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Sample records for powered lift conference

  1. Powered-Lift Aerodynamics and Acoustics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Powered lift technology is reviewed. Topics covered include: (1) high lift aerodynamics; (2) high speed and cruise aerodynamics; (3) acoustics; (4) propulsion aerodynamics and acoustics; (5) aerodynamic and acoustic loads; and (6) full-scale and flight research.

  2. Lifting BLS Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Sarychev, Michael

    2007-08-01

    This note describes BLS power supplies lifting techniques and provides stress calculations for lifting plate and handles bolts. BLS power supply weight is about 120 Lbs, with the center of gravity shifted toward the right front side. A lifting plate is used to attach a power supply to a crane or a hoist. Stress calculations show that safety factors for lifting plate are 12.9 (vs. 5 required) for ultimate stress and 5.7 (vs. 3 required) for yield stress. Safety factor for shackle bolt thread shear load is 37, and safety factor for bolts that attach handles is 12.8.

  3. Powered-lift aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, W. H.; Franklin, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Powered lift aircraft have the ability to vary the magnitude and direction of the force produced by the propulsion system so as to control the overall lift and streamwise force components of the aircraft, with the objective of enabling the aircraft to operate from minimum sized terminal sites. Power lift technology has contributed to the development of the jet lift Harrier and to the forth coming operational V-22 Tilt Rotor and the C-17 military transport. This technology will soon be expanded to include supersonic fighters with short takeoff and vertical landing capability, and will continue to be used for the development of short- and vertical-takeoff and landing transport. An overview of this field of aeronautical technology is provided for several types of powered lift aircraft. It focuses on the description of various powered lift concepts and their operational capability. Aspects of aerodynamics and flight controls pertinent to powered lift are also discussed.

  4. Quiet powered-lift propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Latest results of programs exploring new propulsion technology for powered-lift aircraft systems are presented. Topics discussed include results from the 'quiet clean short-haul experimental engine' program and progress reports on the 'quiet short-haul research aircraft' and 'tilt-rotor research aircraft' programs. In addition to these NASA programs, the Air Force AMST YC 14 and YC 15 programs were reviewed.

  5. Fuel Cell Powered Lift Truck

    SciTech Connect

    Moulden, Steve

    2015-08-20

    This project, entitled “Recovery Act: Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Sysco (Houston) Fleet Deployment”, was in response to DOE funding opportunity announcement DE-PS36-08GO98009, Topic 7B, which promotes the deployment of fuel cell powered material handling equipment in large, multi-shift distribution centers. This project promoted large-volume commercialdeployments and helped to create a market pull for material handling equipment (MHE) powered fuel cell systems. Specific outcomes and benefits involved the proliferation of fuel cell systems in 5-to 20-kW lift trucks at a high-profile, real-world site that demonstrated the benefits of fuel cell technology and served as a focal point for other nascent customers. The project allowed for the creation of expertise in providing service and support for MHE fuel cell powered systems, growth of existing product manufacturing expertise, and promoted existing fuel cell system and component companies. The project also stimulated other MHE fleet conversions helping to speed the adoption of fuel cell systems and hydrogen fueling technology. This document also contains the lessons learned during the project in order to communicate the successes and difficulties experienced, which could potentially assist others planning similar projects.

  6. Design of a portable powered seat lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    People suffering from degenerative hip or knee joints find sitting and rising from a seated position very difficult. These people can rely on large stationary chairs at home, but must ask others for assistance when rising from any other chair. An orthopedic surgeon identified to the MSFC Technology Utilization Office the need for development of a portable device that could perform a similar function to the stationary lift chairs. The MSFC Structural Development Branch answered the Technology Utilization Office's request for design of a portable powered seat lift. The device is a seat cushion that opens under power, lifting the user to near-standing positions. The largest challenge was developing a mechanism to provide a stable lift over the large range of motion needed, and fold flat enough to be comfortable to sit on. CAD 3-D modeling was used to generate complete drawings for the prototype, and a full-scale working model of the Seat lift was made based on the drawings. The working model is of low strength, but proves the function of the mechanism and the concept.

  7. 21 CFR 880.5500 - AC-powered patient lift.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5500 AC-powered patient lift. (a) Identification. An AC-powered lift is an electrically powered device either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport patients in the horizontal or other...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5500 - AC-powered patient lift.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5500 AC-powered patient lift. (a) Identification. An AC-powered lift is an electrically powered device either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport patients in the horizontal or other...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5500 - AC-powered patient lift.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5500 AC-powered patient lift. (a) Identification. An AC-powered lift is an electrically powered device either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport patients in the horizontal or other...

  10. Dragonfly flight. III. Lift and power requirements.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, JM; Ellington, CP

    1997-02-01

    A mean lift coefficient quasi-steady analysis has been applied to the free flight of the dragonfly Sympetrum sanguineum and the damselfly Calopteryx splendens. The analysis accommodated the yaw and accelerations involved in free flight. For any given velocity or resultant aerodynamic force (thrust), the damselfly mean lift coefficient was higher than that for the dragonfly because of its clap and fling. For both species, the maximum mean lift coefficient L was higher than the steady CL,max. Both species aligned their strokes planes to be nearly normal to the thrust, a strategy that reduces the L required for flight and which is different from the previously published hovering and slow dragonfly flights with stroke planes steeply inclined to the horizontal. Owing to the relatively low costs of accelerating the wing, the aerodynamic power required for flight represents the mechanical power output from the muscles. The maximum muscle mass-specific power was estimated at 156 and 166 W kg-1 for S. sanguineum and C. splendens, respectively. Measurements of heat production immediately after flight resulted in mechanical efficiency estimates of 13 % and 9 % for S. sanguineum and C. splendens muscles, respectively.

  11. Simulation of powered-lift flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandalsem, William R.; Chawla, Kalpana; Roth, Karlin R.; Smith, Merritt H.; Rao, Kuditipudi V.; Blum, Thomas C.

    1989-01-01

    The primary objective is to expose government, industry, and academic scientists to work underway at NASA-Ames towards the application of CFD to the powered lift area. One goal is to produce the technologies which will be required in the application of numerical techniques to, for example, the Supersonic STOVL program. The progress to date on the following specific projects is presented: Jet in ground effect with crossflow; Jet in a crossflow; Delta planform with multiple jets in ground effect; Integration of CFD with thermal and acoustic analyses; Improved flow visualization techniques for unsteady flows; YAV-8B Harrier simulation program; and E-7 simulation program.

  12. Summary of Lift and Lift/Cruise Fan Powered Lift Concept Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Woodrow L.

    1993-01-01

    A summary is presented of some of the lift and lift/cruise fan technology including fan performance, fan stall, ground effects, ingestion and thrust loss, design tradeoffs and integration, control effectiveness and several other areas related to vertical short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft conceptual design. The various subjects addressed, while not necessarily pertinent to specific short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) supersonic designs being considered, are of interest to the general field of lift and lift/cruise fan aircraft designs and may be of importance in the future. The various wind tunnel and static tests reviewed are: (1) the Doak VZ-4 ducted fan, (2) the 0.57 scale model of the Bell X-22 ducted fan aircraft, (3) the Avrocar, (4) the General Electric lift/cruise fan, (5) the vertical short takeoff and landing (V/STOL) lift engine configurations related to ingestion and consequent thrust loss, (6) the XV-5 and other fan-in-wing stall consideration, (7) hybrid configurations such as lift fan and lift/cruise fan or engines, and (8) the various conceptual design studies by air-frame contractors. Other design integration problems related to small and large V/STOL transport aircraft are summarized including lessons learned during more recent conceptual design studies related to a small executive V/STOL transport aircraft.

  13. Lifting device for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, F.

    1984-07-17

    A lifting device for lifting and transporting nuclear fuel elements. This device comprises a mast-like support on the lower end of which automatically operated and locked gripping pawls are provided. The support has a considerable height and may be referred to as lifting mast. The gripping pawls and their operating mechanism are referred to as gripping-head. The gripping-head and the lifting mast are telescopically movable relative to each other. To this end guide rods and compression springs are interposed between the lower end of the lifting mast and the gripping-head. The gripping-head comprises two concentric annular members which are relatively movable or rotatable about their common geometrical axis. One of the annular members supports the gripping pawls are T-shaped. One of their transverse ends is adapted to engage the fuel rods, and the other of their transverse ends is adapted to engage curved grooves in the other annular member. The rotary motion of one annular member relative to the other gripping pawls. In their limit positions the two annular members are blocked by a safety lever engaging slits or slots.

  14. 21 CFR 880.5510 - Non-AC-powered patient lift.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-AC-powered patient lift. 880.5510 Section 880... Devices § 880.5510 Non-AC-powered patient lift. (a) Identification. A non-AC-powered patient lift is a hydraulic, battery, or mechanically powered device, either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport a...

  15. [C-type scaphoid fracture in a elite power lifting].

    PubMed

    Heckmann, A; Lahoda, L U; Alkandari, Q; Vogt, P M; Knobloch, K

    2008-06-01

    Power lifting injuries most often involve shoulder injuries with an injury rate of 0.57 to 0.71/1000 hours of power lifting. Wrist injuries are less common in power lifters with 0.05/1000 hours exposure vs. 0.23/1000 h in elite weight lifting men. Often, two contributing factors causing wrist injuries are encountered: a) loss of balance causing the barbell to drift back behind the head of the power lifter, which hyperextends the wrist and b) the maximal weight. We report on an elite power lifting athlete preparing for the World Masters Bench press championships suffering two months of persisting pain during bench press exercise and rest in the snuff-box area following a loss of balance of the bar-bell during bench press with 280 kg load. Following prolonged presentation 2 months after the initial injury with training in the meantime, CT-scan was performed revealing a C-type scaphoid fracture. Surgery was performed as Herbert screw fixation and bone grafting according to the technique of Matti-Russe, followed by an immobilisation of twelve weeks with a plaster. We recommended ending the athletes' power lifting career, however he further exercised with the plaster with consecutive re-operation 3months later and 2nd Matti-Russe and Herbert screw re-do. One year later he became national champion with 240 kg bench pressing. Given the limited scaphoid blood supply and the high complication rate especially among C-type scaphoid fractures, a surgical procedure with bone grafting, Herbert screw fixation and sufficient plaster immobilisation is advocated in scaphoid fractures in elite athletes.

  16. Lift Fan Nozzle for Joint Strike Fighter Tested in NASA Lewis' Powered Lift Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, David W.

    1998-01-01

    Under a nonreimbursable space act agreement between the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Allison Advanced Development Company, Allison tested a lift fan nozzle in Lewis' Powered Lift Rig. This test was in support of the Joint Strike Fighter program (formerly the Joint Advanced Strike Technology) sponsored by the Department of Defense, which will develop and field an affordable, multirole, next-generation, strike fighter aircraft for the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and foreign allies. Allison, along with Pratt & Whitney Company, is part of the Lockheed Martin Corporation team that is scheduled to build a concept demonstrator aircraft by fiscal year 2001. The test was initiated in April and successfully completed in mid-July of 1997. Allison supplied a one-third-scale model of the lift fan nozzle, and Lewis provided the facility and the necessary support team. Various configurations, including pitching vectored angles ranging from 15deg forward to 60deg backward, were tested over a range of nozzle pressure ratios. Nozzle flow rates, thrust, and static pressures were measured for each of the configurations. Results from the test met the design requirements for the Joint Strike Fighter program and were in agreement with Allison's internal computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. Data obtained from this test will also be used in the full-scale design of the lift fan system.

  17. Takeoff predictions for powered-lift aircraft. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardwell, Douglas A.; Sandlin, Doral R.

    1988-01-01

    Takeoff predictions for powered-lift short takeoff (STO) and conventional takeoff (CTO) aircraft have been added to NASA Ames Research Center's Aircraft Synthesis (ACSYNT) code. The new computer code predicts the aircraft engine and nozzle settings required to achieve the minimum takeoff roll. As a test case, the code predicted takeoff ground rolls and nozzle settings for the YAV-8B Harrier that compared well with measured values. Brief analysis of takeoff performance for an Ejector, Remote Augmented Lift, Hybrid-Tandem Fan, and Vectored Thrust STO aircraft using the new routine will be presented.

  18. Takeoff predictions for powered-lift aircraft. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardwell, Douglas A.; Sandlin, Doral R.

    1988-01-01

    Takeoff predictions for powered-lift short takeoff (STO) and conventional takeoff (CTO) aircraft have been added to NASA Ames Research Center's Aircraft Synthesis (ACSYNT) code. The new computer code predicts the aircraft engine and nozzle settings required to achieve the minimum takeoff roll. As a test case, the code predicted takeoff ground rolls and nozzle settings for the YAV-8B Harrier that compared well with measured values. Brief analysis of takeoff performance for an Ejector, Remote Augmented Lift, Hybrid-Tandem Fan, and Vectored Thrust STO aircraft using the new routine will be presented.

  19. Power lifting: people meeting the population challenge.

    PubMed

    Dillon, L

    1994-12-01

    Whereas population pressures are usually associated with developing countries, developed countries like the US also suffer from population-associated problems. For example, in some US cities the infant mortality rate is worse than in the developing world. US policy-makers have found it useful to apply some of the programs used successfully in the developing world to problems at home. Efforts to increase the availability of health care services and education have led to the creation of the Healthy Start program in Baltimore, Maryland, which uses community residents to motivate their peers and provides counseling on family planning, education, and employment. In Oregon, an AIDS-prevention program, which makes condoms more accessible to teenagers, has been transplanted from Zaire. Chattanooga, Tennessee, has used techniques from Brazil to design public transportation systems and improve air quality. In communities across the country, activists are working to instill power in local residents as they seek ways to improve the environment and promote economic health. Modeled on an initiative in Bangladesh, community-run loan programs allow the development of microenterprises which help people develop self-employment opportunities. When women take part in these activities and become successfully employed, their children are given what is usually their first example of parental employment and a reason to hope for a better future.

  20. Lift and Power Requirements in Flight in a Dragonfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mao; Wang, Ji Kang

    The lift and power requirements of a model dragonfly in forward flight are studied, using the method of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The graph of power against flight speed is U-shaped, suggesting that a dragonfly might have a preferred cruising speed. Considerable variation in the relative phase between fore- and hindwings results in only very small change in power requirement. This suggests theat the forewing-hingwing interaction is weak and furthermore, might explain why phase angles ranging from to are employed by dragonflies in hovering and forward flight.

  1. Tentative civil airworthiness flight criteria for powered-lift transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, C. S.; Scott, B. C.

    1976-01-01

    Representatives of the U.S., British, French, and Canadian airworthiness authorities participated in a NASA/FAA program to formulate tentative civil airworthiness flight criteria for powered-lift transports. The ultimate limits of the flight envelope are defined by boundaries in the airspeed/path-angle plane. Angle of attack and airspeed margins applied to these ultimate limits provide protection against both atmospheric disturbances and disturbances resulting from pilot actions or system variability, but do not ensure maneuvering capability directly, as the 30% speed margin does for conventional transports. Separate criteria provide for direct demonstration of adequate capability for approach path control, flare and landing, and for go-around. Demonstration maneuvers are proposed, and appropriate abuses and failures are suggested. Taken together, these criteria should permit selection of appropriate operating points within the flight envelopes for the approach, landing, and go-around flight phases which are likely to be most critical for powered-lift aircraft.

  2. Airworthiness criteria development for powered-lift aircraft: A program summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, R. K.; Stapleford, R. L.; Rumold, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A four-year simulation program to develop airworthiness criteria for powered-lift aircraft is summarized. All flight phases affected by use of powered lift (approach, landing, takeoff) are treated with regard to airworthiness problem areas (limiting flight conditions and safety margins: stability, control, and performance; and systems failure). The general features of powered-lift aircraft are compared to conventional aircraft.

  3. 21 CFR 880.5510 - Non-AC-powered patient lift.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5510 Non-AC-powered patient lift. (a) Identification. A non-AC-powered patient lift is a hydraulic, battery, or mechanically powered device, either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport a...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5510 - Non-AC-powered patient lift.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5510 Non-AC-powered patient lift. (a) Identification. A non-AC-powered patient lift is a hydraulic, battery, or mechanically powered device, either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport a...

  5. Calculations and experiments concerning lifting force and power in TEMPUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zong, J. H.; Szekely, J.; Lohofer, G.

    1993-01-01

    A critical comparison is reported between the theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for the electromagnetic lifting force and the heating rates which may be achieved, under simulated microgravity conditions, using the TEMPUS electromagnetic levitation device. The experiments involved the suspending of a metallic sample from one arm of a recording balance, such that it was carefully positioned between the heating and the positioning coils of the levitation device. The net force exerted by the sample was measured as a function of position, the coil currents, and the nature of the sample. Some calculations are also reported regarding the power absorption by the sample. The theoretical predictions, based on the numerical solution of Maxwell's equations using the volume integral technique, were found to be in excellent agreement with the measurements. For the idealized case of a spherical sample, analytical solutions describing the lifting force were also found to agree very well with the computed results.

  6. Displacement-load force-perceived weight relationships in lifting objects with power-assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, S. M. Mizanoor; Ikeura, Ryojun; Nobe, Masaya; Sawai, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a 1-DOF power assist system (PAS) for lifting objects in vertical direction based on a hypothesis that pertains to operator's weight perception. We particularly studied the relationships among object's displacement, load force (vertical lifting force) and perceived weight for the objects lifted with the PAS. We also compared the load force features for power-assist-lifted objects to that for manually lifted objects for equal heaviness. Finally, we proposed using the findings to develop human-friendly PASs for lifting heavy objects in industries such as construction, military operations, manufacturing and assembly, logistics and transport, mining etc.

  7. Displacement-load force-perceived weight relationships in lifting objects with power-assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, S. M. Mizanoor; Ikeura, Ryojun; Nobe, Masaya; Sawai, Hideki

    2009-12-01

    This paper deals with the design of a 1-DOF power assist system (PAS) for lifting objects in vertical direction based on a hypothesis that pertains to operator's weight perception. We particularly studied the relationships among object's displacement, load force (vertical lifting force) and perceived weight for the objects lifted with the PAS. We also compared the load force features for power-assist-lifted objects to that for manually lifted objects for equal heaviness. Finally, we proposed using the findings to develop human-friendly PASs for lifting heavy objects in industries such as construction, military operations, manufacturing and assembly, logistics and transport, mining etc.

  8. Numerical simulation of a powered-lift landing, tracking flow features using overset grids, and simulation of high lift devices on a fighter-lift-and-control wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana

    1993-01-01

    Attached as appendices to this report are documents describing work performed on the simulation of a landing powered-lift delta wing, the tracking of flow features using overset grids, and the simulation of flaps on the Wright Patterson Lab's fighter-lift-and-control (FLAC) wing. Numerical simulation of a powered-lift landing includes the computation of flow about a delta wing at four fixed heights as well as a simulated landing, in which the delta wing descends toward the ground. Comparison of computed and experimental lift coefficients indicates that the simulations capture the qualitative trends in lift-loss encountered by thrust-vectoring aircraft operating in ground effect. Power spectra of temporal variations of pressure indicate computed vortex shedding frequencies close to the jet exit are in the experimentally observed frequency range; the power spectra of pressure also provide insights into the mechanisms of lift oscillations. Also, a method for using overset grids to track dynamic flow features is described and the method is validated by tracking a moving shock and vortices shed behind a circular cylinder. Finally, Chimera gridding strategies were used to develop pressure coefficient contours for the FLAC wing for a Mach no. of 0.18 and Reynolds no. of 2.5 million.

  9. Biomechanical comparison of unilateral and bilateral power snatch lifts.

    PubMed

    Lauder, Mike A; Lake, Jason P

    2008-05-01

    Biomechanical characteristics of the one-handed dumbbell power snatch (DBPS) were examined to determine whether significant differences existed between unilateral and bilateral weightlifting movements. Kinetic and kinematic movement data were recorded from 10 male weightlifters (mean +/- SD: age: 30.2 +/- 10.2 years; height: 174.2 +/- 4.4 cm; body mass: 81.5 +/- 14.6 kg) during one-handed dumbbell (DB) and traditional barbell (BBPS) power snatch performance with loads of approximately 80% of respective lift one repetition maximums (1RM) with the use of 2 synchronized Kistler force plates and high-speed 3-dimensional video. Results highlighted asymmetry in the ground reaction force and kinematic profile of the DBPS, which deviated from the observed patterns of the bilateral movement. This study found that the nonlifting side (the side corresponding with the hand that did not hold the DB) tended to generate a greater pull phase peak vertical ground reaction forces significantly faster (p = 0.001) than the lifting side (the side corresponding with the hand that held the DB) during the DBPS. In addition, the DBPS nonlifting side catch phase loading rate was approximately double that of the lifting side loading rate (p < 0.05). These results quantify symmetrical deviations in the movement patterns of the unilateral power snatch movement both during the concentric muscular contraction of load vertical displacement, and the loading implications of unilateral landing. This asymmetry supports the contention that unilateral variations of weightlifting movements may provide a different training stimulus to athletes.

  10. Approach path control for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, D. J.; Flora, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    A flight control system concept is defined for approach flightpath control of an augmentor wing (or similar) powered-lift STOL configuration. The proposed STOL control concept produces aircraft transient and steady-state control responses that are familiar to pilots of conventional jet transports, and has potential for good handling qualities ratings in all approach and landing phases. The effects of trailing-edge rate limits, real-engine dynamics, and atmospheric turbulence are considered in the study. A general discussion of STOL handling qualities problems and piloting techniques is included.

  11. Conference Report: Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorino, Naoto; Mori, Hiroyuki

    The 19th Power & Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 24-26, 2008 at Hiroshima University. The total number of technical papers was 415 and 53 sessions (52 oral sessions and 1 poster session) were organized. A panel discussion, a special lecture, technical exhibitions and technical tours were also organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 954 registrations. The conference has been successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. In this article, the outline of the conference is reported.

  12. Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Fleet Deployment Projects Final Technical Report May 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Klingler, James J

    2014-05-06

    The overall objectives of this project were to evaluate the performance, operability and safety of fork lift trucks powered by fuel cells in large distribution centers. This was accomplished by replacing the batteries in over 350 lift trucks with fuel cells at five distribution centers operated by GENCO. The annual cost savings of lift trucks powered by fuel cell power units was between $2,400 and $5,300 per truck compared to battery powered lift trucks, excluding DOE contributions. The greatest savings were in fueling labor costs where a fuel cell powered lift truck could be fueled in a few minutes per day compared to over an hour for battery powered lift trucks which required removal and replacement of batteries. Lift truck operators where generally very satisfied with the performance of the fuel cell power units, primarily because there was no reduction in power over the duration of a shift as experienced with battery powered lift trucks. The operators also appreciated the fast and easy fueling compared to the effort and potential risk of injury associated with switching heavy batteries in and out of lift trucks. There were no safety issues with the fueling or operation of the fuel cells. Although maintenance costs for the fuel cells were higher than for batteries, these costs are expected to decrease significantly in the next generation of fuel cells, making them even more cost effective.

  13. Power affects performance when the pressure is on: evidence for low-power threat and high-power lift.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sonia K; Galinsky, Adam D; Kray, Laura J; Shirako, Aiwa

    2015-05-01

    The current research examines how power affects performance in pressure-filled contexts. We present low-power-threat and high-power-lift effects, whereby performance in high-stakes situations suffers or is enhanced depending on one's power; that is, the power inherent to a situational role can produce effects similar to stereotype threat and lift. Three negotiations experiments demonstrate that role-based power affects outcomes but only when the negotiation is diagnostic of ability and, therefore, pressure-filled. We link these outcomes conceptually to threat and lift effects by showing that (a) role power affects performance more strongly when the negotiation is diagnostic of ability and (b) underperformance disappears when the low-power negotiator has an opportunity to self-affirm. These results suggest that stereotype threat and lift effects may represent a more general phenomenon: When the stakes are raised high, relative power can act as either a toxic brew (stereotype/low-power threat) or a beneficial elixir (stereotype/high-power lift) for performance. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  14. Some measurements of an EBF powered-lift wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Results from a wind tunnel investigation in which velocity vector measurements were obtained in the near wake of an externally blown flap powered lift configuration were analyzed. These measurements were used to develop spanwise distributions for the momentum strength and location of the engine exhaust stream tube with the results used as input parameters to one jet flap analytical method. It is shown that a comparison of the momentum coefficients obtained from forward speed wake surveys with the predicted values from static force data results in a good correlation, which verifies the use of the flap thrust recovery factor as a means of predicting the momentum strength at the flap trailing edge. Also, when wake survey distributions of momentum strength and direction are used as input parameters to one analytical jet flap method, the results show reasonable agreement between the experimental data and analytical results.

  15. Interior noise considerations for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    Powered-lift configurations which are currently under development for future use on STOL aircraft involve impingement of the jet engine exhaust onto wing and flap surfaces. Previous studies have suggested that the impinging jet produces higher noise levels at lower frequencies than does the jet alone. These higher levels, together with the close proximity of the engine and flap noise sources to the fuselage sidewall, suggest that the noise levels in these aircraft may be high enough to interfere with passenger comfort. To investigate this possibility, interior noise levels were estimated for both an upper surface blown (USB) and an externally blown flap (EBF) configuration. This paper describes the procedure used to estimate the interior noise levels and compares these levels with levels on existing jet aircraft and on ground transportation vehicles. These estimates indicate high levels in the STOL aircraft; therefore, areas of possible improvements in technology for control of STOL interior noise are also discussed.

  16. The lift-fan powered-lift aircraft concept: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, Wallace H.

    1993-01-01

    This is one of a series of reports on the lessons learned from past research related to lift-fan aircraft concepts. An extensive review is presented of the many lift-fan aircraft design studies conducted by both government and industry over the past 45 years. Mission applications and design integration including discussions on manifolding hot gas generators, hot gas dusting, and energy transfer control are addressed. Past lift-fan evaluations of the Avrocar are discussed. Lessons learned from these past efforts are identified.

  17. Computational Analysis of Powered Lift Augmentation for the LEAPTech Distributed Electric Propulsion Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deere, Karen A.; Viken, Sally A.; Carter, Melissa B.; Viken, Jeffrey K.; Wiese, Michael R.; Farr, Norma L.

    2017-01-01

    A computational study of a distributed electric propulsion wing with a 40deg flap deflection has been completed using FUN3D. Two lift-augmentation power conditions were compared with the power-off configuration on the high-lift wing (40deg flap) at a 73 mph freestream flow and for a range of angles of attack from -5 degrees to 14 degrees. The computational study also included investigating the benefit of corotating versus counter-rotating propeller spin direction to powered-lift performance. The results indicate a large benefit in lift coefficient, over the entire range of angle of attack studied, by using corotating propellers that all spin counter to the wingtip vortex. For the landing condition, 73 mph, the unpowered 40deg flap configuration achieved a maximum lift coefficient of 2.3. With high-lift blowing the maximum lift coefficient increased to 5.61. Therefore, the lift augmentation is a factor of 2.4. Taking advantage of the fullspan lift augmentation at similar performance means that a wing powered with the distributed electric propulsion system requires only 42 percent of the wing area of the unpowered wing. This technology will allow wings to be 'cruise optimized', meaning that they will be able to fly closer to maximum lift over drag conditions at the design cruise speed of the aircraft.

  18. 14 CFR 61.163 - Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Airline Transport Pilots § 61.163 Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating. (a) A person who is applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a powered-lift category rating must have at...

  19. 14 CFR 61.163 - Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Airline Transport Pilots § 61.163 Aeronautical experience: Powered-lift category rating. (a) A person who is applying for an airline transport pilot certificate with a powered-lift category rating must have at...

  20. Application of powered-lift concepts for improved cruise efficiency of long-range aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Fournier, P. G.

    1976-01-01

    Results of studies conducted to explore the use of powered lift concepts for improved low speed performance of long range subsonic and supersonic cruise vehicles are summarized. It is indicated that powered lift can provide significant improvements in low speed performance, as well as substantial increases in cruise efficiency and range for both subsonic and supersonic cruise configurations.

  1. "Dedicated To The Continued Education, Training and Demonstration of PEM Fuel Cell Powered Lift Trucks In Real-World Applications."

    SciTech Connect

    Dever, Thomas J.

    2011-11-29

    fleets. As a long-standing lift truck dealership, LiftOne was able to introduce the fuel cells to such companies in the demanding applications. Accomplishments vs Objectives: We were successful in respect to the stated objectives. The Education Segment's H2 Education Sessions were able to introduce fuel cell technology to many companies and reached the intended broad audience. Also, demos of the lift truck at the sessions as well as the conferences; expos and area events provided great additional exposure. The Deployments were successful in allowing the 6 participating companies to test the 2 fuel cell powered lift trucks in their demanding applications. One of the 6 sites (BMW) eventually adopted over 80 fuel cells from Plug Power. LiftOne was one of the 3 fuel cell demonstrators at BMW for this trial and played a major role in helping to prove the viability and efficiency of this alternative form of energy for BMW. The other 5 companies that participated in the project's deployments were encouraged by the trials and while not converting over to fuel cell power at this time, expressed the desire to revisit acquisition scenarios in the near future as the cost of fuel cells and infrastructure continue to improve. The Education sessions began in March of 2009 at the 7 LiftOne Branches and continued throughout the duration of the project. Attendees came from a large base of lift truck users in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia. The sessions were free and invitations were sent out to potential users and companies with intrigue. In addition to the Education content at the sessions (which was offered in a 'H2 101' format), LiftOne was able to demonstrate a working fuel cell powered lift truck, which proved to be a big draw with the 'hands on' experience. LiftOne also demo'd the fuel cell lift trucks at many conferences, expos, professional association meetings, trade shows and 'Green' events in major cities region including Charlotte, Greenville, and Columbia. Such

  2. Evaluation of the ability of power to predict low frequency lifting capacity.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, P G; Ayoub, M M; Westfall, P H

    1998-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to examine the role that maximal lifting power has in predicting maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) for a frequency of one lift per 8 h. The secondary aim of the study was to compare the ability of power to predict MAWL to previously used measures of capacity including two measures of isometric strength, five measures of isokinetic strength, and isoinertial capacity on an incremental lifting test. Twenty-five male subjects volunteered to participate in the experiment. The isometric tests involved maximum voluntary contractions for composite lifting strength at vertical heights of 15 and 75 cm. Peak isokinetic strength was measured at velocities of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 m s-1 using a modified CYBEX II isokinetic dynamometer. Isoinertial lifting capacity was measured on the X-factor incremental lifting machine and peak power was measured on the incremental lifting machine by having subjects lift a 25 kg load as quickly as possible. The results indicate that peak isoinertial power is significantly correlated with MAWL, and this correlation was higher than any of the correlations between the other predictor variables and MAWL. The relationships between the isokinetic strength measures and MAWL were stronger than the relationships between the isometric measures and MAWL. Overall, the results suggest that tests used to predict MAWL should be dynamic rather than static.

  3. 21 CFR 880.5510 - Non-AC-powered patient lift.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic... hydraulic, battery, or mechanically powered device, either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5510 - Non-AC-powered patient lift.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic... hydraulic, battery, or mechanically powered device, either fixed or mobile, used to lift and transport...

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of a propeller-powered high-lift semispan wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Garl L., Jr.; Takallu, M. A.; Applin, Zachary T.

    1994-01-01

    A small-scale semispan high-lift wing-flap system equipped under the wing with a turboprop engine assembly was tested in the LaRC 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. Experimental data were obtained for various propeller rotational speeds, nacelle locations, and nacelle inclinations. To isolate the effects of the high lift system, data were obtained with and without the flaps and leading-edge device. The effects of the propeller slipstream on the overall longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of the wing-propeller assembly were examined. Test results indicated that the lift coefficient of the wing could be increased by the propeller slipstream when the rotational speed was increased and high-lift devices were deployed. Decreasing the nacelle inclination (increased pitch down) enhanced the lift performance of the system much more than varying the vertical or horizontal location of the nacelle. Furthermore, decreasing the nacelle inclination led to higher lift curve slope values, which indicated that the powered wing could sustain higher angles of attack near maximum lift performance. Any lift augmentation was accompanied by a drag penalty due to the increased wing lift.

  6. Lower-limb extensor power and lifting characteristics in disabled elders.

    PubMed

    Dancewicz, Teresa M; Krebs, David E; McGibbon, Chris A

    2003-01-01

    Few reports address lifting in disabled elders. Resistance training may facilitate function by improving coordination and muscular recruitment in common lifting tasks. Subjects were considered "functionally limited" if they reported a limitation in at least 1 of 9 possible functional areas listed on the Short-Form Health Survey physical function scale (SF-36), excluding the vigorous activity item. Eighty-nine functionally limited elders (60.3 to 89.8 years old) consented to participate in an intervention trial consisting of a 6-month in-home video-facilitated resistance exercise program using elastic bands. Biomechanical variables (leg extensor power, work, squared jerk), temporal outcomes (lift time and time to peak leg powers), and leg extensor strength were analyzed with the use of analysis of variance (ANOVA) between the (1) experimental group versus control group and the (2) subgroup of the weakest third of subjects (pretest leg extensor strength as percent of body weight [BW]). The experimental group had significant improvements in strength in knee extension (16.7%) and hip extension (20.5%). Resistance-trained weak subjects significantly increased hip extension strength compared to controls. A trend toward improved performance in lifting--decreased total lift time--was noted in the resistance-trained subjects. Significant correlations were found between total leg extension power, total leg extension strength, total work, and lift time. Resistance-trained disabled elders demonstrated strength benefits and several trends consistent with improved coordination and more efficient lifting. Leg-muscle power was related to better functional performance in lifting.

  7. Fuel-conservative guidance system for powered-lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, H.; Mclean, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    A concept for automatic terminal area guidance, comprising two modes of operation, was developed and evaluated in flight tests. In the predictive mode, fuel efficient approach trajectories are synthesized in fast time. In the tracking mode, the synthesized trajectories are reconstructed and tracked automatically. An energy rate performance model derived from the lift, drag, and propulsion system characteristics of the aircraft is used in the synthesis algorithm. The method optimizes the trajectory for the initial aircraft position and wind and temperature profiles encountered during each landing approach. The design theory and the results of simulations and flight tests using the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft are described.

  8. Weight lifted and countermovement potentiation of power in concentric phase of unstable and traditional resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Zemková, Erika; Jelen, Michal; Kováciková, Zuzana; Ollé, Gábor; Vilman, Tomás; Hamar, Dusan

    2014-04-01

    The study evaluates the effect of weight lifted on power in the concentric phase of resistance exercises on stable and unstable surfaces. A group of 19 fit men performed randomly on different days 3 reps of (a) barbell chest presses on the bench and Swiss ball, and (b) barbell squats on stable base and BOSU ball. Exercises were performed without and with countermovement (CM) using maximal effort in concentric phase. Initial weight of 20 kg was increased by 10 kg or 5 kg (at higher loads) up to at least 85% of previously established 1RM under stable conditions. Results showed no significant differences in mean power in the concentric phase of stable and unstable CM chest presses at lower weights lifted (from 20 to 50 kg). However, its values were significantly higher during chest presses on the bench than on Swiss ball while lifting higher weights (from 60 to 90 kg). Similarly, mean power in the concentric phase of squats was significantly higher on stable base than on BOSU ball at higher weights lifted (from 60 to 90 kg). Though a set of data showed significant differences, the effect sizes≤0.7 suggest no practically meaningful differences. It may be concluded that unstable base compromises the power in the concentric phase of resistance exercises, however, only at higher weights lifted.

  9. Development of pneumatic thrust-deflecting powered-lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, R. J.; Nichols, J. H., Jr.; Harris, M. J.; Eppel, J. C.; Shovlin, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Improvements introduced into the Circulation Control Wing/Upper Surface Blowing (CCW/USB) STOL concept (Harris et al., 1982) are described along with results of the full-scale static ground tests and model-scale wind tunnel investigations. Tests performed on the full-scale pneumatic thrust-deflecting system installed on the NASA QSRA aircraft have demonstrated that, relative to the original baseline configuration, a doubling of incremental thrust deflection due to blowing resulted from improvements that increased the blowing span and momentum, as well as from variations in blowing slot height and geometry of the trailing edge. A CCW/Over the Wing model has been built and tested, which was shown to be equivalent to the CCW/USB system in terms of pneumatic thrust deflection and lift generation, while resolving the problem of cruise thrust loss due to exhaust scrubbing on the wing upper surface.

  10. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity in elite power athletes during maximal weight-lifting.

    PubMed

    Dickerman, R D; McConathy, W J; Smith, G H; East, J W; Rudder, L

    2000-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) has been shown to significantly increase during dynamic exercise (running) secondary to increases in cardiac output. Static exercise (weight-lifting) induces supraphysiological arterial pressures up to 450/380 mmHg, and thus may alter CBFV. Catastrophic brain injuries such as stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, retinal hemorrhage and retinal detachment have been associated with weight-lifting. A recent study has shown that intra-ocular pressure (IOP), which is an indirect measure of intracranial pressure, elevates to pathophysiologic levels during weight-lifting. Recent CBFV studies instituting Valsalva have demonstrated decreases in CBFV from 21%-52%. To date, no studies have examined CBFV during maximal weight-lifting to elucidate the cerebrovascular responses to extreme pressure alterations. We recruited nine elite power athletes, including a multi-world record holder in powerlifting, for a transcranial Doppler study of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity at rest and during maximal weight-lifting. All subjects' resting blood flow velocities were within normal ranges (mean 64.4 +/- 9.5 cm sec2). Blood flow velocities were significantly (p < 0.0001) decreased in all subjects during maximal lifting (mean 48.4 +/- 10.1 cm sec2). Linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant inverse linear relationship in the net change of blood velocities from rest to maximal lift for each subject (r = 0.8585, p < 0.001). This study demonstrates that blood flow velocities are significantly decreased during heavy resistance training. The drop in CBFV during weight-lifting was significantly less than previous Valsalva studies, which likely reveals the cardiovascular, baroreflex, and cerebrovascular system adaptations occurring in these elite power athletes.

  11. Flight evaluation of advanced flight control systems and cockpit displays for powered-lift STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Smith, D. W.; Watson, D. M.; Warner, D. N., Jr.; Innis, R. C.; Hardy, G. H.

    1976-01-01

    A flight research program was conducted to assess the improvements, in longitudinal path control during a STOL approach and landing, that can be achieved with manual and automatic control system concepts and cockpit displays with various degrees of complexity. NASA-Ames powered-lift Augmentor Wing Research Aircraft was used in the research program. Satisfactory flying qualities were demonstrated for selected stabilization and command augmentation systems and flight director combinations. The ability of the pilot to perform precise landings at low touchdown sink rates with a gentle flare maneuver was also achieved. The path-control improvement is considered to be applicable to other powered-lift aircraft configurations.

  12. Wind Tunnel Testing of Powered Lift, All-Wing STOL Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Scott W.; Westra, Bryan W.; Lin, John C.; Jones, Gregory S.; Zeune, Cal H.

    2008-01-01

    Short take-off and landing (STOL) systems can offer significant capabilities to warfighters and, for civil operators thriving on maximizing efficiencies they can improve airspace use while containing noise within airport environments. In order to provide data for next generation systems, a wind tunnel test of an all-wing cruise efficient, short take-off and landing (CE STOL) configuration was conducted in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The test s purpose was to mature the aerodynamic aspects of an integrated powered lift system within an advanced mobility configuration capable of CE STOL. The full-span model made use of steady flap blowing and a lifting centerbody to achieve high lift coefficients. The test occurred during April through June of 2007 and included objectives for advancing the state-of-the-art of powered lift testing through gathering force and moment data, on-body pressure data, and off-body flow field measurements during automatically controlled blowing conditions. Data were obtained for variations in model configuration, angles of attack and sideslip, blowing coefficient, and height above ground. The database produced by this effort is being used to advance design techniques and computational tools for developing systems with integrated powered lift technologies.

