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Sample records for power solid-state laser

  1. High power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the following subjects: trends in materials processing with laser radiation; slabs and high power systems; glasses and new crystals; solid state lasers at HOYA Corp.; lamps, resonators and transmission; glasses as active materials for high average power solid state lasers; flashlamp pumped GGG-crystals; alexandrite lasers; designing telescope resonators; mode operation of neodymium: YAG lasers; intracavity frequency doubling with KTP crystal and thermal effects in cylinder lasers.

  2. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has

  3. High average power solid state laser power conditioning system

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkraus, R.F.

    1987-03-03

    The power conditioning system for the High Average Power Laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is described. The system has been operational for two years. It is high voltage, high power, fault protected, and solid state. The power conditioning system drives flashlamps that pump solid state lasers. Flashlamps are driven by silicon control rectifier (SCR) switched, resonant charged, (LC) discharge pulse forming networks (PFNs). The system uses fiber optics for control and diagnostics. Energy and thermal diagnostics are monitored by computers.

  4. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; Mcdonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-01-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  5. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; McDonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-02-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  6. High power phase conjugated solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Zapata, L.E.; Hermann, M.R.

    1994-07-01

    Three laser systems that are being developed for use in x-ray generation which incorporate SBS phase conjugate mirrors are described. A 25J/pulse Nd:glass laser is being developed for commercial proximity print x-ray lithography; a 0.5J/pulse, 1.3 kHz pulse repetition frequency laser is being built for soft x-ray projection lithography; and a 1 kJ/pulse laser driver for a table top x-ray laser has been designed. The results of prototypical experimental investigations are presented and the basic design principles for high average power phase conjugated laser systems shared by each of these lasers are discussed.

  7. High power continuous wave injection-locked solid state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nabors, C.D.; Byer, R.L.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes an injection locked laser system. It comprises a master laser, the master laser including a solid state gain medium and having a continuous wave, single frequency output; a slave laser including a solid state gain medium located in a resonant cavity and having a continuous wave output at a power at least ten times greater than the master laser, with the output of the master laser being injected into the slave laser in order to cause the slave laser to oscillate at the same frequency as the output of the master laser; and means for actively stabilizing the slave laser so that its output frequency remains locked with the output frequency of the master laser.

  8. High power solid state laser modulator

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Ball, Don G.; Cook, Edward G.

    2004-04-27

    A multi-stage magnetic modulator provides a pulse train of .+-.40 kV electrical pulses at a 5-7 kHz repetition rate to a metal vapor laser. A fractional turn transformer steps up the voltage by a factor of 80 to 1 and magnetic pulse compression is used to reduce the pulse width of the pulse train. The transformer is fabricated utilizing a rod and plate stack type of construction to achieve a high packing factor. The pulses are controlled by an SCR stack where a plurality of SCRs are electrically connected in parallel, each SCR electrically connected to a saturable inductor, all saturable inductors being wound on the same core of magnetic material for enhanced power handling characteristics.

  9. Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Prelas, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

  10. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.; Albrecht, G.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  11. Scaling of solid state lasers for satellite power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Albrecht, G.; Beach, R.

    1994-12-31

    The power requirements for a satellite power beaming laser system depend upon the diameter of the beam director, the performance of the adaptive optics system, and the mission requirements. For an 8 meter beam director and overall Strehl ratio of 50%, a 30 kW laser at 850 nm can deliver an equivalent solar flux to a satellite at geostationary orbit. Advances in Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPSSL) have brought these small, efficient and reliable devices to high average power and they should be considered for satellite power beaming applications. Two solid state systems are described: a diode pumped Alexandrite and diode pumped Thulium doped YAG. Both can deliver high average power at 850 nm in a single aperture.

  12. Solar Pumped High Power Solid State Laser for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Laycock, Rustin L.; Green, Jason J. A.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Frederick, Kevin B.; Phillips, Dane J.

    2004-01-01

    Highly coherent laser light provides a nearly optimal means of transmitting power in space. The simplest most direct means of converting sunlight to coherent laser light is a solar pumped laser oscillator. A key need for broadly useful space solar power is a robust solid state laser oscillator capable of operating efficiently in near Earth space at output powers in the multi hundred kilowatt range. The principal challenges in realizing such solar pumped laser oscillators are: (1) the need to remove heat from the solid state laser material without introducing unacceptable thermal shock, thermal lensing, or thermal stress induced birefringence to a degree that improves on current removal rates by several orders of magnitude and (2) to introduce sunlight at an effective concentration (kW/sq cm of laser cross sectional area) that is several orders of magnitude higher than currently available while tolerating a pointing error of the spacecraft of several degrees. We discuss strategies for addressing these challenges. The need to remove the high densities of heat, e.g., 30 kW/cu cm, while keeping the thermal shock, thermal lensing and thermal stress induced birefringence loss sufficiently low is addressed in terms of a novel use of diamond integrated with the laser material, such as Ti:sapphire in a manner such that the waste heat is removed from the laser medium in an axial direction and in the diamond in a radial direction. We discuss means for concentrating sunlight to an effective areal density of the order of 30 kW/sq cm. The method integrates conventional imaging optics, non-imaging optics and nonlinear optics. In effect we use a method that combines some of the methods of optical pumping solid state materials and optical fiber, but also address laser media having areas sufficiently large, e.g., 1 cm diameter to handle the multi-hundred kilowatt level powers needed for space solar power.

  13. High average power diode pumped solid state lasers for CALIOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Halpin, J.; Moran, B.

    1994-07-01

    Diode pumping of solid state media offers the opportunity for very low maintenance, high efficiency, and compact laser systems. For remote sensing, such lasers may be used to pump tunable non-linear sources, or if tunable themselves, act directly or through harmonic crystals as the probe. The needs of long range remote sensing missions require laser performance in the several watts to kilowatts range. At these power performance levels, more advanced thermal management technologies are required for the diode pumps. The solid state laser design must now address a variety of issues arising from the thermal loads, including fracture limits, induced lensing and aberrations, induced birefringence, and laser cavity optical component performance degradation with average power loading. In order to highlight the design trade-offs involved in addressing the above issues, a variety of existing average power laser systems are briefly described. Included are two systems based on Spectra Diode Laboratory`s water impingement cooled diode packages: a two times diffraction limited, 200 watt average power, 200 Hz multi-rod laser/amplifier by Fibertek, and TRW`s 100 watt, 100 Hz, phase conjugated amplifier. The authors also present two laser systems built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) based on their more aggressive diode bar cooling package, which uses microchannel cooler technology capable of 100% duty factor operation. They then present the design of LLNL`s first generation OPO pump laser for remote sensing. This system is specified to run at 100 Hz, 20 nsec pulses each with 300 mJ, less than two times diffraction limited, and with a stable single longitudinal mode. The performance of the first testbed version will be presented. The authors conclude with directions their group is pursuing to advance average power lasers. This includes average power electro-optics, low heat load lasing media, and heat capacity lasers.

  14. All solid-state high power visible laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, William M.

    1993-01-01

    The overall objective of this Phase 2 effort was to develop and deliver to NASA a high repetition rate laser-diode-pumped solid-state pulsed laser system with output in the green portion of the spectrum. The laser is for use in data communications, and high efficiency, short pulses, and low timing jitter are important features. A short-pulse 1 micron laser oscillator, a new multi-pass amplifier to boost the infrared power, and a frequency doubler to take the amplified infrared pulsed laser light into the green. This produced 1.5 W of light in the visible at a pulse repetition rate of 20 kHz in the laboratory. The pulses have a full-width at half maximum of near 1 ns. The results of this program are being commercialized.

  15. Potential of high-average-power solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.R.

    1984-09-25

    We discuss the possibility of extending solid state laser technology to high average power and of improving the efficiency of such lasers sufficiently to make them reasonable candidates for a number of demanding applications. A variety of new design concepts, materials, and techniques have emerged over the past decade that, collectively, suggest that the traditional technical limitations on power (a few hundred watts or less) and efficiency (less than 1%) can be removed. The core idea is configuring the laser medium in relatively thin, large-area plates, rather than using the traditional low-aspect-ratio rods or blocks. This presents a large surface area for cooling, and assures that deposited heat is relatively close to a cooled surface. It also minimizes the laser volume distorted by edge effects. The feasibility of such configurations is supported by recent developments in materials, fabrication processes, and optical pumps. Two types of lasers can, in principle, utilize this sheet-like gain configuration in such a way that phase and gain profiles are uniformly sampled and, to first order, yield high-quality (undistorted) beams. The zig-zag laser does this with a single plate, and should be capable of power levels up to several kilowatts. The disk laser is designed around a large number of plates, and should be capable of scaling to arbitrarily high power levels.

  16. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  17. High power, high efficiency, 2D laser diode arrays for pumping solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; McShea, J.C.; Bogdan, A.R.; Petheram, J.C.; Rosen, A.

    1987-11-01

    This document reports the current performance of 2D laser diode arrays operating at 770 nm and 808 nm for pumping promethium and neodymium solid state lasers, respectively. Typical power densities are in excess of 2kw/cm/sup 2/ with overall efficiencies greater than 30%.

  18. Development Of High Power Solid State Lasers At HOYA Corp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Takayasu; Unternahrer, Josef R.; Amano, Satoru; Tajima, Hidemi; Nakajima, Sadahiro; Moriyama, M.

    1989-03-01

    Several lasers are, or have been, developed at the HOYA Laser Laboratory: Conventional YAG-rod lasers, glass fiber bundle lasers and moving glass slab lasers. Slab lasers are considered the engineering answer to the demand of higher average power. We obtained 386 W with a moving glass slab laser. Parts of the program are also erbium doped YAG and glass lasers. We developed a stable and reliable 10-W output 3-μm Er:YAG laser. All models have been developed with a specific application in mind,

  19. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  20. Modern solid state laser materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krupke, W.F.

    1984-06-20

    This document contains visual aids used in an invited talk entitled Modern Solid State Laser Materials, presented at the Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO) held in Anaheim, California, on June 20, 1984. Interest at LLNL in solid state lasers focuses on evaluating the potential of solid state laser media for high average power applications, including inertial fusion power production. This talk identifies the relevant bulk material parameters characterizing average power capacity and uses chromium and neodymium co-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nd:Cr:GSGG) as an example of a laser material with improved laser properties relative to Nd:YAG (plausible large-scale growth, more efficient spectral coupling to xenon flashlamp radiation, reduced stimulated emission cross section, adequate thermal shock and optical damage threshold parameters, etc.). Recently measured spectroscopic, kinetic, and thermo-mechanical properties of Nd:Cr:GSGG are given.

  1. High power, high beam quality solid state lasers for materials processing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.; Hermann, M.R.

    1994-08-01

    The Laser Science and Technology Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is developing solid state lasers with high average power and high beam quality. Specific systems include a laser to generate 10 to 14 {angstrom} x-rays for proximity print lithography, a 400 mJ, 500 Hz laser for 130 {angstrom} projection lithography and unique systems for speckle imaging, laser radars and medical treatments.

  2. The LUCIA project: a high average power ytterbium diode pumped solid state laser chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdet, Gilbert L.; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe; Fulop, A.; Julien, Y.; Migus, Arnold

    2004-04-01

    With the goal to set up a high average power Diode Pumped Solid State Laser (100 Joules/10 Hz/10 ns), the Laboratory for Use of Intense Laser (LULI) is now studying various solutions concerning the amplifier medium, the cooling, the pumping and the extraction architectures. In this paper, we present the last states of these developments and the solutions already chosen.

  3. The Use of Large Transparent Ceramics in a High Powered, Diode Pumped Solid State Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, R; Bhachu, B; Cutter, K; Fochs, S; Letts, S; Parks, C; Rotter, M; Soules, T

    2007-09-24

    The advent of large transparent ceramics is one of the key enabling technological advances that have shown that the development of very high average power compact solid state lasers is achievable. Large ceramic neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) amplifier slabs are used in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL), which has achieved world record average output powers in excess of 67 kilowatts. We will describe the attributes of using large transparent ceramics, our present system architecture and corresponding performance; as well as describe our near term future plans.

  4. Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Titan-CW Ti:sapphire (titanium-doped sapphire) tunable laser is an innovation in solid-state laser technology jointly developed by the Research and Solid State Laser Divisions of Schwartz Electro-optics, Inc. (SEO). SEO is producing the laser for the commercial market, an outgrowth of a program sponsored by Langley Research Center to develop Ti:sapphire technology for space use. SEO's Titan-CW series of Ti:sapphire tunable lasers have applicability in analytical equipment designed for qualitative analysis of carbohydrates and proteins, structural analysis of water, starch/sugar analyses, and measurements of salt in meat. Further applications are expected in semiconductor manufacture, in medicine for diagnosis and therapy, and in biochemistry.

  5. New multiplexed all solid state pulser for high power wide aperture kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, D V; Muralikrishnan, K; Singh, Bijendra

    2013-11-01

    A novel multiplexed scheme is demonstrated to combine two or more pulsed solid state pulsers of moderate capabilities. Pulse power supply comprising of two solid state pulsers of ~6 kW rating each in multiplexed mode with common magnetic pulse compression stage was demonstrated and optimized for operating with a wide aperture kinetically enhanced copper vapor laser. Using this new configuration, the multiplexed pulsed power supply was capable of operating efficiently at net repetition-rate of ~13 kHz, 12 kW (wall plug average power), 18-20 kV discharge voltage and pulse rise-time of ~80 ns. The laser under multiplexed configuration delivered un-interrupted output power of about ~80 W with scope of further increase in laser output power in excess of 100 W. PMID:24289383

  6. High Power Laser Diode Arrays for 2-Micron Solid State Coherent Lidars Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra; Sudesh, Vikas; Baker, Nathaniel

    2003-01-01

    Laser diode arrays are critical components of any diode-pumped solid state laser systems, constraining their performance and reliability. Laser diode arrays (LDAs) are used as the pump source for energizing the solid state lasing media to generate an intense coherent laser beam with a high spatial and spectral quality. The solid state laser design and the characteristics of its lasing materials define the operating wavelength, pulse duration, and power of the laser diodes. The pump requirements for high pulse energy 2-micron solid state lasers are substantially different from those of more widely used 1-micron lasers and in many aspects more challenging [1]. Furthermore, the reliability and lifetime demanded by many coherent lidar applications, such as global wind profiling from space and long-range clear air turbulence detection from aircraft, are beyond the capability of currently available LDAs. In addition to the need for more reliable LDAs with longer lifetime, further improvement in the operational parameters of high power quasi-cw LDAs, such as electrical efficiency, brightness, and duty cycle, are also necessary for developing cost-effective 2-micron coherent lidar systems for applications that impose stringent size, heat dissipation, and power constraints. Global wind sounding from space is one of such applications, which is the main driver for this work as part of NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program. This paper discusses the current state of the 792 nm LDA technology and the technology areas being pursued toward improving their performance. The design and development of a unique characterization facility for addressing the specific issues associated with the LDAs for pumping 2-micron coherent lidar transmitters and identifying areas of technological improvement will be described. Finally, the results of measurements to date on various standard laser diode packages, as well as custom-designed packages with potentially longer lifetime, will be reported.

  7. Pump power stability range of single-mode solid-state lasers with rod thermal lensing

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; La Porta, P.; Magni, V.

    1987-11-01

    The pump power stability range of solid-state laser resonators operating in the TEM/sub 00/ mode has been thoroughly investigated. It has been shown that, for a very general resonator containing intracavity optical systems, rod thermal lensing engenders a pump power stability range which is a characteristic parameter of laser material and pump cavity, but is independent of resonator configuration. Stability ranges have been calculated and critically discussed for Nd:YAG, Nd:Glasses, Nd:Cr:GSGG, and alexandrite. The independence of the pump power stability range from the resonator configuration has been experimentally demonstrated for a CW Nd:YAG laser.

  8. Improved performance of high average power semiconductor arrays for applications in diode pumped solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.; Emanuel, M.; Benett, W.; Freitas, B.; Ciarlo, D.; Carlson, N.; Sutton, S.; Skidmore, J.; Solarz, R.

    1994-01-01

    The average power performance capability of semiconductor diode laser arrays has improved dramatically over the past several years. These performance improvements, combined with cost reductions pursued by LLNL and others in the fabrication and packaging of diode lasers, have continued to reduce the price per average watt of laser diode radiation. Presently, we are at the point where the manufacturers of commercial high average power solid state laser systems used in material processing applications can now seriously consider the replacement of their flashlamp pumps with laser diode pump sources. Additionally, a low cost technique developed and demonstrated at LLNL for optically conditioning the output radiation of diode laser arrays has enabled a new and scalable average power diode-end-pumping architecture that can be simply implemented in diode pumped solid state laser systems (DPSSL`s). This development allows the high average power DPSSL designer to look beyond the Nd ion for the first time. Along with high average power DPSSL`s which are appropriate for material processing applications, low and intermediate average power DPSSL`s are now realizable at low enough costs to be attractive for use in many medical, electronic, and lithographic applications.

  9. Very high average power solid-state lasers pumped by remotely located nuclear-driven fluorescers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boody, F. P.; Prelas, M. A.

    A total system efficiency of 3 percent is calculated for very high average power active mirror solid-state laser amplifiers of Nd,Cr:GSGG, pumped by remotely generated visible nuclear-driven alkali metal excimer fluorescence. The fluorescence is transported around a radiation shield, separating the fluorescer and the laser, by a large diameter-to-length ratio hollow lightpipe. Parameters are presented for a system producing 1-ms-long 12 MW pulses at 1 Hz, for an average power output of 12 kW.

  10. Physics of laser fusion. Volume IV. The future development of high-power solid-state laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.; Trenholme, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    Solid state lasers, particularly neodymium glass systems, have undergone intensive development during the last decade. In this paper, we review solid state laser technology in the context of high-peak-power systems for inertial confinement fusion. Specifically addressed are five major factors: efficiency, wavelength flexibility, average power, system complexity, and cost; these factors today limit broader application of the technology. We conclude that each of these factors can be greatly improved within current fundamental physical limits. We further conclude that the systematic development of new solid state laser madia, both vitreous and crystalline, should ultimately permit the development of wavelength-flexible, very high average power systems with overall efficiencies in the range of 10 to 20%.

  11. High power diode pumped solid state laser development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Solarz, R.; Albrecht, G.; Hackel, L.

    1994-03-01

    The authors recent developments in high powered diode pumped solid state lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Over the past year the authors have made continued improvements to semiconductor pump array technology which includes the development of higher average power and lower cost pump modules. They report the performance of high power AlGaAs, InGaAs, and AlGaInP arrays. They also report on improvement to the integrated micro-optics designs in conjunction with lensing duct technology which gives rise to very high performance end pumping designs for solid state lasers which have major advantages which they detail. Substantial progress on beam quality improvements to near the diffraction limit at very high power have also been made and will be reported. They also will discuss recent experiments on high power non-linear materials for q-switches, harmonic converters, and parametric oscillators. Advances in diode pumped devices at LLNL which include tunable Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6}, mid-IR Er:YAG, holmium based lasers and other developments will also be outlined. Concepts for delivering up to 30 kilowatts of average power from a DPSSL oscillator will be described.

  12. Solar Pumped Solid State Lasers for Space Solar Power: Experimental Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Carrington, Connie K.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Green, Jason J. A.; Laycock, Rustin L.

    2003-01-01

    We outline an experimentally based strategy designed to lead to solar pumped solid state laser oscillators useful for space solar power. Our method involves solar pumping a novel solid state gain element specifically designed to provide efficient conversion of sunlight in space to coherent laser light. Kilowatt and higher average power is sought from each gain element. Multiple such modular gain elements can be used to accumulate total average power of interest for power beaming in space, e.g., 100 kilowatts and more. Where desirable the high average power can also be produced as a train of pulses having high peak power (e.g., greater than 10(exp 10 watts). The modular nature of the basic gain element supports an experimental strategy in which the core technology can be validated by experiments on a single gain element. We propose to do this experimental validation both in terrestrial locations and also on a smaller scale in space. We describe a terrestrial experiment that includes diagnostics and the option of locating the laser beam path in vacuum environment. We describe a space based experiment designed to be compatible with the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). We anticipate the gain elements will be based on low temperature (approx. 100 degrees Kelvin) operation of high thermal conductivity (k approx. 100 W/cm-K) diamond and sapphire (k approx. 4 W/cm-K). The basic gain element will be formed by sequences of thin alternating layers of diamond and Ti:sapphire with special attention given to the material interfaces. We anticipate this strategy will lead to a particularly simple, robust, and easily maintained low mass modelocked multi-element laser oscillator useful for space solar power.

  13. Solid state power controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rationale, analysis, design, breadboarding and testing of the incremental functional requirements are reported that led to the development of prototype 1 and 5 Amp dc and 1 Amp ac solid state power controllers (SSPC's). The SSPC's are to be considered for use as a replacement of electro-mechanical relays and circuit breakers in future spacecraft and aircraft. They satisfy the combined function of both the relay and circuit breaker and can be remotely controlled by small signals, typically 10 mA, 5 to 28 Vdc. They have the advantage over conventional relay/circuit breaker systems in that they can be located near utilization equipment and the primary ac or dc bus. The low level control, trip indication and status signals can be circuited by small guage wire for control, computer interface, logic, electrical multiplexing, unboard testing, and power management and distribution purposes. This results in increased system versatility at appreciable weight saving and increased reliability.

  14. Thermal effects in high-power Nd:YAG disk-type solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huomu; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2011-09-01

    An investigation of thermal effects in a high-power Nd:YAG disk-type solid state laser pumped with different pump beam transverse profiles is carried out by numerical simulation based on the finite element method (FEM). Impact of the heat sink on the thermal effects is included in the simulation. The distribution of first principle stress, thermally induced birefringence, including the distribution and variation of the birefringence loss, are studied. The characteristics of the phase variation are analyzed with consideration of the temperature gradient, deformation, strain and thermal stress. Thermal lensing is explored as a function of pump power and of the radius pumped with different pump beam transverse profiles. The non-parabolic part of optical phase distortion is simulated. Furthermore, the characteristics of the bi-focus of the disk laser are also studied. Experiments on the maximum tensile stress distribution and depolarization loss are carried out. The presented calculations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Solar-pumped solid state Nd lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Zapata, L.

    1985-01-01

    Solid state neodymium lasers are considered candidates for space-based polar-pumped laser for continuous power transmission. Laser performance for three different slab laser configurations has been computed to show the excellent power capability of such systems if heat problems can be solved. Ideas involving geometries and materials are offered as potential solutions to the heat problem.

  16. Grating enhanced solid-state laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, Alvin C.; Britten, Jerald A.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and apparatus for suppressing ASE and parasitic oscillation modes in a high average power laser is introduced. Such an invention, as disclosed herein, uses diffraction gratings to increase gain, stored energy density, and pumping efficiency of solid-state laser gain media, such as, but not limited to rods, disks and slabs. By coupling predetermined gratings to solid-state gain media, such as crystal or ceramic laser gain media, ASE and parasitic oscillation modes can be effectively suppressed.

  17. Solid state power controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Solid state power controllers (SSPC's) are to be considered for use as replacements of electromechanical relays and circuit breakers in future spacecraft and aircraft. They satisfy the combined function of both the relay and circuit breaker and can be remotely controlled by small signals, typically 10 mA, 5 to 28 v(dc). They have the advantage over conventional relay/circuit breaker systems in that they can be located near the utilization equipment and the primary ac or dc bus. The low level control, trip indication and status signals can be circuited by small gauge wire for control, computer interface, logic, electrical multiplexing, onboard testing, power management, and distribution purposes. This results in increased system versatility at appreciable weight saving and increased reliability. Conventional systems require the heavy gage load wiring and the control wiring to be routed from the bus to the load to other remote relay contacts, switches, sensors, etc. and to the circuit breaker located in the flight engineer's compartment for purposes of manual reset.

  18. High-power CW diode-laser-array-pumped solid-state lasers and efficient nonlinear optical frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, Robert J.; Byer, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    During the interim period of this bridging contract, we have continued to work on the development of high-power cw diode-laser-array-pumped solid-state lasers. Towards that end, we have built lower power lasers in order to test individual components needed for the high-power laser, specifically we have built a 1 watt ring laser and a 5 watt slab laser. The 1 watt laser was used to study the injection locking process while assembling all the necessary electronics. We have demonstrated that it is possible to injection lock a diode-pumped laser using a single piezo-mounted mirror due to the lower intrinsic laser noise compared to an arc-lamp-pumped system. This allows us to optimize the injection locking servo loop and build a more stable locking system. The 5 watt laser was used as a test bed to find a practical way to mount the slab laser while minimizing the losses that occur at the total internal reflection (TIR) points in the slab. After trying many different means of protecting the TIR surfaces, we found that a new product from DuPont, Teflon AF 1600, has all the properties needed to provide a low loss protective coating. Using this material, the laser had a cavity loss of below 2%, which allowed for efficient operation of the laser in a side-pumped design. This laser produced 5 watts of output power with a slope efficiency near 20%.

  19. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  20. Intracavity, adaptive correction of a high-average-power, solid-state, heat-capacity laser

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Brase, J M; Yamamoto, R M

    2005-01-05

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a multigeneration laser development effort scalable to the megawatt power levels. Wavefront quality is a driving metric of its performance. A deformable mirror with over 100 degrees of freedom situated within the cavity is used to correct both the static and dynamic aberrations sensed with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The laser geometry is an unstable, confocal resonator with a clear aperture of 10 cm x 10 cm. It operates in a pulsed mode at a high repetition rate (up to 200 Hz) with a correction being applied before each pulse. Wavefront information is gathered in real-time from a low-power pick-off of the high-power beam. It is combined with historical trends of aberration growth to calculate a correction that is both feedback and feed-forward driven. The overall system design, measurement techniques and correction algorithms are discussed. Experimental results are presented.

  1. High-power solid-state lasers for high-energy-density physics applications at CAEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. S.; Zhang, X. M.; Zheng, W. G.; Wei, X. F.; Huang, X. J.; Sui, Z.; Jing, F.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Q. H.; Wang, X. D.; Zhou, K. N.; Liu, L. Q.; Zeng, X. M.; Wang, X.; Zhu, J. Q.; Lin, Z. Q.; Zhang, W. Y.

    2006-06-01

    High-power solid-state laser programs at China Academy of Engineering Physics have made great progresses in recent years. A three-stage Ti:sapphire laser system, SILEX-I, was completed early in 2004 which could deliver 26-fs pulses at 5TW, 30TW, and 300TW to the corresponding target chambers for diverse applications. SILEX-I has been working very stably since its completion for experiments, demonstrating that it is the most powerful femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser for exploring strong-field phenomena in the world. The SG-III Nd:glass laser facility has been under conceptual design to meet the requirements from laser fusion applications. The SG-III facility is planned to have sixty-four beamlines divided into eight bundles with an output energy more than 100kJ at 0.35μm for 3- to 5-ns pulses. The eight-beamline TIL (Technical Integration Line), the prototype of the SG-III laser facility, has been installed in the new laboratory in Mianyang. The commissioning experiments have been conducted and one of the eight beams has produced 1-ns pulses of 3.0kJ and 1.2kJ at 1.053μm and 0.35μm, respectively. All the eight beamlines will be activated by the end of 2005 and completed in 2006 for operation. Meanwhile, the eight-beam SG-II laser in Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics has been operated for the experiments since 2001 and an additional beam, built in 2004, has been used for plasma backlighting experiments.

  2. Propogation of the 1(mu) High-Power Beam from a Solid-State Heat-Capacity Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, C B; Moriss, J R; Rubenchik, A M; Boley, C D

    2002-06-25

    A solid-state laser system, used as a directed energy defensive weapon, possesses many compelling logistical advantages over high-average-power chemical laser systems. As an electrically-powered laser, it uses no chemicals, generates no effluents, and requires no specialized logistics support--the laser is recharged by running the vehicle engine. It provides stealth, having low signature operation without the generation of temperature, smoke, or visible light. It is silent in operation, limited only by the onboard vehicle electrical charging and propulsion system. Using the heat-capacity mode of operation, scaling of average power from a solid-state laser has been demonstrated beyond 10kW and work in progress will result in the demonstration of a 100 kW solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL). The heat-capacity approach provides unprecedented power-to-weight ratios in a compact platform that is readily adapted to mobile operation. A conceptual engineering and packaging study has resulted in a 100kW SSHCL design that we believe can be integrated onto a hybrid-electric HMMWV or onto new vehicle designs emerging from the future combat system (FCS) development. 100 kW has been proposed as a power level that demonstrates a significant scaling beyond what has been demonstrated for a solid-state laser system and which could have a significant lethality against target sets of interest. However, the characteristics of heat-capacity laser scaling are such that designs with output powers in excess of 1 MW can be readily formulated. An important question when addressing the military utility of a high-power solid-state laser system is that of the required average power during engagement with a target. The answer to this question is complex, involving atmospheric propagation, beam interaction with the target, and the damage response of the target. Successful target shoot-downs with the THEL deuterium fluoride (DF) laser system provide what is probably the best understanding of

  3. High-power monolithic unstable-resonator solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Zhou, S H; Chen, Y C

    1998-03-15

    We report the operation of a diode-pumped monolithic Q-switched unstable-resonator solid-state laser that generates 2.15-mJ, 2-ns pulses in a single transverse mode and a single longitudinal mode. We show that the unstable resonator is effective in suppressing the spatial and the temporal instability of the laser beam in a disk-shaped laser whose transverse dimension is comparable with or larger than its longitudinal dimension. PMID:18084541

  4. Solid state lasers - The next 10 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-10-01

    Major advances in solid state laser technology historically have been preceded by advances in pumping technology. The helical lamp used to pump the early ruby lasers was superseded by the linear flashlamp now used to pump Nd:YAG lasers. The next advance in pumping technology is the diode laser array. The improvements in power and efficiency of the diode laser coupled with the fortuitous spectral overlap of the diode laser emission wavelength with the Nd ion absorption bands near 805 nm have led to a revolution in solid state laser capability. Progress has been rapid with new ions and wavelengths reported in the near infrared from 946 nm to 2010 nm. Frequency extension via nonlinear interactions has led to green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Linewidths of less than 10 kHz have been demonstrated. Overall electrical efficiencies of greater than 10% have been achieved. As diode laser sources decrease in cost, high average power diode laser pumped solid state laser sources will become available. Power levels exceeding 1 kW appear possible. Potential applications of these compact all solid state laser sources to spectroscopy, quantum noise limited sensors, astronomy, and materials processing will be discussed.

  5. High-power pulse repetitive HF(DF) laser with a solid-state pump generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikanov, S. D.; Domazhirov, A. P.; Zaretskiy, N. A.; Kazantsev, S. Yu; Kononov, I. G.; Kromin, A. A.; Podlesnykh, S. V.; Sivachev, A. A.; Firsov, K. N.; Kharitonov, S. V.; Tsykin, V. S.; Shchurov, V. V.; Yutkin, I. M.

    2015-11-01

    Operation of a repetitively pulsed electric-discharge HF(DF) laser with an all-solid-state pump generator based on FID switches is demonstrated. The energy stored in the pump generator capacitors was 880 J at an open-circuit voltage of 240 kV and a discharge pulse repetition rate of 25 Hz. The specific energy extractions were 3.8 and 3.4 J L-1 for the HF and DF lasers, respectively. The possibilities of improving the output laser characteristics are discussed.

  6. High power solid state lasers; Proceedings of the Meeting, Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, Sept. 19, 20, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in high-power solid-state lasers and their applications are discussed in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to slabs and high-power systems; glasses and new crystals; and lamps, resonators, and transmission. Particular attention is given to a 100-W moving-slab glass laser, the lasing properties of flashlamp-pumped GGG crystals, a 17-J Ho laser operating at 2 microns, the emission characteristics of high-power Kr/Xe flashlamps, computation of an optimal laser cavity using splines, a high-repetition-rate large-aperture Nd:YAG disk laser for multi-kW average power, and realization of a high-power green laser by frequency doubling with a KTP crystal.

  7. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes were investigated. A new generation on nonplanar oscillator was fabricated, and it is anticipated that passive linewidths will be pushed to the kilohertz regime. A number of diode-pumped laser transitions were demonstrated in the rod configuration. Second-harmonic conversion efficiencies as high as 15% are routinely obtained in a servo-locked external resonant doubling crystal at 15 mW cw input power levels at 1064 nm.

  8. Lethality Effects of a High-Power Solid-State Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Fochs, S N; Rubenchik, A M

    2007-08-24

    We study the material interactions of a 25-kW solid-state laser, in experiments characterized by relatively large spot sizes ({approx}3 cm) and the presence of airflow. The targets are iron or aluminum slabs, of thickness 1 cm. In the experiments with iron, we show that combustion plays an important role in heating the material. In the experiments with aluminum, there is a narrow range of intensities within which the material interactions vary from no melting at all to complete melt-through. A layer of paint serves to increase the absorption. We explain these effects and incorporate them into a comprehensive computational model.

  9. Large-Spot Material Interactions with a High-Power Solid-State Laser Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Fochs, S N; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-08-06

    We study the material interactions produced by the beam of a 25-kW solid-state laser, in experiments characterized by relatively large spot sizes ({approx}3 cm) and the presence of airflow. The targets are iron or aluminum slabs, of thickness 1 cm. In the experiments with iron, we show that combustion plays an important role in heating the material. In the experiments with aluminum, we observe a sharp transition from no melting to complete melt-through as the intensity on target increases. A layer of paint greatly reduces the requirements for melt-through. We explain these effects and incorporate them into an overall computational model.

  10. Lethality Effects of a High-Power Solid-State Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C; Fochs, S; Rubenchik, A

    2007-03-07

    We study the material interactions of a 25-kW solid-state laser, in experiments characterized by relatively large spot size sizes ({approx}3 cm) and the presence of airflow. The targets are 1-cm slabs of iron or aluminum. In the experiments with iron, we show that combustion plays an important role in heating the material. In the experiments with aluminum, there is a narrow range of intensities within which the material interactions vary from no melting at all to complete melt-through. A paint layer serves to increase the absorption. We explain these effects and incorporate them into a comprehensive computational model.

  11. All-optical Q-switching limiter for high-power gigahertz modelocked diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Klenner, Alexander; Keller, Ursula

    2015-04-01

    Passively modelocked diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSLs) with pulse repetition rates in the gigahertz regime suffer from an increased tendency for Q-switching instabilities. Low saturation fluence intracavity saturable absorbers - such as the semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) - can solve this problem up to a certain average output power limited by the onset of SESAM damage. Here we present a passive stabilization mechanism, an all-optical Q-switching limiter, to reduce the impact of Q-switching instabilities and increase the potential output power of SESAM modelocked lasers in the gigahertz regime. With a proper cavity design a Kerr lens induced negative saturable absorber clamps the maximum fluence on the SESAM and therefore limits the onset of Q-switching instabilities. No critical cavity alignment is required because this Q-switching limiter acts well within the cavity stability regime. Using a proper cavity design, a high-power diode-pumped Yb:CALGO solid-state laser generated sub-100 fs pulses with an average output power of 4.1 W at a pulse repetition rate of 5 GHz. With a pulse duration of 96 fs we can achieve a peak power as high as 7.5 kW directly from the SESAM modelocked laser oscillator without any further external pulse amplification and/or pulse compression. We present a quantitative analysis of this Kerr lens induced Q-switching limiter and its impact on modelocked operation. Our work provides a route to compact high-power multi-gigahertz frequency combs based on SESAM modelocked diode-pumped solid-state lasers without any additional external amplification or pulse compression. PMID:25968691

  12. Solid-State Nuclear Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A strategy for "Solid-State" Nuclear Power is proposed to guide development of technologies and systems into the second 50 years of nuclear spaceflight. The strategy emphasizes a simple and highly integrated system architecture with few moving parts or fluid loops; the leverage of modern advances in materials, manufacturing, semiconductors, microelectromechanical and nanotechnology devices; and the targeted advancement of high temperature nuclear fuels, materials and static power conversion to enable high performance from simple system topologies.

  13. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  14. Antireflective coatings on optical fibers for high-power solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, Manfred; Willamowski, Uwe; Ristau, Detlev; Welling, Herbert; Steiger, Bernhard; Franke, J.; Wolf, Reinhard

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents investigations to improve the quality of high power antireflective coatings for optical fibers used in material processing with Nd:YAG lasers. The coatings were produced by electron-beam deposition and ion-beam-sputtering on step-index, multimode fibers with a core diameter of 1000 micrometers . The reflection losses, the absorption, and the laser-induced damage thresholds of these coatings were determined. Hafnia, tantala, and silica were selected as deposition materials for the AR-coatings. For measuring the reflection losses of the coated fiber surfaces, a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser was used. Absorption measurements were performed by photothermal displacement spectroscopy, a surface sensitive technique which makes scanning of the fiber surface possible. These data were compared to calorimetric values determined from quartz substrates which were deposited in the same coating run. The R-on-1 damage thresholds of the coated fibers were measured using a two- stage single-mode Nd:YAG laser with a pulse duration of 12 ns. A four-stage cw system with 1.2 kW output power and a pulsed Nd:YAG slab laser were used to evaluate the performance of the coated fibers.

  15. Robust modeling and performance analysis of high-power diode side-pumped solid-state laser systems.

    PubMed

    Kashef, Tamer; Ghoniemy, Samy; Mokhtar, Ayman

    2015-12-20

    In this paper, we present an enhanced high-power extrinsic diode side-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) model to accurately predict the dynamic operations and pump distribution under different practical conditions. We introduce a new implementation technique for the proposed model that provides a compelling incentive for the performance assessment and enhancement of high-power diode side-pumped Nd:YAG lasers using cooperative agents and by relying on the MATLAB, GLAD, and Zemax ray tracing software packages. A large-signal laser model that includes thermal effects and a modified laser gain formulation and incorporates the geometrical pump distribution for three radially arranged arrays of laser diodes is presented. The design of a customized prototype diode side-pumped high-power laser head fabricated for the purpose of testing is discussed. A detailed comparative experimental and simulation study of the dynamic operation and the beam characteristics that are used to verify the accuracy of the proposed model for analyzing the performance of high-power DPSSLs under different conditions are discussed. The simulated and measured results of power, pump distribution, beam shape, and slope efficiency are shown under different conditions and for a specific case, where the targeted output power is 140 W, while the input pumping power is 400 W. The 95% output coupler reflectivity showed good agreement with the slope efficiency, which is approximately 35%; this assures the robustness of the proposed model to accurately predict the design parameters of practical, high-power DPSSLs. PMID:26837034

  16. High-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers for optical space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koechner, Walter; Burnham, Ralph; Kasinski, Jeff; Bournes, Pat; Dibiase, Don; Le, Khoa; Marshall, Larry; Hays, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance of a large diode-pumped multi-stage Nd:YAG laser system for space and airborne applications will be described. The laser operates at a repetition rate of 40 Hz and produces an output either at 1.064 micron or 532 nm with an average power in the Q-switched mode of 30 W at the fundamental and 20 W at the second harmonic wavelength. The output beam is diffraction limited (TEM 00 mode) and can optionally also be operated in a single longitudinal mode. The output energy ranges from 1.25 Joule/pulse in the free lasing mode, 0.75 Joule in a 17 nsec Q-switched pulse, to 0.5 Joules/pulse at 532 nm. The overall electrical efficiency for the Q-switched second harmonic output is 4.

  17. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the consequences for solid-state lasers of novel diode laser-pumping technology. Diode laser-pumped neodymium lasers have operated at an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 10 percent in a single spatial mode, with linewidths of less than 10 kHz, and with a spectral power brightness sufficiently great to allow frequency extension by harmonic generation in nonlinear crystals; this has yielded green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Q-switched operation with kW peak powers and mode-locked operation with 10-picosec pulse widths have also been demonstrated. All-solid-state lasers at prices comparable to those of current flash-lamp-pumped laser systems are foreseen, as are power levels exceeding 1 kW, for coherent radar, global satellite sensing, and micromachining.

  18. High energy, high average power solid state green or UV laser

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Norton, Mary; Dane, C. Brent

    2004-03-02

    A system for producing a green or UV output beam for illuminating a large area with relatively high beam fluence. A Nd:glass laser produces a near-infrared output by means of an oscillator that generates a high quality but low power output and then multi-pass through and amplification in a zig-zag slab amplifier and wavefront correction in a phase conjugator at the midway point of the multi-pass amplification. The green or UV output is generated by means of conversion crystals that follow final propagation through the zig-zag slab amplifier.

  19. Nuclear-driven solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelas, Mark A.

    A total system efficiency of 3 percent is calculated for very high average power active mirror solid-state laser amplifiers of co-doped material, such as Nd:Cr:GSGG, pumped by visible nuclear-driven alkali metal excimer fluorescence. The fluorescence is transported around a radiation shield, separating the fluorescer and the laser, by a large diameter-to-length ratio hollow lightpipe. Parameters for a system with peak power of 6 MW for 1 ms pulse at 1 Hz for an average power output of 6 kW are presented. This type of system would require the development of a small 200-kW thermal nuclear reactor (similar in size to small university research reactors). A much larger system can be developed as well.

  20. Transverse mode control in solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bobeck, A.H.; Harriott, L.R.; Hartman, R.L.; Kaplan, D.R.; Przybylek, G.J.; Tabor, W.J.

    1989-09-26

    This patent describes a solid state laser. It comprises a solid state body including an optical resonator, a waveguide in which laser radiation propagates in TE and TM modes. The radiation being incident on a region of a first surface of the body, characterized by a reflection filter disposed on the first surface so as to preferentially reflect either TE or TM modes and to suppress oscillation within the resonator of the non-reflected modes.

  1. Solid State Lasers from an Efficiency Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2007-01-01

    Solid state lasers have remained a vibrant area of research because several major innovations expanded their capability. Major innovations are presented with emphasis focused on the laser efficiency. A product of efficiencies approach is developed and applied to describe laser performance. Efficiency factors are presented in closed form where practical and energy transfer effects are included where needed. In turn, efficiency factors are used to estimate threshold and slope efficiency, allowing a facile estimate of performance. Spectroscopic, thermal, and mechanical data are provided for common solid state laser materials.

  2. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations continue of diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes using them as sources. Diode laser array pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:glass lasers have been demonstrated. Theoretical studies of non-planar oscillators have been advanced, producing new designs which should be more resistant to feedback and offer better frequency stability. A monolithic, singly resonant Optical Parametric Oscillator in MgO:LiNbO3 has been operated.

  3. Multirod unstable resonators for high-power solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, N; Bostanjoglo, G; Weber, H

    1993-10-20

    The properties of positive-branch and negative-branch unstable resonators with variable reflectivity mirrors and several variable internal lenses were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Design rules for optimized unstable resonators for one or more active elements are derived on the basis of the ABCD matrix formalism. Experiments were performed with a pulsed Nd:YAG system consisting of three 6 in. × 3/8 in. (15.24 cm × 0.95 cm) rods. This system provided a maximum output power of 550 W per rod when a symmetric flat-flat resonator was used. Unstable resonators achieved up to 75% of this maximum value with beam-parameter products between 2 and 10 mm mrad. The beam quality becomes worse as more active elements are used inside the resonator. This deterioration of focusability is caused by spherical aberration in combination with differences of refractive power for r and Φ polarizations. PMID:20856412

  4. Pulsed solid state lasers for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertesz, Ivan; Danileiko, A. Y.; Denker, Boris I.; Kroo, Norbert; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.; Prokhorov, Alexander M.

    1994-02-01

    The effect on living tissues of different pulsed solid state lasers: Nd:YAG ((lambda) equals 1.06 micrometers ) Er:glass (1.54 micrometers ), Ho:YAG (2.1 micrometers ) and Er:YAG (2.94 micrometers ) is compared with the continuous wave Nd:YAG- and CO2-lasers used in operating theaters. Portable Er:glass- and Er:YAG-lasers are developed for surgery/cosmetics and HIV-safe blood testing.

  5. Driver Technology for Inertial Fusion Research 1.Status of High Power Solid State Laser for Laser Fusion Experiments and the Prospect of Future Reactor Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hisanori

    The progress in development of high-power glass laser systems during the past 30 years is remarkable NIF (National Ignition Facility), which will deliver 1.8 MJ at 0.35 μm is now construction in the United States. Recently, technology that smoothes out the focal pattern has been developed to a great extent. RPP (Random Phase Plate) and PCL (Partially Coherent Laser) both gave an excellent focal pattern with standard deviation of 3% in the Gekko XII laser system. In the US, Japan and Europe, several ultra-short pulse lasers were developed for research on “fast ignition”. “Fast ignition” is a method which will reduce the total required laser energy for ignition. Because a diode-pumped, solid state laser can operate at a repetition rate of over 10 Hz with an efficiency of about 10% research area of high-power systems at the 1 kW level started to focus on the development of a driver for a commercial laser fusion reactor.

  6. Diode laser pumped solid state laser with 2 micrometer wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, G.; Callenas, A.

    1994-06-01

    Research at the FOA in the field diode laser pumped solid state lasers with 2 micrometer wavelength is presented. The research was made within the project Antisensor laser. Basic models for CW and pulsed lasers are presented together with results and experience from the design of a diode laser pumped CW laser based on Thulium (Tm), Holmium (Ho) doped Yttrium Lithium Fluoride (TLiF4), abbreviated Tm, Ho:YLF. Measurements on upconversion of energy from the upper laser level in the laser crystal has been made. The upconversion causes loss of energy which leads to higher laser threshold and lower upper state effective lifetime. The result shows less upconversion in Tm, Ho doped YLF than with the same active ions doped into Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Tm, Ho: YAG). A simple pump configuration was assembled which produced a pump focus of about 200 micrometers radius. With 1 W pump power, an output power of 50 mW was achieved with the laser crystal at room temperature (25 C). With the crystal cooled to 5 C temperature, 77 mW output power was achieved. The measured laser threshold was in good agreement with the calculated value. The efficiency was only 10% compared to the predicted value of 50%. Measurements of laser beam cross section, wavelength and longitudinal laser modes have also been made and is presented in the report.

  7. Multimode pumped continuous-wave solid-state Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Grabtchikov, A S; Lisinetskii, V A; Orlovich, V A; Schmitt, M; Maksimenka, R; Kiefer, W

    2004-11-01

    We demonstrate the continuous-wave operation of a solid-state Raman laser containing a barium nitrate crystal as the Raman medium. The Raman laser, which has a singly resonant cavity, is pumped by multimode radiation. The Raman oscillation threshold is reached at approximately 2 W of pump power. As much as 500 kW/cm2 of Stokes power density at 60-kW/cm2 pump power density is obtained in the cavity. PMID:15584282

  8. Multimode pumped continuous-wave solid-state Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Grabtchikov, A S; Lisinetskii, V A; Orlovich, V A; Schmitt, M; Maksimenka, R; Kiefer, W

    2004-11-01

    We demonstrate the continuous-wave operation of a solid-state Raman laser containing a barium nitrate crystal as the Raman medium. The Raman laser, which has a singly resonant cavity, is pumped by multimode radiation. The Raman oscillation threshold is reached at approximately 2 W of pump power. As much as 500 kW/cm2 of Stokes power density at 60-kW/cm2 pump power density is obtained in the cavity.

  9. Investigation of unstable resonators with a variable-reflectivity mirror based on a radial birefringent filter for high-average-power solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Kurtev, S; Denchev, O

    1995-07-20

    We investigate a Gaussian-type unstable resonator. The Gaussian mirror comprises a two-element radial birefringent element used within a ring-mirror configuration. It is shown that this resonator compensates undesirable thermally induced birefringence of the active element, which is typical for high-average-power flash-lamp-pumped solid-state lasers. We prove that this resonator is workable and suggest some possibilities for its practical use. Polarization and geometric analyses are also included. PMID:21052249

  10. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Tso Yee; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, interest in diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers has increased due to their advantages over flashlamp-pumped solid-state lasers. A historical overview is presented of semiconductor diode-pumped solid-state lasers beginning with work in the early 1960s and continuing through recent work on wavelength extension of these devices by laser operation on new transitions. Modeling of these devices by rate equations to obtain expressions for threshold, slope efficiency, and figures of merit is also given.

  11. Solid-state-laser-rod holder

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.; Barnes, N.P.; Griggs, J.E.

    1981-08-11

    The disclosure relates to a solid state laser rod holder comprising Invar, copper tubing, and epoxy joints. Materials and coefficients of expansion of the components of the holder combine with the rod to produce a joint which will give before the rod itself will. The rod may be lased at about 70 to 80/sup 0/K and returned from such a temperature to room temperature repeatedly without its or the holder's destruction.

  12. Solid state dye laser for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldag, Henry R.

    1994-06-01

    The development of solid state dye lasers could lead to a major breakthrough in the cost and compactness of a medical device. Advantages include: elimination of the flow system for the gain medium; ease with which to implement wavelength agility or the replacement of a degraded rod or sheet; and toxicity and flammability become a non-issue. Dye lasers have played a role in cardiology, dermatology, and urology. Of these cardiology is of interest to Palomar. The Palomar Model 3010 flashlamp-pumped dye laser medical device was used during phase 1 FDA clinical trials to break-up blood clots that cause heart attacks, a process known as coronary laser thrombolysis. It is the objective of this research and development effort to produce solid matrix lasers that will replace liquid dye lasers in these medical specialties.

  13. Solid state pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Fengfeng; Saddoughi, Seyed Gholamali; Herbon, John Thomas

    2014-02-11

    A power generator includes one or more full bridge inverter modules coupled to a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) through an inductive resonant branch. Each module includes a plurality of switches that are switched in a fashion causing the one or more full bridge inverter modules to drive the semiconductor opening switch SOS through the resonant circuit to generate pulses to a load connected in parallel with the SOS.

