant antenna driven by a compact power supply was investigated in this paper. To match the impedance of the resonant antenna and initial power source, a compact power conditioning circuit based on electro exploding opening switch (EEOS) and pulsed transformer was adopted. In the preliminary experiments, an impulse capacitor was used to drive the system. With the opening of the EEOS at the current of 15 kA flowing trough the primary of the transformer, the resonant antenna was rapidly charged to about -370 kV within a time of about 100 ns. When the switch in the resonant antenna closed at the charging voltage of about -202 kV, the peak intensity of the detected electric field at a distance of about 10 m from the center of the source was 7.2 kV∕m. The corresponding peak power of the radiated electromagnetic field reached 76 MW, while the total radiated electromagnetic energy was about 0.65 J. The total energy efficiency of the resonant antenna was about 22% which can be improved by increasing the closing rapidity of the switch in the antenna.

  12. Hybrid modulation driving power technology for pulsed laser fuze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, He

    2016-10-01

    According to the requirement of the long range detection of the circumferential detection system of the laser fuze, a hybrid modulated pulsed laser driving power supplying for APD avalanche photodiode is designed. The working principle of the laser circumferential detection system is analyzed, and the APD is selected as the photoelectric detector according to the measurement equation of the circumferential detection system. According to the different kinds of APD requirements for high voltage power supply, the principle of boost converter is analyzed. By using PWM and PFM hybrid modulation type power supply technology, PWM modulation is applied in low rising voltage. When the voltage is required to achieve more than 100V, PFM mode boost is chosen. Simulation of the output voltages which are 85V and 200V of the two modes respectively is made. The PCB circuit board is processed to verify the experiment. The experimental results show that the hybrid modulation pulse laser drive power supply can meet the requirements of all kinds of APD power supply. The circuit board can be used in the detection of laser fuze with different target distance, and has wide application prospect.

  13. Development of a stereo-symmetrical nanosecond pulsed power generator composed of modularized avalanche transistor Marx circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Zhong, Xu; Cao, Hui; Zhao, Zheng; Xue, Jing; Li, Tao; Li, Zheng; Wang, Ya-Nan

    2015-09-01

    Avalanche transistors have been widely studied and used in nanosecond high voltage pulse generations. However, output power improvement is always limited by the low thermal capacities of avalanche transistors, especially under high repetitive working frequency. Parallel stacked transistors can effectively improve the output current but the controlling of trigger and output synchronism has always been a hard and complex work. In this paper, a novel stereo-symmetrical nanosecond pulsed power generator with high reliability was developed. By analyzing and testing the special performances of the combined Marx circuits, numbers of meaningful conclusions on the pulse amplitude, pulse back edge, and output impedance were drawn. The combining synchronism of the generator was confirmed excellent and lower conducting current through the transistors was realized. Experimental results showed that, on a 50 Ω resistive load, pulses with 1.5-5.2 kV amplitude and 5.3-14.0 ns width could be flexibly generated by adjusting the number of combined modules, the supply voltage, and the module type.

  14. Development of a stereo-symmetrical nanosecond pulsed power generator composed of modularized avalanche transistor Marx circuits.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-Tao; Zhong, Xu; Cao, Hui; Zhao, Zheng; Xue, Jing; Li, Tao; Li, Zheng; Wang, Ya-Nan

    2015-09-01

    Avalanche transistors have been widely studied and used in nanosecond high voltage pulse generations. However, output power improvement is always limited by the low thermal capacities of avalanche transistors, especially under high repetitive working frequency. Parallel stacked transistors can effectively improve the output current but the controlling of trigger and output synchronism has always been a hard and complex work. In this paper, a novel stereo-symmetrical nanosecond pulsed power generator with high reliability was developed. By analyzing and testing the special performances of the combined Marx circuits, numbers of meaningful conclusions on the pulse amplitude, pulse back edge, and output impedance were drawn. The combining synchronism of the generator was confirmed excellent and lower conducting current through the transistors was realized. Experimental results showed that, on a 50 Ω resistive load, pulses with 1.5-5.2 kV amplitude and 5.3-14.0 ns width could be flexibly generated by adjusting the number of combined modules, the supply voltage, and the module type.

  15. Pulse bursts with a controllable number of pulses from a mode-locked Yb-doped all fiber laser system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shumin; Hao, Yanping; Yang, Zhenjun

    2014-03-24

    Pulse bursts with a controllable number of pulses per burst have been produced directly from a mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser for the first time. Each output burst contained numerous pulses with a high pulse repetition rate of 29.4 MHz. The duration of a single pulse was 680 ps. The pulse burst had a repetition rate of 251.6 kHz. The pulse burst could easily be further amplified to a total pulse burst energy of ~795 nJ, corresponding to a total average power of 200 mW.