  13. Analysis of power and lift for a hovering piezoelectrically actuated flapping wing micro-aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Adam Grant

    A dynamic model of piezoelectrically actuated flapping flight was developed to find an actuator and wing combination capable of providing maximum net lift. Using empirically determined wing characteristics, a best-case wing was constructed and experimentally verified, and a driving point impedance model was developed to describe the dynamic properties of the wing as it moves through a fluid and generates lift. This impedance model was then used to find fluid induced damping and inertial terms, which were used to predict lift and complete the dynamic wing model of the best-case wing. Once the wing model was complete a lumped parameter actuator model was coupled to the wing through a kinematic linkage to search for a piezoelectric actuator capable of self-lifting flight. Optimizations using two piezoceramics, PZT-5H and single-crystal PZN-PT were performed. The results for PZT-5H, which was used in the previous ornithopter designs, confirmed that it is not power dense enough for self-lifting. The PZN-PT optimization however, found a range of actuator dimensions capable of self-lifting flight.

  14. Demonstration of a Low-Lift Heat Pump for High-Power Spacecraft Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzyll, Lawrence R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development and demonstration of a prototype low-lift heat pump for high-power spacecraft thermal control The low-lift heat pump was designed to provide 25 kW of cooling at 303 K and transport this waste heat to a radiator for heat rejection. To accomplish this, a demonstration heat pump with an evaporation temperature of 298 K and a condensing temperature of 301 K was designed and built. HFC-227ea was the working fluid. This effort resulted in optimization of the centrifugal compressor impeller, diffuser, and shroud designs through extensive experimental testing. The detailed design of a magnetic bearing centrifugal compressor was completed. A prototype heat pump thermal control system was designed and fabricated which contained prototypical cold plate and condenser designs. This prototype system was extensively tested and demonstrated to measure performance parameters such as power consumption, cooling capacity, system size and mass, and other key parameters. Finally, the experimental performance was input into the theoretical trade study allowing for a comparison of the actual performance of the low-lift heat pump to a single-phase pumped loop. Inputting the experimental low-lift heat pump performance into the trade study showed that the low-lift heat pump still has lower system mass than the single-phase pumped loop for all space temperatures considered. The experimental results very closely match the theoretical results used in the trade study.

  15. The ground effects of a powered-lift STOL aircraft during landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Victor C.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ground proximity on a powered lift STOL aircraft are presented. The data are from NASA's Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA) flown at landing approach airspeeds of less than 60 knots with an 80 lb/sq ft wing loading. These results show that the ground effect change in lift is positive and does significantly reduce the touchdown sink rate. These results are compared to those of the YC-14 and YC-15. The change in drag and pitching moment caused by ground effects is also presented.

  16. Development and evaluation of automatic landing control laws for power lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinreich, B.; Gevaert, G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of investigations were conducted to generate and verify through ground bases simulation and flight research a data base to aid in the design and certification of advanced propulsive lift short takeoff and landing aircraft. Problems impacting the design of powered lift short haul aircraft that are to be landed automatically on STOL runways in adverse weather were examined. An understanding of the problems was gained by a limited coverage of important elements that are normally included in the certification process of a CAT 3 automatic landing system.

  17. Experimental Development and Evaluation of Pneumatic Powered-Lift Super-STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Campbell, Bryan A.

    2005-01-01

    The powered-lift Channel Wing concept has been combined with pneumatic Circulation Control aerodynamic and propulsive technology to generate a Pneumatic Channel Wing (PCW) configuration intended to have Super-STOL or VSTOL capability while eliminating many of the operational problem areas of the original Channel Wing vehicle. Wind-tunnel development and evaluations of a PCW powered model conducted at Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) have shown substantial lift capabilities for the blown configuration (CL values of 10 to 11). Variation in blowing of the channel was shown to be more efficient than variation in propeller thrust in terms of lift generation. Also revealed was the ability to operate unstalled at very high angles of attack of 40 deg - 45 deg, or to achieve very high lift at much lower angle of attack to increase visibility and controllability. In order to provide greater flexibility in Super-STOL takeoffs and landings, the blown model also displayed the ability to interchange thrust and drag by varying blowing without any moving parts. A preliminary design study of this pneumatic vehicle based on the two technologies integrated into a simple Pneumatic Channel Wing configuration showed very strong Super-STOL potential. This paper presents these experimental results, discusses variations in the configuration geometry under development, and addresses additional considerations to extend this integrated technology to advanced design studies of PCW-type vehicles.

  18. Industrial and commercial power systems technical conference (Conference Record)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 18 selections. Some of the titles are: A Relational Database Approach to Design of Power Plant and Large Industrial Electrical Facilities; Power Quality Site Surveys: Facts, Fiction, and Fallacies; An Application Design Guide for the Selection of Low Voltage Protection Equipment Used in Power Systems with High Level Fault Currents; and Saving Electricity in Commercial Buildings with Adjustable Speed Drives.

  19. An Investigation of the Commercial Alternative Power Sources for the Counterbalanced Industrial Lift Truck.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    was not expected. One factor for this increase could be more efficient combustion of the gaseous fuel. The performance of the diesel (No. 106) truck ...20, (Continued)) 1"<Principal Conclusionsl 1. Internal combustion engine (ICE) trucks are more pro- ductive than are electric: .𔃼’ Diesel was most...then, the second truck , a pneumatic-tired, internal- combustion-engine-powered lift truck ( gas -, diesel -.or LPG-engine driven) is used to complete Per

  20. Development of Pneumatic Channel Wing Powered-Lift Advanced Super-STOL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Campbell, Bryan A.

    2002-01-01

    The powered-lift Channel Wing concept has been combined with pneumatic Circulation Control aerodynamic and propulsive technology to generate a Pneumatic Channel Wing configuration intended to have Super-STOL or VSTOL capability while eliminating many of the operational problem areas of the original Channel Wing vehicle. A preliminary design study of this pneumatic vehicle based on previous wind-tunnel and flight-test data for the two technologies integrated into a simple Pneumatic Channel Wing (PCW) configuration showed very strong Super-STOL potential. Wind-tunnel development and evaluations of a PCW powered model conducted at Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) have shown substantial lift capabilities for the blown configuration (C(sub L) values of 8.5 to 9.0). Variation in blowing of the channel was shown to be more efficient than variation in propeller thrust. Also revealed was the ability to operate unstalled at very high angles of attack of 40 deg-45 deg, or to achieve very high lift at much lower angle of attack to increase visibility and controllability. In order to provide greater flexibility in Super-STOL takeoffs and landings, the blown model also displayed the ability to interchange thrust and drag by varying blowing without any moving parts. This paper presents these experimental results, discusses variations in the configuration geometry under development, and extends this integrated technology to advanced design studies of PCW-type vehicles.

  1. Training for lifting; an unresolved ergonomic issue?

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, A W; Gormley, J T

    1998-10-01

    The paper describes a nine year project on lifting training which included nine trans-Australia consensus conferences attended by more than 900 health professionals. Major outcomes were: (1) The essence of lifting work is the need for the performer to cope with variability in task, environment, and self, and the essence of lifting skill is therefore adaptability; (2) the semi-squat approach provides the safest and most effective basis for lifting training; (3) for lifting training to be effective, the basic principles of skill learning must be systematically applied, with adaptability as a specific goal; (4) physical work capacity (aerobic power, strength, endurance, joint mobility) is a decisive ingredient of safe and effective lifting and, in addition to skill learning, should be incorporated in the training of people engaging regularly in heavy manual work; (5) if effective compliance with recommended skilled behaviour is to be achieved, then training must apply the principles and methods appropriate to adult learning and behaviour modification.

  2. Comparison of Blade Element Momentum Theory to Experimental Data Using Experimental Lift, Drag, and Power Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nealon, Tara; Miller, Mark; Kiefer, Janik; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Blade Element Momentum (BEM) codes have often been used to simulate the power output and loads on wind turbine blades without performing CFD. When computing the lift and drag forces on the blades, the coefficients of lift and drag are normally calculated by interpolating values from standard airfoil data based on the angle of attack. However, there are several empirical corrections that are needed. Due to a lack of empirical data to compare against, the accuracy of these corrections and BEM in general is still not well known. For this presentation, results from an in-house written BEM code computed using experimental lift and drag coefficient data for the airfoils of the V27 wind turbine will be presented. The data is gathered in Princeton University's High Reynolds Number Testing Facility (HRTF) at full scale Reynolds numbers and over a large range of angles of attack. The BEM results are compared to experimental data of the same wind turbine, conducted at full scale Reynolds number and TSR, also in the HRTF. Conclusions will be drawn about the accuracy of the BEM code, and the corrections, regarding the usage of standard airfoil data versus the experimental data, as well as future applications to potentially improve large-eddy simulations of wind turbines in a similar manner.

  3. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an externally blown flap powered lift model with several propulsive system simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoad, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation of a four-engine externally blown flap (EBF) powered-lift transport was conducted in the Langley V/STOL tunnel to determine the effect of different engine configurations on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics. The different engine configurations were simulated by five different sets of propulsion simulators on a single aircraft model. Longitudinal aerodynamic data were obtained for each simulator on each flap deflection corresponding to cruise, take-off, and landing at a range of angles of attack and various thrust coefficients. The bypass ratio (BPR) 6.2 engine simulator provided the best lift and drag characteristics of the five simulators tested in the take-off and landing configurations. The poor performance of the BPR 10.0 and 3.2 engine simulators can be attributed to a mismatch of engine-model sizes or poor engine location and orientation. Isolated engine wake surveys indicated that a reasonable assessment of the aerodynamic characteristics of an engine-wing-flap configuration could be made if qualitative information were available which defined the engine wake characteristics. All configurations could be trimmed easily with relatively small horizontal-tail incidence angles; however, the take-off landing configurations required a high-lift tail.

  4. Analysis of several glidepath and speed control autopilot concepts for a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Longitudinal performance and control utilization data are compared for several different automatic approach autopilot implementations in a powered lift STOL aircraft. As few as two, to as many as four laws reflecting both backside and frontside control techniques. The data are developed from analysis and simulation, but represent configurations which were demonstrated in flight. Transient response characteristics from initial glidepath offsets are presented, along with system operation in turbulence. In furnishing quantitative data in controlled levels of simulated turbulence, these results provide a useful supplement to various flight investigations (including those employing manual control) that involved a comparison of control techniques in this type of aircraft.

  5. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  6. Flight-path and airspeed control during landing approach for powered-lift aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Manual control of flight path and airspeed during landing approach has been investigated for powered-lift transport aircraft. An analysis was conducted to identify the behavior of the aircraft which would be potentially significant to the pilot controlling flight path and airspeed during the approach. The response characteristics found to describe the aircraft behavior were (1) the initial flight-path response and flight-path overshoot for a step change in thrust, (2) the steady-state coupling of flight path and airspeed for a step change in thrust, and (3) the sensitivity of airspeed to changes in pitch attitude. The significance of these response characteristics was evaluated by pilots on a large-motion, ground-based simulator at Ames Research Center. Coupling between flight path and airspeed was considered by the pilot to be the dominant influence on handling qualities for the approach task. Results are compared with data obtained from flight tests of three existing powered-lift V/STOL aircraft.

  7. Comparison of Olympic vs. traditional power lifting training programs in football players.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Cooper, Joshua; Wendell, Michael; Kang, Jie

    2004-02-01

    Twenty members of an National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III collegiate football team were assigned to either an Olympic lifting (OL) group or power lifting (PL) group. Each group was matched by position and trained 4-days.wk(-1) for 15 weeks. Testing consisted of field tests to evaluate strength (1RM squat and bench press), 40-yard sprint, agility, vertical jump height (VJ), and vertical jump power (VJP). No significant pre- to posttraining differences were observed in 1RM bench press, 40-yard sprint, agility, VJ or in VJP in either group. Significant improvements were seen in 1RM squat in both the OL and PL groups. After log10-transformation, OL were observed to have a significantly greater improvement in Delta VJ than PL. Despite an 18% greater improvement in 1RM squat (p > 0.05), and a twofold greater improvement (p > 0.05) in 40-yard sprint time by OL, no further significant group differences were seen. Results suggest that OL can provide a significant advantage over PL in vertical jump performance changes.

  8. Cardiovascular effects of the valsalva maneuver during static arm exercise in elite power lifting athletes.

    PubMed

    Zebrowska, Aleksandra; Gasior, Zbigniew; Jastrzebski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate whether a blood pressure increase during static exercises might affect the left ventricular function and whether a possible pressure overload might decrease cardio-respiratory adaptation to aerobic exercise in power lifting athletes. Nine resistance-trained athletes and ten age-matched untrained men participated in high intensity isometric exercise performed during the Valsalva maneuver and in an incremental arm cranking test. All subjects underwent echocardiographic evaluation. The combine effect of exercise and increased intrathoracic pressure due to the Valsalva maneuver was a significant increase in systolic blood pressure in the athletes compared with controls. Echocardiography demonstrated significant differences in left ventricular mass and left ventricular mass index; both being higher in the athletes than in controls. The intraventricular septum diameter and left ventricular posterior wall thickness were significantly greater and the myocardial performance index was lower in the athletes compared with controls, indicating a better left ventricular function in the athletes. A cumulative effect of mechanical compression of peripheral blood vessels by contracting muscles and intrathoracic pressure increase during the Valsalva maneuver did not compromise myocardial contractility and cardiorespiratory adaptation to incremental arm exercise in power lifting athletes.

  9. The STOL performance of a two-engine, USB powered-lift aircraft with cross-shafted fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, V. C.; Wilson, S. B., III; Zola, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The short takeoff and landing capabilities that characterize the performance of powered-lift aircraft are dependent on engine thrust and are, therefore, severely affected by loss of an engine. This paper shows that the effects of engine loss on the short takeoff and landing performance of powered-lift aircraft can be effectively mitigated by cross-shafting the engine fans in a twin-engine configuration. Engine-out takeoff and landing performances are compared for three powered-lift aircraft configurations: one with four engines, one with two engines, and one with two engines in which the fans are cross-shafted. The results show that the engine-out takeoff and landing performance of the cross-shafted two-engine configuration is significantly better than that of the two-engine configuration without cross-shafting.

  10. Application of empirical and linear methods to VSTOL powered-lift aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margason, Richard; Kuhn, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Available prediction methods applied to problems of aero/propulsion interactions for short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft are critically reviewed and an assessment of their strengths and weaknesses provided. The first two problems deal with aerodynamic performance effects during hover: (1) out-of-ground effect, and (2) in-ground effect. The first can be evaluated for some multijet cases; however, the second problem is very difficult to evaluate for multijets. The ground-environment effects due to wall jets and fountain flows directly affect hover performance. In a related problem: (3) hot-gas ingestion affects the engine operation. Both of these problems as well as jet noise affect the ability of people to work near the aircraft and the ability of the aircraft to operate near the ground. Additional problems are: (4) the power-augmented lift due to jet-flap effects (both in- and out-of-ground effects), and (5) the direct jet-lift effects during short takeoff and landing (STOL) operations. The final problem: (6) is the aerodynamic/propulsion interactions in transition between hover and wing-borne flight. Areas where modern CFD methods can provide improvements to current computational capabilities are identified.

  11. Powered aero-gravity-assist maneuvers considering lift and drag around the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, Jhonathan Orlando Murcia; Prado, Antonio Fernando Bertachini de Almeida

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this research is to study the energy variations in trajectories of a spacecraft that performs a powered aero-gravity-assist maneuver considering the effects of the lift and drag forces around the Earth. It means that the spacecraft makes a passage by the Earth that is close enough to get effects from the atmosphere. Besides those effects, an impulse is applied to the spacecraft when it is passing by the periapsis of the trajectory, which also helps to modify its trajectory. It is varied the ballistic coefficient, lift to drag ratio, magnitude and direction of the impulse and the angle of approach of the maneuver. The mathematical model assumes that a spacecraft comes from an orbit around the Sun, traveling under the restricted three-body problem dynamics, makes a close approach passing inside the atmosphere of the Earth and then goes back to another orbit around the Sun, which is different from the initial orbit. The initial position and velocity of the spacecraft are given according to the usual pure gravity-assisted parameters, using the angle of approach and the perigee altitude and velocity. The energy is measured before and after the passage. The equations of motion are numerically integrated using a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg 7/8 method. For the numerical examples, the perigee altitude is fixed in 120 km and the velocity at this point is fixed in 0.5 canonical units, which is near 14.89 km/s.

  12. NASA powered lift facility internally generated noise and its transmission to the acoustic far field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1988-01-01

    Noise tests of NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility (PLF) were performed to determine the frequency content of the internally generated noise that reaches the far field. The sources of the internally generated noise are the burner, elbows, valves, and flow turbulence. Tests over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.2 to 3.5 using coherence analysis revealed that low frequency noise below 1200 Hz is transmitted through the nozzle. Broad banded peaks at 240 and 640 Hz were found in the transmitted noise. Aeroacoustic excitation effects are possible in this frequency range. The internal noise creates a noise floor that limits the amount of jet noise suppression that can be measured on the PLF and similar facilities.

  13. Study of a safety margin system for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heffley, R. K.; Jewell, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted to explore the feasibility of a safety margin system for powered-lift aircraft which require a backside piloting technique. The objective of the safety margin system was to present multiple safety margin criteria as a single variable which could be tracked manually or automatically and which could be monitored for the purpose of deriving safety margin status. The study involved a pilot-in-the-loop analysis of several safety margin system concepts and a simulation experiment to evaluate those concepts which showed promise of providing a good solution. A system was ultimately configured which offered reasonable compromises in controllability, status information content, and the ability to regulate the safety margin at some expense of the allowable low speed flight path envelope.

  14. Fluctuating pressures on aircraft wing and flap surfaces associated with powered-lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, J. S.; Schoenster, J. A.; Willis, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The present work presents results from two research studies that provide information on the fluctuating pressures generated by the use of powered-lift systems in STOL aircraft. Data are given for several chordwise and spanwise locations on large-scale models of an externally blown flap (EBF) configuration and an upper surface blown flap (USB) configuration in which actual jet engines were used. Pressure levels were high enough to indicate that special design effort will be required to avoid acoustic fatigue failures of wing and flap sturctures. The observation that pressure levels did not decrease very much with increased distance from the engine exhaust center line suggests that a STOL aircraft fuselage, which is in relatively close proximity to the engines for aerodynamic reasons, will be subjected to unusually high external overall fluctuating pressure levels (OAFPLs) that may cause difficulty in control of the cabin noise level.

  15. Parameter estimation of powered-lift STOL aircraft characteristics including turbulence and ground effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The estimation of longitudinal aerodynamic coefficients from data recorded during flight tests of a powered-lift STOL aircraft is considered. First, a comparison is made between the coefficient values determined by the regression and quasilinearization identification techniques from records taken during elevator pulse maneuvers. The results show that for these tests the regression method provides less scatter in coefficient estimates and provides better correlation with the predicted values. Special techniques are then developed which allow identification of the coefficients from records taken during landing maneuvers in which the aircraft encounters turbulence while flying in ground effect. Flight test results are presented to illustrate the effects of air turbulence and ground proximity on the estimated coefficient values.

  16. A simulator investigation of engine failure compensation for powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieuwenhuijse, A. W.; Franklin, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A piloted simulator investigation of various engine failure compensation concepts for powered-lift STOL aircraft was carried out at the Ames Research Center. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of engine failure compensation on recovery from an engine failure during the landing approach and on the precision of the STOL landing. The various concepts include: (1) cockpit warning lights to cue the pilot of an engine failure, (2) programmed thrust and roll trim compensation, (3) thrust command and (4) flight-path stabilization. The aircraft simulated was a 150 passenger four-engine, externally blown flap civil STOL transport having a 90 psf wing loading and a .56 thrust to weight ratio. Results of the simulation indicate that the combination of thrust command and flight-path stabilization offered the best engine-out landing performance in turbulence and did so over the entire range of altitudes for which engine failures occurred.

  17. A practical concept for powered or tethered weight-lifting LTA vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balleyguier, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    A concept for a multi-hull weightlifting airship is presented. The concept is based upon experience in the design and handling of gas-filled balloons for commercial purposes, it was first tested in April, 1972. In the flight test, two barrage balloons were joined side-by-side, with an intermediate frame, and launched in captive flight. The success of this flight test led to plans for a development program calling for a powered, piloted prototype, a follow-on 40 ton model, and a 400 ton transport model. All of these airships utilize a tetrehedric three-line tethering method for loading and unloading phases of flight, which bypasses many of the difficulties inherent in the handling of a conventional airship near the ground. Both initial and operating costs per ton of lift capability are significantly less for the subject design than for either helicopters or airships of conventional mono-hull design.

  18. A zonal method for modeling powered-lift aircraft flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. W.

    1989-01-01

    A zonal method for modeling powered-lift aircraft flow fields is based on the coupling of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code to a potential flow code. By minimizing the extent of the viscous Navier-Stokes zones the zonal method can be a cost effective flow analysis tool. The successful coupling of the zonal solutions provides the viscous/inviscid interations that are necessary to achieve convergent and unique overall solutions. The feasibility of coupling the two vastly different codes is demonstrated. The interzone boundaries were overlapped to facilitate the passing of boundary condition information between the codes. Routines were developed to extract the normal velocity boundary conditions for the potential flow zone from the viscous zone solution. Similarly, the velocity vector direction along with the total conditions were obtained from the potential flow solution to provide boundary conditions for the Navier-Stokes solution. Studies were conducted to determine the influence of the overlap of the interzone boundaries and the convergence of the zonal solutions on the convergence of the overall solution. The zonal method was applied to a jet impingement problem to model the suckdown effect that results from the entrainment of the inviscid zone flow by the viscous zone jet. The resultant potential flow solution created a lower pressure on the base of the vehicle which produces the suckdown load. The feasibility of the zonal method was demonstrated. By enhancing the Navier-Stokes code for powered-lift flow fields and optimizing the convergence of the coupled analysis a practical flow analysis tool will result.

  19. Eighth international conference on MHD electrical power generation. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The VIIIth International Conference on MHD Electrical Power Generation was convened at the initiative of the International Liaison Group on MHD Electrical Power Generation by the USSR Academy of Sciences (Institute of High Temperature) and under the sponsorship of: UNESCO; Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (COMECON); Energoinvest (Yugoslavia), Control Data Corporation (USA); and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India). The proceedings of the VIIIth International Conference on MHD Electrical Power Generation contain the results of most recent R and D work aimed at practical realization of this advanced method of electrical power generation. The papers presented to the Conference deal with heat-generating schemes and cycles, conceptual and detail designs of MHD power plants, including that of the first commercial 500-MW power generating unit presently under construction in the USSR. Research results obtained in pilot and experimental facilities in the USSR, USA, Poland, Japan, Netherlands and other countries are described. Volume 4 was concerned with Materials, Combined-Cycle, Liquid-Metal MHD, and Closed-Cycle Disk-Type MHD Generator. This DOE report contains full translations in English of all the papers in Volume 4. These have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  20. Patient lifts.

    PubMed

    1990-03-01

    In this issue, we evaluate conventional patient lifts that operate by hand cranking, hand pumping, or battery-powered motors and are intended for use in the home or in institutions. We did not evaluate lifts that are designed to be used solely in bathrooms or vehicles or those that permanently affix to walls, floors or ceilings. Some of the evaluated lifts are intended primarily for use in specific environments (e.g., one can be easily disassembled into small components for automobile transport). We evaluated 15 patient lifts from eight manufacturers, basing our ratings on performance, safety, and human factors design. Because different designs make lifts preferable for different environments, we rated the lifts for both home and institutional use based on their size, ruggedness, ease of storage, maneuverability, and cost. Seven units-the Arjo 218150; the Handi-Move 1200; the Hoyer C-CBL; the Invacare 9901, 9916 and 9917; and the Porto-Lift PL-1 are rated Acceptable for both home and institutional use. The Trans-Aid S1-600 and the Versa Lift are rated Acceptable for institutional use and Acceptable-Not Recommended for home use because of their size and cost. The Arjo B and the Hoyer Travel Lift are rated Acceptable for home use and Acceptable-Not Recommended for institutional use because they will not comfortably accommodate patients of all sizes; the Arjo B has additional limitations. The Hoyer C-HLA, the Invacare 9902, and the Trans-Aid LAT-2 are rated Conditionally Acceptable for home use on the condition that they are not used to transfer patients who weigh more than 200 lb; all three units are rated Conditionally Acceptable-Not Recommended for institutional use since there is no reliable way to ensure that they will not be used on heavier patients. The Century C-3 lift is rated Conditionally Acceptable for institutional use on the condition that it is used with the base fully extended; because the fully extended base makes the unit awkward to maneuver in

  1. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act: Fuel Cell Hybrid Power Packs and Hydrogen Refueling for Lift Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Block, Gus

    2011-07-31

    HEB Grocery Company, Inc. (H-E-B) is a privately-held supermarket chain with 310 stores throughout Texas and northern Mexico. H-E-B converted 14 of its lift reach trucks to fuel cell power using Nuvera Fuel Cells’ PowerEdge™ units to verify the value proposition and environmental benefits associated with the technology. Issues associated with the increasing power requirements of the distribution center operation, along with high ambient temperature in the summer and other operating conditions (such as air quality and floor surface condition), surfaced opportunities for improving Nuvera’s PowerEdge fuel cell system design in high-throughput forklift environments. The project included on-site generation of hydrogen from a steam methane reformer, called PowerTap™ manufactured by Nuvera. The hydrogen was generated, compressed and stored in equipment located outside H-E-B’s facility, and provided to the forklifts by hydrogen dispensers located in high forklift traffic areas. The PowerEdge fuel cell units logged over 25,300 operating hours over the course of the two-year project period. The PowerTap hydrogen generator produced more than 11,100 kg of hydrogen over the same period. Hydrogen availability at the pump was 99.9%. H-E-B management has determined that fuel cell forklifts help alleviate several issues in its distribution centers, including truck operator downtime associated with battery changing, truck and battery maintenance costs, and reduction of grid electricity usage. Data collected from this initial installation demonstrated a 10% productivity improvement, which enabled H-E-B to make economic decisions on expanding the fleet of PowerEdge and PowerTap units in the fleet, which it plans to undertake upon successful demonstration of the new PowerEdge reach truck product. H-E-B has also expressed interst in other uses of hydrogen produced on site in the future, such as for APUs used in tractor trailers and refrigerated transport trucks in its fleet.

  2. 14 CFR Appendix G to Part 141 - Flight Instructor Instrument (For an Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Airplane, Helicopter, or Powered-Lift Instrument Instructor Rating, as Appropriate) Certification Course G Appendix G to Part 141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Pt. 141, App. G Appendix G to Part 141...

  3. The power induced effects module: A FORTRAN code which estimates lift increments due to power induced effects for V/STOL flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Howard, Kipp E.

    1991-01-01

    A user friendly FORTRAN code that can be used for preliminary design of V/STOL aircraft is described. The program estimates lift increments, due to power induced effects, encountered by aircraft in V/STOL flight. These lift increments are calculated using empirical relations developed from wind tunnel tests and are due to suckdown, fountain, ground vortex, jet wake, and the reaction control system. The code can be used as a preliminary design tool along with NASA Ames' Aircraft Synthesis design code or as a stand-alone program for V/STOL aircraft designers. The Power Induced Effects (PIE) module was validated using experimental data and data computed from lift increment routines. Results are presented for many flat plate models along with the McDonnell Aircraft Company's MFVT (mixed flow vectored thrust) V/STOL preliminary design and a 15 percent scale model of the YAV-8B Harrier V/STOL aircraft. Trends and magnitudes of lift increments versus aircraft height above the ground were predicted well by the PIE module. The code also provided good predictions of the magnitudes of lift increments versus aircraft forward velocity. More experimental results are needed to determine how well the code predicts lift increments as they vary with jet deflection angle and angle of attack. The FORTRAN code is provided in the appendix.

  4. Development of an Upper Limb Power Assist System Using Pneumatic Actuators for Farming Lift-up Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Eiichi; Harada, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Masaaki

    A power assist system has lately attracted considerable attention to lifting-up an object without low back pain. We have been developing power assist systems with pneumatic actuators for the elbow and shoulder to farming support of lifting-up a bag of rice weighing 30kg. This paper describes the mechanism and control method of this power assist system. The pneumatic rotary actuator supports shoulder motion, and the air cylinder supports elbow motion. In this control method, the surface electromyogram(EMG) signals are used as input information of the controller. The joint support torques of human are calculated based on the antigravity term of necessary joint torques, which are estimated on the dynamics of a human approximated link model. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism and control method of the power assist system.

  5. Lift truck safety review

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents safety information about powered industrial trucks. The basic lift truck, the counterbalanced sit down rider truck, is the primary focus of the report. Lift truck engineering is briefly described, then a hazard analysis is performed on the lift truck. Case histories and accident statistics are also given. Rules and regulations about lift trucks, such as the US Occupational Safety an Health Administration laws and the Underwriter`s Laboratories standards, are discussed. Safety issues with lift trucks are reviewed, and lift truck safety and reliability are discussed. Some quantitative reliability values are given.

  6. Flight evaluation of a precision landing task for a powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, D. M.; Hardy, G. H.; Innis, R. C.; Martin, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A flight research experiment was conducted with the NASA-Ames Research Center's Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft to determine the factors which influence the touchdown distribution for a powered-lift STOL aircraft. The pilots were given two tasks for each of a series of precision approaches flown using a microwave landing system (MLS) in simulated instrument meteorological conditions. They flew the aircraft, with forward vision obscured by a screen, to a 100-ft decision height using a flightpath-oriented, color electronic display and one of four levels of control augmentation. Approaches were flown along a nominal 6 deg glidepath, as well as to calibrated offsets at the decision height to establish a variety of initial conditions for the landing task. The screen was removed at the decision height and the pilot was briefed to land in a 200 foot touchdown zone of the STOLport with a sink rate less than 5 ft/sec. Statistical performance envelopes and pilot ratings are used to describe the results of this experiment. The data generated are expected to be useful for establishing STOL aircraft operating requirements and STOL MLS approach criteria.

  7. Flight evaluation of configuration management system concepts during transition to the landing approach for a powered-lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted to evaluate two control concepts for configuration management during the transition to landing approach for a powered-lift STOL aircraft. NASA Ames' augmentor wing research aircraft was used in the program. Transitions from nominal level-flight configurations at terminal area pattern speeds were conducted along straight and curved descending flightpaths. Stabilization and command augmentation for attitude and airspeed control were used in conjunction with a three-cue flight director that presented commands for pitch, roll, and throttle controls. A prototype microwave system provided landing guidance. Results of these flight experiments indicate that these configuration management concepts permit the successful performance of transitions and approaches along curved paths by powered-lift STOL aircraft. Flight director guidance was essential to accomplish the task.

  8. CO2 Fixation, Lipid Production, and Power Generation by a Novel Air-Lift-Type Microbial Carbon Capture Cell System.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xia; Liu, Baojun; Zhou, Jiti; Jin, Ruofei; Qiao, Sen; Liu, Guangfei

    2015-09-01

    An air-lift-type microbial carbon capture cell (ALMCC) was constructed for the first time by using an air-lift-type photobioreactor as the cathode chamber. The performance of ALMCC in fixing high concentration of CO2, producing energy (power and biodiesel), and removing COD together with nutrients was investigated and compared with the traditional microbial carbon capture cell (MCC) and air-lift-type photobioreactor (ALP). The ALMCC system produced a maximum power density of 972.5 mW·m(-3) and removed 86.69% of COD, 70.52% of ammonium nitrogen, and 69.24% of phosphorus, which indicate that ALMCC performed better than MCC in terms of power generation and wastewater treatment efficiency. Besides, ALMCC demonstrated 9.98- and 1.88-fold increases over ALP and MCC in the CO2 fixation rate, respectively. Similarly, the ALMCC significantly presented a higher lipid productivity compared to those control reactors. More importantly, the preliminary analysis of energy balance suggested that the net energy of the ALMCC system was significantly superior to other systems and could theoretically produce enough energy to cover its consumption. In this work, the established ALMCC system simultaneously achieved the high level of CO2 fixation, energy recycle, and municipal wastewater treatment effectively and efficiently.

  9. AMTEC power systems for remote site applications Conference on alternative powere from space; Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Thomas K.; Ivanenok, Joseph F.; Sievers, Robert K.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Defense, US Forest Service and the University of Alaska operate more than 200 remote sites in the Arctic. Most of these sites are now operated on fuel-burning thermoelectric converters with an efficiency of less than 4%. The cost of supplying even moderate electric power requirements to remote environmental, treaty monitoring and communication sites is strongly dependent on the fuel delivery requirements. In the Arctic where solar input is frequently unreliable, the problem is particularly severe. On average, these sites need only about 60 watts of electrical power but will burn over 2,200 kg of propane per year for continuous operation. At these power levels, Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) systems with their projected 20% to 25% thermal to electric conversion efficiency can provide power for these remote sites with potential annual logistics cost savings (primarily in reduced fuel supply costs) reaching tens of millions of dollars.

  10. Forty-seventh annual power distribution conference, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This is a collection of papers presented at the forty-seventh annual Power Distribution Conference in 1994. The topics of the papers include recent developments in distribution grounding, partial discharge analysis of electrical machinery, insulating fluids analysis as a basis for a complete transformer monitoring program, environmental and regulatory issues regarding the use of silicone transformer fluids, locating and identifying harmonic sources, optimizing distribution operations resources, surface launch directional boring units, electrical supply to Dallas/Fort Worth international airport, a microprocessor-based digital feeder monitor with high-impedance fault detection, a modern review of distribution system protective coordination, and Ski Apache electric service improvements.

  11. Annual national conference of American Public Power Association

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The conference included 38 presentations. References to twenty-eight papers were included in the Energy Database. The general themes of the presentations were related to management and operations of Electric Utilities in the new era of deregulation and increased competition. Topics presented included: (1) Competition at the retail and wholesale levels. (2) Quality assurance of goods and services. (3) Relationships with retail and wholesale customers. (4) Load management through incentive rate structures. (5) Customer oriented service policies. (6) Negotiation of rates and sources for wholesale power. (7) Opportunities in telecommunications. (8) Marketing of services. (9) Benchmarking operation functions to improve performance.

  12. Eighth international conference on MHD electrical power generation. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The VIIIth International Conference on MHD Electrical Power Generation was convened at the initiative of the International Liaison Group on MHD Electrical Power Generation by the USSR Academy of Sciences (Institute of High Temperatures) and under the sponsorship of: UNESCO; Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (COMECON); Energoinvest (Yugoslavia); Control Data Corporation (USA); and the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India). Considerable emphasis is placed in the Conference proceedings on the problems of testing, designing and mathematical modeling of MHD channels, as well as on the studies into MHD flows, heat transfer, properties and physical processes in plasma, electrode phenomena and diagnostics. The various MHD components are described from the standpoint of their development, namely, compressors, air preheaters, systems for seed injection and recovery, combustors, cooling systems, steam generators, superconducting magnets, loading systems etc. Problems related to high-temperature materials, operation of the equipment under conditions of slagging, and suppression of nitrogen and sulfur oxides are discussed. All but one of the papers have been entered into EDB; one had been entered previously from other sources.

  13. Flight experiments using the front-side control technique during piloted approach and landing in a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.; Hardy, G. H.; Innis, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    The essential features of using pitch attitude for glidepath control in conjunction with longitudinal thrust modulation for speed control are described, using a simple linearized model for a powered-lift STOL aircraft operating on the backside of the drag curve and at a fixed setting of propulsive lift. It is shown that an automatic speed-hold system incorporating heave-damping augmentation can allow use of the front-side control technique with satisfactory handling qualities, and the results of previous flight investigations are reviewed. Manual control considerations, as they might be involved following failure of the automatic system, are emphasized. The influence of alternative cockpit controller configurations and flight-director display features were assessed for their effect on the control task, which consisted of a straight-in steep approach flown at constant speed in simulated instrument conditions.

  14. The development of advanced automatic flare and decrab for powered lift short haul aircraft using a microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevaert, G.; Feinreich, B.

    1977-01-01

    Advanced automatic flare and decrab control laws were developed for future powered lift STOL aircraft using the NASA-C-8A augmentor wing vehicle as the aircraft model. The longitudinal control laws utilize the throttle for flight path control and use the direct lift augmentor flap chokes for flight path augmentation. The elevator is used to control airspeed during the approach phase and to enhance path control during the flare. The forward slip maneuver was selected over the flat decrab technique for runway alignment because it can effectively handle the large crab angles obtained at STOL approach speeds. Performance evaluation of selected system configurations were obtained over the total landing environment. Limitations were defined and critical failure modes assessed. Pilot display concepts are discussed.

  15. Kinematics and kinetics of the dead lift in adolescent power lifters.

    PubMed

    Brown, E W; Abani, K

    1985-10-01

    This study documented characteristics of the dead lift of teenage lifters. Films of 10 "skilled" and 11 "unskilled" contestants in a Michigan Teenage Powerlifting Championship provided data for analysis. Equations of motion, force, and moments were developed for a multisegment model of the lifters' movement in the sagittal plane and applied to the film data. Analysis was limited to 1) body segment orientations, 2) vertical bar accelerations, 3) vertical joint reaction forces, 4) segmental angular accelerations, 5) horizontal moment arms of the bar to selected joints, and 6) intersegmental resultant moments. Significant differences (P less than 0.05) in body segment orientation indicated a more upright posture at lift-off in the skilled group. Maximum vertical bar acceleration and angular acceleration of the trunk tended to occur near lift-off in the skilled lifters. The unskilled subjects demonstrated greater variability and magnitude in linear and angular acceleration parameters. In all lifters, maximum vertical force was experienced at the ankle joint. Within each subject, the hip joint experienced the greatest torque because of the relatively large horizontal moment arm of the bar (dominant mass in the system) to this joint. In all subjects, the magnitude of the mass lifted, and not the technique, was the primary determinant in the intersegmental resultant moment acting at the hip and the vertical force experienced at the ankle, knee, and hip joints.

  16. Powering and Motion Predictions of High Speed Sea Lift (HSSL) Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    and Motion Predictions of High Speed Sea Lift (HSSL) Ships Joseph Gorski and Ronald Miller Pablo Carrica, Mani Kandasamy , and Fred Stem US Naval...Carrica, P.M., R. Wilson, R. Noack, T. Xing, M. Kandasamy , J. Shao, N. Sakamoto, and F. Stem, "A Dynamic Overset, Single- Figure 5. Model 5594 centerhull...experience is limited. Miller, R., P. Carrica, M. Kandasamy , T. Xing, J. Gorski, and F. Consequently, computational tools are needed to predict Stem

  17. Flight-test of the glide-slope track and flare-control laws for an automatic landing system for a powered-lift STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, D. M.; Hardy, G. H.; Warner, D. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An automatic landing system was developed for the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Airplane to establish the feasibility and examine the operating characteristics of a powered-lift STOL transport flying a steep, microwave landing system (MLS) glide slope to automatically land on a STOL port. The flight test results address the longitudinal aspects of automatic powered lift STOL airplane operation including glide slope tracking on the backside of the power curve, flare, and touchdown. Three different autoland control laws were evaluated to demonstrate the tradeoff between control complexity and the resulting performance. The flight test and simulation methodology used in developing conventional jet transport systems was applied to the powered-lift STOL airplane. The results obtained suggest that an automatic landing system for a powered-lift STOL airplane operating into an MLS-equipped STOL port is feasible. However, the airplane must be provided with a means of rapidly regulation lift to satisfactorily provide the glide slope tracking and control of touchdown sink rate needed for automatic landings.