  14. SPS solid state antenna power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzsimmons, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    Solid state dc-rf converters offer potential improvements in reliability, mass and low voltage operation, provided that anticipated efficiencies in excess of 80 percent can be realized. Field effect transistors offer the greatest potential in the SPS frequency band at 2.45 GHz. To implement this approach it is essential that means be found to sum the power of many relatively low power solid state sources in a low-loss manner, and that means be provided to properly control the phase of the outputs of the large number of solid state sources required. To avoid the power combining losses associated with circuit hybrids it was proposed that the power from multiple solid state amplifiers be combined by direct coupling of each amplifier's output to the radiating antenna structure. The selected power-combining antenna consists of a unique printed (metalized) microstrip circuit on a ceramic type dielectric substrate which is backed by a shallow lightweight aluminum cavity which sums the power of four microwave sources. The antenna behaves like two one-half wavelength slot-line antennas coupled together via their common cavity structure.

  15. SPS solid state antenna power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzsimmons, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    A concept for a solar power satellite antenna power combiner which utilizes solid state dc-rf converters is described. To avoid the power combining losses associated with circuit hybrids it is proposed that the power from multiple solid state amplifiers be combined by direct coupling of each amplifier's output to the radiating antenna structure. The selected power-combining antenna consists of a printed (metalized) microstrip circuit on a ceramic type dielectric substrate which is backed by a shallow lightweight aluminum cavity which sums the power of four microwave sources. The antenna behaves like two one-half wavelength slot-line antennas coupled together via their common cavity structure. A significant feature of the antenna configuration selected is that the radiated energy is summed to yield a single radiated output phase which represents the average insertion phase of the four power amplifiers. This energy may be sampled and, by comparison with the input signal, one can phase error correct to maintain the insertion phase of all solid state power combining modules at exactly the same value. This insures that the insertion phase of each SPS power combining antenna module is identical. An experiment verification program is described.

  16. An active solid state ring laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of an active, solid state ring laser gyroscope were investigated. Two laser diode pumped monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators (NPRO), forced to lase in opposite directions, formed the NPRO-Gyro. It was unique in being an active ring laser gyroscope with a homogeneously broadened gain medium. This work examined sources of technical and fundamental noise. Associated calculations accounted for aspects of the NPRO-Gyro performance, suggested design improvements, and outlined limitations. The work brought out the need to stabilize the NPRO environment in order to achieve performance goals. Two Nd:YAG NPROs were mounted within an environment short term stabilized to microdegrees Celsius. The Allan variance of the NPRO-Gyro beat note was 500 Hz for a one second time delay. Unequal treatment of the NPROs appeared as noise on the beat frequency, therefore reducing its rotation sensitivity. The sensitivity to rotation was limited by technical noise sources.

  17. Broadly tunable high-power operation of an all-solid-state titanium-doped sapphire laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, T. R.; Gerstenberger, D. C.; Drobshoff, A.; Wallace, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Broadly tunable and high-power operation of a Ti-doped sapphire laser is obtained with a diode-laser-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser as the pump source. A maximum broadband (FWHM = 25 nm) output pulse energy of 720 microJ at 795 nm in a TEM00 mode is obtained for 1850 microJ of energy of 532-nm pump light. A minimum pulse duration of 7 nsec is obtained from a 40-mm-long cavity. With the use of an intracavity prism, the Ti:sapphire laser is tunable continuously over the 696-1000-nm spectral range (with three different mirror sets).

  18. Development of high-power and high-energy 2μm bulk solid-state lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koen, Wayne; Jacobs, Cobus; Wu, Lorinda; Strauss, Hencharl

    2016-05-01

    A selection of 2 μm lasers and amplifiers developed at the CSIR National Laser Centre in South Africa is presented. A diverse range of near diffraction-limited 2 μm lasers and amplifiers were developed which varied from high-energy, single-frequency oscillators and amplifiers, to compact and efficient MOPA systems delivering high average powers. This was made possible by exploiting various advantageous properties of holmium-doped YLF while mitigating its detrimental properties through the use of novel pump and laser design approaches.

  19. New diode wavelengths for pumping solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Beach, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    High-power laser-diode arrays have been demonstrated to be viable pump sources for solid-state lasers. The diode bars (fill factor of 0.7) were bonded to silicon microchannel heatsinks for high-average-power operation. Over 12 W of CW output power was achieved from a one cm AlGaInP tensile-strained single-quantum-well laser diode bar. At 690 nm, a compressively-strained single-quantum-well laser-diode array produced 360 W/cm{sup 2} per emitting aperture under CW operation, and 2.85 kW of pulsed power from a 3.8 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array. InGaAs strained single-quantum-well laser diodes emitting at 900 nm produced 2.8 kW pulsed power from a 4.4 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array.

  20. Solid-state ring laser gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S.

    The ring laser gyroscope is a rotation sensor used in most kinds of inertial navigation units. It usually consists in a ring cavity filled with a mixture of helium and neon, together with high-voltage pumping electrodes. The use of a gaseous gain medium, while resulting naturally in a stable bidirectional regime enabling rotation sensing, is however the main industrially limiting factor for the ring laser gyroscopes in terms of cost, reliability and lifetime. We study in this book the possibility of substituting for the gaseous gain medium a solid-state medium (diode-pumped Nd-YAG). For this, a theoretical and experimental overview of the lasing regimes of the solid-state ring laser is reported. We show that the bidirectional emission can be obtained thanks to a feedback loop acting on the states of polarization and inducing differential losses proportional to the difference of intensity between the counterpropagating modes. This leads to the achievement of a solid-state ring laser gyroscope, whose frequency response is modified by mode coupling effects. Several configurations, either mechanically or optically based, are then successively studied, with a view to improving the quality of this frequency response. In particular, vibration of the gain crystal along the longitudinal axis appears to be a very promising technique for reaching high inertial performances with a solid-state ring laser gyroscope. Gyrolaser à état solide. Le gyrolaser est un capteur de rotation utilisé dans la plupart des centrales de navigation inertielle. Dans sa forme usuelle, il est constitué d'une cavité laser en anneau remplie d'un mélange d'hélium et de néon pompé par des électrodes à haute tension. L'utilisation d'un milieu amplificateur gazeux, si elle permet de garantir naturellement le fonctionnement bidirectionnel stable nécessaire à la mesure des rotations, constitue en revanche la principale limitation industrielle des gyrolasers actuels en termes de coût, fiabilit

  1. High sustained average power cw and ultrafast Yb:YAG near-diffraction-limited cryogenic solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Brown, David C; Singley, Joseph M; Kowalewski, Katie; Guelzow, James; Vitali, Victoria

    2010-11-22

    We report what we believe to be record performance for a high average power Yb:YAG cryogenic laser system with sustained output power. In a CW oscillator-single-pass amplifier configuration, 963 W of output power was measured. In a second configuration, a two amplifier Yb:YAG cryogenic system was driven with a fiber laser picosecond ultrafast oscillator at a 50 MHz repetition rate, double-passed through the first amplifier and single-passed through the second, resulting in 758 W of average power output. Pulses exiting the system have a FWHM pulsewidth of 12.4 ps, an energy/pulse of 15.2 μJ, and a peak power of 1.23 MW. Both systems are force convection-cooled with liquid nitrogen and have been demonstrated to run reliably over long time periods.

  2. Q-switching of a high-power solid-state laser by a fast scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Baburin, N V; Borozdov, Yu V; Danileiko, Yu K; Denker, B I; Ivanov, A D; Osiko, Vyacheslav V; Sverchkov, S E; Sidorin, A V; Chikov, V A; Ifflander, R; Hack, R; Kertesz, I; Kroo, N

    1998-07-31

    An investigation was made of the suitability of a Q-switch, based on a piezoelectrically scanned short-base Fabry-Perot interferometer, for an Nd{sup 3+}:YAG laser with an average output radiation power up to 2 kW. The proposed switch made it possible to generate of giant pulses of 60 - 300 ns duration at a repetition rate of 20 - 100 kHz. Throughout the investigated range of the pulse repetition rates the average power was at least equal to that obtained by cw lasing. Special requirements to be satisfied by the interferometer, essential for efficient Q-switching, were considered. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  3. High-efficiency solid state power amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallis, Robert E. (Inventor); Cheng, Sheng (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A high-efficiency solid state power amplifier (SSPA) for specific use in a spacecraft is provided. The SSPA has a mass of less than 850 g and includes two different X-band power amplifier sections, i.e., a lumped power amplifier with a single 11-W output and a distributed power amplifier with eight 2.75-W outputs. These two amplifier sections provide output power that is scalable from 11 to 15 watts without major design changes. Five different hybrid microcircuits, including high-efficiency Heterostructure Field Effect Transistor (HFET) amplifiers and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) phase shifters have been developed for use within the SSPA. A highly efficient packaging approach enables the integration of a large number of hybrid circuits into the SSPA.

  4. Modeling of Material Removal by Solid State Heat Capacity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2002-04-17

    Pulsed lasers offer the capability of rapid material removal. Here we present simulations of steel coupon tests by two solid state heat capacity lasers built at LLNL. Operating at 1.05 pm, these deliver pulse energies of about 80 J at 10 Hz, and about 500 J at 20 Hz. Each is flashlamp-pumped. The first laser was tested at LLNL, while the second laser has been delivered to HELSTF, White Sands Missile Range. Liquid ejection appears to be an important removal mechanism. We have modeled these experiments via a time-dependent code called THALES, which describes heat transport, melting, vaporization, and the hydrodynamics of liquid, vapor, and air. It was previously used, in a less advanced form, to model drilling by copper vapor lasers [1] . It was also used to model vaporization in beam dumps for a high-power laser [2]. The basic model is in 1D, while the liquid hydrodynamics is handled in 2D.

  5. Hybrid solid state laser system using a neodymium-based master oscillator and an ytterbium-based power amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Marshall, Christopher D.; Powell, Howard T.; Krupke, William F.

    2001-01-01

    In a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) hybrid laser system, the master oscillator (MO) utilizes a Nd.sup.3+ -doped gain medium and the power amplifier (PA) utilizes a diode-pumped Yb.sup.3+ -doped material. The use of two different laser gain media in the hybrid MOPA system provides advantages that are otherwise not available. The Nd-doped gain medium preferably serves as the MO because such gain media offer the lowest threshold of operation and have already been engineered as practical systems. The Yb-doped gain medium preferably serves in the diode-pumped PA to store pump energy effectively and efficiently by virtue of the long emission lifetime, thereby reducing diode pump costs. One crucial constraint on the MO and PA gain media is that the Nd and Yb lasers must operate at nearly the same wavelength. The 1.047 .mu.m Nd:YLF/Yb:S-FAP [Nd:LiYF.sub.4 /Yb:Sr.sub.5 (PO.sub.4).sub.3 F] hybrid MOPA system is a preferred embodiment of the hybrid Nd/Yb MOPA.

  6. Mid-infrared solid-state lasers and laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Byvik, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    An account is given of NASA-Langley's objectives for the development of advanced lasers and laser materials systems applicable to remote sensing in the mid-IR range. Prominent among current concerns are fiber-optic spectroscopy, eye-safe solid-state lasers for both Doppler sensing and mid-IR wavelength-generation laser pumping, and nonlinear optics generating tunable mid-IR radiation. Ho:YAG lasers are noted to exhibit intrinsic advantages for the desired applications, and are pumpable by GaAlAs laser diodes with a quantum efficiency approaching 2.

  7. The search for solid state fusion lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research puts severe demands on the laser driver. In recent years large, multibeam Nd:glass lasers have provided a flexible experimental tool for exploring fusion target physics because of their high powers, variable pulse length and shape, wavelength flexibility using harmonic generation, and adjustable that Nd:glass lasers can be scaled up to provide a single-phase, multi-megajoule, high-gain laboratory microfusion facility, and gas-cooled slab amplifiers with laser diode pump sources are viable candidates for an efficient, high repetition rate, megawatt driver for an ICF reactor. In both applications requirements for energy storage and energy extraction drastically limit the choice of lasing media. Nonlinear optical effects and optical damage are additional design constraints. New laser architectures applicable to ICF drivers and possible laser materials, both crystals and glasses, are surveyed. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  8. High-power QCW microsecond-pulse solid-state sodium beacon laser with spiking suppression and D2b re-pumping.

    PubMed

    Bian, Qi; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Jun-wei; Guo, Chuan; Xu, Chang; Tu, Wei; Shen, Yu; Zong, Nan; Yuan, Lei; Gao, Hong-wei; Peng, Qin-jun; Chen, Hong-bin; Feng, Lu; Jin, Kai; Wei, Kai; Cui, Da-fu; Xue, Sui-jian; Zhang, Yu-dong; Xu, Zu-yan

    2016-04-15

    A 65 W quasi-continuous-wave microsecond-pulse solid-state sodium beacon laser tuned to the sodium D2a line has been developed with a linewidth of 0.3 GHz, beam quality of M2=1.38, and pulse width of 120 μs at a repetition rate of 500 Hz by sum-frequency mixing 1319 and 1064 nm diode-pumped Nd:YAG master-oscillator power-amplifier systems. The laser wavelength stability is less than ±0.15 GHz through feedback controlling. The laser spiking due to relaxation oscillations is suppressed by inserting frequency doublers in both 1319 and 1064 nm oscillators. Sodium D2b re-pumping is accomplished by tuning the frequency of the electro-optic modulator with the right D2a-D2b offset. A bright sodium laser guide star with a photon return of 1820 photons/cm2/s was achieved with the laser system when a 32 W circular polarized beam was projected to the sky during our field test at the Xinglong Observatory.

  9. High-power QCW microsecond-pulse solid-state sodium beacon laser with spiking suppression and D2b re-pumping.

    PubMed

    Bian, Qi; Bo, Yong; Zuo, Jun-wei; Guo, Chuan; Xu, Chang; Tu, Wei; Shen, Yu; Zong, Nan; Yuan, Lei; Gao, Hong-wei; Peng, Qin-jun; Chen, Hong-bin; Feng, Lu; Jin, Kai; Wei, Kai; Cui, Da-fu; Xue, Sui-jian; Zhang, Yu-dong; Xu, Zu-yan

    2016-04-15

    A 65 W quasi-continuous-wave microsecond-pulse solid-state sodium beacon laser tuned to the sodium D2a line has been developed with a linewidth of 0.3 GHz, beam quality of M2=1.38, and pulse width of 120 μs at a repetition rate of 500 Hz by sum-frequency mixing 1319 and 1064 nm diode-pumped Nd:YAG master-oscillator power-amplifier systems. The laser wavelength stability is less than ±0.15 GHz through feedback controlling. The laser spiking due to relaxation oscillations is suppressed by inserting frequency doublers in both 1319 and 1064 nm oscillators. Sodium D2b re-pumping is accomplished by tuning the frequency of the electro-optic modulator with the right D2a-D2b offset. A bright sodium laser guide star with a photon return of 1820 photons/cm2/s was achieved with the laser system when a 32 W circular polarized beam was projected to the sky during our field test at the Xinglong Observatory. PMID:27082331

  10. Endoscopic cystoventriculostomy and ventriculocysternostomy using a recently developed 2.0-micron fiber-guided high-power diode-pumped solid state laser in children with hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans C.; Kruschat, Thomas; Knobloch, Torsten; Rostasy, Kevin; Buchfelder, Michael

    2005-04-01

    Preterm infants have a high incidence of post hemorrhagic or post infectious hydrocephalus often associated with ventricular or arachnoic cysts which carry a high risk of entrapment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In these cases fenestration and opening of windows within the separating membranes are neurosurgical options. Although Nd:YAG- and diode-lasers have already been used in neuroendoscopic procedures, neurosurgeons avoid the use of high energy lasers in proximity to vital structures because of potential side effects. We have used a recently developed diode pumped solid state (DPSS) laser emitting light at a wavelength of 2.0 μm (Revolix TM LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany), which can be delivered through silica fibres towards endoscopic targets. From July 2002 until June 2004 fourteen endoscopic procedures in 12 consecutive patients (age 3 months to 12 years old) were performed. Most children suffered from complex post hemorrhagic and post infectious hydrocephalus, in whom ventriculoperitoneal shunt devices failed to restore a CSF equilibrium due to entrapment of CSF pathways by the cysts. We used two different endoscopes, a 6 mm Neuroendoscope (Braun Aesculap, Melsungen, Germany; a 4 mm miniature Neuroscope (Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). The endoscopes were connected to a standard camera and TV monitor, the laser energy was introduced through a 365 μm core diameter bare ended silica fibre (PercuFib, LISA laser products, Katlenburg, Germany) through the endoscope"s working channel. The continuous wave laser was operated at power levels from 5 to 15 Watt in continuous and chopped mode. The frequency of the laser in chopped mode was varied between 5 and 20 Hz. All patients tolerated the procedure well. No immediate or long term side effects were noted. In 3 patients with cystic compression of the 4th ventricle, insertion of a shunt device could be avoided. The authors conclude that the use of the new RevolixTM laser enables safe and effective procedures

  11. Solar Power Satellite (SPS) solid-state antenna power combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A low loss power-combining microstrip antenna suitable for solid state solar power satellite (SPS) application was developed. A unique approach for performing both the combining and radiating function in a single cavity-type circuit was verified, representing substantial refinements over previous demonstration models in terms of detailed geometry to obtain good matching and adequate bandwidth at the design frequency. The combiner circuit was designed, built, and tested and the overall results support the view that the solid state power-combining antenna approach is a viable candidate for a solid state SPS antenna building block.

  12. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-02

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  13. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  14. NASA developments in solid state power amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last ten years, NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of solid state power amplifiers for space applications. Historically, the program may be divided into three phases. The first efforts were carried out in support of the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) program, which is developing an experimental version of a Ka-band commercial communications system. These first amplifiers attempted to use hybrid technology. The second phase was still targeted at ACTS frequencies, but concentrated on monolithic implementations, while the current, third phase, is a monolithic effort that focusses on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and stresses amplifier efficiency. The topics covered include: (1) 20 GHz hybrid amplifiers; (2) 20 GHz monolithic MESFET power amplifiers; (3) Texas Instruments' (TI) 20 GHz variable power amplifier; (4) TI 20 GHz high power amplifier; (5) high efficiency monolithic power amplifiers; (6) GHz high efficiency variable power amplifier; (7) TI 32 GHz monolithic power amplifier performance; (8) design goals for Hughes' 32 GHz variable power amplifier; and (9) performance goals for Hughes' pseudomorphic 60 GHz power amplifier.

  15. Engineering aspects of solid-state phase conjugate lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, Eduard; Mordaunt, David W.; Matthews, Steven C.; Kahan, Osher; Muir, Alexander R.; Palombo, Mario

    1992-06-01

    An engineering approach for the development of laser hardware that takes advantage of the special properties of phase conjugation is reported. The principal advantages of conjugate solid-state lasers are alignment stability and passive compensation of thermal distortion in a double pass laser amplifier chain. Attention is given to the application of phase conjugation techniques to the design, fabrication, and field testing of an Nd:YAG second harmonic 0.5 Joule, 30 Hertz flashlamp pumped laser in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration. The double pass amplifier featured a phase conjugate mirror and a second harmonic crystal within the amplifier chain. The basic Nd:YAG laser produced a doubling efficiency of 75 percent from 1064 to 532 nm. This output was subsequently used as the source, and a conversion efficiency of 80 percent into six wavelengths in the visible spectrum was obtained using stimulated rotational Raman scattering.

  16. Relative Advantages of Direct and Indirect Drive for an Inertial Fusion Energy Power Plant Driven by a Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D.

    2001-03-06

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the relative advantages of direct drive (DD) and indirect drive (ID) for a 1 GWe inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant driven by a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL). This comparison is motivated by a recent study (1) that shows that the projected cost of electricity (COE) for DD is actually about the same as that for ID even though the target gain for DD can be much larger. We can therefore no longer assume that DD is the ultimate targeting scenario for IFE, and must begin a more rigorous comparison of these two drive options. The comparison begun here shows that ID may actually end up being preferred, but the uncertainties are still rather large.

  17. High power single frequency solid state master oscillator power amplifier for gravitational wave detection.

    PubMed

    Basu, Chandrajit; Wessels, Peter; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2012-07-15

    High power single frequency, single mode, linearly polarized laser output at the 1 μm regime is in demand for the interferometric gravitational wave detectors (GWDs). A robust single frequency solid state master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) is a promising candidate for such applications. We present a single frequency solid state multistage MOPA system delivering 177 W of linearly polarized output power at 1 μm with 83.5% TEM(00) mode content.

  18. The solid state detector technology for picosecond laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    We developed an all solid state laser ranging detector technology, which makes the goal of millimeter accuracy achievable. Our design and construction philosophy is to combine the techniques of single photon ranging, ultrashort laser pulses, and fast fixed threshold discrimination while avoiding any analog signal processing within the laser ranging chain. The all solid state laser ranging detector package consists of the START detector and the STOP solid state photon counting module. Both the detectors are working in an optically triggered avalanche switching regime. The optical signal is triggering an avalanche current buildup which results in the generation of a uniform, fast risetime output pulse.

  19. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models. PMID:21643092

  20. Solid state lasers for planetary exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Ben; Taubman, Matthew; Watts, Jeffrey W.; Gaither, Gary L.

    1991-09-01

    Design and performance data on two laser transmitters for spaceborne laser ranging are presented. The first laser uses a master oscillator/power amplifier configuration consisting of a diode pumped Nd:YAG slab ring and a multipass diode pumped slab amplifier which can operate at 40 Hz for > 109 shots. The other laser is a diode pumped Nd:YAG slab standing wave oscillator which operates at 10 Hz for > 0.6 X 109 shots. For submillimeter laser ranging, one laser operates in a mode-locked cavity-dumped mode to produce 180 mJ, 40 psec pulses at 1.064 micrometers . For altimetry, the same laser operates in a Q-switched mode to produce 700 mJ, 3.5 nsec pulses at 1.064 micrometers . Second and third harmonic generators generate 0.532 micrometers and 0.355 micrometers for ranging at 2 wavelengths to terrestrial targets with inherent atmospheric correction. The oscillator utilizes a ring resonator configuration with active mode locking, active Q-switching, active pre-lase stabilization, and active cavity dumping. The mode-locked output pulsewidth is 40 psec. A second oscillator mode, remotely selectable, produces 3.5 nsec pulses. Stabilization and alignment is done with real-time feedback during the mission. The amplifier is a multipass slab. Parasitic (ASE) oscillations are suppressed despite very high stored energy in the amplifier medium. The second laser transmitter is a linearly polarized Q-switched Nd:YAG slab laser cavity. The Nd:YAG is pumped by a 44-bar array of AlGaAs laser diodes. It produces 45 mJ, 10 nsec, pulses at 1064 nm and will operate at 10 Hz for the two-earth-year on-orbit lifetime. The expected operation will produce 6 X 108 shots during the mission. The laser transmitter will consume 15 watts, which represents a 3% wall plug efficiency. The laser transmitter has a beam divergence of 0.25 mrad and will maintain boresight to the receiver within 100 (mu) rad. The lasers have been specifically developed for ultra-high reliability for use in space

  1. Miniaturized radioisotope solid state power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurial, J.-P.; Snyder, G. J.; Patel, J.; Herman, J. A.; Caillat, T.; Nesmith, B.; Kolawa, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical power requirements for the next generation of deep space missions cover a wide range from the kilowatt to the milliwatt. Several of these missions call for the development of compact, low weight, long life, rugged power sources capable of delivering a few milliwatts up to a couple of watts while operating in harsh environments. Advanced solid state thermoelectric microdevices combined with radioisotope heat sources and energy storage devices such as capacitors are ideally suited for these applications. By making use of macroscopic film technology, microgenrators operating across relatively small temperature differences can be conceptualized for a variety of high heat flux or low heat flux heat source configurations. Moreover, by shrinking the size of the thermoelements and increasing their number to several thousands in a single structure, these devices can generate high voltages even at low power outputs that are more compatible with electronic components. Because the miniaturization of state-of-the-art thermoelectric module technology based on Bi2Te3 alloys is limited due to mechanical and manufacturing constraints, we are developing novel microdevices using integrated-circuit type fabrication processes, electrochemical deposition techniques and high thermal conductivity substrate materials. One power source concept is based on several thermoelectric microgenerator modules that are tightly integrated with a 1.1W Radioisotope Heater Unit. Such a system could deliver up to 50mW of electrical power in a small lightweight package of approximately 50 to 60g and 30cm3. An even higher degree of miniaturization and high specific power values (mW/mm3) can be obtained when considering the potential use of radioisotope materials for an alpha-voltaic or a hybrid thermoelectric/alpha-voltaic power source. Some of the technical challenges associated with these concepts are discussed in this paper. .

  2. Aberrations and focusability in large solid-state-laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, W.W.

    1981-01-01

    Solid state lasers for fusion experiments must reliably deliver maximum power to small (approximately .5 mm) targets from stand-off focal distances of 1 m or more. This requirement places stringent limits upon the optical quality of the several major components - amplifiers, Faraday isolators, spatial filters - in each amplifier train. Residual static aberrations in optical components are transferred to the beam as it traverses the optical amplifier chain. Although individual components are typically less than lambda/20 for components less than 10 cm clear aperture; and less than lambda/10 for components less than 20 cm clear aperture; the large number of such components in optical series results in a wavefront error that may exceed one wave for modern solid state lasers. For pulse operation, the focal spot is additionally broadened by intensity dependent nonlinearities. Specific examples of the performance of large aperture components will be presented within the context of the Argus and Shiva laser systems, which are presently operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Design requirements upon the larger aperture Nova laser components, up to 74 cm in clear aperture, will also be discussed; these pose a significant challenge to the optical industry.

  3. Fracture of solid state laser slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, J.E.

    1986-07-01

    Fracture due to thermal stress limits the power output potential of modern, high average power slab lasers. Here the criteria for slab fracture and the nature of the surface flaws which constitute the strength-controlling defects are reviewed. Specific fracture data for gadolinium scandium gallium garnet and LHG-5 phosphate glass with different surface finishes are evaluated in the context of assigning appropriate slab operating parameters using Wiebull statistics. These examples illustrate both the danger of design using brittle components without adequate fracture testing, and the inadequacy of design methods which use a fixed safety factor, for this class of materials. Further consideration reveals that operation of slab lasers in contact with an aqueous coolant may lead to strength degradation with time. Finally, the evolution of the failure process in which a characteristic midplane crack forms is outlined, and the pertinent parameters for avoiding slab fracture are identified.

  4. Overview of the Lucia laser program: toward 100-Joules, nanosecond-pulse, kW averaged power based on ytterbium diode-pumped solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteloup, J.-C.; Yu, H.; Bourdet, G.; Dambrine, C.; Ferre, S.; Fulop, A.; Le Moal, S.; Pichot, A.; Le Touze, G.; Zhao, Z.

    2005-04-01

    We present the current status of the Lucia laser being built at the LULI laboratory, the national civil facility for intense laser matter interaction in France. This diode pumped laser will deliver a 100 Joules, 10 ns, 10 Hz pulse train from Yb:YAG using 4400 power diode laser bars. We first focus on the amplifier stage by describing the reasons for selecting our extraction architecture. Thermal issues and solutions for both laser and pumping heads are then described. Finally, we emphasize more specifically the need for long-lifetime high-laser-damage-threshold coatings and optics.

  5. Lanthanide Series And Transition Metal Solid-State Lasers Meeting New Objectives With Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1986-06-01

    Ater the initial introduction of the first solid-state laser, there was a flurry of research directed toward the discovery of new lasers. Activity during this period of time produced the Cr:Al2O3 laser and the Nd:YAG laser. For a relatively long time after this, research directed toward the discovery of new solid-state lasers appeared to subside. Over the past several years, this trend seemed to reverse itself. Cr:BeAl2O4 was one of the first of the new lasers to be introduced. Rather than concentrate either on this laser or on Nd-based lasers, this talk will be directed toward other new solid-state lasers. New lasers, or rediscovery of old lasers, has concentrated on two groups of elements, the lanthanide series elements and the transition metal elements. A substantial difference exists between the solid-state lasers depending on the group of elements of which the active atom is a member. Differences and similarities will be highlighted as the methods used in solid-state laser engineering to meet new objectives are explored.

  6. High power RF solid state power amplifier system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, III, William Herbert (Inventor); Chavers, Donald Gregory (Inventor); Richeson, James J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high frequency, solid state power amplifier system includes a plurality of input multiple port splitters for receiving a high-frequency input and for dividing the input into a plurality of outputs and a plurality of solid state amplifier units. Each amplifier unit includes a plurality of amplifiers, and each amplifier is individually connected to one of the outputs of multiport splitters and produces a corresponding amplified output. A plurality of multiport combiners combine the amplified outputs of the amplifiers of each of the amplifier units to a combined output. Automatic level control protection circuitry protects the amplifiers and maintains a substantial constant amplifier power output.

  7. Modelling and simulation of large solid state laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, W.W.; Warren, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of numerical methods to simulate the several physical processes (e.g., diffraction, self-focusing, gain saturation) that are involved in coherent beam propagation through large laser systems is discussed. A comprehensive simulation code for modeling the pertinent physical phenomena observed in laser operations (growth of small-scale modulation, spatial filter, imaging, gain saturation and beam-induced damage) is described in some detail. Comparisons between code results and solid state laser output performance data are presented. Design and performance estimation of the large Nova laser system at LLNL are given. Finally, a global design rule for large, solid state laser systems is discussed.

  8. Solid-state lasers for coherent communication and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    Semiconductor-diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers have properties that are superior to other lasers for the applications of coherent communication and remote sensing. These properties include efficiency, reliability, stability, and capability to be scaled to higher powers. We have demonstrated that an optical phase-locked loop can be used to lock the frequency of two diode-pumped 1.06 micron Nd:YAG lasers to levels required for coherent communication. Monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators constructed from solid pieces of the laser material provide better than 10 kHz frequency stability over 0.1 sec intervals. We have used active feedback stabilization of the cavity length of these lasers to demonstrate 0.3 Hz frequency stabilization relative to a reference cavity. We have performed experiments and analysis to show that optical parametric oscillators (OPO's) reproduce the frequency stability of the pump laser in outputs that can be tuned to arbitrary wavelengths. Another measurement performed in this program has demonstrated the sub-shot-noise character of correlations of the fluctuations in the twin output of OPO's. Measurements of nonlinear optical coefficients by phase-matched second harmonic generation are helping to resolve inconsistency in these important parameters.

  9. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy in complex solid state materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianqi

    2014-12-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on applying the ultrafast laser spectroscopy to the complex solid state materials. It shows that the ultrafast laser pulse can coherently control the material properties in the femtosecond time scale. And the ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be employed as a dynamical method for revealing the fundamental physical problems in the complex material systems.

  10. Solid state modulator for klystron power supply XFEL TDS INJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadtsev, A. A.; Zavadtsev, D. A.; Zybin, D. A.; Churanov, D. V.; Shemarykin, P. V.

    2016-09-01

    The transverse deflecting system XFEL TDS INJ for European X-ray Free Electron Laser includes power supply for the CPI VKS-8262HS klystron. It has been designed for pulse high-voltage, cathode heating, solenoid and klystron ion pump. The klystron power supply includes solid state modulator, pulse transformer, controlled power supply for cathode heating and commercial power supplies for solenoid and ion pump. Main parameters of the modulator are 110 kV of peak voltage, 72 A peak current, and pulse length up to 6 μs. The klystron power supply has been developed, designed, manufactured, tuned, tested and installed in the XFEL building. All designed parameters are satisfied.

  11. Tunable solid-state laser technology for applications to scientific and technological experiments from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allario, F.; Taylor, L. V.

    1986-01-01

    Current plans for the Earth Observing System (EOS) include development of a lidar facility to conduct scientific experiments from a polar orbiting platforms. A recommended set of experiments were scoped, which includes techniques of atmospheric backscatter (Lidar), Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), altimetry, and retroranging. Preliminary assessments of the resources (power, weight, volume) required by the Eos Lidar Facility were conducted. A research program in tunable solid state laser technology was developed, which includes laser materials development, modeling and experiments on the physics of solid state laser materials, and development of solid state laser transmitters with a strong focus on Eos scientific investigations. Some of the system studies that were conducted which highlight the payoff of solid state laser technology for the Eos scientific investigations will be discussed. Additionally, a summary of some promising research results which have recently emerged from the research program will be presented.

  12. Solid state remote power controllers for 120 Vdc power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.; Baker, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Solid state Remote Power Controllers (RPCs) developed for use in any dc power system with voltage up to 120 Vdc and distributed power up to 3.6 kW per bus are described. The RPCs were demonstrated to be reliable, 99 percent efficient, comparatively simple, and potentially low in cost. Advantages of the RPCs include: contactless switching; controlled rates of current rise and fall; current limiting; and fast, well-defined, repeatable response to overloads and faults.

  13. Conceptual design of 100-TW solid state laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMordie, John A.

    1995-12-01

    Currently the main solid state laser facilities used for plasma physics research in the United Kingdom are the VULCAN laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the HELEN facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment. In the future it is proposed to replace HELEN with a new 100 TW facility to come on line early in the next century.

  14. Solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weksler, M.; Shwartz, J.

    1988-06-01

    Results are presented for direct solar pumping of a ND:YAG rod laser. Stable CW output of more than 60 W was obtained with a slope efficiency exceeding 2 percent. A compound parabolic concentrator, designed to increase the solar radiation coupled into the laser rod, was used in these experiments. The results are consistent with predictions based on a simple solar-pumped laser model, which is also presented. Using this model, it is shown that existing laser materials with broad-band absorption characteristics (e.g., alexandrite and Nd:Cr:GSGG) have a potential for better than 10 percent overall conversion efficiency when solar pumped.

  15. Compact 10 mW all-solid-state 491 nm laser based on frequency doubling a master oscillator power amplifier laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluck, Daniel; Pliska, Tomas; Günter, Peter

    1996-02-01

    We report on continuous-wave blue-green light generation by direct frequency doubling a monolithically integrated master oscillator power amplifier laser diode in a potassium niobate (KNbO 3) crystal. 10 mW of diffraction limited ( M2 ≤ 1.1) second-harmonic light at 491 nm is generated with a fundamental power of 760 mW incident on a 17 mm long crystal. The blue-green laser radiation is 100% polarised and single-longitudinal mode with a frequency linewidth of ˜33 GHz corresponding to a coherence length of ˜6 mm. The root-mean-square fluctuations of the second-harmonic output power is as low as 0.1% and the power drift is less than 3% over six hours.

  16. Solid-state coherent laser radar wind shear measuring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1992-01-01

    Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) was established in 1984 to engage in the development of coherent laser radar systems and subsystems with applications in atmospheric remote sensing, and in target tracking, ranging and imaging. CTI focuses its capabilities in three major areas: (1) theoretical performance and design of coherent laser radar system; (2) development of coherent laser radar systems for government agencies such as DoD and NASA; and (3) development of coherent laser radar systems for commercial markets. The topics addressed are: (1) 1.06 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system; (2) wind measurement using 1.06 micron system; and flashlamp-pumped 2.09 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system.

  17. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of highly efficient coherent optical sources was reviewed. This work has focused on nonlinear frequency conversion of the highly coherent output of the non-planar ring laser oscillators developed earlier in the program, and includes high efficiency second harmonic generation and the operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability.

  18. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of highly efficient coherent optical sources is reviewed. This work focusses on nonlinear frequency conversion of the highly coherent output of the Non-Planar Ring Laser Oscillators developed earlier in the program, and includes high efficiency second harmonic generation and the operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability.

  19. Dual mode solid state power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, Louis C. (Inventor); Williams, Donald E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A solid state amplifier has an output transistor stage and an input transistor stage interconnected as a Darlington circuit. An interstage transistor interconnecting the collectors of the two stages of the Darlington circuit is connected with the first stage transistor in a compound configuration. When the load current furnished by the amplifier is less than a predetermined value, the output stage operates as a simple saturated switch with its base drive current flowing through the emitter-base junction of the first stage which produces no collector current because the base-emitter junction of the interstage transistor is reverse-biased. When the load current exceeds said predetermined value, the interstage transistor begins to conduct allowing the input and output stages to operate as a Darlington amplifier and diverting a significant portion of the base drive current of the output transistor back into the load.

  20. Ion production from solid state laser ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Raeder, S.; Wendt, K.; Havener, C.; Liu, Y.; Lassen, J.; Rothe, S.

    2010-02-15

    Laser ion sources based on resonant excitation and ionization of atoms are well-established tools for selective and efficient production of radioactive ion beams. Recent developments are focused on the use of the state-of-the-art all solid-state laser systems. To date, 35 elements of the periodic table are available from laser ion sources based on tunable Ti:sapphire lasers. Recent progress in this field regarding the establishment of suitable optical excitation schemes for Ti:sapphire lasers are reported.

  1. Solid-state lasers for coherent communication and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Work in the stabilization of monolithic Nd:YAG lasers and the application of these lasers to nonlinear optical frequency conversion is discussed. The intrinsic stability of semiconductor diode laser pumped solid state lasers has facilitated a number of demonstration in external resonant cavity harmonic generation and stable optical parametric oscillation. Relative laser frequency stabilization of 0.3 Hz was achieved, and absolute stability of a few hundred hertz is anticipated. The challenge is now to reproduce this frequency stability in the output of tunable nonlinear optical devices. Theoretical and experimental work toward this goal are continuing.

  2. 1.2 MW peak power, all-solid-state picosecond laser with a microchip laser seed and a high gain single-passing bounce geometry amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhua; Shen, Lifeng; Zhao, Zhiliang; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Hongbo; Chen, Jun; Liu, Chong

    2016-11-01

    A semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) based passively Q-switched microchip Nd:YVO4 seed laser with pulse duration of 90 ps at repetition rate of 100 kHz is amplified by single-passing a Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier with varying seed input power from 20 μW to 10 mW. The liquid pure metal greasy thermally conductive material is used to replace the traditional thin indium foil as the thermal contact material for better heat load transfer of the Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier. Temperature distribution at the pump surface is measured by an infrared imager to compare with the numerically simulated results. A highest single-passing output power of 11.3 W is obtained for 10 mW averaged seed power, achieving a pulse peak power of ~1.25 MW and pulse energy of ~113 μJ. The beam quality is well preserved with M2 ≤1.25. The simple configuration of this bounce laser amplifier made the system flexible, robust and cost-effective, showing attractive potential for further applications.

  3. Solid state laser applications in photovoltaics manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsky, Corey; Colville, Finlay

    2008-02-01

    Photovoltaic energy conversion devices are on a rapidly accelerating growth path driven by increasing government and societal pressure to use renewable energy as part of an overall strategy to address global warming attributed to greenhouse gas emissions. Initially supported in several countries by generous tax subsidies, solar cell manufacturers are relentlessly pushing the performance/cost ratio of these devices in a quest to reach true cost parity with grid electricity. Clearly this eventual goal will result in further acceleration in the overall market growth. Silicon wafer based solar cells are currently the mainstay of solar end-user installations with a cost up to three times grid electricity. But next-generation technology in the form of thin-film devices promises streamlined, high-volume manufacturing and greatly reduced silicon consumption, resulting in dramatically lower per unit fabrication costs. Notwithstanding the modest conversion efficiency of thin-film devices compared to wafered silicon products (around 6-10% versus 15-20%), this cost reduction is driving existing and start-up solar manufacturers to switch to thin-film production. A key aspect of these devices is patterning large panels to create a monolithic array of series-interconnected cells to form a low current, high voltage module. This patterning is accomplished in three critical scribing processes called P1, P2, and P3. Lasers are the technology of choice for these processes, delivering the desired combination of high throughput and narrow, clean scribes. This paper examines these processes and discusses the optimization of industrial lasers to meet their specific needs.

  4. Femtosecond solid-state laser based on a few-layered black phosphorus saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiancui; Wang, Yiran; Zhang, Baitao; Zhao, Ruwei; Yang, Kejian; He, Jingliang; Hu, Qiangqiang; Jia, Zhitai; Tao, Xutang

    2016-05-01

    In this Letter, a high-quality, few-layered black phosphorus (BP) saturable absorber (SA) was fabricated successfully, and a femtosecond solid-state laser modulated by BP-SA was experimentally demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Pulses as short as 272 fs were achieved with an average output power of 0.82 W, corresponding to the pulse energy of 6.48 nJ and peak power of 23.8 MW. So far, these represent the shortest pulse duration and highest output power ever obtained with a BP-based mode-locked solid-state laser. The results indicate the promising potential of few-layered BP-SA for applications in solid-state femtosecond mode-locked lasers. PMID:27128045

  5. Tunable solid state laser system for dermatology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, Zion; Bank, Alexander; Donskoy, Dmitri M.; Nechitailo, Vladimir S.

    1994-12-01

    The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is the most recent in a series of pulsed laser systems for plastic surgery. The 532 nm wavelength has been shown to be absorbed by a variety of chromophores. These include tattoo pigments, oxygenated hemoglobin and melanin-containing epidermal cells. A simple multi-line solid state laser module pumped by double-frequency Q- switched YAG laser is presented. This solid state multi-line module enables tuning of the wavelength in the yellow spectral range to 560 nm or to 580 nm for dermatology applications. Conversion efficiency in excess of 70% was achieved at 10 Hz pulse repetition frequency and output energy per pulse of approximately 200 mJ.

  6. Cladding for transverse-pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L. (Inventor); Fan, Tso Y. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a transverse pumped, solid state laser, a nonabsorptive cladding surrounds a gain medium. A single tranverse mode, namely the Transverse Electromagnetic (TEM) sub 00 mode, is provided. The TEM sub 00 model has a cross sectional diameter greater than a transverse dimension of the gain medium but less than a transverse dimension of the cladding. The required size of the gain medium is minimized while a threshold for laser output is lowered.

  7. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films

    DOEpatents

    Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber.

  8. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films

    DOEpatents

    Zapata, L.E.

    1994-08-02

    A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber. 16 figs.

  9. Solid state lasers for photodynamic therapy of malignant neoplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khulugurov, Vitaliy M.; Ivanov, Nikolai; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Mayorov, Alexander; Bordzilovsky, Dnitri; Masycheva, Valentina; Danilenko, Elena; Chung, Moon-Kwan

    2002-05-01

    This work demonstrates the possibility of treating animals with malignant neoplasms using 608 nm of laser radiation by means of photodynamic therapy (PDT). The intracavity transformation of the Nd:YAP main radiation 1079 nm was Raman converted in barium nitrate crystal, and the Stokes frequency (1216 nm) was doubled using KTP or RTA crystals. The LiF or Cr:YAG crystals are used for the Q-switch. The radiation parameters were obtained at 100 Hz pump repetition frequency. The average power at 608-nm radiation with LiF and KTP was 700 mW at multimode generation. The 3-6 single 10-15 ns pulses were generated during one cycle of pumping. The doubling efficiency with RTA was two times more than with KTP. The cells of Ehrlich adenocarcinoma (0.1 ml) were implanted in hind thighs of ICR white non-imbred mice. Photosensitizer HpD was i.v. administered in a dose of 10 mg/kg. Ten animals were treated (2 as a control). There was a 9-30% decrease in the tumor growth depending on the irradiation dose. The better result (30%) was for the 200 J/cm2 dose radiation. These results show the possibility of using all solid state lasers with wavelength of 608 nm for PDT.

  10. Prototype laser-diode-pumped solid state laser transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Cheng, Emily A. P.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Monolithic, diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers can provide diffraction-limited, single-frequency, narrow-linewidth, tunable output which is adequate for use as a local oscillator in a coherent communication system. A laser was built which had a linewidth of about 2 kHz, a power of 5 milliwatts, and which was tunable over a range of 30 MHz in a few microseconds. This laser was phase-locked to a second, similar laser. This demonstrates that the powerful technique of heterodyne detection is possible with a diode-pumped laser used as the local oscillator. Laser diode pumping of monolithic Nd:YAG rings can lead to output powers of hundreds of milliwatts from a single laser. A laser was built with a single-mode output of 310 mW. Several lasers can be chained together to sum their power, while maintaining diffraction-limited, single frequency operation. This technique was demonstrated with two lasers, with a total output of 340 mW, and is expected to be practical for up to about ten lasers. Thus with lasers of 310 mW, output of up to 3 W is possible. The chaining technique, if properly engineered, results in redundancy. The technique of resonant external modulation and doubling is designed to efficiently convert the continuous wave, infrared output of our lasers into low duty-cycle pulsed green output. This technique was verified through both computer modeling and experimentation. Further work would be necessary to develop a deliverable system using this technique.

  11. Analysis of measurements for solid state laser remote lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1995-01-01

    The merits of using lidar systems for remote measurements of various atmospheric processes such as wind, turbulence, moisture, and aerosol concentration are widely recognized. Although the lidar technology has progressed considerably over the past two decades, significant research particularly in the area of solid state lidars remains to be conducted in order to fully exploit this technology. The work performed by the UAH (University of Alabama in Huntsville) personnel under this Delivery Order concentrated on analyses of measurements required in support of solid state laser remote sensing lidar systems which are to be designed, deployed, and used to measure atmospheric processes and constituents. UAH personnel has studied and recommended to NASA/MSFC the requirements of the optical systems needed to characterize the detection devices suitable for solid state wavelengths and to evaluate various heterodyne detection schemes. The 2-micron solid state laser technology was investigated and several preliminary laser designs were developed and their performance for remote sensing of atmospheric winds and clouds from a spaceborne platform were specified. In addition to the laser source and the detector, the other critical technologies necessary for global wind measurements by a spaceborne solid state coherent lidar systems were identified to be developed and demonstrated. As part of this work, an analysis was performed to determine the atmospheric wind velocity estimation accuracy using the line-of-sight measurements of a scanning coherent lidar. Under this delivery order, a computer database of materials related to the theory, development, testing, and operation of lidar systems was developed to serve as a source of information for lidar research and development.

  12. Heat generation and thermo-mechanical effect modeling in longitudinally diode-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhdari, Fouad; Osmani, Ismahen; Tabet, Saida

    2015-09-01

    Thermal management in solid state laser is a challenge to the high power laser industry's ability to provide continued improvements in device and system performance. In this work an investigation of heat generation and thermo-mechanical effect in a high-power Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG cylindrical-type solid state laser pumped longitudinally with different power by fibre coupled laser diode is carried out by numerical simulation based on the finite element method (FEM). Impact of the dopant concentration on the power conversion efficiency is included in the simulation. The distribution of the temperature inside the lasing material is resolute according to the thermal conductivity. The thermo-mechanical effect is explored as a function of pump power in order to determine the maximum pumping power allowed to prevent the crystal's fracture. The presented simulations are in broad agreement with analytical solutions; provided that the boundary condition of the pump induced heat generation is accurately modelled.

  13. Toward high brightness, multi-kilowatt solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Manes, K.R.

    1990-11-01

    High average power (HAP) solid state laser output with improved beam quality has introduced new capabilities in materials processing. At the 500 W level and with a beam quality of a few'' times the diffraction limit, the General Electric NY slab is able to drill 5 cm of stainless steel in a few seconds. We expect that 2--3 kW of near infrared laser output in a low order spatial mode would enable metal working now unknown to industry. The HAP output of slab lasers is limited by the size of the available laser crystals and the pump power. Core free, six cm diameter NY boules have been grown on an experimental basis. High optical quality NG can be obtained up to 10 cm in diameter. We present the results of our modeling based on these crystals pumped by advanced arc-lamps or laser diode arrays. We project HAP laser outputs of 1.6 kW from an existing Vortek pumped NG oscillator and about 2 kW from diode pumped NY device. Several kW of laser output can be expected from two such slabs in a MOPA configuration before optical damage limits are reached. The three dimensional stress-optic code which we used to optimize our designs, was normalized to available experimental data obtained with the above NG slab at the 500 W level and a 40 W diode pumped NY test bed. Our calculations indicate the essential parameters for attainment of high beam quality. Cooling uniformity across the pumped faces of the slab is critical and the location of the transition between pumped and un-pumped regions towards the slab tips is very important. A flat pumping profile was found to be desirable and predicted one wave of distortion which should be correctable over about 75% of the aperture however, an even better wavefront was predicted over 90% of the aperture when the regions near the edges of the slab were slightly over-pumped relative to the central regions and the regions near to the ends were tapered to compensate for transition effects.

  14. Variable pulse repetition frequency output from an optically injected solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Kane, D M; Toomey, J P

    2011-02-28

    An optically injected solid state laser (OISSL) system is known to generate complex nonlinear dynamics within the parameter space of varying the injection strength of the master laser and the frequency detuning between the master and slave lasers. Here we show that within these complex nonlinear dynamics, a system which can be operated as a source of laser pulses with a pulse repetition frequency (prf) that can be continuously varied by a single control, is embedded. Generation of pulse repetition frequencies ranging from 200 kHz up to 4 MHz is shown to be achievable for an optically injected Nd:YVO4 solid state laser system from analysis of prior experimental and simulation results. Generalizing this to other optically injected solid state laser systems, the upper bound on the repetition frequency is of order the relaxation oscillation frequency for the lasers. The system is discussed in the context of prf versatile laser systems more generally. Proposals are made for the next generation of OISSLs that will increase understanding of the variable pulse repetition frequency operation, and determine its practical limitations. Such variable prf laser systems; both low powered, and, higher powered systems achieved using one or more optical power amplifier stages; have many potential applications from interrogating resonance behaviors in microscale structures, through sensing and diagnostics, to laser processing.