  16. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges in overhead power lines. Part I. Fast pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ramrus, A.

    1986-02-01

    Objective of the study was to create conceptual designs of high voltage pulsers capable of simulating two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) caused by a high-altitude nuclear burst; the slow rise time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD-EMP) and the fast rise time high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The pulser design was directed towards facilities capable of performing EMP vulnerability testing of components used in the national electric power system.

  17. High (1 GHz) repetition rate compact femtosecond laser: A powerful multiphoton tool for nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, A.; Riemann, I.; Martin, S.; Le Harzic, R.; Bartels, A.; Janke, C.; König, K.

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton tomography of human skin and nanosurgery of human chromosomes have been performed with a 1GHz repetition rate laser by the use of the commercially available femtosecond multiphoton laser tomograph DermaInspect as well as a compact galvoscanning microscope. We performed the autofluorescence tomography up to 100μm in the depth of human skin. Submicron cutting lines and hole drillings have been conducted on labeled human chromosomes.

  18. High-throughput machining using a high-average power ultrashort pulse laser and high-speed polygon scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schille, Joerg; Schneider, Lutz; Streek, André; Kloetzer, Sascha; Loeschner, Udo

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput ultrashort pulse laser machining is investigated on various industrial grade metals (aluminum, copper, and stainless steel) and Al2O3 ceramic at unprecedented processing speeds. This is achieved by using a high-average power picosecond laser in conjunction with a unique, in-house developed polygon mirror-based biaxial scanning system. Therefore, different concepts of polygon scanners are engineered and tested to find the best architecture for high-speed and precision laser beam scanning. In order to identify the optimum conditions for efficient processing when using high-average laser powers, the depths of cavities made in the samples by varying the processing parameter settings are analyzed and, from the results obtained, the characteristic removal values are specified. For overlapping pulses of optimum fluence, the removal rate is as high as 27.8 mm3/min for aluminum, 21.4 mm3/min for copper, 15.3 mm3/min for stainless steel, and 129.1 mm3/min for Al2O3, when a laser beam of 187 W average laser powers irradiates. On stainless steel, it is demonstrated that the removal rate increases to 23.3 mm3/min when the laser beam is very fast moving. This is thanks to the low pulse overlap as achieved with 800 m/s beam deflection speed; thus, laser beam shielding can be avoided even when irradiating high-repetitive 20-MHz pulses.

  19. Effects of repetitive pulsing on multi-kHz planar laser-induced incandescence imaging in laminar and turbulent flames

    DOE PAGES

    Michael, James B.; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Shaddix, Christopher R.; ...

    2015-04-08

    Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) imaging is reported at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using a burst-mode laser system to enable studies of soot formation dynamics in highly turbulent flames. Furthermore, to quantify the accuracy and uncertainty of relative soot volume fraction measurements, the temporal evolution of the LII field in laminar and turbulent flames is examined at various laser operating conditions. Under high-speed repetitive probing, it is found that LII signals are sensitive to changes in soot physical characteristics when operating at high laser fluences within the soot vaporization regime. For these laser conditions, strong planar LII signals aremore » observed at measurement rates up to 100 kHz but are primarily useful for qualitative tracking of soot structure dynamics. However, LII signals collected at lower fluences allow sequential planar measurements of the relative soot volume fraction with a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio at repetition rates of 10–50 kHz. Finally, guidelines for identifying and avoiding the onset of repetitive probe effects in the LII signals are discussed, along with other potential sources of measurement error and uncertainty.« less

  20. Effects of repetitive pulsing on multi-kHz planar laser-induced incandescence imaging in laminar and turbulent flames

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, James B.; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Meyer, Terrence R.

    2015-04-08

    Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) imaging is reported at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using a burst-mode laser system to enable studies of soot formation dynamics in highly turbulent flames. Furthermore, to quantify the accuracy and uncertainty of relative soot volume fraction measurements, the temporal evolution of the LII field in laminar and turbulent flames is examined at various laser operating conditions. Under high-speed repetitive probing, it is found that LII signals are sensitive to changes in soot physical characteristics when operating at high laser fluences within the soot vaporization regime. For these laser conditions, strong planar LII signals are observed at measurement rates up to 100 kHz but are primarily useful for qualitative tracking of soot structure dynamics. However, LII signals collected at lower fluences allow sequential planar measurements of the relative soot volume fraction with a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio at repetition rates of 10–50 kHz. Finally, guidelines for identifying and avoiding the onset of repetitive probe effects in the LII signals are discussed, along with other potential sources of measurement error and uncertainty.