  18. Portable seat lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A portable seat lift that can help individuals either (1) lower themselves to a sitting position or (2) raise themselves to a standing position is presented. The portable seat lift consists of a seat mounted on a base with two levers, which are powered by a drive unit.

  19. Interday reliability of peak muscular power outputs on an isotonic dynamometer and assessment of active trunk control using the chop and lift tests.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Thomas G; Uhl, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    Assessment techniques used to measure functional tasks involving active trunk control are restricted to linear movements that lack the explosive movements and dynamic tasks associated with activities of daily living and sport. Reliable clinical methods used to assess the diagonal and ballistic movements about the trunk are lacking. To assess the interday reliability of peak muscular power outputs while participants performed diagonal chop and lift tests and maintained a stable trunk. Controlled laboratory study. University research laboratory. Eighteen healthy individuals (10 men and 8 women; age  =  32 ± 11 years, height  =  168 ± 12 cm, mass  =  80 ± 19 kg) from the general population participated. Participants performed 2 power tests (chop, lift) using an isotonic dynamometer and 3 endurance tests (Biering-Sørensen, side-plank left, side-plank right) to assess active trunk control. Testing was performed on 3 different days separated by at least 1 week. Reliability was compared between days 1 and 2 and between days 2 and 3. Correlations between the power and endurance tests were evaluated to determine the degree of similarity. Peak muscular power outputs (watts) derived from a 1-repetition maximum protocol for the chop and lift tests were collected for both the right and left sides. Intraclass correlation coefficients for peak muscular power were highly reliable for the chop (range, 0.87-0.98), lift (range, 0.83-0.96), and endurance (range, 0.80-0.98) tests between test sessions. The correlations between the power assessments and the Biering-Sørensen test (r range, -0.008 to 0.017) were low. The side-plank tests were moderately correlated with the chop (r range, 0.528-0.590) and the lift (r range, 0.359-0.467) tests. The diagonal chop and lift power protocol generated reliable data and appears to be a dynamic test that simulates functional tasks, which require dynamic trunk control.

  20. [Injuries and damage caused by excess stress in body building and power lifting].

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M; Schöppe, K; Lange, G; Schulitz, K P

    1989-03-01

    A questionnaire, designed to elict information about training programs, experience and injury profile, was administered to 358 bodybuilders and 60 powerlifters. This was followed by a clinical orthopedic and radiological examination. The upper extremity, particulary the shoulder and elbow joint, showed the highest injury rate. More than 40% of all injuries occurred in this area. The low back region and the knee were other sites of elevated injury occurrences. Muscular injuries (muscle pulls, tendonitis, sprains) were perceived to account for 83.6% of all injury types. Powerlifting showed a twice as high injury rate as bodybuilding, probably of grounds of a more uniform training program. Weight-training should be associated with a sports-related medical care and supervised by knowledgeable people, who can instruct the athletes in proper lifting techniques and protect them from injury which can result from incorrect weight-training.

  1. Breast lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. A breast lift, or mastopexy, is cosmetic breast surgery to lift the breasts. The surgery ... the position of the areola and nipple. Description Cosmetic breast surgery can be done at an outpatient ...

  2. Pitch attitude, flight path, and airspeed control during approach and landing of a powered lift STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Innis, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical investigations and piloted moving base simulator evaluations were conducted for manual control of pitch attitude, flight path, and airspeed for the approach and landing of a powered lift jet STOL aircraft. Flight path and speed response characteristics were described analytically and were evaluated for the simulation experiments which were carried out on a large motion simulator. The response characteristics were selected and evaluated for a specified path and speed control technique. These charcteristics were: (1) the initial pitch response and steady pitch rate sensitivity for control of attitude with a pitch rate command/ attitude hold system, (2) the initial flight path response, flight path overshoot, and flight path-airspeed coupling in response to a change in thrust, and (3) the sensitivity of airspeed to pitch attitude changes. Results are presented in the form of pilot opinion ratings and commentary, substantiated where appropriate by response time histories and aircraft states at the point of touchdown.

  3. Proceedings of the international conference on nuclear power plant aging, availability factor and reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on nuclear power plant life extension. Topics considered at the conference included availability, accelerated aging techniques, the qualification of electrical equipment, probabilistic risk assessment, reactor maintenance, outages, reliability, computer-aided design, seismic effects, mechanical vibrations, fatigue monitoring, steam generators, and materials degradation by aging and embrittlement.

  4. Kindergartners Use PowerPoint to Lead Their Own Parent-Teacher Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Dianne; Behounek, Lynn M.

    2006-01-01

    Student-led parent-teacher conferences help young children make sense of what hey know and what they need to learn at school. Just ask them! For the past two years, the kindergarten children at Seymour Elementary School in Ralston, Nebraska, have used PowerPoint to tell their parents how they are doing in school, and the conferences have been a…

  5. Powerful politics at the XI International Conference on AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, D J

    1996-01-01

    The XI International Conference on AIDS, held in Vancouver from July 7 to 12, 1996, produced encouraging signs of significant progress in basic, clinical and preventive science in the field of HIV infection and AIDS. The largest conference ever held on the global AIDS epidemic, it featured political and media highlights that served to focus the attention of participants and the public on controversial issues. Such political activity has become an expected part of international AIDS conferences and serves to remind participants and observers of the urgent need to continue the fight against AIDS. PMID:8823217

  6. 77 FR 22312 - Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical... Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System on Monday, April 30, 2012, from 11 a.m. to 4... issues related to reliability of the Bulk-Power System as affected by geomagnetic disturbances. The...

  7. 77 FR 24952 - Staff Technical Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power System; Technical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    .... to 4:00 p.m. to discuss issues related to the reliability of the Bulk-Power System as affected by... currents to transformers and other equipment on the Bulk-Power System, as well as, options for addressing... Energy Regulatory Commission Staff Technical Conference on Geomagnetic Disturbances to the Bulk-Power...

  8. Wind tunnel and ground static tests of a .094 scale powered model of a modified T-39 lift/cruise fan V/STOL research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, D.; Clinglan, J.; Salemann, V.; Omar, E.

    1977-01-01

    Ground static and wind tunnel test of a scale model modified T-39 airplane are reported. The configuration in the nose and replacement of the existing nacelles with tilting lift/cruise fans. The model was powered with three 14 cm diameter tip driven turbopowered simulators. Forces and moments were measured by an internal strain guage balance. Engine simulator thrust and mass flow were measured by calibrated pressure and temperature instrumentation mounted downstream of the fans. The low speed handling qualities and general aerodynamic characteristics of the modified T-39 were defined. Test variables include thrust level and thrust balance, forward speed, model pitch and sideslip angle at forward speeds, model pitch, roll, and ground height during static tests, lift/cruise fan tilt angle, flap and aileron deflection angle, and horizonal stabilizer angle. The effects of removing the landing gear, the lift/cruise fans, and the tail surfaces were also investigated.

  9. Interday Reliability of Peak Muscular Power Outputs on an Isotonic Dynamometer and Assessment of Active Trunk Control Using the Chop and Lift Tests

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Thomas G.; Uhl, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Assessment techniques used to measure functional tasks involving active trunk control are restricted to linear movements that lack the explosive movements and dynamic tasks associated with activities of daily living and sport. Reliable clinical methods used to assess the diagonal and ballistic movements about the trunk are lacking. Objective: To assess the interday reliability of peak muscular power outputs while participants performed diagonal chop and lift tests and maintained a stable trunk. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Eighteen healthy individuals (10 men and 8 women; age  =  32 ± 11 years, height  =  168 ± 12 cm, mass  =  80 ± 19 kg) from the general population participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 power tests (chop, lift) using an isotonic dynamometer and 3 endurance tests (Biering-Sørensen, side-plank left, side-plank right) to assess active trunk control. Testing was performed on 3 different days separated by at least 1 week. Reliability was compared between days 1 and 2 and between days 2 and 3. Correlations between the power and endurance tests were evaluated to determine the degree of similarity. Main Outcome Measure(s): Peak muscular power outputs (watts) derived from a 1-repetition maximum protocol for the chop and lift tests were collected for both the right and left sides. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients for peak muscular power were highly reliable for the chop (range, 0.87–0.98), lift (range, 0.83–0.96), and endurance (range, 0.80–0.98) tests between test sessions. The correlations between the power assessments and the Biering-Sørensen test (r range, −0.008 to 0.017) were low. The side-plank tests were moderately correlated with the chop (r range, 0.528–0.590) and the lift (r range, 0.359–0.467) tests. Conclusions: The diagonal chop and lift power protocol generated reliable data and

  10. Power Relationships on the Unionized Campus. Proceedings, Annual Conference (17th, April 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel M., Ed.

    Papers from the 17th Annual Conference present observations and analysis of how the power equation has, or has not, been altered by the introduction of faculty and support staff unionism. The first section on power relationships between professors and senates contains: "The Academic as Political Man or Woman" (Seymour Lipset); "Governance: Senates…

  11. Lift and moment coefficients expanded to the seventh power of frequency for oscillating rectangular wings in supersonic flow and applied to a specific flutter problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Herbert C; Rainey, Ruby A; Watkins, Charles E

    1954-01-01

    Linearized theory for compressible unsteady flow is used to derive the velocity potential and lift and moment coefficients in the form of oscillating rectangular wing moving at a constant supersonic speed. Closed expressions for the velocity potential and lift and moment coefficients associated with pitching and translation are given to seventh power of the frequency. These expressions extend the range of usefulness of NACA report 1028 in which similar expressions were derived to the third power of the frequency of oscillation. For example, at a Mach number of 10/9 the expansion of the potential to the third power is an accurate representation of the potential for values of the reduced frequency only up to about 0.08; whereas the expansion of the potential to the seventh power is an accurate representation for values of the reduced frequency up to about 0.2. The section and total lift and moment coefficients are discussed with the aid of several figures. In addition, flutter speeds obtained in the Mach number range from 10/9 to 10/6 for a rectangular wing of aspect ratio 4.53 by using section coefficients derived on the basis of three-dimensional flow are compared with flutter speeds for this wing obtained by using coefficients derived on the basis of two-dimensional flow.

  12. Wind tower service lift

    DOEpatents

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  13. A flight-test evaluation of a go-around control system for a twin engine powered-lift STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, D. M.; Hardy, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    An automatic go-around control system was evaluated on the Augmentor Wing Jet Short Takeoff and Landing (STOL) Research Airplane (AWJSRA) as part of a study of an automatic landing system for a powered-lift STOL airplane. The results of the evaluation indicate that the go-around control system can successfully transition the airplane to a climb configuration from any initiation point during the glide-slope track or the flare maneuver prior to touchdown.

  14. PREFACE: 14th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    It is our great pleasure to welcome you to the 14th International Conference on Micro- and Nano-Technology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications, or PowerMEMS 2014, in Awaji Island, Japan. The aim of PowerMEM is to present the latest research results in the field of miniature, micro- and nano-scale technologies for power generation and energy conversion. The conference will also- give us the opportunity to exchange informations and new ideas in the field of Power MEMS/NEMS. The current status of the field of PowerMEMS spans the full spectrum from basic research to practical applications. We will enjoy valuable discussions not only from the viewpoint of academia but from commercial and industrial perspectives. In the conference, three invited speakers lead the technical program. We received 172 abstracts and after a careful reviewing process by the Technical Program Committee a total of 133 papers were selected for presentation. These have been organized into 16 Oral sessions in two parallel streams and two poster sessions including some late-news papers. The oral and regular poster papers are published by the Institute of Physics (IOP). We have also organized a PowerMEMS School in Kobe-Sannomiya contiguous to the main conference. This two-day school will cover various topics of energy harvesting. World leading experts will give invited lectures on their main topics. This is a new experiment to broaden the technology remit of our conference by organizing mini symposiums that aim to gather the latest research on the following topics by the organizers: Microscale Combustion, Wideband Vibration Energy Harvesting, RF Energy Transfer and Industrial Application. We hope this, and other activities will make PowerMEMS2014 a memorable success. One of the important programs in an international conference is the social program, and we prepare the PowerMEMS2014 banquet in the banquet room at the Westin Awaji Island Hotel. This will provide an opportunity to

  15. Forehead lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... both sides even. If you have already had plastic surgery to lift your upper eyelids, a forehead ... Managing the cosmetic patient. In: Neligan PC, ed. Plastic Surgery . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013: ...

  16. Buttock Lift

    MedlinePlus

    ... after surgery using a needle and syringe. Poor wound healing. Sometimes areas along the incision line heal poorly ... might be given antibiotics if there is a wound healing problem. Scarring. Incision scars from a buttock lift ...

  17. 77 FR 11109 - Reactive Power Resources; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... interconnecting asynchronous generators and raises questions concerning the need and efficacy of continuing the... by which reactive power is currently secured such as through self-supply; and how a technology that... accessibility@ferc.gov or call toll free 1-866-208- 3372 (voice) or 202-208-8659 (TTY); or send a fax to...

  18. Development of a Publications and Conferences Data Base in the Mexican Electric Power Research Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripoll, C. Lopez Cerdan; And Others

    This paper describes the development by the Mexican Electric Power Research Institute (Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas or IIE) over a 10-year period of a publications and conferences database (PCDB) of research and development output of the institute. The paper begins by listing the objectives of the database and describing data coverage…

  19. Development of a Publications and Conferences Data Base in the Mexican Electric Power Research Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripoll, C. Lopez Cerdan; And Others

    This paper describes the development by the Mexican Electric Power Research Institute (Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas or IIE) over a 10-year period of a publications and conferences database (PCDB) of research and development output of the institute. The paper begins by listing the objectives of the database and describing data coverage…

  20. 1996 international conference on power electronics, drives and energy systems for industrial growth: Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, S.S.; Roy, S.; Divan, D.; Doradla, S.R.; Murthy, B.V.

    1995-12-31

    This is volume 2 of the proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Power Electronics, Drives and Energy Systems for Industrial Growth held during January 1996, in New Delhi, India. The topics of this volume include AC/DC and AC/AC converters, induction generators, traction and electric vehicle drives, application of neural networks and fuzzy logic systems, power electronics converters and drives, machine analysis and other topics.

  1. Face Lift.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dinah; Small, Kevin H; Barton, Fritz E

    2015-11-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify the essential anatomy of the aging face and its relationship to face-lift surgery. 2. Understand the common operative approaches to the aging face and a historical perspective. 3. Understand and describe the common complications following face lifting and treatment options. Surgical rejuvenation of the aging face remains one of the most commonly performed plastic surgery procedures. This article reviews the anatomy of the face and its impact on surgical correction. In addition, this review discusses the evolution of various face-lift techniques and the current surgical approach to the aging face. Finally, this article discusses potential postoperative complications after rhytidectomy and management solutions.

  2. Meeting power requirements for organic printed sensor tags (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Tse Nga; Mei, Ping; Schwartz, David E.; Veres, Janos; Broms, Per; Karlsson, Christer

    2016-11-01

    In electronic systems, components often require different supply voltage for operation. In order to meet this requirement and to optimize power consumption for flexible electronics, we demonstrate a pulsed voltage multiplier that boosts the voltage at specific circuit nodes above the supply voltage. A five-stage pulsed voltage multiplier is shown to provide an output voltage up to 18 V from a supply voltage of 10 V, with minimum 10 ms pulse rise time for a 70 pF load. A key requirement for the pulsed voltage multiplier circuit is low device leakage to boost the output voltage level. To minimize leakage, the composition of the organic semiconducting layer is modified by blending an insulating polymer with the small molecule semiconductor. This modification allows control over the transistor turn-on voltage, which enables low leakage current required for operation of the circuits. The printed multiplier allows a single power source to deliver multiple voltage levels and enables integration of lower voltage logic with components that require higher operating voltage, for example, in the case of recording data into memory cells in sensor tags.

  3. The 13th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitcheson, Paul; Beeby, Steve

    2013-12-01

    It is a pleasure to welcome you to The Royal Society in London and the 13th International Conference on Micro- and Nano-Technology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications, or PowerMEMS 2013. The objective of PowerMEMS 2013 is to catalyse innovation in miniature, micro- and nano-scale technologies for power generation and energy conversion. The conference aims to stimulate the exchange of insights and information, and the development of new ideas in the Power MEMS/NEMS field as well as at the meso-scale. It will allow the attendees to interact and network within our multidisciplinary community that includes professionals from many branches of science and engineering. The technical program is led by four invited speakers covering inductive power transfer, chip scale power sources, thermal energy harvesting and implantable biofuel cells. We received 177 abstracts and following a careful reviewing process by the Technical Program Committee a total of 137 papers were selected for presentation. These have been organised into 16 oral sessions in two parallel streams and two poster sessions that have been augmented by 10 late news papers. The oral and regular poster papers are, for the first time, being published by the Institute of Physics. We have made every effort to make PowerMEMS 2013 the busiest yet and have included for the first time the PowerMEMS School. This two-day school held at Imperial College London covered a wide range of power-MEMS topics including technologies for power generation, power transmission, energy storage, power electronics interfaces and metrology. Registrations for the School exceeded our expectations and it was full by early November. We hope this, and other activities such as the Discussion Panel and the inclusion of late news papers, will make PowerMEMS 2013 a memorable success. We have also reached out to new communities, such as those working in wireless power transfer and RF harvesting to broaden the technology remit of

  4. The 11th Topical Conference on Radio frequency Power in Plasmas. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Chan, V.S.

    1996-03-01

    The Eleventh Topical Conference on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas was held in Palm Springs, California under the sponsorship of General Atomics and the American Physical Society. These proceedings represent the papers presented at the Conference. The topics discussed included mode conversion heating and current drive experiments in TFTR, the coupling of high ICRF power in JT{minus}60U(through a 15 cm gap between the antenna and the plasma) as required for ITER, and the H{minus}mode in ASDEX{minus}U, antenna design and technology was discussed in some detail as well as the interaction of plasmas and radio frequency waves for fusion and non{minus}fusion applications. There are 102 papers published in the proceedings and 101 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  5. Report of workshop on clean and inexhaustible space solar power at unispace III conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, N.; Mankins, J.; Erb, B.; Vassaux, D.; Pignolet, G.; Kassing, D.; Collins, P.

    2001-12-01

    The third United Nations Global Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNISPACE III) was held from 19 to 30 July, 1999 at Vienna, Austria. The theme of the Conference was "Space Benefits for Humanity in the Twenty-first Century". The IAF Power Committee organized the Workshop on Clean and Inexhaustible Space Solar Power (SSP) as a part of the Technical Forum. At the beginning of the workshop, current research and potential interactions of SSP with the environment were presented, together with the outlook for worldwide energy requirements. The feasibility, benefits and disadvantages of SSP were discussed for different countries, especially developing countries. Presentations included reports on field research in equatorial countries and China. Useful findings and recommendations were submitted to the relevant committees at UNISPACE concerning international cooperation and collaboration on both political and technical issues in order to realize SSP in the near future.

  6. Body lift.

    PubMed

    Capella, Joseph F

    2008-01-01

    The body in the patient who has lost a massive amount of weight presents an extreme form of traditional esthetic and functional body contour concerns. Routine body contouring procedures usually produce only suboptimal results in this patient population. The body lift described herein is an excellent alternative to treat the body contour deformity of the patient who has undergone bariatric surgery. As with every technique, careful patient selection, education, and preparation are critical to minimizing complications and optimizing outcome.

  7. Face lift.

    PubMed

    Warren, Richard J; Aston, Sherrell J; Mendelson, Bryan C

    2011-12-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify and describe the anatomy of and changes to the aging face, including changes in bone mass and structure and changes to the skin, tissue, and muscles. 2. Assess each individual's unique anatomy before embarking on face-lift surgery and incorporate various surgical techniques, including fat grafting and other corrective procedures in addition to shifting existing fat to a higher position on the face, into discussions with patients. 3. Identify risk factors and potential complications in prospective patients. 4. Describe the benefits and risks of various techniques. The ability to surgically rejuvenate the aging face has progressed in parallel with plastic surgeons' understanding of facial anatomy. In turn, a more clear explanation now exists for the visible changes seen in the aging face. This article and its associated video content review the current understanding of facial anatomy as it relates to facial aging. The standard face-lift techniques are explained and their various features, both good and bad, are reviewed. The objective is for surgeons to make a better aesthetic diagnosis before embarking on face-lift surgery, and to have the ability to use the appropriate technique depending on the clinical situation.

  8. Unsteady Lift Generation for MAVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-22

    canonical pitch - up , pitch -down wing maneuver, in 39th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference, AIAA 2009-3687, San Antonio, TX, 22-25 June 2009. [7] C. P. Ellington...unsteady lift generation on three-dimensional flapping wings in the MAV flight regime and, if a leading edge vortex develops at MAV-like Reynolds numbers... wing rotates in a propeller-like motion through a wing stroke angle up to 90 degrees. Unsteady lift and drag force data was acquired throughout the

  9. Lift Recovery for AFC-Enabled High Lift System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin; Yadlin, Yoram; Dickey, Eric D.; Gissen, Abraham N.; Whalen, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    This project is a continuation of the NASA AFC-Enabled Simplified High-Lift System Integration Study contract (NNL10AA05B) performed by Boeing under the Fixed Wing Project. This task is motivated by the simplified high-lift system, which is advantageous due to the simpler mechanical system, reduced actuation power and lower maintenance costs. Additionally, the removal of the flap track fairings associated with conventional high-lift systems renders a more efficient aerodynamic configuration. Potentially, these benefits translate to a approx. 2.25% net reduction in fuel burn for a twin-engine, long-range airplane.

  10. PESC '81; Power Electronics Specialists Conference, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, June 29-July 3, 1981, Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference focused on power electronics control techniques, components and circuits in high technology applications, dc-to-dc conversion, power semiconductor devices, high-power systems, and power electronics modeling and analysis techniques. Papers are presented on instabilities in current-mode controlled switching voltage regulators, simulation of the controlled EMC in spacecraft performance prediction, automatic fault diagnosis of a switching regulator, a gated resonant inverter power processor for pulsed loads, and stability analysis of a boost converter with nonlinear feedback.

  11. Proceedings: Second biennial PFBC (pressurized fluidized-bed combustion) power plants utility conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This conference, jointly sponsored by EPRI and the Wisconsin Electric Power Company, was organized to review recent technical and market developments related to PFBC systems for utility applications. The conference focused on the current design thinking going into key PFBC subsystem components (viz, the combustor, hot gas cleanup, and the gas turbine). Recent operating experience reports were presented from the major PFBC pilot plant facilities in the world and contemporary thought about commercial plant design, configuration and cost was presented. The objective of the seminar was to provide electric utilities in the US with information to allow them to begin evaluating the PFBC option. Attendees included 140 representatives from a variety of organizations, including electric utilities, equipment vendors, architect/engineering companies, universities, and various government organizations. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  12. Lifting Bodies on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 21, 1971. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970, and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  13. 5. annual clean coal technology conference: powering the next millennium. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference focuses on presenting strategies and approaches that will enable clean coal technologies to resolve the competing, interrelated demands for power, economic viability, and environmental constraints associated with the use of coal in the post-2000 era. The program addresses the dynamic changes that will result from utility competition and industry restructuring, and to the evolution of markets abroad. Current projections for electricity highlight the preferential role that electric power will have in accomplishing the long-range goals of most nations. Increase demands can be met by utilizing coal in technologies that achieve environmental goals while keeping the cost- per-unit of energy competitive. Results from projects in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program confirm that technology is the pathway to achieving these goals. The industry/government partnership, cemented over the past 10 years, is focused on moving the clean coal technologies into the domestic and international marketplaces. The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference provides a forum to discuss these benchmark issues and the essential role and need for these technologies in the post-2000 era. This volume contains technical papers on: advanced coal process systems; advanced industrial systems; advanced cleanup systems; and advanced power generation systems. In addition, there are poster session abstracts. Selected papers from this proceedings have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  14. Aerodynamics of Hypersonic Lifting Vehicles: Conference Proceedings Held at the Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium in Bristol, United Kingdom on 6-9 April 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    setting the upper threshold level, T2 . Since these fluc- tuations have a Gaussian distribution, the probability of finding points at any chosen...ramjets still offered large advantages in range, powered saneuverability and powered intercept compared to rockets in volume and/or weight limited...Wright Brothers’ first flight (see, e.g., Sir George Cayley’s contributions) , the requisite high power-to- weight ratio powerplant to achieve powered

  15. 5. annual clean coal technology conference: powering the next millennium. Vol.1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference focuses on presenting strategies and approaches that will enable clean coal technologies to resolve the competing, interrelated demands for power, economic viability, and environmental constraints associated with the use of coal in the post-2000 era. The program addresses the dynamic changes that will result from utility competition and industry restructuring, and to the evolution of markets abroad. Current projections for electricity highlight the preferential role that electric power will have in accomplishing the long-range goals of most nations. Increased demands can be met by utilizing coal in technologies that achieve environmental goals while keeping the cost- per-unit of energy competitive. Results from projects in the DOE Clean Coal technology Demonstration Program confirm that technology is the pathway to achieving these goals. The industry/government partnership, cemented over the past 10 years, is focused on moving the clean coal technologies into the domestic and international marketplaces. The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference provides a forum to discuss these benchmark issues and the essential role and need for these technologies in the post-2000 era. This volume contains papers presented at the plenary session and panel sessions on; international markets for clean coal technologies (CCTs); role of CCTs in the evolving domestic electricity market; environmental issues affecting CCT deployment; and CCT deployment from today into the next millennium. In addition papers presented at the closing plenary session on powering the next millennium--CCT answers the challenge are included. Selected papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  16. Total facelift: forehead lift, midface lift, and neck lift.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Man

    2015-03-01

    Patients with thick skin mainly exhibit the aging processes of sagging, whereas patients with thin skin develop wrinkles or volume loss. Asian skin is usually thicker than that of Westerners; and thus, the sagging of skin due to aging, rather than wrinkling, is the chief problem to be addressed in Asians. Asian skin is also relatively large in area and thick, implying that the weight of tissue to be lifted is considerably heavier. These factors account for the difficulties in performing a facelift in Asians. Facelifts can be divided into forehead lift, midface lift, and lower face lift. These can be performed individually or with 2-3 procedures combined.

  17. Total Facelift: Forehead Lift, Midface Lift, and Neck Lift

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Patients with thick skin mainly exhibit the aging processes of sagging, whereas patients with thin skin develop wrinkles or volume loss. Asian skin is usually thicker than that of Westerners; and thus, the sagging of skin due to aging, rather than wrinkling, is the chief problem to be addressed in Asians. Asian skin is also relatively large in area and thick, implying that the weight of tissue to be lifted is considerably heavier. These factors account for the difficulties in performing a facelift in Asians. Facelifts can be divided into forehead lift, midface lift, and lower face lift. These can be performed individually or with 2-3 procedures combined. PMID:25798381

  18. Retractable End Plates for Aircraft Lifting Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Mangalam, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    End plates and winglets improve aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft wings and other fixed lifting surfaces. Retractable end plates automatically actuated by same shaft that deflects lifting surface and require little or no extra power and absolutely no control input from cockpit. Besides being modular in construction, easily fitted to any existing aircraft design with only minor modifications.

  19. New and expected developments in artificial lift

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winkler, H.W.

    1994-12-31

    Artificial lift is a broad subject. This paper discusses some of the new developments in the major areas of artificial lift. These are (1) beam lift, (2) electrical submersible pumping, (3) gas lift, (4) hydraulic pumping and (5) miscellaneous topics. The beam lift discussion concerns a new rod material, downhole measurements for rod loading, unit design and some miscellaneous topics. The ESP (Electrical Submersible Pump) section includes a discussion on solids handling, downhole sensor technology, new motor temperature limitations, motor efficiency, and other topics. The gas lift discussion includes mention of coiled tubing with gas lift valves internal, a surface controlled gas lift valve concept, and gas lift valve testing and modeling. Hydraulic pumping is used in many locations with deep pay and fairly small production rates. New hydraulic developments include a wider availability of power fluid pumps other than positive displacement pumps, and small jet pumps specifically designed for de-watering gas wells. Some miscellaneous developments include an insertable PC (progressing cavity) pump and improved plunger lift algorithms and equipment.

  20. Influence of Lift Offset on Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    The influence of lift offset on the performance of several rotorcraft configurations is explored. A lift-offset rotor, or advancing blade concept, is a hingeless rotor that can attain good efficiency at high speed by operating with more lift on the advancing side than on the retreating side of the rotor disk. The calculated performance capability of modern-technology coaxial rotors utilizing a lift offset is examined, including rotor performance optimized for hover and high-speed cruise. The ideal induced power loss of coaxial rotors in hover and twin rotors in forward flight is presented. The aerodynamic modeling requirements for performance calculations are evaluated, including wake and drag models for the high-speed flight condition. The influence of configuration on the performance of rotorcraft with lift-offset rotors is explored, considering tandem and side-by-side rotorcraft as well as wing-rotor lift share.

  1. Influence of Lift Offset on Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The influence of lift offset on the performance of several rotorcraft configurations is explored. A lift-offset rotor, or advancing blade concept, is a hingeless rotor that can attain good efficiency at high speed, by operating with more lift on the advancing side than on the retreating side of the rotor disk. The calculated performance capability of modern-technology coaxial rotors utilizing a lift offset is examined, including rotor performance optimized for hover and high-speed cruise. The ideal induced power loss of coaxial rotors in hover and twin rotors in forward flight is presented. The aerodynamic modeling requirements for performance calculations are evaluated, including wake and drag models for the high speed flight condition. The influence of configuration on the performance of rotorcraft with lift-offset rotors is explored, considering tandem and side-by-side rotorcraft as well as wing-rotor lift share.

  2. Variable Lifting Index (VLI)

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). Background: There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. Method: In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. Results: The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. Conclusions: The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. Application: The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. PMID:26646300

  3. Power Effects on High Lift, Stability and Control Characteristics of the TCA Model Tested in the LaRC 14 x 22 Ft Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glessner, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The TCA-2 wind-tunnel test was the second in a series of planned tests utilizing the 5% Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) model. Each of the tests was planned to utilize the unique capabilities of the NASA Langley 14'x22' and the NASA Ames 12' test facilities, in order to assess specific aspects of the high lift and stability and control characteristics of the TCA configuration. However, shortly after the completion of the TCA-1 test, an early projection of the Technology Configuration (TC) identified the need for several significant changes to the baseline TCA configuration. These changes were necessary in order to meet more stringent noise certification levels, as well as, to provide a means to control dynamic structural modes. The projected changes included a change to the outboard wing (increased aspect ratio and lower sweep) and a reconfiguration of the longitudinal control surfaces to include a medium size canard and a reduced horizontal tail. The impact of these proposed changes did not affect the TCA-2 test, because it was specifically planned to address power effects on the empennage and a smaller horizontal tail was in the plan to be tested. However, the focus of future tests was reevaluated and the emphasis was shifted away from assessment of TCA specific configurations to a more general assessment of configurations that encompass the projected design space for the TC.

  4. Power Effects on High Lift, Stability and Control Characteristics of the TCA Model Tested in the LaRC 14 x 22 Ft Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glessner, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The TCA-2 wind-tunnel test was the second in a series of planned tests utilizing the 5% Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) model. Each of the tests was planned to utilize the unique capabilities of the NASA Langley 14'x22' and the NASA Ames 12' test facilities, in order to assess specific aspects of the high lift and stability and control characteristics of the TCA configuration. However, shortly after the completion of the TCA-1 test, an early projection of the Technology Configuration (TC) identified the need for several significant changes to the baseline TCA configuration. These changes were necessary in order to meet more stringent noise certification levels, as well as, to provide a means to control dynamic structural modes. The projected changes included a change to the outboard wing (increased aspect ratio and lower sweep) and a reconfiguration of the longitudinal control surfaces to include a medium size canard and a reduced horizontal tail. The impact of these proposed changes did not affect the TCA-2 test, because it was specifically planned to address power effects on the empennage and a smaller horizontal tail was in the plan to be tested. However, the focus of future tests was reevaluated and the emphasis was shifted away from assessment of TCA specific configurations to a more general assessment of configurations that encompass the projected design space for the TC.

  5. Lifting Bodies on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 22, 1972. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970, and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC-now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  6. Breast lift (mastopexy) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100188.htm Breast lift (mastopexy) - series—Incisions To use the sharing features ... to slide 3 out of 3 Overview Breast lift (mastopexy) is usually performed for drooping breasts, which ...

  7. Forehead lift - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100020.htm Forehead lift - series—Indications To use the sharing features on ... to slide 3 out of 3 Overview Forehead lifts are most commonly done for people in their ...

  8. Investigation report on the powered platform lift-truck accident at the U.S. Department of Energy Pinellas Plant on January 28, 1991, in Area 119 West

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This investigation was performed to collect and examine the evidence associated with an incident occurring on a platform lift-truck inside Building 100 at Pinellas Plant on January 28, 1991. The incident resulted in head injuries to the employee operating the device. The direct cause of the accident was operation of the platform lift-truck in an area incompatible with its design, i.e., in an area with low overhead obstructions.

  9. Inexpensive Dramatic Pneumatic Lift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Robert A.

    2017-09-01

    Various experiments and demonstrations relate air pressure and air pressure difference to force and area. Carpenter and Minnix describe a large-scale pneumatic lift in which a person sitting on a board atop a plastic garbage bag is lifted when the bag is connected to the exhaustport of a vacuum cleaner, which easily lifts the person. This article describes the construction and use of an inexpensive hand-held pneumatic lift to demonstrate the same principle.

  10. Integrated lift/drag controller for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olcott, J. W.; Seckel, E.; Ellis, D. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system for altering the lift/drag characteristics of powered aircraft to provide a safe means of glide path control includes a control device integrated for coordination action with the aircraft throttle. Such lift/drag alteration devices as spoilers, dive brakes, and the like are actuated by manual operation of a single lever coupled with the throttle for integrating, blending or coordinating power control. Improper operation of the controller is inhibited by safety mechanisms.

  11. Inexpensive Dramatic Pneumatic Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert A.

    Various experiments and demonstrations relate air pressure and air pressure difference to force and area. Carpenter and Minnix describe a large-scale pneumatic lift in which a person sitting on a board atop a plastic garbage bag is lifted when the bag is connected to the exhaustport of a vacuum cleaner, which easily lifts the person. This article…

  12. Flight-Test Evaluation of STOL Control and Flight Director Concepts in a Powered-Lift Aircraft Flying Curved Decelerating Approaches (Evaluation des Essais en Vol d’un Directeur de Vol et des Commands d’un Adac portance Assistee evoluanten Approche Curviligne en Deceleration).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    system noise . (The abnormally high wing loading of expression: powered-lift STOL aircraft serves to effectively filter K7 ( 57.3 d 57.3 the aircraft ...POWERED-LIFT AIRCRAFT FLYING CURVED DECELERATING APPROACHES by W.S.Hindson, G.H.Hardy and R.C.Innis National Aeronautical Establishm nt OTTAWA MARCH...IN A POWERED-LIFT AIRCRAFT FLYING CURVED DECELERATING APPROACHESk-4. (VALUATION DESESSAIS EN VOL D’UN DIRECTEUR DE YOL ET DES COMMANDS D’UN ADAC

  13. SMAP Lift to CR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-16

    Inside the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, engineers and technicians use a crane to move a component of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP, spacecraft for a lift by a crane. SMAP will launch on a Delta II 7320 configuration vehicle featuring a United Launch Alliance first stage booster powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-27A main engine and three Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, strap-on solid rocket motors. Once on station in Earth orbit, SMAP will provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. These measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. SMAP data also will be used to quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes and to develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capabilities. Launch from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for Jan. 29, 2015.

  14. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, C.; Velásquez-García, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Greetings, and welcome to Boston, MA and PowerMEMS 2015 - the 15th International Conference on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications! The objective of PowerMEMS 2015 is to catalyze innovation in micro- and nano-scale technologies for the energy domain. The scope of the meeting ranges from basic principles, to materials and fabrication, to devices and systems, to applications. The many applications of Power MEMS range from the harvesting, storage, conversion and conditioning of energy, to integrated systems that manage these processes, to actuation, pumping, and propulsion. Our Conference aims to stimulate the exchange of insights and information, as well as the development of new ideas, in the Power MEMS field. Our goal is to allow the attendees to interact and network within our multidisciplinary community that includes professionals from many branches of science and engineering, as well as energy, policy, and entrepreneurial specialists interested in the commercialization of Power MEMS technologies. Since the first PowerMEMS in Sendai, Japan in 2000, the Conference has grown in size, reputation, impact, and technical breadth. This continuing growth is evident in this year's technical program, which includes an increasing number of papers on nanomaterials, additive manufacturing for energy systems, actuators, energy storage, harvesting strategies and integrated energy harvesting systems, for example. This year's technical program is highlighted by six plenary talks from prominent experts on piezoelectrics, robotic insects, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, nanocomposite cathodes, and thermal energy conversion systems. The contributed program received a large number of abstract submissions this year, 169 in total. After careful review by the 34-member Technical Program Committee, a total of 135 papers were selected for presentation. The 60 contributed oral presentations are arranged in two parallel sessions. The 75 posters

  15. High lift selected concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The benefits to high lift system maximum life and, alternatively, to high lift system complexity, of applying analytic design and analysis techniques to the design of high lift sections for flight conditions were determined and two high lift sections were designed to flight conditions. The influence of the high lift section on the sizing and economics of a specific energy efficient transport (EET) was clarified using a computerized sizing technique and an existing advanced airplane design data base. The impact of the best design resulting from the design applications studies on EET sizing and economics were evaluated. Flap technology trade studies, climb and descent studies, and augmented stability studies are included along with a description of the baseline high lift system geometry, a calculation of lift and pitching moment when separation is present, and an inverse boundary layer technique for pressure distribution synthesis and optimization.

  16. Pig lift: A new artifical lift method

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, P.C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Artificial lift of oil wells is a fairly broad subject. There are many different methods available but in a few cases none of them turns out to be a fit option. Some specific situation such as high viscosity or waxy oil, high gas-to-liquid ratio (GLR), horizontal and/or very deep well generate artificial lift problems that causes high reservoir back pressure, and, consequently, low production rates. Pig lift is a new novel artificial lift method developed to solve some of these problems. It uses a U-shaped double completion string in the wellbore, with a full bore bottom hole connector, and a surface piping and control system. This physical arrangement is put together to allow the cyclic and automated launching of a low density foam pig from the surface, pushing along with it the liquid phase accumulated into the tubing string. The method is, therefore, cyclic. High pressure gas is used to displace the pig. The system was successfully installed in five wells in Brazil, increasing the production flow rate significantly, as compared to conventional artificial lift methods. This paper presents the description of the pig lift method, and reports the results obtained in these field trials. Discussions of its technical and economical advantages and potential areas of application is also given.

  17. Proceedings of the 2. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The goal of the conference was to try to attract a variety of points of view from well-informed people to debate issues concerning nuclear power. Hopefully from that process a better understanding of what one should be doing will emerge. In organizing the conference lessons learned from the previous one were applied. A continuous effort was made to see to it that the arguments for the alternatives to nuclear power were given abundant time for presentation. This is ultimately because nuclear power is going to have to compete with all of the energy technologies. Thus, in discussing energy strategy all of the alternatives must be considered in a reasonable fashion. The structure the conference used has seven sessions. The first six led up to the final session which was concerned with what the future nuclear power strategy should be. Each session focused upon a question concerning the future. None of these questions has a unique correct answer. Rather, topics are addressed where reasonable people can disagree. In order to state some of the important arguments for each session`s question, the combination of a keynote paper followed by a respondent was used. The respondent`s paper is not necessarily included to be a rebuttal to the keynote; but rather, it was recognized that two people will look at a complex question with different shadings. Through those two papers the intention was to get out the most important arguments affecting the question for the session. The purpose of the papers was to set the stage for about an hour of discussion. The real product of this conference was that discussion.