  15. Workshop on Solid State Switches for Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnoy, W. M.; Kristiansen, M.

    1983-05-01

    A Workshop on Solid State Pulsed Power Switching was conducted by Texas Tech U at Tamarron, Colorado, in January, 1983 for the US Army Research Office. The Workshop addressed the state-of-the-art in solid state switching, particularly semiconductor switches, and new solid state related switching concepts for pulsed power applications. An important objective of the Workshop was to establish research priorities. Group discussions were augmented by invited presentations. The principal topics included opening switches, high power closing switches, extremely fast risetime closing switches and state transition switches; devices of particular interest were thyristors, avalanche switches and the optically triggered intrinsic switch. The invited papers, along with summaries of the Working Group discussions and recommendations, are presented in this report. A general summary, including suggested research topics, is included.

  16. Kilovolt dc solid state remote power controller development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    The experience gained in developing and applying solid state power controller (SSPC) technology at high voltage dc (HVDC) potentials and power levels of up to 25 kilowatts is summarized. The HVDC switching devices, power switching concepts, drive circuits, and very fast acting overcurrent protection circuits were analyzed. A 25A bipolar breadboard with Darlington connected switching transistor was built. Fault testing at 900 volts was included. A bipolar transistor packaged breadboard design was developed. Power MOSFET remote power controller (RPC) was designed.

  17. Topical meeting on tunable solid state lasers. Digest of technical papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included lidar remote sensing, advances in alexandrite technology, photoluminescence, tunable laser materials selection, flash-pumped titanium lasers, color center lasers, Q-switching, alexandrite lasers, transparent glass ceramics, diode-pumped solid-state lasers for NASA space station lidar experiments, sources for optically pumped solid-state lasers, laser tuning, and monochromator wavelength measurement devices.

  18. VCSEL-pumped passively Q-switched monolithic solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Leeuwen, Robert; Xu, Bing; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qing; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Zhou, Delai; Ghosh, Chuni

    2016-03-01

    High power 808 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) arrays were used to end-pump diffusion-bonded composite laser rods consisting of an Nd:YAG gain medium and a Cr:YAG saturable absorber. The laser pulse energy, q-switch delay time, and optical efficiency of a passively Q-switched monolithic solid state laser in a compact rugged package were measured as a function of VCSEL power for various heatsink temperatures. Up to 19 mJ laser pulse energy was produced with 13% optical efficiency.

  19. Development of Ceramic Solid-State Laser Host Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Trivedi, Sudhir; Kutcher, Susan; Wang, Chen-Chia; Kim, Joo-Soo; Hommerich, Uwe; Shukla, Vijay; Sadangi, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline ceramic laser materials are gaining importance in the development of novel diode-pumped solid-state lasers. Compared to single-crystals, ceramic laser materials offer advantages in terms of ease of fabrication, shape, size, and control of dopant concentrations. Recently, we have developed Neodymium doped Yttria (Nd:Y2O3) as a solid-state ceramic laser material. A scalable production method was utilized to make spherical non agglomerated and monodisperse metastable ceramic powders of compositions that were used to fabricate polycrystalline ceramic material components. This processing technique allowed for higher doping concentrations without the segregation problems that are normally encountered in single crystalline growth. We have successfully fabricated undoped and Neodymium doped Yttria material up to 2" in diameter, Ytterbium doped Yttria, and erbium doped Yttria. We are also in the process of developing other sesquioxides such as scandium Oxide (Sc2O3) and Lutesium Oxide (Lu2O3) doped with Ytterbium, erbium and thulium dopants. In this paper, we present our initial results on the material, optical, and spectroscopic properties of the doped and undoped sesquioxide materials. Polycrystalline ceramic lasers have enormous potential applications including remote sensing, chem.-bio detection, and space exploration research. It is also potentially much less expensive to produce ceramic laser materials compared to their single crystalline counterparts because of the shorter fabrication time and the potential for mass production in large sizes.

  20. Laser supported solid state absorption fronts in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D

    2010-02-09

    We develop a model based on simulation and experiment that explains the behavior of solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts generated in fused silica during high intensity (up to 5GW/cm{sup 2}) laser exposure. We find that the absorption front velocity is constant in time and is nearly linear in laser intensity. Further, this model can explain the dependence of laser damage site size on these parameters. This behavior is driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. The regime of parameter space critical to this problem spans and extends that measured by other means. It serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  1. Laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, C. W.; Bude, J. D.; Demange, P.

    2010-11-01

    We develop a model based on simulation and extensive experimentation that explains the behavior of solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts generated in fused silica during high intensity (up to 5GW/cm2 ) laser exposure. Both experiments and simulations show that the absorption front velocity is constant in time and is nearly linear in laser intensity. Further, this model can explain the dependence of laser damage site size on these parameters. We show that these absorption fronts naturally result from the combination of high-temperature-activated deep subband-gap optical absorptivity, free-electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15000K and pressures <10GPa . The regime of parameter space critical to this problem spans and extends that measured by other means. It serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  2. Solid state lasers for use in non-contact temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1989-01-01

    The last decade has seen a series of dramatic developments in solid state laser technology. Prominent among these has been the emergence of high power semiconductor laser diode arrays and a deepening understanding of the dynamics of solid state lasers. Taken in tandem these two developments enable the design of laser diode pumped solid state lasers. Pumping solid state lasers with semiconductor diodes relieves the need for cumbersome and inefficient flashlamps and results in an efficient and stable laser with the compactness and reliability. It provides a laser source that can be reliably used in space. These new coherent sources are incorporated into the non-contact measurement of temperature. The primary focus is the development and characterization of new optical materials for use in active remote sensors of the atmosphere. In the course of this effort several new materials and new concepts were studied which can be used for other sensor applications. The general approach to the problem of new non-contact temperature measurements has had two components. The first component centers on passive sensors using optical fibers; an optical fiber temperature sensor for the drop tube was designed and tested at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Work on this problem has given insight into the use of optical fibers, especially new IR fibers, in thermal metrology. The second component of the effort is to utilize the experience gained in the study of passive sensors to examine new active sensor concepts. By active sensor are defined as a sensing device or mechanism which is interrogated in some way be radiation, usually from a laser. The status of solid state lasers as sources for active non-contact temperature sensors are summarized. Some specific electro-optic techniques are described which are applicable to the sensor problems at hand. Work on some of these ideas is in progress while other concepts are still being worked out.

  3. ARPA solid state laser and nonlinear materials program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moulton, P.F.

    1994-06-01

    The Research Division of Schwartz Electro-Optics, as part of the ARPA Solid State Laser and Nonlinear Materials Program, conducted a three-year study Erbium-Laser-Based Infrared Sources. The aim of the study was to improve the understanding of semiconductor-laser-pumped, infrared (IR) solid state lasers based on the trivalent rare-earth ion erbium (Er) doped into a variety of host crystals. The initial program plan emphasized operation of erbium-doped materials on the 2.8-3.0 micrometers laser transition. Pulsed, Q-switched sources using that transition, when employed as a pump source for parametric oscillators, can provide tunable mid-IR energy. The dynamics of erbium lasers are more complex than conventional neodymium (Nd)-doped lasers and they intended to use pump-probe techniques to measure the level and temporal behavior of gain in various materials. To do so they constructed a number of different cw Er-doped lasers as probe sources and employed the Cr:LiSAF(LiSrAlF6) laser as a pulsed pump source that would simulate pulsed diode arrays. The authors identified the 970-nm wavelength pump band of Er as the most efficient and were able to make use of recently developed cw and pulsed InGaAs strained-quantum-well diode lasers in the effort. At the conclusion of the program they demonstrated the first pulsed diode bar pumping of the most promising materials for pulsed operation, the oxide garnets YSGG and GGG and the fluoride BaY2F8.

  4. All-solid-state continuous-wave frequency doubling Nd:LuVO4/LBO laser with 2.17 W output power at 543 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Zhao, L.; Zhang, Y. B.; Zheng, Q.; Zhao, Y.; Yao, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Efficient and compact green-yellow laser output at 543 nm is generated by intracavity frequency doubling of a CW diode-pumped Nd:LuVO4 laser at 1086 nm under the condition of suppressing the higher gain transition near 1064 nm. With 16 W of diode pump power and the frequency-doubling crystal LBO, as high as 2.17 W of CW output power at 543 nm is achieved, corresponding to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 13.6% and the output power stability over 8 hours is better than 2.86%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest watt-level laser at 543 nm generated by intracavity frequency doubling of a diode pumped Nd:LuVO4 laser at 1086 nm.

  5. Solid state power systems for DC and RF accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R. J.; Richter-Sand, R. J.

    1999-06-10

    Modern accelerator applications require high average and peak powers - particularly RF accelerators and DC accelerators. In many of these applications, it is possible to replace tubes in the power systems with solid state power supplies. In this paper we outline work which we have performed in developing solid state pulsed and CW pulsed power systems for RF linacs and for DC accelerators. We have built and successfully tested a 125 kV, 2.5 MW peak, 60 kW average pulsed power system which is well suited to driving ion beam linacs. This system is modular, with 3 modules capable of driving a large Klystron. The system has been extensively tested with both resistive and fault loads. This type of power supply promises to be less than half as expensive as a conventional thyratron modulator, with considerably more flexibility in pulse duration. We have also powered our Nested High Voltage (NHV) accelerators with a solid state power supply using IGBTs. This type of supply is suitable for both NHV machines, and other Dynamitron style accelerators. Pulsed burst mode excitation of this type of power supply allows us to maintain 1 MV in the NHV accelerator with less than three hundred watts of idling power.

  6. Solid state power systems for DC and RF accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, R. J.; Richter-Sand, R. J.

    1999-06-01

    Modern accelerator applications require high average and peak powers—particularly RF accelerators and DC accelerators. In many of these applications, it is possible to replace tubes in the power systems with solid state power supplies. In this paper we outline work which we have performed in developing solid state pulsed and CW pulsed power systems for RF linacs and for DC accelerators. We have built and successfully tested a 125 kV, 2.5 MW peak, 60 kW average pulsed power system which is well suited to driving ion beam linacs. This system is modular, with 3 modules capable of driving a large Klystron. The system has been extensively tested with both resistive and fault loads. This type of power supply promises to be less than half as expensive as a conventional thyratron modulator, with considerably more flexibility in pulse duration. We have also powered our Nested High Voltage (NHV) accelerators with a solid state power supply using IGBTs. This type of supply is suitable for both NHV machines, and other Dynamitron style accelerators. Pulsed burst mode excitation of this type of power supply allows us to maintain 1 MV in the NHV accelerator with less than three hundred watts of idling power.

  7. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg; George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Sooy, Walter; Sutton, Steven B.

    1996-01-01

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  8. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  9. Novel stability diagrams for continuous-wave solid-state laser resonators

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.; Magni, V.

    1986-08-01

    Two novel stability diagrams are proposed, which provide a clear understanding of the behavior of solid-state laser resonators with focusing rods. By means of this graphic analysis, information on the stability boundaries, dynamic stability, misalignment sensitivity, and spot size in the rod can be obtained. On the basis of these diagrams the complicated experimental output power curves of a cw Nd:YAG laser have been easily interpreted.

  10. All-Solid-State Four-Color Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gosnell, T.R.; Xie, P.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to develop a solid state laser that produces visible output wavelengths, including the commercially compelling blue wavelength. The basic architecture of the device consists of a single-mode optical fiber doped with Pr{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions. When the ions are simultaneously pumped with a near infrared laser (860 nm), complex energy transfer processes involving multiple excited ions leads to population of a high-lying energy level of Pr{sup 3+}. Results include the demonstration of the existence of a photon avalanche mechanism responsible for creation of the population inversion and demonstration of the highest optical-to-optical efficiency of any up-conversion laser reported to date. A US Patent was awarded for this invention in 1998.

  11. Solid-state-based laser system as a replacement for Ar+ lasers.

    PubMed

    Beck, Tobias; Rein, Benjamin; Sörensen, Fabian; Walther, Thomas

    2016-09-15

    We report on a solid-state-based laser system at 1028 nm. The light is generated by a diode laser seeded ytterbium fiber amplifier. In two build-up cavities, its frequency is doubled and quadrupled to 514 nm and 257 nm, respectively. At 514 nm, the system delivers up to 4.7 W of optical power. In the fourth harmonic, up to 173 mW are available limited by the nonlinear crystal. The frequency of the laser is mode-hop-free tunable by 16 GHz in 10 ms in the UV. Therefore, the system is suitable as a low maintenance, efficient, and tunable narrowband replacement for frequency doubled Ar+ laser systems.

  12. Solid-state-based laser system as a replacement for Ar+ lasers.

    PubMed

    Beck, Tobias; Rein, Benjamin; Sörensen, Fabian; Walther, Thomas

    2016-09-15

    We report on a solid-state-based laser system at 1028 nm. The light is generated by a diode laser seeded ytterbium fiber amplifier. In two build-up cavities, its frequency is doubled and quadrupled to 514 nm and 257 nm, respectively. At 514 nm, the system delivers up to 4.7 W of optical power. In the fourth harmonic, up to 173 mW are available limited by the nonlinear crystal. The frequency of the laser is mode-hop-free tunable by 16 GHz in 10 ms in the UV. Therefore, the system is suitable as a low maintenance, efficient, and tunable narrowband replacement for frequency doubled Ar+ laser systems. PMID:27628353

  13. Surface heat transfer coefficient, heat efficiency, and temperature of pulsed solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, K.; Weber, H.

    1988-08-01

    The temperature of solid-state lasers is a critical parameter. Efficiency and output power are strongly influenced by it. The two parameters which determine the temperature are the heat generation efficiency (HGE) and the surface heat transfer coefficient (SHTC) of the laser rod. These parameters allow the scaling of the rod temperature up to high pumping powers. Moreover, from the temperature inside the rod, the temperature gradients and the mechanical stress can be evaluated. Using transient temperature measurements, the SHTC and the HGE were determined for air- and water-cooled Nd:YAG and alexandrite lasers. The SHTC can be confirmed by theoretical considerations.

  14. Nuclear-Driven Fluorescence Pumped Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boody, Frederick Parker

    Nuclear-Driven Fluorescence lamps (NDFs) coupled via hollow lightpipes to Nd/Cr codoped solid-state lasers have been evaluated; absolutely calibrated Ar, Kr, and Xe NDF spectra measured; and transient radiation-induced absorption (TRIA) effects characterized. Efficient NDFs require a high quantum efficiency (eta_ {q}), low W* fluorescer combined with a distributed mum-dimension nuclear source (aerosol or fibers). Alkali metals, 4.6 eV < W^* ~ 1.2 I_1 < 6.4 eV, are potentially efficient low W^* fluorescers. With radiation trapping, effective lifetimes of alkali-metal D-lines increase to ms range, effectively becoming metastable and allowing time for significant excimer formation and radiation. At nuclear pumping's low power densities, electron quenching of excimers formation and radiation. At nuclear pumping's low power densities, electron quenching of excimers should not be significant. Large (>0.25) diameter-to-length Ag reflector hollow lightpipes should have T > 70%, 90% with tapered fluorescer cells, while active mirror laser geometry is necessary for combining a lightpipe with an incoherent source. A conceptual rotating-disk coupled reactor/laser system produces 12 MW, 1 ms pulses with 3% total efficiency. ^3He(n,p)T excited NDF spectra (400-950 nm) were measured for deposited power densities of 7 mW/cm^3 (steady-state) and 20 W/cm^3 (pulsed), +/-30-40%. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies (eta_{fl}) were only 1% for Kr, 0.6% for Ar, and 0.2% for Xe, due to low eta_{q} (19% max for Kr) and He's high W^* value. Spectra consist of a few dominant lines plus several weaker lines. At 20 W/cm^3 weaker lines are much stronger relative to dominant lines than at 0.7 mW/cm ^3 and eta_{fl } slightly higher. For Ar and Kr, peak intensity of the dominant lines occurs at ~45 torr while for Xe it occurs between 9 and 22 torr. Comparing Kr NDF spectrum to an arc lamp, the 760-nm line is relatively much weaker and the 811-nm line much stronger. Strength of the 811-nm Kr NDF line

  15. April 25, 2003, FY2003 Progress Summary and FY2002 Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers,and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W; Bibeau, C

    2005-10-25

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, synergistic effort to develop inertial fusion energy (IFE). This program is building a physics and technology base to complement the laser-fusion science being pursued by DOE Defense programs in support of Stockpile Stewardship. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The current LLNL proposal is a companion document to the one submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. The NRL and LLNL proposals also jointly pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, target physics, materials and power plant economics. This proposal requests continued funding in FY03 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1 kW, 100 J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser, as well as research into high gain fusion target design, fusion chamber issues, and survivability of the final optic element. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments. The HAPL Program pursues technologies needed for laser-driven IFE. System level considerations indicate that a rep-rated laser technology will be needed, operating at 5-10 Hz. Since a total energy of {approx}2 MJ will ultimately be required to achieve suitable target gain with direct drive targets, the architecture must be scaleable. The Mercury Laser is intended to offer such an architecture. Mercury is a solid state laser that incorporates diodes, crystals and gas cooling technologies.

  16. Four-Pass Coupler for Laser-Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-pass optical coupler affords increased (in comparison with related prior two-pass optical couplers) utilization of light generated by a laser diode in side pumping of a solid-state laser slab. The original application for which this coupler was conceived involves a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) crystal slab, which, when pumped by a row of laser diodes at a wavelength of 809 nm, lases at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. Heretofore, typically, a thin laser slab has been pumped in two passes, the second pass occurring by virtue of reflection of pump light from a highly reflective thin film on the side opposite the side through which the pump light enters. In two-pass pumping, a Nd:YAG slab having a thickness of 2 mm (which is typical) absorbs about 84 percent of the 809-nm pump light power, leaving about 16 percent of the pump light power to travel back toward the laser diodes. This unused power can cause localized heating of the laser diodes, thereby reducing their lifetimes. Moreover, if the slab is thinner than 2 mm, then even more unused power travels back toward the laser diodes. The four-pass optical coupler captures most of this unused pump light and sends it back to the laser slab for two more passes. As a result, the slab absorbs more pump light, as though it were twice as thick. The gain and laser cavity beam quality of a smaller laser slab in conjunction with this optical coupler can thus be made comparable to those of a larger two-pass-pumped laser slab.

  17. All-solid-state continuous-wave frequency-doubled Nd:YAG-BiBO laser with 2.8-W output power at 473 nm.

    PubMed

    Czeranowsky, C; Heumann, E; Huber, G

    2003-03-15

    We report on a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser with 4.6 W of linear polarized continuous-wave (cw) output power on the 4F3/2 --> 4I9/2 transitions at 946 nm. Three different crystals, cut for critical type I phase matching at room temperature, are used for the intracavity frequency doubling of the laser: 10-mm-long LiBaO5 (LBO), an 8-mm-long beta-BaB2O4 (BBO), and a 10.4-mm-long BiB3O6 (BiBO) grown by FEE GmbH. Up to 2.8 W of cw output power in the blue spectral range at 473 nm has been achieved with the BiBO crystal (2.1 W with BBO and 1.5 W with LBO).

  18. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  19. Solid-state lasers for coherent communication and remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Laser development, high efficiency, high power second harmonic generation, operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability, and studies in coherent communications are reviewed.

  20. Solid state systems concepts. [solar power satellite transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, I. K.

    1980-01-01

    Two prototype solid state phased array systems concepts for potential use in the Solar Power Satellite are described; the end-mounted and the sandwich systems. In both concepts, the beam is centered on the rectenna by means of phase conjugation of a pilot signal emanating from the ground. In the end-mounted system 36-watt amplifiers are mounted on the ground-plane, whereas in the sandwich the amplifiers are elevated to the dipoles, and their waste heat is dissipated by beryllium oxide discs. The feed lines are underneath the ground-plane, and a coaxial transmission line is carried all the way to the amplifier input. Also discussed is solid state amplifier development.

  1. Gratings for Increasing Solid-State Laser Gain and Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Erlandson, A C; Britten, J A; Bonlie, J D

    2010-04-16

    We introduce new concepts for increasing the efficiency of solid state lasers by using gratings deposited on laser slabs or disks. The gratings improve efficiency in two ways: (1) by coupling out of the slab deleterious amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and (2) by increasing the absorption efficiency of pump light. The gratings also serve as antireflective coatings for the extracting laser beam. To evaluate the potential for such coatings to improve laser performance, we calculated optical properties of a 2500 groove/mm, tantala-silica grating on a 1cm x 4cm x 8cm titanium-doped sapphire slab and performed ray-trace calculations for ASE and pump light. Our calculations show substantial improvements in efficiency due to grating ASE-coupling properties. For example, the gratings reduce pump energy required to produce a 0.6/cm gain coefficient by 9%, 20% and 35% for pump pulse durations of 0.5 {micro}s, 1{micro}s and 3{micro}s, respectively. Gratings also increase 532-nm pump-light absorption efficiency, particularly when the product slab overall absorption is small. For example, when the single-pass absorption is 1 neper, absorption efficiency increases from 66%, without gratings, to 86%, when gratings are used.

  2. Solid-state laser sources for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Kane, T.; Eggleston, J.; Long, S. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Recent progress in slab-geometry and conventional rod Nd:YAG solid-state lasers for applications in remote sensing is presented. Developments in slab geometry lasers, which were aimed at improving pulse energy and tuning range, have been based on the use of a Nd:glass substrate with a zig-zag optical path, with selective Raman shifting in gases and harmonic generation in LiNbO3 and KDP to extend the tuning range into the UV and visible regions. The theoretically predicted advantages of the elimination of birefringence and thermal and stress-induced focusing in the slab-geometry laser have been confirmed in measurements on a test-bed Nd:glass system, and a CW lamp pumped Nd:YAG oscillator, which have also demonstrated an order of magnitude improvement in laser performance. A single axial mode Nd:YAG oscillator has also been designed which, operating in a 3-msec quasi-CW mode, has a chirp rate of 30 kHz/microsec and a free-running stability of + or - 20 MHz. With chirp compensation, this stability is adequate for wind velocity measurements by coherent lidar.

  3. 1.6  MW peak power, 90  ps all-solid-state laser from an aberration self-compensated double-passing end-pumped Nd:YVO4 rod amplifier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Liu, Chong; Shen, Lifeng; Zhao, Zhiliang; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Hongbo

    2016-03-20

    In this paper a delicately designed double-passing end-pumped Nd:YVO4 rod amplifier is reported that produces 10.2 W average laser output when seeded by a 6 mW Nd:YVO4 microchip laser at a repetition rate of 70 kHz with pulse duration of 90 ps. A pulse peak power of ∼1.6  MW and pulse energy of ∼143  μJ is achieved. The beam quality is well preserved by a double-passing configuration for spherical-aberration compensation. The laser-beam size in the amplifier is optimized to prevent the unwanted damage from the high pulse peak-power density. This study provides a simple and robust picosecond all-solid-state master oscillator power amplifier system with both high peak power and high beam quality, which shows great potential in the micromachining. PMID:27140580

  4. Vacuum space charge effect in laser-based solid-state photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Jeff; Hellmann, Stefan; Jozwiak, Chris; Smallwood, Christopher; Hussain, Zahid; Kaindl, Robert; Kipp, Lutz; Rossnagel, Kai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2009-08-05

    We report a systematic measurement of the space charge effect observed in the few-ps laser pulse regime in laser-based solid-state photoemission spectroscopy experiments. The broadening and the shift of a gold Fermi edge as a function of spot size, laser power, and emission angle are characterized for pulse lengths of 6 ps and 6 eV photon energy. The results are used as a benchmark for an N-body numerical simulation and are compared to different regimes used in photoemission spectroscopy. These results provide an important reference for the design of time and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy setups and next-generation light sources.

  5. Solid State Laser Technology Development for Atmospheric Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, James C.

    1998-01-01

    NASA atmospheric scientists are currently planning active remote sensing missions that will enable global monitoring of atmospheric ozone, water vapor, aerosols and clouds as well as global wind velocity. The measurements of these elements and parameters are important because of the effects they have on climate change, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, atmospheric transport and, in general, the health of the planet. NASA will make use of Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) and backscatter lidar techniques for active remote sensing of molecular constituents and atmospheric phenomena from advanced high-altitude aircraft and space platforms. This paper provides an overview of NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC's) development of advanced solid state lasers, harmonic generators, and wave mixing techniques aimed at providing the broad range of wavelengths necessary to meet measurement goals of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  6. X-Band, 17-Watt Solid-State Power Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittskus, Anthony; Stone, Ernest; Boger, William; Burgess, David; Honda, Richard; Nuckolls, Carl

    2005-01-01

    An advanced solid-state power amplifier that can generate an output power of as much as 17 W at a design operating frequency of 8.4 GHz has been designed and constructed as a smaller, lighter, less expensive alternative to traveling-wave-tube X-band amplifiers and to prior solid-state X-band power amplifiers of equivalent output power. This amplifier comprises a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifier module and a power-converter module integrated into a compact package (see Figure 1). The amplifier module contains an input variable-gain amplifier (VGA), an intermediate driver stage, a final power stage, and input and output power monitors (see Figure 2). The VGA and the driver amplifier are 0.5-m GaAs-based metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). The final power stage contains four parallel high-efficiency, GaAs-based pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistors (PHEMTs). The gain of the VGA is voltage-variable over a range of 10 to 24 dB. To provide for temperature compensation of the overall amplifier gain, the gain-control voltage is generated by an operational-amplifier circuit that includes a resistor/thermistor temperature-sensing network. The driver amplifier provides a gain of 14 dB to an output power of 27 dBm to drive the four parallel output PHEMTs, each of which is nominally capable of putting out as much as 5 W. The driver output is sent to the input terminals of the four parallel PHEMTs through microstrip power dividers; the outputs of these PHEMTs are combined by microstrip power combiners (which are similar to the microstrip power dividers) to obtain the final output power of 17 W.

  7. Solid-State Laser Source of Tunable Narrow-Bandwidth Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Lew; Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    1998-01-01

    A solid-state laser source of tunable and narrow-bandwidth UV light is disclosed. The system relies on light from a diode laser that preferably generates light at infrared frequencies. The light from the seed diode laser is pulse amplified in a light amplifier, and converted into the ultraviolet by frequency tripling, quadrupling, or quintupling the infrared light. The narrow bandwidth, or relatively pure light, of the seed laser is preserved, and the pulse amplifier generates high peak light powers to increase the efficiency of the nonlinear crystals in the frequency conversion stage. Higher output powers may be obtained by adding a fiber amplifier to power amplify the pulsed laser light prior to conversion.

  8. Self-Starting Solid-State Laser with Dynamic Self-Adaptive Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, Oleg

    2002-10-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Institute of Applied Physics as follows: The present project is directed at the development of physical principles of creation of solid-state lasers of a new class with cavity completed by dynamic holographic gratings induced in nonlinear medium by generating beam itself. The self-starting laser oscillator based on Nd:YAG laser crystals with cavity formed with participation of refractive-index and gain gratings accompanied by population gratings induced in the laser crystal by generating waves will be studied both experimentally and theoretically. The industry-related importance of our project is indicated in its main goal: the solution of a very important problem of laser engineering, - that is the creation of a high power industrial laser with good beam quality. Such lasers could find numerous applications in precision technologies such as drilling of small apertures, cutting, spot thermo-hardening of metals, treatment of ceramics and other materials.

  9. Recent advances and challenges for diode-pumped solid-state lasers as an inertial fusion energy driver candidate

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Beach, R.J.; Bibeau, C.

    1997-12-23

    We discuss how solid-state laser technology can serve in the interests of fusion energy beyond the goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is now being constructed to ignite a deuterium-tritium target to fusion conditions in the laboratory for the first time. We think that advanced solid-state laser technology can offer the repetition-rate and efficiency needed to drive a fusion power plant, in contrast to the single-shot character of NIF. As discuss below, we propose that a gas-cooled, diode-pumped Yb:S-FAP laser can provide a new paradigm for fusion laser technology leading into the next century.

  10. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  11. The Solid-State Heat-Capacity Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Rotter, M D; Dane, C B; Gonzales, S A; Merrill, R D; Mitchell, S C; Parks, C W; Yamamoto, R M

    2003-12-08

    Heat-capacity operation of a laser is a novel method by which high average powers can be generated. In this paper, we present the principles behind heat-capacity operation, in addition to describing the results of recent experiments.

  12. Solid-State High-Temperature Power Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitacre, Jay; West, William

    2008-01-01

    All-solid-state electrochemical power cells have been fabricated and tested in a continuing effort to develop batteries for instruments for use in environments as hot as 500 C. Batteries of this type are needed for exploration of Venus, and could be used on Earth for such applications as measuring physical and chemical conditions in geothermal and oil wells, processing furnaces, and combustion engines. In the state-of-the-art predecessors of the present solid-state power cells, fully packaged molten eutectic salts are used as electrolytes. The molten-salt-based cells can be susceptible to significant amounts of self-discharge and corrosion when used for extended times at elevated temperatures. In contrast, all-solid-state cells such as the present ones are expected to be capable of operating for many days at temperatures up to 500 C, without significant self-discharge. The solid-state cell described here includes a cathode made of FeS2, an electrolyte consisting of a crystalline solid solution of equimolar amounts of Li3PO4 and Li4SiO4, and an anode made of an alloy of Li and Si (see figure). The starting material for making the solid electrolyte is a stoichiometric mixture of Li3PO4, SiO2, and Li3CO2. This mixture is ball-milled, then calcined for two hours at a temperature of 1,100 C, then placed in a die atop the cathode material. Next, the layers in the die are squeezed together at a pressure between 60 and 120 MPa for one hour at a temperature of 600 C to form a unitary structure comprising the solid electrolyte and cathode bonded together. Finally, the lithium-alloy anode is pressure-bonded to the solid electrolyte layer, using an intermediate layer of pure lithium. In one test of a cell of this type, a discharge rate of about 1 mA per gram of cathode material was sustained for 72 hours at a temperature of about 460 C. This is about three times the discharge rate required to support some of the longer duration Venus-exploration mission scenarios.

  13. Mode-locked solid state lasers using diode laser excitation

    DOEpatents

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2012-03-06

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. An asymmetric cavity provides relatively large beam spot sizes in gain medium to permit efficient coupling to a volume pumped by a laser diode bar. The cavity can include a collimation region with a controlled beam spot size for insertion of a saturable absorber and dispersion components. Beam spot size is selected to provide stable mode locking based on Kerr lensing. Pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved in Yb:KGW.

  14. A Completely Solid-State Tunable Ti:Sapphire Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, David V.; Coyle, D. Barry; Krebs, Danny J.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, completely solid-state tunable pulsed laser system passively cooled developed for potential employment in aircraft and sounding-rocket lidar experiments. Ti:sapphire based laser system pumped with frequency-doubled diode-pumped Nd:YAG. Rugged, self-contained system extremely flexible and provides pulsed output at specific frequencies with low input-power requirements. In-situ measurements enables scientists to study upper-atmosphere dynamics. Tuning range easily extended to bands between 650-950 nm in order to study other atmospheric constituents.

  15. Coherent laser radar at 2 microns using solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Suni, Paul J. M.; Hale, Charley P.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Magee, James R.; Bruns, Dale L.; Yuen, Eric H.

    1993-01-01

    Coherent laser radar systems using 2-micron Tm- and Tm, Ho-doped solid-state lasers are useful for the remote range-resolved measurement of atmospheric winds, aerosol backscatter, and DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor and CO2 concentrations. Recent measurements made with a 2-micron coherent laser radar system, advances in the laser technology, and atmospheric propagation effects on 2-micron coherent lidar performance are described.

  16. Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Donald A.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1988-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers work performed during the period from April 13, 1988 to October 13, 1988 under NASA grant number NAG-1-877 entitled, Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar. We have designed a flashlamp-pumped Cr3(+);GSAG laser of pulsed laser energy greater than 200 mJ and of pulse width of 1 ms FWHM to simulate a high-power laser diode in pumping mid-infrared laser crystals such as Tm3(+), Er3(+), and/or Ho3(+)-ion doped YAG, YLF or other host materials. This Cr3(+);GSAG laser will be used to determine optimum conditions for laser diode pumped mid-infrared lasers, maximum energy extraction limit with longitudinal pumping, thermal damage limit, and other problems related to high power laser diode pumping. We have completed a modification of an existing flashlamp-pumped and liquid nitrogen cooled rare earth laser system for 60 J electrical input energy and a 500 micron pulse width, and have carried out preliminary experiments with a Ho(+):Er3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal to test the system performance. This flashlamp-pumped rare earth laser system will be used to determine optimum Tm3(+)-ion concentration in Ho3(+):Cr3(+):Tm3(+):YAG crystal in the remaining research period.

  17. Analytical solution of the heat equation in a longitudinally pumped cubic solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Nadgaran, Hamid; Mousave, Laleh

    2008-05-01

    Knowledge about the temperature distribution inside solid-state laser crystals is essential for calculation of thermal phase shift, thermal lensing, thermally induced birefringence, and heat-induced crystal bending. Solutions for the temperature distribution for the case of steady-state heat loading have appeared in the literature only for simple cylindrical crystal shapes and are usually based on numerical techniques. For the first time, to our knowledge, a full analytical solution of the heat equation for an anisotropic cubic cross-section solid-state crystal is presented. The crystal is assumed to be longitudinally pumped by a Gaussian pump profile. The pump power attenuation along the crystal and the real cooling mechanisms, such as convection, are considered in detail. A comparison between our analytical solutions and its numerical counterparts shows excellent agreement when just a few terms are employed in the series solutions.

  18. Analytical solution of the heat equation in a longitudinally pumped cubic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Nadgaran, Hamid; Mousave, Laleh

    2008-05-01

    Knowledge about the temperature distribution inside solid-state laser crystals is essential for calculation of thermal phase shift, thermal lensing, thermally induced birefringence, and heat-induced crystal bending. Solutions for the temperature distribution for the case of steady-state heat loading have appeared in the literature only for simple cylindrical crystal shapes and are usually based on numerical techniques. For the first time, to our knowledge, a full analytical solution of the heat equation for an anisotropic cubic cross-section solid-state crystal is presented. The crystal is assumed to be longitudinally pumped by a Gaussian pump profile. The pump power attenuation along the crystal and the real cooling mechanisms, such as convection, are considered in detail. A comparison between our analytical solutions and its numerical counterparts shows excellent agreement when just a few terms are employed in the series solutions.

  19. Mid - infrared solid state lasers for spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, Yuri

    This work is devoted to study of novel high power middle-infrared (Mid-IR) laser sources enabling development of portable platform for sensing of organic molecules with the use of recently discovered Quartz Enhanced Photo Acoustic Spectroscopy (QEPAS). The ability to detect small concentrations is beneficial to monitor atmosphere pollution as well for biomedical applications such as analysis of human breath to detect earlier stages of cancer or virus activities. A QEPAS technique using a quartz tuning fork (QTF) as a detector enables a strong enhancement of measured signal when pump laser is modulated with a frequency coinciding with a natural frequency of a QTF. It is known that the detectability of acousto-optics based sensors is proportional to the square root of the laser intensity used for detection of analyte. That is the reason why commercially available semiconductor Mid-IR lasers having small output power limit sensitivity of modern QEPAS based sensors. The lack of high power broadly tunable lasers operating with a modulation frequency of quartz forks (~ 32.768 kHz) is the major motivation of this study. Commercially available Mid-IR (2-3.3 microm), single frequency, continuous wave (CW) fiber pumped lasers based on transition metal doped chalcogenides (e.g. Cr:ZnSe) prove to be efficient laser sources for organic molecules detection. However, their direct modulation is limited to several kHz, and cannot be directly used in combination with QEPAS. Hence, one objective of this work is to study and develop fiber laser pumped Ho:YAG (Er:YAG)/Cr:ZnSe tandem laser system/s. Ho (Holmium) and/or Er (Erbium) ions having long radiation lifetime (~ 10 ms) can effectively accumulate population inversion under CW fiber laser excitation. Utilization of acousto-optic (AO) modulators in the cavity of Ho:YAG (Er:YAG) laser will enable effective Q-Switching with repetition rate easily reaching the resonance frequency of a QTF. It is expected that utilization of Ho:YAG (Er

  20. Theoretical simulation of a 2 micron airborne solid state laser anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbert, Beatrice; Cariou, Jean-Pierre

    1992-01-01

    In the near future, military aircraft will need to know precisely their true airspeed in order to optimize flight conditions. In comparison with classical anemometer probes, an airborne Doppler lidar allows measurement of the air velocity without influence from aircraft aerodynamic disturbance. While several demonstration systems of heterodyne detection using a CO2 laser have been reported, improvements in the technology of solid state lasers have recently opened up the possibility that these devices can be used as an alternative to CO2 laser systems. In particular, a diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser allows a reliable compact airborne system with an eye safe wavelength (lambda = 2.09 microns) to be achieved. The theoretical study of performances of a coherent lidar using a solid state diode pumped Tm:Ho:YAG laser, caled SALSA, for measuring aircraft airspeed relative to atmospheric aerosols is described. A computer simulation was developed in order to modelize the Doppler anemometer in the function of atmospheric propagation and optical design. A clever analysis of the power budget on the detector area allows optical characteristic parameters of the system to be calculated, and then it can be used to predict performances of the Doppler system. Estimating signal to noise ratios (SNR) and heterodyne efficiency provides the available energy of speed measurement as well as a useful measurement of the alignment of the backscattered and reference fields on the detector.

  1. A self-injected, diode-pumped, solid-state ring laser for laser cooling of Li atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Miake, Yudai; Mukaiyama, Takashi; O’Hara, Kenneth M.; Gensemer, Stephen

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed a solid-state light source for experiments with laser cooled lithium atoms based on a Nd:Y V O{sub 4} ring laser with second-harmonic generation. Unidirectional lasing, an improved mode selection, and a high output power of the ring laser were achieved by weak coupling to an external cavity which contained the lossy elements required for single frequency operation. Continuous frequency tuning is accomplished by controlling two piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) in the internal and the external cavities simultaneously. The light source has been utilized to trap and cool fermionic lithium atoms into the quantum degenerate regime.

  2. Analysis of lasers as a solution to efficiency droop in solid-state lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Crawford, Mary H.

    2015-10-06

    This letter analyzes the proposal to mitigate the efficiency droop in solid-state light emitters by replacing InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with lasers. The argument in favor of this approach is that carrier-population clamping after the onset of lasing limits carrier loss to that at threshold, while stimulated emission continues to grow with injection current. A fully quantized (carriers and light) theory that is applicable to LEDs and lasers (above and below threshold) is used to obtain a quantitative evaluation. The results confirm the potential advantage of higher laser output power and efficiency above lasing threshold, while also indicating disadvantages including low efficiency prior to lasing onset, sensitivity of lasing threshold to temperature, and the effects of catastrophic laser failure. As a result, a solution to some of these concerns is suggested that takes advantage of recent developments in nanolasers.

  3. Analysis of lasers as a solution to efficiency droop in solid-state lighting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chow, Weng W.; Crawford, Mary H.

    2015-10-06

    This letter analyzes the proposal to mitigate the efficiency droop in solid-state light emitters by replacing InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with lasers. The argument in favor of this approach is that carrier-population clamping after the onset of lasing limits carrier loss to that at threshold, while stimulated emission continues to grow with injection current. A fully quantized (carriers and light) theory that is applicable to LEDs and lasers (above and below threshold) is used to obtain a quantitative evaluation. The results confirm the potential advantage of higher laser output power and efficiency above lasing threshold, while also indicating disadvantages includingmore » low efficiency prior to lasing onset, sensitivity of lasing threshold to temperature, and the effects of catastrophic laser failure. As a result, a solution to some of these concerns is suggested that takes advantage of recent developments in nanolasers.« less

  4. Solid state laser driver for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Honig, J.; Reichert, P.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    We describe the design and initial performance of a Nd:YAG laser master oscillator/phase conjugated power amplifier as a driver for extreme ultraviolet lithography. The design provides 0.5 to 1 joule per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width and excellent beam quality up through 1.5 kHz repetition frequency.

  5. Thermal effects in thin-film organic solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Leang, Tatiana; Forget, Sébastien; Chénais, Sébastien

    2014-12-01

    With the recent development of organic solid-state lasers (OSSLs) architectures enabling power scaling and progresses towards continuous-wave operation, the question of thermal effects now arises in OSSLs. In this paper, a Rhodamine 640-PMMA based vertical external cavity surface emitting organic laser is investigated. A thermal microscope is used to record temperature maps at the organic thin film surface during laser action; those maps are compared with time-resolved finite element thermal simulations. The measured and simulated peak temperature rises are in good accordance and are shown to remain below 10 K in standard operating conditions, showing a negligible impact on performance. The validated model is used to investigate typical OSSL structures from the literature, in a virtual high average power regime, and up to the CW regime. It is shown that whenever true CW organic lasing will be realized, significant thermal effects will have to be considered and properly managed.

  6. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrate as saturable absorber for femtosecond solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. C.; Man, B. Y.; Jiang, S. Z.; Chen, C. S.; Liu, M.; Yang, C.; Gao, S. B.; Feng, D. J.; Hu, G. D.; Huang, Q. J.; Chen, X. F.; Zhang, C.

    2014-08-01

    We present a novel method for the direct metal-free growth of graphene on quartz substrate. The direct-grown graphene yields excellent nonlinear saturable absorption properties and is demonstrated to be suitable as a saturable absorber (SA) for an ultrafast solid-state laser. Nearly Fourier-limited 367 fs was obtained at a central wavelength of 1048 nm with a repetition rate of 105.7 MHz. At a pump power of 7.95 W, the average output power was 1.93 W and the highest pulse energy reached 18.3 nJ, with a peak power of 49.8 kW. Our work opens an easy route for making a reliable graphene SA with a mode-locking technique and also displays an exciting prospect in making low-cost and ultrafast lasers.

  7. Few-layer black phosphorus based saturable absorber mirror for pulsed solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Lu, Shunbin; Guo, Zhinan; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Han; Tang, Dingyuan; Fan, Dianyuan

    2015-08-24

    We experimentally demonstrated that few-layer black phosphorus (BP) could be used as an optical modulator for solid-state lasers to generate short laser pulses. The BP flakes were fabricated by the liquid phase exfoliation method and drop-casted on a high-reflection mirror to form a BP-based saturable absorber mirror (BP-SAM). Stable Q-switched pulses with a pulse width of 620 ns at the wavelength of 1046 nm were obtained in a Yb:CaYAlO(4) (Yb:CYA) laser with the BP-SAM. The generated pulse train has a repetition rate of 113.6 kHz and an average output power of 37 mW. Our results show that the BP-SAMs could have excellent prospective for ultrafast photonics applications.

  8. Compact, diode-pumped, solid-state lasers for next generation defence and security sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, M.; Lee, S. T.; Borthwick, A.; McRae, I.; Jackson, D.; Alexander, W.

    2015-06-01

    Low-cost semiconductor laser diode pump sources have made a dramatic impact in sectors such as advanced manufacturing. They are now disrupting other sectors, such as defence and security (D&S), where Thales UK is a manufacturer of sensor systems for application on land, sea, air and man portable. In this talk, we will first give an overview of the market trends and challenges in the D&S sector. Then we will illustrate how low cost pump diodes are enabling new directions in D&S sensors, by describing two diode pumped, solid- state laser products currently under development at Thales UK. The first is a new generation of Laser Target Designators (LTD) that are used to identify targets for the secure guiding of munitions. Current systems are bulky, expensive and require large battery packs to operate. The advent of low cost diode technology, merged with our novel solid-state laser design, has created a designator that will be the smallest, lowest cost, STANAG compatible laser designator on the market. The LTD delivers greater that 50mJ per pulse up to 20Hz, and has compact dimensions of 125×70×55mm. Secondly, we describe an ultra-compact, eye-safe, solid-state laser rangefinder (LRF) with reduced size, weight and power consumption compared to existing products. The LRF measures 100×55×34mm, weighs 200g, and can range to greater than 10km with a single laser shot and at a reprate of 1Hz. This also leverages off advances in laser pump diodes, but also utilises low cost, high reliability, packaging technology commonly found in the telecoms sector. As is common in the D&S sector, the products are designed to work in extreme environments, such as wide temperature range (-40 to +71°C) and high levels of shock and vibration. These disruptive products enable next- generation laser sensors such as rangefinders, target designators and active illuminated imagers.

  9. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1997-11-18

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications. 5 figs.

  10. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications.

  11. Solid state laser communications in space (SOLACOS) position, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) subsystem implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemmig, Joerg; Pribil, Klaus

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents the concept and implementation aspects of the Pointing, Acquisition and Tracking Subsystem (PAT) which is developed in the frame of the SOLACOS (Solid State Laser Communications in Space) program.

  12. Broadly tunable Cr 4+-doped solid-state lasers in the near infrared and visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennaroglu, Alphan

    2002-11-01

    This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of the characteristics of Cr 4+-doped solid-state lasers which produce broadly tunable coherent radiation in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum between 1.13 and 1.63 μm. Cr 4+-doped gain media have several favorable characteristics including broad absorption bands that overlap with the operating wavelengths of several commercial pump lasers, a 4-level energy structure that allows continuous-wave as well as pulsed operation with low threshold pump powers, and the presence of broad amplification bands for the generation of ultrashort optical pulses. In addition, non-linear frequency conversion schemes can be readily employed to construct broadly tunable coherent visible sources based on Cr 4+-doped gain media. These favorable features make Cr 4+-doped lasers potentially important in many applications in optical communications, eye-safe imaging, medicine, and spectroscopy. After a description of the basic physical mechanisms that lead to broad emission in tunable solid-state lasers in general and Cr 4+-doped gain media in particular, the manuscript provides a detailed description of the operational characteristics of Cr 4+-doped lasers, including rate-equation analysis of power performance, role of thermal effects, and different mode-locking techniques for the generation of ultrashort optical pulses. Later sections focus on the work performed in the development and characterization of specific examples of Cr 4+-doped lasers. Particular attention is given to Cr 4+:forsterite and Cr 4+:YAG laser systems due to their superior power performance. Gain-switched, continuous-wave, and mode-locked operations of these lasers are described with a particular emphasis on recent developments. Studies carried out with other Cr 4+-doped lasers such as Cr 4+:Y 2SiO 5, Cr 4+-doped oxyapatite, Cr 4+-doped garnets, and Cr 4+:Ca 2GeO 4 are also described. Finally, use of non-linear conversion schemes in the generation

  13. CONTROLLING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF LASER LIGHT: Relaxation oscillations in solid-state ring lasers with arbitrary mode polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naniĭ, O. E.; Paleev, M. R.

    1993-07-01

    An expression is derived for the frequency of relaxation oscillations of a solid-state ring laser for arbitrary polarizations of the radiation, for an arbitrary feedback parameter, and for a cavity with amplitude and frequency nonreciprocity. The analysis is also applicable to linear double-mode and two-channel solid-state lasers.

  14. Optimization of rod diameter in solid state lasers side pumped with multiple laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Newton, Jr.; Chamblee, Christyl M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Cross, Patricia L.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the optimum laser rod diameter for maximum output energy in a solid state neodymium laser transversely pumped with multiple laser diode arrays are reported here. Experiments were performed with 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm and 2.0 mm rod radii of both neodymium doped Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and La2Be2O5 (Nd:BeL) pumped with laser diode arrays having a maximum combined energy of 10.5 mJ. Equations were derived which predict the optimum rod radius and corresponding output mirror reflectivity for a given laser material and total pump energy. Predictions of the equations agreed well with the experiments for each of the laser materials which possessed significantly different laser properties from one another.

  15. Resonators for solid-state lasers with large-volume fundamental mode and high alignment stability

    SciTech Connect

    Magni, V.

    1986-01-01

    Resonators containing a focusing rod are thoroughly analyzed. It is shown that, as a function of the dioptric power of the rod, two stability zones of the same width exist and that the mode volume in the rod always presents a stationary point. At this point, the output power is insensitive to the focal length fluctuations, and the mode volume inside the rod is inversely proportional to the range of the input power for which the resonator is stable. The two zones are markedly different with respect to misalignment sensitivity, which is, in general, much greater in one zone than in the other. Two design procedures are presented for monomode solid-state laser resonators with large mode volume and low sensitivity both to focal length fluctuations and to misalignment.

  16. Diode-pumped solid-state laser driver experiments for inertial fusion energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C.D.; Payne, S.A.; Emanuel, M.E.; Smith, L.K.; Powell, H.T.; Krupke, W.F.

    1995-07-11

    Although solid-state lasers have been the primary means by which the physics of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) have been investigated, it was previously thought that solid-state laser technology could not offer adequate efficiencies for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. Orth and co-workers have recently designed a conceptual IFE power plant, however, with a high efficiency diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver that utilized several recent innovations in laser technology. It was concluded that DPSSLs could offer adequate performance for IFE with reasonable assumptions. This system was based on a novel diode pumped Yb-doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F (Yb:S-FAP) amplifier. Because this is a relatively new gain medium, a project was established to experimentally validate the diode-pumping and extraction dynamics of this system at the smallest reasonable scale. This paper reports on the initial experimental results of this study. We found the pumping dynamics and extraction cross-sections of Yb:S-FAP crystals to be similar to those previously inferred by purely spectroscopic techniques. The saturation fluence for pumping was measured to be 2.2 J/cm{sup 2} using three different methods based on either the spatial, temporal, or energy transmission properties of a Yb:S-FAP rod. The small signal gain implies an emission cross section of 6.0{times}10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2}. Up to 1.7 J/cm{sup 3} of stored energy density was achieved in a 6{times}6{times}44 mm{sup 3} Yb:S-FAP amplifier rod. In a free running configuration diode-pumped slope efficiencies up to 43% were observed with output energies up to {approximately}0.5 J per 1 ms pulse from a 3{times}3{times}30 mm{sup 3} rod. When the rod was mounted in a copper block for cooling, 13 W of average power was produced with power supply limited operation at 70 Hz with 500 {mu}s pulses.