  18. Concussion Management Plan Compliance: A Study of NCAA Power 5 Conference Schools.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Thomas A; Baugh, Christine M; Meehan, William P; DiFabio, Melissa S

    2017-04-01

    In response to concerns over concussions and repeated head impacts that occur during sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) mandated that all member institutions enact a concussion management plan (CMP). Although institutional and health care provider self-reports have been investigated, compliance with NCAA protocol recommendations has not been examined. To examine the CMPs from the 65 institutions within the NCAA Power 5 conferences for compliance with the NCAA 2015 concussion guidelines. Descriptive epidemiology study. Each institution's publicly available CMP was obtained in 2015, reviewed, and coded for compliance with each of the required 47 components. Overall compliance rate, item-level, category-level, and institution-level compliance was assessed. Independent predictors of compliance, including each institution's athletic training staff size, academic performance, and athletic performance, were examined with quasi-binomial regression. CMPs varied substantially in length and level of detail. The overall compliance rate for all components across all institutions was 94.3% (2880/3055). Twelve components achieved 100% (65/65) compliance, and the lowest levels of compliance were clustered in "return to learn." There were 22 institutions that achieved a 100% compliance rate; the lowest institutional compliance was 59.6%. There were no significant associations between the independent predictors and institutional compliance. Overall compliance with NCAA concussion management requirements was high, but there remains room for improvement. The lowest level of compliance was clustered in the return-to-learn section. There were limited details provided in the reducing head trauma component. Items with lower compliance (reducing head trauma, return to learn) tended to be outside the core competencies of the medical staff, indicating an area for improvement. Encouragingly, many institutions and specific components demonstrated full compliance.

  19. Concussion Management Plan Compliance: A Study of NCAA Power 5 Conference Schools

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Thomas A.; Baugh, Christine M.; Meehan, William P.; DiFabio, Melissa S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In response to concerns over concussions and repeated head impacts that occur during sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) mandated that all member institutions enact a concussion management plan (CMP). Although institutional and health care provider self-reports have been investigated, compliance with NCAA protocol recommendations has not been examined. Purpose: To examine the CMPs from the 65 institutions within the NCAA Power 5 conferences for compliance with the NCAA 2015 concussion guidelines. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Each institution’s publicly available CMP was obtained in 2015, reviewed, and coded for compliance with each of the required 47 components. Overall compliance rate, item-level, category-level, and institution-level compliance was assessed. Independent predictors of compliance, including each institution’s athletic training staff size, academic performance, and athletic performance, were examined with quasi-binomial regression. Results: CMPs varied substantially in length and level of detail. The overall compliance rate for all components across all institutions was 94.3% (2880/3055). Twelve components achieved 100% (65/65) compliance, and the lowest levels of compliance were clustered in “return to learn.” There were 22 institutions that achieved a 100% compliance rate; the lowest institutional compliance was 59.6%. There were no significant associations between the independent predictors and institutional compliance. Conclusion: Overall compliance with NCAA concussion management requirements was high, but there remains room for improvement. The lowest level of compliance was clustered in the return-to-learn section. There were limited details provided in the reducing head trauma component. Items with lower compliance (reducing head trauma, return to learn) tended to be outside the core competencies of the medical staff, indicating an area for improvement. Encouragingly, many

  20. Allometry of hummingbird lifting performance

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, D. L.; Dudley, R.; Heredia, S. M.; McGuire, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical lifting performance in 67 hummingbird species was studied across a 4000 m elevational gradient. We used the technique of asymptotic load-lifting to elicit maximum sustained muscle power output during loaded hovering flight. Our analysis incorporated direct measurements of maximum sustained load and simultaneous wingbeat kinematics, together with aerodynamic estimates of mass-specific mechanical power output, all within a robust phylogenetic framework for the Trochilidae. We evaluated key statistical factors relevant to estimating slopes for allometric relationships by performing analyses with and without phylogenetic information, and incorporating species-specific measurement error. We further examined allometric relationships at different elevations because this gradient represents a natural experiment for studying physical challenges to animal flight mechanics. Maximum lifting capacity (i.e. vertical force production) declined with elevation, but was either isometric or negatively allometric with respect to both body and muscle mass, depending on elevational occurrence of the corresponding taxa. Maximum relative muscle power output exhibited a negative allometry with respect to muscle mass, supporting theoretical predictions from muscle mechanics. PMID:20154187

  1. Allometry of hummingbird lifting performance.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, D L; Dudley, R; Heredia, S M; McGuire, J A

    2010-03-01

    Vertical lifting performance in 67 hummingbird species was studied across a 4000 m elevational gradient. We used the technique of asymptotic load-lifting to elicit maximum sustained muscle power output during loaded hovering flight. Our analysis incorporated direct measurements of maximum sustained load and simultaneous wingbeat kinematics, together with aerodynamic estimates of mass-specific mechanical power output, all within a robust phylogenetic framework for the Trochilidae. We evaluated key statistical factors relevant to estimating slopes for allometric relationships by performing analyses with and without phylogenetic information, and incorporating species-specific measurement error. We further examined allometric relationships at different elevations because this gradient represents a natural experiment for studying physical challenges to animal flight mechanics. Maximum lifting capacity (i.e. vertical force production) declined with elevation, but was either isometric or negatively allometric with respect to both body and muscle mass, depending on elevational occurrence of the corresponding taxa. Maximum relative muscle power output exhibited a negative allometry with respect to muscle mass, supporting theoretical predictions from muscle mechanics.

  2. Catwalk grate lifting tool

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Larry W.

    1992-01-01

    A device for lifting catwalk grates comprising an elongated bent member with a handle at one end and a pair of notched braces and a hook at the opposite end that act in conjunction with each other to lock onto the grate and give mechanical advantage in lifting the grate.

  3. Portable Lifting Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Portable lifting machine assists user in rising from seated position to standing position, or in sitting down. Small and light enough to be carried like briefcase. Used on variety of chairs and benches. Upholstered aluminum box houses mechanism of lifting seat. Springs on outer shaft-and-arm subassembly counterbalance part of user's weight to assist motor.

  4. Catwalk grate lifting tool

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, L.W.

    1992-08-11

    A device is described for lifting catwalk grates comprising an elongated bent member with a handle at one end and a pair of notched braces and a hook at the opposite end that act in conjunction with each other to lock onto the grate and give mechanical advantage in lifting the grate. 10 figs.

  5. Understanding Wing Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, J.; Soares, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional explanation of aerodynamic lift based on Bernoulli's equation is one of the most common mistakes in presentations to school students and is found in children's science books. The fallacies in this explanation together with an alternative explanation for aerofoil lift have already been presented in an excellent article by Babinsky…

  6. Portable Lifting Seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Portable lifting machine assists user in rising from seated position to standing position, or in sitting down. Small and light enough to be carried like briefcase. Used on variety of chairs and benches. Upholstered aluminum box houses mechanism of lifting seat. Springs on outer shaft-and-arm subassembly counterbalance part of user's weight to assist motor.

  7. High lift aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John; Schneider, Steve; Campbell, Bryan; Bucci, Greg; Boone, Rod; Torgerson, Shad; Erausquin, Rick; Knauer, Chad

    1994-01-01

    The current program is aimed at providing a physical picture of the flow physics and quantitative turbulence data of the interaction of a high Reynolds number wake with a flap element. The impact of high lift on aircraft performance is studied for a 150 passenger transport aircraft with the goal of designing optimum high lift systems with minimum complexity.

  8. Understanding Wing Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, J.; Soares, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional explanation of aerodynamic lift based on Bernoulli's equation is one of the most common mistakes in presentations to school students and is found in children's science books. The fallacies in this explanation together with an alternative explanation for aerofoil lift have already been presented in an excellent article by Babinsky…

  9. Samus Counter Lifting Fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1998-05-27

    A lifting fixture has been designed to handle the Samus counters. These counters are being removed from the D-zero area and will be transported off site for further use at another facility. This fixture is designed specifically for this particular application and will be transferred along with the counters. The future use of these counters may entail installation at a facility without access to a crane and therefore a lift fixture suitable for both crane and/or fork lift usage has been created The counters weigh approximately 3000 lbs. and have threaded rods extended through the counter at the top comers for lifting. When these counters were first handled/installed these rods were used in conjunction with appropriate slings and handled by crane. The rods are secured with nuts tightened against the face of the counter. The rod thread is M16 x 2({approx}.625-inch dia.) and extends 2-inch (on average) from the face of the counter. It is this cantilevered rod that the lift fixture engages with 'C' style plates at the four top comers. The strongback portion of the lift fixture is a steel rectangular tube 8-inch (vertical) x 4-inch x .25-inch wall, 130-inch long. 1.5-inch square bars are welded perpendicular to the long axis of the rectangular tube at the appropriate lift points and the 'C' plates are fastened to these bars with 3/4-10 high strength bolts -grade 8. Two short channel sections are positioned-welded-to the bottom of the rectangular tube on 40 feet centers, which are used as locators for fork lift tines. On the top are lifting eyes for sling/crane usage and are rated at 3500 lbs. safe working load each - vertical lift only.

  10. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 5: Transportation and operations analysis. [heavy lift launch and orbit transfer vehicles for orbital assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    The development of transportation systems to support the operations required for the orbital assembly of a 5-gigawatt satellite is discussed as well as the construction of a ground receiving antenna (rectenna). Topics covered include heavy lift launch vehicle configurations for Earth-to LEO transport; the use of chemical, nuclear, and electric orbit transfer vehicles for LEO to GEO operations; personnel transport systems; ground operations; end-to-end analysis of the construction, operation, and maintenance of the satellite and rectenna; propellant production and storage; and payload packaging.

  11. Advanced underwater lift device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.; Hopkins, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Flexible underwater lift devices ('lift bags') are used in underwater operations to provide buoyancy to submerged objects. Commercially available designs are heavy, bulky, and awkward to handle, and thus are limited in size and useful lifting capacity. An underwater lift device having less than 20 percent of the bulk and less than 10 percent of the weight of commercially available models was developed. The design features a dual membrane envelope, a nearly homogeneous envelope membrane stress distribution, and a minimum surface-to-volume ratio. A proof-of-concept model of 50 kg capacity was built and tested. Originally designed to provide buoyancy to mock-ups submerged in NASA's weightlessness simulators, the device may have application to water-landed spacecraft which must deploy flotation upon impact, and where launch weight and volume penalties are significant. The device may also be useful for the automated recovery of ocean floor probes or in marine salvage applications.

  12. Lifting the Runners

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-25

    Under the unflinching summer sun, workers at NASA Deep Space Network complex in Goldstone, Calif., use a crane to lift a runner segment that is part of major surgery on a giant, 70-meter-wide antenna.

  13. FREIGHT CONTAINER LIFTING STANDARD

    SciTech Connect

    POWERS DJ; SCOTT MA; MACKEY TC

    2010-01-13

    This standard details the correct methods of lifting and handling Series 1 freight containers following ISO-3874 and ISO-1496. The changes within RPP-40736 will allow better reading comprehension, as well as correcting editorial errors.

  14. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  15. Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Describes some experiments showing both qualitatively and quantitatively that aerodynamic lift is a reaction force. Demonstrates reaction forces caused by the acceleration of an airstream and the deflection of an airstream. Provides pictures of demonstration apparatus and mathematical expressions. (YP)

  16. 75 FR 52528 - Mandatory Reliability Standards for the Bulk-Power System; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Mandatory Reliability Standards for the Bulk-Power System; Notice of... ] 61,053 (2007). \\2\\ Mandatory Reliability Standards for the Bulk Power System, 130 FERC ] 61,218... a frequency response requirement.'' \\3\\ \\1\\ Mandatory Reliability Standards for the Bulk-Power...

  17. The third suture in MACS-lifting: making midface-lifting simple and safe.

    PubMed

    Verpaele, A; Tonnard, P; Gaia, S; Guerao, F P; Pirayesh, A

    2007-01-01

    The minimal access cranial suspension (MACS)-lift is a short scar rhytidectomy with vertical purse string suture suspension of the facial tissues. It exists in a simple and extended version. The simple MACS-lift achieves a vertical lifting of neck and lower half of the face with two purse string sutures. The action of a third, malar suture gives additional correction of the middle third of the face, and results in the extended MACS-lift. To draw attention to the power and advantages of the 'third' malar suture in the extended MACS-lift in achieving volumetric restoration of the midface, softening of the nasolabial fold and enhancing support of the lower eyelid. The core principle of this technique is the use of strong purse string sutures in a pure antigravitational direction for correction of the ageing neck and lower two-thirds of the face. In a simple MACS-lift the neck is corrected by a first narrow vertical purse-string suture. The volume of jowls and cheeks is repositioned in a cranial direction with a second, slightly oblique purse string suture. To achieve better control over the midface an extended MACS-lift is performed by adding a third malar vertical purse string suture between the paracanthal area and the malar fat pad. 557 MACS-lift procedures have been performed by the two senior authors, of which 183 were simple and 374 extended. A retrospective review of this technique revealed high patient satisfaction, only one major complication and a minor complication rate of 6%. Both versions of the technique deliver a vertical vector correction of sagged facial features. The third suture restores the volume of the midface and malar mound and provides strong support of the lower eyelid. The third suture in the MACS-lift short scar rhytidectomy produces a natural midface lifting through a short scar, with adequate softening of the nasolabial fold and good support of the lower eyelid.

  18. Project Plan for Vertical Lift Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, G F

    2002-08-05

    This document describes the Project Plan for the development and manufacture of a Vertical Lift Machine. It is assumed by this project plan that the Vertical Lift Machine will be developed, designed, manufactured, and tested by a qualified vendor. LLNL will retain review and approval authority for each step given in this project plan. The Vertical Lift Machine is a single linear axis positioning device capable of lifting objects vertically at controlled rates and positioning them repeatedly at predetermined heights, in relation to other objects suspended from above, for high neutron multiplication experiments. Operation of the machine during the experiments is done remotely. The lift mechanism shall accommodate various platforms (tables) that support the objects to be raised. A frame will support additional subassemblies from above such that the lower subassembly can be raised close to and/or interface with those above. The structure must be stiff and motion of the table linear such that radial alignment is maintained (e.g. concentricity). The safe position for the Vertical Lift Machine is the lift mechanism fully retracted with the subassemblies fully separated. The machine shall reside in this position when not in use. It must return to this safe condition from any position upon failure of power sources, open safety interlocks, or operator initiated SCRAM. The Vertical Lift Machine shall have the capability of return to the safe position with no externally applied power. The Vertical Lift Machine shall have dual operator interfaces, one near the machine and another located in a remote control room. Conventional single key, key-lock switching shall be implemented to lock out the control interface not in use. The interface at the machine will be used for testing and ''dry running'' experimental setup(s) with inert subassemblies (i.e. Setup Mode). The remote interface shall provide full control and data recording capability (i.e. Assembly Mode). The control system

  19. Army Science Conference 2006 TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF SOLDIER & MAN PORTABLE FUEL CELL POWER

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-27

    Research Development Engineering Center (CERDEC) Fuel Cell Technology Team initiated several development contracts to address multiple areas where fuel cell technologies... fuel cell technology focuses specifically on Soldier worn power equipment, mainly from the sub to 100 Watt range. Man Portable Power fuel cell technology

  20. Regime dependence of photo-darkening-induced modal degradation in high power fiber amplifier (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boullet, Johan; Vincont, Cyril; Jolly, Alain; Pierre, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    Thermally induced transverse modal instabilities (TMI) have attracted these five years an intense research efforts of the entire fiber laser development community, as it represents the current most limiting effect of further power scaling of high power fiber laser. Anyway, since 2014, a few publications point out a new limiting thermal effect: fiber modal degradation (FMD). It is characterized by a power rollover and simultaneous increase of the cladding light at an average power far from the TMI threshold together with a degraded beam which does not exhibit temporal fluctuations, which is one of the main characteristic of TMI. We report here on the first systemic experimental study of FMD in a high power photonic crystal fiber. We put a particular emphasis on the dependence of its average power threshold on the regime of operation. We experimentally demonstrate that this dependence is intrinsically linked to regime-dependent PD-saturated losses, which are nearly three times higher in CW regime than in short pulse picosecond regime. We make the hypothesis that the existence of these different PD equilibrium states between CW regime and picosecond QCW pulsed regime is due to a partial photo-bleaching of color centers in picosecond regime thanks to a higher probability of multi-photon process induced photobleaching (PB) at high peak power. This hypothesis is corroborated by the demonstration of the reversibility of the FMD induced in CW regime by simply switching the seed CW 1064 nm light by a short pulse, picosecond oscillator.

  1. Elevated Building Lift Systems on Permanent Snowfields: A Report on the Elevated Building Lift Systems in Polar Environments Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-18

    the power plant and mechanical systems, the “Noisy” building, and the “Quiet” building...Syowa Station, Antarctica ..................................................................... 32 22 Lever hand winch is the lifting mechanism to raise...tech- nical information and knowledge focused specifically on the mechanical lift systems used for raising the structures to elevate and maintain them

  2. Regional changes in spine posture at lift onset with changes in lift distance and lift style.

    PubMed

    Gill, K Peter; Bennett, Simon J; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2007-07-01

    Repeated measures experiment. To determine the effect of changes in horizontal lift distance on the amount of flexion, at lift onset, in different spine regions when using different lift styles. By approximating spine bending during lifting as a pure rotation about a single revolute joint, the differential effects of task constraints and instructions on motions of different spine levels will be obscured. Eight participants lifted a 10-kg crate from the floor, 10 times at each of five distances. Participants were instructed to use freestyle (a participant's preferred lift style), squat, or stoop lift styles. Kinematic data were collected from the mid thoracic spine, lower thoracic/upper lumbar spine, mid lumbar spine, and the lower lumbar spine at lift onset. A whole spine angle was also calculated. Flexion of the lower lumbar spine was not affected by lift distance and style. Differences between lift styles occurred mainly in the mid thoracic and the lower thoracic/upper lumbar regions. With increasing horizontal distance, changes in lift style occurred in the upper three spine regions. These results suggest that the tensile strain on tissues in the lower lumbar spine, which can be a cause of injury in lifting, was not affected by lift style or horizontal lift distance when lifting from floor level.

  3. High-power 100-fs SESAM-modelocked VESCEL (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldburger, Dominik; Link, Sandro M.; Alfieri, Cesare G. E.; Golling, Matthias; Keller, Ursula

    2017-03-01

    Ultrafast vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) are versatile laser sources and feature high-power operation. To date the best modelocking results have been achieved with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). Ultrafast optically pumped semiconductor disk lasers (SDLs) are compact, cost-efficient and provide excellent beam quality at gigahertz pulse repetition rates for applications such as for example multi-photon imaging, ultrafast communication and in particular self-referenced gigahertz frequency combs. The highest peak power obtained with an ultrafast VECSEL is 4.35 kW in 400-fs pulses and the shortest pulses until now are 107 fs at 3 mW average output power. Here we present a SESAM-modelocked VECSEL with pulses as short as 96 fs and 100 mW average output power. These are to the best of our knowledge the shortest pulses achieved by a fundamentally modelocked SDL and result in a very high peak power of 0.56 kW at a pulse repetition rate of 1.63 GHz. The short pulse duration was achieved by introducing a small amount of positive group delay dispersion with a single path through an external 2-mm thick ZnSe window plate that compensated the initially negatively chirped 107-fs output pulses. Currently the power is limited by the transition from fundamental modelocking to multi-pulse operation, which reduces the pulse peak power and introduces additional noise. Therefore, we present a study of the multi-pulse behavior of the high-power 100-fs SDL resulting from the complex modelocking mechanism. This study also provides an insight into special issues of pulse characterization that may suggest stable fundamental modelocking even if this is not the case.

  4. [Modern face lift surgery].

    PubMed

    von Gregory, H F; Gubisch, W

    2011-09-01

    Face lift surgery is generally considered the classical surgical procedure of plastic surgery. This is an extensive operation which has undergone a huge development since its first implementation more than 100 years ago. What began as a simple skin tightening procedure is today a sophisticated and complex technique which ideally combines different treatment methods planned with surgical precision. This article provides an overview of the history of the procedure to the present state of the art concept of pairing biplanar and bivectorial face-neck lifts with autologous fat transfer and dermabrasion.

  5. Three Lifting Bodies on Lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The wingless, lifting body aircraft sitting on Rogers Dry Lake at what is now NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, from left to right are the X-24A, M2-F3 and the HL-10.The lifting body aircraft studied the feasibility of maneuvering and landing an aerodynamic craft designed for reentry from space. These lifting bodies were air launched by a B-52 mother ship, then flew powered by their own rocket engines before making an unpowered approach and landing. They helped validate the concept that a space shuttle could make accurate landings without power. The X-24A flew from April 17, 1969 to June 4, 1971. The M2-F3 flew from June 2, 1970 until December 20, 1972. The HL-10 flew from December 22, 1966 until July 17, 1970 and logged the highest and fastest records in the lifting body program. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (FRC--now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered flight on March 19

  6. A perspective on 15 years of proof-of-concept aircraft development and flight research at Ames-Moffett by the Rotorcraft and Powered-Lift Flight Projects Division, 1970-1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Few, David D.

    1987-01-01

    A proof-of-concept (POC) aircraft is defined and the concept of interest described for each of the six aircraft developed by the Ames-Moffet Rotorcraft and Powered-Lift Flight Projects Division from 1970 through 1985; namely, the OV-10, the C-8A Augmentor Wing, the Quiet Short-Haul Research Aircraft (QSRA), the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft (TRRA), the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA)-compound, and the yet-to-fly RSRA/X-Wing Aircraft. The program/project chronology and most noteworthy features of the concepts are reviewed. The paper discusses the significance of each concept and the project demonstrating it; it briefly looks at what concepts are on the horizon as potential POC research aircraft and emphasizes that no significant advanced concept in aviation technology has ever been accepted by civilian or military users without first completing a demonstration through flight testing.

  7. [Endoscopy and face-lift].

    PubMed

    Dardour, J C; Abbou, R

    2017-08-02

    For many years, the face-lift has not been the only intervention for facial rejuvenation. It is necessary today to specify the type of face-lift, cervico-facial lifting, frontal lifting or facelift. We will consider in this article the frontal lift and centro-facial lift and its possible execution assisted by endoscopy with therefore minimal scars, hidden in the scalp. We will consider successively its technique, its indications and its results highlighting a very long hold over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser power meters as x-ray intensity monitors for LCLS-II (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Philip A.; Moeller, Stefan P.; Carbajo Garcia, Sergio; Song, Sanghoon; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Fritz, David M.

    2017-06-01

    For the LCLS-II instruments we are developing laser power meters as compact intensity monitors that can operate at soft and tender X-ray photon energies. There is a need to monitor the relative X-ray intensity at various locations along an X-ray FEL beamline in order to observe a possible decrease in the reflectivity of X-ray mirrors. In addition for experiments, it is valuable to know the absolute intensity at the sample. There are two types of laser power meters based on thermopile and pyroelectric sensors. The thermopile power meters measure an average temperature and are compatible with the high repetition rates of LCLS-II. Pyroelectric power meters provide a pulse-by-pulse response. Ultra-high vacuum compatibility is being tested by residual gas analysis. An in-house development beamtime is being conducted at the LCLS SXR instrument. Measurements using both thermopile and pyroelectric power meters will be conducted at a set of photon energies in the soft X-ray range. The detectors' response will be compared with the gas monitor detector installed at the SXR instrument.

  9. IEEE Conference Record of 1982 Fifteenth Power Modulator Symposium, 14-16 June 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Intensity of the SPS, Cliii SS/AC/ 77-12. c~raalu bm3) H. Kuhn, G.H. Schr ~ der , High Power Pulse Generators f or Fast Pulsed Magnets - Development and...Opera- tionaL Experience. 14th Pulse Power Modulator Sym- posium, Orlando, 1980. 4) H. Kuhn, G.M. Schr ~ der , J-C. Souli6, SPS Inflector a) for...calibrated for ders that the only energy which counts is that both wavelengths were used to control the output which is in the risetime portion of the

  10. JWST Lifting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolleson, William

    2012-01-01

    A document describes designing, building, testing, and certifying a customized crane (Lifting Device LD) with a strong back (cradle) to facilitate the installation of long wall panels and short door panels for the GHe phase of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The LD controls are variable-frequency drive controls designed to be adjustable for very slow and very-short-distance movements throughout the installation. The LD has a lift beam with an electric actuator attached at the end. The actuator attaches to a rectangular strong back (cradle) for lifting the long wall panels and short door panels from a lower angle into the vertical position inside the chamber, and then rotating around the chamber for installation onto the existing ceiling and floor. The LD rotates 360 (in very small increments) in both clockwise and counterclockwise directions. Eight lifting pads are on the top ring with 2-in. (.5-cm) eye holes spaced evenly around the ring to allow for the device to be suspended by three crane hoists from the top of the chamber. The LD is operated by remote controls that allow for a single, slow mode for booming the load in and out, with slow and very slow modes for rotating the load.

  11. Lifting as You Climb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Debra R.

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses leadership themes and answers leadership questions presented to "Exchange" by the Panel members who attended the "Exchange" Panel of 300 Reception in Dallas, Texas, last November. There is an old proverb that encourages people to lift as they climb: "While you climb a mountain, you must not forget others along the way." With…

  12. Lifting Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust sample return capsule successfully landed at the U.S. Air Force Utah Test and Training Range at 2:10 a.m. Pacific time (3:10 a.m. Mountain time). The capsule contains cometary and interstellar samples gathered by the Stardust spacecraft.

    Here, the capsule is being lifted at the landing site.

  13. Hydraulic lifting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, Kyle (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A piston and cylinder assembly is disclosed which is constructed of polyvinyl chloride that uses local water pressure to perform small lifting tasks. The chamber is either pressurized to extend the piston or depressurized to retract the piston. The present invention is best utilized for raising and lowering toilet seats.

  14. Lifting as You Climb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Debra R.

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses leadership themes and answers leadership questions presented to "Exchange" by the Panel members who attended the "Exchange" Panel of 300 Reception in Dallas, Texas, last November. There is an old proverb that encourages people to lift as they climb: "While you climb a mountain, you must not forget others along the way." With…

  15. Compact high power multi-SLED source design and packaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Apurva; Dattner, Yonathan

    2017-03-01

    Packaging solutions developed for Luxmux's BeST SLED family of sources will be discussed along with their applications. In particular, a narrow linewidth (<300 pm) continuously tunable (from 1250 nm to 1750 nm) laser source providing >20mW output power from a compact fiber-coupled butterfly package will be presented.

  16. 77 FR 21555 - Reactive Power Resources; Supplemental Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Interconnection Studies. This panel will discuss: Methods used to determine the reactive power requirements for a... Robert Jenkins, Director--Utility Interconnection, First Solar Kris Zadlo, Vice President, Invenergy..., Director--Utility Interconnection, First Solar Michael Jacobs, Director Market and Regulatory Policy...

  17. The Power of Information: Transforming the World. Professional Papers from the Annual Conference of the Special Libraries Association (86th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, June 10-15, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Libraries Association, Washington, DC.

    These papers are intended to relate to a number of issues suggested by the overall conference theme of the power of information and how it is transforming the world. Most of the 11 papers cover a number of related issues--managing information, technological advances and their impacts, and new roles for librarians. Titles include: "The…

  18. The Power of Information: Transforming the World. Professional Papers from the Annual Conference of the Special Libraries Association (86th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, June 10-15, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Libraries Association, Washington, DC.

    These papers are intended to relate to a number of issues suggested by the overall conference theme of the power of information and how it is transforming the world. Most of the 11 papers cover a number of related issues--managing information, technological advances and their impacts, and new roles for librarians. Titles include: "The…

  19. Proceedings of the International Conference on High-Power Particle Beams (12th) Held in Haifa, Israel on June 7-12, 1998. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-12

    Kovalyov, A.I. Kormilitsin et al. "Proceedings of the Higher Education Institutions. Physics", Tomsk, volume 38, #12, 1995, pp. 84-92. 3. A.I... Kormilitsin , V.S. Diyankov. "Controlled Multiple Channel Switch" Proceedings of the 1 Ph International Conference on High Power Particle Beams, 1996

  20. A novel "gain chip" concept for high-power lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Li, Mingzhong; Wang, Zhenguo; Yan, Xiongwei; Jiang, Xinying; Zheng, Jiangang; Cui, Xudong; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2017-05-01

    High-power lasers, including high-peak power lasers (HPPL) and high-average power lasers (HAPL), attract much interest for enormous variety of applications in inertial fusion energy (IFE), materials processing, defense, spectroscopy, and high-field physics research. To meet the requirements of high efficiency and quality, a "gain chip" concept is proposed to properly design the pumping, cooling and lasing fields. The gain chip mainly consists of the laser diode arrays, lens duct, rectangle wave guide and slab-shaped gain media. For the pumping field, the pump light will be compressed and homogenized by the lens duct to high irradiance with total internal reflection, and further coupled into the gain media through its two edge faces. For the cooling field, the coolant travels along the flow channel created by the adjacent slabs in the other two edge-face direction, and cool the lateral faces of the gain media. For the lasing field, the laser beam travels through the lateral faces and experiences minimum thermal wavefront distortions. Thereby, these three fields are in orthogonality offering more spatial freedom to handle them during the construction of the lasers. Transverse gradient doping profiles for HPPL and HAPL have been employed to achieve uniform gain distributions (UGD) within the gain media, respectively. This UGD will improve the management for both amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and thermal behavior. Since each "gain chip" has its own pump source, power scaling can be easily achieved by placing identical "gain chips" along the laser beam axis without disturbing the gain and thermal distributions. To detail our concept, a 1-kJ pulsed amplifier is designed and optical-to-optical efficiency up to 40% has been obtained. We believe that with proper coolant (gas or liquid) and gain media (Yb:YAG, Nd:glass or Nd:YAG) our "gain chip" concept might provide a general configuration for high-power lasers with high efficiency and quality.

  1. 2.1 μm high-power laser diode beam combining(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrou, Antoine P. C.; Elder, Ian F.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Laser power and brightness scaling, in "eye safe" atmospheric transmission windows, is driving laser system research and development. High power lasers with good beam quality, at wavelength around 2.1 µm, are necessary for optical countermeasure applications. For such applications, focusing on efficiency and compactness of the system is mandatory. In order to cope with these requirements, one must consider the use of laser diodes which emit directly in the desired spectral region. The challenge for these diodes is to maintain a good beam quality factor as the output power increases. 2 µm diodes with excellent beam quality in both axes are available with output powers of 100 mW. Therefore, in order to reach multi-watt of average output power, broad-area single emitters and beam combining becomes relevant. Different solutions have been implemented in the 1.9 to 2 µm wavelength range, one of which is to stack multiple emitter bars reaching more than one hundred watt, while another is a fibre coupled diode module. The beam propagation factor of these systems is too high for long atmospheric propagation applications. Here we describe preliminary results on non-coherent beam combining of 2.1 µm high power Fabry-Perot GaSb laser diodes supplied by Brolis Semiconductors Ltd. First we evaluated single mode diodes (143 mW) with good beam quality (M2 < 1.5 for slow axis and < 1.1 for fast axis). Then we characterized broad-area single emitter diodes (808 mW) with an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 19 %. The emitter width was 90 µm with a cavity length of 1.5 mm. In our experiments we found that the slow axis multimode output beam consisted of two symmetric lobes with a total full width at half maximum (FWHM) divergence angle of 25 degrees, corresponding to a calculated beam quality factor of M2 = 25. The fast axis divergence was specified to be 44 degrees, with an expected beam quality factor close to the diffraction limit, which informed our selection of collimation

  2. CONFERENCE REPORT: Summary of the 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Fusion Power Plant Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. Ph.; Gulden, W.; Kolbasov, B.; Louzeiro-Malaquias, A.-J.; Petti, D.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.

    2008-01-01

    Reports were presented covering a selection of topics on the safety of fusion power plants. These included a review on licensing studies developed for ITER site preparation surveying common and non-common issues (i.e. site dependent) as lessons to a broader approach for fusion power plant safety. Several fusion power plant models, spanning from accessible technology to more advanced-materials based concepts, were discussed. On the topic related to fusion-specific technology, safety studies were reported on different concepts of breeding blanket modules, tritium handling and auxiliary systems under normal and accident scenarios' operation. The testing of power plant relevant technology in ITER was also assessed in terms of normal operation and accident scenarios, and occupational doses and radioactive releases under these testings have been determined. Other specific safety issues for fusion have also been discussed such as availability and reliability of fusion power plants, dust and tritium inventories and component failure databases. This study reveals that the environmental impact of fusion power plants can be minimized through a proper selection of low activation materials and using recycling technology helping to reduce waste volume and potentially open the route for its reutilization for the nuclear sector or even its clearance into the commercial circuit. Computational codes for fusion safety have been presented in support of the many studies reported. The on-going work on establishing validation approaches aiming at improving the prediction capability of fusion codes has been supported by experimental results and new directions for development have been identified. Fusion standards are not available and fission experience is mostly used as the framework basis for licensing and target design for safe operation and occupational and environmental constraints. It has been argued that fusion can benefit if a specific fusion approach is implemented, in particular

  3. [Maximum acceptable weight of lift for manual lifting tasks].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Lei

    2006-04-01

    To explore the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) in different lifting conditions and the suitable lifting equation for the stipulation of occupational health standard of manual lifting tasks in China. The MAWL was investigated among the thirteen male and ten female students using psychophysical methodology and the recommended weight of limit (RWL) was compared. The MAWL of male and female subjects was decreased gradually with the increase of lifting height. Once the height of lifting was over shoulder, the MAWL was decreased dramatically. The RWL was greater than the MAWL at 25 cm horizontal distance in male subjects, but the RWL was smaller than the MAWL at the distance of 45 cm and 63 cm. The average MAWL of male subjects was 30.8% greater than that of female subjects. The MAWL was decreased gradually with increase of the horizontal distance at the same height of lifting. The result of the male subjects was consistent with that of the female subjects. For the asymmetric lifting tasks of the male subjects, the bigger the angle of rotation was, the less the MAWL became. The angle of rotation had negative correlation with the capability of lifting (r = -0.996 6, P < 0.01). When the subjects performed asymmetric lifting tasks, the RWL was smaller than the MAWL and the difference was significant. The revision is sufficient for the horizontal distance and asymmetric lifting in the NIOSH lifting equation, but it is not suitable for height, especially for the task of lifting over shoulder. The RWL for the task of lifting over shoulder should be lowered. The factor of gender should be taken into account in the lifting equation and the constant of gender S can be added. Then S = 1 for male while S = 0.692 for female.

  4. Optical power diodes based on phase-transition materials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chenghao; Horak, Erik H.; Zhou, You; Zhang, Zhen; Salman, Jad; Roney, Patrick; Rensberg, Jura; Gundlach, Bradley; Ramanathan, Shriram; Goldsmith, Randall H.; Ronning, Carsten; Kats, Mikhail A.

    2017-03-01

    We present several designs and experimental implementations of optical power diodes - devices that are designed to be transparent from one direction, but opaque from the other, when illuminated by a beam with sufficient intensity. Optical power diodes can be used to protect optical devices that both detect and transmit light. Our designs are based on phase-change material vanadium dioxide (VO2), which undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) that can be triggered thermally or optically. Here, VO2 films serve as nonlinear elements that can be transformed from transparent to opaque by intense illumination. We build thin-film metallic structures on top of the VO2 films such that the optical absorption becomes asymmetric - light impinging from one direction is absorbed at a higher rate than from the other direction, triggering the transition, and turning the device opaque. This results in asymmetric transmission. The designs are optimized with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations, using optical constants of VO2 extracted using ellipsometry, and are shown to be scalable across the near- and mid-infrared. Our initial experimental results using a simple design comprised of metal and VO2 films on sapphire, designed for an operating wavelength of 1.35µm, show a transmission asymmetry ratio of 2, and experiments with superior designs are ongoing. Future work will include the use of defect-engineered VO2 to engineer the intensity threshold of optical power diodes.

  5. Lifting speed preferences and their effects on the maximal lifting capacity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Cheng, Chih-Feng

    2017-02-07

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate how lifting capacity and subjective preferences are affected by different lifting speeds. The maximum lifting capacity of lift was determined with three independent variables, lifting speed, lifting technique, and lifting height. Questionnaires were evaluated after the experiment by the participants for the lifting speed preferences. This study found that the lifting speed was a significant factor in the lifting capacity (p<0.001); and the lifting height (p<0.001) and the interaction of lifting speed and lifting height (p=0.005) affected the lifting capacity significantly. The maximal lifting capacity was achieved around the optimal speed that was neither too fast nor too slow. Moreover, the participants' preferred lifting speeds were consistently close to the optimal lifting speed. The results showed that the common lifting practice guideline to lift slowly might make the worker unable to generate a large lifting capacity.

  6. Lifting speed preferences and their effects on the maximal lifting capacity

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Chiuhsiang Joe; CHENG, Chih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate how lifting capacity and subjective preferences are affected by different lifting speeds. The maximum lifting capacity of lift was determined with three independent variables, lifting speed, lifting technique, and lifting height. Questionnaires were evaluated after the experiment by the participants for the lifting speed preferences. This study found that the lifting speed was a significant factor in the lifting capacity (p<0.001); and the lifting height (p<0.001) and the interaction of lifting speed and lifting height (p=0.005) affected the lifting capacity significantly. The maximal lifting capacity was achieved around the optimal speed that was neither too fast nor too slow. Moreover, the participants’ preferred lifting speeds were consistently close to the optimal lifting speed. The results showed that the common lifting practice guideline to lift slowly might make the worker unable to generate a large lifting capacity. PMID:27383532

  7. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    A $1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight. (Contains 1 figure.)

  8. Helicopter Toy and Lift Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    A $1 plastic helicopter toy (called a Wacky Whirler) can be used to demonstrate lift. Students can make basic measurements of the toy, use reasonable assumptions and, with the lift formula, estimate the lift, and verify that it is sufficient to overcome the toy's weight. (Contains 1 figure.)

  9. Lift performance and lumbar loading in standing and seated lifts.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Kane J; Carstairs, Greg L; Ham, Daniel J

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of posture on lifting performance. Twenty-three male soldiers lifted a loaded box onto a platform in standing and seated postures to determine their maximum lift capacity and maximum acceptable lift. Lift performance, trunk kinematics, lumbar loads, anthropometric and strength data were recorded. There was a significant main effect for lift effort but not for posture or the interaction. Effect sizes showed that lumbar compression forces did not differ between postures at lift initiation (Standing 5566.2 ± 627.8 N; Seated 5584.0 ± 16.0) but were higher in the standing posture (4045.7 ± 408.3 N) when compared with the seated posture (3655.8 ± 225.7 N) at lift completion. Anterior shear forces were higher in the standing posture at both lift initiation (Standing 519.4 ± 104.4 N; Seated 224.2 ± 9.4 N) and completion (Standing 183.3 ± 62.5 N; Seated 71.0 ± 24.2 N) and may have been a result of increased trunk flexion and a larger horizontal distance of the mass from the L5-S1 joint. Practitioner Summary: Differences between lift performance and lumbar forces in standing and seated lifts are unclear. Using a with-in subjects repeated measures design, we found no difference in lifted mass or lumbar compression force at lift initiation between standing and seated lifts.

  10. A contrarotative aircraft lifting concept for a future Titan mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquesnay, P.; Coustenis, A.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Tavel, J.

    2008-09-01

    Titan has a thick and cold atmosphere (surface pressure 1.5 bar and surface temperature 94 K) and the surface gravity is about 1/7 of Earth's. Surface wind velocities are low. These unique characteristics make Titan's atmosphere an ideal place for an helicopter type of aircraft with vertical lift capability. Here we present a conceptual idea of a Titan helicopter designed as a student project. Two cases have been considered: a 100-kg helicopter and a 2-kg one. The concept is based on a contra-rotating double rotor. The device would be powered by a combination of rechargeable batteries and a low-power radioisotope source. The double rotor and the body of the helicopter would be protected by a mesh structure. It would carry a science payload at its base that would allow surface sampling and analysis each time it would land. During landing, it would also recharge its batteries to allow flying to the next stop. The concept has been inspired by studying modelaircraft- making devices. Various concepts developed for industrial and military applications have also been a source of inspiration. The following web sites were consulted: • www.onera.fr/conferences/drones • www.aurora.aero • www.sikorsky.com/sik/index.asp • www.microdrones.com The poster will present a preliminary design of the device. Its capability to contribute to the exploration of Titan's surface will be illustrated.

  11. Ultrasound imaging using all-optical power and signal transfer in catheters (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, Martin; van der Mark, Martin B.

    2017-02-01

    Smart medical catheters face a connectivity challenge. An example is found in ultrasound imaging where the supply of power at the distal end and the signal transmission requires many thin and fragile wires in order to keep the catheter thin and flexible and this leads to a relatively high cost of production. We have built a fully functional benchtop demonstrator that is immediately scalable to catheter dimensions, in which all electrical wires are replaced by just two optical fibers. We show signal transfer of synthetic aperture ultrasound images as well as photovoltaic conversion to supply all electronics. The absence of conductors provides excellent galvanic isolation as well as RF and MRI compatibility and the simple design utilizing off the shelf components holds a promise of cost effectiveness all of which may help translation of these advanced devices into the clinic. We show photovoltaic conversion of 405 nm light to 45 V and 1.8 V by two blue LEDs as well as 200 MHz broad-band signal transfer using modulated 850 nm VCSEL light. Synthetic aperture ultrasound images are acquired at a frequency of 12 MHz with a collapse-mode capacitive-micromachined ultrasonic transducer. Bandwidth, noise level and dynamic range are nearly identical as shown in comparison of the images acquired with the optical link and its electrical equivalent. In conclusion, we have successfully demonstrated low-cost and scalable optical signal and power transmission for an ultrasound imaging system enjoying intrinsic RF / MRI compatibility and galvanic isolation.

  12. High-Lift Systems on Commercial Subsonic Airliners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C.

    1996-01-01

    The early breed of slow commercial airliners did not require high-lift systems because their wing loadings were low and their speed ratios between cruise and low speed (takeoff and landing) were about 2:1. However, even in those days the benefit of high-lift devices was recognized. Simple trailing-edge flaps were in use, not so much to reduce landing speeds, but to provide better glide-slope control without sideslipping the airplane and to improve pilot vision over the nose by reducing attitude during low-speed flight. As commercial-airplane cruise speeds increased with the development of more powerful engines, wing loadings increased and a real need for high-lift devices emerged to keep takeoff and landing speeds within reasonable limits. The high-lift devices of that era were generally trailing-edge flaps. When jet engines matured sufficiently in military service and were introduced commercially, airplane speed capability had to be increased to best take advantage of jet engine characteristics. This speed increase was accomplished by introducing the wing sweep and by further increasing wing loading. Whereas increased wing loading called for higher lift coefficients at low speeds, wing sweep actually decreased wing lift at low speeds. Takeoff and landing speeds increased on early jet airplanes, and, as a consequence, runways worldwide had to be lengthened. There are economical limits to the length of runways; there are safety limits to takeoff and landing speeds; and there are speed limits for tires. So, in order to hold takeoff and landing speeds within reasonable limits, more powerful high-lift devices were required. Wing trailing-edge devices evolved from plain flaps to Fowler flaps with single, double, and even triple slots. Wing leading edges evolved from fixed leading edges to a simple Krueger flap, and from fixed, slotted leading edges to two- and three-position slats and variable-camber (VC) Krueger flaps. The complexity of high-lift systems probably

  13. What's new in artificial lift

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winker, H.W.

    1989-05-01

    New developments might be expected to decline as oil, and thus equipment and service, prices decrease. However, there is no indication that this is occurring. In fact, several new and innovative developments are covered in this article. Of the more unique are a new geometry pumping unit and a hydraulic powered sucker and rod system. Other items described in this article include: New pump-off controller; Automatic balancing for air balanced pumping units; New rod couplings; New pump plunger; Sucker rod pulsation dampener; Stripper type BOP; Rod coupling tool; ESP cable protectors; New ESP motor; VSD communications interface; ESP gas separator; Portable hydraulic production test unit; Casing gas lift plunger; Production shut-of valve; Ceramic material for pump parts; Pressure transmitter; and New versatile packer.

  14. High lift wake investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. P.; Schneider, S. P.; Hoffenberg, R.

    1996-01-01

    The behavior of wakes in adverse pressure gradients is critical to the performance of high-lift systems for transport aircraft. Wake deceleration is known to lead to sudden thickening and the onset of reversed flow; this 'wake bursting' phenomenon can occur while surface flows remain attached. Although known to be important for high-lift systems, few studies of such decelerated wakes exist. In this study, the wake of a flat plate has been subjected to an adverse pressure gradient in a two-dimensional diffuser, whose panels were forced to remain attached by use of slot blowing. Pitot probe surveys, L.D.V. measurements, and flow visualization have been used to investigate the physics of this decelerated wake, through the onset of reversed flow.

  15. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  16. ESB Heavy Lift Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    capacity, cross-country travel ability, and redundancy than the three axles and twelve tires found on the M870 trailer.13,14 In fact, this...equates to an organic ability to move approximately twenty- three percent of the battalion’s heavy equipment that requires prime movers in one lift...Truck Tractor manufactured by Oshkosh Truck Corporation and the M1000 Heavy Equipment Transporter semi-trailer manufactured by Systems

  17. Lifting liquid from boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, T.E.

    1983-05-17

    A device for lifting liquid from boreholes comprises a pump which is located downhole in the region of a production formation and which consists of a fluid-actuated, double-action piston. The pump is connected by fluid pressure lines to a source of fluid pressure disposed above ground and a switching valve is connected to provide fluid pressure to alternate sides of the piston to effect reciprocation thereof.

  18. Development and flight testing of the HL-10 lifting body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Painter, Weneth D.

    1993-01-01

    The Horizontal Lander 10 (HL-10) lifting body successfully completed 37 flights, achieved the highest Mach number and altitude of this class of vehicle, and contributed to the technology base used to develop the space shuttle and future generations of lifting bodies. Design, development, and flight testing of this low-speed, air-launched, rocket-powered, lifting body was part of an unprecedented effort by NASA and the Northrop Corporation. This paper describes the evolution of the HL-10 lifting body from theoretical design, through development, to selection as one of two low-speed flight vehicles chosen for fabrication and piloted flight testing. Interesting and unusual events which occurred during the program and flight tests, review of significant problems encountered during the first flight, and discussion of how these problems were solved are presented. In addition, impressions of the pilots who flew the HL-10 lifting body are given.

  19. International Conference on MHD Electrical Power Generation, 7th, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, June 16-20, 1980, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2 & 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, A. M.; Overlan, D.

    The first volume of this conference on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for electrical power generation covers: (1) MHD pilot plants; (2) MHD generator experiments and modeling; (3) the performance of various MHD generator types; (4) MHD channel design considerations; (5) MHD channel materials considerations; (6) MHD system components, heat recovery and emissions; and (7) MHD oxidizers and inverters. The second volume deals with (8) MHD system magnets and combustors; (9) MHD field, flow and chemical processes; (10) MHD fluid dynamics; (11) MHD electrical power plant design; (12) current transfer and diagnostics; and (13) MHD power plant systems considerations.

  20. General Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Research Model with High Disk Loading Direct Lifting Fan Mounted in Fuselage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-10-26

    3/4 Low front view of fuselage and fan. Showing jet engine hanging below. Lift fan powered by jet exhaust. General Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Research Model with High Disk Loading Direct Lifting Fan Mounted in Fuselage

  1. Utilities plan fish lifts for Susquehanna River Dams

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    Pennsylvania Power Light Co., Baltimore Gas Electric Co., and Metropolitan Edison Co. will install fish lifts at three dams on the Susquehanna River to aid the spawning of American shad. The utilities estimate the lifts will cost a total of $15 million. PP L will install two lifts at its 108-MW Holtwood Dam, according to the utility's Bob Domermuth, a project scientist. One will be located at the spillway and the second in the tailrace. The two lifts will cost approximately $8 million. At the 417-MW Safe Harbor Dam, which PP L and BG E jointly own, one lift costing $5 million to $6 million will be built on the west side of the powerhouse. Met Ed will install a lift at its 20-MW York Haven Dam, the farthest upstream, at a cost of $3 million. Lifts at Holtwood and Safe Harbor will be completed in time for the spring 1997 shad run; York Haven's passage is to be completed no later than the spring of the year 2000. In 1991, Philadelphia Electric Co. completed a lift at its 512-MW Conowingo Dam, the first dam shad encounter as they swim upstream from the ocean. The utilities agreed with state and federal fish and wildlife agencies to build the lifts, after a decade of studying shad population and rebuilding stocks. Although the agreement is only in draft form, the utilities have begun studying fish movement to determine the best lift designs. While American shad is the species targeted by the effort, the lifts will open the river to all species, Comermuth said. The utilities also are preparing a bid package soliciting design and construction proposals.

  2. Widely tunable, high peak power ultrafast laser sources in biological imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Julien

    2017-02-01

    Widely tunable ultrafast lasers have enabled a large number of biological imaging techniques including point scanning multiphoton excited fluorescence (MPEF), SHG/THG and stimulated Raman imaging. Tunable ultrafast lasers offer spectral agility, covering the entire relative transparency window in live tissue (700-1300nnm) and flexibility with multi-color, synchronized outputs to support sophisticated label free techniques (e.g. stimulated Raman modalities). More recently newly available high peak power lasers based on Ytterbium technology drive advances in two-photon light-sheet, 3 photon excited fluorescence and holographic patterning for optogenetics photo-stimulation. These laser platforms offer a unique blend of compactness, ease of use and cost efficiency, and ideally complement tunable platforms typically based on Ti:Sapphire and IR optical parametric oscillators (OPO). We present various types of ultrafast laser architectures, link their optical characteristics to key bio-imaging requirements, and present relevant examples and images illustrating their impact in biological science. In particular we review the use of ultrafast lasers in optogenetics and fast in-vivo Calcium imaging deep in mouse brain.

  3. Organic permeable-base transistors - superb power efficiency at highest frequencies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Markus P.; Fischer, Axel; Kaschura, Felix; Scholz, Reinhard; Lüssem, Björn; Kheradmand-Boroujeni, Bahman; Ellinger, Frank; Kasemann, Daniel; Leo, Karl

    2016-11-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFET) are important elements in thin-film electronics, being considered for flat-panel or flexible displays, radio frequency identification systems, and sensor arrays. To optimize the devices for high-frequency operation, the channel length, defined as the horizontal distance between the source and the drain contact, can be scaled down. Here, an architecture with a vertical current flow, in particular the Organic Permeable-Base Transistors (OPBT), opens up new opportunities, because the effective transit length in vertical direction is precisely tunable in the nanometer range by the thickness of the semiconductor layer. We present an advanced OPBT, competing with best OFETs while a low-cost, OLED-like fabrication with low-resolution shadow masks is used (Klinger et al., Adv. Mater. 27, 2015). Its design consists of a stack of three parallel electrodes separated by two semiconductor layers of C60 . The vertical current flow is controlled by the middle base electrode with nano-sized openings passivated by an native oxide. Using insulated layers to structure the active area, devices show an on/off ratio of 10⁶ , drive 11 A/cm² at an operation voltage of 1 V, and have a low subthreshold slope of 102 mV/decade. These OPBTs show a unity current-gain transit frequency of 2.2 MHz and off-state break-down fields above 1 MV/cm. Thus, our optimized setup does not only set a benchmark for vertical organic transistors, but also outperforms best lateral OFETs using similar low-cost structuring techniques in terms of power efficiency at high frequencies.

  4. Development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray sources using ultrahigh power lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Hojbota, Calin; Jeon, Jong Ho; Rhee, Yong-Joo; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seong Ku; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Hwang Woon; Pathak, Vishwa B.; Pae, Ki Hong; Sebban, Stéphane; Tissandier, Fabien; Gautier, Julien; Ta Phuoc, Kim; Malka, Victor; Nam, Chang Hee

    2017-05-01

    Short-pulse x-ray/gamma-ray sources have become indispensable light sources for investigating material science, bio technology, and photo-nuclear physics. In past decades, rapid advancement of high intensity laser technology led extensive progresses in the field of radiation sources based on laser-plasma interactions - x-ray lasers, betatron radiation and Compton gamma-rays. Ever since the installation of a 100-TW laser in 2006, we have pursued the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiations, such as x-ray lasers, relativistic high-order harmonics, betatron radiation and all-optical Compton gamma-rays. With the construction of two PW Ti:Sapphire laser beamlines having peak powers of 1.0 PW and 1.5 PW in 2010 and 2012, respectively [1], we have investigated the generation of multi-GeV electron beams [2] and MeV betatron radiations. We plan to carry out the Compton backscattering to generate MeV gamma-rays from the interaction of a GeV electron beam and a PW laser beam. Here, we present the recent progress in the development of ultrashort x-ray/gamma-ray radiation sources based on laser plasma interactions and the plan for developing Compton gamma-ray sources driven by the PW lasers. In addition, we will present the applications of laser-plasma x-ray lasers to x-ray holography and coherent diffraction imaging. [references] 1. J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. J. Yu, T. M. Jeong, and J. Lee, Opt. Lett. 35, 3021 (2010). 2. H. T. Kim, K. H. Pae, H. J. Cha, I J. Kim, T. J. Yu, J. H. Sung, S. K. Lee, T. M. Jeong, J. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 165002 (2013).

  5. Advanced power assessment for Czech lignite, Task 3.6, Part 2. The 2nd international conference on energy and environment: Transitions in East Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Sondreal, E.A.; Mann, M.D.; Weber, G.W.; Young, B.C.

    1995-12-01

    On November 1-5, 1994, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Power Research Institute of Prague cosponsored their second conference since 1991 in the Czech Republic, entitled ``Energy and Environment: Transitions in East Central Europe.`` This conference was a continuation of the EERC`s joint commitment, initiated in 1190, to facilitate solutions to short- and long-term energy and environmental problems in East Central Europe. Production of energy from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner is a critical issue facing East Central Europe, because the region continues to rely on coal as its primary energy source. The goal of the conference was to develop partnerships between industry, government, and the research community in East Central Europe and the United States to solve energy and environmental issues in a manner that fosters economic development. Among the topics addressed at the conference were: conventional and advanced energy generation systems; economic operation of energy systems; air pollution controls; power system retrofitting and repowering, financing options; regulatory issues; energy resource options; waste utilization and disposal; and long-range environmental issues. Selected papers in the proceedings have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  6. Detail of lift wire rope attachment to lift span at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of lift wire rope attachment to lift span at southeast corner. Note rope-adjustment turnbuckle with strap keepers to prevent its rotation, which could pull the bridge out of alignment. A single rope and light-gauge attachment at each corner were adequate for lifting the span because most of its weight was balanced by the two counterweights. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  7. Ground effects and control effectiveness tests of a .095 scale powered model of a modified T-39 lift/cruise fan V/STOL research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, C. R.; Omar, E.

    1977-01-01

    Wind tunnel test data are analysed to determine ground effects and the effectiveness of the aerodynamic control surfaces to provide a technology base for a Navy type A V/STOL airplane. Three 14CM (5.5 inch) turbopowered simulators were used to power the model which was tested primarily in the following configurations: (1) VTOL with flaps deployed, gear down, and engines tilted to 80 deg, 90 deg, and 95 deg, (2) STOL with flap and gear down and engines tilted to 50 deg; and (3) Loiter with flaps and gear up and L/C nacelles off. Data acquired during the tests are included as an appendix.

  8. Cost Benefit Analysis of Boat Lifts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Craft Shallow Water TX Texas Cost Benefit Analysis of Boat Lifts x UNCLAS//Public | CG-926 R...example, cleaning the hull by scraping or power washing will lead to pollutants potentially dropping into the water and therefore requires a permit...development of a written Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP), implementation of control measures, and submittal of a request for permit coverage

  9. Weight and cost estimating relationships for heavy lift airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Weight and cost estimating relationships, including additional parameters that influence the cost and performance of heavy-lift airships (HLA), are discussed. Inputs to a closed loop computer program, consisting of useful load, forward speed, lift module positive or negative thrust, and rotors and propellers, are examined. Detail is given to the HLA cost and weight program (HLACW), which computes component weights, vehicle size, buoyancy lift, rotor and propellar thrust, and engine horse power. This program solves the problem of interrelating the different aerostat, rotors, engines and propeller sizes. Six sets of 'default parameters' are left for the operator to change during each computer run enabling slight data manipulation without altering the program.

  10. Weight and cost estimating relationships for heavy lift airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Weight and cost estimating relationships, including additional parameters that influence the cost and performance of heavy-lift airships (HLA), are discussed. Inputs to a closed loop computer program, consisting of useful load, forward speed, lift module positive or negative thrust, and rotors and propellers, are examined. Detail is given to the HLA cost and weight program (HLACW), which computes component weights, vehicle size, buoyancy lift, rotor and propellar thrust, and engine horse power. This program solves the problem of interrelating the different aerostat, rotors, engines and propeller sizes. Six sets of 'default parameters' are left for the operator to change during each computer run enabling slight data manipulation without altering the program.

  11. Boundary-layer transition and displacement thickness effects on zero-lift drag of a series of power-law bodies at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Wave and skin-friction drag have been numerically calculated for a series of power-law bodies at a Mach number of 6 and Reynolds numbers, based on body length, from 1.5 million to 9.5 million. Pressure distributions were computed on the nose by the inverse method and on the body by the method of characteristics. These pressure distributions and the measured locations of boundary-layer transition were used in a nonsimilar-boundary-layer program to determine viscous effects. A coupled iterative approach between the boundary-layer and pressure-distribution programs was used to account for boundary-layer displacement-thickness effects. The calculated-drag coefficients compared well with previously obtained experimental data.

  12. LiftingWiSe: a lifting-based efficient data processing technique in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Aboelela, Emad

    2014-08-11

    Monitoring thousands of objects which are deployed over large-hard-to-reach areas, is an important application of the wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Such an application requires disseminating a large amount of data within the WSN. This data includes, but is not limited to, the object's location and the environment conditions at that location. WSNs require efficient data processing and dissemination processes due to the limited storage, processing power, and energy available in the WSN nodes. The aim of this paper is to propose a data processing technique that can work under constrained storage, processing, and energy resource conditions. The proposed technique utilizes the lifting procedure in processing the disseminated data. Lifting is usually used in discrete wavelet transform (DWT) operations. The proposed technique is referred to as LiftingWiSe, which stands for Lifting-based efficient data processing technique for Wireless Sensor Networks. LiftingWiSe has been tested and compared to other relevant techniques from the literature. The test has been conducted via a simulation of the monitored field and the deployed wireless sensor network nodes. The simulation results have been analyzed and discussed.

  13. LiftingWiSe: A Lifting-Based Efficient Data Processing Technique in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Aboelela, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring thousands of objects which are deployed over large-hard-to-reach areas, is an important application of the wireless sensor networks (WSNs). Such an application requires disseminating a large amount of data within the WSN. This data includes, but is not limited to, the object's location and the environment conditions at that location. WSNs require efficient data processing and dissemination processes due to the limited storage, processing power, and energy available in the WSN nodes. The aim of this paper is to propose a data processing technique that can work under constrained storage, processing, and energy resource conditions. The proposed technique utilizes the lifting procedure in processing the disseminated data. Lifting is usually used in discrete wavelet transform (DWT) operations. The proposed technique is referred to as LiftingWiSe, which stands for Lifting-based efficient data processing technique for Wireless Sensor Networks. LiftingWiSe has been tested and compared to other relevant techniques from the literature. The test has been conducted via a simulation of the monitored field and the deployed wireless sensor network nodes. The simulation results have been analyzed and discussed. PMID:25116902

  14. Framelet lifting in image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Da-Yong; Feng, Tie-Yong

    2010-08-01

    To obtain appropriate framelets in image processing, we often need to lift existing framelets. For this purpose the paper presents some methods which allow us to modify existing framelets or filters to construct new ones. The relationships of matrices and their eigenvalues which be used in lifting schemes show that the frame bounds of the lifted wavelet frames are optimal. Moreover, the examples given in Section 4 indicate that the lifted framelets can play the roles of some operators such as the weighted average operator, the Sobel operator and the Laplacian operator, which operators are often used in edge detection and motion estimation applications.

  15. Noise of fan designed to reduce stator lift fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Woodward, R. P.; Stakolich, E. G.

    1977-01-01

    An existing fan stage was redesigned to reduce stator lift fluctuations and was acoustically tested at three nozzle sizes for reduced noise generation. The lift fluctuations on the stator were reduced by increasing the stator cord, adjusting incidence angles, and adjusting the rotor velocity diagrams. Broadband noise levels were signficantly reduced in the middle to high frequencies. Blade passage tone sound power was not lessened, but decreases in the harmonics were observed. Aerodynamic improvements in both performance and efficiency were obtained.

  16. Civil markets for buoyant heavy-lift vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettam, P. J.; Hansen, D.; Ardema, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    Worldwide civil markets for heavy lift airships were investigated. Substantial potential market demand was identified for payloads of from 13 to 800 tons. The largest markets appear to be in applications to relieve port congestion, construction of power generating plants, and, most notably, logging. Because of significant uncertainties both in vehicle and market characteristics, further analysis will be necessary to verify the identified market potential of heavy lift airship concepts.

  17. NASA safety standard for lifting devices and equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    NASA's minimum safety requirements are established for the design, testing, inspection, maintenance, certification, and use of overhead and gantry cranes (including top running monorail, underhung, and jib cranes), mobile cranes, derrick hoists, and special hoist supported personnel lifting devices (these do not include elevators, ground supported personnel lifts, or powered platforms). Minimum requirements are also addressed for the testing, inspection, and use of Hydra-sets, hooks, and slings. Safety standards are thoroughly detailed.

  18. NASA safety standard for lifting devices and equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's minimum safety requirements are established for the design, testing, inspection, maintenance, certification, and use of overhead and gantry cranes (including top running monorail, underhung, and jib cranes), mobile cranes, derrick hoists, and special hoist supported personnel lifting devices (these do not include elevators, ground supported personnel lifts, or powered platforms). Minimum requirements are also addressed for the testing, inspection, and use of Hydra-sets, hooks, and slings. Safety standards are thoroughly detailed.

  19. Wind-tunnel investigation of a large-scale model of a lift-cruise fan V/STOL aircraft with extended lift-cruise nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambucci, B. J.; Aoyagi, K.; Rolls, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a large-scale model of a lift/cruise fan V/STOL aircraft were determined. The model was equipped with three fans, one mounted in the forward section of the fuselage in a lift mode, and two mounted on top of the wing adjacent to the fuselage in a lift/cruise mode. The data that were obtained include longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics of the model, with the horizontal tail on and off, for both the powered-lift and cruise configurations. Lateral-directional characteristics were obtained with the horizontal and vertical tail sections removed. Powered-lift data were obtained at several wind-tunnel velocities and at several lift-cruise fan thrust vector angles by varying the position of the hooded deflectors from 0 deg (the cruise condition) to 90 deg.

  20. Lifting strategy and stability in strength-impaired elders.

    PubMed

    Puniello, M S; McGibbon, C A; Krebs, D E

    2001-04-01

    Ninety-six subjects underwent biomechanical analysis of freestyle box lifting. To relate lifting strategy to lower extremity muscle strength and postural stability in functionally limited elders. Back pain and postural instability in elders is rampant and poorly understood. Much of the literature on lifting relates to young subjects. Lifting strategy for 91 functionally limited elders was classified by timing of peak power in the back and knee joints. Isometric hip and knee extensor strength and postural stability were compared among strategy classifications. Postural stability was analyzed by measuring center of gravity (CG) displacement during lifting. Three lift strategy groups were established: back-lift, or back dominant strategy (BDS); leg-lift, or leg dominant strategy (LDS); and leg-dominant back-first mixed strategy (LDB). Subjects with relatively strong hip and knee extensors used leg dominant strategy; subjects with relatively strong knee, but weak hip, extensors used leg-dominant back-first mixed strategy; and subjects with weak hip and knee extensors used back dominant strategy. Leg dominant strategy and leg-dominant back-first mixed strategy engendered less center of gravity displacement and thus were posturally more stable than the back dominant strategy. Subjects apparently chose their lift strategy based on their hip and knee extensor strength. Weaker elders using a less stable back dominant strategy could be susceptible to falls and subsequent long bone and vertebral body fractures. Clinicians could identify at-risk elders by muscle testing. Beyond emphasizing strength and endurance exercise in elderly patients, weak elders should be taught to use a leg dominant lifting strategy, or if they are not physically able, to use a combined back/leg strategy.

  1. Investigation of Maximum Blade Loading Capability of Lift-Offset Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Maximum blade loading capability of a coaxial, lift-offset rotor is investigated using a rotorcraft configuration designed in the context of short-haul, medium-size civil and military missions. The aircraft was sized for a 6600-lb payload and a range of 300 nm. The rotor planform and twist were optimized for hover and cruise performance. For the present rotor performance calculations, the collective pitch angle is progressively increased up to and through stall with the shaft angle set to zero. The effects of lift offset on rotor lift, power, controls, and blade airloads and structural loads are examined. The maximum lift capability of the coaxial rotor increases as lift offset increases and extends well beyond the McHugh lift boundary as the lift potential of the advancing blades are fully realized. A parametric study is conducted to examine the differences between the present coaxial rotor and the McHugh rotor in terms of maximum lift capabilities and to identify important design parameters that define the maximum lift capability of the rotor. The effects of lift offset on rotor blade airloads and structural loads are also investigated. Flap bending moment increases substantially as lift offset increases to carry the hub roll moment even at low collective values. The magnitude of flap bending moment is dictated by the lift-offset value (hub roll moment) but is less sensitive to collective and speed.

  2. Effects of range and mode on lifting capability and lifting time.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 3 lifting ranges and 3 lifting modes on maximum lifting capability and total lifting time. The results demonstrated that the maximum lifting capability for FK (from floor to knuckle height) was greater than that for KS (from knuckle height to shoulder height) or FS (from floor to shoulder height). Additionally, asymmetric lifting with initial trunk rotation decreased maximum lifting capability compared with symmetric lifting or asymmetric lifting with final trunk rotation. The difference in total lifting time between KS and FS was not significant, while FK increased total lifting time by ~20% compared with FS even though the travel distance was 50% shorter.

  3. What is a safe lift?

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2013-09-01

    In a perfect world, a "safe" lift would be 51 pounds if the object is within 7 inches from the front of the body, if it is at waist height, if it is directly in front of the person, if there is a handle on the object, and if the load inside the box/bucket doesn't shift once lifted. If the load to be lifted does not meet all of these criteria, then it is an unsafe lift, and modifications must be made. Modifications would include lightening the load, getting help, or using a mechanical lifting device. There is always a way to turn an unsafe lift into a safer lift. An excellent resource for anyone interested in eliminating some of the hazards associated with lifting is the "Easy Ergonomics" publication from Cal/OSHA. This booklet offers practical advice on how to improve the workplace using engineering and administrative controls, problem-solving strategies and solutions, and a vast amount of ergonomics information and resources. "Easy Ergonomics" can be obtained by calling Cal/OSHA's education and training unit in Sacramento at 800-963-9424. A free copy can be obtained via www.dir.ca.gov/dosh/puborder.asp.

  4. Pneumatic Spoiler Controls Airfoil Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Krauss, T.

    1991-01-01

    Air ejection from leading edge of airfoil used for controlled decrease of lift. Pneumatic-spoiler principle developed for equalizing lift on helicopter rotor blades. Also used to enhance aerodynamic control of short-fuselage or rudderless aircraft such as "flying-wing" airplanes. Leading-edge injection increases maneuverability of such high-performance fixed-wing aircraft as fighters.

  5. Project LIFT: Year Two Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Michael; Piccinino, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Research for Action (RFA) has completed its second year of a five-year external evaluation of the Project Leadership and Investment for Transformation (LIFT) Initiative in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District (CMS). Project LIFT is a public-private partnership between CMS and the local philanthropic and business communities in Charlotte,…

  6. Project LIFT: Year 1 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Michael; Piccinino, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Research for Action (RFA) is currently in the second year of a five-year external evaluation of the Project Leadership and Investment for Transformation (LIFT) Initiative in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District (CMS). Project LIFT is a public-private partnership between CMS and the local philanthropic and business communities in Charlotte,…

  7. Lift enhancing tabs for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tab deployable from the trailing edge of a main airfoil element forces flow onto a following airfoil element, such as a flap, to keep the flow attached and thus enhance lift. For aircraft wings with high lift systems that include leading edge slats, the slats may also be provided with tabs to turn the flow onto the following main element.

  8. Pneumatic Spoiler Controls Airfoil Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Krauss, T.

    1991-01-01

    Air ejection from leading edge of airfoil used for controlled decrease of lift. Pneumatic-spoiler principle developed for equalizing lift on helicopter rotor blades. Also used to enhance aerodynamic control of short-fuselage or rudderless aircraft such as "flying-wing" airplanes. Leading-edge injection increases maneuverability of such high-performance fixed-wing aircraft as fighters.

  9. V/STOL gets a lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, Tom

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a supersonic STOVL that could offer enhanced mission capability, survivability, operational flexibility, and utility over conventional aircraft is presented. Emphasis is currently on design studies, CFD work, small- and large-scale wind tunnel tests, simulation activities, flight experiments, and ground environment experiments. Propulsion system technology centers about the adaptation of existing or off-the-shelf engines. Concepts under study include separate flow in hover, gas-driven lift fan, and shaft-driven lift fan. NASA is examining generic valve and ducting configurations with airflow at ambient temperature and at temperatures up to 1000 F to gather pressure loss and heat transfer data. Advanced civil rotorcraft technologies examined include high-efficiency/dual-mode components such as torque converters; lightweight, quiet transmissions; and variable geometry power turbines; along with dual-function or convertible engines.

  10. Impact of Airfoils on Aerodynamic Optimization of Heavy Lift Rotorcraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Modeling Capability with a Conceptual Rotorcraft Sizing Code,” American Helicopter Society Vertical Lift Aircraft Design Conference, San Francisco...American Helicopter Society International, Inc. All rights reserved. Introduction A new generation of very large, fast rotorcraft is being studied to...Ref. 4). Other codes, including NASTRAN and HeliFoil, were used for subsystem analyses. Reference 1 discusses the integration of the various

  11. 10. CLOSEUP VIEW OF THE TRASH RAKES, THEIR LIFTING MECHANISM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF THE TRASH RAKES, THEIR LIFTING MECHANISM (RIGHT FOREGROUND), AND CLUTCHES THAT OPEN AND CLOSE THE SIX INTAKE GATES ON THE POST FALLS POWERHOUSE, LOOKING WEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Middle Channel Powerhouse & Dam, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  12. Energetics of oscillating lifting surfaces using integral conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmadi, Ali R.; Widnall, Sheila E.

    1987-01-01

    The energetics of oscillating flexible lifting surfaces in two and three dimensions is calculated by the use of integral conservation laws in inviscid incompressible flow for general and harmonic transverse oscillations. Total thrust is calculated from the momentum theorem and energy loss rate due to vortex shedding in the wake from the principle of conservation of mechanical energy. Total power required to maintain the oscillations and hydrodynamic efficiency are also determined. In two dimensions, the results are obtained in closed form. In three dimensions, the distribution of vorticity on the lifting surface is also required as input to the calculations. Thus, unsteady lifting-surface theory must be used as well. The analysis is applicable to oscillating lifting surfaces of arbitrary planform, aspect ratio, and reduced frequency and does not require calculation of the leading-edge thrust.

  13. Energetics of oscillating lifting surfaces using integral conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmadi, Ali R.; Widnall, Sheila E.

    1987-01-01

    The energetics of oscillating flexible lifting surfaces in two and three dimensions is calculated by the use of integral conservation laws in inviscid incompressible flow for general and harmonic transverse oscillations. Total thrust is calculated from the momentum theorem and energy loss rate due to vortex shedding in the wake from the principle of conservation of mechanical energy. Total power required to maintain the oscillations and hydrodynamic efficiency are also determined. In two dimensions, the results are obtained in closed form. In three dimensions, the distribution of vorticity on the lifting surface is also required as input to the calculations. Thus, unsteady lifting-surface theory must be used as well. The analysis is applicable to oscillating lifting surfaces of arbitrary planform, aspect ratio, and reduced frequency and does not require calculation of the leading-edge thrust.

  14. Variational scheme towards an optimal lifting drive in fluid adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dias, Eduardo O; Miranda, José A

    2012-10-01

    One way of determining the adhesive strength of liquids is provided by a probe-tack test, which measures the force or energy required to pull apart two parallel flat plates separated by a thin fluid film. The vast majority of the existing theoretical and experimental works in fluid adhesion use very viscous fluids, and consider a linear drive L(t)∼Vt with constant lifting plate velocity V. This implies a given energy cost and large lifting force magnitude. One challenging question in this field pertains to what would be the optimal time-dependent drive Lopt(t) for which the adhesion energy would be minimized. We use a variational scheme to systematically search for such Lopt(t). By employing an optimal lifting drive, in addition to saving energy, we verify a significant decrease in the adhesion force peak. The effectiveness of the proposed lifting procedure is checked for both Newtonian and power-law fluids.

  15. Wind tunnel study of slot spoilers for direct lift control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrisani, D., II; Gentry, G. L., Jr.; Stickle, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in a 300-mph 7- by 10- foot tunnel to obtain data for a slot spoiler direct lift control system. Slot spoilers are believed to have advantages over flap-type direct lift control (DLC) systems because of the small amount of power required for actuation. These tests, run at a Reynolds number of 1,400,000 showed that up to 78 percent of the lift due to flap deflection could be spoiled by opening several spanwise slots within the flaps. For a given lift change the drag change was significantly less than that which would be obtained by a variable flap DLC system. A nozzle-shaped slot was the most effective of the slot shapes tested.

  16. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an alternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum for learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We…

  17. Development lifts Egyptian output

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Oil revenue is now the largest source of foreign exchange for the Arab Republic of Egypt, and, as such, is of vital importance to the country's plans for industrial and social development. Last year oil exports earned Egypt $2.9 billion, playing a key role in keeping the nation's economy in the black. Oil production in 1980 averaged 585,000 bpd, up from 510,000 bpd in 1979. This year oil output should average 650,000 bpd. While output is increasing, it does not appear to be doing so at a sufficient rate to meet the 1984 government target of 1 million bpd. However, the oil industry view in Egypt is that this target is achievable, though not until the mid to late 1980s. Development work scheduled for completion by 1984 only seems set to lift output to between 750,000 and 800,000 bpd. At the same time, if expansions plans for gas production are taken into account, then total hydrocarbon output measured in oil equivalents will not be too far short of the 1-million-bpd figure.

  18. Lifting strength in two-person teamwork.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of lifting range, hand-to-toe distance, and lifting direction on single-person lifting strengths and two-person teamwork lifting strengths. Six healthy males and seven healthy females participated in this study. Two-person teamwork lifting strengths were examined in both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. Our results showed that lifting strength significantly decreased with increasing lifting range or hand-to-toe distance. However, lifting strengths were not affected by lifting direction. Teamwork lifting strength did not conform to the law of additivity for both strength-matched and strength-unmatched groups. In general, teamwork lifting strength was dictated by the weaker of the two members, implying that weaker members might be exposed to a higher potential danger in teamwork exertions. To avoid such overexertion in teamwork, members with significantly different strength ability should not be assigned to the same team.

  19. CHRONICLE: Twelfth International Symposium on Gas and Chemical Lasers and High-Power Laser Conference (GCL/HPL '98)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreysho, A. S.; Koretskii, Ya P.; Mashendzhinov, Viktor I.; Morozov, A. V.; Rotinyan, Mikhail A.

    1999-03-01

    A review is given of the papers presented at the GCL/HPL'98 Meeting held on August 31 — September 5, 1998 in St Petersburg. A brief account is given of the associated exhibition and a satellite conference held at the All-Russia Scientific-Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federal Nuclear Centre) in the city of Sarov.

  20. High-Lift Capability of Low Aspect Ratio Wings Utilizing Circulation Control and Upper Surface Blowing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    the Upper Surface Blowing (USB) and the Circulation Control Wing (CCW). Both concepts use the Coanda effect as a means of augmenting aerodynamic lift...USB), and a unique combination of the two (CCW/USB). Wing tip sails were used as a means of increasing th(, effective aspect ratio of these wings...wing tip sails are effective in reducing the induced drag of these powered- lift low aspect ratio wings under high-lift conditions. The induced drag

  1. Null lifts and projective dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco

    2015-11-15

    We describe natural Hamiltonian systems using projective geometry. The null lift procedure endows the tangent bundle with a projective structure where the null Hamiltonian is identified with a projective conic and induces a Weyl geometry. Projective transformations generate a set of known and new dualities between Hamiltonian systems, as for example the phenomenon of coupling-constant metamorphosis. We conclude outlining how this construction can be extended to the quantum case for Eisenhart–Duval lifts.