  17. Solid-state laser source of narrowband ultraviolet B light for skin disease care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Aleksandr A.; Chu, Hong

    2013-03-01

    We report about the development of all-solid-state laser source of narrowband UV-B light for medical applications. The device is based on a gain-switched Ti: Sapphire laser with volume Bragg grating, pumped at 532 nm and operating at 931.8 nm, followed by a third harmonic generator and a fiber optic beam homogenizer. The maximum available pulse energy exceeded 5 mJ at 310.6 nm, with a pulse repetition rates of 50 Hz. The output characteristics satisfy the medical requirements for psoriasis and vitiligo treatment. A new optical scheme for third harmonic generation enhancement at moderate levels of input intensities is proposed and investigated. As a result, 40% harmonic efficiency was obtained, when input pulse power was only 300 kW.

  18. Discrete excitation of mode pulses using a diode-pumped solid-state digital laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngcobo, Sandile; Bell, Teboho

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate novel method of generating discrete excitation of on-demand Lagaurre-Gaussian (LG) mode pulses, in a diode pumped solid-state digital laser. The digital laser comprises of an intra-cavity spatial light modulator (SLM) that acts as an end-mirror of the resonator for uploading digital holograms, for the selection of discrete LG modes and controlling the quality facto, Q of the resonator. Discrete excitation of LG mode pulses of azimuthal-order l of 0, 1, 2, with zero radial-order (p = 0) were generated. Pulses of duration 200 ms and intensities as high as 1 mW with repetition speed of 60 Hz were produced at 1 um wavelength. The maximum peak power-conversion efficiency measured was 1.3%.

  19. Exfoliated layers of black phosphorus as saturable absorber for ultrafast solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baitao; Lou, Fei; Zhao, Ruwei; He, Jingliang; Li, Jing; Su, Xiancui; Ning, Jian; Yang, Kejian

    2015-08-15

    High-quality black phosphorus (BP) saturable absorber mirror (SAM) was successfully fabricated with few-layered BP (phosphorene). By employing the prepared phosphorene SAM, we have demonstrated ultrafast pulse generation from a BP mode-locked bulk laser for the first time to our best knowledge. Pulses as short as 6.1 ps with an average power of 460 mW were obtained at the central wavelength of 1064.1 nm. Considering the direct and flexible band gap for different layers of phosphorene, this work may provide a possible method for fabricating BP SAM to achieve ultrafast solid-state lasers in IR and mid-IR wavelength region.

  20. 100  J-level nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Mason, Paul D; Ertel, Klaus; Jonathan Phillips, P; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Divoky, Martin; Pilar, Jan; Smith, Jodie; Butcher, Thomas; Lintern, Andrew; Tomlinson, Steph; Shaikh, Waseem; Hooker, Chris; Lucianetti, Antonio; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Mocek, Tomas; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John L

    2016-05-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of a 100 J-level, diode pumped solid state laser based on cryogenic gas cooled, multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. When operated at 175 K, the system delivered a pulse energy of 107 J at a 1 Hz repetition rate and 10 ns pulse duration, pumped by 506 J of diode energy at 940 nm, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 21%. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest energy obtained from a nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser. This demonstration confirms the energy scalability of the diode pumped optical laser for experiments laser architecture.

  1. Laser-driven phosphor-converted white light source for solid-state illumination.

    PubMed

    George, Anthony F; Al-waisawy, Sara; Wright, Jason T; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M; Rahman, Faiz

    2016-03-10

    Energy efficiency and lighting quality considerations are driving research into laser-pumped white light sources. Laser diodes as pump sources for downconversion phosphors promise freedom from "droop" that adversely affects the efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). High-intensity laser diode-pumped light sources for applications such as search lights and automobile headlights have been demonstrated recently. Our paper describes the design and construction of a domestic/office-type solid-state luminaire driven by light from an integrated violet laser-diode module. A trichromatic phosphor made from a blend of separate europium-containing rare-earth phosphors was used as the downconversion medium. Mechanical and optical design of the reflector and the phosphor plate are described. Characteristics of both the pump light and the downconverted light are also described. Our studies also looked at the variation of chromaticity coordinates with variation in pump power and the effect of laser speckle on the lamp's light output. Finally, there is a brief discussion of energy conversion efficiency and longevity considerations, comparing pumping with LEDs versus pumping with laser diodes. PMID:26974780

  2. High repetition ration solid state switched CO2 TEA laser employed in industrial ultrasonic testing of aircraft parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bergmann, Hubertus; Morkel, Francois; Stehmann, Timo

    2015-02-01

    Laser Ultrasonic Testing (UT) is an important technique for the non-destructive inspection of composite parts in the aerospace industry. In laser UT a high power, short pulse probe laser is scanned across the material surface, generating ultrasound waves which can be detected by a second low power laser system and are used to draw a defect map of the part. We report on the design and testing of a transversely excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser system specifically optimised for laser UT. The laser is excited by a novel solid-state switched pulsing system and utilises either spark or corona preionisation. It provides short output pulses of less than 100 ns at repetition rates of up to 1 kHz, optimised for efficient ultrasonic wave generation. The system has been designed for highly reliable operation under industrial conditions and a long term test with total pulse counts in excess of 5 billion laser pulses is reported.

  3. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using optical coatings

    DOEpatents

    Honea, Eric C.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2005-06-07

    A laser gain medium having a layered coating on at least certain surfaces of the laser gain medium. The layered coating having a reflective inner material and an absorptive scattering outside material.

  4. Organization of the topical meeting on tunable solid-state lasers. Held in North Falmouth, Massachusetts on May 1-3 1989. Final report, 30 August 1988-30 August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-30

    Progress and interest in solid-state lasers generally, and in tunable solid state-lasers specifically, continues to expand. Applications of these lasers include spectroscopy, remote sensing, ranging and imaging, and medicine. New solid-state materials are providing lasers with higher output power, broader tunability, and more-efficient pumping schemes. The quantum electronics and crystal-chemistry properties of these new materials are leading to enhanced laser performance. At the meeting, sessions were held on sapphire, novel laser schemes, Cr lasers, forsterite and excited-state absorption, solid-state lasers for specialized applications, alexandrite lasers, Cr-related issues, diode pumped lasers, nonlinear frequency conversion, 1.3-micrometer Nd lasers, infrared lasers and energy transfer, 2-micrometer lasers, rare earth laser materials, and Er lasers.

  5. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  6. NASA satellite communications application research. Phase 2: Efficient high power, solid state amplifier for EFH communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benet, James

    1993-01-01

    The final report describes the work performed from 9 Jun. 1992 to 31 Jul. 1993 on the NASA Satellite Communications Application Research (SCAR) Phase 2 program, Efficient High Power, Solid State Amplifier for EHF Communications. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate the feasibility of high-efficiency, high-power, EHF solid state amplifiers that are smaller, lighter, more efficient, and less costly than existing traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifiers by combining the output power from up to several hundred solid state amplifiers using a unique orthomode spatial power combiner (OSPC).

  7. Cr/sup 3+/-doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Krupke, W.F.

    1989-03-07

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF/sub 6/:Cr/sup 3+/, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr/sup 3+/ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slope efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high-slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd/sup 3+/ or Tm/sup 3+/ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility.

  8. Cr.sup.3+ -doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Chase, Lloyd L.; Newkirk, Herbert W.; Krupke, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF.sub.6 :Cr.sup.3+, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr.sup.3+ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slop efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd.sup.3+ or Tm.sup.3+ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility.

  9. Cr/sup 3 +/-doped colquiriite solid state laser material

    DOEpatents

    Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Newkirk, H.W.; Krupke, W.F.

    1988-03-31

    Chromium doped colquiriite, LiCaAlF/sub 6/:Cr/sup 3 +/, is useful as a tunable laser crystal that has a high intrinsic slope efficiency, comparable to or exceeding that of alexandrite, the current leading performer of vibronic sideband Cr/sup 3 +/ lasers. The laser output is tunable from at least 720 nm to 840 nm with a measured slope efficiency of about 60% in a Kr laser pumped laser configuration. The intrinsic slope efficiency (in the limit of large output coupling) may approach the quantum defect limited value of 83%. The high slope efficiency implies that excited state absorption (ESA) is negligible. The potential for efficiency and the tuning range of this material satisfy the requirements for a pump laser for a high density storage medium incorporating Nd/sup 3 +/ or Tm/sup 3 +/ for use in a multimegajoule single shot fusion research facility. 4 figs.

  10. Far-red polyurethane-host solid-state dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S V; Pozhar, V V; Dzyubenko, M I; Doroshenko, A O

    2009-09-30

    The output energy and emission spectrum of a solid-state dye laser using Oxazine 1 in polyurethane as the gain medium have been measured. Under microsecond pumping, efficient lasing has been obtained in the range 700-745 nm. The highest conversion efficiency and output energy achieved are 23% and 127 mJ, respectively. (lasers)

  11. Self-Mixing Thin-Slice Solid-State Laser Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Kenju

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the dynamic effect of thin-slice solid-state lasers subjected to frequency-shifted optical feedback, which led to the discovery of the self-mixing modulation effect, and its applications to quantum-noise-limited versatile laser metrology systems with extreme optical sensitivity. PMID:22319406

  12. Self-mixing thin-slice solid-state laser metrology.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kenju

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the dynamic effect of thin-slice solid-state lasers subjected to frequency-shifted optical feedback, which led to the discovery of the self-mixing modulation effect, and its applications to quantum-noise-limited versatile laser metrology systems with extreme optical sensitivity.

  13. UV solid state laser ablation of intraocular lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, A.; Lagiou, D. P.; Evangelatos, Ch.; Spyratou, E.; Bacharis, C.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    Commercially available intraocular lenses (IOLs) are manufactured from silicone and acrylic, both rigid (e.g. PMMA) and foldable (hydrophobic or hydrophilic acrylic biomaterials), behaving different mechanical and optical properties. Recently, the use of apodizing technology to design new diffractive-refractive multifocals improved the refractive outcome of these intraocular lenses, providing good distant and near vision. There is also a major ongoing effort to refine laser refractive surgery to correct other defects besides conventional refractive errors. Using phakic IOLs to treat high myopia potentially provides better predictability and optical quality than corneal-based refractive surgery. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of laser ablation on IOL surface shaping, by drilling circular arrays of holes, with a homemade motorized rotation stage, and scattered holes on the polymer surface. In material science, the most popular lasers used for polymer machining are the UV lasers, and, therefore, we tried in this work the 3rd and the 5th harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ=355 nm and λ=213 nm respectively). The morphology of the ablated IOL surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM, Fei - Innova Nanoscope) at various laser parameters. Quantitative measurements were performed with a contact profilometer (Dektak-150), in which a mechanical stylus scanned across the surface of gold-coated IOLs (after SEM imaging) to measure variations in surface height and, finally, the ablation rates were also mathematically simulated for depicting the possible laser ablation mechanism(s). The experimental results and the theoretical modelling of UV laser interaction with polymeric IOLs are discussed in relation with the physical (optical, mechanical and thermal) properties of the material, in addition to laser radiation parameters (laser energy fluence, number of pulses). The qualitative aspects of laser ablation at λ=213 nm reveal a

  14. Gigahertz frequency comb from a diode-pumped solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Klenner, Alexander; Schilt, Stéphane; Südmeyer, Thomas; Keller, Ursula

    2014-12-15

    We present the first stabilization of the frequency comb offset from a diode-pumped gigahertz solid-state laser oscillator. No additional external amplification and/or compression of the output pulses is required. The laser is reliably modelocked using a SESAM and is based on a diode-pumped Yb:CALGO gain crystal. It generates 1.7-W average output power and pulse durations as short as 64 fs at a pulse repetition rate of 1 GHz. We generate an octave-spanning supercontinuum in a highly nonlinear fiber and use the standard f-to-2f carrier-envelope offset (CEO) frequency fCEO detection method. As a pump source, we use a reliable and cost-efficient commercial diode laser. Its multi-spatial-mode beam profile leads to a relatively broad frequency comb offset beat signal, which nevertheless can be phase-locked by feedback to its current. Using improved electronics, we reached a feedback-loop-bandwidth of up to 300 kHz. A combination of digital and analog electronics is used to achieve a tight phase-lock of fCEO to an external microwave reference with a low in-loop residual integrated phase-noise of 744 mrad in an integration bandwidth of [1 Hz, 5 MHz]. An analysis of the laser noise and response functions is presented which gives detailed insights into the CEO stabilization of this frequency comb.

  15. Precision Micron Hole Drilling using a Frequency Doubled, Diode Pumped Solid State Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H W; Pierce, E L

    2004-04-21

    This work represents the second phase of a program to demonstrate precision laser drilling with minimal Heat Affected Zone. The technique uses a Diode Pumped Solid State Laser with two wavelengths and two modes of operation. The fundamental mode of the DPSSL at 1.06 microns is used to drill a hole with a diameter of a fraction of a millimeter diameter in a millimeter thick substrate quickly, but with low precision. This hole is then machined to precision dimensions using the second harmonic of the DPSSL Laser at 532 nm using a trepanning technique. Both lasers operate in the ablative mode with peak powers at or above a giga-watt per square centimeter and pulse durations in the 80 - 100 ns range. Under these conditions, the thermal diffusion distance is of the order of a micron or less and that fact coupled with the ablative nature of the process results in little or no HAZ (heat affected zone). With no HAZ, there isn't any change in the crystalline structure surrounding the hole and the strength of the substrate is maintained. Applications for these precision holes include cooling passages in turbine blades, ports for diesel injectors, suction holes for boundary layer control on wings and holes for dies in precision extrusion processes.

  16. Solid-state laser source of narrowband ultraviolet B light for skin disease care with advanced performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Aleksandr A.; Chu, Hong; Buchwald, Kristian

    2015-02-01

    Two years ago we reported about the development of solid state laser source for medical skin treatment with wavelength 310.6 nm and average power 200 mW. Here we describe the results of investigation of the advanced version of the laser, which is a more compact device with increased output power and flat top beam profile. Ti: Sapphire laser, the main module of our source, was modified and optimized such, that UV average power of the device was increased 1.7 times. Fiber optic homogenizer was replaced by articulated arm with diffraction diffuser, providing round spot with flat profile at the skin. We investigated and compare characteristics of Ti: Sapphire lasers with volume Bragg grating and with fused silica transmission grating, which was used first time for Ti: Sapphire laser spectral selection and tuning. Promising performance of last gratings is demonstrated.

  17. New tunable flashlamp-pumped solid state Ti:sapphire laser for laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi X.; Giannetas, V.; Charlton, Andrew; King, Terence A.

    1993-05-01

    Laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, solid state Ti:sapphire laser (Vuman, free running untuned wavelength 792 nm, 2 microseconds pulse width and up to 240 mJ pulse energy) have been successfully and efficiently coupled into thin optical fibers. The coupling efficiency can be up to 67% for 300 micron and 43% for 200 micron core diameter optical fibers. With these two optical fibers in vitro laser lithotripsy has been performed successfully on various human calculi including gall bladder, kidney, ureter and salivary duct stones. The bright white flash of the induced plasma emission, strong shock waves, fiber recoil and stone propulsion and the splattering of the stone chips have been observed during the calculi fragmentation.

  18. High-efficiency pyrromethene doped solid-state dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, R.E. ); Allik, T.H.; Chandra, S. ); Hutchinson, J.A. )

    1993-08-16

    Successful laser oscillation of various pyrromethene dyes doped in a modified acrylic plastic has been achieved. Pumped with a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm, a slope efficiency of 85% has been obtained from one of the dyes in plastic, with an output beam energy of 128 mJ. A useful lifetime of greater than 20 000 shots at 3.33 Hz with output energies above 30 mJ has been demonstrated, with only a 34% loss in the available output energy.

  19. Solid-state continuous Lyman-alpha source for laser-cooling of antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, Jochen; Beyer, Thomas; Kolbe, Daniel; Markert, Frank; Muellers, Andreas; Scheid, Martin

    2008-08-08

    Cooling antihydrogen atoms is important for future experiments both to test the fundamental CPT symmetry by high-resolution laser spectroscopy and also to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Laser-cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1 S-2 P transition at the wavelength of Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm). Ongoing work to set up a solid-state continuous-wave laser source at Lyman-alpha is described.

  20. Inkjet-printed vertically emitting solid-state organic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mhibik, Oussama; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien; Defranoux, Christophe; Sanaur, Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we show that Inkjet Printing can be successfully applied to external-cavity vertically emitting thin-film organic lasers and can be used to generate a diffraction-limited output beam with an output energy as high as 33.6 μJ with a slope efficiency S of 34%. Laser emission shows to be continuously tunable from 570 to 670 nm using an intracavity polymer-based Fabry-Perot etalon. High-optical quality films with several μm thicknesses are realized, thanks to ink-jet printing. We introduce a new optical material where EMD6415 commercial ink constitutes the optical host matrix and exhibits a refractive index of 1.5 and an absorption coefficient of 0.66 cm-1 at 550-680 nm. Standard laser dyes like Pyrromethene 597 and Rhodamine 640 are incorporated in solution to the EMD6415 ink. Such large size "printed pixels" of 50 mm2 present uniform and flat surfaces, with roughness measured as low as 1.5 nm in different locations of a 50 μm × 50 μm AFM scan. Finally, as the gain capsules fabricated by Inkjet printing are simple and do not incorporate any tuning or cavity element, they are simple to make, have a negligible fabrication cost, and can be used as fully disposable items. This work opens the way towards the fabrication of really low-cost tunable visible lasers with an affordable technology that has the potential to be widely disseminated.

  1. Compact solid-state laser source for 1S-2S spectroscopy in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-02-15

    We demonstrate a compact solid-state laser source for high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen. The source emits up to 20 mW at 243 nm and consists of a 972 nm diode laser, a tapered amplifier, and two doubling stages. The diode laser is actively stabilized to a high-finesse cavity. We compare the new source to the stable 486 nm dye laser used in previous experiments and record 1S-2S spectra using both systems. With the solid-state laser system, we demonstrate a resolution of the hydrogen spectrometer of 6x10{sup 11}, which is promising for a number of high-precision measurements in hydrogenlike systems.

  2. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In H.; Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors consider the relation between the threshold pumping intensity, the material properties, the resonator parameters, and the ultimate slope efficiencies of various solid-state laser materials for solar pumping. They clarify the relation between the threshold pump intensity and the material parameters and the relation between the ultimate slope efficiency and the laser resonator parameters such that a design criterion for the solar-pumped solid-state laser can be established. Among the laser materials evaluated, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6 percent; however, it does not seem to be practical for a solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AM0) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12 percent when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  3. All-solid-state deep ultraviolet laser for single-photon ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chengqian; Liu, Xianhu; Zeng, Chenghui; Zhang, Hanyu; Jia, Meiye; Wu, Yishi; Luo, Zhixun; Fu, Hongbing; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-02-01

    We report here the development of a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer utilizing single-photon ionization based on an all-solid-state deep ultraviolet (DUV) laser system. The DUV laser was achieved from the second harmonic generation using a novel nonlinear optical crystal KBe2BO3F2 under the condition of high-purity N2 purging. The unique property of this laser system (177.3-nm wavelength, 15.5-ps pulse duration, and small pulse energy at ∼15 μJ) bears a transient low power density but a high single-photon energy up to 7 eV, allowing for ionization of chemicals, especially organic compounds free of fragmentation. Taking this advantage, we have designed both pulsed nanospray and thermal evaporation sources to form supersonic expansion molecular beams for DUV single-photon ionization mass spectrometry (DUV-SPI-MS). Several aromatic amine compounds have been tested revealing the fragmentation-free performance of the DUV-SPI-MS instrument, enabling applications to identify chemicals from an unknown mixture. PMID:26931868

  4. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-01

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  5. Generation of turquoise light by sum frequency mixing of a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in periodically poled KTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sandra; Spiekermann, Stefan; Wang, Shunhua; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik; Ekvall, Katrin

    2004-10-01

    We report a simple and efficient method to achieve visible light by sum-frequency mixing radiation from a diode-pumped solid-state laser and a laser diode in a periodically poled KTiOPO4 crystal. Since high-power laser diodes are available at a wide range of wavelengths, it is thereby possible to obtain essentially any wavelength in the visible spectrum by appropriate choice of lasers. For demonstration we choose to construct a light source in the blue-green region. A turquoise output power of 4.0 mW was achieved.

  6. Modeling Antimortar Lethality by a Solid-State Heat-Capacity Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2005-02-15

    We have studied the use of a solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL) in mortar defense. This type of laser, as built at LLNL, produces high-energy pulses with a wavelength of about 1 {micro}m and a pulse repetition rate of 200 Hz. Currently, the average power is about 26 kW. Our model of target interactions includes optical absorption, two-dimensional heat transport in the metal casing and explosive, melting, wind effects (cooling and melt removal), high-explosive reactions, and mortar rotation. The simulations continue until HE initiation is reached. We first calculate the initiation time for a range of powers on target and spot sizes. Then we consider an engagement geometry in which a mortar is fired at an asset defended by a 100-kW SSHCL. Propagation effects such as diffraction, turbulent broadening, scattering, and absorption are calculated for points on the trajectory, by means of a validated model. We obtain kill times and fluences, as functions of the rotation rate. These appear quite feasible.

  7. Mathematical modeling of a Ti:sapphire solid-state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swetits, John J.

    1987-01-01

    The project initiated a study of a mathematical model of a tunable Ti:sapphire solid-state laser. A general mathematical model was developed for the purpose of identifying design parameters which will optimize the system, and serve as a useful predictor of the system's behavior.

  8. Inexpensive timing circuit for a Q-switched solid-state laser using NE555 Timers

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash, N.; Sathianandan, K.

    1980-08-01

    A simple circuit using NE555 Timers for controlling a low repetition rate (upto 10 pulses/min.) Q-switched solid-state laser is described. This circuit produces two pulses, one for firing the flashlamp and the other for driving the electro-optic Q-switch, whose delay can be continuously varied up to 700 ..mu..s.

  9. Nonconfocal unstable resonator for solid-state dye lasers based on a gradient-reflectivity mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Allik, T.H.; Hutchinson, J.A.

    1995-12-01

    A compact high-brightness solid-state dye laser, consisting of a nonconfocal unstable resonator formed of a planar mirror and a gradient-reflectivity mirror, is modeled by use of ray-tracing analysis. Collimated 80-mJ output was obtained in a 10-mmmrad beam. {copyright} {ital 1995 Optical Society of America.}

  10. Nonradiative relaxation in tunable solid state laser crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of nonradiative transitions between the 4T2 and 2E excited states of trivalent-chromium-ion-activated ruby (containing 0.04 percent Cr2O3 by weight) and alexandrite (containing 0.4 at. percent chromium ion) laser crystals were studied using the technique described by Gayen et al. (1985). In this technique, a 527-nm pulse excites the 4T2 band of the Cr(3+), and the subsequent population kinetics among excited states is monitored by an IR picosecond probe pulse as a function of pump-probe delay. In ruby, a resolution-limited sharp rise in the excited state population was followed by a long-lifetime decay, leading to an upper limit of 7 ps for the 4T2-state nonradiative lifetime. In alexandrite, a longer rise time was followed by a multicomponent decay. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining the induced absorption and the transition dynamics observed in these crystals.

  11. 14 J/2 Hz Yb3+:YAG diode pumped solid state laser chain.

    PubMed

    Gonçalvès-Novo, Thierry; Albach, Daniel; Vincent, Bernard; Arzakantsyan, Mikayel; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-14

    The Lucia laser chain is a Diode Pumped Solid State Laser system based on Yb3+ doped YAG disks used in an active mirror scheme. Front-end and amplifier stages are presented with recent energetic performances (14 J/2 Hz) achieved with improved pumping and extraction architectures. Emphasis is given on the crucial role of ASE and thermal mitigation considerations in engineering the amplifier head. PMID:23388979

  12. Nonradiative relaxation in tunable solid-state laser crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gayen, S.K.; Wang, W.B.; Pettricevic, V.; Alfano, R.R.

    1985-12-01

    The picosecond excite-and-probe adsorption technique is used to study the nonradiative transition dynamics between the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ and the /sup 2/ E excited states of two trivalent-chromium-ion-activated laser crystals -- ruby and alexandrite. A 527-nm 7-ps pulse excites the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ pump band of the Cr/sup 3 +/ ion in these crystals, and the subsequent population kinetics among excited states is monitored by an infrared picosecond probe pulse as a function of pump-probe delay. In ruby, a resolution-limited sharp rise in the excited-state population followed by a long-lifetime decay is observed. This leads to an upper limit of 7 ps for the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ state nonradiative lifetime in ruby. In alexandrite, a longer risetime followed by a multicomponent decay is observed. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining the observed induced absorption and kinetics from excited states of the Cr/sup 3 +/ ion in these crystals. In alexandrite, vibrational relaxation rate for transition from the higher-lying vibrational states of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ to the bottom of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ energy parabola is estimated to be approx. 6 x 10/sup 10/ (relaxation time approx. 17 ps). Transition rate from the bottom of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ parabola to the /sup 2/E is found to be of the order of 3.7 x 10/sup 10//s (relaxation time approx. 27 ps), while the thermal refilling rate of /sup 4/T/sub 2/ from /sup 2/E is approx. 3.5 x 10/sup 9//s. The infrared absorption cross section from the excited /sup 4/T/sub 2/ state is estimated to about an order-of-magnitude higher than that from the metastable /sup 2/E level.

  13. Distributed solid state programmable thermostat/power controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Jane C. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A self-contained power controller having a power driver switch, programmable controller, communication port, and environmental parameter measuring device coupled to a controllable device. The self-contained power controller needs only a single voltage source to power discrete devices, analog devices, and the controlled device. The programmable controller has a run mode which, when selected, upon the occurrence of a trigger event changes the state of a power driver switch and wherein the power driver switch is maintained by the programmable controller at the same state until the occurrence of a second event.

  14. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  15. A 100Mbps coherent optical link demonstration using frequency stabilized solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, CHIEN-C.; Arbel, Dalia; Win, Moe Z.

    1992-01-01

    The design, implementation, and performance evaluation of a 100Mbps binary phase shift keying (BPSK) coherent optical link using frequency stabilized solid state lasers is described. In this demonstration, the transmitted data is binary phase modulated at 100Mbps using an external resonant cavity phase modulator. At the receiving end, the signal is detected using a balanced heterodyne detector. An auxiliary frequency tracking loop (FTL) is used to help the initial frequency acquisition before handing over to the carrier phase tracking loop. The FTL is implemented using a delay line discriminator, and the detected frequency error is fed back to the local oscillator laser to close the tracking loop. Phase coherent reception is achieved by synchronizing the carrier phase using a Costas tracking loop. The demonstration showed that a high data rate phase coherent optical link can be implemented using frequency stabilized solid state lasers.

  16. A 100Mbps coherent optical link demonstration using frequency stabilized solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-C.; Arbel, Dalia; Win, Moe Z.

    1992-06-01

    The design, implementation, and performance evaluation of a 100Mbps binary phase shift keying (BPSK) coherent optical link using frequency stabilized solid state lasers is described. In this demonstration, the transmitted data is binary phase modulated at 100Mbps using an external resonant cavity phase modulator. At the receiving end, the signal is detected using a balanced heterodyne detector. An auxiliary frequency tracking loop (FTL) is used to help the initial frequency acquisition before handing over to the carrier phase tracking loop. The FTL is implemented using a delay line discriminator, and the detected frequency error is fed back to the local oscillator laser to close the tracking loop. Phase coherent reception is achieved by synchronizing the carrier phase using a Costas tracking loop. The demonstration showed that a high data rate phase coherent optical link can be implemented using frequency stabilized solid state lasers.

  17. Update on diode-pumped solid-state laser experiments for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C.; Smith, L.; Payne, S.

    1994-08-15

    The authors have completed the initial phase of the diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) experimental program to validate the expected pumping dynamics and extraction cross-sections of Yb{sup 3+}-doped Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F (Yb:S-FAP) crystals. Yb:S-FAP crystals up to 25 x 25 x 175 mm in size have been grown for this purpose which have acceptable loss characteristics (<1 %/cm) and laser damage thresholds ({approximately}20 J/cm{sup 2}). The saturation fluence for pumping has been measured to be 2.2 J/cm{sup 2} using three different methods based on either the spatial, temporal, or energy transmission properties of a Yb:S-FAP rod. The small signal gain under saturated pumping conditions was measured. These measurements imply an emission cross section of 6.0 x 10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2} that falls within error bars of the previously reported value of 7.3 x 10{sup {minus}20} cm{sup 2}, obtained from purely spectroscopic techniques. The effects of radiation trapping on the emission lifetime have been quantified. The long lifetime of Yb:S-FAP has beneficial effects for diode-pumped amplifier designs, relative to materials with equivalent cross sections but shorter lifetimes, in that less peak pump intensity is required (thus lower diode costs) and that lower spontaneous emission rates lead to a reduction in amplified spontaneous emission. Consequently, up to 1.7 J/cm{sup 3} of stored energy density was achieved in a 6x6x44 mm Yb:S-FAP amplifier rod; this stored energy density is large relative to typical flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass values of 0.3 to 0.5 J/cm{sup 3}. A 2.4 kW peak power InGaAs diode array has been fabricated by Beach, Emanuel, and co-workers which meets the central wavelength, bandwidth, and energy specifications for the author`s immediate experiments. These results further increase their optimism of being able to produce a {approximately} 10% efficient diode-pumped solid state laser for inertial fusion energy.

  18. Multiple-photon excitation imaging with an all-solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.; Centonze, Victoria F.; White, John G.; Hird, Steven N.; Sepsenwol, S.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.; Maker, Gareth T.; Ferguson, Allister I.

    1996-05-01

    Two-photon excitation imaging is a recently described optical sectioning technique where fluorophore excitation is confined to--and therefore defines--the optical section being observed. This characteristic offers a significant advantage over laser-scanning confocal microscopy; the volume of fluorophore excited in the minimum necessary for imaging, thereby minimizing the destructive effects of fluorophore excitation in living tissues. In addition, a confocal pinhole is not required for optical scattering--thus further reducing the excitation needed for efficient photon collection. We have set up a two-photon excitation imaging system which uses an all-solid-state, short-pulse, long-wavelength laser as an excitation source. The source is a diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser operating in the infrared (1047 nm). This laser is small, has modest power requirements, and has proven reliable and stable in operation. The short laser pulses from the laser are affected by the system optical path; this has been investigated with second harmonic generation derived from a nonlinear crystal. The system has been specifically designed for the study of live biological specimens. Two cell types especially sensitive to high-energy illumination, the developing Caenorhabditis elegans embryo and the crawling sperm of the nematode, Ascaris, were used to demonstrate the dramatic increase in viability when fluorescence is generated by two-photon excitation. The system has the capability of switching between two-photon and confocal imaging modes to facilitate direct comparison of theory of these two optical sectioning techniques on the same specimen. A heavily stained zebra fish embryo was used to demonstrate the increase in sectioning depth when fluorescence is generated by infrared two- photon excitation. Two-photon excitation with the 1047 nm laser produces bright images with a variety of red emitting fluorophores, and some green emitting fluorophores, commonly used in biological

  19. FY2002 Progress Summary Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers, and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A; Bibeau, C; Beach, R; Behrendt, B; Ebbers, C; Latkowski, J; Meier, W; Payne, S; Perkins, J; Schaffers, K; Skulina, K; Ditmire, T; Kelly, J; Waxer, L; Rudi, P; Randles, M; Witter, D; Meissner, H; Merissner, O

    2001-12-13

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, coordinated effort to develop a high-energy, repetitively pulsed laser system for Inertial Fusion Energy and other DOE and DOD applications. This program is building a laser-fusion energy base to complement the laser-fusion science developed by DOE Defense programs over the past 25 years. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and LLNL. The current LLNL proposal is a companion proposal to that submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. Aside from the driver development aspect, the NRL and LLNL companion proposals pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, materials and power plant economics. This report requests continued funding in FY02 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1kW, 100J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser. In addition, research in high gain laser target design, fusion chamber issues and survivability of the final optic element will be pursued. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments.

  20. Analysis of S-band solid-state transmitters for the solar power satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belohoubek, E. F.; Ettenberg, M.; Huang, H. C.; Nowogrodzki, M.; Sechi, F. N.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of replacing the Reference System antenna in which thermionic devices are used for the dc-to-microwave conversion, with solid-state elements was explored. System, device, and antenna module tradeoff investigations strongly point toward the desirability of changing the transmitter concept to a distributed array of relatively low power elements, deriving their dc power directly from the solar cell array and whose microwave power outputs are combined in space. The approach eliminates the thermal, weight, and dc-voltage distribution problems of a system in which high power tubes are simply replaced with clusters of solid state amplifiers. The proposed approach retains the important advantages of a solid state system: greatly enhanced reliability and graceful degradation of the system.

  1. Solid-state Isotopic Power Source for Computer Memory Chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Paul M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in materials technology now make it possible to fabricate nonthermal thin-film radioisotopic energy converters (REC) with a specific power of 24 W/kg and a 10 year working life at 5 to 10 watts. This creates applications never before possible, such as placing the power supply directly on integrated circuit chips. The efficiency of the REC is about 25 percent which is two to three times greater than the 6 to 8 percent capabilities of current thermoelectric systems. Radio isotopic energy converters have the potential to meet many future space power requirements for a wide variety of applications with less mass, better efficiency, and less total area than other power conversion options. These benefits result in significant dollar savings over the projected mission lifetime.

  2. The potential of ill-nitride laser diodes for solid-state lighting [Advantages of III-Nitride Laser Diodes in Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, Jonathan; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    2014-09-01

    III-nitride laser diodes (LDs) are an interesting light source for solid-state lighting (SSL). Modelling of LDs is performed to reveal the potential advantages over traditionally used light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The first, and most notable, advantage is LDs have higher efficiency at higher currents when compared to LEDs. This is because Auger recombination that causes efficiency droop can no longer grow after laser threshold. Second, the same phosphor-converted methods used with LEDs can also be used with LDs to produce white light with similar color rendering and color temperature. Third, producing white light from direct emitters is equally challenging for both LEDs and LDs, with neither source having a direct advantage. Lastly, the LD emission is directional and can be more readily captured and focused, leading to the possibility of novel and more compact luminaires. These advantages make LDs a compelling source for future SSL.

  3. The potential of ill-nitride laser diodes for solid-state lighting [Advantages of III-Nitride Laser Diodes in Solid-State Lighting

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wierer, Jonathan; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    2014-09-01

    III-nitride laser diodes (LDs) are an interesting light source for solid-state lighting (SSL). Modelling of LDs is performed to reveal the potential advantages over traditionally used light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The first, and most notable, advantage is LDs have higher efficiency at higher currents when compared to LEDs. This is because Auger recombination that causes efficiency droop can no longer grow after laser threshold. Second, the same phosphor-converted methods used with LEDs can also be used with LDs to produce white light with similar color rendering and color temperature. Third, producing white light from direct emitters is equally challenging for bothmore » LEDs and LDs, with neither source having a direct advantage. Lastly, the LD emission is directional and can be more readily captured and focused, leading to the possibility of novel and more compact luminaires. These advantages make LDs a compelling source for future SSL.« less

  4. Solid state RF power: The route to 1W per euro cent

    SciTech Connect

    Heid, Oliver

    2013-04-19

    In most particle accelerators RF power is a decisive design constraint due to high costs and relative inflexibility of current electron beam based RF sources, i.e. Klystrons, Magnetrons, Tetrodes etc. At VHF/UHF frequencies the transition to solid state devices promises to fundamentally change the situation. Recent progress brings 1 Watt per Euro cent installed cost within reach. We present a Silicon Carbide semiconductor solution utilising the Solid State Direct Drive technology at unprecedented efficiency, power levels and power densities. The proposed solution allows retrofitting of existing RF accelerators and opens the route to novel particle accelerator concepts.

  5. Bistability of self-modulation oscillations in an autonomous solid-state ring laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dudetskii, V Yu

    2013-11-30

    Bistable self-modulation regimes of generation for a ring YAG : Nd chip laser with the counterpropagating waves asymmetrically coupled via backward scattering are simulated numerically. Two branches of bistable self-modulation regimes of generation are found in the domain of the parametric resonance between the selfmodulation and relaxation oscillations. The self-modulation regimes observed in earlier experiments pertain to only one of the branches. Possible reasons for such a discrepancy are considered, related to the influence of technical and natural noise on the dynamics of solid-state ring lasers. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. Advanced 2-micron Solid-state Laser for Wind and CO2 Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  7. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) Concept Definition Study (Exhibit D). Solid-State Amplifier Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Data resulting from a continuing effort to provide system/subsystem definition data to aid in the evaluation of the SPS program concept is presented. The specific data described relate to the proposed use of solid state devices as microwave power amplifiers in the satellite microwave power transmission subsystem.

  8. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occurring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Nd/sup 3+/ in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  9. Excited-state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occuring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelength resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed form the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  10. generation of picosecond pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.N.; Matrosov, V.N.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Trunov, V.I.

    1986-07-01

    Results are reported of investigations aimed at generating nanosecond radiation pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media having broad gain lines. Passive mode locking is accomplished for the first time in a BeLa:Nd/sup 3/ laser at a wavelength 1.354 microm, and in a YAG:Nd/sup 3/ laser on a 1.32-microm transition. The free lasing and mode-locking regimes were investigated in an alexandrite (BeA1/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3/) laser in the 0.72-0.78-microm range and in a synchronously pumped laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers in LiF in the 1.12-1.24-microm region. The features of nonlinear perception of IR radiation by the eye, using a developed picosecond laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers, are investigated for the first time.

  11. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliewer, Michael L.; Powell, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics in laser-pumped, rare-earth-doped, solid-state laser materials are investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It is found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited-state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process is an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  12. High Efficiency Ka-Band Solid State Power Amplifier Waveguide Power Combiner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chevalier, Christine T.; Freeman, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    A novel Ka-band high efficiency asymmetric waveguide four-port combiner for coherent combining of two Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Solid State Power Amplifiers (SSPAs) having unequal outputs has been successfully designed, fabricated and characterized over the NASA deep space frequency band from 31.8 to 32.3 GHz. The measured combiner efficiency is greater than 90 percent, the return loss greater than 18 dB and input port isolation greater than 22 dB. The manufactured combiner was designed for an input power ratio of 2:1 but can be custom designed for any arbitrary power ratio. Applications considered are NASA s space communications systems needing 6 to 10 W of radio frequency (RF) power. This Technical Memorandum (TM) is an expanded version of the article recently published in Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) Electronics Letters.

  13. Temporal model of an optically pumped co-doped solid state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wangler, T. G.; Swetits, J. J.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    Currently, research is being conducted on the optical properties of materials associated with the development of solid state lasers in the two micron region. In support of this effort, a mathematical model describing the energy transfer in a holmium laser sensitized with thulium is developed. In this paper, we establish some qualitative properties of the solution of the model, such as non-negativity, boundedness, and integrability. A local stability analysis is then performed from which conditions for asymptotic stability are attained. Finally, we report on our numerical analysis of the system and how it compares with experimental results.

  14. High Energy, Single-Mode, All-Solid-State Nd:YAG Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Hovis, Floyd

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, recent progress made in the design and development of an all-solid-state, single longitudinal mode, conductively cooled Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm wavelength for UV lidar for ozone sensing applications is presented. Currently, this pump laser provides an output pulse energy of greater than 1.1 J/pulse at 50 Hz PRF and a pulsewidth of 22 ns. The spatial profile of the output beam is a rectangular super Gaussian. Electrical-to-optical system efficiency of greater than 7% and a minimum M(sup 2) value of less than 2 have been achieved.

  15. A compact 500 MHz 4 kW Solid-State Power Amplifier for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, M.; Pedrozzi, M.; Ferreira, L. F. R.; Garvey, T.

    2011-05-01

    We present the development of a compact narrow-band Solid-State Power Amplifier (SSPA). We foresee a promising application of solid-state amplifiers specifically in accelerators for new generation synchrotron light sources. Such a new technology has reached a competitive price/performance ratio and expected lifetime in comparison with klystron and IOT amplifiers. The increasing number of synchrotron light sources using 500 MHz as base frequency justifies the effort in the development of the proposed amplifier. Two different techniques are also proposed to improve the control and performance of these new distributed amplification systems which we call, respectively, complete distributed system and forced compression.

  16. High-power, solid-state rf source for accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.R.; Mols, G.E.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years the Defense and Electronics Center of Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a solid-state, 250-kW peak, rf amplifier for use with the SPS-40 radar system. This system has a pulse length of 60 ..mu..s and operates across the frequency band from 400 to 450 MHz. Because of the potential use of such a system as an rf source for accelerator applications, a collaborative experiment was initiated between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Westinghouse to simulate the resonant load conditions of an accelerator cavity. This paper describes the positive results of that experiment as well as the solid-state amplifier architecture. It also explores the future of high-power, solid-state amplifiers as rf sources for accelerator structures.

  17. Dye-triplet-state and singlet-oxygen quenching effects in solid state dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Terence A.; Ahmad, Mohammad; Gorman, Anthony; Hamblett, I.; Rahn, Mark D.

    2000-04-01

    The main photodegradation mechanisms of pyrromethene 567 are discussed, and the quantum efficiency of self-sensitized photo-oxidation, the predominant mechanism, was found to be 0.5% in aerated benzene-d6. Other degradation mechanisms do exist, but the high photostability of the dye in solid host media possibly implies that they are all diffusion controlled. Solid-state dye lasers based on pyrromethene 567 doped poly(methyl methacrylate) with an added singlet oxygen quencher 1,4-diazobicyclo [2,2,2] octane showed a lifetime of 550,000 pulses. A triplet quencher, perylene, provided no improvement. Singlet oxygen quenching is effective in the solid-state whereas triplet quenching is not, presumably due to the slower diffusion rate of dye molecules compared with oxygen.

  18. Solar power satellite system definition study. Volume 4: Solid State SPS Analysis, Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A 2500 megawatt solid ground output Solar Power Satellite (SPS) of conventional configuration was designed and analyzed. Because the power per receiving antenna is halved, as compared with the klystron reference, twice the number of receiving antennas are needed to deliver the same total power. The solid state approach appears feasible with a slightly greater specific mass and slightly higher cost than the klystron SPS design.

  19. Self-referencable frequency comb from a 170-fs, 1.5-μm solid-state laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, M. C.; Pekarek, S.; Oehler, A. E. H.; Südmeyer, T.; Dudley, J. M.; Keller, U.

    2010-05-01

    We report measurement of the first carrier-envelope offset (CEO) frequency signal from a spectrally broadened ultrafast solid-state laser oscillator operating in the 1.5 μm spectral region. The f-to-2 f CEO frequency beat signal is 49 dB above the noise floor (100-kHz resolution bandwidth) and the free-running linewidth of 3.6 kHz is significantly better than typically obtained by ultrafast fiber laser systems. We used a SESAM mode-locked Er:Yb:glass laser generating 170-fs pulses at a 75 MHz pulse repetition rate with 110-mW average power. It is pumped by one standard telecom-grade 980-nm diode consuming less than 1.5 W of electrical power. Without any further pulse compression and amplification, a coherent octave-spanning frequency comb is generated in a polarization-maintaining highly-nonlinear fiber (PM-HNLF). The fiber length was optimized to yield a strong CEO frequency beat signal between the outer Raman soliton and the spectral peak of the dispersive wave within the supercontinuum. The polarization-maintaining property of the supercontinuum fiber was crucial; comparable octave-spanning supercontinua from two non-PM fibers showed higher intensity noise and poor coherence. A stable CEO-beat was observed even with pulse durations above 200 fs. Achieving a strong CEO frequency signal from relatively long pulses with moderate power levels substantially relaxes the demands on the driving laser, which is particularly important for novel gigahertz diode-pumped solid-state and semiconductor lasers.

  20. Q-switched all-solid-state lasers and application in processing of thin-film solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liangqing; Wang, Feng

    2009-08-01

    Societal pressure to renewable clean energy is increasing which is expected to be used as part of an overall strategy to address global warming and oil crisis. Photovoltaic energy conversion devices are on a rapidly accelerating growth path driven by government, of which the costs and prices lower continuously. The next generation thin-film devices are considered to be more efficiency and greatly reduced silicon consumption, resulting in dramatically lower per unit fabrication costs. A key aspect of these devices is patterning large panels to create a monolithic array of series-interconnected cells to form a low current, high voltage module. This patterning is accomplished in three critical scribing processes called P1, P2, and P3. All-solid-state Q-switched lasers are the technology of choice for these processes, due to their advantages of compact configuration, high peak-value power, high repeat rate, excellent beam quality and stability, delivering the desired combination of high throughput and narrow, clean scribes. The end pumped all-solid-state lasers could achieve 1064nm IR resources with pulse width of nanoseconds adopting acoustic-optics Q-switch, shorter than 20ns. The repeat rate is up to 100kHz and the beam quality is close to diffraction limit. Based on this, 532nm green lasers, 355nm UV lasers and 266nm DUV lasers could be carried out through nonlinear frequency conversion. Different wave length lasers are chose to process selective materials. For example, 8-15 W IR lasers are used to scribe the TCO film (P1); 1-5 W green lasers are suitable for scribing the active semiconductor layers (P2) and the back contact layers (P3). Our company, Wuhan Lingyun Photo-electronic System Co. Ltd, has developed 20W IR and 5W green end-pumped Q-switched all-solid-state lasers for thin-film solar industry. Operating in high repeat rates, the speed of processing is up to 2.0 m/s.

  1. High efficiency single frequency 355 nm all-solid-state UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaobing; Wei, Daikang; Ma, Xiuhua; Li, Shiguang; Liu, Jiqiao; Zhu, Xiaolei; Chen, Weibiao

    2016-05-01

    A novel conductively cooled high energy single-frequency 355 nm all-solid-state UV laser is presented based on sum-frequency mixing technique. In this system, a pulsed seeder laser at 1064 nm wavelength, modulated by an AOM, is directly amplified by the cascaded multi-stage hybrid laser amplifiers, and two LBO crystals are used for the SHG and SFG, finally a maximum UV pulse energy of 226 mJ at 355 nm wavelength is achieved with frequency-tripled conversion efficiency as high as 55%, the pulse width is around 12.2 ns at the repetition frequency of 30 Hz. The beam quality factor M 2 of the output UV laser is measured to be 2.54 and 2.98 respectively in two orthogonal directions.

  2. Solderjet bumping technique used to manufacture a compact and robust green solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribes, P.; Burkhardt, T.; Hornaff, M.; Kousar, S.; Burkhardt, D.; Beckert, E.; Gilaberte, M.; Guilhot, D.; Montes, D.; Galan, M.; Ferrando, S.; Laudisio, M.; Belenguer, T.; Ibarmia, S.; Gallego, P.; Rodríguez, J. A.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.

    2015-06-01

    Solder-joining using metallic solder alloys is an alternative to adhesive bonding. Laser-based soldering processes are especially well suited for the joining of optical components made of fragile and brittle materials such as glasses, ceramics and optical crystals due to a localized and minimized input of thermal energy. The Solderjet Bumping technique is used to assemble a miniaturized laser resonator in order to obtain higher robustness, wider thermal conductivity performance, higher vacuum and radiation compatibility, and better heat and long term stability compared with identical glued devices. The resulting assembled compact and robust green diode-pumped solid-state laser is part of the future Raman Laser Spectrometer designed for the Exomars European Space Agency (ESA) space mission 2018.

  3. Gigahertz dual-comb modelocked diode-pumped semiconductor and solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, S. M.; Mangold, M.; Golling, M.; Klenner, A.; Keller, U.

    2016-03-01

    We present a simple approach to generate simultaneously two gigahertz mode-locked pulse trains from a single gain element. A bi-refringent crystal in the laser cavity splits the one cavity beam into two cross-polarized and spatially separated beams. This polarization-duplexing is successfully demonstrated for both a semiconductor disk laser (i.e. MIXSEL) and a diode-pumped solid-state Nd:YAG laser. The beat between the two beams results in a microwave frequency comb, which represents a direct link between the terahertz optical frequencies and the electronically accessible microwave regime. This dual-output technique enables compact and cost-efficient dual-comb lasers for spectroscopy applications.

  4. Damage resistant optics for a mega-joule solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. H.; Rainer, F.; Kozlowski, M. R.; Wolfe, C. R.; Thomas, I.; Milanovich, F.

    1990-12-01

    Research on Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has progressed rapidly in the past several years. As a consequence, LLNL is developing plans to upgrade the current 120 kJ solid state (Nd3+ phosphate glass) Nova laser to a 1.5 to 2 megajoule system with the goal of achieving fusion ignition. The design of the planned Nova Upgrade is briefly discussed. Because of recent improvements in the damage resistance of optical materials it is now technically and economically feasible to build a megajoule-class solid state laser. Specifically, the damage threshold of Nd(+3)-doped phosphate laser glass, multilayer dielectric coatings, and non-linear optical crystals (e.g., KDP) have been dramatically improved. These materials now meet the fluence requirements for a 1.5 to 2 MJ Nd(+3)-glass laser operating at 1054 and 351 nm and at a pulse length of 3 ns. The recent improvements in damage thresholds are reviewed; threshold data at both 1064 and 355 nm and the measured pulse length scaling are presented.

  5. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  6. A 32-GHz solid-state power amplifier for deep space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wamhof, P. D.; Rascoe, D. L.; Lee, K. A.; Lansing, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    A 1.5-W solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) has been demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 35 GHz for future deep space missions. Output power and efficiency measurements for a monolithic millimeter-wave integrated circuit (MMIC)-based SSPA are reported. Technical design details for the various modules and a thermal analysis are discussed, as well as future plans.

  7. Dental ablation with 1064 nm, 500 ps, Diode pumped solid state laser: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Merigo, Elisabetta; Vescovi, Paolo; Selleri, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Er:YAG laser in conservative dentistry is. good alternative to conventional instruments. Though several studies show the advantages of these devices, some drawbacks and unsolved problems are still present, such as the cost of the device and the large dimensions of the equipment. Purpose: In the present study, the effectiveness of dental surface ablation with a picosecond infrared diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser was investigated. In vitro tests on extracted human teeth were carried out, with assessment of the ablation quality in the tooth and thermal increase inside the pulp chamber. Materials and Methods: A solid-state picosecond laser was used for the experiments. The samples were exposed to laser energy at 1064 nm at a frequency of 30 kHz and a 500 ps pulse width. The target teeth were cooled during exposures. The internal temperature of the pulp chamber was monitored with. thermocouple. Results: Optical microscope images showed effective ablation with the absence of carbonisation and micro-cracks. The cooling maintained the temperature rise in the pulp chamber below the permitted 5.5°C. Discussion: The main problem with the use of lasers in dentistry when teeth are the target is the heat generated in the pulp chamber of the target teeth. With lasers operating in the femtosecond mode, a better management of the internal temperature is possible, but is offset by the high cost of such devices. With the ps domain system used in the present study together with cooling using chilled water, effective and clean ablation could be achieved with a controlled thermal effect in the pulp chamber. Conclusions: In this preliminary study with a picosecond domain DPSS laser using water cooling for the target, effective hard tissue ablation was achieved keeping the thermal increase in the pulp within the permitted range. The results suggest that this system could be used in clinical practice with appropriate modifications. PMID:24204093

  8. Reconfigurable Solid-state Dye-doped Polymer Ring Resonator Lasers.

    PubMed

    Chandrahalim, Hengky; Fan, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents wavelength configurable on-chip solid-state ring lasers fabricated by a single-mask standard lithography. The single- and coupled-ring resonator hosts were fabricated on a fused-silica wafer and filled with 3,3'-Diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide (CY3), Rhodamine 6G (R6G), and 3,3'-Diethylthiadicarbocyanine iodide (CY5)-doped polymer as the reconfigurable gain media. The recorded lasing threshold was ~220 nJ/mm(2) per pulse for the single-ring resonator laser with R6G, marking the lowest threshold shown by solid-state dye-doped polymer lasers fabricated with a standard lithography process on a chip. A single-mode lasing from a coupled-ring resonator system with the lasing threshold of ~360 nJ/mm(2) per pulse was also demonstrated through the Vernier effect. The renewability of the dye-doped polymer was examined by removing and redepositing the dye-doped polymer on the same resonator hosts for multiple cycles. We recorded consistent emissions from the devices for all trials, suggesting the feasibility of employing this technology for numerous photonic and biochemical sensing applications that entail for sustainable, reconfigurable, and low lasing threshold coherent light sources on a chip. PMID:26674508

  9. Reconfigurable Solid-state Dye-doped Polymer Ring Resonator Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Chandrahalim, Hengky; Fan, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents wavelength configurable on-chip solid-state ring lasers fabricated by a single-mask standard lithography. The single- and coupled-ring resonator hosts were fabricated on a fused-silica wafer and filled with 3,3′-Diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide (CY3), Rhodamine 6G (R6G), and 3,3′-Diethylthiadicarbocyanine iodide (CY5)-doped polymer as the reconfigurable gain media. The recorded lasing threshold was ~220 nJ/mm2 per pulse for the single-ring resonator laser with R6G, marking the lowest threshold shown by solid-state dye-doped polymer lasers fabricated with a standard lithography process on a chip. A single-mode lasing from a coupled-ring resonator system with the lasing threshold of ~360 nJ/mm2 per pulse was also demonstrated through the Vernier effect. The renewability of the dye-doped polymer was examined by removing and redepositing the dye-doped polymer on the same resonator hosts for multiple cycles. We recorded consistent emissions from the devices for all trials, suggesting the feasibility of employing this technology for numerous photonic and biochemical sensing applications that entail for sustainable, reconfigurable, and low lasing threshold coherent light sources on a chip. PMID:26674508

  10. Solid state amorphization of nanocrystalline nickel by cryogenic laser shock peening

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chang Ren, Zhencheng; Zhao, Jingyi; Hou, Xiaoning; Dong, Yalin; Liu, Yang; Sang, Xiahan

    2015-10-07

    In this study, complete solid state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel has been achieved through cryogenic laser shock peening (CLSP). High resolution transmission electron microscopy has revealed the complete amorphous structure of the sample after CLSP processing. A molecular dynamic model has been used to investigate material behavior during the shock loading and the effects of nanoscale grain boundaries on the amorphization process. It has been found that the initial nanoscale grain boundaries increase the initial Gibbs free energy before plastic deformation and also serve as dislocation emission sources during plastic deformation to contribute to defect density increase, leading to the amorphization of pure nanocrystalline nickel.

  11. Customized ablation using an all-solid-state deep-UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, G.; Lenzner, M.; Kittelmann, O.; Zatonski, R.; Kirsch, M.; Kuklin, Y.

    2003-07-01

    We show first deep UV ablation results achieved with our new all solid state laser system. The system parameters allow high repetition rate ablation with a small spot diameter of about 0.250mm and a fluence of 350 mJ/cm2 at a wavelength of 210 nm using sequential frequency conversion of a diode pumped laser source. The single shot and multishot ablation rates as well as the ablation profiles have been defined using MicroProf (Fries Research and Technology GmbH, Germany). By means of computer controlled scanning we produce smooth ablation profiles corresponding to a correction of myopia, hyperopia or astigmatism. Due to the small spot size and high repetition rate of the laser we are able to generate in short time intervals complicated ablation profiles described by higher order polynomial functions which are required for the needs of customized corneal ablation.

  12. Solid state ultraviolet laser (213 nm) ablation of the cornea and synthetic collagen lenticules.

    PubMed

    Gailitis, R P; Ren, Q S; Thompson, K P; Lin, J T; Waring, G O

    1991-01-01

    We used a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with non-linear optical crystals to produce the 5th (213 nm) and the 4th (266 nm) harmonic frequencies. Using these two wavelengths, we ablated fresh porcine corneas and type I collagen synthetic epikeratoplasty lenticules. For the 213-nm ablation, radiant exposure was 1.3 J/cm2. The ablation rate was 0.23 micron per pulse for the epikeratoplasty lenticules. We examined all tissues with light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Histology for the 213-nm ablation showed a clean ablation crater with minimal collagen lamellae disruption and a damage zone less than 1 micron. In comparison, the 266 nm radiation showed more charring at the edges with a damage zone approximately 25 microns deep with disruption of the stromal lamella. Our results show that this solid state UV laser is a potential alternative to the excimer laser for cornea surgery.

  13. Solid-state spectroscopy with far-infrared continuous-wave lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacke, M.

    The results of experimental and theoretical work on far infrared (FIR) spectroscopy are summarized, along with attendant problems. Reviews are presented of experimentation with solid-state spectroscopy using CW FIR lasers in transmission spectroscopy, spectroscopy with a variable parameter, resonator and interferometer investigations, and studies involving surface electromagnetic waves. Attention is also given to refractometry and planar dielectric lightguides, and comparisons are made with the performance obtained with Fourier spectroscopy. The theoretical framework underlying FIR laser spectroscopy is discussed in terms of the physical optics of FIR wavelengths, plane waves, Gaussian modes, and Gaussian beams in spectroscopic experiments. Parameters governing the local optics at FIR wavelengths are considered, noting the limitations of geometric optics in the FIR regime. Applications of the Wigner function for intensity calculations is described and illustrated with several examples. Finally, it is shown that laser spectroscopy is more effective for quantifying the amplitude of radiation than is Fourier spectroscopy.

  14. The high frequency characteristics of laser reflection and visible light during solid state disk laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangdong; You, Deyong; Katayama, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Optical properties are related to weld quality during laser welding. Visible light radiation generated from optical-induced plasma and laser reflection is considered a key element reflecting weld quality. An in-depth analysis of the high-frequency component of optical signals is conducted. A combination of a photoelectric sensor and an optical filter helped to obtain visible light reflection and laser reflection in the welding process. Two groups of optical signals were sampled at a high sampling rate (250 kHz) using an oscilloscope. Frequencies in the ranges 1-10 kHz and 10-125 kHz were investigated respectively. Experimental results showed that there was an obvious correlation between the high-frequency signal and the laser power, while the high-frequency signal was not sensitive to changes in welding speed. In particular, when the defocus position was changed, only a high frequency of the visible light signal was observed, while the high frequency of the laser reflection signal remained unchanged. The basic correlation between optical features and welding status during the laser welding process is specified, which helps to provide a new research focus for investigating the stability of welding status.

  15. The Use of a Solid State Analog Television Transmitter as a Superconducting Electron Gun Power Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    J.G. Kulpin, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    A solid state analog television transmitter designed for 200 MHz operation is being commissioned as a radio frequency power amplifier on the Wisconsin superconducting electron gun cavity. The amplifier consists of three separate radio frequency power combiner cabinets and one monitor and control cabinet. The transmitter employs rugged field effect transistors built into one kilowatt drawers that are individually hot swappable at maximum continuous power output. The total combined power of the transmitter system is 33 kW at 200 MHz, output through a standard coaxial transmission line. A low level radio frequency system is employed to digitally synthesize the 200 MHz signal and precisely control amplitude and phase.

  16. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    Generation of femtosecond pulses from a continuous-wave mode-locked chromium-doped forsterite (Cr(4+):Mg2SiO4) laser has been accomplished. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high-dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power (with 1 percent output coupler), tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured.

  17. Cavity length dependence of mode beating in passively Q-switched Nd-solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zameroski, Nathan D.; Wanke, Michael; Bossert, David

    2013-03-01

    The temporal intensity profile of pulse(s) from passively Q-switched and passively Q-switched mode locked (QSML) solid-state lasers is known to be dependent on cavity length. In this work, the pulse width, modulation depth, and beat frequencies of a Nd:Cr:GSGG laser using a Cr+4:YAG passive Q-switch are investigated as function cavity length. Measured temporal widths are linearly correlated with cavity length but generally 3-5 ns larger than theoretical predictions. Some cavity lengths exhibit pulse profiles with no modulation while other lengths exhibit complete amplitude modulation. The observed beat frequencies at certain cavity lengths cannot be accounted for with passively QSML models in which the pulse train repetition rate is τRT-1, τRT= round-trip time. They can be explained, however, by including coupled cavity mode-locking effects. A theoretical model developed for a two section coupled cavity semiconductor laser is adapted to a solid-state laser to interpret measured beat frequencies. We also numerically evaluate the temporal criterion required to achieve temporally smooth Q-switched pulses, versus cavity length and pump rate. We show that in flash lamp pumped systems, the difference in buildup time between longitudinal modes is largely dependent on the pump rate. In applications where short pulse delay is important, the pumping rate may limit the ability to achieve temporally smooth pulses in passively Q-switched lasers. Simulations support trends in experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Semiconductor-doped glass saturable absorbers for near-infrared solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarevich, A. M.; Yumashev, K. V.; Lipovskii, A. A.

    2008-04-01

    A survey of results on use of semiconductor-doped glass saturable absorbers for near-infrared passively mode-locked and Q-switched solid-state lasers is presented. Nanosized semiconductor particles (quantum dots) belong to quantum confined systems where motion of an electron and a hole is defined by the finite size of the nanoparticle. Dependence of the excitonic transition energy on the QDs size provides the possibility to tune the absorption of the glasses embedded with such particles to wavelength of specific light source. IV-VI semiconductor QDs (PbS, PbSe) are of interest for IR application due to their narrow band gap and large exciton Bohr radii. These allow for exciton absorption band at the wavelength through 1-3μm. Nonlinear optical properties of PbS, PbSe, and CuxSe nanoparticles embedded in glass matrices necessary for saturable absorber applications are analyzed. It is shown that these materials can be efficiently used for passive mode locking and Q switching of solid-state lasers based on Nd3+, Yb3+, Cr4+, Tm3+, and Ho3+ ions emitting through 1-2.1μm spectral range.

  19. Multifrequency solid state YAG:Nd laser for diagnosis of malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalayan, Asatur A.; Aidinian, Lusine E.; Galstian, Hayro M.

    1998-09-01

    The possibility of laser fluorescence diagnosis of malignant tumors with the aid of multifrequency (355, 440, 446, 532, 660, 670 nm) solid state YAG:Nd laser and the rise in accuracy of this method were discussed. Permitted for clinical employment sodium fluorescein has been used as human tumor-localizing dye. The fluorescence spectra of sodium fluorescein containing human normal tissue and breast, stomach, intestine, skin cancer during excitation with the third harmonics of YAG:Nd and with help of multichannel fiber-optic spectrofluorometer were studied. The contrast accumulation of the dye in tumors of different localization was investigated. The fluorescence spectra of chlorine e6, containing animal tissues at different excitation wavelength (355, 532 and 660 nm) were obtained. The pharmacokinetic behavior of chlorine e6, containing different organs and tumor tissues of rats, infected with Sarcoma-45 has been investigated.

  20. Lif and Raman Spectroscopy in Undergraduate Labs Using Green Diode-Pumped Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    Electronic spectroscopy of molecular iodine vapor has long been studied in undergraduate physical chemistry teaching laboratories, but the effectiveness of emission work has typically been limited by availability of instrumentation. This talk shows how to make inexpensive green diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) lasers easily tunable for efficient, selective excitation of I2. Miniature fiber-optic spectrometers then enable rotationally resolved fluorescence spectroscopy up to v" = 42 near 900 nm with acquisition times of less than one minute. DPSS lasers are also versatile excitation sources for vibrational Raman spectroscopy, which is another common exercise that has been limited by lack of proper instrumentation in the teaching laboratory. This talk shows how to construct a simple accessory for commercial fluorimeters to record vibrational Raman spectra and depolarization ratios for CCl4 and C2Cl4 as part of a lab exercise featuring molecular symmetry.

  1. Lead salt diode lasers and development of tunable solid state lasers for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, C.; Bielinski, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Extensive studies of the output characteristics of single quantum well lead-telluride lasers developed at the General Motors Research Laboratories were carried out. Threshold currents, output powers and line structures were measured as a function of temperature. Very low-current lasing thresholds, record high operating temperatures and over 30% tuning ranges were achieved. Excellent reproducibilities, good far-field patterns and reasonable linewidths (approx. 500 kHz) were found.

  2. FY2005 Progress Summary and FY2006 Program Plan Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers, and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C

    2006-03-24

    The primary focus this year was to operate the system with two amplifiers populated with and pumped by eight high power diode arrays. The system was operated for extended run periods which enabled average power testing of components, diagnostics, and controls. These tests were highly successful, with a demonstrated energy level of over 55 joules for 4 cumulative hours at a repetition rate of 10 Hz (average power 0.55 kW). In addition, high average power second harmonic generation was demonstrated, achieving 227 W of 523.5 nm light (22.7 J, 10 Hz, 15 ns, 30 minutes) Plans to achieve higher energy levels and average powers are in progress. The dual amplifier system utilizes a 4-pass optical arrangement. The Yb:S-FAP slabs were mounted in aerodynamic aluminum vane structures to allow turbulent helium gas flow across the faces. Diagnostic packages that monitored beam performance were deployed during operation. The laser experiments involved injecting a seed beam from the front end into the system and making four passes through both amplifiers. Beam performance diagnostics monitored the beam on each pass to assess system parameters such as gain and nearfield intensity profiles. This year, an active mirror and wavefront sensor were procured and demonstrated in an off-line facility. The active mirror technology can correct for low order phase distortions at user specified operating conditions (such as repetition rates different than 10 Hz) and is a complementary technology to the static phase plates used in the system for higher order distortions. A picture of the laser system with amplifier No.2 (foreground) and amplifier No.1 (background) is shown in Fig. 1.0.1.1. The control system and diagnostics were recently enhanced for faster processing and allow remote operation of the system. The growth and fabrication of the Yb:S-FAP slabs constituted another major element of our program objectives. Our goal was to produce at least fourteen 4x6 cm2 crystalline slabs. These

  3. Phase conjugation by wave-mixing interactions in solid-state laser gain media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brignon, A.

    The heat load deposited in solid-state laser medium leads to thermally induced aberrations. This undesirable effect causes wavefront distorsions and reduces the brightness of lasers. Phase-distorsion correction of an optical wave propagating in laser media is thus a crucial problem that must be taken into account in solid-state laser sources. Indeed, many applications require a high-spatial-quality, diffraction-limited output beam. An approach offering great potential to solve this problem involves nonlinear optical phase conjugation. Phase conjugation can be obtained with degenerate wave mixing in the laser medium itself by gain saturation. The use of solid-state laser amplifiers for such operation presents very attractive features including the automatic matching of the nonlinearity with the laser wavelength, a fast response time and a high efficiency of the nonlinear process due to the laser amplification of all interacting beams. In as much as gain saturation is inherent in all tenporal regimes, phase conjugation in inverted media can be performed in both pulsed and cw regimes. This nonlinear mechanism is theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated in flash-lamp pumped Nd:YAG amplifiers and in a compact diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 amplifier in the nanosecond pulsed regime. Efficient continuous wave operation is also demonstrated in a Nd:YVO4 amplifier pumped by a cw Ti:sapphire laser. Applications to dynamic holography and correction of aberrated wavefronts propagating in laser media are presented. Finally, it is shown that saturable gain media can be used as efficient phase conjugate mirrors for all-solid-state high beam quality laser sources. Les lasers solides présentent des avantages relatifs à leur compacité, facilité d'utilisation et à leur durée de vie. Cependant, une partie importante de l'énergie de pompage se dissipe sous forme de chaleur provocant des distorsions de phase importantes dans le milieu laser. Cet effet indésirable dégrade la

  4. Photovoltaic, gravitationally-stabilized solid-state, satellite solar power station /GSS4PS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantafio, L. J.; Chobotov, V. A.; Wolfe, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The salient feature of a gravitationally-stabilized satellite solar power system (SSPS) for a photovoltaic system is that the large solar array is separated into smaller segments or subunits, joined together in a linear array oriented along the local vertical. Applicability of gravitational stabilization to the design of photovoltaic SSPS is demonstrated. Both actively controlled systems using multiple solar panels oriented to the sun and passively controlled systems requiring no sun orientation are considered and determined to be feasible. Expressions for gravity-gradient induced tension and restoring torques about the local vertical are assessed. Particular attention is directed to the applicability of solid-state approaches to the design of SSPS. It is shown that an all solid-state SSPS utilizing the LITOMIC (light-to-microwave conversion) concept is feasible but that a hybrid system employing a combination of both solid-state and cryogenic cooled low-voltage techniques to the design of the power management and distribution subsystem may also provide a solution.

  5. One-step spray processing of high power all-solid-state supercapacitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun; Grant, Patrick S.

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous suspensions of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in dilute H2SO4 were sprayed onto both sides of a Nafion membrane and dried to fabricate flexible solid-state supercapacitors. A single cell with MWNT-only electrodes had a capacitance of 57 F g−1 per electrode at 2 mV s−1 and 44 F g−1 at 150 mV s−1 but with low H+ mobility. Cells with MWNT + ionomer hybrid electrodes showed higher H+ mobility, and the electric double layer (EDL) capacitance increased to 145 F g−1 at 2 mV s−1 and 91 F g−1 at 150 mV s−1. The energy and power densities of one electrode charged to 1 V at 1 A g−1 were 12.9 Wh kg−1 and 3.3 kW kg−1 respectively. Three solid-state supercapacitor cells connected in series charged to 3 V at 1 and 2 A g−1 provided a device power density of 8.9 kW kg−1 at 1 A g−1 and 9.4 kW kg−1 at 2 A g−1, the highest for all-solid-state EDL supercapacitors. PMID:23928828

  6. High-power all-solid-state batteries using sulfide superionic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuki; Hori, Satoshi; Saito, Toshiya; Suzuki, Kota; Hirayama, Masaaki; Mitsui, Akio; Yonemura, Masao; Iba, Hideki; Kanno, Ryoji

    2016-04-01

    Compared with lithium-ion batteries with liquid electrolytes, all-solid-state batteries offer an attractive option owing to their potential in improving the safety and achieving both high power and high energy densities. Despite extensive research efforts, the development of all-solid-state batteries still falls short of expectation largely because of the lack of suitable candidate materials for the electrolyte required for practical applications. Here we report lithium superionic conductors with an exceptionally high conductivity (25 mS cm‑1 for Li9.54Si1.74P1.44S11.7Cl0.3), as well as high stability ( ∼0 V versus Li metal for Li9.6P3S12). A fabricated all-solid-state cell based on this lithium conductor is found to have very small internal resistance, especially at 100 ∘C. The cell possesses high specific power that is superior to that of conventional cells with liquid electrolytes. Stable cycling with a high current density of 18 C (charging/discharging in just three minutes; where C is the C-rate) is also demonstrated.

  7. An all solid state pulse power source for high PRF induction accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing a flexible, all solid-state pulsed power source that will enable an induction accelerator to produce mulitkiloampere electron beams at a maximum pulse repetition frequency (prf) of 2 MHz. The prototype source consists of three, 15-kV, 4.8-kA solid-state modulators stacked in an induction adder configuration. Each modulator contains over 1300 field-effect transistors (FETs) that quickly connect and disconnect four banks of energy storage capacitors to a magnetic induction core. The FETs are commanded on and off by an optical signal that determines the duration of the accelerating pulse. Further electronic circuitry is provided that resets the magnetic cores in each modulator immediately after the accelerating pulse. The system produces bursts of five or more pulses with an adjustable pulse width that ranges from 200 ns to 2 {micro}s The pulse duty factor within a burst can be as high as 25% while still allowing time for the induction core to reset. The solid-state modulator described above is called ARM-II and is named for the Advanced Radiographic Machine (ARM)-a powerful radiographic accelerator that will be the principal diagnostic device for the future Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF).

  8. High-repetition-rate Q-modulation in solid-state laser using fast saturable absorber V:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jia-Sai; Wang, Feng; Li, Pei-Xin; Hu, Wei-Wei; Yin, Chun-Hao; Xu, Jin-Long

    2015-07-01

    A high-repetition-rate Q-modulation operation in a solid-state Nd:GdVO4 laser with a V3+:YAG saturable absorber has been demonstrated in this paper. The V3+:YAG crystal behaves as a fast saturable absorber in this laser because of its very short lifetime of 22 ns. Taking advantage of such fast bleaching recovery and effective cooling of the V:YAG by a home-made copper holder, we realized a pulse repetition rate of 2.4 MHz, which is, to our best knowledge, the maximum among the reported passively Q-switched lasers. The corresponding average output power and pulse width were 1.28 W and 170 ns, respectively, giving a slope efficiency of 15.9% and a pulse energy of 0.53 µJ. This compact high-repetition-rate Q-switched laser offers a potential application in the construction of low-cost, integrated and portable sensing detection equipment which needs a high laser pulse repetition rate.

  9. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    Major accomplishments under NASA grant NAG-1-1346 are summarized. (1) numerical modeling of the four mirror astigmatically compensated, Z-fold cavity was performed and several design parameters to be used for the construction of a femtosecond forsterite laser were revealed by simulation. (2) femtosecond pulses from a continuous wave mode-locked chromium doped forsterite laser were generated. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured. (3) Self-mode-locked operation of the Cr:forsterite laser was achieved. Synchronous pumping was used to mode lock the forsterite laser resulting in picosecond pulses, which in turn provided the starting mechanism for self-mode-locking. The pulses generated had an FWHM of 105 fs and were tunable between 1230-1270 nm. (4) Numerical calculations indicated that the pair of SF 14 prisms used in the cavity compensated for quadratic phase but introduced a large cubic phase term. Further calculations of other optical glasses indicated that a pair of SFN 64 prisms can introduce the same amount of quadratic phase as SF 14 prisms but introduce a smaller cubic phase. When the SF 14 prisms were replaced by SFN 64 prisms the pulsewidth was reduced to 50 fs. Great improvement was observed in the stability of the self mode-locked forsterite laser and in the ease of achieving mode locking. Using the same experimental arrangement and a new forsterite crystal with improved FOM the pulse width was reduced to 36 fs.

  10. Easy measurement and analysis method of zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility of water-dispersed colloidal particles by using a self-mixing solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Ohtomo, T.; Otsuka, K.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a highly sensitive method of measuring electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of water-dispersed colloidal particles by using a self-mixing laser Doppler velocimeter with a laser-diode-pumped, thin-slice solid-state laser with extremely high optical sensitivity. The power spectra of laser output modulated by reinjected laser light scattered by the electrophoretic particles were observed. The power spectrum cannot be described by the well-known formula for translational motion or flowing Brownian motion, i.e., a combination of Doppler shift, diffusion, and translation. The power spectra shape is found to reflect the velocity distribution of electrophoretic particles in a capillary tube due to the electro-osmotic flow contribution. Not only evaluation of the electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential but also the particle diameter undergoing electrophoretic motion can be performed from the shape of the power spectrum.

  11. Organic solid-state lasers based on sexiphenyl as active chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D.; Rabe, T.; Riedl, T.; Dobbertin, T.; Kröger, M.; Becker, E.; Johannes, H.-H.; Kowalsky, W.; Weimann, T.; Wang, J.; Hinze, P.

    2005-08-01

    We report on various sexiphenyl derivatives as gain media in organic solid-state lasers. The molecules involved in this research are simple p-sexiphenyl, the laser dye molecule 2,5,2""',5""'-tetra-t-butyl-p-sexiphenyl (TBS) and the spirolinked sexiphenyl-derivative 2,7-bis(biphenyl-4-yl)-2',7'-di-tert-butyl-9,9'-spirobifluorene. It appears that the morphology of vacuum-deposited thin films is highly dependent on the sterical dimensions of the respective molecules. Whereas thin films based on simple p-sexiphenyl comprise large clusters which significantly deteriorate their waveguiding properties; films formed by TBS, and the spiroderivative show a dramatically improved morphology with reduced surface roughness. Therefore amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and lasing are demonstrated in both of the last but not in films based on p-sexiphenyl. Second-order distributed-feedback lasers with TBS as the active medium have been prepared with an emission between 390 and 435 nm depending on the grating period of the Bragg reflector. While the ASE characteristics are similar in films formed by TBS and the spiroderivative, TBS exhibits even superior laser threshold densities which are as low as 45μJ/cm2 at a wavelength of 396 nm.

  12. a Mathematical Model of the Dynamics of AN Optically Pumped Codoped Solid State Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangler, Thomas Gerard

    1990-01-01

    This is a study of a mathematical model for the dynamics of an optically pumped codoped solid state laser system. The model comprises five first order, nonlinear, coupled, ordinary differential equations which describe the temporal evolution of the dopant electron populations in the laser crystal as well as the photon density in the laser cavity. The analysis of the model is conducted in three parts. First, a detailed explanation of the modeling process is given and the full set of rate equations is obtained. The model is then simplified and certain qualitative properties of the solution are obtained. In the second part the equilibrium solutions are obtained and a local stability analysis is performed. The system of rate equations is solved numerically and the effects, on the solution, of varying physical parameters is discussed. Finally, the third part addresses the oscillatory behavior of the system by "tracking" the eigenvalues of the linearized system. A comparison is made between the frequency of oscillations in the linear and nonlinear system. Pertinent physical processes--back transfer, Q-switching, and up -conversion--are then examined. The laser system consists of thulium and holmium ions in a YAG crystal operated in a Fabrey-Perot cavity. All computer programs were written in FORTRAN and currently run on either an IBM-PC or a DEC VAX 11/750.

  13. A mathematical model of the dynamics of an optically pumped codoped solid-state laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    This is a study of a mathematical model for the dynamics of an optically pumped codoped solid state laser system. The model comprises five first order, nonlinear, coupled, ordinary differential equations which describe the temporal evolution of the dopant electron populations in the laser crystal as well as the photon density in the laser cavity. The analysis of the model is conducted in three parts. First, a detailed explanation of the modeling process is given and the full set of rate equations is obtained. The model is then simplified and certain qualitative properties of the solution are obtained. In the second part the equilibrium solutions are obtained and local stability analysis is performed. The system of rate equations is solved numerically and the effects, on the solution, of varying physical parameters is discussed. Finally, the third part addresses the oscillatory behavior of the system by tracking the eigenvalues of the linearized system. A comparison is made between the frequency of oscillations in the linear and nonlinear system. Pertinent physical processes - back transfer, Q-switching, and up-conversion - are then examined. The laser system consists of thulium and holmium ions in YAG crystal operated in a Fabrey-Perot cavity. All computer programs were written in FORTRAN and currently run on either an IBM-PC or a DEC VAX 11/750.

  14. High Energy, Single-Mode, All-Solid-State and Tunable UV Laser Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Hovis, FLoyd

    2007-01-01

    A high energy, single mode, all solid-state Nd:YAG laser primarily for pumping an UV converter is developed. Greater than 1 J/pulse at 50 HZ PRF and pulse widths around 22 ns have been demonstrated. Higher energy, greater efficiency may be possible. Refinements are known and practical to implement. Technology Demonstration of a highly efficient, high-pulse-energy, single mode UV wavelength generation using flash lamp pumped laser has been achieved. Greater than 90% pump depletion is observed. 190 mJ extra-cavity SFG; IR to UV efficiency > 21% (> 27% for 1 mJ seed). 160 mJ intra-cavity SFG; IR to UV efficiency up to 24% Fluence < 1 J/sq cm for most beams. The pump beam quality of the Nd:YAG pump laser is being refined to match or exceed the above UV converter results. Currently the Nd:YAG pump laser development is a technology demonstration. System can be engineered for compact packaging.

  15. Laser Beam Failure Mode Effects and Analysis (FMEA) of the Solid State Heat Capacity Laser (SSHCL)

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.

    2015-09-07

    A laser beam related FMEA of the SSHCL was performed to determine potential personnel and equipment safety issues. As part of the FMEA, a request was made to test a sample of the drywall material used for walls in the room for burn-through. This material was tested with a full power beam for five seconds. The surface paper material burned off and the inner calcium carbonate turned from white to brown. The result of the test is shown in the photo below.

  16. Measurement of submilliwatt, picosecond terahertz emission from a femtosecond-laser-pumped solid-state dc to ac radiation converter based on a ZnSe crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Yugami, Noboru; Ohata, Nobuo; Yaegashi, Kenta; Kawanago, Hiroshi

    2006-11-15

    We measured the terahertz pulse emission from a femtosecond-laser-pumped solid-state dc to ac radiation converter using a 150 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulse for dense plasma diagnostics. The laser-produced ionization front was directly modulated from a periodic electrostatic field to pulsed emission. The central frequency of the emission was measured to be 0.13 THz having a bandwidth of 0.1 THz and a peak power of 0.2 mW. This emission source is suitable for use in various novel diagnostic techniques, such as dense plasma diagnostics.

  17. Intracavity adaptive correction of a 10 kW, solid-state, heat-capacity laser.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Johansson, E M; Dane, C B; Fochs, S N; Brase, J M

    2004-01-12

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL), under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large aperture (100 cm{sup 2}), confocal, unstable resonator requiring near-diffraction-limited beam quality. There are two primary sources of the aberrations in the system: residual, static aberrations from the fabrication of the optical components and predictable, time-dependent, thermally-induced index gradients within the gain medium. A deformable mirror placed within the cavity is used to correct the aberrations that are sensed externally with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Although it is more challenging than external correction, intracavity correction enables control of the mode growth within the resonator, resulting in the ability to correct a more aberrated system longer. The overall system design, measurement techniques and correction algorithms are discussed. Experimental results from initial correction of the static aberrations and dynamic correction of the time-dependent aberrations are presented.

  18. Intracavity adaptive correction of a 10 kW, solid-state, heat-capacity laser

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Brase, J M; Yamamoto, R M

    2004-05-13

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL), under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a large aperture (100 cm{sup 2}), confocal, unstable resonator requiring near-diffraction-limited beam quality. There are two primary sources of the aberrations in the system: residual, static aberrations from the fabrication of the optical components and predictable, time-dependent, thermally-induced index gradients within the gain medium. A deformable mirror placed within the cavity is used to correct the aberrations that are sensed externally with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Although the complexity of intracavity adaptive correction is greater than that of external correction, it enables control of the mode growth within the resonator, resulting in the ability to correct a more aberrated system longer. The overall system design, measurement techniques and correction algorithms are discussed. Experimental results from initial correction of the static aberrations and dynamic correction of the time-dependent aberrations are presented.

  19. Potential for efficient frequency conversion at high average power using solid state nonlinear optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Eimerl, D.

    1985-10-28

    High-average-power frequency conversion using solid state nonlinear materials is discussed. Recent laboratory experience and new developments in design concepts show that current technology, a few tens of watts, may be extended by several orders of magnitude. For example, using KD*P, efficient doubling (>70%) of Nd:YAG at average powers approaching 100 KW is possible; and for doubling to the blue or ultraviolet regions, the average power may approach 1 MW. Configurations using segmented apertures permit essentially unlimited scaling of average power. High average power is achieved by configuring the nonlinear material as a set of thin plates with a large ratio of surface area to volume and by cooling the exposed surfaces with a flowing gas. The design and material fabrication of such a harmonic generator are well within current technology.

  20. Quasi-optical solid-state power combining for millimeter-wave active seeker applications

    SciTech Connect

    Halladay, R.H.; Terrill, S.D.; Bowling, D.R.; Gagnon, D.R. U.S. Navy, Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA )

    1992-05-01

    Consideration is given to quasi-optical power combining techniques, state-of-the-art demonstrated performance, and system issues as they apply to endoatmospheric homing seeker insertion. Quasi-optical power combining is based on combining microwave and millimeter-wave solid-state device power in space through the use of antennas and lenses. It is concluded that quasi-optical power combining meets the severe electrical requirements and packaging constraints of active MMW seekers for endoatmospheric hit-to-kill missiles. The approach provides the possibility of wafer-scale integration of major components for low cost production and offers high reliability. Critical issues include thermal loading and system integration, which must be resolved before the quasi-optical power combining technology will be applied to an active MMW seeker. 18 refs.

  1. A scalable high-energy diode-pumped solid state laser for laser-plasma interaction science and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vido, M.; Ertel, K.; Mason, P. D.; Banerjee, S.; Phillips, P. J.; Butcher, T. J.; Smith, J. M.; Shaikh, W.; Hernandez-Gomes, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Collier, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Laser systems efficiently generating nanosecond pules at kJ energy levels and at multi-Hz repetition rates are required in order to translate laser-plasma interactions into practical applications. We have developed a scalable, actively-cooled diode-pumped solid state laser amplifier design based on a multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG architecture called DiPOLE (Diode-Pumped Optical Laser for Experiments) capable of meeting such requirements. We demonstrated 10.8 J, 10 Hz operation at 1030 nm using a scaled-down prototype, reaching an optical-to-optical efficiency of 22.5%. Preliminary results from a larger scale version, delivering 100 J pulse energy at 10 Hz, are also presented.

  2. Advances in solid state switchgear technology for large space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    High voltage solid state remote power controllers (RPC's) and the required semiconductor power switches to provide baseline technology for large, high power distribution systems in the space station, all electric airplane and other advanced aerospace applications were developed. The RPC's were developed for dc voltages from 28 to 1200 V and ac voltages of 115, 230, and 440 V at frequencies of 400 Hz to 20 kHz. The benefits and operation of solid state RPC's and highlights of several developments to bring the RPC to technology readiness for future aerospace needs are examined. The 28 V dc Space Shuttle units, three RPC types at 120 V dc, two at 270/300 V dc, two at 230 V ac and several high power RPC models at voltages up to 1200 V dc with current ratings up to 100 A are reviewed. New technology programs to develop a new family of (DI)2 semiconductor switches and 20 kHz, 440 V ac RPC's are described.

  3. Develop Solid State Laser Sources for High Resolution Video Projection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brickeen, B.K.

    2000-10-24

    Magic Lantern and Honeywell FM and T worked together to develop lower-cost, visible light solid-state laser sources to use in laser projector products. Work included a new family of video displays that use lasers as light sources. The displays would project electronic images up to 15 meters across and provide better resolution and clarity than movie film, up to five times the resolution of the best available computer monitors, up to 20 times the resolution of television, and up to six times the resolution of HDTV displays. The products that could be developed as a result of this CRADA could benefit the economy in many ways, such as: (1) Direct economic impact in the local manufacture and marketing of the units. (2) Direct economic impact in exports and foreign distribution. (3) Influencing the development of other elements of display technology that take advantage of the signals that these elements allow. (4) Increased productivity for engineers, FAA controllers, medical practitioners, and military operatives.

  4. Laser Hardening Prediction Tool Based On a Solid State Transformations Numerical Model

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Ukar, E.; Lamikiz, A.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents a tool to predict hardening layer in selective laser hardening processes where laser beam heats the part locally while the bulk acts as a heat sink.The tool to predict accurately the temperature field in the workpiece is a numerical model that combines a three dimensional transient numerical solution for heating where is possible to introduce different laser sources. The thermal field was modeled using a kinetic model based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Considering this equation, an experimental adjustment of transformation parameters was carried out to get the heating transformation diagrams (CHT). With the temperature field and CHT diagrams the model predicts the percentage of base material converted into austenite. These two parameters are used as first step to estimate the depth of hardened layer in the part.The model has been adjusted and validated with experimental data for DIN 1.2379, cold work tool steel typically used in mold and die making industry. This steel presents solid state diffusive transformations at relative low temperature. These transformations must be considered in order to get good accuracy of temperature field prediction during heating phase. For model validation, surface temperature measured by pyrometry, thermal field as well as the hardened layer obtained from metallographic study, were compared with the model data showing a good adjustment.

  5. Laser Hardening Prediction Tool Based On a Solid State Transformations Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, S.; Ukar, E.; Lamikiz, A.; Liebana, F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a tool to predict hardening layer in selective laser hardening processes where laser beam heats the part locally while the bulk acts as a heat sink. The tool to predict accurately the temperature field in the workpiece is a numerical model that combines a three dimensional transient numerical solution for heating where is possible to introduce different laser sources. The thermal field was modeled using a kinetic model based on Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. Considering this equation, an experimental adjustment of transformation parameters was carried out to get the heating transformation diagrams (CHT). With the temperature field and CHT diagrams the model predicts the percentage of base material converted into austenite. These two parameters are used as first step to estimate the depth of hardened layer in the part. The model has been adjusted and validated with experimental data for DIN 1.2379, cold work tool steel typically used in mold and die making industry. This steel presents solid state diffusive transformations at relative low temperature. These transformations must be considered in order to get good accuracy of temperature field prediction during heating phase. For model validation, surface temperature measured by pyrometry, thermal field as well as the hardened layer obtained from metallographic study, were compared with the model data showing a good adjustment.

  6. Solid-state laser pumping with a planar compound parabolic concentrator.

    PubMed

    Panteli, D V; Pani, B M; Beli, L Z

    1997-10-20

    A novel solid-state laser-pumping scheme is proposed that combines a reflective lamp chamber and a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) as a light guide. The CPC is made of a transparent material of high refractive index, and light is guided by the total internal reflection, with drastically reduced reflection losses. Material is chosen so that the absorption losses are minimized in the pumping wavelength range. The lamp chamber is designed with the principles of nonimaging optics, which ensures that the radiation is efficiently transferred from the lamp to the input aperture of the CPC. The pumping efficiency was first estimated theoretically, which gave us enough justification for the more accurate calculations with ray tracing. Single as well as multiple pumping cavities are discussed. New pumping geometry results in significantly increased pumping efficiency compared with conventional geometries. Also the lamp and the laser rod are separated, leading to reduced thermal load. We found that the proposed pumping method is also applicable to diode-pumped lasers. PMID:18264293

  7. Networked Lighting Power and Control Platform for Solid State Lighting in Commercial Office Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Covaro, Mark

    2012-08-15

    Redwood Systems' objective is to further accelerate the acceptance of solid state lighting (SSL) with fine grain and easy-to-use control. In addition, increased and improved sensor capability allows the building owner or user to gather data on the environment within the building. All of this at a cost equal to or less than that of code-compliant fluorescent lighting. The grant we requested and received has been used to further enhance the system with power conversion efficiency improvements and additional features. Some of these features, such as building management system (BMS) control, allow additional energy savings in non-lighting building systems.

  8. Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Donald A.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1989-01-01

    Laser performance of Ho(3+):Tm(3+):Cr(3+):YAG crystals was investigated under both Cr:GSAG laser and flashlamp pumping. A flashlamp pumped Cr:GSAG laser was built to simulate high power quasi-CW laser diode pumping of a 2.1 micrometer holmium laser. The 2.1 micrometer output laser energy exceeded more than 14 mJ, the highest value reported to date under laser pumping near 785 nm. This was obtained in a pulse length of nearly 650 microsec from a 3 x 3 mm Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG rod by using the flashlamp-pumped Cr:CSAG laser as a pumping source at the diode laser wavelength, 785 micrometers. In addition, Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG crystals with various Tm(3+) concentrations were evaluated for flashlamp-pumped normal mode and Q-switched 2.1 micrometer laser operations under a wide variety of experimental conditions in order to understand internal dynamic processes among the ions and to determine an optimum lasing condition. An increase of the laser slope efficiency was observed with the increase of the Tm(3+) concentration from 2.5 to 4.5 atomic percent. The thermal dependence of the laser performance was also investigated. Q-switched laser output energies corresponding to nearly 100 percent of the normal-mode laser energies were obtained in a strong single spike of 200 ns pulse length by optimizing the opening time of a lithium niobate Q-switch.

  9. Analytical predictions of the temperature profile within semiconductor nanostructures for solid-state laser refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Davis, E. James; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2016-03-01

    The laser refrigeration of solid-state materials with nanoscale dimensions has been demonstrated for both semi- conducting (cadmium sulfide, CdS) and insulating dielectrics (Yb:YLiF4, YLF) in recent years. During laser refrigeration it is possible to observe morphology dependent resonances (MDRs), analogous to what is well- known in classical (Mie) light scattering theory, when the characteristic dimensions of the nanostructure are comparable to the wavelength of light used to initiate the laser cooling process. Mie resonances can create substantial increases for internal optical fields within a given nanostructure with the potential to enhance the absorption efficiency at the beginning of the cooling cycle. Recent breakthroughs in the laser refrigeration of semiconductor nanostructures have relied on materials that exhibit rectangular symmetry (nanoribbons). Here, we will present recent analytical, closed-form solutions to the energy partial differential equation that can be used to calculate the internal spatial temperature profile with a given semiconductor nanoribbon during irradiation by a continuous-wave laser. First, the energy equation is made dimensionless through the substitution of variables before being solved using the classical separation-of-variables approach. In particular, calculations will be presented for chalcogenide (CdS) nanoribbons using a pump wavelength of 1064 nm. For nanostructures with lower symmetry (such as YLF truncated tetragonal bipyramids) it is also possible to observe MDRs through numerical simulations using either the discrete dipole approximation or finite-difference time-domain simulations, and the resulting temperature profile can be calculated using the finite element method. Theoretical predictions are presented using parameters that will allow comparison with experimental data in the near future.

  10. Generation of 3.5W high efficiency blue-violet laser by intracavity frequency-doubling of an all-solid-state tunable Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Ding, X; Wang, R; Zhang, H; Wen, W Q; Huang, L; Wang, P; Yao, J Q; Yu, X Y; Li, Z

    2008-03-31

    In this paper, we report a high power, high efficiency blue-violet laser obtained by intracavity frequency-doubling of an all-solid-state Q-switched tunable Ti:sapphire laser, which was pumped by a 532 nm intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. A beta-BaB2O4 (BBO) crystal was used for frequency-doubling of the Ti:sapphire laser and a V-shape folded three-mirror cavity was optimized to obtain high power high efficiency second harmonic generation (SHG). At an incident pump power of 22 W, the tunable output from 355 nm to 475 nm was achieved, involving the maximum average output of 3.5 W at 400 nm with an optical conversion efficiency of 16% from the 532 nm pump laser to the blue-violet output. The beam quality factor M(2) was measured to be Mx(2)=2.15, My(2)=2.38 for characterizing the tunable blue laser.

  11. A flexible super-capacitive solid-state power supply for miniature implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chuizhou; Gall, Oren Z; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2013-12-01

    We present a high-energy local power supply based on a flexible and solid-state supercapacitor for miniature wireless implantable medical devices. Wireless radio-frequency (RF) powering recharges the supercapacitor through an antenna with an RF rectifier. A power management circuit for the super-capacitive system includes a boost converter to increase the breakdown voltage required for powering device circuits, and a parallel conventional capacitor as an intermediate power source to deliver current spikes during high current transients (e.g., wireless data transmission). The supercapacitor has an extremely high area capacitance of ~1.3 mF/mm(2), and is in the novel form of a 100 μm-thick thin film with the merit of mechanical flexibility and a tailorable size down to 1 mm(2) to meet various clinical dimension requirements. We experimentally demonstrate that after fully recharging the capacitor with an external RF powering source, the supercapacitor-based local power supply runs a full system for electromyogram (EMG) recording that consumes ~670 μW with wireless-data-transmission functionality for a period of ~1 s in the absence of additional RF powering. Since the quality of wireless powering for implantable devices is sensitive to the position of those devices within the RF electromagnetic field, this high-energy local power supply plays a crucial role in providing continuous and reliable power for medical device operations.

  12. A flexible super-capacitive solid-state power supply for miniature implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Meng, Chuizhou; Gall, Oren Z; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2013-12-01

    We present a high-energy local power supply based on a flexible and solid-state supercapacitor for miniature wireless implantable medical devices. Wireless radio-frequency (RF) powering recharges the supercapacitor through an antenna with an RF rectifier. A power management circuit for the super-capacitive system includes a boost converter to increase the breakdown voltage required for powering device circuits, and a parallel conventional capacitor as an intermediate power source to deliver current spikes during high current transients (e.g., wireless data transmission). The supercapacitor has an extremely high area capacitance of ~1.3 mF/mm(2), and is in the novel form of a 100 μm-thick thin film with the merit of mechanical flexibility and a tailorable size down to 1 mm(2) to meet various clinical dimension requirements. We experimentally demonstrate that after fully recharging the capacitor with an external RF powering source, the supercapacitor-based local power supply runs a full system for electromyogram (EMG) recording that consumes ~670 μW with wireless-data-transmission functionality for a period of ~1 s in the absence of additional RF powering. Since the quality of wireless powering for implantable devices is sensitive to the position of those devices within the RF electromagnetic field, this high-energy local power supply plays a crucial role in providing continuous and reliable power for medical device operations. PMID:23832644

  13. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  14. Synthesis, structure, and physical properties of hybrid nanocomposites for solid-state dye lasers.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, I; Costela, A; Cuesta, A; García, O; del Agua, D; Sastre, R

    2005-11-24

    We report on the synthesis, structural characterization, physical properties, and lasing action of two organic dyes, Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and Pyrromethene 597 (PM597), incorporated into new hybrid organic-inorganic materials, where the organic component was either poly(2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate) (PHEMA) or copolymers of HEMA with methyl methacrylate (MMA), and the inorganic counterpart consisted of silica derived from hydrolysis-condensation of methyltriethoxysilane (TRIEOS) in weight proportion of up to 30%. Lasing efficiencies of up 23% and high photostabilities, with no sign of degradation in the initial laser output after 100 000 pump pulses at 10 Hz, were demonstrated when pumping the samples transversely at 534 nm with 5.5 mJ/pulse. A direct relationship could be established between the structure of the hybrid materials, analyzed by solid-state NMR, and their laser behavior. An inorganic network dominated by di-/tri- substituted silicates in a proportion approximately 35:65, corresponding to samples of HEMA with 15 and 20 wt % proportion of TRIEOS, optimizes the lasing photostability. The thermal properties of these materials, together with the high homogeneity revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, even in compounds with high silica content, indicate their microstructure to be a continuous phase, corresponding to the polymer matrix, which "traps" the silica components at molecular level via covalent bonding, with few or no silica islands.

  15. All solid-state cw passively mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser using a colored glass filter

    SciTech Connect

    Sarukura, N.; Ishida, Y.; Yanagawa, T.; Nakano, H. )

    1990-07-16

    All solid-state cw passive mode locking of a Ti:sapphire laser is accomplished using a colored glass filter, instead of an organic dye, as a saturable absorber. The tuning range is remarkably wide (785--855 nm), and 2.7 ps pulses are obtained directly from the cavity.

  16. Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

    2010-10-26

    Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  17. Measurement of Adhesion Strength of Solid-State Diffusion Bonding Between Nickel and Copper by Means of Laser Shock Spallation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, M.; Akamatsu, H.; Hasegawa, A.

    2009-12-01

    Coating and bonding techniques between different materials are essential to the field of technology. Bond mechanism is of interest from scientific point of view. A well-established method to make bonding between unalloyed nickel and copper was utilized, that was solid-state diffusion bonding at elevated temperatures. Irradiation by Nd:YAG laser with 7ns-pulse width created shock wave that caused tensile stress after reflection at free surface. The adhesion strength was determined by the critical laser power that caused exfoliation of the bonding interface.

  18. The solid state remote power controller - Its status, use and perspective. [for aircraft and spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.; Billings, W. W.