  2. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  3. The Future of Heavy Lift

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    Future of Heavy Lift. MAWTS-1 Memo, 2001. Osprey On-Line. Home Page. <http://www.navair.navy.mil/ v22 />. Overarching Commonality Assessment...logistics tails grow. While the MV-22 Osprey will provide this "Over the Horizon" (OTH) capability, it is strictly a medium lift aircraft. It will never...territory. The MV-22 is the Marine Corps’ current answer to implementing OMFTS/STOM from an aviation perspective. 3 The Osprey will eventually

  4. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  5. Ergonomic Assessment of Floor-based and Overhead Lifts

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Thomas R.; Dick, Robert; Lowe, Brian; Werren, Dwight; Parsons, Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Manual full-body vertical lifts of patients have high risk for developing musculoskeletal disorders. Two primary types of battery-powered lift assist devices are available for these tasks: floor-based and overhead-mounted devices. Studies suggest that the operation of floor-based devices may require excessive pushing and pulling forces and that overhead-mounted devices are safer and require lower operating forces. This study evaluated required operating hand forces and resulting biomechanical spinal loading for overhead-mounted lifts versus floor-based lifts across various floor surfaces and patient weight conditions. We did not examine differences in how operators performed the tasks, but rather focused on differences in required operating forces and estimated biomechanical loads across various exposure conditions for a typical operator. Findings show that the floor-based lifts exceeded recommended exposure limits for pushing and pulling for many of the floor/weight conditions and that the overhead-mounted lifts did not. As expected, forces and spinal loads were greater for nonlinoleum floor surfaces compared with linoleum floors. Based on these findings, it is suggested that overhead-mounted devices be used whenever possible, particularly in instances where carpeted floors would be encountered. PMID:26550545

  6. Occupational lifting during pregnancy and child's birth size in a large cohort study.

    PubMed

    Juhl, Mette; Larsen, Pernille Stemann; Andersen, Per Kragh; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Bonde, Jens Peter; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine

    2014-07-01

    It has been suggested that the handling of heavy loads during pregnancy is associated with impaired fetal growth. We examined the association between quantity and frequency of maternal occupational lifting and the child's size at birth, measured by weight, length, ponderal index, small-for-gestational-age (SGA), abdominal circumference, head circumference, and placental weight. We analyzed birth size from the Danish Medical Birth Registry of 66 693 live-born children in the Danish National Birth Cohort according to the mother's self-reported information on occupational lifting from telephone interviews around gestational week 16. Data were collected in the period 1996-2002. We used linear and logistic regression models and adjusted for confounders. In the fully adjusted models, most of the mean differences in birth size measures had values indicating a smaller size of offspring among women with occupational lifting versus women with no lifting, but the differences were very small, and there was a statistically significant trend only for placental weight showing lighter weight with increasing number of kilos lifted per day. In jobs likely to include person-lifting, we found increased odds of SGA among children of women who lifted 501-1000 kilos per day [odds ratio (OR) 1.34, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.98-1.83] and >1000 kilos per day (OR 1.51, 95% CI 0.83-2.76) compared to no lifting. In jobs with no person-lifting, occupational lifting was not associated with SGA. Overall, we observed no strong support for an association between maternal occupational lifting and impaired size at birth. Our data indicated a potential association between lifting and SGA among offspring of women in occupations that are likely to include person-lifting. These results should, however, be interpreted with caution due to limited statistical power, and we suggest that future studies include detailed, individual information on job functions and ergonomic routines of lifting

  7. Moving base simulation of an ASTOVL lift-fan aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, William W. Y.; Borchers, Paul F.; Franklin, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Using a generalized simulation model, a moving-base simulation of a lift-fan short takeoff/vertical landing fighter aircraft was conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator at Ames Research Center. Objectives of the experiment were to (1) assess the effects of lift-fan propulsion system design features on aircraft control during transition and vertical flight including integration of lift fan/lift/cruise engine/aerodynamic controls and lift fan/lift/cruise engine dynamic response, (2) evaluate pilot-vehicle interface with the control system and head-up display including control modes for low-speed operational tasks and control mode/display integration, and (3) conduct operational evaluations of this configuration during takeoff, transition, and landing similar to those carried out previously by the Ames team for the mixed-flow, vectored thrust, and augmentor-ejector concepts. Based on results of the simulation, preliminary assessments of acceptable and borderline lift-fan and lift/cruise engine thrust response characteristics were obtained. Maximum pitch, roll, and yaw control power used during transition, hover, and vertical landing were documented. Control and display mode options were assessed for their compatibility with a range of land-based and shipboard operations from takeoff to cruise through transition back to hover and vertical landing. Flying qualities were established for candidate control modes and displays for instrument approaches and vertical landings aboard an LPH assault ship and DD-963 destroyer. Test pilot and engineer teams from the Naval Air Warfare Center, Boeing, Lockheed, McDonnell Douglas, and the British Defence Research Agency participated in the program.

  8. Development of an integrated staircase lift for home access

    PubMed Central

    Mattie, Johanne L.; Borisoff, Jaimie F.; Leland, Danny; Miller, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stairways into buildings present a significant environmental barrier for those with mobility impairments, including older adults. A number of home access solutions that allow users to safely enter and exit the home exist, however these all have some limitations. The purpose of this work was to develop a novel, inclusive home access solution that integrates a staircase and a lift into one device. Method The development of an integrated staircase lift followed a structured protocol with stakeholders providing feedback at various stages in the design process, consistent with rehabilitation engineering design methods. Results A novel home access device was developed. The integrated staircase-lift has the following features: inclusivity, by a universal design that provides an option for either use of stairs or a lift; constant availability, with a lift platform always ready for use on either level; and potential aesthetic advantages when integrating the device into an existing home. The potential also exists for emergency descent during a power outage, and self-powered versions. Conclusions By engaging stakeholders in a user centred design process, insight on the limitations of existing home access solutions and specific feedback on our design guided development of a novel home access device. PMID:26793318

  9. A Simple Method for High-Lift Propeller Conceptual Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael; Borer, Nick; German, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method for designing propellers that are placed upstream of the leading edge of a wing in order to augment lift. Because the primary purpose of these "high-lift propellers" is to increase lift rather than produce thrust, these props are best viewed as a form of high-lift device; consequently, they should be designed differently than traditional propellers. We present a theory that describes how these props can be designed to provide a relatively uniform axial velocity increase, which is hypothesized to be advantageous for lift augmentation based on a literature survey. Computational modeling indicates that such propellers can generate the same average induced axial velocity while consuming less power and producing less thrust than conventional propeller designs. For an example problem based on specifications for NASA's Scalable Convergent Electric Propulsion Technology and Operations Research (SCEPTOR) flight demonstrator, a propeller designed with the new method requires approximately 15% less power and produces approximately 11% less thrust than one designed for minimum induced loss. Higher-order modeling and/or wind tunnel testing are needed to verify the predicted performance.

  10. Tolerability to prolonged lifting tasks. A validation of the recommended limits.

    PubMed

    Capodaglio, P; Bazzini, G

    1997-01-01

    Prolonged physical exertion is subjectively regulated by the perception of effort. This preliminary study was conducted to validate the use of subjective perceptions of effort in assessing objectively tolerable workloads for prolonged lifting tasks. Ten healthy male subjects tested their maximal lifting capacity (MLC) on a lift dynamometer (LidoLift, Loredan Biomed., West Sacramento, CA) and underwent incremental and 30-minute endurance lifting tests. Cardiorespiratory parameters were monitored with an oxygen uptake analyzer, mechanical parameters were calculated using a computerized dynamometer. Ratings of perceived exertion were given on Borg's 10-point scale. Physiological responses to repetitive lifting were matched with subjective perceptions. A single-variable statistical regression for power functions was performed to obtain the individual "iso-perception" curves as functions of the mechanical work exerted. We found that the "iso-perception" curve corresponding to a "moderate" perception of effort may represent the individual "tolerance threshold" for prolonged lifting tasks, since physiological responses at this level of intensity did not change significantly and the respiratory exchange ratio was less than one. The individually tolerable weight for lifting tasks lasting 30 min has been expressed as a percentage of the isoinertial MLC value and compared with the currently recommended limits for prolonged lifting tasks (Italian legislation D.L. 626/94). On the basis of our preliminary results a "tolerance threshold" of 20% MLC has been proposed for prolonged lifting tasks.

  11. Mist lift analysis summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, R.L.

    1980-09-01

    The mist flow open-cycle OTEC concept proposed by S.L. Ridgway has much promise, but the fluid mechanics of the mist flow are not well understood. The creation of the mist and the possibility of droplet growth leading to rainout (when the vapor can no longer support the mist) are particularly troublesome. This report summarizes preliminary results of a numerical analysis initiated at SERI in FY79 to study the mist-lift process. The analysis emphasizes the mass transfer and fluid mechanics of the steady-state mist flow and is based on one-dimensional models of the mist flow developed for SERI by Graham Wallis. One of Wallis's models describes a mist composed of a single size of drops and another considers several drop sizes. The latter model, further developed at SERI, considers a changing spectrum of discrete drop sizes and incorporates the mathematics describing collisions and growth of the droplets by coalescence. The analysis results show that under conditions leading to maximum lift in the single-drop-size model, the multigroup model predicts significantly reduced lift because of the growth of droplets by coalescence. The predicted lift height is sensitive to variations in the mass flow rate and inlet pressure. Inclusion of a coasting section, in which the drops would rise ballistically without change in temperature, may lead to increased lift within the existing range of operation.

  12. Normalized lift: an energy interpretation of the lift coefficient simplifies comparisons of the lifting ability of rotating and flapping surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Phillip; Alexander, David E

    2012-01-01

    For a century, researchers have used the standard lift coefficient C(L) to evaluate the lift, L, generated by fixed wings over an area S against dynamic pressure, ½ρv(2), where v is the effective velocity of the wing. Because the lift coefficient was developed initially for fixed wings in steady flow, its application to other lifting systems requires either simplifying assumptions or complex adjustments as is the case for flapping wings and rotating cylinders.This paper interprets the standard lift coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/ρ·S), compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, ½v(2). This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift, is derived from the work-energy theorem and compares the lifting capabilities of dissimilar lift systems on a similar energy footing. The normalized lift is the same as the standard lift coefficient for fixed wings, but differs for wings with more complex motions; it also accounts for such complex motions explicitly and without complex modifications or adjustments. We compare the normalized lift with the previously-reported values of lift coefficient for a rotating cylinder in Magnus effect, a bat during hovering and forward flight, and a hovering dipteran.The maximum standard lift coefficient for a fixed wing without flaps in steady flow is around 1.5, yet for a rotating cylinder it may exceed 9.0, a value that implies that a rotating cylinder generates nearly 6 times the maximum lift of a wing. The maximum normalized lift for a rotating cylinder is 1.5. We suggest that the normalized lift can be used to evaluate propellers, rotors, flapping wings of animals and micro air vehicles, and underwater thrust-generating fins in the same way the lift coefficient is currently used to evaluate fixed wings.

  13. Normalized Lift: An Energy Interpretation of the Lift Coefficient Simplifies Comparisons of the Lifting Ability of Rotating and Flapping Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, Phillip; Alexander, David E.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, researchers have used the standard lift coefficient CL to evaluate the lift, L, generated by fixed wings over an area S against dynamic pressure, ½ρv2, where v is the effective velocity of the wing. Because the lift coefficient was developed initially for fixed wings in steady flow, its application to other lifting systems requires either simplifying assumptions or complex adjustments as is the case for flapping wings and rotating cylinders. This paper interprets the standard lift coefficient of a fixed wing slightly differently, as the work exerted by the wing on the surrounding flow field (L/ρ·S), compared against the total kinetic energy required for generating said lift, ½v2. This reinterpreted coefficient, the normalized lift, is derived from the work-energy theorem and compares the lifting capabilities of dissimilar lift systems on a similar energy footing. The normalized lift is the same as the standard lift coefficient for fixed wings, but differs for wings with more complex motions; it also accounts for such complex motions explicitly and without complex modifications or adjustments. We compare the normalized lift with the previously-reported values of lift coefficient for a rotating cylinder in Magnus effect, a bat during hovering and forward flight, and a hovering dipteran. The maximum standard lift coefficient for a fixed wing without flaps in steady flow is around 1.5, yet for a rotating cylinder it may exceed 9.0, a value that implies that a rotating cylinder generates nearly 6 times the maximum lift of a wing. The maximum normalized lift for a rotating cylinder is 1.5. We suggest that the normalized lift can be used to evaluate propellers, rotors, flapping wings of animals and micro air vehicles, and underwater thrust-generating fins in the same way the lift coefficient is currently used to evaluate fixed wings. PMID:22629326

  14. Looking west at lift bridge, canal, and tow path, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking west at lift bridge, canal, and tow path, with U.S. Rt. 11 bridge in background. Remnant of spur track to R. Paul Smith Power Station is at left, and abandoned Western Maryland Railway right of way parallels canal at right. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  15. West elevation of lift bridge, with Bollman Bridge in background. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West elevation of lift bridge, with Bollman Bridge in background. Note portion of R. Paul Smith Power Station in right background. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  16. North elevation of lift bridge. Plywood decking is not original. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North elevation of lift bridge. Plywood decking is not original. Note portion of R. Paul Smith Power Station in left background. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  17. PESC '83; Annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference, 14th, Albuquerque, NM, June 6-9, 1983, Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consideration is given to such topics as dc-dc converter synthesis and analysis, motor drives and power systems, power devices, power supplies, converter modeling and control, and converter circuit techniques. Particular papers are presented on the synthesis of switched-mode converters, a MOSFET converter-fed position servo system with sliding mode control, design considerations for FET-gated high voltage transistors, a magnetic trickle-charge regulator for a solar cell/battery space power system, a unified SCR model for continuous topology CADA, and ferroresonant converters with high-frequency drive. For individual items see A84-18410 to A84-18426

  18. Serrated-Planform Lifting-Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGrath, Brian E. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A novel set of serrated-planform lifting surfaces produce unexpectedly high lift coefficients at moderate to high angles-of-attack. Each serration, or tooth, is designed to shed a vortex. The interaction of the vortices greatly enhances the lifting capability over an extremely large operating range. Variations of the invention use serrated-planform lifting surfaces in planes different than that of a primary lifting surface. In an alternate embodiment, the individual teeth are controllably retractable and deployable to provide for active control of the vortex system and hence lift coefficient. Differential lift on multiple serrated-planform lifting surfaces provides a means for vehicle control. The important aerodynamic advantages of the serrated-planform lifting surfaces are not limited to aircraft applications but can be used to establish desirable performance characteristics for missiles, land vehicles, and/or watercraft.

  19. Integral lift engine preliminary design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, W.; Leto, A.; Schaefer, R.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary mechanical design of a complete lift fan engine system is reported. A description of the lift fan engine, layout drawings of the components and complete engine, and a discussion of the design analyses and results are presented. The design features and areas of analysis include fan and compressor rotor blades of composite construction, a combustor folded over the compressor, relatively high-temperature blades in the high-pressure turbine, the first stage of the low-pressure turbine used for bearing support and ducting of lubricant to the bearings, a complete lubrication system, critical speeds of the shafting, and vibration and flutter of the blading.

  20. Endoscopic brow lifts uber alles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupendra C K

    2006-12-01

    Innumerable approaches to the ptotic brow and forehead have been described in the past. Over the last twenty-five years, we have used all these techniques in cosmetic and reconstructive patients. We have used the endoscopic brow lift technique since 1995. While no one technique is applicable to all patients, the endoscopic brow lift, with appropriate modifications for individual patients, can be used effectively for most patients with brow ptosis. We present the nuances of this technique and show several different fixation methods we have found useful.

  1. OCT-based quantification of flow velocity, shear force, and power generated by a biological ciliated surface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Loewenberg, Michael; Choma, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    In cilia-driven fluid flow physiology, quantification of flow velocity, shearing force, and power dissipation is important in defining abnormal ciliary function. The capacity to generate flow can be robustly described in terms of shearing force. Dissipated power can be related to net ATP consumption by ciliary molecular motors. To date, however, only flow velocity can be routinely quantified in a non-invasive, non-contact manner. Additionally, traditional power-based metrics rely on metabolic consumption that reflects energy consumption not just from cilia but also from all active cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the estimation of all three of these quantities (flow velocity, shear force, and power dissipation) using only optical coherence tomography (OCT). Specifically, we develop a framework that can extract force and power information from vectorial flow velocity fields obtained using OCT-based methods. We do so by (a) estimating the viscous stress tensor from flow velocity fields to estimate shearing force and (b) using the viscous stress tensor to estimate the power dissipation function to infer total mechanical power. These estimates have the advantage of (a) requiring only a single modality, (b) being non-invasive in nature, and (c) being reflective of only the net power work generated by a ciliated surface. We demonstrate our all-optical approach to the estimation of these parameters in the Xenopus animal model system under normal and increased viscous loading. Our preliminary data support the hypothesis that the Xenopus ciliated surface can increase force output under loading conditions.

  2. Lifting hydro's potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihach, N.

    1980-12-01

    The advantages of hydroelectric power, in terms of capital, operating and maintenance costs and in terms of fuel and environmental considerations, are causing an upgrading of existing installations to provide more generating capacity. Hydrocapacity supplies 1/8 of the U.S. electric energy and will probably increase from 50 to 100% by the early 2000's as the price of other forms of energy rises. Ways of increasing output are: better water control, uprating of hydrogenerators, standardization of turbines, and methods of pumped hydro, an energy storage technique. An obstacle to this aim is the cumbersome licensing process of competing federal agencies which places a particular burden on small projects.

  3. Numerical investigations of self- and cross-phase modulation effects in high-power fiber amplifiers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunoubi, Mohammad R.; Anderson, Brian; Naderi, Shadi A.; Madden, Timothy J.; Dajani, Iyad

    2017-03-01

    The development of high-power fiber lasers is of great interest due to the advantages they offer relative to other laser technologies. Currently, the maximum power from a reportedly single-mode fiber amplifier stands at 10 kW. Though impressive, this power level was achieved at the cost of a large spectral linewidth, making the laser unsuitable for coherent or spectral beam combination techniques required to reach power levels necessary for airborne tactical applications. An effective approach in limiting the SBS effect is to insert an electro-optic phase modulator at the low-power end of a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system. As a result, the optical power is spread among spectral sidebands; thus raising the overall SBS threshold of the amplifier. It is the purpose of this work to present a comprehensive numerical scheme that is based on the extended nonlinear Schrodinger equations that allows for accurate analysis of phase modulated fiber amplifier systems in relation to the group velocity dispersion and Kerr nonlinearities and their effect on the coherent beam combining efficiency. As such, we have simulated a high-power MOPA system modulated via filtered pseudo-random bit sequence format for different clock rates and power levels. We show that at clock rates of ≥30 GHz, the combination of GVD and self-phase modulation may lead to a drastic drop in beam combining efficiency at the multi-kW level. Furthermore, we extend our work to study the effect of cross-phase modulation where an amplifier is seeded with two laser sources.

  4. Hydro-resistive measurement of dynamic lifting strength.

    PubMed

    Pinder, A D; Grieve, D W

    1997-04-01

    A device is described for measuring strength and power outputs of dynamic vertical lifts between heights of 0.4 and 2.2 m. The device is safe, robust, and easily transportable. It consists of a water-filled tube 2 m high and 200 mm internal diameter. The subject pulls vertically on a handle which is connected with flexible wire rope via a series of pulleys to a piston suspended inside the tube. The piston has holes which can be closed with bungs. The drag force is proportional to the square of the velocity. The constant of proportionality can be chosen over a more than 100-fold range and is independent of temperature. Manual force is measured using a strain gauged cantilever over which the rope passes. Rope movement is monitored with a shaft encoder. These devices are sampled synchronously by an interfaced computer. Velocity and power are derived from the measurements of displacement, time and force. The device is highly accurate. Power measurements are not significantly different on two separate days although repetitions on one day show a warming-up effect. This device allows the study of dynamic lifts ranging from slow, high force, quasi-isokinetic lifts to lifts where high velocities and accelerations occur.

  5. SMAP Lift to CR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-16

    Inside the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, engineers and technicians rotate NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP, spacecraft to begin processing. SMAP will launch on a Delta II 7320 configuration vehicle featuring a United Launch Alliance first stage booster powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-27A main engine and three Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, strap-on solid rocket motors. Once on station in Earth orbit, SMAP will provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. These measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. SMAP data also will be used to quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes and to develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capabilities. Launch from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for Jan. 29, 2015.

  6. SMAP Lift to CR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-16

    Inside the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, engineers and technicians inspect NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP, spacecraft. SMAP will launch on a Delta II 7320 configuration vehicle featuring a United Launch Alliance first stage booster powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-27A main engine and three Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, strap-on solid rocket motors. Once on station in Earth orbit, SMAP will provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. These measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. SMAP data also will be used to quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes and to develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capabilities. Launch from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for Jan. 29, 2015.

  7. SMAP Lift to CR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-16

    Inside the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, engineers and technicians remove a protective covering from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP, spacecraft. SMAP will launch on a Delta II 7320 configuration vehicle featuring a United Launch Alliance first stage booster powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-27A main engine and three Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, strap-on solid rocket motors. Once on station in Earth orbit, SMAP will provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. These measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. SMAP data also will be used to quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes and to develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capabilities. Launch from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for Jan. 29, 2015.

  8. SMAP Lift to CR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-16

    Inside the Astrotech payload processing facility on Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, engineers and technicians begin processing of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive, or SMAP, spacecraft. SMAP will launch on a Delta II 7320 configuration vehicle featuring a United Launch Alliance first stage booster powered by an Aerojet Rocketdyne RS-27A main engine and three Alliant Techsystems, or ATK, strap-on solid rocket motors. Once on station in Earth orbit, SMAP will provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. These measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. SMAP data also will be used to quantify net carbon flux in boreal landscapes and to develop improved flood prediction and drought monitoring capabilities. Launch from Space Launch Complex 2 is targeted for Jan. 29, 2015.

  9. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  10. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  11. Wing rotation and lift in SUEX flapping wing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateti, Kiron; Byrne-Dugan, Rory A.; Tadigadapa, Srinivas A.; Rahn, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    This research presents detailed modeling and experimental testing of wing rotation and lift in the LionFly, a low cost and mass producible flapping wing mechanism fabricated monolithically from SUEX dry film and powered by piezoelectric bimorph actuators. A flexure hinge along the span of the wing allows the wing to rotate in addition to flapping. A dynamic model including aerodynamics is developed and validated using experimental testing with a laser vibrometer in air and vacuum, stroboscopic photography and high definition image processing, and lift measurement. The 112 mg LionFly produces 46° flap and 44° rotation peak to peak with 12° phase lag, which generates a maximum average lift of 71 μN in response to an applied sinusoidal voltage of 75 V AC and 75 V DC at 37 Hz. Simulated wing trajectories accurately predict measured wing trajectories at small voltage amplitudes, but slightly underpredict amplitude and lift at high voltage amplitudes. By reducing the length of the actuator, reducing the mechanism amplification and tuning the rotational hinge stiffness, a redesigned device is simulated to produce a lift to weight ratio of 1.5.

  12. Unsuccessful vs. successful performance in snatch lifts: a kinematic approach.

    PubMed

    Gourgoulis, Vassilios; Aggeloussis, Nikolaos; Garas, Athanasios; Mavromatis, Georgios

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the kinematic characteristics of snatch movements that result in an unsuccessful performance, involving the barbell's drop in front of the weightlifter. The sample comprised 7 high-level men weightlifters competing at the international level. Their successful and unsuccessful snatch lifts with the same load were recorded with 2 S-VHS camcorders (60 Hz), and selected points onto the body and the barbell were digitized manually using the Ariel Performance Analysis System. The statistical treatment of the data showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) between successful and unsuccessful lifts in the angular displacement and velocity data of the lower-limb joints, the trajectory and vertical linear velocity of the barbell, or the generated work and power output during the first and second pulls of the lift. Consequently, the general movement pattern of the limbs and the barbell was not modified in unsuccessful lifts in relation to the successful ones. However, significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the direction of the barbell's resultant acceleration vector, suggesting that proper direction of force application onto the barbell is crucial for a successful performance in snatch lifts. Thus, coaches should pay particular attention to the applied force onto the barbell from the first pull.

  13. Vertical jump biomechanics after plyometric, weight lifting, and combined (weight lifting + plyometric) training.

    PubMed

    Arabatzi, Fotini; Kellis, Eleftherios; Saèz-Saez De Villarreal, Eduardo

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of an Olympic weight lifting (OL), a plyometric (PL), and combined weight lifting + plyometric (WP) training program on vertical jump (VJ) biomechanics. Thirty-six men were assigned randomly to 4 groups: PL group (n = 9), OL group (n = 9), WP group (), and control (C) group (n = 8). The experimental groups trained 3 d.wk, for 8 weeks. Sagital kinematics, VJ height, power, and electromyographic (EMG) activity from rectus femoris (RF) and medial gastrocnemius (GAS) were collected during squat jumping and countermovement jumping (CMJ) before and after training. The results showed that all experimental groups improved VJ height (p < 0.05). The OL training improved power and muscle activation during the concentric phase of the CMJ while the subjects used a technique with wider hip and knee angles after training (p < 0.05). The PL group subjects did not change their CMJ technique although there was an increase in RF activation and a decrease of GAS activity after training (p < 0.05). The WP group displayed a decline in maximal hip angle and a lower activation during the CMJ after training (p < 0.05). These results indicate that all training programs are adequate for improving VJ performance. However, the mechanisms for these improvements differ between the 3 training protocols. Olympic weight lifting training might be more appropriate to achieve changes in VJ performance and power in the precompetition period of the training season. Emphasis on the PL exercises should be given when the competition period approaches, whereas the combination of OL and PL exercises may be used in the transition phases from precompetition to the competition period.

  14. The magnitude of lift forces acting on drops and bubbles in liquids flowing inside microchannels.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard A; Whitesides, George M

    2013-02-07

    Hydrodynamic lift forces offer a convenient way to manipulate particles in microfluidic applications, but there is little quantitative information on how non-inertial lift mechanisms act and compete with each other in the confined space of microfluidic channels. This paper reports measurements of lift forces on nearly spherical drops and bubbles, with diameters from one quarter to one half of the width of the channel, flowing in microfluidic channels, under flow conditions characterized by particle capillary numbers Ca(P) = 0.0003-0.3 and particle Reynolds numbers Re(P) = 0.0001-0.1. For Ca(P) < 0.01 and Re(P) < 0.01 the measured lift forces were much larger than predictions of deformation-induced and inertial lift forces found in the literature, probably due to physicochemical hydrodynamic effects at the interface of drops and bubbles, such as the presence of surfactants. The measured forces could be fit with good accuracy using an empirical formula given herein. The empirical formula describes the power-law dependence of the lift force on hydrodynamic parameters (velocity and viscosity of the carrier phase; sizes of channel and drop or bubble), and includes a numerical lift coefficient that depends on the fluids used. The empirical formula using an average lift coefficient of ~500 predicted, within one order of magnitude, all lift force measurements in channels with cross-sectional dimensions below 1 mm.

  15. Lift-based paddling in diving grebe.

    PubMed

    Johansson, L C; Lindhe Norberg, U M

    2001-05-01

    To examine the hydrodynamic propulsion mechanism of a diving great crested grebe (Podiceps cristatus), the three-dimensional kinematics was determined by digital analysis of sequential video images of dorsal and lateral views. During the acceleration phase of this foot-propelled bird, the feet move through an arc in a plane nearly normal to the bird's line of motion through the water, i.e. the toes move dorsally and medially but not caudally relative to the water. The kinematics of the grebe's lobed feet is different from that in anseriforms, whose feet move in a plane mostly parallel to the bird's line of progress through the water. Our results suggest that the foot-propelled locomotor mechanism of grebes is based primarily on a lift-producing leg and foot stroke, in contrast to the drag-based locomotion assumed previously. We suggest that the lift-based paddling of grebes considerably increases both maximum swimming speed and energetic efficiency over drag-based propulsion. Furthermore, the results implicate a new interpretation of the functional morphology of these birds, with the toes serving as a self-stabilizing multi-slotted hydrofoil during the power phase.

  16. Lower extremity joint kinetics and lumbar curvature during squat and stoop lifting.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Youngeun; Kim, Youngho

    2009-02-02

    In this study, kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity joint and the lumbar lordosis during two different symmetrical lifting techniques(squat and stoop) were examined using the three-dimensional motion analysis. Twenty-six young male volunteers were selected for the subjects in this study. While they lifted boxes weighing 5, 10 and 15 kg by both squat and stoop lifting techniques, their motions were captured and analyzed using the 3D motion analysis system which was synchronized with two forceplates and the electromyographic system. Joint kinematics was determined by the forty-three reflective markers which were attached on the anatomical locations based on the VICON Plug-in-Gait marker placement protocol. Joint kinetics was analyzed by using the inverse dynamics. Paired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the differences of variables between two techniques, and among three different weights. Correlation coefficient was calculated to explain the role of lower limb joint motion in relation to the lumbar lordosis. There were not significant differences in maximum lumbar joint moments between two techniques. The hip and ankle contributed the most part of the support moment during squat lifting, and the knee flexion moment played an important role in stoop lifting. The hip, ankle and lumbar joints generated power and only the knee joint absorbed power in the squat lifting. The knee and ankle joints absorbed power, the hip and lumbar joints generated power in the stoop lifting. The bi-articular antagonist muscles' co-contraction around the knee joint during the squat lifting and the eccentric co-contraction of the gastrocnemius and the biceps femoris were found important for maintaining the straight leg during the stoop lifting. At the time of lordotic curvature appearance in the squat lifting, there were significant correlations in all three lower extremity joint moments with the lumbar joint. Differently, only the hip moment had significant

  17. Lower extremity joint kinetics and lumbar curvature during squat and stoop lifting

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seonhong; Kim, Youngeun; Kim, Youngho

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity joint and the lumbar lordosis during two different symmetrical lifting techniques(squat and stoop) were examined using the three-dimensional motion analysis. Methods Twenty-six young male volunteers were selected for the subjects in this study. While they lifted boxes weighing 5, 10 and 15 kg by both squat and stoop lifting techniques, their motions were captured and analyzed using the 3D motion analysis system which was synchronized with two forceplates and the electromyographic system. Joint kinematics was determined by the forty-three reflective markers which were attached on the anatomical locations based on the VICON Plug-in-Gait marker placement protocol. Joint kinetics was analyzed by using the inverse dynamics. Paired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the differences of variables between two techniques, and among three different weights. Correlation coefficient was calculated to explain the role of lower limb joint motion in relation to the lumbar lordosis. Results There were not significant differences in maximum lumbar joint moments between two techniques. The hip and ankle contributed the most part of the support moment during squat lifting, and the knee flexion moment played an important role in stoop lifting. The hip, ankle and lumbar joints generated power and only the knee joint absorbed power in the squat lifting. The knee and ankle joints absorbed power, the hip and lumbar joints generated power in the stoop lifting. The bi-articular antagonist muscles' co-contraction around the knee joint during the squat lifting and the eccentric co-contraction of the gastrocnemius and the biceps femoris were found important for maintaining the straight leg during the stoop lifting. At the time of lordotic curvature appearance in the squat lifting, there were significant correlations in all three lower extremity joint moments with the lumbar joint. Differently, only the hip

  18. The effect of fatigue on multijoint kinematics and load sharing during a repetitive lifting test.

    PubMed

    Sparto, P J; Parnianpour, M; Reinsel, T E; Simon, S

    1997-11-15

    A repetitive lifting test in the sagittal plane was performed with a submaximal load at a maximal lifting rate to understand the effects of fatigue on kinematic and kinetic measures of performance. To quantify the effect of fatigue during a highly repetitive lifting task, in terms of lifting force transmitted to the load, joint motion patterns, and internal joint load sharing. Industrial surveillance and epidemiologic data suggest that repetitive lifting is a risk factor for low back pain. Previous studies examining the effect of fatigue have either been constrained to isolated trunk movement, or have not explored the internal load distribution and potential alteration in the loading patterns. Sixteen healthy male subjects performed repetitive lifting in the sagittal plane with a load equal to 25% of their maximal lifting capacity, at a maximal lifting rate. Changes in lifting performance were determined from the power transferred to the box, joint kinematics, and joint kinetics. Data from three cycles at the start and end of the exercise were tested for the effect of fatigue using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Fatigue was documented by a reduction in average lifting force and hip and spine torque generation, whereas internal joint load sharing was relatively unchanged. The fatigue was associated with decreased knee and hip motion, and increased lumbar flexion. Decreased postural stability also was evident. The significant decrease in postural stability and force generation capability because of the repetitive lifting task indicated a higher risk of injury in the presence of unexpected perturbation. Multijoint coordinated lifting tasks provide a more realistic protocol to study neuromuscular fatigue.

  19. Protect Your Back: Guidelines for Safer Lifting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantu, Carolyn O.

    2002-01-01

    Examines back injury in teachers and child care providers; includes statistics, common causes of back pain (improper alignment, improper posture, improper lifting, and carrying), and types of back pain (acute and chronic). Focuses on preventing back injury, body mechanics for lifting and carrying, and proper lifting and carrying of children. (SD)

  20. 30 CFR 56.16016 - Lift trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lift trucks. 56.16016 Section 56.16016 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND....16016 Lift trucks. Fork and other similar types of lift trucks shall be operated with the— (a) Upright...

  1. 30 CFR 57.16016 - Lift trucks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lift trucks. 57.16016 Section 57.16016 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... § 57.16016 Lift trucks. Fork and other similar types of lift trucks shall be operated with the: (a...

  2. 46 CFR 64.43 - Lifting fittings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifting fittings. 64.43 Section 64.43 Shipping COAST... HANDLING SYSTEMS Standards for an MPT § 64.43 Lifting fittings. Each MPT must have attached lifting fittings so that the tank remains horizontal and stable while being moved....

  3. Protect Your Back: Guidelines for Safer Lifting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantu, Carolyn O.

    2002-01-01

    Examines back injury in teachers and child care providers; includes statistics, common causes of back pain (improper alignment, improper posture, improper lifting, and carrying), and types of back pain (acute and chronic). Focuses on preventing back injury, body mechanics for lifting and carrying, and proper lifting and carrying of children. (SD)

  4. Project LIFT: Year Three Student Outcomes Memo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Michael; Kim, Dae Y.; Long, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Research for Action (RFA) was commissioned to evaluate changes in student outcomes during the first three years of the Project Leadership and Investment for Transformation (LIFT). This report focuses on two questions: (1) how do LIFT students' behavioral and academic performance compare to those of a matched set of non-LIFT comparison students?;…

  5. Vertical Lift - Not Just For Terrestrial Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A

    2000-01-01

    Autonomous vertical lift vehicles hold considerable potential for supporting planetary science and exploration missions. This paper discusses several technical aspects of vertical lift planetary aerial vehicles in general, and specifically addresses technical challenges and work to date examining notional vertical lift vehicles for Mars, Titan, and Venus exploration.

  6. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish a system of regular and frequent maintenance checks of lifts sufficient to determine if they are operative...

  7. An Alternative Maxillary Sinus Lift Technique – Sinu Lift System

    PubMed Central

    T, Parthasaradhi; B, Shivakumar; Kumar, T.S.S.; P, Suganya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Maxillary sinus augmentation surgical techniques have evolved greatly allowing successful placement of dental implants in the atrophic posterior maxillary region. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and postoperative morbidity of sinus floor elevation procedures performed using the minimally invasive surgical technique the Sinu lift system. Materials and Methods: Sinus lift procedure was done using the sinu lift system by a transcrestal approach and bone augmentation was done on ten systemically healthy patients using β- tricalcium phosphate and platelet rich plasma mix. The study was evaluated upto six months period with bone related parameters being assessed at base line using CT scan, OPG and after six months the results were analysed using SPSS Version 18.0 software (p < 0.01 (0.005). Wilcoxson signed rank sum test was used to correlate between preoperative and postoperative measurements. Implant placements were done at the desired area of sinus augmentation with a two year follow up. (Nobel Biocare, Nobel Biocare Holding AG, Zürich-Flughafen, Switzerland) Results: The augmented sites had a significant increase in the bone parameters at the desired grafted region. The mean gain in bone height as observed in CT Scan had revealed increased measurements from 5.80mm±0.98 to 10.20mm±1.68 at the sixth month evaluation. This was statistically significant (0.005). Clinically, no complications were observed during or after the surgical procedure. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the Sinu lift system with a controlled working action resulted in high procedural success and this procedure may be an alternative to the currently used surgical methods. PMID:25954702

  8. An alternative maxillary sinus lift technique - sinu lift system.

    PubMed

    T, Parthasaradhi; B, Shivakumar; Kumar, T S S; Jain, Ashish R; P, Suganya

    2015-03-01

    Maxillary sinus augmentation surgical techniques have evolved greatly allowing successful placement of dental implants in the atrophic posterior maxillary region. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and postoperative morbidity of sinus floor elevation procedures performed using the minimally invasive surgical technique the Sinu lift system. Sinus lift procedure was done using the sinu lift system by a transcrestal approach and bone augmentation was done on ten systemically healthy patients using β- tricalcium phosphate and platelet rich plasma mix. The study was evaluated upto six months period with bone related parameters being assessed at base line using CT scan, OPG and after six months the results were analysed using SPSS Version 18.0 software (p < 0.01 (0.005). Wilcoxson signed rank sum test was used to correlate between preoperative and postoperative measurements. Implant placements were done at the desired area of sinus augmentation with a two year follow up. (Nobel Biocare, Nobel Biocare Holding AG, Zürich-Flughafen, Switzerland) Results: The augmented sites had a significant increase in the bone parameters at the desired grafted region. The mean gain in bone height as observed in CT Scan had revealed increased measurements from 5.80mm±0.98 to 10.20mm±1.68 at the sixth month evaluation. This was statistically significant (0.005). Clinically, no complications were observed during or after the surgical procedure. Within the limitations of this study, the Sinu lift system with a controlled working action resulted in high procedural success and this procedure may be an alternative to the currently used surgical methods.

  9. Maximal aerobic capacity for repetitive lifting: comparison with three standard exercise testing modes.

    PubMed

    Sharp, M A; Harman, E; Vogel, J A; Knapik, J J; Legg, S J

    1988-01-01

    A multi-stage, repetitive lifting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) test was developed to be used as an occupational research tool which would parallel standard ergometric VO2max testing procedures. The repetitive lifting VO2max test was administered to 18 men using an automatic repetitive lifting device. An intraclass reliability coefficient of 0.91 was obtained with data from repeated tests on seven subjects. Repetitive lifting VO2max test responses were compared to those for treadmill, cycle ergometer and arm crank ergometer. The mean +/- SD repetitive lifting VO2max of 3.20 +/- 0.42 l.min-1 was significantly (p less than 0.01) less than treadmill VO2max (delta = 0.92 l.min-1) and cycle ergometer VO2max (delta = 0.43 l.min-1) and significantly greater than arm crank ergometer VO2max (delta = 0.63 l.min-1). The correlation between repetitive lifting oxygen uptake and power output was r = 0.65. VO2max correlated highly among exercise modes, but maximum power output did not. The efficiency of repetitive lifting exercise was significantly greater than that for arm cranking and less than that for leg cycling. The repetitive lifting VO2max test has an important advantage over treadmill or cycle ergometer tests in the determination of relative repetitive lifting intensities. The individual curves of VO2 vs. power output established during the multi-stage lifting VO2max test can be used to accurately select work loads required to elicit given percentages of maximal oxygen uptake.

  10. Education as Power. Report of Americans for Indian Opportunity Title IV, Part A, Technical Assistance Conference (Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 4-6, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    Included in this report on the 1977 Title IV Part A Technical Assistance conference held in Albuquerque are: (1) a descriptive narrative of conference events; (2) a summary of the 120 evaluation responses; and (3) the resolutions adopted by conference participants as a specific vehicle to make their concerns known to the Office of Indian Education…

  11. Conference Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, W. Warner, Ed.; Beckhard, Richard, Ed.

    This book, written to instruct in the use of a conference as a medium of social intercourse, is divided into four sections. Section I, which contains five articles, deals with factors to be considered in planning a conference. Specific techniques one can employ to improve a conference and several different techniques for evaluating the…

  12. Changes and Challenges: The Power of Education to Build the World to Which We Aspire. Australian College of Educators (ACE) National Conference Proceedings (Sydney, Australia, September 26-27, 2016)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikin, Kerrie, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The theme of the 2016 National Conference of the Australian College of Educators (ACE), "Challenges and changes: The power of education to build the world to which we aspire," provided a unique opportunity for education professionals to carefully consider and propose papers, workshops, and poster sessions to stimulate discussion and…

  13. Got Languages? Powerful Skills for the 21st Century. Dimension 2011. Selected Proceedings of the 2011 Joint Conference of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching, the Louisiana Foreign Language Teachers' Association, and the Southeastern Association of Language Learning Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Carol, Ed.; Swanson, Peter B., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) held its annual conference March 10-12, 2011, at the Crowne Plaza in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in collaboration with the Louisiana Foreign Language Teachers Association (LFLTA) and the Southeastern Association of Language Learning Technology (SEALLT). Those individuals whose proposals were…

  14. Got Languages? Powerful Skills for the 21st Century. Dimension 2011. Selected Proceedings of the 2011 Joint Conference of the Southern Conference on Language Teaching, the Louisiana Foreign Language Teachers' Association, and the Southeastern Association of Language Learning Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Carol, Ed.; Swanson, Peter B., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Southern Conference on Language Teaching (SCOLT) held its annual conference March 10-12, 2011, at the Crowne Plaza in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in collaboration with the Louisiana Foreign Language Teachers Association (LFLTA) and the Southeastern Association of Language Learning Technology (SEALLT). Those individuals whose proposals were…

  15. Experimental assessment of thermal effects of high power density light stimulation for optogenetics control of deep brain structures (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senova, Suhan; Scisniak, Ilona; Chiang, Chih Chieh; Doignon, Isabelle; Martin, Claire; Palfi, Stephane; Chaillet, Antoine; Pain, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    2D surface maps of light distribution and temperature increase were recorded in wild type anesthetized rats brains during 90s light stimulation at 478nm (blue) and 638nm (red) with continuous or pulsed optical stimulations with corresponding power ranging from 100 up to 1200 mW/mm² at the output of an optical fiber. Post mortem maps were recorded in the same animals to assess the cooling effect of blood flow. Post mortem histological analysis were carried out to assess whether high power light stimulations had phototoxic effects or could trigger non physiological functional activation. Temperature increase remains below physiological changes (0,5 -1°) for stimulations up to 400mW/mm² at 40Hz. . Histology did not show significant irreversible modifications or damage to the tissues. The spatial profile of light distribution and heat were correlated and demonstrate as expected a rapid attenuation with diatnce to the fiber.