    1977-01-01

    Remote power controllers (RPCs) are solid state devices that combine in one unit the capability to perform all the needed functions of load switching, overload protection, and a direct indication of whether the load is on or off. They provide total system protection of equipment and wires. RPCs are designed to be located near the load and communicate control and status information remotely via low level signals of a few milliwatts. The design and operation of the RPC are considered, taking into account the operation of an RPC, the RPC power switch and drive circuits, control and trip circuits, fail-safe devices, and RPC overcurrent protection. Attention is given to the RPC development status, RPC applications, and RPC perspectives.

  19. Solid-State, High Energy 2-Micron Laser Development for Space-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    report in 2000 strongly advocated that NASA maintain in-house laser and lidar capability, and that NASA should work to lower the technology risk for all future lidar missions. A multi-Center NASA team formulated an integrated NASA strategy to provide the technology and maturity of systems necessary to make Lidar/Laser systems viable for space-based study and monitoring of the Earth's atmosphere. In 2002 the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) and Office of Aerospace Technology (OAT) created the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and directed NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Goddard Space Flight Center to carry out synergistic and complementary research towards solid-state lasers/lidars developments for space-based remote sensing applications.

  20. Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers investigated laser performance of Ho(3+):Tm(3+):Cr(3+):YAG crystals under both Cr:GSAG laser and flashlamp pumping. A flashlamp pumped Cr:GSAG laser was built to simulate high power quasi-CW laser diode pumping of a 2.1 micron holmium laser. The 2.1 micron output laser energy exceeded more than 14 mJ, the highest value reported to date under laser pumping near 785 nm. This was obtained in a pulse length of nearly 650 microns from a 3 x 3 mm Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG rod by using the flashlamp-pumped Cr:GSAG laser as a pumping source at the diode laser wavelength, 785 microns. In addition, Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG crystals with various Tm(3+) concentrations have been evaluated for flashlamp-pumped normal mode and Q-switched 2.1 micron laser operations under a wide variety of experimental conditions in order to understand internal dynamic processes among the ions and to determine an optimum lasing condition. An increase of the laser slope efficiency was observed with the increase of the Tm(3+) concentration from 2.5 atomic percent to 4.5 atomic percent. The thermal dependence of the laser performance was also investigated. Q-switched laser output energies corresponding to nearly 100 percent of the normal-mode laser energies were obtained in a strong single spike of 200 ns pulse length by optimizing the opening time of a lithium niobate Q-switch.

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L.; Welch, A.J.; Motamedi, M.; Rastegar, S.; Tittel, F.; Esterowitz, L.

    1993-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the collaborating engineering enters at Rice University, UT-Austin, Texas A&M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  2. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, S. L.; Welch, A. J.; Motamedi, M.; Rastegar, S.

    1992-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the colloborating engineering centers at Rice University, UT-Austin, and Texas A&M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the Naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  3. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. . Cancer Center); Welch, A.J. ); Motamedi, M. . Medical Branch); Rastegar, S. ); Tittel, F. ); Esterowitz, L. )

    1992-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the colloborating engineering centers at Rice University, UT-Austin, and Texas A M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the Naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  4. Diagnostic and therapeutic applications of diode lasers and solid state lasers in medicine. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L.; Welch, A.J.; Motamedi, M.; Rastegar, S.; Tittel, F.; Esterowitz, L.

    1992-05-01

    The Texas Medical Center in Houston and the nearby UT Medical Branch at Galveston together constitute a major center of medical research activities. Laser applications in medicine are under development with the engineering assistance of the colloborating engineering centers at Rice University, UT-Austin, and Texas A&M Univ. In addition, this collective is collaborating with the Naval Research Laboratory, where new developments in laser design are underway, in order to transfer promising new laser technology rapidly into the medical environment.

  5. Deflagration-induced flash of solid pyrotechnics as pumps for high-energy solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiaoli; Liu, Liming; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-09-01

    Using the flash produced by deflagration of solid pyrotechnics to pump the laser gain medium is a potentially effective way to develop portable high power lasers. The purpose of this work is to examine the effect of some optimization or modifications in terms of compositions and distribution of the pyrotechnic pumping sources on the laser output. The optimization means the transmittance of the output couple. Modifications include: (1) pyrotechnic compositions are improved by adding small amounts of nano Al powders; (2) distribution of pumping light around the laser rod is changed through changing the discrete pyrotechnic tablets into continuous pyrotechnic bars. Results showed that laser output energy reached the maximum of 656 mJ when the transmittance of output mirror raised to10%; after adding nano Al powders into pyrotechnic compositions, laser energy increased by 80% at addition of 2% in the case of discrete distribution, while in the case of continuous distribution, even the mass of pyrotechnics was halved, laser energy still increased to the maximum of 442 mJ with 1% nano Al added. Besides, typical temporal waveform and spot of the laser as well as the light radiation performance of the pyrotechnic tablet are measured to help analyze the laser output performance. It is suggested that the mechanisms of the three modifications we employed are different though they all lead to increase in laser output.

  6. Birefringence of solid-state laser media: broadband tuning discontinuities and application to laser line narrowing

    SciTech Connect

    Krasinski, J.S.; Band, Y.B.; Chin, T.; Heller, D.F.; Morris, R.C.; Papanestor, P.

    1989-04-15

    Spectral consequences that result from using birefringent media with broadband gain inside of laser cavities containing polarizing elements are described. We show that the laser intensity is modulated as a function of the output frequency unless the cavity elements are carefully aligned so that their polarization axis coincides with a principal optical axis of the gain medium. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of a birefringent polarization-dependent gain medium is exploited to provide a simple method for line narrowing the laser output. By introduction of an intracavity birefringent compensator the narrow-band output can be continuously tuned. Experimental results for alexandrite lasers are presented.

  7. Progress on High-Energy 2-micron Solid State Laser for NASA Space-Based Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center during last fifteen years have resulted in significant advancement of a 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurements from ground, air and space-borne platforms. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2-micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  8. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling of continuous-wave solid-state lasers including rate equations, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence.

    PubMed

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-07-27

    The computer-aided design of high quality mono-mode, continuous-wave solid-state lasers requires fast, flexible and accurate simulation algorithms. Therefore in this work a model for the calculation of the transversal dominant mode structure is introduced. It is based on the generalization of the scalar Fox and Li algorithm to a fully-vectorial light representation. To provide a flexible modeling concept of different resonator geometries containing various optical elements, rigorous and approximative solutions of Maxwell's equations are combined in different subdomains of the resonator. This approach allows the simulation of plenty of different passive intracavity components as well as active media. For the numerically efficient simulation of nonlinear gain, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence effects in solid-state active crystals a semi-analytical vectorial beam propagation method is discussed in detail. As a numerical example the beam quality and output power of a flash-lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser are improved. To that end we compensate the influence of stress-induced birefringence and thermal lensing by an aspherical mirror and a 90° quartz polarization rotator.

  9. Fully vectorial laser resonator modeling of continuous-wave solid-state lasers including rate equations, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence.

    PubMed

    Asoubar, Daniel; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-07-27

    The computer-aided design of high quality mono-mode, continuous-wave solid-state lasers requires fast, flexible and accurate simulation algorithms. Therefore in this work a model for the calculation of the transversal dominant mode structure is introduced. It is based on the generalization of the scalar Fox and Li algorithm to a fully-vectorial light representation. To provide a flexible modeling concept of different resonator geometries containing various optical elements, rigorous and approximative solutions of Maxwell's equations are combined in different subdomains of the resonator. This approach allows the simulation of plenty of different passive intracavity components as well as active media. For the numerically efficient simulation of nonlinear gain, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence effects in solid-state active crystals a semi-analytical vectorial beam propagation method is discussed in detail. As a numerical example the beam quality and output power of a flash-lamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser are improved. To that end we compensate the influence of stress-induced birefringence and thermal lensing by an aspherical mirror and a 90° quartz polarization rotator. PMID:26367545

  10. High-quality low-loss coatings for diode-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, Elena A.; Novopashin, Vladimir V.; Shestakov, Alexander V.

    1998-10-01

    Recently much success has been achieved in the field of dielectric interference coatings. However, the appearance of new types of lasers (for example, diode-pumped solid-state lasers) required development of the high quality low loss coatings for various spectral regions. These coatings may be divided into two groups, antireflective coatings and cut-off filters. We have investigated the various aspects of these coatings. There are choice of the optimum construction of the optical coatings to obtain the required parameters in the specific spectral region, development of the production process to obtain the reproducing results when assembling lasers, study of optical parameters. As a result, the technology for making the following coatings has been developed: (1) the AR coatings for Nd:YAG crystals with the coefficient of residual reflection ((rho) ) less than 0.1% of one surface at 1.06 micrometer; (2) the AR stable coating for LiJO3 crystals with the same parameters; (3) the AR coating for KTP crystals with (rho) less than 0.1% of one surface at 1.06 and 0.53 micrometer simultaneously; (4) the AR coating for the BK-7 substrates with (rho) less than 0.3% at 0.809 and 0.53 micrometer simultaneously; (5) the cut-off filter for the BK-7 or Nd:YAG crystal with high reflection (HR) greater than 99.9% at 1.06 micrometer and high transmission (HT) greater than 95% at 0.809 and 0.53 micrometer; (6) the cut-off filter with HR greater than 99.9% at 1.34 micrometer and HT greater than 95% at 0.67 micrometer; (7) the cut-off filter with HR greater than 99.9% at 1.08 micrometer, HR greater than 90% at 0.53 micrometer and HT greater than 85% at 0.355 micrometer. All types of the optical coatings have been tested in the assembly of the lasers. Now these coatings are successfully used in the commercial lasers.

  11. Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Hardware Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L.; Khan, P.; Silva, A.

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in wide-bandgap (WBG) gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductor technology, there is considerable interest in developing efficient solid-state power amplifiers (SSPAs) as an alternative to the traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for space applications. This article documents proof-of-concept hardware used to validate power-combining technologies that may enable a 120-W, 40 percent power-added efficiency (PAE) SSPA. Results in previous articles [1-3] indicate that architectures based on at least three power combiner designs are likely to enable the target SSPA. Previous architecture performance analyses and estimates indicate that the proposed architectures can power combine 16 to 32 individual monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) with >80 percent combining efficiency. This combining efficiency would correspond to MMIC requirements of 5- to 10-W output power and >48 percent PAE. In order to validate the performance estimates of the three proposed architectures, measurements of proof-of-concept hardware are reported here.

  12. Solid state laser communications in space (SOLACOS) high data rate satellite communication system verification program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribil, Klaus; Flemmig, Joerg

    1994-09-01

    This paper gives an overview on the current development status of the SOLACOS program and presents the highlights of the program. SOLACOS (Solid State Laser Communications in Space) is the national German program to develop a high performance laser communication system for high data rate transmission between LEO and GEO satellites (Inter Orbit Link, IOL). Two experimental demonstrator terminals are designed and developed in the SOLACOS program. The main development objectives are the Pointing Acquisition and Tracking subsystem (PAT) and the high data rate communication system. All key subsystems and components are straightway developed to be upgraded in follow- on projects to full space qualification. The main design objective for the system is a high degree of modularity which allows to easily upgrade the system with new upcoming technologies. Therefore, all main subsystems are interconnected via fibers to ease replacement of subsystems. The system implements an asymmetric data link with a 650 MBit/s return channel and a 10 MBit/s forward channel. The 650 MBit/s channel is based on a diode pumped Nd:YAG, Integrated Optics Modulator and uses the syncbit transmission scheme. In the syncbit system synchronization information which is necessary to maintain phase lock of the local oscillator of the coherent receiver is transmitted time multiplexed into the data stream. The PAT system comprises two beam detection sensors and three beam steering elements. For initial acquisition and tracking of the remote satellite a high speed CCD camera with an integrated image processing unit, the Acquisition and Tracking Sensor (ATS) is used. In the tacking mode the beam position is sensed via the Fibernutator sensor which is also used to couple the incoming signal into the receiver fiber. Incoming and outgoing beams are routed through the telescopes which are positioned with a 2 axis gimbal mechanism and a high speed beam steering mirror. The PAT system is controlled by a digital

  13. Laser diode pumped, erbium-doped, solid state laser with high slope efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterowitz, Leon; Allen, R.; Kintz, G.

    1989-10-01

    A laser and method for producing a laser emission at a wavelength of substantially 2.8 microns is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the laser comprises laser diode means for emitting a pump beam at a preselected wavelength; and a crystal having a preselected host material doped with a predetermined percent concentration of erbium activator ions sufficient to produce a laser emission at substantially 2.8 microns at a slope efficiency of at least 5 percent, but preferrably 10 percent, when the crystal is pumped by the pump beam. It is well known that the human body is comprised of approximately 70 percent water, with various human tissues containing about 60 to 90 percent of water, and bone and cartilage containing about 30 to 40 percent of water. Since the 2.8 micron wavelength has a substantially maximum absorption in water, this 2.8 micron wavelength is the ideal wavelength to use for a large variety of medical laser applications on the human body. A 2.8 micron wavelength laser could be used for precise surgery in such exemplary applications as brain surgery, neurosurgery, eye surgery, plastic surgery, burn treatment, and the removal of malignancies.

  14. Laser-diode-pumped, erbium-doped, solid-state laser with high slope efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Esterowitz, L.; Allen, R.; Kintz, G.

    1989-10-31

    A laser and method for producing a laser emission at a wavelength of substantially 2.8 microns is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the laser comprises laser diode means for emitting a pump beam at a preselected wavelength; and a crystal having a preselected host material doped with a predetermined percent concentration of erbium activator ions sufficient to produce a laser emission at substantially 2.8 microns at a slope efficiency of at least 5 percent, but preferrably 10 percent, when the crystal is pumped by the pump beam. It is well known that the human body is comprised of approximately 70% water, with various human tissues containing about 60% to 90% of water, and bone and cartilage containing about 30% to 40% of water. Since the 2.8 micron wavelength has a substantially maximum absorption in water, this 2.8 micron wavelength is the ideal wavelength to use for a large variety of medical laser applications on the human body. A 2.8 micron wavelength laser could be used for precise surgery in such exemplary applications as brain surgery, neurosurgery, eye surgery, plastic surgery, burn treatment and the removal of malignancies.

  15. Thermal considerations in the use of solid state power amplifiers on the GOES spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallette, L.; Darby, S.; Baatz, M.; Ujihara, K.

    1984-01-01

    The use of solid state power amplifiers (SSPA) in satellites has been quite prevalent in several frequency bands. This trend is evidenced by the use of SSPAs at Hughes in the UHF band (Leasat/Syncom IV), S band (GOES), C band (Telstar), and SHF band. The junction temperature of the transistor is the driving requirement which determines the lifetime of the transistor, SSPA, and the payload. This temperature is determined by the transistor characteristics, use of the device, and mounting temperature of the SSPA. The temperature of the spacecraft in the area of the SSPA can be controlled by active or passive means. The various factors and interrelationships used to calculate and control the temperatures of SSPAs are described. The thermal design and calculation of junction temperatures are exemplified with the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite spacecraft.

  16. Self-seeded single-frequency solid-state ring laser and system using same

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2007-02-20

    A method of operating a laser to obtain an output pulse having a single wavelength, comprises inducing an intracavity loss into a laser resonator having an amount that prevents oscillation during a time that energy from the pump source is being stored in the gain medium. Gain is built up in the gain medium with energy from the pump source until formation of a single-frequency relaxation oscillation pulse in the resonator. Upon detection of the onset of the relaxation oscillation pulse, the intracavity loss is reduced, such as by Q-switching, so that the built-up gain stored in the gain medium is output from the resonator in the form of an output pulse at a single frequency. An electronically controllable output coupler is controlled to affect output pulse characteristics. The laser acts a master oscillator in a master oscillator power amplifier configuration. The laser is used for laser peening.

  17. Spectral narrowing of solid state lasers by narrow-band PTR Bragg mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T.; Rapaport, A.; Chen, Y.; Smirnov, V.; Hemmer, M.; Glebov, L. B.; Richardson, M. C.; Bass, M.

    2006-05-01

    Dramatic spectral narrowing of normally broad band lasers, Ti:Sapphire,Cr:LiSAF, and alexandrite was achieved by simply replacing the output mirror with a reflective, volumetric Bragg grating recorded in photo thermal refractive (PTR) glass. The output power of each laser was changed very slightly from that obtained using dielectric coated output mirrors with the same output coupling as the Bragg grating while spectral brightness increased by about three orders of magnitude.

  18. Hybrid integrated biological–solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, Jared M.; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 106 mm−2) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm−2 and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm−2 from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%. PMID:26638983

  19. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Roseman, Jared M; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-12-07

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 10(6) mm(-2)) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm(-2) and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm(-2) from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%.

  20. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Roseman, Jared M; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na(+)/K(+) adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 10(6) mm(-2)) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm(-2) and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm(-2) from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%. PMID:26638983

  1. Hybrid integrated biological-solid-state system powered with adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roseman, Jared M.; Lin, Jianxun; Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2015-12-01

    There is enormous potential in combining the capabilities of the biological and the solid state to create hybrid engineered systems. While there have been recent efforts to harness power from naturally occurring potentials in living systems in plants and animals to power complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor integrated circuits, here we report the first successful effort to isolate the energetics of an electrogenic ion pump in an engineered in vitro environment to power such an artificial system. An integrated circuit is powered by adenosine triphosphate through the action of Na+/K+ adenosine triphosphatases in an integrated in vitro lipid bilayer membrane. The ion pumps (active in the membrane at numbers exceeding 2 × 106 mm-2) are able to sustain a short-circuit current of 32.6 pA mm-2 and an open-circuit voltage of 78 mV, providing for a maximum power transfer of 1.27 pW mm-2 from a single bilayer. Two series-stacked bilayers provide a voltage sufficient to operate an integrated circuit with a conversion efficiency of chemical to electrical energy of 14.9%.

  2. Tetravalent Chromium (Cr(4+)) as Laser-Active Ion for Tunable Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    During 10/31/92 - 3/31/93, the following summarizes our major accomplishments: (1) the self-mode-locked operation of the Cr:forsterite laser was achieved; (2) synchronous pumping was used to mode lock the forsterite laser resulting in picosecond pulses, which in turn provided the starting mechanism for self-mode-locking; and (3) the pulses generated had a FWHW of 105 fs and were tunable between 1230 - 1270 nm.

  3. A repetitively pulsed xenon chloride excimer laser with all ferrite magnetic cores (AFMC) based all solid state exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benerji, N. S.; Varshnay, N. K.; Ghodke, D. V.; Singh, A.

    2016-10-01

    Performance of repetitively pulsed xenon chloride excimer laser (λ~308 nm) with solid state pulser consisting of magnetic pulse compression circuit (MPC) using all ferrite magnetic cores (AFMC) is reported. Laser system suitable for 100 Hz operation with inbuilt pre-ionizer, compact gas circulation and cooling has been developed and presented. In this configuration, high voltage pulses of ~8 μs duration are compressed to ~100 ns by magnetic pulse compression circuit with overall compression factor of ~80. Pulse energy of ~18 J stored in the primary capacitor is transferred to the laser head with an efficiency of ~85% compared to ~70% that is normally achieved in such configurations using annealed met-glass core. This is a significant improvement of about 21%. Maximum output laser pulse energy of ~100 mJ was achieved at repetition rate of 100 Hz with a typical pulse to pulse energy stability of ±5% and laser pulse energy of 150 mJ was generated at low rep-rate of ~40 Hz. This exciter uses a low current and low voltage solid state switch (SCR) that replaces high voltage and high current switch i. e, thyratron completely. The use of solid state exciter in turn reduces electromagnetic interference (EMI) effects particularly in excimer lasers where high EMI is present due to high di/dt. The laser is focused on a thin copper sheet for generation of micro-hole and the SEM image of the generated micro hole shows the energy stability of the laser at high repetition rate operation. Nearly homogeneous, regular and well developed xenon chloride (XeCl) laser beam spot was achieved using the laser.

  4. A Hybrid Fiber/Solid-State Regenerative Amplifier with Tunable Pulse Widths for Satellite Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Barry; Poulios, Demetrios

    2013-01-01

    A fiber/solid-state hybrid seeded regenerative amplifier, capable of achieving high output energy with tunable pulse widths, has been developed for satellite laser ranging applications. The regenerative amplifier cavity uses a pair of Nd:YAG zigzag slabs oriented orthogonally to one another in order to make thermal lensing effects symmetrical and simplify optical correction schemes. The seed laser used is a fiber-coupled 1,064-nm narrowband (<0.02 nm) diode laser that is discretely driven in a new short-pulsed mode, enabling continuously tunable seed pulse widths in the 0.2-to-0.4-ns range. The amplifier gain unit consists of a pair of Brewster-cut 6-bounce zigzag Nd:YAG laser slabs, oriented 90deg relative to each other in the amplifier head. This arrangement creates a net-symmetrical thermal lens effect (an opposing singleaxis effect in each slab), and makes thermo-optical corrections simple by optimizing the curvature of the nearest cavity mirror. Each slab is pumped by a single 120-W, pulsed 808-nm laser diode array. In this configuration, the average pump beam distribution in the slabs had a 1-D Gaussian shape, which matches the estimated cavity mode size. A half-wave plate between the slabs reduces losses from Fresnel reflections due to the orthogonal slabs Brewster-cut end faces. Successful "temporal" seeding of the regenerative amplifier cavity results in a cavity Q-switch pulse envelope segmenting into shorter pulses, each having the width of the input seed, and having a uniform temporal separation corresponding to the cavity round-trip time of approx. =10 ns. The pulse energy is allowed to build on successive passes in the regenerative amplifier cavity until a maximum is reached, (when cavity gains and losses are equal), after which the pulse is electro- optically switched out on the next round trip The overall gain of the amplifier is approx. =82 dB (or a factor of 1.26 million). After directing the amplified output through a LBO frequency doubling

  5. Solid State Power Amplifier for 805 MegaHertz at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.L.; Lyles, J.T.M.

    1998-10-19

    Particle accelerators for protons, electrons, and other ion species often use high-power vacuum tubes for RF amplification, due to the high RF power requirements to accelerate these particles with high beam currents. The final power amplifier stages driving large accelerators are unable to be converted to solid-state devices with the present technology. In some instances, radiation levels preclude the use of transistors near beamlines. Work is being done worldwide to replace the RF power stages under about ten kilowatts CW with transistor amplifiers, due to the lower maintenance costs and obsolescence of power tubes in these ranges. This is especially practical where the stages drive fifty Ohm impedance and are not located in high radiation zones. The authors are doing this at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) proton linear accelerator (linac) in New Mexico. They replaced a physically-large air-cooled UHF power amplifier using a tetrode electron tube with a compact water-cooled unit based on modular amplifier pallets developed at LANSCE. Each module uses eight push-pull bipolar power transistor pairs operated in class AB. Four pallets can easily provide up to 2,800 watts of continuous RF at 805 MHz. A radial splitter and combiner parallels the modules. This amplifier has proven to be completely reliable after over 10,000 hours of operation without failure. A second unit was constructed and installed for redundancy, and the old tetrode system was removed in 1998. The compact packaging for cooling, DC power, impedance matching, RF interconnection, and power combining met the electrical and mechanical requirements. CRT display of individual collector currents and RF levels is made possible with built-in samplers and a VXI data acquisition unit.

  6. Cr,Ce,Nd:GGG material for efficient solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshechkin, M. I.; Sigachev, V. B.; Strelov, V. I.; Pugachev, V. A.

    High optical quality Cr,Ce,Nd:GGG laser crystals up to 65 mm in diameter and with 200 mm total length have been grown using the Czochralski technique. It is found that, after UV pump light irradiation, the codoping of Nd:GGG crystals with chromium and cerium make it possible to avoid stable color-center formation. Chronium and cerium codoping increases the laser efficiency. A flashlamp pumped Cr,Ce,Nd:GGG laser operating at 1062 nm demonstrates a maximum slope efficiency of 7.5 percent, in free running mode for the 8 x 90 mm rod. More than 170 walts of average output laser power have been obtained for a 6 x 100 mm rod at 50 pps repetition rate and 68 J pump pulse energy.

  7. Tetravalent Chromium (Cr(4+)) as Laser-Active Ion for Tunable Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    During 10/31/91 - 3/31/92, the following summarizes are major accomplishments: (1) numerical modeling of the four mirror astigmatically compensated, Z-fold cavity was performed; and (2) the simulation revealed several design parameters to be used for the construction of a femtosecond forsterite laser.

  8. Demonstration of long-term reliability of a 266-nm, continuous-wave, frequency-quadrupled solid-state laser using beta-BaB(2)O(4).

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Oka, M; Wada, H; Fukui, T; Umezu, N; Tatsuki, K; Kubota, S

    1998-02-01

    We report what we believe to be the first operation of more than 1000 h of a 266-nm (cw) frequency-quadrupled solid-state laser with a 100-mW output. We used beta-BaB(2)O(4)(BBO) crystal grown by the Czochralski method to double the green-light (532-nm) wavelength, using an external resonant cavity. The green light was generated with an intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YVO(4)laser pumped by a 4-W laser diode. When the incident 532-nm power on the external resonant doubler was 500 mW, we generated 100 mW of cw 266-nm radiation with the BBO crystal. The degradation rate seems to be proportional to the strength of the UV optical electric field. We also obtained a relative intensity noise of -130dB/Hz at frequencies of 2 to 10 MHz for 266-nm laser light.

  9. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  10. Semi-analytical solution for the temperature profiles in solid-state laser disks mounted on heat spreaders.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Norman; Caprara, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Temperature profiles in pumped solid-state laser disks are generally calculated numerically by using finite-element programs to solve the heat conduction equation in the disk and the heat spreader. Analytical expressions exist for the longitudinal temperature profile in the case of an infinitely thick heat spreader or in the limit of zero thickness of the disk. We are presenting a simplified, semi-analytical method to calculate the three-dimensional temperature profiles for any disk or heat spreader dimensions by solving the heat conduction equation using Hankel transforms. This method allows for straightforward optimization of the cooling properties of heat-sink-mounted solid-state and semiconductor disk lasers.

  11. Semi-analytical solution for the temperature profiles in solid-state laser disks mounted on heat spreaders.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Norman; Caprara, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Temperature profiles in pumped solid-state laser disks are generally calculated numerically by using finite-element programs to solve the heat conduction equation in the disk and the heat spreader. Analytical expressions exist for the longitudinal temperature profile in the case of an infinitely thick heat spreader or in the limit of zero thickness of the disk. We are presenting a simplified, semi-analytical method to calculate the three-dimensional temperature profiles for any disk or heat spreader dimensions by solving the heat conduction equation using Hankel transforms. This method allows for straightforward optimization of the cooling properties of heat-sink-mounted solid-state and semiconductor disk lasers. PMID:27409198

  12. Suppression of Nonlinear Interactions in Resonant Macroscopic Quantum Devices: The Example of the Solid-State Ring Laser Gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Sylvain; Feugnet, Gilles; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Gutty, Francois; Bouyer, Philippe

    2008-05-09

    We report fine-tuning of nonlinear interactions in a solid-state ring laser gyroscope by vibrating the gain medium along the cavity axis. We demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that nonlinear interactions vanish for some values of the vibration parameters, leading to quasi-ideal rotation sensing. We eventually point out that our conclusions can be mapped onto other subfields of physics such as ring-shaped superfluid configurations, where nonlinear interactions could be tuned by using Feshbach resonance.

  13. Development of mid-infrared solid state lasers for spaceborne lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Donald A.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1989-01-01

    The laser performance of a Ho(3+):Tm(3+):Cr(3+):YAG crystal was measured under flashlamp pumping at various operating temperatures. The normal mode laser thresholds of a Ho(3+)(0.45 at. percent):Tm(3+)(2.5 at. percent):Cr(3+)(1.5 at. percent ):YAG crystal were found to range from 26 to 50 J between 120 and 200 K with slope efficiencies up to 0.36 percent with a 60 percent reflective output mirror. From the Q-switched operations a slope efficiency corresponding to 90 percent of the normal mode operation was observed. Laser wavelengths were measured for various operating conditions and fluorescence spectra were obtained at various temperatures in order to help understand the dynamic energy processes among the Ho(3+), Tm(3+), and Cr(3+) ions. A pulse forming network for a flashlamp pumped Cr:GSAG laser, which is to be used as a high power laser diode simulator in rare earth laser pumping, was completed and tested. The network provided critically damped, 1 ms FWHM, square pulses with a rise time of about 160 micrometers at an input electrical energy of 300 J.

  14. One-Joule-per-Pulse Q-Switched 2-micron Solid State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Modlin, Ed A.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Pual J.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2005-01-01

    Q-switched output of 1.1 J per pulse at 2-micron wavelength has been achieved in a diode pumped Ho:Tm:LuLF laser using a side-pumped rod configuration in a Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) architecture. This is the first time that a 2-micron laser has broken the Joule per pulse barrier for Q-switched operation. The total system efficiency reaches 5% and 6.2% for single and double pulse operation, respectively. The system produces excellent 1.4 times of transform limited beam quality.

  15. Bio-optimized energy transfer in densely packed fluorescent protein enables near-maximal luminescence and solid-state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gather, Malte C.; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Bioluminescent organisms are likely to have an evolutionary drive towards high radiance. As such, bio-optimized materials derived from them hold great promise for photonic applications. Here, we show that biologically produced fluorescent proteins retain their high brightness even at the maximum density in solid state through a special molecular structure that provides optimal balance between high protein concentration and low resonance energy transfer self-quenching. Dried films of green fluorescent protein show low fluorescence quenching (-7 dB) and support strong optical amplification (gnet=22 cm-1 96 dB cm-1). Using these properties, we demonstrate vertical cavity surface emitting micro-lasers with low threshold (<100 pJ, outperforming organic semiconductor lasers) and self-assembled all-protein ring lasers. Moreover, solid-state blends of different proteins support efficient Förster resonance energy transfer, with sensitivity to intermolecular distance thus allowing all-optical sensing. The design of fluorescent proteins may be exploited for bio-inspired solid-state luminescent molecules or nanoparticles.

  16. Bio-optimized energy transfer in densely packed fluorescent protein enables near-maximal luminescence and solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Gather, Malte C; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-08

    Bioluminescent organisms are likely to have an evolutionary drive towards high radiance. As such, bio-optimized materials derived from them hold great promise for photonic applications. Here, we show that biologically produced fluorescent proteins retain their high brightness even at the maximum density in solid state through a special molecular structure that provides optimal balance between high protein concentration and low resonance energy transfer self-quenching. Dried films of green fluorescent protein show low fluorescence quenching (-7 dB) and support strong optical amplification (gnet=22 cm(-1); 96 dB cm(-1)). Using these properties, we demonstrate vertical cavity surface emitting micro-lasers with low threshold (<100 pJ, outperforming organic semiconductor lasers) and self-assembled all-protein ring lasers. Moreover, solid-state blends of different proteins support efficient Förster resonance energy transfer, with sensitivity to intermolecular distance thus allowing all-optical sensing. The design of fluorescent proteins may be exploited for bio-inspired solid-state luminescent molecules or nanoparticles.

  17. High-Performance Solid-State W-Band Power Amplifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Samoska, Lorene; Wells, Mary; Ferber, Robert; Pearson, John; Campbell, April; Peralta, Alejandro; Swift, Gerald; Yocum, Paul; Chung, Yun

    2003-01-01

    The figure shows one of four solid-state power amplifiers, each capable of generating an output power greater than or equal to 240 mW over one of four overlapping frequency bands from 71 to 106 GHz. (The bands are 71 to 84, 80 to 92, 88 to 99, and 89 to 106 GHz.) The amplifiers are designed for optimum performance at a temperature of 130 K. These amplifiers were developed specifically for incorporation into frequency-multiplier chains in local oscillators in a low-noise, far-infrared receiving instrument to be launched into outer space to make astrophysical observations. The designs of these amplifiers may also be of interest to designers and manufacturers of terrestrial W-band communication and radar systems. Each amplifier includes a set of six high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) GaAs monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) chips, microstrip cavities, and other components packaged in a housing made from A-40 silicon-aluminum alloy. This alloy was chosen because, for the original intended spacecraft application, it offers an acceptable compromise among the partially competing requirements for high thermal conductivity, low mass, and low thermal expansion. Problems that were solved in designing the amplifiers included designing connectors and packages to fit the available space; designing microstrip signal-power splitters and combiners; matching of impedances across the frequency bands; matching of the electrical characteristics of those chips installed in parallel power-combining arms; control and levelling of output power across the bands; and designing the MMICs, microstrips, and microstrip cavities to suppress tendencies toward oscillation in several modes, both inside and outside the desired frequency bands.

  18. Improved Characterization of Transmitted Wavefront Error on CADB Epoxy-Free Bonded Solid State Laser Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A

    2010-12-09

    Current state-of-the-art and next generation laser systems - such as those used in the NIF and LIFE experiments at LLNL - depend on ever larger optical elements. The need for wide aperture optics that are tolerant of high power has placed many demands on material growers for such diverse materials as crystalline sapphire, quartz, and laser host materials. For such materials, it is either prohibitively expensive or even physically impossible to fabricate monolithic pieces with the required size. In these cases, it is preferable to optically bond two or more elements together with a technique such as Chemically Activated Direct Bonding (CADB{copyright}). CADB is an epoxy-free bonding method that produces bulk-strength bonded samples with negligible optical loss and excellent environmental robustness. The authors have demonstrated CADB for a variety of different laser glasses and crystals. For this project, they will bond quartz samples together to determine the suitability of the resulting assemblies for large aperture high power laser optics. The assemblies will be evaluated in terms of their transmitted wavefront error, and other optical properties.

  19. Advances in industrial high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Holger

    2005-03-01

    Four major types of laser sources are used for material processing. Excluding Excimer lasers, this paper focuses on advances in High Power CO2 lasers, Solid State Lasers and Diode Lasers. Because of their unrivaled cost to brightness relationship the fast axial flow CO2 laser remains unrivaled for flat-sheet laser cutting. Adding approximately a kW of output power ever four years, this laser type has been propelling the entire sheet metal fabrication industry for the last two decades. Very robust, diffusion cooled annular discharge CO2 lasers with 2kW output power have enabled robot mounted lasers for 3D applications. Solid State Lasers are chosen mainly because of the option of fiber delivery. Industrial applications still rely on lamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers with guaranteed output powers of 4.5 kW at the workpiece. The introduction of the diode pumped Thin Disc Laser 4.5 kW laser enables new applications such as the Programmable Focus Optics. Pumping the Thin Disc Laser requires highly reliable High Power Diode Lasers. The necessary reliability can only be achieved in a modern, automated semiconductor manufacturing facility. For Diode Lasers, electro-optical efficiencies above 65% are as important as the passivation of the facets to avoid Burn-In power degradation.

  20. Comparison between blue lasers and light-emitting diodes for future solid-state lighting: Comparison between blue lasers and light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, Jonathan J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Sizov, Dmitry S.

    2013-08-01

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) is now the most efficient source of high color quality white light ever created. Nevertheless, the blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are the light engine of SSL still have significant performance limitations. Foremost among these is the decrease in efficiency at high input current densities widely known as “efficiency droop.” Efficiency droop limits input power densities, contrary to the desire to produce more photons per unit LED chip area and to make SSL more affordable. Pending a solution to efficiency droop, an alternative device could be a blue laser diode (LD). LDs, operated in stimulated emission, can have high efficiencies at much higher input power densities than LEDs can. In this article, LEDs and LDs for future SSL are explored by comparing: their current state-of-the-art input-power-density-dependent power-conversion efficiencies; potential improvements both in their peak power-conversion efficiencies and in the input power densities at which those efficiencies peak; and their economics for practical SSL.

  1. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  2. High energy efficient solid state laser sources. [slab geometry laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Slab glass performance studies demonstate 18 J of output at 2 Hz with 2.3% wall plug efficiency. The goal is to achieve 10 J per pulse at 10 Hz and 3% wall plug efficiency during the next annual period. The slab concept was extended to Nd:YAG and to Nd:GGG. To date over 80 W of CW output power at 2% efficiency was generated in slab Nd:YAG. A multiplexed slab Nd:YAG pre-amplifier was invented and a Nd:YAG oscillator was demonstrated with 100kHz linewidth for eventual use in wind velocity measurements.

  3. Corneal wound healing after photoablation with a 213-nm scanning solid state laser: histological and ultrastructural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legeais, Jean-Marc; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Savoldelli, Michele; Drubaix, Isabelle; Soederberg, Per G.; Manns, Fabrice; Renard, Gilles; Pouliquen, Yves

    1995-05-01

    To investigate wound healing in rabbits after corneal photoablation with a 213 nm UV scanning solid state laser. We used a frequency quintupled Nd:YAG laser to photoablate the cornea of 32 rabbits (5 mm ablation zone, 6 D myopic correction). The contralateral eyes and the eyes of 3 untreated animals served as controls. Light and electron microscopy analyses were performed on postoperative days 0, 7, 28, 90. Abnormal, light basal epithelial cells were observed during the first postoperative month, but normal epithelial maturation was evident at 3 months. Basement membrane duplication was noted. Keratocyte proliferation occurred in the anterior stroma and in a few cases, in the posterior stroma, where keratocyte activation was present. Degenerative endothelial changes were observed immediately after ablation with intracellular disorganization and junction alteration. Surface profiles with variable regularity led to a variable wound healing. Apart from differences in epithelial basal cell appearance, photoablation with a 213 nm solid state laser induced wound healing processes similar to those observed previously with prototype ArF excimer lasers. It is hoped that laser refinements will improve the surface regularity and lead to more consistent wound healing responses. However, several studies are required to assess mutagenicity, penetration depth and ablation rate of the 213 nm wavelength on ocular tissues, as well as the effects of hydration on the clinical outcome.

  4. A high repetition rate multiwavelength polarized solid state laser source for long range lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, S. K.; Pillai, V. P. Mahadevan; Nayar, V. U.

    2006-12-01

    Advances in Laser Technology and nonlinear Optical techniques can be effectively utilized for LIDAR applications in space and atmospheric sciences to achieve better flexibility and control of the available optical power. Using such devices, one can achieve highly accurate and resolved, measurement of the distribution for atmospheric scattering layers. In the present investigation a diode double end pumped high repetition rate, multi wavelength Nd:YAG laser is designed, fabricated and various laser beam parameters have been characterized for LIDAR applications. Nonlinear optical techniques have been employed to generate higher harmonics like 532nm, 355nm and 266nm for various spectral studies. The experimental setup mainly consists of two Fiber coupled pump laser diodes (Model FAP- 81-30C-800B, Coherent Inc, USA) with a maximum output power of 30Watt at a wavelength of 807-810nm at 30°C set temperature. A second harmonic LBO crystal cut for critical phase matching placed within the laser resonator is provided for converting a fraction of the fundamental beam to a second harmonic beam. A type II frequency tripling LBO nonlinear crystal (cut for critical phase matching) is also located inside the laser resonator. The third harmonic beam and the unconverted fundamental beam are then directed across a type I fourth harmonic LBO crystal cut for critical phase matching where a portion of the fundamental beam and a portion of the third harmonic beam are converted to a fourth harmonic frequency when both fundamental and third harmonic beams propagate through the frequency quadrupling crystal. The resulting beams which are the fundamental (1064nm), second harmonic (532nm), third harmonic (355nm) and fourth harmonic (266nm) are then directed to a fourth harmonic separator in which the fourth harmonic beam is separated from the fundamental beam. A maximum average power of 12W at 1064nm, 8W at 532nm, 5W at 355nm and 3W at 266nm have been measured at a repetition rate of 10KHz

  5. Generation of high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes in end-pumped solid-state lasers for square vortex array laser beam generation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shu-Chun; Chen, Yun-Ting; Tsai, Ko-Fan; Otsuka, Kenju

    2012-03-26

    This study reports the first systematic approach to the excitation of all high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes (HGMs) in end-pumped solid-state lasers. This study uses a metal-wire-inserted laser resonator accompanied with the "off axis pumping" approach. This study presents numerical analysis of the excitation of HGMs in end-pumped solid-state lasers and experimentally generated HGM patterns. This study also experimentally demonstrates the generation of an square vortex array laser beams by passing specific high-order HGMs (HGn,n + 1 or HGn + 1,n modes) through a Dove prism-embedded unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer [Optics Express 16, 19934-19949]. The resulting square vortex array laser beams with embedded vortexes aligned in a square array can be applied to multi-spot dark optical traps in the future. PMID:22453395

  6. Generation of high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes in end-pumped solid-state lasers for square vortex array laser beam generation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shu-Chun; Chen, Yun-Ting; Tsai, Ko-Fan; Otsuka, Kenju

    2012-03-26

    This study reports the first systematic approach to the excitation of all high-order Hermite-Gaussian modes (HGMs) in end-pumped solid-state lasers. This study uses a metal-wire-inserted laser resonator accompanied with the "off axis pumping" approach. This study presents numerical analysis of the excitation of HGMs in end-pumped solid-state lasers and experimentally generated HGM patterns. This study also experimentally demonstrates the generation of an square vortex array laser beams by passing specific high-order HGMs (HGn,n + 1 or HGn + 1,n modes) through a Dove prism-embedded unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer [Optics Express 16, 19934-19949]. The resulting square vortex array laser beams with embedded vortexes aligned in a square array can be applied to multi-spot dark optical traps in the future.

  7. Numerical estimation of phase transformations in solid state during Yb:YAG laser heating of steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, Marcin Piekarska, Wiesława; Domański, Tomasz; Saternus, Zbigniew; Stano, Sebastian

    2015-03-10

    This work concerns the numerical modeling of heat transfer and phase transformations in solid state occurring during the Yb:YAG laser beam heating process. The temperature field is obtained by the numerical solution into transient heat transfer equation with convective term. The laser beam heat source model is developed using the Kriging interpolation method with experimental measurements of Yb:YAG laser beam profile taken into account. Phase transformations are calculated on the basis of Johnson - Mehl - Avrami (JMA) and Koistinen - Marburger (KM) kinetics models as well as continuous heating transformation (CHT) and continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams for S355 steel. On the basis of developed numerical algorithms 3D computer simulations are performed in order to predict temperature history and phase transformations in Yb:YAG laser heating process.

  8. The passive Q-switching regime in a solid state laser with a multiloop cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogoda, A. P.; Burkovskii, G. V.; Makarchuk, P. S.; Khakhalin, I. S.; Boreisho, A. S.; Fedin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    A compact, pulsed-periodic YAG: Nd3+ laser with self-pumped phase-conjugate multiloop cavity and passive Q-switching by YAG: Cr 4+ and GSGG: Cr 4+ crystals has been studied. It is established that the energy and temporal parameters of radiation in separate pulses of a periodic train can be controlled almost without changing the pulse train energy. A regime of generating modulated radiation pulses with a peak power of up to 30 MW and a spatial brightness of 1.7 × 1015 W/(cm2 sr) at a radiation beam quality parameter of M 2 < 1.2 has been realized in experiment.

  9. Bright High Average Power Table-top Soft X-Ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, Jorge; Reagan, Brendon; Wernsing, Keith; Luther, Brad; Curtis, Alden; Nichols,, Anthony; Wang, Yong; Alessi, David; Martz, Dale; Yin, Liang; Wang, Shoujun; Berrill, Mark A; Furch, Federico; Woolston, Mark; Patel, Dinesh; Marconi, Mario; Menoni, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the generation of bright soft x-ray laser pulses with record-high average power from compact plasma amplifiers excited by ultrafast solid state lasers. These lasers have numerous applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology.

  10. Plasmon-Assisted Nd(3+)-Based Solid-State Nanolaser.

    PubMed

    Molina, Pablo; Yraola, Eduardo; Ramírez, Mariola O; Tserkezis, Christos; Plaza, José L; Aizpurua, Javier; Bravo-Abad, Jorge; Bausá, Luisa E

    2016-02-10

    Solid-state lasers constitute essential tools in a variety of scientific and technological areas, being available in many different designs. However, although nanolasing has been successfully achieved for dyes and semiconductor gain media associated with plasmonic structures, the operation of solid-state lasers beyond the diffraction limit has not been reported yet. Here, we demonstrate room temperature laser action with subwavelength confinement in a Nd(3+)-based solid-state laser by means of the localized surface plasmon resonances supported by chains of metallic nanoparticles. We show a 50% reduction of the pump power at threshold and a remarkable 15-fold improvement of the slope efficiency with respect to the bulk laser operation. The results can be extended to the large diversity of solid-state lasers with the subsequent impact on their applications. PMID:26751848

  11. Plasmon-Assisted Nd(3+)-Based Solid-State Nanolaser.

    PubMed

    Molina, Pablo; Yraola, Eduardo; Ramírez, Mariola O; Tserkezis, Christos; Plaza, José L; Aizpurua, Javier; Bravo-Abad, Jorge; Bausá, Luisa E

    2016-02-10

    Solid-state lasers constitute essential tools in a variety of scientific and technological areas, being available in many different designs. However, although nanolasing has been successfully achieved for dyes and semiconductor gain media associated with plasmonic structures, the operation of solid-state lasers beyond the diffraction limit has not been reported yet. Here, we demonstrate room temperature laser action with subwavelength confinement in a Nd(3+)-based solid-state laser by means of the localized surface plasmon resonances supported by chains of metallic nanoparticles. We show a 50% reduction of the pump power at threshold and a remarkable 15-fold improvement of the slope efficiency with respect to the bulk laser operation. The results can be extended to the large diversity of solid-state lasers with the subsequent impact on their applications.

  12. Oscillation regimes of a solid-state ring laser with active beat-note stabilization: From a chaotic device to a ring-laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Sylvain; Feugnet, Gilles; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Lariontsev, Evguenii

    2007-08-15

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of a rotating diode-pumped Nd-YAG ring laser with active beat-note stabilization. Our experimental setup is described in the usual Maxwell-Bloch formalism. We analytically derive a stability condition and some frequency response characteristics for the solid-state ring-laser gyroscope, illustrating the important role of mode coupling effects on the dynamics of such a device. Experimental data are presented and compared with the theory on the basis of realistic laser parameters, showing very good agreement. Our results illustrate the duality between the very rich nonlinear dynamics of the diode-pumped solid-state ring laser (including chaotic behavior) and the possibility to obtain a very stable beat note, resulting in a potentially new kind of rotation sensor.

  13. Packaging of solid state devices

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.

    2006-01-03

    A package for one or more solid state devices in a single module that allows for operation at high voltage, high current, or both high voltage and high current. Low thermal resistance between the solid state devices and an exterior of the package and matched coefficient of thermal expansion between the solid state devices and the materials used in packaging enables high power operation. The solid state devices are soldered between two layers of ceramic with metal traces that interconnect the devices and external contacts. This approach provides a simple method for assembling and encapsulating high power solid state devices.

  14. LD-pumped solid-state lasers with improved frequency, spatial, and polarization characteristics for precise spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakov, A. S.; Kostik, O. E.; Mashko, V. V.; Teplyashin, L. L.; Bogdanovich, M. V.; Enzhyieuski, A. I.; Pozhidaev, A. V.; Ryabtsev, A. G.; Ryabtsev, G. I.; Shchemelev, M. A.

    2007-06-01

    New methods for precise control of main parameters of LD-pumped solid-state lasers assigned for spectroscopic applications have been developed. Tunable lasing in wide range has been achieved. Active elements on the base of crystals (Nd 3+:YAG, Nd 3+:YVO 4) and glasses (Er,Yb doped boro-silico-phosphate glass) were used. The active crystals with uniform and non-uniform distribution of the activator ions were studied. Output beams with high quality and polarization degree have been realized.

  15. Tunable infrared solid-state laser materials based on Cr/sup 3 +/ in low ligand fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, P.T.; Andrews, L.; Lempick, A.; McCollum, B.

    1982-08-01

    A new class of solid-state tunable lasers based on Cr/sup 3 +/ in low ligand field materials is described. Spectroscopic and calculated laser properties have been obtained for the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ emission in two low field crystals: K/sub 2/Na Sc/sub 1-x/ Cr/sub x/F/sub 6/ and Al/sub 1-x/ Cr/sub x/ (PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. A comparison is made with two d/sup 3/ laser materials (Cr/sup 3 +/:alexandrite and V/sup 2 +/:MgF/sub 2/). The prospect of expanding this class of materials is assessed.

  16. Solid-State Thermionic Nuclear Power for Megawatt Propulsion, Planetary Surface and Commercial Power Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Thermionic (TI) power conversion is a promising technology first investigated for power conversion in the 1960's, and of renewed interest due to modern advances in nanotechnology, MEMS, materials and manufacturing. Benefits include high conversion efficiency (20%), static operation with no moving parts and potential for high reliability, greatly reduced plant complexity, and the potential for reduced development costs. Thermionic emission, credited to Edison in 1880, forms the basis of vacuum tubes and much of 20th century electronics. Heat can be converted into electricity when electrons emitted from a hot surface are collected across a small gap. For example, two "small" (6 kWe) Thermionic Space Reactors were flown by the USSR in 1987-88 for ocean radar reconnaissance. Higher powered Nuclear-Thermionic power systems driving Electric Propulsion (Q-thruster, VASIMR, etc.) may offer the breakthrough necessary for human Mars missions of < 1 yr round trip. Power generation on Earth could benefit from simpler, moe economical nuclear plants, and "topping" of more fuel and emission efficient fossil-fuel plants.

  17. High Power High Efficiency Ka-Band Power Combiners for Solid-State Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Jon C.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    Wide-band power combining units for Ka-band are simulated for use as MMIC amplifier applications. Short-slot couplers as well as magic-tees are the basic elements for the combiners. Wide bandwidth (5 GHz) and low insertion (approx.0.2 dB) and high combining efficiencies (approx.90 percent) are obtained.