  16. Gluteal lift with subfascial implants.

    PubMed

    de la Peña-Salcedo, Jose Abel; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; Vaquera-Guevara, Marcelo Osvaldo; Lopez-Salguero, Jose Fernando; Lavareda-Santana, Marco Antonio; Ledezma-Rodriguez, Jocelyn Celeste

    2013-06-01

    Gluteal enhancement surgery includes buttock implants, gluteal flaps, lipografting, and gluteal lifts. However, no information is available on the outcomes achievable using the gluteal lift combined with subfascial gluteal implants. A retrospective study was performed to analyze the outcomes of gluteal lift combined with subfascial gluteal implants performed during a 7-year period by a single surgeon at a single institution. During the study period, 114 patients (228 implants) ages 27-68 years (mean 47 years) were found. The follow-up period was 1-7 years (mean 4.5 years). The findings showed seroma in 11.4 % of the patients, hematoma in 5.26 %, minor wound dehiscence in 19.29 %, major wound dehiscence in 1.75 %, minor infection in 1.75 %, implant exposure in 0 %, capsular contracture Becker 3 and 4 in 3.5 %, implant rupture in 0 %, implant malposition in 5.25 %, long-term numbness of the buttock in 0 %, palpability of the implant in 0 %, implant rippling in 0 %, implant rupture in 0 %, wide scars in 41.2 %, need for secondary surgery in 26.31 %, and dissatisfaction with the final volume in 10.52 %. A patient satisfaction rate of 9.6 in 10 was found. The study showed that the gluteal lift combined with gluteal implants placed in the subfascial pocket provided good long-lasting results with an acceptable rate of complications, very high patient satisfaction, and easily concealed scars. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  17. Aerodynamics of Supersonic Lifting Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    verso of front cover. 19 Y WOROS (Continue on rt.’,;erso side i recessary and identily by block number) Theoretical Aerodynamics Lifting Bodies Wind ...waverider solution, developed from the supersonic wedge flow solution, is then i Fused to fashion vertLcal stabilizer-likh control surfaces. Wind ...served as Project Engineers ror thE wind tunnel work. Important contributions were also made bv: Mr. iis±ung Miin; Lee, -M. Beom-Soo Kim, Mtr. Martin Weeks

  18. Numerical simulation of lifting mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebel, E. S.; Zhursenbaev, B. I.; Solomin, V. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    The article presents a method of kinematical synthesis of planar multilink linkage with adjustable closed loop, which is designed for a plane-parallel motion of the output lever and can be used as an actuator for lifting mechanism. Methods of kinematical synthesis and analysis are developed in this paper allow to design the scheme of mechanism that performs the given function of displacement of the output link, and to evaluate the kinematical characteristics of the designed layout.

  19. PESC '86; Annual Power Electronics Specialists Conference, 17th, Vancouver, Canada, June 23-27, 1986, Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papers are presented on the control of switched-mode converter harmonic-free terminal waveforms through internal energy storage; the zero voltage switching technique in dc/dc converters; the use of depletion mode MOSFET devices in synchronous rectification; the switching behavior of a BIMOS switching plate; the effects of coupled output chokes on loop dynamics in multiple output converters; and the steady-state analysis and design of parallel resonant converters. Topics discussed include an approach to modeling double converters; the conducted interference voltage of ac-dc converters; backward noise generation in dc-to-dc converters; a harmonic current compensator composed of a static power converter; the overall efficiency of class E power converters; variations of quasi-resonant dc-dc converter topologies; and an optimum delta modulation strategy for inverter operation. Consideration is given to the nonlinear torque control of electric motor drives; the closed-loop dynamic response of a static Scherbius drive; the sliding mode control of dc-ac converters; an adaptive current controller for PWM inverters; a programmable simulator for photovoltaic generators; and Space Station 20 kHz power management and distribution system.

  20. Research on speed control of secondary regulation lifting system of parking equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Faye

    2005-12-01

    Hydrostatic transmission with secondary regulation is a new kind of hydrostatic transmission that can regenerate inertial and gravitational energy of load. On the basis of an in-depth analysis of the working principles and energy-saving mechanisms of the parking equipment lifting systems with, secondary regulating technology, this paper proposes a method of regenerating a lifting system's inertial energy by controlling rotational speed and reclaiming the gravitational energy by use of a constant rotational speed. Considering large changes of the parameters of lifting systems and then non-linearity, a fuzzy control was adopted to control the lifting system, and a mathematical model of the system was established. By simulation and experiment of the lifting system, the conclusion was reached a lifting system's braking achieved by controlling rotational speed is reliable and stable at a definite speed. It also permits changing the efficiency of recovery by changing the rotational speed. The design power of the lifting system can be chosen in terms of the system's average power, so the system's power can be reduced and energy savings achieved.

  1. Generalised Eisenhart lift of the Toda chain

    SciTech Connect

    Cariglia, Marco; Gibbons, Gary

    2014-02-15

    The Toda chain of nearest neighbour interacting particles on a line can be described both in terms of geodesic motion on a manifold with one extra dimension, the Eisenhart lift, or in terms of geodesic motion in a symmetric space with several extra dimensions. We examine the relationship between these two realisations and discover that the symmetric space is a generalised, multi-particle Eisenhart lift of the original problem that reduces to the standard Eisenhart lift. Such generalised Eisenhart lift acts as an inverse Kaluza-Klein reduction, promoting coupling constants to momenta in higher dimension. In particular, isometries of the generalised lift metric correspond to energy preserving transformations that mix coordinates and coupling constants. A by-product of the analysis is that the lift of the Toda Lax pair can be used to construct higher rank Killing tensors for both the standard and generalised lift metrics.

  2. Lift enhancement by bats' dynamically changing wingspan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu

    2015-01-01

    This paper elucidates the aerodynamic role of the dynamically changing wingspan in bat flight. Based on direct numerical simulations of the flow over a slow-flying bat, it is found that the dynamically changing wingspan can significantly enhance the lift. Further, an analysis of flow structures and lift decomposition reveal that the elevated vortex lift associated with the leading-edge vortices intensified by the dynamically changing wingspan considerably contributed to enhancement of the time-averaged lift. The nonlinear interaction between the dynamically changing wing and the vortical structures plays an important role in the lift enhancement of a flying bat in addition to the geometrical effect of changing the lifting-surface area in a flapping cycle. In addition, the dynamically changing wingspan leads to the higher efficiency in terms of generating lift for a given amount of the mechanical energy consumed in flight. PMID:26701882

  3. Variable Lifting Index (VLI): A New Method for Evaluating Variable Lifting Tasks.

    PubMed

    Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting Index (VLI). There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift Index (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift Index (CLI) equation is used with lifting index (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  4. The relationship between maximal lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift in strength-based soldiering tasks.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert J; Best, Stuart A; Carstairs, Greg L; Ham, Daniel J

    2012-07-01

    Psychophysical assessments, such as the maximum acceptable lift, have been used to establish worker capability and set safe load limits for manual handling tasks in occupational settings. However, in military settings, in which task demand is set and capable workers must be selected, subjective measurements are inadequate, and maximal capacity testing must be used to assess lifting capability. The aim of this study was to establish and compare the relationship between maximal lifting capacity and a self-determined tolerable lifting limit, maximum acceptable lift, across a range of military-relevant lifting tasks. Seventy male soldiers (age 23.7 ± 6.1 years) from the Australian Army performed 7 strength-based lifting tasks to determine their maximum lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift. Comparisons were performed to identify maximum acceptable lift relative to maximum lifting capacity for each individual task. Linear regression was used to identify the relationship across all tasks when the data were pooled. Strong correlations existed between all 7 lifting tasks (rrange = 0.87-0.96, p < 0.05). No differences were found in maximum acceptable lift relative to maximum lifting capacity across all tasks (p = 0.46). When data were pooled, maximum acceptable lift was equal to 84 ± 8% of the maximum lifting capacity. This study is the first to illustrate the strong and consistent relationship between maximum lifting capacity and maximum acceptable lift for multiple single lifting tasks. The relationship developed between these indices may be used to help assess self-selected manual handling capability through occupationally relevant maximal performance tests.

  5. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SEMICONDUCTOR INJECTION LASERS SELCO-87: Behavior of gain-guided lasers generating high-power nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbert, G.

    1988-11-01

    Computer-controlled apparatus was used in an investigation of gain-guided narrow-stripe AlGaAs double heterostructure lasers. These lasers were excited with current pulses of 10 ns duration and amplitudes up to 3 A. The watt-ampere characteristics together with near- and far-field radiation patterns were considered using an analytic model of the lasers. The results showed that the values of the gain under a stripe contact or of the absorption outside this region varied with the output power.

  6. Abdominal lift for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Koti, Rahul; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-31

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (key-hole removal of the gallbladder) is now the most often used method for treatment of symptomatic gallstones. Several cardiopulmonary changes (decreased cardiac output, pulmonary compliance, and increased peak airway pressure) occur during pneumoperitoneum, which is now introduced to allow laparoscopic cholecystectomy. These cardiopulmonary changes may not be tolerated in individuals with poor cardiopulmonary reserve. To assess the benefits and harms of abdominal wall lift compared to pneumoperitoneum in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2013. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing abdominal wall lift (with or without pneumoperitoneum) versus pneumoperitoneum. We calculated the risk ratio (RR), rate ratio (RaR), or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on intention-to-treat analysis with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using the Review Manager (RevMan) software. For abdominal wall lift with pneumoperitoneum versus pneumoperitoneum, a total of 130 participants (all with low anaesthetic risk) scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised in five trials to abdominal wall lift with pneumoperitoneum (n = 53) versus pneumoperitoneum only (n = 52). One trial which included 25 people did not state the number of participants in each group. All five trials had a high risk of bias. There was no mortality or conversion to open cholecystectomy in any of the participants in the trials that reported these outcomes. There was no significant difference in the rate of serious adverse events between the two groups (two trials; 2/29 events (0.069 events per person) versus 2/29 events (0.069 events per person); rate ratio 1.00; 95% CI 0

  7. Abdominal lift for laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Koti, Rahul; Samraj, Kumarakrishnan; Davidson, Brian R

    2012-05-16

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (key-hole removal of the gallbladder) is now the most often used method for treatment of symptomatic gallstones. Several cardiopulmonary changes (decreased cardiac output, pulmonary compliance, and increased peak airway pressure) occur during pneumoperitoneum, which is now introduced to allow laparoscopic cholecystectomy. These cardiopulmonary changes may not be tolerated in individuals with poor cardiopulmonary reserve. To assess the benefits and harms of abdominal wall lift compared with pneumoperitoneum in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded until January 2012. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing abdominal wall lift (with or without pneumoperitoneum) versus pneumoperitoneum. We calculated the risk ratio (RR), rate ratio (RaR), or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on intention-to-treat analysis with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using RevMan software. For abdominal wall lift with pneumoperitoneum versus pneumoperitoneum, a total of 156 participants (all with low anaesthetic risk) who underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomised in six trials to abdominal wall lift with pneumoperitoneum (n = 65) versus pneumoperitoneum only (n = 66). One trial which included 25 patients did not state the number of patients in each group. All six trials had a high risk of bias. There was no mortality or conversion to open cholecystectomy in any of the patients in the trials that reported these outcomes. There was no significant difference in the rate of serious adverse events between the two groups (2 trials; 2/29 events (0.069 events per patient) versus 2/29 events (0.069 events per patient); rate ratio 1.00; 95% CI 0.17 to 5.77). None of the

  8. Analog time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) optical focusing inside scattering media with high power gain (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Focusing light deep inside scattering media plays a key role in such biomedical applications as high resolution optical imaging, control, and therapy. In recent years, wavefront shaping technologies have come a long way in controlling light propagation in complex media. A prominent example is time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) focusing, which allows noninvasive introduction of "guide stars" inside biological tissue to guide light focusing. By measuring the optical wavefront emanating from an ultrasound focus created at the target location, TRUE determines the desired wavefront non-iteratively, and achieves focusing at the target position via a subsequent optical time reversal. Compared to digital counterparts that employ slow electronic spatial light modulators and cameras, analog TRUE focusing relies on nonlinear photorefractive crystals that inherently accommodate more spatial modes and eliminate the troublesome alignment and data transfer required by digital approaches. However, analog TRUE focusing suffers from its small gain, defined as the energy or power ratio between the focusing and probing beams in the focal volume. Here, by implementing a modified analog TRUE focusing scheme that squeezes the duration of the time-reversed photon packet below the carrier-recombination-limited hologram decay time of the crystal, we demonstrated a photon flux amplification much greater than unity at a preset focal voxel in between two scattering layers. Although the energy gain was still below unity, the unprecedented power gain will nevertheless benefit new biomedical applications.

  9. Aerospace technology and commercial nuclear power; Proceedings of the Workshop Conference, Williamsburg, VA, November 18-20, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, J.

    An attempt has been made to compare the technologies, institutions and procedures of the aerospace and commercial nuclear power industries, in order to characterize similarities and contrasts as well as to identify the most fruitful means by which to transfer information, technology, and procedures between the two industries. The seven working groups involved in this study took as their topics powerplant design formulation and effectiveness, plant safety and operations, powerplant control technology and integration, economic and financial analyses, public relations, and the management of nuclear waste and spent fuel. Consequential differences are noted between the two industries in matters of certification and licencing procedures, assignment of responsibility for both safety and financial performance, and public viewpoint. Areas for beneficial interaction include systems management and control and safety system technology. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  10. Aerospace technology and commercial nuclear power; Proceedings of the Workshop Conference, Williamsburg, VA, November 18-20, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grey, J. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    An attempt has been made to compare the technologies, institutions and procedures of the aerospace and commercial nuclear power industries, in order to characterize similarities and contrasts as well as to identify the most fruitful means by which to transfer information, technology, and procedures between the two industries. The seven working groups involved in this study took as their topics powerplant design formulation and effectiveness, plant safety and operations, powerplant control technology and integration, economic and financial analyses, public relations, and the management of nuclear waste and spent fuel. Consequential differences are noted between the two industries in matters of certification and licencing procedures, assignment of responsibility for both safety and financial performance, and public viewpoint. Areas for beneficial interaction include systems management and control and safety system technology. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  11. Aerospace technology and commercial nuclear power; Proceedings of the Workshop Conference, Williamsburg, VA, November 18-20, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grey, J. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    An attempt has been made to compare the technologies, institutions and procedures of the aerospace and commercial nuclear power industries, in order to characterize similarities and contrasts as well as to identify the most fruitful means by which to transfer information, technology, and procedures between the two industries. The seven working groups involved in this study took as their topics powerplant design formulation and effectiveness, plant safety and operations, powerplant control technology and integration, economic and financial analyses, public relations, and the management of nuclear waste and spent fuel. Consequential differences are noted between the two industries in matters of certification and licencing procedures, assignment of responsibility for both safety and financial performance, and public viewpoint. Areas for beneficial interaction include systems management and control and safety system technology. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  12. 20-junction photonic power converter performance under non-uniform illumination calculated by 3D distributed circuit model (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, Sanmeet; Wilkins, Mathew M.; Masson, Denis P.; Fafard, Simon; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Distributed circuit models (DCM) divide photovoltaic devices into discrete elementary units. Each unit is assigned an equivalent circuit based on geometry and location, with circuit parameters being fit to or extrapolated from experimental results. Interconnection of these elementary units with ohmic resistors representing lateral and vertical resistances within the layers of the device forms the complete circuit model. DCMs allow grid design optimization, simulation of chromatic aberration, luminescent coupling and analysis of power losses due to regionally specific resistances, which are not possible with simple lumped models. Previous DCMs have been limited to 1-3 junction devices, using a 2D surface model, or use of a one-diode circuit model for the cell junctions. Furthermore, a DCM can be used to simulate complex multi-junction devices with non-uniform illumination, whereas in comprehensive physics-based simulators like Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus this would require vastly greater computational resources. In this work, a parameterized 3D distributed circuit model was developed to calculate the performance of III-V solar cells and photonic power converters (PPC) with a variable number of epitaxially stacked pn junctions. We validated these calculations against published results using a similar 3D model for a 1-junction solar cell. Furthermore, experimental results from Azastra Opto's 20-junction PPC illuminated by an 845 nm diode laser are compared. These devices are designed with many pn junctions to achieve higher voltages and to operate under non-uniform illumination profiles from a laser or LED. The effect on device performance of varying both these parameters will be discussed.

  13. Auxiliary lift propulsion system with oversized front fan

    SciTech Connect

    Castells, O.T.; Johnson, J.E.; Rundell, D.J.

    1980-09-16

    A propulsion system for use primarily in V/STOL aircraft is provided with a variable cycle, double bypass gas turbofan engine and a remote augmenter to produce auxiliary lift. The fan is oversized in air-pumping capability with respect to the cruise flight requirements of the remainder of the engine and a variable area, low pressure turbine is capable of supplying varying amounts of rotational energy to the oversized fan, thereby modulating its speed and pumping capability. During powered lift flight, the variable cycle engine is operated in the single bypass mode with the oversized fan at its maximum pumping capability. In this mode, substantially all of the bypass flow is routed as an auxiliary airstream to the remote augmenter where it is mixed with fuel, burned and exhausted through a vectorable nozzle to produce thrust for lifting. Additional lift is generated by the high energy products of combustion of the variable cycle engine which are further energized in an afterburner and exhausted through a thrust vectorable nozzle at the rear of the engine.

  14. Tethered lifting systems for measurements in the lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Michael Lamar

    2000-10-01

    This work defines a Tethered Lifting System for measurements in the lower atmosphere, its design and development, and applications for its use. Using historical kite research and the unique capabilities of tethered lifting platforms as motivation, a complete system has been created offering the complementary benefits of parafoil kites and tethered balloons as lifting platforms. Support systems including tethers, winching systems and payload data collection and telemetry systems round out the Tethered Lifting System to provide a complete atmospheric measurement system. The kite platforms have been enhanced by the invention and development of a wind-powered Tether Rover for Atmospheric Research (WindTRAM), providing rapid profiling and precise positioning capabilities. Design of the WindTRAM and implementation of onboard feedback control are covered in detail, as they comprise the most novel contribution of this research. The breadth of possible applications for these technologies is touched upon by examination of some of the specific research applications undertaken by the researchers at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences during the last decade.

  15. Overview of NASA HSR high-lift program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, William P.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of the NASA High-Speed Research (HSR) Program being conducted to develop the technologies essential for the successful U.S. development of a commercial supersonic air transport in the 2005 timeframe are provided. The HSR program is being conducted in two phases, with the first phase stressing technology to ensure environmental acceptability and the second phase stressing technology to make the vehicle economically viable (in contrast to the current Concorde design). During Phase 1 of the program, a key element of the environmental emphases is minimization of community noise through effective engine nozzle noise suppression technology and through improving the performance of high-lift systems. An overview of the current Phase 1 High-Lift Program, directed at technology for community noise reduction, is presented. The total target for takeoff engine noise reduction to meet expected regulations is believed to be about 20 EPNdB. The high-lift research is stressing the exploration of innovative high-lift concepts and advanced flight operations procedures to achieve a substantial (approximately 6 EPNdB) reduction in community noise to supplement the reductions expected from engine nozzle noise suppression concepts; primary concern is focused on the takeoff and climbout operations where very high engine power settings are used. Significant reductions in aerodynamic drag in this regime will allow substantial reductions in the required engine thrust levels and therefore reductions in the noise generated.

  16. Dynamical regimes and hydrodynamic lift of viscous vesicles under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meßlinger, Sebastian; Schmidt, Benjamin; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2009-07-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional viscous vesicles in shear flow, with different fluid viscosities ηin and ηout inside and outside, respectively, is studied using mesoscale simulation techniques. Besides the well-known tank-treading and tumbling motions, an oscillatory swinging motion is observed in the simulations for large shear rate. The existence of this swinging motion requires the excitation of higher-order undulation modes (beyond elliptical deformations) in two dimensions. Keller-Skalak theory is extended to deformable two-dimensional vesicles, such that a dynamical phase diagram can be predicted for the reduced shear rate and the viscosity contrast ηin/ηout . The simulation results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, when thermal fluctuations are incorporated in the theory. Moreover, the hydrodynamic lift force, acting on vesicles under shear close to a wall, is determined from simulations for various viscosity contrasts. For comparison, the lift force is calculated numerically in the absence of thermal fluctuations using the boundary-integral method for equal inside and outside viscosities. Both methods show that the dependence of the lift force on the distance ycm of the vesicle center of mass from the wall is well described by an effective power law ycm-2 for intermediate distances 0.8Rp≲ycm≲3Rp with vesicle radius Rp . The boundary-integral calculation indicates that the lift force decays asymptotically as 1/[ycmln(ycm)] far from the wall.

  17. Lift enhancement by trapped vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of lift enhancement by trapped vortex are provided. Efforts are continuously being made to find simple ways to convert wings of aircraft from an efficient cruise configuration to one that develops the high lift needed during landing and takeoff. The high-lift configurations studied here consist of conventional airfoils with a trapped vortex over the upper surface. The vortex is trapped by one or two vertical fences that serve as barriers to the oncoming stream and as reflection planes for the vortex and the sink that form a separation bubble on top of the airfoil. Since the full three-dimensional unsteady flow problem over the wing of an aircraft is so complicated that it is hard to get an understanding of the principles that govern the vortex trapping process, the analysis is restricted here to the flow field illustrated in the first slide. It is assumed that the flow field between the two end plates approximates a streamwise strip of the flow over a wing. The flow between the endplates and about the airfoil consists of a spanwise vortex located between the suction orifices in the endplates. The spanwise fence or spoiler located near the nose of the airfoil serves to form a separated flow region and a shear layer. The vorticity in the shear layer is concentrated into the vortex by withdrawal of fluid at the suction orifices. As the strength of the vortex increases with time, it eventually dominates the flow in the separated region so that a shear or vertical layer is no longer shed from the tip of the fence. At that point, the vortex strength is fixed and its location is such that all of the velocity contributions at its center sum to zero thereby making it an equilibrium point for the vortex. The results of a theoretical analysis of such an idealized flow field are described.

  18. Ultrasonically assisted face-lift.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Jose Abel; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; López-Salguero, José Fernando

    2012-08-01

    The face-lift procedure is one of the most skillful interventions performed by plastic surgeons. Ultrasonic energy is used to elevate the facial skin flap, which allows for preservation of vascular, lymphatic, and nervous structures, thereby decreasing the morbidity associated with this procedure. A retrospective study to compare the outcomes of ultrasound and non-ultrasound-assisted face-lifts is reported. All the procedures were performed at the Institute for Plastic Surgery. Each group consisted of 104 patients. Statistical analysis was performed to determine differences between the groups. The mean operating time was 4 h in the treatment group versus 4.2 h in the control group (p>0.05). The incidence of hematoma formation was 0.96% in the treatment group versus 2.4% in the control group (p<0.05). The incidence of flap necrosis was 0% in both groups. The duration of ecchymosis was 13 days in the experimental group versus 17.2 days in the control group (p<0.05). The duration of postoperative swelling was 17.4 days in the treatment group versus 20.4 days in the control group (p<0.05). As reported, 85% of patients in the treatment group were very satisfied, 14.42% were satisfied, 0% were mildly satisfied, and 0% were not satisfied. In the control group, 80.7% were very satisfied, 18.26% were satisfied, 0.96% were mildly satisfied, and 0% were not satisfied. According to Fisher's exact test, the p value for patient satisfaction exceeded 0.05%. The preservation of the blood and lymphatic vessels diminishes postoperative swelling and shortens the duration of ecchymosis considerably. The incidence of hematoma formation is lower than with a non-ultrasonic face-lift. This study failed to prove any statistically significant difference in operating time or patient satisfaction between the two groups.

  19. On the Estimation of Time Dependent Lift of a European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) during Flapping Flight.

    PubMed

    Stalnov, Oksana; Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam J; Guglielmo, Christopher G; Kopp, Gregory A; Liberzon, Alexander; Gurka, Roi

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of unsteady lift in the context of flapping wing bird flight. Both aerodynamicists and biologists have attempted to address this subject, yet it seems that the contribution of unsteady lift still holds many open questions. The current study deals with the estimation of unsteady aerodynamic forces on a freely flying bird through analysis of wingbeat kinematics and near wake flow measurements using time resolved particle image velocimetry. The aerodynamic forces are obtained through two approaches, the unsteady thin airfoil theory and using the momentum equation for viscous flows. The unsteady lift is comprised of circulatory and non-circulatory components. Both approaches are presented over the duration of wingbeat cycles. Using long-time sampling data, several wingbeat cycles have been analyzed in order to cover both the downstroke and upstroke phases. It appears that the unsteady lift varies over the wingbeat cycle emphasizing its contribution to the total lift and its role in power estimations. It is suggested that the circulatory lift component cannot assumed to be negligible and should be considered when estimating lift or power of birds in flapping motion.

  20. On the Estimation of Time Dependent Lift of a European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) during Flapping Flight

    PubMed Central

    Stalnov, Oksana; Ben-Gida, Hadar; Kirchhefer, Adam J.; Guglielmo, Christopher G.; Kopp, Gregory A.; Liberzon, Alexander; Gurka, Roi

    2015-01-01

    We study the role of unsteady lift in the context of flapping wing bird flight. Both aerodynamicists and biologists have attempted to address this subject, yet it seems that the contribution of unsteady lift still holds many open questions. The current study deals with the estimation of unsteady aerodynamic forces on a freely flying bird through analysis of wingbeat kinematics and near wake flow measurements using time resolved particle image velocimetry. The aerodynamic forces are obtained through two approaches, the unsteady thin airfoil theory and using the momentum equation for viscous flows. The unsteady lift is comprised of circulatory and non-circulatory components. Both approaches are presented over the duration of wingbeat cycles. Using long-time sampling data, several wingbeat cycles have been analyzed in order to cover both the downstroke and upstroke phases. It appears that the unsteady lift varies over the wingbeat cycle emphasizing its contribution to the total lift and its role in power estimations. It is suggested that the circulatory lift component cannot assumed to be negligible and should be considered when estimating lift or power of birds in flapping motion. PMID:26394213

  1. The vertical medial thigh lift.

    PubMed

    Capella, Joseph F

    2014-10-01

    This article discusses management of the post-weight loss thigh deformity. Beginning with an explanation of the soft tissue variables contributing to the thigh and medial thigh deformity in the postbariatric individual, the article describes the important elements of selecting and screening candidates for surgery and the ideal sequence of procedures that should be followed to optimize results in this patient population. A detailed step-by-step description of the author's technique for medial thigh lift is provided along with multiple examples of outcomes. Aftercare is reviewed along with potential complications and their management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mathematical model for lift/cruise fan V/STOL aircraft simulator programming data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, M. P.; Fajfar, B.; Konsewicz, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Simulation data are reported for the purpose of programming the flight simulator for advanced aircraft for tests of the lift/cruise fan V/STOL Research Technology Aircraft. These simulation tests are to provide insight into problem areas which are encountered in operational use of the aircraft. A mathematical model is defined in sufficient detail to represent all the necessary pertinent aircraft and system characteristics. The model includes the capability to simulate two basic versions of an aircraft propulsion system: (1) the gas coupled configuration which uses insulated air ducts to transmit power between gas generators and fans in the form of high energy engine exhaust and (2) the mechanically coupled power system which uses shafts, clutches, and gearboxes for power transmittal. Both configurations are modeled such that the simulation can include vertical as well as rolling takeoff and landing, hover, powered lift flight, aerodynamic flight, and the transition between powered lift and aerodynamic flight.

  3. Maximum isoinertial lifting capabilities for different lifting ranges and container dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of lifting range and container dimension on human maximum isoinertial lifting capability in the sagittal plane. Ten young and experienced lifters were tested for their maximum isoinertial lifting capabilities for 12 different lifting conditions (three lifting ranges x four container dimensions). The results showed that lifting range and container dimension significantly affected human maximum isoinertial lifting capability. The order for the highest to lowest lifting capability for the three lifting ranges was FK (from floor to knuckle height, 0-74 cm), FS (from floor to shoulder height, 0-141 cm) and KS (from knuckle height to shoulder height, 74-141 cm) regardless of the container dimension, and for the four container dimensions was 50 x 35 x 15 cm(3), 70 x 35 x 15 cm(3), 50 x 50 x 15 cm(3) and 70 x 50 x 15 cm(3) regardless of the lifting range. The mean(SD) maximum isoinertial lifting capability ranged from 29.3(3.3) kg for the combination of KS range and 70 x 50 x 15 cm(3) container to 53.2(5.7)kg for the combination of FK range and 50 x 35 x 15 cm(3) container. The results of this study can help our knowledge of human maximum isoinertial lifting capability and designing the upper limit of lifting weight.

  4. Flow Control Research at NASA Langley in Support of High-Lift Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, William L., III; Jones, Gregory S.; Moore, Mark D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the efforts at NASA Langley to apply active and passive flow control techniques for improved high-lift systems, and advanced vehicle concepts utilizing powered high-lift techniques. The development of simplified high-lift systems utilizing active flow control is shown to provide significant weight and drag reduction benefits based on system studies. Active flow control that focuses on separation, and the development of advanced circulation control wings (CCW) utilizing unsteady excitation techniques will be discussed. The advanced CCW airfoils can provide multifunctional controls throughout the flight envelope. Computational and experimental data are shown to illustrate the benefits and issues with implementation of the technology.

  5. Factors affecting handling qualities of a lift-fan aircraft during steep terminal area approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerdes, R. M.; Hynes, C. S.

    1975-01-01

    The XV-5B lift-fan aircraft was used to explore the factors affecting handling qualities in the terminal area. A 10 deg ILS approach task was selected to explore these problems. Interception of the glide slope at 457.2 m, glide slope tracking, deceleration along the glide slope to a spot hover were considered. Variations in airplane deck angle, deceleration schedule, and powered-lift management were studied. The overall descent performance envelope was identified on the basis of fan stall, maximum comfortable descent rate, and controllability restrictions. The collective-lift stick provided precise glide slope tracking capability. The pilot preferred a deck-parallel attitude for which he used powered lift to control glide slope and pitch attitude to keep the angle of attack near zero. Workload was reduced when the deceleration schedule was delayed until the aircraft was well established on the glide slope, since thrust vector changes induced flight path disturbances.

  6. HSR High-Lift Technology Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Z. T.

    1999-01-01

    High-lift system performance will have a large impact on airplane noise and weight. Successful completion of PCD1 activities provided greater understanding of aerodynamic characteristics and configuration features important to high-lift system performance including: 1) Reynolds number effects (Ref. H); 2) Propulsion/airframe integration effects; and 3) Planform effects, canard/3-surface, alternate high-lift concepts, etc. PCD2 plans are aimed at achieving technology development performance goals and increasing technology readiness level for Technology Concept.

  7. Military Energy Alternatives Conference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    Power Generation and Alternative Energy Branch US Army RDECOM CERDEC CP&ID Power Division Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD...RDER-CCA-PG PG A E - C R – 1 2– 0 1 M ili ta ry E ne rg y A lte rn at iv es C on fe re nc e Military Energy ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Military Energy Alternatives Conference 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jonathan

  8. The lift-fan aircraft: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the highlights and results of a workshop held at NASA Ames Research Center in October 1992. The objective of the workshop was a thorough review of the lessons learned from past research on lift fans, and lift-fan aircraft, models, designs, and components. The scope included conceptual design studies, wind tunnel investigations, propulsion systems components, piloted simulation, flight of aircraft such as the SV-5A and SV-5B and a recent lift-fan aircraft development project. The report includes a brief summary of five technical presentations that addressed the subject The Lift-Fan Aircraft: Lessons Learned.

  9. Aerodynamic lift effect on satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.; Cleland, J. G.; Devries, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    Numerical quadrature is employed to obtain orbit perturbation results from the general perturbation equations. Both aerodynamic lift and drag forces are included in the analysis of the satellite orbit. An exponential atmosphere with and without atmospheric rotation is used. A comparison is made of the perturbations which are caused by atmospheric rotation with those caused by satellite aerodynamic effects. Results indicate that aerodynamic lift effects on the semi-major axis and orbit inclination can be of the same order as the effects of atmosphere rotation depending upon the orientation of the lift vector. The results reveal the importance of including aerodynamic lift effects in orbit perturbation analysis.

  10. Lift generation by the avian tail.

    PubMed

    Maybury, W J; Rayner, J M; Couldrick, L B

    2001-07-22

    Variation with tail spread of the lift generated by a bird tail was measured on mounted, frozen European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in a wind tunnel at a typical air speed and body and tail angle of attack in order to test predictions of existing aerodynamic theories modelling tail lift. Measured lift at all but the lowest tail spread angles was significantly lower than the predictions of slender wing, leading edge vortex and lifting line models of lift production. Instead, the tail lift coefficient based on tail area was independent of tail spread, tail aspect ratio and maximum tail span. Theoretical models do not predict bird tail lift reliably and, when applied to tail morphology, may underestimate the aerodynamic optimum tail feather length. Flow visualization experiments reveal that an isolated tail generates leading edge vortices as expected for a low-aspect ratio delta wing, but that in the intact bird body-tail interactions are critical in determining tail aerodynamics: lifting vortices shed from the body interact with the tail and degrade tail lift compared with that of an isolated tail.

  11. Correlations in photoacoustic estimates of tumor oxygenation during novel cancer therapies with power Doppler measurements (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Al-Mahrouki, Azza; Elfarnawany, Mai; Lacefield, James C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging of tumor oxygenation can be used to monitor vascular-targeted novel therapies. This study examines how a combination treatment, ultrasound-microbubbles (USMB)/radiation-therapy (XRT) alters oxygen saturation (sO2) estimates, which are then compared to power Doppler (PD) assessments of tumor vascularity. SCID mice were inoculated with subcutaneous, hind-leg PC3 tumors. The treatment consisted of XRT/MB (XRT: 8Gy/single-fraction; USMB: 3%/500 kHz/570kPa; n=3), USMB (n=3) and XRT (n=5) alone and untreated control (n=5). PA/PD imaging was acquired pre-treatment and 2h/24h post-treatment using the VevoLAZR (21 MHz, 750/850 nm). The volumetric tumor sO2 was quantified using histogram distributions and the average mode was computed. The vascularization index (VI), a PD metric of tumor vessel density, was studied along with the sO2 mode by comparing changes at 2h with pre-treatment. Mice whose pre-treatment sO2 levels were over 65%, exhibited a 15% drop in oxygenation at 2h, remaining unchanged by 24h. Examining the sO2 and VI relationships revealed differences between the groups. All groups (except control) exhibited a positive correlation when the ∆VI was plotted as a function of ∆sO2 (r2≥0.85). Mice in the XRT/MB group had the largest slope (11.7) suggesting that a change in sO2 was accompanied by the largest change in vessel density. The slope of the USMB and XRT treatments was 5.6 and 2.9, respectively. The combination treatment induced the largest changes in vessel density and sO2. Early PA estimates of tumor oxygenation appear to correlate with the treatment-induced vascular changes. Such measure could potentially be used for predicting treatment outcome.

  12. Future Roles for Autonomous Vertical Lift in Disaster Relief and Emergency Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2006-01-01

    System analysis concepts are applied to the assessment of potential collaborative contributions of autonomous system and vertical lift (a.k.a. rotorcraft, VTOL, powered-lift, etc.) technologies to the important, and perhaps underemphasized, application domain of disaster relief and emergency response. In particular, an analytic framework is outlined whereby system design functional requirements for an application domain can be derived from defined societal good goals and objectives.

  13. Hybrid Airships for Lift: A New Lift Paradigm and a Pragmatic Assessment of the Vehicle’s Key Operational Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    required lift for flight, Hybrid Airships use a combination of buoyant lift (provided by a gas such as Helium), aerodynamic lift (generated by airflow...AIR FORCE FELLOWS AIR UNIVERSITY HYBRID AIRSHIPS FOR LIFT: A NEW LIFT PARADIGM AND A PRAGMATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE...00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hybrid Airships for Lift: A New Lift Paradigm And A Pragmatic Assessment Of The Vehicle’s Key

  14. 77 FR 20558 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Platform Lifts for Motor Vehicles; Platform Lift...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... route bus systems and vehicles purchased by private entities for use in public transportation to provide... use lifts. FMVSS No. 404, S4.1.1 requires that the lift on each lift-equipped bus, school bus and... Body Company (Blue Bird), the School Bus Manufacturers Technical Council (SBMTC), which represents...

  15. Isolated neck-lifting procedure: isolated stork lift.

    PubMed

    Barbarino, Sheila C; Wu, Allan Y; Morrow, David M

    2013-04-01

    Many patients desire cosmetic improvement of neck laxity when consulting with a plastic surgeon about their face. Neck laxity and loss of the cervicomental angle can be due to multiple components of aging such as skin quality/elasticity, loss of platysma muscle tone, and submental fat accumulation. Traditionally, the procedure of choice for patients with an aging lower face and neck is a cervicofacial rhytidectomy. However, occasionally, a patient wishes to have no other facial surgery than an improvement of their excessive skin of the anterior, lateral, and/or posterior neck. In other instances, a patient may present with having had a face/neck-lifting procedure that left objectionable vertical/diagonal lines at the lateral neck. In both these instances, a surgeon should consider an isolated stork lift (ISL) procedure. An ISL procedure avoids and/or corrects problematic vertical/diagonal lateral neck folds by "walking" the excess skin flaps around the posterior inferior occipital hairline bilaterally, bringing the flaps together at the lateral and posterior neck, which sometimes involves a midline posterior dart excision of the dog ear. A patient presenting with excessive skin of the neck (anterior, lateral, and/or posterior) and/or residual vertical/diagonal skin folds is an excellent candidate for the ISL. The ISL procedure was performed on 273 patients over a 2-year period at The Morrow Institute. Patients were included if they had excessive skin of the anterior, lateral, and/or posterior neck and/or diagonal/vertical lateral bands and did not desire a full face-lifting procedure. Patients were excluded from this study if they would not accept having longer hair in order to cover the scar along the posterior inferior occipital hairline or a midline T-flap skin closure scar at the base of the posterior midline neck. Under a combination of local anesthesia and IV sedation, a postauricular face-lift incision was made that was extended in a circumoccipital fashion

  16. Flight-Determination of the Low-Lift Drag and Longitudinal Stability of a 1/10-Scale Rocket-Powered Model of the Douglas XF4D-1 Airplane at Mach Numbers from 0.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcham, Grady L.; Blanchard, Willard S., Jr.; Hastings, Earl C., Jr.