  18. Achieving High-Energy-High-Power Density in a Flexible Quasi-Solid-State Sodium Ion Capacitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongsen; Peng, Lele; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Guihua

    2016-09-14

    Simultaneous integration of high-energy output with high-power delivery is a major challenge for electrochemical energy storage systems, limiting dual fine attributes on a device. We introduce a quasi-solid-state sodium ion capacitor (NIC) based on a battery type urchin-like Na2Ti3O7 anode and a capacitor type peanut shell derived carbon cathode, using a sodium ion conducting gel polymer as electrolyte, achieving high-energy-high-power characteristics in solid state. Energy densities can reach 111.2 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 800 W kg(-1), and 33.2 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 11200 W kg(-1), which are among the best reported state-of-the-art NICs. The designed device also exhibits long-term cycling stability over 3000 cycles with capacity retention ∼86%. Furthermore, we demonstrate the assembly of a highly flexible quasi-solid-state NIC and it shows no obvious capacity loss under different bending conditions. PMID:27500429

  19. Achieving High-Energy-High-Power Density in a Flexible Quasi-Solid-State Sodium Ion Capacitor.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongsen; Peng, Lele; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Guihua

    2016-09-14

    Simultaneous integration of high-energy output with high-power delivery is a major challenge for electrochemical energy storage systems, limiting dual fine attributes on a device. We introduce a quasi-solid-state sodium ion capacitor (NIC) based on a battery type urchin-like Na2Ti3O7 anode and a capacitor type peanut shell derived carbon cathode, using a sodium ion conducting gel polymer as electrolyte, achieving high-energy-high-power characteristics in solid state. Energy densities can reach 111.2 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 800 W kg(-1), and 33.2 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 11200 W kg(-1), which are among the best reported state-of-the-art NICs. The designed device also exhibits long-term cycling stability over 3000 cycles with capacity retention ∼86%. Furthermore, we demonstrate the assembly of a highly flexible quasi-solid-state NIC and it shows no obvious capacity loss under different bending conditions.

  20. High-voltage, high-power, solid-state remote power controllers for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Two general types of remote power controller (RPC) that combine the functions of a circuit breaker and a switch were developed for use in direct-current (dc) aerospace systems. Power-switching devices used in these designs are the relatively new gate-turnoff thyristor (GTO) and poweer metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). The various RPC's can switch dc voltages to 1200 V and currents to 100 A. Seven different units were constructed and subjected to comprehensive laboratory and thermal vacuum testing. Two of these were dual units that switch both positive and negative voltages simultaneously. The RPC's using MOSFET's have slow turnon and turnoff times to limit voltage spiking from high di/dt. The GTO's have much faster transition times. All RPC's have programmable overload tripout and microsecond tripout for large overloads. The basic circuits developed can be used to build switchgear limited only by the ratings of the switching device used.

  1. Measurement of adhesion strength of solid-state diffusion bonding between nickel and copper by means of laser shock spallation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Manabu; Akamatsu, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Akira

    2009-06-01

    Coating and bonding techniques between different materials are essential to the field of technology. Bonding mechanism is of interest from scientific points of view. Several works concerning to the strength such bonding have been revealed that the strength depended on crystallographic orientations, differences of thermal expansion and chemical affinity and so on. The methods adopted for those measurements had uncertainties due to plastic deformation near the interface. A laser shock spallation method was utilized to measure adhesion strength of the bonding in this paper to minimize the deformation outside of the interface. A well-established method to make bonding between unalloyed nickel and copper was utilized, that was solid-state diffusion bonding at elevated temperatures. Irradiation by Nd:YAG laser with 7ns-pulse width created shock wave that caused tensile stress after reflection at free surface. The stress depended on laser power and was estimated by surface velocity profile measured by a laser interferometer. The adhesion strength was determined by the critical laser power that caused exfoliation of the bonding interface.

  2. Frequency stable high power lasers in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of a laser heterodyne gravity wave antenna that would operate in solar orbit with a one million kilometer path length is discussed. Laser technology that would be appropriate for operation of this space-based gravity wave detector is also discussed. The rapid progress in diode laser coupled with the energy storage and potentially sub-Hertz linewidths of solid state lasers, and the possibility of efficient frequency conversion by nonlinear optical techniques defines a technology that is appropriate for laser interferometry in space. The present status of diode-laser-pumped, solid state lasers is summarized and future progress is projected in areas of linewidth control, high average power, operating efficiency, and operational lifetimes that are essential for space-based applications.

  3. Hard Horn Design for Quasi-Optical Power Combining Using Solid-State Power Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickens, W. S.; Epp, L. W.; Hoppe, D. J.

    2004-02-01

    In recent years, there has been significant interest in the use of corrugated, periodic structures to control the wave impedance of a given surface. It has been shown [1] that a quasi-transverse-electromagnetic (TEM) wave can be excited in a waveguide by correctly choosing the impedance at the guide wall. This correctly chosen impedance is referred to as the hard boundary condition. We have taken advantage of this property of the so-called "hard" guide to attempt to create a spatial power combiner/splitter that couples to an array of microstrip patch antennas feeding a bank of monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) power amplifiers. The hard horn described here employs longitudinal corrugations filled with a low-loss dielectric material along the vertical walls to achieve the hard boundary condition. We believe the use of dielectric-filled corrugations will improve the insertion loss performance over that of a hard guide using dielectric slabs bonded to the guide wall. Additionally, the horn is tapered to its maximum aperture along a cosine curve in order to improve return loss performance. Included in this article is a discussion of the fabrication process of prototype hard horns, measurements of a hard horn prototype, and preliminary modal analysis results.

  4. Power and Energy Management Strategy for Solid State Transformer Interfaced DC Microgrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xunwei

    As a result of more and more applications of renewable energy into our ordinary life, how to construct a microgrid (MG) based on the distributed renewable energy resources and energy storages, and then to supply a reliable and flexible power to the conventional power system are the hottest topics nowadays. Comparing to the AC microgrid (AC MG), DC microgrid (DC MG) gets more attentions, because it has its own advantages, such as high efficiency, easy to integrate the DC energy sources and energy storages, and so on. Furthermore, the interaction between DC MG system and the distribution system is also an important and practical issue. In Future Renewable Electric Energy Delivery and Management Systems Center (FREEDM), the Solid State Transformer (SST) is built, which can transform the distribution system to the low AC and DC system directly (usually home application level). Thus, the SST gives a new promising solution for low voltage level MG to interface the distribution level system instead of the traditional transformer. So a SST interfaced DC MG is proposed. However, it also brings new challenges in the design and control fields for this system because the system gets more complicated, which includes distributed energy sources and storages, load, and SST. The purpose of this dissertation is to design a reliable and flexible SST interfaced DC MG based on the renewable energy sources and energy storages, which can operate in islanding mode and SST-enabled mode. Dual Half Bridge (DHB) is selected as the topology for DC/DC converter in DC MG. The DHB operation procedure and average model are analyzed, which is the basis for the system modeling, control and operation. Furthermore, two novel power and energy management strategies are proposed. The first one is a distributed energy management strategy for the DC MG operating in the SST-enabled mode. In this method, the system is not only in distributed control to increase the system reliability, but the power sharing

  5. Power and Energy Management Strategy for Solid State Transformer Interfaced DC Microgrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xunwei

    As a result of more and more applications of renewable energy into our ordinary life, how to construct a microgrid (MG) based on the distributed renewable energy resources and energy storages, and then to supply a reliable and flexible power to the conventional power system are the hottest topics nowadays. Comparing to the AC microgrid (AC MG), DC microgrid (DC MG) gets more attentions, because it has its own advantages, such as high efficiency, easy to integrate the DC energy sources and energy storages, and so on. Furthermore, the interaction between DC MG system and the distribution system is also an important and practical issue. In Future Renewable Electric Energy Delivery and Management Systems Center (FREEDM), the Solid State Transformer (SST) is built, which can transform the distribution system to the low AC and DC system directly (usually home application level). Thus, the SST gives a new promising solution for low voltage level MG to interface the distribution level system instead of the traditional transformer. So a SST interfaced DC MG is proposed. However, it also brings new challenges in the design and control fields for this system because the system gets more complicated, which includes distributed energy sources and storages, load, and SST. The purpose of this dissertation is to design a reliable and flexible SST interfaced DC MG based on the renewable energy sources and energy storages, which can operate in islanding mode and SST-enabled mode. Dual Half Bridge (DHB) is selected as the topology for DC/DC converter in DC MG. The DHB operation procedure and average model are analyzed, which is the basis for the system modeling, control and operation. Furthermore, two novel power and energy management strategies are proposed. The first one is a distributed energy management strategy for the DC MG operating in the SST-enabled mode. In this method, the system is not only in distributed control to increase the system reliability, but the power sharing

  6. Effect of diode-pumped solid state laser on polymerization shrinkage and color change in composite resins.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun-Hoa; Cho, Bong-Hae; Nah, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2010-05-01

    A diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser emitting at 473 nm was used to test its influence on the degree of polymerization of composite resins. Eight composite resins were chosen and light cured with three different light-curing systems [a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) lamp-based unit, a light-emitting diode (LED) unit, and a DPSS laser]. Polymerization shrinkage and color change in specimens were measured. According to the statistical analysis, each light-curing system produced a significantly different value of maximum polymerization shrinkage. In most specimens, the DPSS laser induced the least polymerization shrinkage. After being immersed in distilled water for 10 days, specimens light-cured by the DPSS laser had undergone less color change than those cured by the other units. In conclusion, the DPSS laser induced better or similar polymerization in terms of polymerization shrinkage and color change in composite resins compared with those of the QTH lamp-based and LED units. PMID:19205788

  7. Development of State of the Art Solid State Lasers for Altimetry and other LIDAR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, Richard B.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes work performed and research accomplished through the end of 1997. During this time period, we have designed and fabricated two lasers for flight LIDAR applications to medium altitudes (Laser Vegetation Imaging System designs LVIS 1 and LVIS 2), designed one earth orbiting LIDAR transmitter (VCL-Alt), and continued work on a high rep-rate LIDAR laser (Raster Scanned Altimeter, RASCAL). Additionally, a 'White Paper' was prepared which evaluates the current state of the art of Nd:YAG lasers and projects efficiencies to the year 2004. This report is attached as Appendix 1 of this report.

  8. Growth and characterization of tunable solid state lasers in the near infrared spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard C.; Martin, Joel J.

    1990-01-01

    This research resulted in the publication of two major papers. The major results include the development of improved crystal growth techniques for rare earth-doped LiYF4 crystals and the determination of laser-pumped laser characteristics of Tm:Ho:Y3Al5O12 crystals.

  9. Every good virtue you ever wanted in a Q-switched solid-state laser and more: Monolithic, diode-pumped, self-Q-switched, highly reproducible, diffraction-limited Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Lee, K. K.

    The applications of Q-switched lasers are well known, for example, laser radar, laser remote sensing, satellite orbit determination, Moon orbit and 'moon quake' determination, satellite laser communication, and many nonlinear optics applications. Most of the applications require additional properties of the Q-switched lasers, such as single-axial and/or single-transverse mode, high repetition rate, stable pulse shape and pulse width, or ultra compact and rugged oscillators. Furthermore, space based and airborne lasers for lidar and laser communication applications require efficient, compact, lightweight, long-lived, and stable-pulsed laser sources. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) have recently shown the potential for satisfying all of these requirements. We will report on the operating characteristics of a diode-pumped, monolithic, self-Q-switched Cr,Nd:YAG laser where the chromium ions act as a saturable absorber for the laser emission at 1064 nm. The pulse duration is 3.5 ns and the output is highly polarized with an extinction ratio of 700:1. It is further shown that the output is single-longitudinal-mode with transform-limited spectral line width without pulse-to-pulse mode competition. Consequently, the pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuation is less than the instrument resolution of 0.25 percent. This self-stabilization mechanism is because the lasing mode bleaches the distributed absorber and establishes a gain-loss grating similar to that used in the distributed feedback semiconductor lasers. A repetition rate above 5 KHz has also been demonstrated. For higher power, this laser can be used for injection seeding an amplifier (or amplifier chain) or injection locking of a power oscillator pumped by diode lasers. We will discuss some research directions on the master oscillator for higher output energy per pulse as well as how to scale the output power of the diode-pumped amplifier(s) to multi-kilowatt average power.

  10. Every Good Virtue You Ever Wanted in a Q-switched Solid-state Laser and More: Monolithic, Diode-pumped, Self-q-switched, Highly Reproducible, Diffraction-limited Nd:yag Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Lee, K. K.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of Q-switched lasers are well known, for example, laser radar, laser remote sensing, satellite orbit determination, Moon orbit and 'moon quake' determination, satellite laser communication, and many nonlinear optics applications. Most of the applications require additional properties of the Q-switched lasers, such as single-axial and/or single-transverse mode, high repetition rate, stable pulse shape and pulse width, or ultra compact and rugged oscillators. Furthermore, space based and airborne lasers for lidar and laser communication applications require efficient, compact, lightweight, long-lived, and stable-pulsed laser sources. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) have recently shown the potential for satisfying all of these requirements. We will report on the operating characteristics of a diode-pumped, monolithic, self-Q-switched Cr,Nd:YAG laser where the chromium ions act as a saturable absorber for the laser emission at 1064 nm. The pulse duration is 3.5 ns and the output is highly polarized with an extinction ratio of 700:1. It is further shown that the output is single-longitudinal-mode with transform-limited spectral line width without pulse-to-pulse mode competition. Consequently, the pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuation is less than the instrument resolution of 0.25 percent. This self-stabilization mechanism is because the lasing mode bleaches the distributed absorber and establishes a gain-loss grating similar to that used in the distributed feedback semiconductor lasers. A repetition rate above 5 KHz has also been demonstrated. For higher power, this laser can be used for injection seeding an amplifier (or amplifier chain) or injection locking of a power oscillator pumped by diode lasers. We will discuss some research directions on the master oscillator for higher output energy per pulse as well as how to scale the output power of the diode-pumped amplifier(s) to multi-kilowatt average power.

  11. Pulsed coherent solid-state 1.06-micron and 2.1-micron laser radar systems for remote velocity measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Huffaker, R. Milton; Kavaya, Michael J.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.

    1990-01-01

    A low average power, pulsed, solid-state, 1.06-micron coherent laser radar (CLR) for range and velocity measurements of atmospheric and hard targets has been developed. The system has been operating at a field test site near Boulder, CO since September, 1988. Measurements have been taken on moving targets such as atmospheric aerosol particles, belt sanders, spinning disks, and various stationary targets. The field measurements have shown that this system exhibits excellent velocity measurement performance. A fast-tuning CW Nd:YAG oscillator has also been developed which has a frequency tuning range of greater than 30 GHz (which spans a target radial velocity range of over 16 km/s) and a tuning speed greater than 30 GHz/ms.

  12. Composition and method of preparation of solid state dye laser rods

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention includes solid polymeric-host laser rods prepared using bulk polymerization of acrylic acid ester comonomers which, when admixed with dye(s) capable of supporting laser oscillation and polymerized with a free radical initiator under mild thermal conditions, produce a solid product having the preferred properties for efficient lasing. Unsaturated polymerizable laser dyes can also be employed as one of the comonomers. Additionally, a method is disclosed which alleviates induced optical stress without having to anneal the polymers at elevated temperatures (>85.degree. C.).

  13. Modeling of thermal lensing in side and end-pumped finite solid-state laser rods. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackett, Vincent G.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical expression for approximating the time-dependent thermal focal length in finite solid state laser rods was derived. The analysis is based on the temperature variation of the material refractive index caused by optical pumping of these rods. Several quantities were found to be relevant to this analysis. These quantities were the specific thermal profiles of the rods, type of optical pumping employed, type of cooling scheme employed (side and end-cooling parameters), and the specific material characteristics of the rods. The Thermal Lensing Model was formulated using the geometric ray tracing approach. The focal lengths are then approximated, by calculating the phase shift in the index of refraction, as the different rays of an incident plane wave are tracked through a lens-like crystal medium. The approach also applies in the case of Gaussian or parabolic pump beams. It is shown that the prediction of thermal focal length is in good quantitative agreement with experimentally obtained data.

  14. Solar pumped laser technology options for space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of long-range options for in-space laser power transmission is presented. The focus is on the new technology and research status of solar-pumped lasers and their solar concentration needs. The laser options include gas photodissociation lasers, optically-pumped solid-state lasers, and blackbody-pumped transfer lasers. The paper concludes with a summary of current research thrusts.

  15. Solar powered blackbody-pumped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Walter H.; Sirota, J. M.

    1991-02-01

    A concept for a solar-powered laser is presented which utilizes an intermediate blackbody cavity to provide a uniform optical pumping environment for the lasant, typically CO or CO2 or possibly a solid state laser medium. High power cw blackbody- pumped lasers with efficiencies on the order of 20 percent or more are feasible. The physical basis of this idea is reviewed. Small scale experiments using a high temperature oven as the optical pump have been carried out with gas laser mixtures. Detailed calculations showing a potential efficiency of 35 percent for blackbody pumped Nd:YAG system are discussed.

  16. Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Prototype Combiner Spurious Mode Suppression and Power Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, P.; Epp, L.

    2006-01-01

    Results of prototype hardware activities related to a 120-W, 32-GHz (Ka-band) solid-state power amplifier (SSPA) architecture study are presented. Spurious mode suppression and the power-handling capability of a prototype 24-way radial combiner and a prototype 2-way septum binary combiner were investigated. Experimental data indicate that a commercial absorptive filter, designed to pass the circular TE01 mode, effectively suppressed the higher-order modes generated by a narrowband, flower-petal-type mode transducer. However, the same filter was not effective in suppressing higher-order modes generated by the broadband Marie mode transducer that is used in the prototype waveguide radial combiner. Should greater filtering be required by a particular SSPA application, a broadband mode filter that can suppress specifically those higher-order modes that are generated by the Marie transducer will need to be developed. A back-to-back configuration of the prototype radial combiner was tested with drive power up to approximately 50 W. No anomalous behavior was observed. Power measurements of the septum combiner indicate that up to 10-W radio frequency (RF) can be dissipated in the integrated resistive element before a permanent performance shift is observed. Thus, a given adder (a single-stage, 2-way combiner) can safely combine two 20-W sources, and the adder will not be damaged in the event of a source failure. This result is used to calculate the maximum source power that can be safely combined as a function of the number of sources combined and the number of source failures allowed in a multi-stage combiner. The analysis shows that SSPA power >140 W can be generated by power combining 16 sources producing 10 W each. In this configuration, up to three sources could fail with the guarantee that the combiner would not be damaged. Finally, a modified prototype septum combiner design was verified. The improved design reduced the assembly time from over 2 hours to about 15

  17. NASA satellite communications application research, phase 2 addendum. Efficient high power, solid state amplifier for EHF communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benet, James

    1994-01-01

    This document is an addendum to the NASA Satellite Communications Application Research (SCAR) Phase 2 Final Report, 'Efficient High Power, Solid State Amplifier for EHF Communications.' This report describes the work performed from 1 August 1993 to 11 March 1994, under contract number NASW-4513. During this reporting period an array of transistor amplifiers was repaired by replacing all MMIC amplifier chips. The amplifier array was then tested using three different feedhorn configurations. Descriptions, procedures, and results of this testing are presented in this report, and conclusions are drawn based on the test results obtained.

  18. Optical Features of Spherical Gold Nanoparticle-Doped Solid-State Dye Laser Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, D. Q.; Lien, N. T. H.; Duong, V. T. T.; Duong, V.; An, N. T. M.

    2016-05-01

    The development of a new laser medium based on gold nanoparticle/dye-doped polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been investigated. In particular, gold nanoparticles with small (16 nm diameter) spherical shape strongly influenced the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of [2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-6-methyl-4 H-pyran-4-ylidene]-propanedinitrile (DCM) laser dye. Fluorescence quenching and enhancement of DCM emission were observed for various concentrations of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Fluorescence intensity enhancement was recorded for the sample containing 1.5 × 1010 par/mL GNPs and doped with 3 × 10-5 mol/L DCM. Thermal photodegradation was significantly decreased by using low pump energy for laser emission.

  19. Low data rate coherent optical link demonstration using frequency stabilized solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, CHIEN-C.; Win, Moe Z.; Marshall, William K.; Lesh, James R.

    1991-01-01

    A low data rate laboratory heterodyne link demonstration operating at 1.06 micron using frequency stabilized Nd:YAG lasers was implemented. The data was modulated onto the optical carrier at 100 kbps using binary pulse position modulation. Phase coherent reception was achieved by closing the receiver phase tracking loop around the piezo-electric and temperature-tuned local oscillator laser. Initial frequency acquisition was accomplished by linearly scanning the LO frequency over the uncertainty range while a combined frequency and phase tracking loop searches for a lock indicator signal. The link performance was experimentally evaluated and compared to the theoretical predictions.

  20. Hybrid high power femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resan, Bojan

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing demand for ultrafast laser systems with high average power and repetition rate. We present two hybrid master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) architectures employing variety of available technologies to achieve 100 W average power femtosecond pulses. We achieved 120 W 820 fs pulses using solid-state oscillator and fiber amplifiers and chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique (10 μJ pulse energy at 10 MHz and 100 μJ at 400 kHz). In the second experiment, we achieved 160 W 800 fs pulses in a compact system without the standard CPA using solidstate oscillator and single crystal fiber amplifiers. As currently every component experiences some limitations, it is a challenge to choose the optimal architecture with associated components to achieve a desired combination of laser output parameters.

  1. Activation of theMercury Laser System: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser Driver for Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Beach, R J; Bibeau, C; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Kanz, V K; Payne, S A; Schaffers, K I; Skulina, K M; Smith, L K; Tassano, J B

    2001-09-10

    Initial measurements are reported for the Mercury laser system, a scalable driver for rep-rated inertial fusion energy. The performance goals include 10% electrical efficiency at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length. We report on the first Yb:S-FAP crystals grown to sufficient size for fabricating full size (4 x 6 cm) amplifier slabs. The first of four 160 kW (peak power) diode arrays and pump delivery systems were completed and tested with the following results: 5.5% power droop over a 0.75 ms pulse, 3.95 nm spectral linewidth, far field divergence of 14.0 mrad and 149.5 mrad in the microlensed and unmicrolensed directions respectively, and 83% optical-to-optical transfer efficiency through the pump delivery system.

  2. Filamentation and supercontinuum generation in solid-state dielectric media with picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinis, J.; Tamošauskas, G.; GražulevičiÅ«tÄ--, I.; KeblytÄ--, E.; Jukna, V.; Dubietis, A.

    2015-09-01

    Filamentation and supercontinuum generation with 1.3-ps, 1055-nm laser pulses in YAG crystal is investigated numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations based on solving the unidirectional nonparaxial propagation equation uncover that the self-focusing dynamics of a picosecond laser pulse markedly differs from that observed in a femtosecond filamentation regime. We show that spatiotemporal transformation of the picosecond pulse is governed by the free electron plasma, which defocuses and absorbs its rear part, resulting in the formation of several subpulses of femtosecond duration, which thereafter undergo peculiar spatiotemporal dynamics and have different contributions to spectral superbroadening. The numerical findings are confirmed experimentally by measuring the spatiotemporal intensity profiles of the wave packet at various stages of propagation where relevant events of the spectral broadening occur.

  3. Cavity-configuration-dependent instability in a tightly focused end-pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Hsu; Tai, Po-Tse; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2004-11-01

    We experimentally studied the cavity-configuration-dependent instability in an end-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser in the vicinity of the degenerate resonator configuration of g1g2 = 1/4 with small pump size. We found that the laser instability occurs in a narrow range of cavity tuning on each side of the degeneracy, which shows periodic, period-doubling, and chaotic time evolutions. By using Collin's integral together with rate equations and taking into account the thermal lens effect, we show that the simulation is consistent with the experiments. The observed instabilities are new and, as far as we know, this is the first report that discusses the relationship between the instability and the thermal lens effect.

  4. Cubic-phase-free dispersion compensation in solid-state ultrashort-pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Lemoff, B E; Barty, C P

    1993-01-01

    We show that intracavity group-velocity dispersion compensation with the use of prisms composed of conventional optical materials can be accomplished while simultaneously eliminating the round-trip cavity cubic phase. The ability to compensate perfectly both second- and third-order dispersion exists for pulses whose central wavelengths lie within a range that depends on the prism and laser rod materials as well as on the prism angles. In the case of Ti:sapphire and Cr:LiSrAlF(6) lasers, Brewster prisms composed of readily available materials can be used to compensate for both group-velocity dispersion and cubic phase over much of the respective tuning rangers.

  5. Diode-pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs) for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Krupke, W.F.

    1996-10-01

    The status of diode-pumped, transverse-gas-flow cooled, Yb-S-FAP slab lasers is reviewed. Recently acquired experimental performance data are combined with a cost/performance IFE driver design code to define a cost-effective development path for IFE DPSSL drivers. Specific design parameters are described for the Mercury 100J/10 Hz, 1 kW system (first in the development scenario).

  6. Method for fabricating zig-zag slabs for solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar (Inventor); Saraf, Shailendhar (Inventor); Byer, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for batch manufacturing of slabs for zig-zag lasers including steps of bonding two non-active media to either side of an active medium to form a sandwich, dicing the sandwich to provide slices, rendering two surfaces of each slice into total-internal-reflection (TIR) surfaces, and then dicing the slices perpendicular to the TIR surfaces to provide a plurality of zig-zag slabs.

  7. Solid-state tunable lasers based on dye-doped sol-gel materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, B.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Zink, J.I.; Stafsudd, O.M.

    1992-03-01

    The sol-gel process is a solution synthesis technique which provides a low temperature chemical route for the preparation of rigid transparent matrix materials. The luminescent organic dye molecules, rhodamine 6G and coumarin 540A have been incorporated, via the sol-gel method, into aluminosilicate and organically modified silicate host matrices. Synthesis, laser oscillation and photostability for these systems are reported. The improved photostability of these materials with respect to comparable polymeric host materials is discussed.

  8. The pump parameters optimization in LDA pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yaofeng; Zhang, Ruofan; Yang, Hongru

    2015-02-01

    Based on the propagation of Gaussian light, Zemax program is used to simulate the pump light propagating process and absorbing distribution for LDA side-pump laser rod,and the corresponding heat load distribution analysis of the rod is done by using Lascad program.On the basis of simulation results,the pump parameters of LDA side-pump Nd:YAG are optimized which provide valuable guidances for side-pump LDA designing and pump module engineering.

  9. Comparative analysis of the use of various solid-state laser media for the self-starting of four-wave PCW generation in a loop laser resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smetanin, Sergei N.

    2013-01-01

    A generalised theory has been used to carry out a comparative analysis of the use of various four-level and quasi-threelevel media for the self-starting of degenerate four-wave mixing PCW generation directly in a laser medium placed in a loop resonator. It has been shown that quasi-three-level media can compete with four-level media at long upper laser level lifetimes and increased pump intensities. The most attractive solid-state laser media for four-wave PCW generation have been identified that have the highest deposited energy at a given pump intensity. In addition to neodymium-doped crystals, which are already widely used for four-wave PCW generation, promising materials are fourlevel chromium-doped media, e.g. alexandrite and Cr : LiCAF, and quasi-three-level media with the longest upper laser level lifetime, such as Yb : YAG and Tm, Ho : YAG, at high pump intensities.

  10. In Vitro Mean Red Blood Cell Volume Change Induced by Diode Pump Solid State Low-Level Laser of 405 nm

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Mohamad Suhaimi; Al-Gailani, Bassam T.; Ahmed, Naser Mahmoud; Suhaimi, Fatanah Mohamad; Suardi, Nursakinah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the effects of low-level laser (LLL) doses on human red blood cell volume. The effects of exposure to a diode pump solid state (DPSS) (λ = 405 nm) laser were observed. Background data: The response of human blood to LLL irradiation gives important information about the mechanism of interaction of laser light with living organisms. Materials and methods Blood samples were collected into ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-containing tubes, and each sample was divided into two equal aliquots, one to serve as control and the other for irradiation. The aliquot was subjected to laser irradiation for 20, 30, 40, or 50 min at a fixed power density of 0.03 W/cm2. Mean cell volume (MCV) and red blood cell (RBC) counts were measured immediately after irradiation using a computerized hemtoanalyzer. Results: Significant decrease in RBC volume (p < 0.05, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.05, respectively) was induced with variation in laser doses.The highest response was observed with an exposure time of 40 min. This result was reproduced in RBCs suspended in a buffered NaCl solution. In contrast to this finding, laser-induced RBC volume change was completely abolished by suspending RBCs in a solution containing a higher concentration of EDTA. Conclusions: It was suggested that LLL can reduce RBC volume possibly because of the increased free intracellular Ca+2 concentrations, which activate Ca+2-dependent K+ channels with consequent K+ ion efflux and cell shrinkage. PMID:26966989

  11. Development of a high current high temperature SiC MOSFET based solid-state power controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuanbo

    Solid-State Power Controllers (SSPCs) are critical components in the development of electric aircraft and must be small in size, fast in response, and have high reliability. They are also proposed for use in microgrids to improve the power quality and system reliability. The development of Silicon Carbide (SiC) semiconductor switches provides a series of improvements for the SSPCs in both electrical and thermal performances. In the proposed SSPC design investigation, SiC MOSFETs die are mounted on cast-aluminum traces, under which are an aluminum nitride (AlN) layer and an aluminum composite base plate. The concept of i2t and its application in solid state protection is discussed in detail. Transient thermal characterizations of SiC MOSFETs are provided for a nearly-all-aluminum package by Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The SSPC is targeted for 120A nominal, 1200A fault current, 270V DC system, and working at 105°C environment with a maximum 350°C transient junction temperature capability.

  12. Development of a high-power solid-state switch using static induction thyristors for a klystron modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuchi, Akira; Kamitsukasa, Fumiyoshi; Furukawa, Kazuya; Kawase, Keigo; Kato, Ryukou; Irizawa, Akinori; Fujimoto, Masaki; Osumi, Hiroki; Funakoshi, Sousuke; Tsutsumi, Ryouta; Suemine, Shoji; Honda, Yoshihide; Isoyama, Goro

    2015-01-01

    We developed a solid-state switch with static induction thyristors for the klystron modulator of the L-band electron linear accelerator (linac) at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University. This switch is designed to have maximum specifications of a holding voltage of 25 kV and a current of 6 kA at the repetition frequency of 10 Hz for forced air cooling. The turn-on time of the switch was measured with a matched resistor to be 270 ns, which is sufficiently fast for the klystron modulator. The switch is retrofitted in the modulator to generate 1.3 GHz RF pulses with durations of either 4 or 8 μs using a 30 MW klystron, and the linac is successfully operated under maximum conditions. This finding demonstrates that the switch can be used as a high-power switch for the modulator. Pulse-to-pulse variations of the klystron voltage are measured to be less than 0.015%, and those of RF power and phase are lower than 0.15% and 0.1°, respectively. These values are significantly smaller than those obtained with a thyratron; hence, the stability of the main RF system is improved. The solid-state switch has been used in normal operation of the linac for more than a year without any serious trouble. Thus, we confirmed the switch's robustness and long-term reliability.

  13. In-situ investigation of thermal instabilities and solid state dewetting in polycrystalline platinum thin films via confocal laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jahangir, S.; Cheng, Xuan; Huang, H. H.; Nagarajan, V.; Ihlefeld, J.

    2014-10-28

    Solid state dewetting and the subsequent morphological changes for platinum thin films grown on zinc oxide (ZnO) buffered (001) silicon substrates (Pt/ZnO/SiO{sub 2}/(001)Si system) is investigated under vacuum conditions via a custom-designed confocal laser microscope coupled with a laser heating system. Live imaging of thin film dewetting under a range of heating and quenching vacuum ambients reveals events including hillock formation, hole formation, and hole growth that lead to formation of a network of Pt ligaments, break up of Pt ligaments to individual islands and subsequent Pt islands shape reformation, in chronological fashion. These findings are corroborated by ex-situ materials characterization and quantitative electron microscopy analysis. A secondary hole formation via blistering before film rupture is revealed to be the critical stage, after which a rapid dewetting catastrophe occurs. This process is instantaneous and cannot be captured by ex-situ methods. Finally, an intermetallic phase forms at 900 °C and alters the morphology of Pt islands, suggesting a practical limit to the thermal environments that may be used for these platinized silicon wafers in vacuum conditions.

  14. Probing organometallic reactions by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in solution and in the solid state using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Calladine, James A; Horvath, Raphael; Davies, Andrew J; Wriglesworth, Alisdair; Sun, Xue-Zhong; George, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    The photochemistry and photophysics of metal carbonyl compounds (W(CO)6, Cp*Rh(CO)2 (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5), and fac-[Re(CO)3(4,4'-bpy)2Br] [bpy = bipyridine]) have been examined on the nanosecond timescale using a time-resolved infrared spectrometer with an external cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL) as the infrared source. We show the photochemistry of W(CO)6 in alkane solution is easily monitored, and very sensitive measurements are possible with this approach, meaning it can monitor small transients with absorbance changes less than 10(-6) ΔOD. The C-H activation of Cp*Rh(CO)(C6H12) to form Cp*Rh(CO)(C6H11)H occurs within the first few tens of nanoseconds following photolysis, and we demonstrate that kinetics obtained following deconvolution are in excellent agreement with those measured using an ultrafast laser-based spectrometer. We also show that the high flux and tunability of QCLs makes them suited for solid-state and time-resolved measurements.

  15. Compact, low-noise, all-solid-state laser system for stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Steinle, Tobias; Kumar, Vikas; Steinmann, Andy; Marangoni, Marco; Cerullo, Giulio; Giessen, Harald

    2015-02-15

    We present a highly stable and compact laser source for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. cw-seeding of an optical parametric amplifier pumped by a bulk femtosecond Yb-oscillator and self-phase modulation in a tapered fiber allow for broad tunability without any optical or electronic synchronization. The source features noise levels of the Stokes beam close to the shot-noise limit at MHz modulation frequencies. We demonstrate the superior performance of our system by SRS imaging of micrometer-sized polymer beads. PMID:25680158

  16. Synthetic-aperture-radar imaging with a solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Green, T J; Marcus, S; Colella, B D

    1995-10-20

    We report the operation of an imaging Nd:YAG microchip-laser synthetic-aperture radar, with which we imaged two-dimensional (2-D) models of military targets. The images obtained showed spatial resolution significantly better than the diffraction limit of the real aperture in the along-track dimension. The signal processing is described, and the measurement sensitivity is both predicted and verified. In addition, 2-D images with high resolution in both dimensions were generated by using an asymmetric aperture to match the along-track synthetic-aperture resolution with the across-track diffraction-limited resolution.

  17. Multilayer waveguide-grating mirror in the Fabry - Perot cavity of an alexandrite solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kondratyuk, V A; Mikhailov, V A; Lyndin, N M; Sychugov, V A; Parriaux, O

    1999-02-28

    A multilayer waveguide-grating optical component for laser cavities was proposed, made, and investigated. It is found that corrugation of all the layers of the component makes it possible to obtain a high coefficient of narrow-band (with respect to wavelength) reflection of moderate-power light beams. The possibility of the operation of the component in the laser cavity in narrow-band filter regime is noted. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. Optical absorption and emission properties of Nd3+-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses for solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachari, D.; Rama Moorthy, L.; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2014-11-01

    Optical absorption and near-infrared luminescent properties of Nd3+ ions doped oxyfluorosilicate (NKZLSNd) glasses were investigated. Raman spectrum was recorded to investigate the structural properties of NKZLSNd glasses. The Judd-Ofelt theory (JO) has been applied to the absorption spectrum of 1.0 mol% Nd3+-doped oxyfluorosilicate glass to derive the JO intensity parameters (Ωλ), which are in turn used to calculate the radiative properties of Nd3+ ions luminescent levels. The near-infrared emission spectra recorded with 808 nm laser diode excitation revealed the effective bandwidths values around 30-40 nm for the 4F3/2 level of Nd3+-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses. The measured decay times of 4F3/2 level decreased with increasing Nd3+ ions concentration due to the concentration quenching.

  19. Demonstration of miniaturized 20mW CW 280nm and 266nm solid-state UV laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landru, Nicolas; Georges, Thierry; Beaurepaire, Julien; Le Guen, Bruno; Le Bail, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Visible 561 nm and 532 nm laser emissions from 14-mm long DPSS monolithic cavities are frequency converted to deep UV 280 nm and 266 nm in 16-mm long monolithic external cavities. Wavelength conversion is fully insensitive to mechanical vibrations and the whole UV laser sources fit in a miniaturized housing. More than 20 mW deep UV laser emission is demonstrated with high power stability, low noise and good beam quality. Aging tests are in progress but long lifetimes are expected thanks to the cavity design. Protein detection and deep UV resonant Raman spectroscopy are applications that could benefit from these laser sources.

  20. Highly efficient solid-state distributed feedback dye laser based on polymer-filled nanoporous glass composite excited by a diode-pumped solid-state Nd:LSB microlaser.

    PubMed

    Katarkevich, Vasili M; Rubinov, Anatoli N; Efendiev, Terlan Sh; Anufrik, Slavamir S; Koldunov, Modest F

    2015-09-10

    Realization of a compact, robust, highly stable, and efficient solid-state distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser based on pyrromethene 580-doped modified poly-(methyl methacrylate) embedded into nanoporous glass host is reported. A diode-pumped solid-state STA01SH-500 Nd:LSB microlaser (λ=532  nm; τ0.5∼0.5  ns; EP≤80  μJ; f≤500  Hz) is used as a pump source. When pumped well above threshold, a DFB laser emits a train of ultrashort pulses (τ≤1  ns; τ0.5<0.5  ns; Δλ0.5≤0.01  nm), while at excitation intensities not far from threshold, single transform-limited picosecond pulses (τ0.5≤40  ps; τ0.5Δν0.5∼0.3), tunable from 541 to 598 nm, are generated. The DFB lasing efficiency reaches ∼60% upon an energy stability of ∼1.4% and an overall service life of the active element of ∼9×107 laser shots. More than an order of magnitude increase in the temperature stability of a lasing wavelength as compared with ethanol solutions of laser dyes is practically demonstrated.

  1. Highly efficient solid-state distributed feedback dye laser based on polymer-filled nanoporous glass composite excited by a diode-pumped solid-state Nd:LSB microlaser.

    PubMed

    Katarkevich, Vasili M; Rubinov, Anatoli N; Efendiev, Terlan Sh; Anufrik, Slavamir S; Koldunov, Modest F

    2015-09-10

    Realization of a compact, robust, highly stable, and efficient solid-state distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser based on pyrromethene 580-doped modified poly-(methyl methacrylate) embedded into nanoporous glass host is reported. A diode-pumped solid-state STA01SH-500 Nd:LSB microlaser (λ=532  nm; τ0.5∼0.5  ns; EP≤80  μJ; f≤500  Hz) is used as a pump source. When pumped well above threshold, a DFB laser emits a train of ultrashort pulses (τ≤1  ns; τ0.5<0.5  ns; Δλ0.5≤0.01  nm), while at excitation intensities not far from threshold, single transform-limited picosecond pulses (τ0.5≤40  ps; τ0.5Δν0.5∼0.3), tunable from 541 to 598 nm, are generated. The DFB lasing efficiency reaches ∼60% upon an energy stability of ∼1.4% and an overall service life of the active element of ∼9×107 laser shots. More than an order of magnitude increase in the temperature stability of a lasing wavelength as compared with ethanol solutions of laser dyes is practically demonstrated. PMID:26368971

  2. All-solid-state CW Nd:GdVO4-LBO red laser under direct 912 nm pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Song, L.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2012-05-01

    We report a red laser at 670.5 nm generation by intracavity frequency doubling of a continuous wave (CW) laser operation of a 1341 nm Nd:GdVO4 laser under in-band diode pumping at 912 nm. An LBO crystal, cut for critical type I phase matching is used for second harmonic generation of the laser. At an incident pump power of 8.9 W, as high as 347 mW of CW output power at 670.5 nm is achieved. The fluctuation of the red output power was better than 3.7% in the given 30 min, and the beam quality factor M 2 is 1.65.

  3. Optimization and Characterization of a Novel Self Powered Solid State Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, Justin

    There is a strong interest in detecting both the diversion of special nuclear material (SNM) from legitimate, peaceful purposes and the transport of illicit SNM across domestic and international borders and ports. A simple solid-state detector employs a planar solar-cell type p-n junction and a thin conversion layer that converts incident neutrons into detectable charged particles, such as protons, alpha-particles, and heavier ions. Although simple planar devices can act as highly portable, low cost detectors, they have historically been limited to relatively low detection efficiencies; ˜10% and ˜0.2% for thermal and fast detectors, respectively. To increase intrinsic detection efficiency, the incorporation of 3D microstructures into p-i-n silicon devices was proposed. In this research, a combination of existing and new types of detector microstructures were investigated; Monte Carlo models, based on analytical calculations, were constructed and characterized using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. The simulation output revealed that an array of etched hexagonal holes arranged in a honeycomb pattern and filled with either enriched (99% 10B) boron or parylene resulted in the highest intrinsic detection efficiencies of 48% and 0.88% for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively. The optimal parameters corresponding to each model were utilized as the basis for the fabrication of several prototype detectors. A calibrated 252Cf spontaneous fission source was utilized to generate fast neutrons, while thermal neutrons were created by placing the 252Cf in an HDPE housing designed and optimized using the MCNP simulation software. Upon construction, thermal neutron calibration was performed via activation analysis of gold foils and measurements from a 6Li loaded glass scintillator. Experimental testing of the prototype detectors resulted in maximum intrinsic efficiencies of 4.5 and 0.12% for the thermal and fast devices, respectively. The prototype thermal device was filled

  4. Advances in High Energy Solid-State 2-micron Laser Transmitter Development for Ground and Airborne Wind and CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Koch, Grady; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) during last fifteen years have resulted in a significant advancement in 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurement from ground, air and space-borne platform. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2-micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  5. Experimental demonstration of intracavity solid-state laser cooling of Yb{sup 3+}:ZrF{sub 4}-BaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3}-AlF{sub 3}-NaF glass

    SciTech Connect

    Heeg, B.; Stone, M.D.; Khizhnyak, A.; DeBarber, P.A.; Rumbles, G.; Mills, G.

    2004-08-01

    We report an approach to bulk optical cooling of solid-state materials by placing the cooling medium inside a laser cavity. The laser system is a diode-pumped Yb{sup 3+}:KY(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (KYW) laser, while the cooling medium is an uncoated sample of 2%-doped Yb{sup 3+}:ZrF{sub 4}-BaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3}-AlF{sub 3}-NaF (ZBLAN) glass. A typical drop of 6 K from ambient temperature was obtained from a noncontact temperature measurement based on the anti-Stokes luminescence profile, using diode pump power at the gain medium of 6 W, a laser wavelength of 1027 nm, and an absorbed power of 1.25 W.

  6. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. OSA Proceedings on Advanced Solid-State Lasers. Vol. 10 - Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Hilton Head, SC, Mar. 18-20, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, G.; Chase, L. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA )

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advanced solid-state lasers discusses Cr(3+), Cr(4+), short-pulse, titanium, F-center, mid-IR, and diode-pumped lasers, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to the stabilization and a spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements, crystal growth and spectroscopy of Cr:LiBaAlF6, a Q-switched tunable forsterite laser, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of chromium-doped forsterite. Topics addressed include efficient frequency doubling of a self-starting additive-pulse mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, recent advances in Ti:Al2O3 unstable-resonator lasers, all-solid-state operation of a CW Ti:Al2O3 laser, and upconversion studies of flashlamp-pumped Cr,T,Ho:YAG. Also discussed are the top output parameters of an Ho-laser, spectroscopy and the 3-micron laser potential of Er crystals, the pulsed operation of microchip lasers, and blue optical parametric generation in LiB3O5.

  9. Thermal properties of monoclinic KLu(WO4)2 as a promising solid state laser host.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Oscar; Grau, Joan; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Massons, Jaume; Aguiló, Magdalena; Díaz, Francesc; Borowiec, Mieczyslaw T; Szewczyk, Andrzej; Gutowska, Maria U; Massot, Marta; Salazar, Agustín; Petrov, Valentin

    2008-03-31

    Thermal analysis of the monoclinic solid state laser host KLu(WO4)2 is presented. The specific heat was measured by the relaxation method in the temperature range from 1.9 to 385 K: its value at room temperature is 0.324 J/gK. The Debye temperature and the sound velocity amount to 303+/-3 K and 3734 m/s. The linear thermal expansion tensor was measured by X-ray powder diffraction from room temperature up to 773 K. The eigenvalues of this tensor are alpha'(11)=8.98 x 10(-6) K(-1), alpha'(22)=3.35 x 10(-6) K(-1), and alpha'(33)=16.72 x 10(-6) K(-1), with the maximum value in the a-b crystallographic plane, at 31.94 degrees from the N(g) principal optical axis. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy in the temperature range between 300 and 500 K were measured by the pyroelectric method to determine the thermal conductivity tensor. The eigenvalues of the thermal conductivity are kappa'(11)=2.95 Wm(-1)K(-1), kappa'(22)=2.36 Wm-1K-1, and kappa'(33)=4.06 Wm(-1)K(-1), with the maximum value along a direction again in the a-b crystallographic plane, at 40.75 degrees from the N(g) principal optical axis. Simulation of the temperature distribution in a bulk sample of KLu(WO4)2 with dimensions 3 x 3 x 3 mm(3) shows that pump and laser beam directions along the N(p) principal optical axis in terms of thermal effects are preferable because the propagation is along a quasi-isothermal path.

  10. Solid-State Fault Current Limiter Development : Design and Testing Update of a 15kV SSCL Power Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ram Adapa; Mr. Dante Piccone

    2012-04-30

    ABSTRACT The Solid-State Fault Current Limiter (SSCL) is a promising technology that can be applied to utility power delivery systems to address the problem of increasing fault currents associated with load growth. As demand continues to grow, more power is added to utility system either by increasing generator capacity or by adding distributed generators, resulting in higher available fault currents, often beyond the capabilities of the present infrastructure. The SSCL is power-electronics based equipment designed to work with the present utility system to address this problem. The SSCL monitors the line current and dynamically inserts additional impedance into the line in the event of a fault being detected. The SSCL is based on a modular design and can be configured for 5kV through 69kV systems at nominal current ratings of 1000A to 4000A. Results and Findings This report provides the final test results on the development of 15kV class SSCL single phase power stack. The scope of work included the design of the modular standard building block sub-assemblies, the design and manufacture of the power stack and the testing of the power stack for the key functional tests of continuous current capability and fault current limiting action. Challenges and Objectives Solid-State Current Limiter technology impacts a wide spectrum of utility engineering and operating personnel. It addresses the problems associated with load growth both at Transmission and Distribution class networks. The design concept is pioneering in terms of developing the most efficient and compact power electronics equipment for utility use. The initial test results of the standard building blocks are promising. The independent laboratory tests of the power stack are promising. However the complete 3 phase system needs rigorous testing for performance and reliability. Applications, Values, and Use The SSCL is an intelligent power-electronics device which is modular in design and can provide current

  11. Solid state d.c. power controller design philosophies and their evaluation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maus, L. G.; Williams, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    Evaluation of remote power controllers (RPC), which has enhanced knowledge of the capabilities of various design philosophies and has indicated certain limitations that RPC's exhibit. Additionally, this activity has clearly emphasized that certain RPC design parameters merit further consideration in development. The major design parameters to be analyzed in more detail are the rates of change of the rise and fall times of the output current. The major reason why transient voltages and currents should be reduced is the minimization of the reverse collector-to-emitter voltage. The requirement for higher bus voltage coupled with the present problem of improving the efficiency of power control points out the urgent need for improvement and advancement of higher current, voltage, and gain power semiconductors.

  12. Solid state power amplifier as 805 MHz master source for the LANSCE coupled-cavity linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, J.; Davis, J.

    1998-12-31

    From 100 to 800 MeV, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) proton linac receives RF power from forty-four 1.25 MW klystrons at 805 Megahertz (MHz). A single master RF source provides a continuous high level phase reference signal which drives the klystrons along the 731 meter-long linac through a coaxial transmission line. A single point failure of this system can deenergize the entire coupled-cavity linac (CCL) RF plant. The authors replaced a physically large air-cooled tetrode amplifier with a compact water-cooled unit based on modular amplifier pallets developed at LANSCE. Each 600 Watt pallet utilizes eight push-pull bipolar power transistor pairs operated in class AB. Four of these can easily provide the 2000 watt reference carrier from the stable master RF source. A radial splitter and combiner parallels the modules. This amplifier has proven to be completely reliable after two years of operation without failure. A second unit was constructed and installed for redundancy, and the old tetrode system was removed in 1998. The compact packaging for cooling, DC power, impedance matching, RF interconnection, and power combining met the electrical and mechanical requirements. CRT display of individual collector currents and RF levels is made possible with built-in samplers and a VXI data acquisition unit.

  13. A solid-state controllable power supply for a magnetic suspension wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Tripp, John S.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Langley 6-inch Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (6-in. MSBS) requires an independently controlled bidirectional dc power source for each of six positioning electromagnets. These electromagnets provide five-degree-of-freedom control over a suspended aerodynamic test model. Existing power equipment, which employs resistance-coupled thyratron-controlled rectifiers as well as ac to dc motor-generator converters, is obsolete, inefficient, and unreliable. A replacement six-phase bidirectional controlled bridge rectifier is proposed, which employs power MOSFET switches sequenced by hybrid analog/digital circuits. Full-load efficiency is 80 percent compared with 25 percent for the resistance-coupled thyratron system. Current feedback provides high control linearity, adjustable current limiting, and current overload protection. A quenching circuit suppresses inductive voltage impulses. It is shown that 20-kHz interference from positioning magnet power into MSBS electromagnetic model position sensors results predominantly from capacitively coupled electric fields. Hence, proper shielding and grounding techniques are necessary. Inductively coupled magnetic interference is negligible.

  14. A Ka-Band Wide-Bandgap Solid-State Power Amplifier: Architecture Performance Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, L.; Khan, P.; Silva, A.

    2005-01-01

    Motivated by recent advances in wide-bandgap (WBG) gallium nitride (GaN) semiconductor technology, there is considerable interest in developing efficient solidstate power amplifiers (SSPAs) as an alternative to the traveling-wave tube amplifier (TWTA) for space applications. This article documents the results of a study to investigate power-combining technology and SSPA architectures that can enable a 120-W, 40 percent power-added efficiency (PAE) SSPA. Results of the study indicate that architectures based on at least three power combiner designs are likely to enable the target SSPA. The proposed architectures can power combine 16 to 32 individual monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) with >80 percent combining efficiency. This corresponds to MMIC requirements of 5- to 10-W output power and >48 percent PAE. For the three proposed architectures [1], detailed analysis and design of the power combiner are presented. The first architecture studied is based on a 16-way septum combiner that offers low loss and high isolation over the design band of 31 to 36 GHz. Analysis of a 2-way prototype septum combiner had an input match >25 dB, output match >30 dB, insertion loss <0.02 dB, and isolation >30 dB over the design band. A 16-way design, based on cascading this combiner in a binary fashion, is documented. The second architecture is based on a 24-way waveguide radial combiner. A prototype 24-way radial base was analyzed to have an input match >30 dB (under equal excitation of all input ports). The match of the mode transducer that forms the output of a radial combiner was found to be >27 dB. The functional bandwidth of the radial base and mode transducer, which together will form a radial combiner/divider, exceeded the design band. The third architecture employs a 32-way, parallel-plate radial combiner. Simulation results indicated an input match >24 dB, output match >22 dB, insertion loss <0.23 dB, and adjacent port isolation >20 dB over the design band. All

  15. Deformable mirror for high power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrň; a, Libor; Sarbort, Martin; Hola, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    The modern trend in high power laser applications such as welding, cutting and surface hardening lies in the use of solid-state lasers. The output beam of these lasers is characterized by a Gaussian intensity distribution. However, the laser beams with different intensity distributions, e.g. top-hat, are preferable in various applications. In this paper we present a new type of deformable mirror suitable for the corresponding laser beam shaping. The deformation of the mirror is achieved by an underlying array of actuators and a pressurized coolant that also provides the necessary cooling. We describe the results of the surface shape measurement using a 3D scanner for different settings of actuators. Further, we show the achieved intensity distributions measured by a beam profiler for a low power laser beam reflected from the mirror.

  16. Medium performance effect on the high output energy from a xenon lamp-pumped pyrromethene-567 solid-state dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, De-Ying; Fan, Rong-Wei; He, Wei-Ming

    2012-04-01

    In order to obtain a high output energy from a xenon lamp-pumped solid-state dye laser, homogeneities of laser mediums and flatnesses of medium faces with different processing treatments are discussed in the paper. The mediums without aging treatment, which are prepared by using a prepolymer process and have diamond-machined end faces to produce the required optical finish, give a highest laser output of 281.9 mJ with 0.215% slope efficiency at 2.0 × 10-4 mol/L. The best medium lifetime is 21 shots to 50% of original output equating 74.6 kJ/liter.

  17. Yb 3+-doped oxide crystals for diode-pumped solid state lasers: crystal growth, optical spectroscopy, new criteria of evaluation and combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulon, G.

    2003-04-01

    Our recent scientific program has involved the general evaluation of Yb 3+-doped oxide crystals for diode-pumped solid state lasers. Among crystalline families which provide the best expected performances, some have been grown: sesquioxide, oxyapatite, niobate and garnet fibres pulled either from the Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) or the Micro-Pulling Down ( μ-PD) technique, tungstates by the top nucleated floating crystal (TNFC) and garnet and oxiapatite by the Czochralski (CZ) technique. Optical spectra of all crystals have been performed. In addition, a combinatorial chemistry approach has been pointed out to study the radiative lifetime and the concentration quenching processes in these laser crystals.

  18. Activation of the Mercury Laser: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser Driver for Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Bibeau, C; Beach, R J; Chanteloup, J C; Ebbers, C A; Kanz, K; Nakano, H; Payne, S A; Powell, H T; Schaffers, K I; Seppala, L; Skulina, K; Smith, L K; Sutton, S B; Zapata, L E

    2001-03-07

    Initial measurements are reported for the Mercury laser system, a scalable driver for rep-rated high energy density physics research. The performance goals include 10% electrical efficiency at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length. This laser is an angularly multiplexed 4-pass gas-cooled amplifier system based on image relaying to minimize wavefront distortion and optical damage risk at the 10 Hz operating point. The efficiency requirements are fulfilled using diode laser pumping of ytterbium doped strontium fluorapatite crystals.

  19. Solid State Remote Power Controllers for high voltage DC distribution systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, W. W.; Sundberg, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    Presently, hybrid Remote Power Controllers (RPC's) are in production and prototype units are available for systems utilizing 28VDC, 120VDC, 115VAC/400 Hz and 230VAC/400 Hz. This paper describes RPC development in a new area of application: HVDC distribution systems utilizing 270/300VDC. Two RPC current ratings, 1 amp and 2 amps, were selected for development as they are adequate to control 90% of projected system loads. The various aspects and trade-offs encountered in circuit development are discussed with special focus placed on the circuits that see the duress of the high dc potentials. The comprehensive evaluation tests are summarized which confirmed the RPC compliance with the specification and with system/load compatibility requirements. In addition, present technology status and new applications are summarized.

  20. Thermal management of space-based, high-power solid-state RF amplifiers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M.F.; Chow, L.C.; Johnson, J.H.

    1990-08-01

    The advanced weapons concepts envisioned by the SDIO employed a wide array of highly energetic devices, which due to inefficiencies, generate large quantities of waste heat. Power and thermal management are integrally related. In the vacuum of space, disposing of waste energy is a major problem which can contribute as much as 50% to the overall spacecraft mass and volume. The problem becomes more acute as the temperature at which the energy must be rejected is lowered. In an earlier study, thermal management issues associated with megawatt class RF microwave tubes were explored to determine if there were simple, approximately mass neutral schemes which might be adapted to dispose of the waste energy generated within a tube collector operating in space. The assumptions for that study were: (1) Tubes were in the megawatt class-70% efficient for single simple collector and 90% efficient for depressed collectors, (2) On-board, super critical hydrogen was available at a pressure of 35 bars and a temperature of 35 K. (3) The largest single event run time was 500 seconds. (4) The device would be dormant for long periods of time, be required to become active in tens of seconds followed by long periods of dormancy. (5) The only allowable effluent is hydrogen. (6) System impact must be minimal.

  1. Spatial and polarization entanglement of lasing patterns and related dynamic behaviors in laser-diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, K; Chu, S-C; Lin, C-C; Tokunaga, K; Ohtomo, T

    2009-11-23

    To provide the underlying physical mechanism for formations of spatial- and polarization-entangled lasing patterns (namely, SPEPs), we performed experiments using a c-cut Nd:GdVO(4) microchip laser with off-axis laser-diode pumping. This extends recent work on entangled lasing pattern generation from an isotropic laser, where such a pattern was explained only in terms of generalized coherent states (GCSs) formed by mathematical manipulation. Here, we show that polarization-resolved transverse patterns can be well explained by the transverse mode-locking of distinct orthogonal linearly polarized Ince-Gauss (IG) mode pairs rather than GCSs. Dynamic properties of SPEPs were experimentally examined in both free-running and modulated conditions to identify long-term correlations of IG mode pairs over time. The complete chaos synchronization among IG mode pairs subjected to external perturbation is also demonstrated.

  2. CHRONICLE: International forum on advanced high-power lasers and applications (AHPLA '99)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, Yurii V.; Zavestovskaya, I. N.; Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Senatsky, Yu V.; Starodub, Aleksandr N.

    2000-05-01

    A review of reports made on the International Forum on Advanced High-Power Lasers and Applications, which was held at the beginning of November 1999 in Osaka (Japan), is presented. Five conferences were held during the forum on High-Power Laser Ablation, High-Power Lasers in Energy Engineering, High-Power Lasers in Civil Engineering and Architecture, High-Power Lasers in Manufacturing, and Advanced High-Power Lasers. The following trends in the field of high-power lasers and their applications were presented: laser fusion, laser applications in space, laser-triggered lightning, laser ablation of materials by short and ultrashort pulses, application of high-power lasers in manufacturing, application of high-power lasers in mining, laser decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear reactors, high-power solid-state and gas lasers, x-ray and free-electron lasers. One can find complete information on the forum in SPIE, vols. 3885-3889.

  3. Monolithic translucent BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors for laser-driven solid state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzan, Clayton; Brady, Michael J.; O'Dea, Nicholas; Levin, Emily E.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Seshadri, Ram

    2016-10-01

    With high power light emitting diodes and laser diodes being explored for white light generation and visible light communication, thermally robust encapsulation schemes for color-converting inorganic phosphors are essential. In the current work, the canonical blue-emitting phosphor, high purity Eu-doped BaMgAl10O17, has been prepared using microwave-assisted heating (25 min) and densified into translucent ceramic phosphor monoliths using spark plasma sintering (30 min). The resulting translucent ceramic monoliths convert UV laser light to blue light with the same efficiency as the starting powder and provide superior thermal management in comparison with silicone encapsulation.

  4. Comparative analysis of the use of various solid-state laser media for the self-starting of four-wave PCW generation in a loop laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, Sergei N

    2013-01-31

    A generalised theory has been used to carry out a comparative analysis of the use of various four-level and quasi-threelevel media for the self-starting of degenerate four-wave mixing PCW generation directly in a laser medium placed in a loop resonator. It has been shown that quasi-three-level media can compete with four-level media at long upper laser level lifetimes and increased pump intensities. The most attractive solid-state laser media for four-wave PCW generation have been identified that have the highest deposited energy at a given pump intensity. In addition to neodymium-doped crystals, which are already widely used for four-wave PCW generation, promising materials are fourlevel chromium-doped media, e.g. alexandrite and Cr : LiCAF, and quasi-three-level media with the longest upper laser level lifetime, such as Yb : YAG and Tm, Ho : YAG, at high pump intensities. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  5. Activation of the mercury laser: a diode-pumped solid-state laser driver for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Bibeau, C; Beach, R J; Ebbers, C A; Kanz, K; Nakano, H; Orth, C D; Payne, S A; Powell, H T; Schaffers, K I; Seppala, L; Skulina, K; Smith, L K; Sutton, S B; Zapata, L E

    2000-09-19

    Initial measurements are reported for the Mercury laser system, a scalable driver for rep-rated high energy density physics research. The performance goals include 10% electrical efficiency at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length.

  6. Diode-end-pumped solid-state ultraviolet laser based on intracavity third-harmonic generation of 1.06 μm in YCa 4O(BO 3) 3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chenlin; Wang, Zhengping; Xu, Guibao; Liu, Junhai; Xu, Xinguang; Fu, Kun; Wang, Jiyang; Shao, Zongshu

    2002-11-01

    Intracavity type-I sum-frequency mixing of 1.06 μm and 532 nm with a ( θ, ϕ)=(106°,77.2°)-cut YCOB crystal was performed in a compact laser-diode-pumped solid-state laser. Three type-II phase-matching KTP crystals with different length were used to generate 532 nm light by frequency-doubling of 1.06 μm. The 355 nm output power was measured with the three KTP crystals for Q-switched and continuous-wave (CW) operation, respectively. The maximum ultraviolet output power of 1305 μW was obtained with a 15 mm KTP crystal for CW operation, while the maximum ultraviolet average output power of 124 mW was obtained with a 10 mm KTP crystal for Q-switched operation.

  7. High Power Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2004-04-12

    FEL Oscillators have been around since 1977 providing not only a test bed for the physics of Free Electron Lasers and electron/photon interactions but as a workhorse of scientific research. The characteristics that have driven the development of these sources are the desire for high peak and average power, high pulse energies, wavelength tunability, timing flexibility, and wavelengths that are unavailable from more conventional laser sources. User programs have been performed using such sources encompassing medicine, biology, solid state research, atomic and molecular physics, effects of non-linear fields, surface science, polymer science, pulsed laser vapor deposition, to name just a few. Recently the incorporation of energy recovery systems has permitted extension of the average power capabilities to the kW level and beyond. Development of substantially higher power systems with applications in defense and security is believed feasible with modest R&D efforts applied to a few technology areas. This paper will discuss at a summary level the physics of such devices, survey existing and planned facilities, and touch on the applications that have driven the development of these popular light sources.

  8. Advancement of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays For Space-based Laser Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, nathaniel R.; Baggott, Renee S.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Space-based laser and lidar instruments play an important role in NASA s plans for meeting its objectives in both Earth Science and Space Exploration areas. Almost all the lidar instrument concepts being considered by NASA scientist utilize moderate to high power diode-pumped solid state lasers as their transmitter source. Perhaps the most critical component of any solid state laser system is its pump laser diode array which essentially dictates instrument efficiency, reliability and lifetime. For this reason, premature failures and rapid degradation of high power laser diode arrays that have been experienced by laser system designers are of major concern to NASA. This work addresses these reliability and lifetime issues by attempting to eliminate the causes of failures and developing methods for screening laser diode arrays and qualifying them for operation in space.

  9. Development of Solid State Laser Materials for Application in Lasers for Atmospheric Ozone and Water Vapor Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noginov, Makhail A.; Loutts, G. B.

    2002-01-01

    We have grown neodymium doped mixed apatite crystals, (Sr(x)Ba(l-x)5(PO4)3F, Sr5(P(1-x)V(x)O4)3F, and Ba5(P(1-x)V(x)O4)3F, and spectroscopically studied them as potential gain media for a laser source for atmospheric water sensing operating at 944.11 nm0. We conclude that an appropriate apatite host material for a 944.11 nm laser should be a mixture of Sr5(PO4)3F with a small fraction of Ba5(PO4)3F. The precise wavelength tuning around 944.11 nm can be accomplished by varying the host composition, temperature, and threshold population inversion. In apatite crystals of mixed composition, the Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) loss at 1.06 microns is predicted to be significantly smaller than that in the end members.

  10. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  11. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  12. A lightweight, rugged, solid state laser radar system enabled by non-mechanical electro-optic beam steerers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Gann, Derek; Luey, Ben; Gamble, Joseph D.; Ziemkiewicz, Michael; Anderson, Mike

    2016-05-01

    There is currently a good deal of interest in developing laser radar (ladar) for autonomous navigation and collision avoidance in a wide variety of vehicles. In many of these applications, minimizing size, weight and power (SWaP) is of critical importance, particularly onboard aircraft and spacecraft where advanced imaging systems are also needed for location, alignment, and docking. In this paper, we describe the miniaturization of a powerful ladar system based on an electro-optic (EO) beamsteering device in which liquid crystal birefringence is exploited to achieve a 20° x 5° field of view (FOV) with no moving parts. This FOV will be significantly increased in future versions. In addition to scanning, the device is capable of operating in a "point and hold" mode where it locks onto a single moving object. The nonmechanical design leads to exceptionally favorable size and weight values: 1 L and < 1 kg respectively. Furthermore, these EO scanners operate without mechanical resonances or inertial effects. A demonstration was performed with a 50 kHz, 1 microjoule laser with a 2 mm beam diameter to image at a range of 100 m yielding a 2 fps frame rate limited by the pulse laser repetition rate. The fine control provided by the EO steerer results in an angle precision of 6x10-4 degrees. This FOV can be increased with discreet, non-mechanical polarization grating beamsteerers. In this paper, we will present the design, preliminary results, and planned next generation improvements.

  13. Solid state active/passive night vision imager using continuous-wave laser diodes and silicon focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H.

    2013-04-01

    Passive imaging offers covertness and low power, while active imaging provides longer range target acquisition without the need for natural or external illumination. This paper describes a focal plane array (FPA) concept that has the low noise needed for state-of-the-art passive imaging and the high-speed gating needed for active imaging. The FPA is used with highly efficient but low-peak-power laser diodes to create a night vision imager that has the size, weight, and power attributes suitable for man-portable applications. Video output is provided in both the active and passive modes. In addition, the active mode is Class 1 eye safe and is not visible to the naked eye or to night vision goggles.

  14. A lunar rover powered by an orbiting laser diode array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Young, R. J.; Williams, M. D.; Walker, G. H.; Schuster, G. L.; Lee, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design of a high-power, long-duration lunar rover powered by a laser beam is proposed. The laser transmitter in lunar orbit consists of an SP-100 nuclear reactor prime power source providing 100 kW of electricity to a laser array that emits 50 kW of laser radiation. The laser radiation is beamed to the lunar surface where it is received by a GaAlAs solid-state, laser-to-electric converter. This converter provides 22 kW of electrical power to the rover vehicle for science, locomotion, and crew needs. The mass of the laser transmitter is approximately 5000 kg, whereas the mass of the rover power supply is 520 kg. The rover power unit is significantly less massive than alternative rover power units.

  15. A compact 10 kW, 476 MHz solid state radio frequency amplifier for pre-buncher cavity of free electron laser injector linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mohania, Praveen; Mahawar, Ashish; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Gupta, P. D.

    2013-09-15

    A 10 kW, 476 MHz, 0.1% duty cycle solid state RF amplifier system for driving sub-harmonic, pre-buncher cavity of IR-FEL injector LINAC, has been developed at RRCAT. The 10 kW power is achieved by combining output of eight 1400 W amplifier modules using 8-way planar corporate combiner. The solid state amplifier modules have been developed using 50 V RF LDMOS transistors which although meant for push-pull operation are being used in single ended configuration with matching circuit developed on a thin (25 mils), high dielectric constant (9.7), low loss microwave laminate with an aim to have a compact structure. Ease of fabrication, modularity, small size, and low cost are the important features of this design which could be used as a template for low duty cycle medium to high pulsed power UHF amplifier system.

  16. Laser power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Edmund J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of previous studies related to laser power transmission is presented. Particular attention is given to the use of solar pumped lasers for space power applications. Three general laser mechanisms are addressed: photodissociation lasing driven by sunlight, photoexcitation lasing driven directly by sunlight, and photoexcitation lasing driven by thermal radiation.

  17. Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Repetti, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technially or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming. 58 refs.

  18. Real-time power measurement and control for high power diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wen-bin; Liu, You-qiang; Cao, Yin-hua; Wang, Zhi-yong

    2011-06-01

    As the continual improvement of technology and beam quality, diode laser, with poor beam quality, no longer just apply to pump solid-state laser. As a kind of implement of laser materials processing, high-power diode laser has been used in manufacture, as a brand new means of laser processing. Due to the influence of inevitable unstable factors, for example, the temperature of water-cooler, the current of power supply, etc, the output power of diode laser will be unstable. And laser output power, as an important parameter, frequently affects the performance of the laser beam and the experimental results of processing, especially in the laser materials processing. Therefore, researching the real-time power measurement and control of high power diode laser has great significance, and for diode laser, it would improve performance of itself. To achieve the purpose of real-time detection, traditional measuring method, placing a power sensor behind the total-reflection mirror of laser resonant cavity, is mainly applied in the system of gas laser and solid-state laser. However, Owing to the high integration level of diode laser, traditional measuring method can't be adopted. A technique for real-time measure output power of high power diode laser is developed to improve quality of the laser in this paper. A lens placed at an angle of 45° in the system was used to sample output light of laser, and a piece of ground glass was used to uniform the beam power density, then the photoelectric detector received an optic signal and converted it into electric signal. This feeble signal was processed by amplification circuit with a filter. Finally, this detected electric signal was applied to accomplish the closed-loop control of power. The performance of power measurement and control system was tested with the 300W diode laser, and the measuring inaccuracy achieved was less than +/-1%.

  19. Freeform beam shaping for high-power multimode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2014-03-01

    Widening of using high power multimode lasers in industrial laser material processing is accompanied by special requirements to irradiance profiles in such technologies like metal or plastics welding, cladding, hardening, brazing, annealing, laser pumping and amplification in MOPA lasers. Typical irradiance distribution of high power multimode lasers: free space solid state, fiber-coupled solid state and diodes lasers, fiber lasers, is similar to Gaussian. Laser technologies can be essentially improved when irradiance distribution on a workpiece is uniform (flattop) or inverse-Gauss; when building high-power pulsed lasers it is possible to enhance efficiency of pumping and amplification by applying super-Gauss irradiance distribution with controlled convexity. Therefore, "freeform" beam shaping of multimode laser beams is an important task. A proved solution is refractive field mapping beam shaper like Shaper capable to control resulting irradiance profile - with the same unit it is possible to get various beam profiles and choose optimum one for a particular application. Operational principle of these devices implies transformation of laser irradiance distribution by conserving beam consistency, high transmittance, providing collimated low divergent output beam. Using additional optics makes it possible to create resulting laser spots of necessary size and round, elliptical or linear shape. Operation out of focal plane and, hence, in field of lower wavefront curvature, allows extending depth of field. The refractive beam shapers are implemented as telescopes and collimating systems, which can be connected directly to fiber-coupled lasers or fiber lasers, thus combining functions of beam collimation and irradiance transformation.

  20. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-10-07

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced.

  1. 1047 nm laser diode master oscillator Nd:YLF power amplifier laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, A. W.; Krainak, M. A.; Unger, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter system at 1047 nm wavelength using a semiconductor laser diode and a diode pumped solid state (Nd:YLF) laser (DPSSL) amplifier is described. A small signal gain of 23 dB, a near diffraction limited beam, 1 Gbit/s modulation rates and greater than 0.6 W average power are achieved. This MOPA laser has the advantage of amplifying the modulation signal from the laser diode master oscillator (MO) with no signal degradation.

  2. Growth of new materials for solid state laser applications. The growth of ZnGeP2 by the vertical Bridgman method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    This is the final technical report on the cooperative NASA program 'Growth of New Materials for Solid State Laser Applications,' covering the period from 9-1-86 through 3-31-91. The first two and one half years of the program, from 9-1-86 through 3-31-89, was devoted to the development of new eye-safe laser sources. Single crystal fibers of rare earth doped and co-doped YAG were grown by the laser-heated pedestal growth method, characterized for their structural properties and supplied to NASA/Langley for spectroscopic evaluation. From 4-1-89 though 3-31-91, research focused on the growth of zinc germanium phosphide for nonlinear optical applications in the IR. The vertical Bridgman growth process was evaluated as a means to achieve better control over the short wavelength optical absorption in this material that adversely affects 2 micron-pumped optical parametric oscillators.

  3. Growth of new materials for solid state laser applications. The growth of ZnGeP2 by the vertical Bridgman method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, R. S.

    1993-10-01

    This is the final technical report on the cooperative NASA program 'Growth of New Materials for Solid State Laser Applications,' covering the period from 9-1-86 through 3-31-91. The first two and one half years of the program, from 9-1-86 through 3-31-89, was devoted to the development of new eye-safe laser sources. Single crystal fibers of rare earth doped and co-doped YAG were grown by the laser-heated pedestal growth method, characterized for their structural properties and supplied to NASA/Langley for spectroscopic evaluation. From 4-1-89 though 3-31-91, research focused on the growth of zinc germanium phosphide for nonlinear optical applications in the IR. The vertical Bridgman growth process was evaluated as a means to achieve better control over the short wavelength optical absorption in this material that adversely affects 2 micron-pumped optical parametric oscillators.

  4. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin; Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian

    2014-03-01

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM00) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde. PMID:24689563

  5. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin; Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian

    2014-03-15

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM{sub 00}) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde.

  6. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin; Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian

    2014-03-01

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM00) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde.

  7. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang; Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin; Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian

    2014-03-01

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM00) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde.

  8. Chip-Scale Power Conversion for LED Lighting: Integrated Power Chip Converter for Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    ADEPT Project: Teledyne is developing cost-effective power drivers for energy-efficient LED lights that fit on a compact chip. These power drivers are important because they transmit power throughout the LED device. Traditional LED driver components waste energy and don't last as long as the LED itself. They are also large and bulky, so they must be assembled onto a circuit board separately which increases the overall manufacturing cost of the LED light. Teledyne is shrinking the size and improving the efficiency of its LED driver components by using thin layers of an iron magnetic alloy and new gallium nitride on silicon devices. Smaller, more efficient components will enable the drivers to be integrated on a single chip, reducing costs. The new semiconductors in Teledyne's drivers can also handle higher levels of power and last longer without sacrificing efficiency. Initial applications for Teledyne's LED power drivers include refrigerated grocery display cases and retail lighting.

  9. The future of high power laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poprawe, Reinhart; Loosen, Peter; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2007-05-01

    High Power Lasers have been used for years in corresponding applications. Constantly new areas and new processes have been demonstrated, developed and transferred to fruitful use in industry. With the advent of diode pumped solid state lasers in the multi-kW-power regime at beam qualities not far away from the diffraction limit, a new area of applicability has opened. In welding applications speeds could be increased and systems could be developed with higher efficiently leading also to new perspectives for increased productivity, e.g. in combined processing. Quality control is increasingly demanded by the applying industries, however applications still are rare. Higher resolution of coaxial process control systems in time and space combined with new strategies in signal processing could give rise to new applications. The general approach described in this paper emphasizes the fact, that laser applications can be developed more efficiently, more precisely and with higher quality, if the laser radiation is tailored properly to the corresponding application. In applying laser sources, the parameter ranges applicable are by far wider and more flexible compared to heat, mechanical or even electrical energy. The time frame ranges from several fs to continuous wave and this spans approximately 15 orders of magnitude. Spacewise, the foci range from several µm to cm and the resulting intensities suitable for materials processing span eight orders of magnitude from 10 3 to 10 11 W/cm2. In addition to space (power, intensity) and time (pulse) the wavelength can be chosen as a further parameter of optimization. As a consequence, the resulting new applications are vast and can be utilized in almost every market segment of our global economy (Fig. 1). In the past and only partly today, however, this flexibility of laser technology is not exploited in full in materials processing, basically because in the high power regime the lasers with tailored beam properties are not

  10. Solid-state lithium battery

    DOEpatents

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  11. All solid-state spectral broadening: an average and peak power scalable method for compression of ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Marcus; Arisholm, Gunnar; Brons, Jonathan; Pervak, Vladimir; Pronin, Oleg

    2016-05-01

    Spectral broadening in bulk material is a simple, robust and low-cost method to extend the bandwidth of a laser source. Consequently, it enables ultrashort pulse compression. Experiments with a 38 MHz repetition rate, 50 W average power Kerr-lens mode-locked thin-disk oscillator were performed. The initially 1.2 μJ, 250 fs pulses are compressed to 43 fs by means of self-phase modulation in a single 15 mm thick quartz crystal and subsequent chirped-mirror compression. The losses due to spatial nonlinear effects are only about 40 %. A second broadening stage reduced the Fourier transform limit to 15 fs. It is shown that the intensity noise of the oscillator is preserved independent of the broadening factor. Simulations manifest the peak power scalability of the concept and show that it is applicable to a wide range of input pulse durations and energies.

  12. Solid state laser technology for inertial confinement fusion: A collection of articles from ''Energy and Technology Review''

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    This paper contains reprinted articles that record several milestones in laser research at LLNL. ''Neodymium-Glass Laser Research and Development at LLNL'' recounts the history of the Laser Program and our work on neodymium-glass lasers. ''Nova Laser Technology'' describes the capabilities of the Nova laser and some of its uses. ''Building Nova: Industry Relations and Technology Transfer'' illustrates the Laboratory's commitment to work with US industry in technology development. ''Managing the Nova Laser Project'' details the organization and close monitoring of costs and schedules during the construction of the Nova laser facility. The article ''Optical Coatings by the Sol-Gel Process,'' describes our chemical process for making the damage-resistant, antireflective silica coatings used on the Nova laser glass. The technical challenges in designing and fabricating the KDP crystal arrays used to convert the light wave frequency of the Nova lasers are reported in ''Frequency Conversion of the Nova Laser.'' Two articles, ''Eliminating Platinum Inclusions in Laser Glass'' and ''Detecting Microscopic Inclusions in Optical Glass,'' describe how we dealt with the problem of damaging metal inclusions in the Nova laser glass. The last article reprinted here, ''Auxilliary Target Chamber for Nova,'' discusses the diversion of two of Nova's ten beamlines into a secondary chamber for the purpose of increasing our capacity for experimentation.

  13. Singlet Oxygen and Dye-Triplet-State Quenching in Solid-State Dye Lasers Consisting of Pyrromethene 567 Doped Poly(Methyl Methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Rahn, Mark D.; King, Terence A.

    1999-10-01

    Solid-state dye lasers based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) doped with Pyrromethene 567 dye (P567) have been investigated. The preparation techniques employed provided high photostability and laser damage threshold for P567 in pure PMMA with 270,000 pulses emitted before the conversion efficiency fell to half its initial value for a pump fluence of 0.16 J cm 2 . When PMMA was modified with 1,4-diazobicyclo 2,2,2 octane singlet oxygen quencher, the longevity increased to 550,000 pulses, corresponding to a normalized photostability of 270 GJ mol 1 . Modification of PMMA with a triplet quencher (perylene) yielded no improvement, but in ethanol solutions both additives enhanced photostability. It is possible that in PMMA, stabilization by means of triplet quenching that depends on dye diffusion is prevented but that stabilization by means of singlet oxygen quenching that depends on the faster oxygen diffusion rate will succeed.

  14. Ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation using a diode-pumped solid-state laser based frequency comb and a polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver.

    PubMed

    Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Buchs, Gilles; Kundermann, Stefan; Balet, Laurent; Lecomte, Steve

    2015-12-14

    We report ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation at a 9.6 GHz carrier frequency from optical frequency combs based on diode-pumped solid-state lasers emitting at telecom wavelength and referenced to a common cavity-stabilized continuous-wave laser. Using a novel fibered polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver, a single-oscillator phase-noise floor of -171 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz offset frequency has been measured with commercial PIN InGaAs photodiodes, constituting a record for this type of detector. Also, a direct optical measurement of the stabilized frequency combs' timing jitter was performed using a balanced optical cross correlator, allowing for an identification of the origin of the phase-noise limitations in the system. PMID:26699033

  15. Efficient Tm:Fiber Pumped Solid-State Ho:YLF 2-micrometer Laser for Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    2012-01-01

    An efficient 19 W, TEM(sub 00) mode, Ho:YLF laser pumped by continuous wave Tm:fiber laser has been demonstrated at the room temperature. The slope efficiency and optical-to-optical efficiency are 65% and 55%, respectively.

  16. Optimizing average power in low quantum defect lasers.

    PubMed

    Bowman, S R

    2015-11-01

    Waste heat generation is a generic problem in high-power solid-state laser systems. One way to reduce heat loading while improving efficiency is to reduce the laser's quantum defect. This paper presents a simple analysis of low quantum defect laser materials. In these laser materials, the effects of fluorescent cooling and weak loss processes should not be ignored. Simple expressions are developed for efficiency and heating in a steady-state purely radiative material. These expressions are then extended to include weak losses and fluorescence reabsorption. Evaluation of these relations using ytterbium-doped YAG is used to illustrate several optimization schemes and the impact of realistic losses. PMID:26560625

  17. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  18. Optical power control filters: from laser dazzling to damage protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donval, Ariela; Golding, Karin; Nevo, Doron; Fisher, Tali; Lipman, Ofir; Oron, Moshe

    2012-02-01

    With the development of more powerful lasers for applications, optical limiters and blockers are required for providing human eye and optical sensors protection. In some scenarios, laser radiation may seriously interrupt the signal, from transient saturation and can lead to permanent damage. We present a variety of non-linear, solid-state dynamic filter solutions protecting from dazzling and damage in a passive way. Our filters either limit or block the transmission, only if the power exceeds a certain threshold as opposed to spectral filters that block a certain wavelength permanently. We propose a dynamic protection for cameras, sensors and the human eye from laser threats.

  19. Optimization of the Diode-Pumped Solid State Nd:YLF Amplifier Chain for the 263 nm Drive Laser at the FAST Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Julie M.; Corcovilos, Theodore A.; Edstrom, Dean R., Jr.; Ruan, Jinhao; Santucci, James K.

    The RF photoinjector of the 50 MeV superconducting electron linear accelerator at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility is driven by a phase-locked laser system. The neodymium-doped yttrium-lithium fluoride (Nd:YLF) seed laser provides short (3 ps) infrared (1053 nm) pulses to an amplifier chain before conversion to ultraviolet (263 nm) through two frequency-doubling BBO crystals. The amplification section consists of seven diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) amplifiers, which increase the pulse energy of the seed laser using optically end-pumped Nd:YLF crystals. To maximize the total gain of the amplifier chain, each stage must be properly tuned with optimized optics, alignment, and laser beam characterization. In this paper we report on one of the single-pass amplifier improvements to achieve a consistent gain of 4.83 with stabilized output pulse trains for up to 1500 seed pulses. The final ultraviolet pulses imaged onto the Cs2Te photocathode of the RF electron gun have been doubled in energy to 10.2 μJ per pulse as a result of these alterations. Operated by Fermi Research Alliance, LLC under Contract No. De-AC02-07CH11359 with the United States Department of Energy.

  20. Three-channel three-dimensional self-mixing thin-slice solid-state laser-Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtomo, Takayuki; Sudo, Seiichi; Otsuka, Kenju

    2009-01-20

    We report successful real-time three-channel self-mixing laser-Doppler measurements with extreme optical sensitivity using a laser-diode-pumped thin-slice Nd:GdVO4 laser in the carrier-frequency-division-multiplexing scheme with three pairs of acoustic optical modulators (i.e., frequency shifters) and a three-channel FM-wave demodulation circuit. We demonstrate (1) simultaneous independent measurement of three different nanometer-vibrating targets, (2) simultaneous measurements of small particles in Brownian motion from three directions, and (3) identification of the velocity vector of small particles moving in water flowing in a small-diameter glass pipe.

  1. Powerful copper chloride laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Two design innovations give up to thirtyfold increase in power in 300 W laser amplifier. Heat is removed by flowing lasing gas through system, allowing larger lasing volumes. Fast, uniform excitation discharges are obtained with transverse, rather than longitudinal, electrodes.

  2. The Organic Solid State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Dwaine O.; Wlygul, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews interesting and useful electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of the organic solid state. Offers speculation as to areas of fruitful research. Discusses organic superconductors, conducting organic polymers, organic metals, and traces recent history of creation of organic metals. (JM)

  3. A Solid State Ultraviolet Lasers Based on Cerium-Doped LiCaAIF(sub 6) Crystal Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Le, Thanh; Schowalter, Steven J.; Rellergert, Wade; Jeet, Justin; Lin, Guoping; Hudson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of a UV laser using a high-Q whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator of Ce+: LiCaAlF6. We show that WGM resonators from LiCaAlF6 can achieve a Q of 2.6 x 10(sup 7) at UV. We demonstrated a UV laser at 290 nm with a pulsed pump laser at 266 nm. The experiments showed the low pump threshold intensity of 7.5 x 10(sup 9) W/m(sup 2) and slope efficiency of 25%. We have also observed lasing delay dynamics. These results are consistent with our modeling and theoretical estimates, and pave the way for a low threshold cw UV laser using WGM resonator cavity.

  4. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  5. High voltage DC switchgear development for multi-kW space power system: Aerospace technology development of three types of solid state power controllers for 200-1100VDC with current ratings of 25, 50, and 80 amperes with one type utilizing an electromechanical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    Three types of solid state power controllers (SSPC's) for high voltage, high power DC system applications were developed. The first type utilizes a SCR power switch. The second type employes an electromechanical power switch element with solid state commutation. The third type utilizes a transistor power switch. Significant accomplishments include high operating efficiencies, fault clearing, high/low temperature performance and vacuum operation.

  6. Design guidelines of storage class memory based solid-state drives to balance performance, power, endurance, and cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onagi, Takahiro; Sun, Chao; Takeuchi, Ken

    2015-04-01

    The all storage-type storage-class memory (S-SCM) solid-state drive (SSD) and hybrid memory-type SCM (M-SCM)/NAND flash SSD (hybrid SSD) are two promising solutions for high performance storage. In this paper, the effect of wear leveling on the all S-SCM SSD performance, energy consumption, and endurance is evaluated. Furthermore, the all S-SCM SSD’s performance dependency on S-SCM input/output (I/O) frequency and latency are discussed. From the experimental results, for the financial server application, the all S-SCM SSD has a higher performance than that of the hybrid SSD when S-SCM I/O frequency >200 MHz and latency <5 µs/sector. Last, the costs of the all S-SCM SSD and hybrid SSD are compared according to the cost of each memory device. Assuming the cost ratio of M-SCM and S-SCM to NAND flash is 10 and <3.25, respectively, the all S-SCM SSD is more cost-efficient than hybrid SSD with a 25% M-SCM/NAND capacity ratio.

  7. Solid-state 3D imaging using a 1nJ/100ps laser diode transmitter and a single photon receiver matrix.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Sahba; Jansson, Jussi-Pekka; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2016-09-19

    A 3D imaging concept based on pulsed time-of-flight focal plane imaging is presented which can be tailored flexibly in terms of performance parameters such as range, image update rate, field-of-view, 2D resolution, depth accuracy, etc. according to the needs of different applications. The transmitter is based on a laser diode operating in enhanced gain-switching mode with a simple MOS/CMOS-switch current driver and capable of producing short (~100ps FWHM) high energy (up to nJ) pulses at a high pulsing rate. The receiver consists of 2D SPAD and TDC arrays placed on the same die, but in separate arrays. Paraxial optics can be used to illuminate the target field-of-view with the receiver placed at the focal plane of the receiver lens. To validate the concept, a prototype system is presented with a bulk laser diode/MOS driver operating at a wavelength of 870nm with a pulsing rate of 100kHz as the transmitter and a single-chip 9x9 SPAD array with 10-channel TDC as the receiver. The possibility of using this method as a solid-state solution to the task of 3D imaging is discussed in the light of the results derived from this prototype.

  8. Solid-state 3D imaging using a 1nJ/100ps laser diode transmitter and a single photon receiver matrix.

    PubMed

    Jahromi, Sahba; Jansson, Jussi-Pekka; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2016-09-19

    A 3D imaging concept based on pulsed time-of-flight focal plane imaging is presented which can be tailored flexibly in terms of performance parameters such as range, image update rate, field-of-view, 2D resolution, depth accuracy, etc. according to the needs of different applications. The transmitter is based on a laser diode operating in enhanced gain-switching mode with a simple MOS/CMOS-switch current driver and capable of producing short (~100ps FWHM) high energy (up to nJ) pulses at a high pulsing rate. The receiver consists of 2D SPAD and TDC arrays placed on the same die, but in separate arrays. Paraxial optics can be used to illuminate the target field-of-view with the receiver placed at the focal plane of the receiver lens. To validate the concept, a prototype system is presented with a bulk laser diode/MOS driver operating at a wavelength of 870nm with a pulsing rate of 100kHz as the transmitter and a single-chip 9x9 SPAD array with 10-channel TDC as the receiver. The possibility of using this method as a solid-state solution to the task of 3D imaging is discussed in the light of the results derived from this prototype. PMID:27661900

  9. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  10. Applicability of UV laser-induced solid-state fluorescence spectroscopy for characterization of solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Woltmann, Eva; Meyer, Hans; Weigel, Diana; Pritzke, Heinz; Posch, Tjorben N; Kler, Pablo A; Schürmann, Klaus; Roscher, Jörg; Huhn, Carolin

    2014-10-01

    High production output of solid pharmaceutical formulations requires fast methods to ensure their quality. Likewise, fast analytical procedures are required in forensic sciences, for example at customs, to substantiate an initial suspicion. We here present the design and the optimization of an instrumental setup for rapid and non-invasive characterization of tablets by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (with a UV-laser (λ ex = 266 nm) as excitation source) in reflection geometry. The setup was first validated with regard to repeatability, bleaching phenomena, and sensitivity. The effect on the spectra by the physical and chemical properties of the samples, e.g. their hardness, homogeneity, chemical composition, and granule grain size of the uncompressed material, using a series of tablets, manufactured in accordance with design of experiments, was investigated. Investigation of tablets with regard to homogeneity, especially, is extremely important in pharmaceutical production processes. We demonstrate that multiplicative scatter correction is an appropriate tool for data preprocessing of fluorescence spectra. Tablets with different physical and chemical characteristics can be discriminated well from their fluorescence spectra by subjecting the results to principal component analysis.

  11. Strength of metals in liquid and solid states at extremely high tension produced by femtosecond laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Ashitkov, Sergey I.; Inogamov, Nail A.; Komarov, Pavel S.; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V.; Oleynik, Ivan I.; Agranat, Mikhail B.; Kanel, Gennady I.; Fortov, Vladimir E.

    2012-07-30

    We will discuss results of combined experimental and theoretical investigations of ablation and laser-driven shock-wave phenomena in metal films irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses. The femtosecond interferometric microscopy technique was used to make time-resolved measurements of optical properties as well as record the deformation dynamics at both the rear and frontal surfaces during initial two-temperature electron-ion relaxation and subsequent hydrodynamic expansion. In conjunction with experiment, the formation and propagation of strong tensile and compression waves were investigated by a combination of two-temperature hydrodynamic modeling and molecular dynamics simulations. The experimental tensile strengths of aluminum and nickel in solid and liquid states at extremely high strain rates in range 10{sup 8} Division-Sign 10{sup 9}s{sup -1} were obtained from the time evolution of rear and frontal surface velocities. Theoretical tensile strengths calculated by atomistic simulations of ablation and spallation using micron-sized films agree well with experiment. Elastic-plastic response of metallic films to shock compression investigated by both experiment and theory/modeling will also be discussed.

  12. Efficient green continuous-wave lasing of blue-diode-pumped solid-state lasers based on praseodymium-doped LiYF4.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nils-Owe; Bellancourt, Aude-Reine; Weichmann, Ulrich; Huber, Günter

    2010-07-10

    We report highly efficient laser operation of praseodymium-doped LiYF(4) in the green spectral range. The influence of the crystal length and pump light focusing on the laser performance has been studied. The pump radiation was delivered by InGaN laser diodes. Optimizing the setup for a 2.9 mm long crystal with a doping concentration of 0.5% led to an electric to green laser power conversion efficiency as high as 7.4%. With 500 and 1000 mW of pump light power, output powers of 179 and 358 mW have been reached, respectively. With respect to absorbed power, slope efficiencies of up to approximately 60% have been achieved.

  13. Effect of 457 nm Diode-Pumped Solid State Laser on the Polymerization Composite Resins: Microhardness, Cross-Link Density, and Polymerization Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sung-Ae; Park, Jeong-Kil; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Ko, Ching-Chang; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of the present study was to test the usefulness of 457 nm diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser as a light source to cure composite resins. Materials and methods: Five different composite resins were light cured using three different light-curing units (LCUs): a DPSS 457 nm laser (LAS), a light-emitting diode (LED), and quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) units. The light intensity of LAS was 560 mW/cm2, whereas LED and QTH LCUs was ∼900 mW/cm2. The degree of polymerization was tested by evaluating microhardness, cross-link density, and polymerization shrinkage. Results: Before water immersion, the microhardness of laser-treated specimens ranged from 40.8 to 84.7 HV and from 31.7 to 79.0 HV on the top and bottom surfaces, respectively, and these values were 3.3–23.2% and 2.9–31.1% lower than the highest microhardness obtained using LED or QTH LCUs. Also, laser-treated specimens had lower top and bottom microhardnesses than the other LCUs treated specimens by 2.4–19.4% and 1.4–27.8%, respectively. After ethanol immersion for 24 h, the microhardness of laser-treated specimens ranged from 20.3 to 63.2 HV on top and bottom surfaces, but from 24.9 to 71.5 HV when specimens were cured using the other LCUs. Polymerization shrinkage was 9.8–14.7 μm for laser-treated specimens, and these were significantly similar or lower (10.2–16.0 μm) than those obtained using the other LCUs. Conclusions: The results may suggest that the 457 nm DPSS laser can be used as a light source for light-curing dental resin composites. PMID:25549163

  14. Solid-State Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutliff, Ronald D.; And Others

    This self-study course is designed to familiarize Marine Corps enlisted personnel with the principles of solid-state devices and their functions. The course contains four study units. Each study unit begins with a general objective, which is a statement of what the student should learn from the unit. The study units are divided into numbered work…

  15. Solid State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-03-30

    The article discusses solid state lighting technologies. This topic was covered in two previous ASHRAE Journal columns (2010). This article covers advancements in technologies and the associated efficacies. The life-cycle, energy savings and market potential of these technologies are addressed as well.

  16. Continuous-wave 193.4 nm laser with 120 mW output power.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Jun; Kaneda, Yushi; Oka, Naoya; Ishida, Takayuki; Moriizumi, Koichi; Kusunose, Haruhiko; Furukawa, Yasunori

    2015-12-01

    This Letter describes an all-solid-state continuous-wave, deep-ultraviolet coherent source that generates more than 100 mW of output power at 193.4 nm. The source is based on nonlinear frequency conversion of three single-frequency infrared fiber laser master-oscillator power-amplifier (MOPA) light sources.

  17. High voltage systems (tube-type microwave)/low voltage system (solid-state microwave) power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nussberger, A. A.; Woodcock, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    SPS satellite power distribution systems are described. The reference Satellite Power System (SPS) concept utilizes high-voltage klystrons to convert the onboard satellite power from dc to RF for transmission to the ground receiving station. The solar array generates this required high voltage and the power is delivered to the klystrons through a power distribution subsystem. An array switching of solar cell submodules is used to maintain bus voltage regulation. Individual klystron dc voltage conversion is performed by centralized converters. The on-board data processing system performs the necessary switching of submodules to maintain voltage regulation. Electrical power output from the solar panels is fed via switch gears into feeder buses and then into main distribution buses to the antenna. Power also is distributed to batteries so that critical functions can be provided through solar eclipses.

  18. Modeling of the gain distribution for diode pumping of a solid-state laser rod with nonimaging optics.

    PubMed

    Koshel, R J; Walmsley, I A

    1993-03-20

    We investigate the absorption distribution in a cylindrical gain medium that is pumped by a source of distributed laser diodes by means of a pump cavity developed from the edge-ray principle of nonimaging optics. The performance of this pumping arrangement is studied by using a nonsequential, numerical, three-dimensional ray-tracing scheme. A figure of merit is defined for the pump cavities that takes into account the coupling efficiency and uniformity of the absorption distribution. It is found that the nonimaging pump cavity maintains a high coupling efficiency with extended two-dimensional diode arrays and obtains a fairly uniform absorption distribution. The nonimaging cavity is compared with two other designs: a close-coupled side-pumped cavity and an imaging design in the form of a elliptical cavity. The nonimaging cavity has a better figure of merit per diode than these two designs. It also permits the use of an extended, sparse, two-dimensional diode array, which reduces thermal loading of the source and eliminates all cavity optics other than the main reflector. PMID:20820281

  19. Remote pumping of solid state lasers with nuclear driven fluorescers. Final report, October 1, 1990--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Prelas, M.A.

    1993-11-30

    Development of an electron density model, microwave propagation model and power density model was completed for various visible excimer gas media including the xenon oxide excimer (XeO*). In addition, a heat transfer model has been developed. Optimization of a microwave pumped excimer lamp has begun and the results indicate that high frequency modes can be excited efficiently. A model for power density in the cavity has been developed and indicates that 111 modes appear to be the most uniform. A He{sup 3} excited nuclear ``pumped`` lamp was built to take spectra of gas mixtures in a reactor environment. The effects of nuclear radiation on optical materials was examined from 350 nm to 950 nm. The results demonstrated that radiation effects are nonlinear with power. Additionally, radiation damage was strongest in the UV bandwidth. Studies were also made of radiation induced fluorescence. A method was developed to subtract radiation induced fluorescence from the fluorescence signal in the lamp. Using the results of radiation induced absorption and radiation induced fluorescence, a technique for determining absolutely calibrated spectra from the lamp was developed. Absolutely calibrated spectra from He, He-Ar, He-Xe, and He-Kr were taken. The results from this study were compared to electrically driven flashlamps. A heat pipe for a reactor experimentation with alkali metals was developed. Several experiments were run using the heat pipe filled with 5 grams of sodium. Radiation from the violet bands of sodium at around 436 nm was expected. Indeed observations of emission at 436 nm were made. The overall results of this work were: (1) development of a microwave excitation system which approximated nuclear ``pumping.`` (2) Development of methods to compensate for radiation induced absorption and radiation induced fluorescence in optical systems in high radiation environments. (3) Development of methods to obtain absolutely calibrated spectra from light.

  20. Composite Thin-Disk Laser Scaleable to 100 kW Average Power Output and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.; Beach, R.; Payne, S.

    2000-06-01

    By combining newly developed technologies to engineer composite laser components with state of the art diode laser pump delivery technologies, we are in a position to demonstrate high beam quality, continuous wave, laser radiation at scaleable high average powers. The crucial issues of our composite thin disk laser technology were demonstrated during a successful first light effort. The high continuous wave power levels that are now within reach make this system of high interest to future DoD initiatives in solid-state laser technology for the laser weapon arena.