    1951-01-01

    A flight investigation has been made to determine the drag and longitudinal stability of a 1/10- scale model of the Douglas XF4D-1 airplane from Mach numbers 0.7 to 1.4 at lift coefficients near zero. The drag rise occurred near M = 0.95. The external drag coefficient was a constant value of about 0.012 at subsonic speeds up to the point of drag rise where it increased abruptly to a value of 0.030 at M = 1.0 followed by a more gradual increase to a value of 0.038 at M = 1.25. The model indicated that, at 35,000 feet and a level-flight free-stream Mach number of 1.0, the drag of the full-scale airplane would exceed the thrust available from an XJ40-WE-8 engine with after-burning. The transonic trim change was small. The aerodynamic center moved gradually from the most forward location of 21.0-percent mean aerodynamic chord at M = 0.9 to the most rearward location of 40-percent mean aerodynamic chord at M = 1.25. The damping in pitch was low.

  17. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  18. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  19. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  20. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  1. 33 CFR 118.85 - Lights on vertical lift bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lights on vertical lift bridges... BRIDGES BRIDGE LIGHTING AND OTHER SIGNALS § 118.85 Lights on vertical lift bridges. (a) Lift span lights. The vertical lift span of every vertical lift bridge shall be lighted so that the center of the...

  2. Design Considerations for Artificial Lifting of Enhanced Geothermal System Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Xina Xie; K. K. Bloomfield; G. L. Mines; G. M. Shook

    2005-07-01

    This work evaluates the effect of production well pumping requirements on power generation. The amount of work that can be extracted from a geothermal fluid and the rate at which this work is converted to power increase as the reservoir temperature increases. Artificial lifting is an important issue in this process. The results presented are based on a configuration comprising one production well and one injection well, representing an enhanced geothermal system. The effects of the hydraulic conductivity of the geothermal reservoir, the flow rate, and the size of the production casing are considered in the study. Besides submersible pumps, the possibility of using lineshaft pumps is also discussed.

  3. Heavy-lift airship dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. B.; Ringland, R. F.; Jex, H. R.

    1983-01-01

    The basic aerodynamic and dynamic properties of an example heavy-lift airship (HLA) configuration are analyzed using a nonlinear, multibody, 6-degrees-of-freedom digital simulation. The slung-payload model is described, and a preliminary analysis of the coupled vehicle-payload dynamics is presented. Trim calculations show the importance of control mixing selection and suggest performance deficiencies in crosswind stationkeeping for the unloaded example HLA. Numerically linearized dynamics of the unloaded vehicle exhibit a divergent yaw mode and an oscillatory pitch mode whose stability characteristic is sensitive to flight speed. An analysis of the vehicle-payload dynamics shows significant coupling of the payload dynamics with those of the basic HLA. It is shown that significant improvement in the vehicle's dynamic behavior can be achieved with the incorporation of a simple flight controller having proportional, rate, and integral-error feedbacks.

  4. Lip Lifting: Unveiling Dental Beauty.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Kyle; Caligiuri, Matthew; Schlichting, Luís Henrique; Bazos, Panaghiotis K; Magne, Michel

    2017-01-01

    The focus for the achievement of complete success in the esthetic zone has traditionally been on addressing deficiencies of intraoral hard and soft tissue. Often, these deficiencies are accompanied by esthetic concerns regarding the lips that are routinely neglected by the dental team. A predictable plastic surgery technique - the lip lift - has been used for decades to enhance lip esthetics by shortening the senile upper lip to achieve a more youthful appearance. Over the years, this technique has been refined and used in many different ways, allowing its routine incorporation into full facial esthetic planning. Through restoration of the upper lip to its optimal position, the artistry of the dentist and dental technician can truly be appreciated in the rejuvenated smile. By the introduction of this minimally invasive surgical technique to the dental community, patients stand to benefit from a comprehensive orofacial approach to anterior dental esthetic planning.

  5. Improving Grading Consistency through Grade Lift Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet, Ido

    2010-01-01

    We define Grade Lift as the difference between average class grade and average cumulative class GPA. This metric provides an assessment of how lenient the grading was for a given course. In 2006, we started providing faculty members individualized Grade Lift reports reflecting their position relative to an anonymously plotted school-wide…

  6. Training Guidelines: Fork Lift Truck Driving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual of operative training guidelines for fork lift truck driving has been developed by the Ceramics, Glass and Mineral Products Industry Training Board (Great Britain) in consultation with a number of firms which manufacture fork lift trucks or which already have training--programs for their use. The purpose of the guidelines is to assist…

  7. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  8. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish...

  9. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish...

  10. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish...

  11. 49 CFR 37.203 - Lift maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lift maintenance. 37.203 Section 37.203 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.203 Lift maintenance. (a) The entity shall establish...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... American National Standards for “Vehicle Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms,” ANSI A92.2-1969, including appendix. Aerial lifts acquired before January 22, 1973 which do not meet the requirements of ANSI... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... American National Standards for “Vehicle Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms,” ANSI A92.2-1969, including appendix. Aerial lifts acquired before January 22, 1973 which do not meet the requirements of ANSI... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  14. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  15. Hydraulic lift in a neotropical savanna.

    Treesearch

    M.Z. Moreira; F.G. Scholz; S.J. Bucci; L.S. Sternberg; G. Goldstein; F.C. Meinzer; A.C. Franco

    2003-01-01

    We report hydraulic lift in the sawmlia vegetation of central Brazil (Cerrado). Both heat-pulse measurements and isotopic (deuterium) labelling were used to determine whether hydraulic lift occurred in two common species, and whether neighbouring small shrubs and trees were utilizing this water.Both techniques showed water uptake by tap-...

  16. Lifting of evacuation orders and subsequent efforts in Japan.

    PubMed

    Arima, N

    2016-12-01

    With confirmation of the cold shutdown conditions of the nuclear reactors after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Japanese Government reclassified the areas under evacuation orders as follows: (1) difficult-to-return zones (>50 mSv y(-1)), (2) restricted residence zones (20-50 mSv y(-1)), and (3) zones in preparation for lifting of the evacuation order (<20 mSv y(-1)). The Government continued its initiatives towards reconstruction of Fukushima, and has lifted evacuation orders in Zones 2 and 3. In terms of radiological protection, the Government emphasised its policy of placing importance on individual dose, and promoted the assignment of consultants in each municipality.

  17. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  18. Design and analysis of lifting tool assemblies to lift different engine block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Arpana; Deshmukh, Nilaj N.; Chauhan, Santosh; Dabhadkar, Mandar; Deore, Rupali

    2017-07-01

    Engines block are required to be lifted from one place to another while they are being processed. The human effort required for this purpose is more and also the engine block may get damaged if it is not handled properly. There is a need for designing a proper lifting tool which will be able to conveniently lift the engine block and place it at the desired position without any accident and damage to the engine block. In the present study lifting tool assemblies are designed and analyzed in such way that it may lift different categories of engine blocks. The lifting tool assembly consists of lifting plate, lifting ring, cap screws and washers. A parametric model and assembly of Lifting tool is done in 3D modelling software CREO 2.0 and analysis is carried out in ANSYS Workbench 16.0. A test block of weight equivalent to that of an engine block is considered for the purpose of analysis. In the preliminary study, without washer the stresses obtained on the lifting tool were more than the safety margin. In the present design, washers were used with appropriate dimensions which helps to bring down the stresses on the lifting tool within the safety margin. Analysis is carried out to verify that tool design meets the ASME BTH-1 required safety margin.

  19. View of West end of central lift span truss web ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of West end of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing web brace of lift girder superstructure, looking west - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  20. Literature for American Power Conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Recent experimental work of the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration has opened the perspective of a focusing gamma-ray telescope operating in the energy range of nuclear transitions, featuring unprecedented sensitivity, angular and energy resolution. The instrument consists of a tunable crystal diffraction lens situated on a stabilized spacecraft, focusing gamma-rays onto a small array of Germanium detectors perched on an extendible boom. While the weight of such an instrument is less than 500 kg, it features an angular resolution of 15 in., an energy resolution of 2 keV and a 3 {sigma} narrow line sensitivity of a few times 10 {sup {minus}7} photons s{sup {minus}2} cm {sup {minus}2} (10 {sup 6} sec observation). This instrumental concept permits observation of any identified source at any selected line-energy ;in a range of typically 200 keV to 1300 keV. The resulting ``sequential`` operation mode makes sites of explosive nucleosynthesis natural scientific objectives for such a telescope: The nuclear lines of extragalactic supernovae ({sup 56}Ni, {sup 44}Ti, {sup 60}Fe) and galactic novac (p{sup {minus}}p{sup +} line, {sup 7}Be) are accessible to observation, one at a time, due to the erratic appearance and the sequence of half-lifes of these events Other scientific objective include the narrow 511 keV line from galactic broad class annihilators (such as 1E1740-29, nova musca) and possible redshifted annihilation lines from AGN`s.

  1. Impact of the A18.1 ASME Standard on platform lifts and stairway chairlifts on accessibility and usability.

    PubMed

    Balmer, David C

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article summarizes the effect of the ASME A18.1 Standard concerning accessibility and usability of Platform Lifts and their remaining technological challenges. While elevators are currently the most effective means of vertical transportation related to speed, capacity, rise and usability, their major drawbacks for accessibility are cost and space. Platform lifts and stairway chairlifts remain the "devices of choice" for small elevation changes in existing buildings. ADAAG limits them to very specific circumstances in new construction. The ASME A18.1 Standard addresses the safety requirements of inclined stairway chairlifts (which are not ADA compliant) and inclined and vertical platform lifts (which are ADA Compliant). Chairlifts do not provide access for wheeled mobility devices. Restricting access by means of keys is eliminated, inclined platform lift designs that do not interfere with stairway traffic, promoting new ideas for the design of vertical lifts, increasing the allowable vertical travel of a lift and strengthening lift ramps to improve their safety. Despite design advances inherent in the A18.1, significant platform lift usability issues continue to exist. Increased sizes and weights of powered mobility devices indicate that the permitted lift platform area be modified and that permitted weight capacities be codified as minimums instead of maximums.

  2. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  3. 18 CFR 300.2 - Informal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS FOR FEDERAL POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS CONFIRMATION AND APPROVAL OF THE RATES OF FEDERAL POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS General Provisions § 300.2 Informal conference. The..., with respect to the appropriate form and content of such application....

  4. High Lift Common Research Model for Wind Tunnel Testing: An Active Flow Control Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John C.; Melton, Latunia P.; Viken, Sally A.; Andino, Marlyn Y.; Koklu, Mehti; Hannon, Judith A.; Vatsa, Veer N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a research and development effort sponsored by the NASA Advanced Air Transport Technology Project to achieve the required high-lift performance using active flow control (AFC) on simple hinged flaps while reducing the cruise drag associated with the external mechanisms on slotted flaps of a generic modern transport aircraft. The removal of the external fairings for the Fowler flap mechanism could help to reduce drag by 3.3 counts. The main challenge is to develop an AFC system that can provide the necessary lift recovery on a simple hinged flap high-lift system while using the limited pneumatic power available on the aircraft. Innovative low-power AFC concepts will be investigated in the flap shoulder region. The AFC concepts being explored include steady blowing and unsteady blowing operating in the spatial and/or temporal domain. Both conventional and AFC-enabled high-lift configurations were designed for the current effort. The high-lift configurations share the cruise geometry that is based on the NASA Common Research Model, and therefore, are also open geometries. A 10%-scale High Lift Common Research Model (HL-CRM) is being designed for testing at the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel during fiscal year 2018. The overall project plan, status, HL-CRM configurations, and AFC objectives for the wind tunnel test are described.

  5. Blade design trade-offs using low-lift airfoils for stall-regulated HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S.; Tangler, J.L.

    1999-11-01

    A systematic blade design study was conducted to explore the trade-offs in using low-lift airfoils for a 750-kilowatt stall-regulated wind turbine. Tip-region airfoils having a maximum-lift coefficient ranging from 0.7--1.2 were considered in this study, with the main objective of identifying the practical lower limit for the maximum-life coefficient. Blades were optimized for both maximum annual energy production and minimum cost of energy using a method that takes into account aerodynamic and structural considerations. The results indicate that the effect of the maximum-lift coefficient on the cost of energy is small with a slight advantage to the highest maximum lift coefficient airfoils for the tip-region of the blade become more desirable as machine size increases, provided the airfoils yield acceptable stall characteristics. The conclusions are applicable to large wind turbines that use passive or active stall to regulate peak power.

  6. Ligation of intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT) to treat anal fistula: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, K D; Kang, S; Kalaskar, S; Wexner, S D

    2014-08-01

    Sphincter-preserving approaches to treat anal fistula do not jeopardize continence; however, healing rates are suboptimal. In this context, ligation of the intersphincteric fistula tract (LIFT) can be considered promising offering high success rates and a relatively simple procedure. This review aimed to investigate the outcomes of LIFT to treat anal fistula. We conducted a systematic review of the Pubmed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases, to retrieve all relevant scientific original articles and scientific abstracts (Web of Science) related to the LIFT procedure for anal fistula between January 2007 and March 2013. The search yielded 24 original articles including 1,110 patients; these included one randomized controlled study, three case control studies, and 20 case series. Most studies included patients with trans-sphincteric or complex fistula, not amenable to fistulotomy. During a pooled mean 10.3 months of follow-up, the mean success, incontinence, intraoperative, and postoperative complication rates were 76.4, 0, 0, and 5.5%, respectively. A sensitivity analysis showed that the impact on success in terms of follow-up duration, study size, and combining other procedures was limited. There was no association between pre-LIFT drainage seton and success of LIFT. Ligation of the intersphincteric fistula tract appears to be an effective and safe treatment for trans-sphincteric or complex anal fistula. Combining other procedures and a pre-LIFT drainage seton does not seem to confer any added benefit in terms of success. However, given the lack of prospective randomized trials, interpretation of these data must be cautious. Further trials are mandatory to identify predictive factors for success, and true effectiveness of the LIFT compared to other sphincter-preserving procedures to treat anal fistula.

  7. Lifting without Seeing: The Role of Vision in Perceiving and Acting upon the Size Weight Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Gavin; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Our expectations of an object's heaviness not only drive our fingertip forces, but also our perception of heaviness. This effect is highlighted by the classic size-weight illusion (SWI), where different-sized objects of identical mass feel different weights. Here, we examined whether these expectations are sufficient to induce the SWI in a single wooden cube when lifted without visual feedback, by varying the size of the object seen prior to the lift. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants, who believed that they were lifting the same object that they had just seen, reported that the weight of the single, standard-sized cube that they lifted on every trial varied as a function of the size of object they had just seen. Seeing the small object before the lift made the cube feel heavier than it did after seeing the large object. These expectations also affected the fingertip forces that were used to lift the object when vision was not permitted. The expectation-driven errors made in early trials were not corrected with repeated lifting, and participants failed to adapt their grip and load forces from the expected weight to the object's actual mass in the same way that they could when lifting with vision. Conclusions/Significance Vision appears to be crucial for the detection, and subsequent correction, of the ostensibly non-visual grip and load force errors that are a common feature of this type of object interaction. Expectations of heaviness are not only powerful enough to alter the perception of a single object's weight, but also continually drive the forces we use to lift the object when vision is unavailable. PMID:20300575

  8. Testing Claims for On-Line Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selfe, Cynthia L.; Meyer, Paul R.

    1991-01-01

    Describes an exploratory study of gender and power relationships on Megabyte University, one particular on-line conference. Finds that, although results of the study are not definite, they do suggest that gender and power are present to some extent even in on-line conferences. (MG)

  9. An experimental study of the lift, drag and static longitudinal stability for a three lifting surface configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostowari, C.; Naik, D.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental procedure and aerodynamic force and moment measurements for wind tunnel testing of the three lifting surface configuration (TLC) are described. The influence of nonelliptical lift distributions on lift, drag, and static longitudinal stability are examined; graphs of the lift coefficient versus angle of attack, the pitching moment coefficient, drag coefficient, and lift to drag ratio versus lift coefficient are provided. The TLC data are compared with the conventional tail-aft configuration and the canard-wing configuration; it is concluded that the TLC has better lift and high-lift drag characteristics, lift to drag ratio, and zero-lift moments than the other two configurations. The effects of variations in forward and tail wind incidence angles, gap, stagger, and forward wind span on the drag, lift, longitudinal stability, and zero-lift moments of the configuration are studied.

  10. In depth review of the 1979 AIAA Lighter-Than-Air Systems Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    The lighter than air (LTA) systems technology conference is reviewed. Highlights of the conference were: (1) the interest shown in patrol and surveillance airships, particularly for coastal patrol missions; (2) the session devoted to overviews of foreign activity; and (3) heavy lift and long range transport aircraft design considerations.

  11. Lifting motion simulation using a hybrid approach.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiahong; Qu, Xingda; Chen, Chun-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a hybrid dynamic model for lifting motion simulation is presented. The human body is represented by a two-dimensional (2D) five-segment model. The lifting motions are predicted by solving a nonlinear optimisation problem, the objective function of which is defined based on a minimal-effort performance criterion. In the optimisation procedure, the joint angular velocities are bounded by time-functional constraints that are determined by actual motions. Symmetric lifting motions performed by younger and older adults under varied task conditions were simulated. Comparisons between the simulation results and actual motion data were made for model evaluation. The results showed that the mean and median joint angle errors were less than 10°, which suggests the proposed model is able to accurately simulate 2D lifting motions. The proposed model is also comparable with the existing motion simulation models in terms of the prediction accuracy. Strengths and limitations of this hybrid model are discussed. Practitioner Summary: Human motion simulation is a useful tool in assessing the risks of occupational injuries. Lifting motions are associated with low-back pain. A hybrid model for lifting motion simulation was constructed. The model was able to accurately simulate 2D lifting motions in varied task scenarios for younger and older subjects.

  12. Lift-Enhancing Tabs on Multielement Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C.; Storms, Bruce L.; Carrannanto, Paul G.

    1995-01-01

    The use of flat-plate tabs (similar to Gurney flaps) to enhance the lift of multielement airfoils is extended here by placing them on the pressure side and near the trailing edge of the main element rather than just on the furthest downstream wing element. The tabs studied range in height from 0.125 to 1.25% of the airfoil reference chord. In practice, such tabs would be retracted when the high-lift system is stowed. The effectiveness of the concept was demonstrated experimentally and computationally on a two-dimensional NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Mod B airfoil with a single-slotted, 30%-chord flap. Both the experiments and computations showed that the tabs significantly increase the lift at a given angle of attack and the maximum lift coefficient of the airfoil. The computational results showed that the increased lift was a result of additional turning of the flow by the tab that reduced or eliminated now separation on the flap. The best configuration tested, a 0.5%-chord tab placed 0.5% chord upstream of the trailing edge of the main element, increased the maximum lift coefficient of the airfoil by 12% and the maximum lift-to-drag ratio by 40%.

  13. Modeling lift operations with SASmacr Simulation Studio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Leow Soo

    2016-10-01

    Lifts or elevators are an essential part of multistorey buildings which provide vertical transportation for its occupants. In large and high-rise apartment buildings, its occupants are permanent, while in buildings, like hospitals or office blocks, the occupants are temporary or users of the buildings. They come in to work or to visit, and thus, the population of such buildings are much higher than those in residential apartments. It is common these days that large office blocks or hospitals have at least 8 to 10 lifts serving its population. In order to optimize the level of service performance, different transportation schemes are devised to control the lift operations. For example, one lift may be assigned to solely service the even floors and another solely for the odd floors, etc. In this paper, a basic lift system is modelled using SAS Simulation Studio to study the effect of factors such as the number of floors, capacity of the lift car, arrival rate and exit rate of passengers at each floor, peak and off peak periods on the system performance. The simulation is applied to a real lift operation in Sunway College's North Building to validate the model.

  14. Biomechanical comparison of isokinetic lifting and free lifting when applied to chronic low back pain rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Bouilland, S; Loslever, P; Lepoutre, F X

    2002-03-01

    The study compares free and isokinetic lifting using a multivariate statistical analysis. Each of the 13 male subjects performed three free lifts and three isokinetic lifts using a CYBEX LIFTASK. The measurement variables were obtained from a 3D video system, two force plates and two strain-gauge transducers. Coupling of fuzzy space-time windowing and multiple correspondence analysis was used to show the links between the variables and the differences between the experimental situations. Isokinetic lifting had almost no points in common with free-lifting, but there was a similar range of extension for the different joints. Most free-lifting strategies could not be used in isokinetic lifting, as constraints between the subject and his environment were different. The main drawback of the isokinetic lifting was due to the necessity for individuals to reach the machine speed, yielding high transient efforts. The maximum vertical effort at the L5/S1 joint was about 1600, 1500 and 1400N for low, medium and high speed, whereas it was lower than 1300N, irrespective of the load, during free lifting. In the context of chronic low back pain rehabilitation, movement strategies used in free lifting could not be relearnt using an isokinetic machine. A better understanding of the common points and differences between isokinetic movement and free movement could help rehabilitation physicians to plan rehabilitation programmes, taking advantage of each kind of movement.

  15. Optimization of reproductive management programs using lift chart analysis and cost-sensitive evaluation of classification errors.

    PubMed

    Shahinfar, Saleh; Guenther, Jerry N; Page, C David; Kalantari, Afshin S; Cabrera, Victor E; Fricke, Paul M; Weigel, Kent A

    2015-06-01

    yield relative to contemporaries. In the second data set, the strategy of inseminating only a subset consisting of 59% of the most fertile cows conferred a gain in profit of $5.21 per eligible cow in a monthly breeding period. These results suggest that, when used with a powerful classification algorithm, lift chart analysis and cost-sensitive evaluation of correctly classified and misclassified insemination events can enhance the performance and profitability of reproductive management programs on commercial dairy farms.

  16. 29 CFR 1918.65 - Mechanically powered vehicles used aboard vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equipped with power steering. (5) When mechanically powered vehicles use cargo lifting devices that have a... weight shall not exceed the combined safe lifting capacity of all trucks. (c) Guards for fork lift trucks...) “Approved power-operated industrial truck” means one listed as approved for the intended use or location by...

  17. Secondary lift for magnetically levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Richard K.

    1976-01-01

    A high-speed terrestrial vehicle that is magnetically levitated by means of magnets which are used to induce eddy currents in a continuous electrically conductive nonferromagnetic track to produce magnetic images that repel the inducing magnet to provide primary lift for the vehicle. The magnets are arranged so that adjacent ones have their fields in opposite directions and the magnets are spaced apart a distance that provides a secondary lift between each magnet and the adjacent magnet's image, the secondary lift being maximized by optimal spacing of the magnets.

  18. Wingless Flight: The Lifting Body Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. Dale; Lister, Darlene (Editor); Huntley, J. D. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Wingless Flight tells the story of the most unusual flying machines ever flown, the lifting bodies. It is my story about my friends and colleagues who committed a significant part of their lives in the 1960s and 1970s to prove that the concept was a viable one for use in spacecraft of the future. This story, filled with drama and adventure, is about the twelve-year period from 1963 to 1975 in which eight different lifting-body configurations flew. It is appropriate for me to write the story, since I was the engineer who first presented the idea of flight-testing the concept to others at the NASA Flight Research Center. Over those twelve years, I experienced the story as it unfolded day by day at that remote NASA facility northeast of los Angeles in the bleak Mojave Desert. Benefits from this effort immediately influenced the design and operational concepts of the winged NASA Shuttle Orbiter. However, the full benefits would not be realized until the 1990s when new spacecraft such as the X-33 and X-38 would fully employ the lifting-body concept. A lifting body is basically a wingless vehicle that flies due to the lift generated by the shape of its fuselage. Although both a lifting reentry vehicle and a ballistic capsule had been considered as options during the early stages of NASA's space program, NASA initially opted to go with the capsule. A number of individuals were not content to close the book on the lifting-body concept. Researchers including Alfred Eggers at the NASA Ames Research Center conducted early wind-tunnel experiments, finding that half of a rounded nose-cone shape that was flat on top and rounded on the bottom could generate a lift-to-drag ratio of about 1.5 to 1. Eggers' preliminary design sketch later resembled the basic M2 lifting-body design. At the NASA Langley Research Center, other researchers toyed with their own lifting-body shapes. Meanwhile, some of us aircraft-oriented researchers at the, NASA Flight Research Center at Edwards Air

  19. Geometry program for aerodynamic lifting surface theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medan, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program that provides the geometry and boundary conditions appropriate for an analysis of a lifting, thin wing with control surfaces in linearized, subsonic, steady flow is presented. The kernel function method lifting surface theory is applied. The data which is generated by the program is stored on disk files or tapes for later use by programs which calculate an influence matrix, plot the wing planform, and evaluate the loads on the wing. In addition to processing data for subsequent use in a lifting surface analysis, the program is useful for computing area and mean geometric chords of the wing and control surfaces.

  20. HSCT high-lift technology requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antani, D. L.; Morgenstern, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of high lift needs and related aerodynamic goals established in system studies are described. The goals are presented for the takeoff, approach, and subsonic climb and cruise modes. The status of the related high lift databases and available design and analysis methods are described. Various high lift research and technology areas for future work including innovative concepts verification, flap design, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calibration and application, high Reynolds number testing, subsonic/transonic flap optimization, and flight testing are described.

  1. A lifting surface theory in rotational flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiau, M. J.; Lan, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The partial differential equation for small disturbance steady rotational flow in three dimensions is solved through an integral equation approach. The solution is obtained by using the method of weighted residuals. Specific applications are directed to wings in nonuniform subsonic parallel streams with velocity varying in vertical and spanwise directions and to airfoils in nonuniform freestream. Comparison with limited known results indicates that the present method is reasonably accurate. Numerical results for the lifting pressure of airfoil, lift, induced drag, and pitching moments of airfoil, lift, induced drag, and pitching moments of elliptic, rectangular, and delta wings in a jet, wake, or monotonic sheared stream are presented. It is shown that, in addition to the effect of local dynamic pressures, a positive velocity gradient tends to enhance the lift.

  2. Experimental determination of baseball spin and lift.

    PubMed

    Alaways, L W; Hubbard, M

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new method for the determination of lift on spinning baseballs. Inertial trajectories of (a) ball surface markers during the first metre of flight and (b) the centre of mass trajectory near home-plate were measured in a pitch using high-speed video. A theoretical model was developed, incorporating aerodynamic Magnus-Robins lift, drag and cross forces, which predicts the centre of mass and marker trajectories. Parameters including initial conditions and aerodynamic coefficients were estimated iteratively by minimizing the error between predicted and measured trajectories. We compare the resulting lift coefficients and spin parameter values with those of previous studies. Lift on four-seam pitches can be as much as three times that of two-seam pitches, although this disparity is reduced for spin parameters greater than 0.4.

  3. Heavy Lift & Propulsion Technology (HL&PT)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Cris Guidi delivers a presentation from the Heavy Lift & Propulsion Technology (HL&PT) study team on May 25, 2010, at the NASA Exploration Enterprise Workshop held in Galveston, TX. The purpose of ...

  4. Bernoulli's Law and Aerodynamic Lifting Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weltner, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    Explains the lifting force based on Bernoulli's law and as a reaction force. Discusses the interrelation of both explanations. Considers accelerations in line with stream lines and perpendicular to stream lines. (YP)

  5. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter MRO Lifts Off

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-08-12

    Atlas V launch vehicle, 19 stories tall, with a two-ton NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter MRO on top, lifts off the pad on Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Aug. 12, 2005.

  6. The Effect of Lifting Speed on Cumulative and Peak Biomechanical Loading for Symmetric Lifting Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Greenland, Kasey O.; Merryweather, Andrew S.; Bloswick, Donald S.

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the influence of lifting speed and type on peak and cumulative back compressive force (BCF) and shoulder moment (SM) loads during symmetric lifting. Another aim of the study was to compare static and dynamic lifting models. Methods Ten male participants performed a floor-to-shoulder, floor-to-waist, and waist-to-shoulder lift at three different speeds [slow (0.34 m/s), medium (0.44 m/s), and fast (0.64 m/s)], and with two different loads [light (2.25 kg) and heavy (9 kg)]. Two-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were determined. A three-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to calculate peak and cumulative loading of BCF and SM for light and heavy loads. Results Peak BCF was significantly different between slow and fast lifting speeds (p < 0.001), with a mean difference of 20% between fast and slow lifts. The cumulative loading of BCF and SM was significantly different between fast and slow lifting speeds (p < 0.001), with mean differences ≥80%. Conclusion Based on peak values, BCF is highest for fast speeds, but the BCF cumulative loading is highest for slow speeds, with the largest difference between fast and slow lifts. This may imply that a slow lifting speed is at least as hazardous as a fast lifting speed. It is important to consider the duration of lift when determining risks for back and shoulder injuries due to lifting and that peak values alone are likely not sufficient. PMID:23961334

  7. Liftings and stresses for planar periodic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Borcea, Ciprian; Streinu, Ileana

    2015-06-01

    We formulate and prove a periodic analog of Maxwell's theorem relating stressed planar frameworks and their liftings to polyhedral surfaces with spherical topology. We use our lifting theorem to prove deformation and rigidity-theoretic properties for planar periodic pseudo-triangulations, generalizing features known for their finite counterparts. These properties are then applied to questions originating in mathematical crystallography and materials science, concerning planar periodic auxetic structures and ultrarigid periodic frameworks.

  8. Reduction of wing lift by the drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A; Lotz, J

    1932-01-01

    Drag and loss of lift of a wing are attributable to the same cause, wake formation, thus indicating that there is some relation between both. The analysis of measurements on Joukowsky sections revealed a typical course of curves for the interdependence between drag and loss of lift. The shape of the curves apparently depends quite regularly on the mean camber and on the thickness of the profile.

  9. Liftings and stresses for planar periodic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Borcea, Ciprian; Streinu, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    We formulate and prove a periodic analog of Maxwell’s theorem relating stressed planar frameworks and their liftings to polyhedral surfaces with spherical topology. We use our lifting theorem to prove deformation and rigidity-theoretic properties for planar periodic pseudo-triangulations, generalizing features known for their finite counterparts. These properties are then applied to questions originating in mathematical crystallography and materials science, concerning planar periodic auxetic structures and ultrarigid periodic frameworks. PMID:26973370

  10. IECEC '91; Proceedings of the 26th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference, Boston, MA, Aug. 4-9, 1991. Vol. 2 - Aerospace power systems, conversion technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The present volume on energy and the environment discusses space power requirements, space power systems, space power systems hardware, space radioisotope systems, space solar arrays, space solar cells, space station power, and terrestrial applications of aerospace technology. Attention is given to NASA future space power requirements and issues, the design of a battery charger for the NASA EOS Space Platform, in situ carbon dioxide fixation on Mars, and a preliminary design update of the CRAF/Cassini Power Subsystem. Topics addressed include concentrator testing using projected images, solar power satellites and demonstraton platforms from nonterrestrial materials, a mass sensitivity analysis of lunar orbiting beam power systems, and a power-beaming-based infrastructure for space power. Also discussed are fiber-optic sensors for aerospace electrical measurements, the preliminary design of a mobile lunar power supply, advanced power systems for EOS, and Air Force photovoltaic array alternatives.

  11. Conference reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongpei, Chen; Yulong, Ma

    1994-12-01

    The Ultrasonic Electronics Branch Society of the China Acoustics Society, and the Electronics Countermeasure Branch Society of the China Electronics Society held and All-China Applications Conference of Ultrasonic Electronics Devices in Electronic Countermeasures, Radar and Military Communication Technology. A total of 66 papers was received by the conference with contents relating to surface acoustic wave devices, high-frequency acoustic wave devices, acousto-optical devices, applications of devices in radar, applications of devices in electronic countermeasures, and applications of devices in military communication systems.

  12. Novice Lifters Exhibit A More Kyphotic Lifting Posture Than Experienced Lifters In Straight-Leg Lifting

    PubMed Central

    Riley, A.E.; Craig, T.D.; Sharma, N.K.; Billinger, S.A.; Wilson, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    As torso flexion and repetitive lifting are known risk factors for low back pain and injury, it is important to investigate lifting techniques that might reduce injury during repetitive lifting. By normalizing lumbar posture to a subject’s range of motion (ROM), as a function of torso flexion, this research examined when subjects approached their range of motion limits during dynamic lifting tasks. For this study, it was hypothesized that experienced lifters would maintain a more neutral lumbar angle relative to their range of motion, while novice lifters would approach the limits of their lumbar ROM during the extension phase of a straight-leg lift. The results show a statistically significant difference in lifting patterns for these two groups supporting this hypothesis. The novice group maintained a much more kyphotic lumbar angle for both the flexion (74% of the lumbar angle ROM) and extension phases (86% of the lumbar angle ROM) of the lifting cycle, while the experienced group retained a more neutral curvature throughout the entire lifting cycle (37% of lumbar angle ROM in flexion and 48% of lumbar angle ROM in extension). By approaching the limits of their range of motion, the novice lifters could be at greater risk of injury by placing greater loads on the supporting soft tissues of the spine. Future research should examine whether training subjects to assume more neutral postures during lifting could indeed lower injury risks. PMID:26077846

  13. Validation of a musculoskeletal model of lifting and its application for biomechanical evaluation of lifting techniques.

    PubMed

    Mirakhorlo, Mojtaba; Azghani, Mahmood Reza; Kahrizi, Sedighe

    2014-01-01

    Lifting methods, including standing stance and techniques have wide effects on spine loading and stability. Previous studies explored lifting techniques in many biomechanical terms and documented changes in muscular and postural response of body as a function of techniques .However, the impact of standing stance and lifting technique on human musculoskeletal had not been investigated concurrently. A whole body musculoskeletal model of lifting had been built in order to evaluate standing stance impact on muscle activation patterns and spine loading during each distinctive lifting technique. Verified model had been used in different stances width during squat, stoop and semi-squat lifting for examining the effect of standing stance on each lifting technique. The model muscle's activity was validated by experimental muscle EMGs resulting in Pearson's coefficients of greater than 0.8. Results from analytical analyses show that the effect of stance width on biomechanical parameters consists in the lifting technique, depending on what kind of standing stance was used. Standing stance in each distinctive lifting technique exhibit positive and negative aspects and it can't be recommended either one as being better in terms of biomechanical parameters.

  14. Novice lifters exhibit a more kyphotic lifting posture than experienced lifters in straight-leg lifting.

    PubMed

    Riley, A E; Craig, T D; Sharma, N K; Billinger, S A; Wilson, S E

    2015-07-16

    As torso flexion and repetitive lifting are known risk factors for low back pain and injury, it is important to investigate lifting techniques that might reduce injury during repetitive lifting. By normalizing lumbar posture to a subject's range of motion (ROM), as a function of torso flexion, this research examined when subjects approached their range of motion limits during dynamic lifting tasks. For this study, it was hypothesized that experienced lifters would maintain a more neutral lumbar angle relative to their range of motion, while novice lifters would approach the limits of their lumbar ROM during the extension phase of a straight-leg lift. The results show a statistically significant difference in lifting patterns for these two groups supporting this hypothesis. The novice group maintained a much more kyphotic lumbar angle for both the flexion (74% of the lumbar angle ROM) and extension phases (86% of the lumbar angle ROM) of the lifting cycle, while the experienced group retained a more neutral curvature throughout the entire lifting cycle (37% of lumbar angle ROM in flexion and 48% of lumbar angle ROM in extension). By approaching the limits of their range of motion, the novice lifters could be at greater risk of injury by placing greater loads on the supporting soft tissues of the spine. Future research should examine whether training subjects to assume more neutral postures during lifting could indeed lower injury risks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of asymmetry on psychophysical lifting capacity for three lifting types.

    PubMed

    Han, B; Stobbe, T J; Hobbs, G R

    2005-03-15

    The effect of asymmetry on a person's lifting capacity was investigated using the psychophysical approach. Ten male college students lifted a box from pallet height (15 cm) to conveyor height (75 cm) at a frequency of one and five lifts/min. Three types of asymmetric lifting tasks (step-turn, middle twist and twist) were studied using 90 and 180 degrees task angles. Lifting capacity reductions for middle twist and twist at a 90 degrees asymmetric angle were about one-half of the 30% reduction that would be calculated by the 1991 National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH) lifting equation. The lifting capacity reduction for step-turn at 180 degrees was 14.9%, although that reduction cannot be calculated in the NIOSH equation. The middle twist lifting capacity was greatest among the three types at a 90 degrees task angle. The reductions for the middle twist and step-turn were not proportional to the task angle. This is contrary to the proportional reduction in the NIOSH lifting equation. Heart rate did not increase with an increase in task angle. Based on the results of this research, a different approach to assigning the asymmetric multiplier is proposed. This approach includes a task angle (as opposed to asymmetric angle) of up to 180 degrees.

  16. Buttock Lifting with Polypropylene Strips.

    PubMed

    Ballivian Rico, José; Esteche, Atilio; Hanke, Carlos José Ramírez; Ribeiro, Ricardo Cavalcanti

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of gluteal suspension with polypropylene strips. Ninety healthy female patients between the ages of 20 and 50 years (mean, 26 years), who wished to remodel their buttocks from December 2004 to February 2013 were studied retrospectively. All 90 patients were treated with 2 strips of polypropylene on each buttock using the following procedures: 27 (30 %) patients were suspended with polypropylene strips; 63 (70 %) patients were treated with tumescent liposuction in the sacral "V", lower back, supragluteal regions, and flanks to improve buttocks contour (aspirated volume of fat from 350 to 800 cc); 16 (18 %) patients underwent fat grafting in the subcutaneous and intramuscular layers (up to 300 cc in each buttock to increase volume); 5 (6 %) patients received implants to increase volume; and 4 (4.4 %) patients underwent removal and relocation of intramuscular gluteal implants to improve esthetics. Over an 8-year period, 90 female patients underwent gluteal suspension surgeries. Good esthetic results without complications were obtained in 75 of 90 (84 %) cases. Complications occurred in 15 of 90 (16.6 %) patients, including strip removal due to postoperative pain in 1 (1.1 %) patient, and seroma in both subgluteal sulci in 3 (3.3 %) patients. The results of this study performed in 90 patients over 8 years showed that the suspension with polypropylene strips performed as a single procedure or in combination with other cosmetic methods helps to enhance and lift ptosed gluteal and paragluteal areas. This journal requires that the authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  17. Production automation system for gas lift wells

    SciTech Connect

    Cooksey, A.; Pool, M.

    1995-12-31

    Economic conditions in the gas and oil industry have necessitated not only reductions in manpower and capital expenditure but also optimization of existing facilities. The approach that appears to offer the most viability for satisfying these needs is system automation. For this reason, technology in gas lift operation has directed its attention toward the development of modular systems that can automate operations at each wellhead and platform. Intelligent controllers can be used (1) with centralized master station direction or (2) as stand-alone products for automating immediate response to preset conditional parameters. In addition to reducing manpower requirements, intelligent controllers will further enhance gas lift operation by helping to increase the efficiency of continuous-flow gas lift operations. In addition, they can be used to automate load shedding that results from lift gas fluctuations. With automated systems, operators can now set up field-wide programs that provide optimum use of available lift gas with minimal manpower; this supports the operational direction encouraged by the economic climate of today`s oilfield. Production rates increase when normal gas lift flow rate set-point control is maintained at each well. In the optimization system described in this paper, the set point changes can be manually entered at the wellhead controller or from a central master station.

  18. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) lifted off from Cape Canaveral

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    KSC-2015-1363 (02/11/2015) --- The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:03 p.m. EST. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force, and will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Tim Powers

  19. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) lifted off from Cape Canaveral

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Open Image KSC-2015-1368.KSC-2015-1368 (02/11/2015) --- The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Liftoff occurred at 6:03 p.m. EST. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force, and will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Tim Powers

  20. Large-Area Laser-Lift-Off Processing in Microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, R.; Pätzel, R.; Brune, J.

    Laser lift-off is an enabling technology for microelectronics growth markets such as light emitting diodes, densely packaged semiconductor devices, and flexible displays. For example, thin film transistor structures fabricated on top of polymer layers spun on glass carriers must be delaminated from rigid substrates to create lightweight and rugged flexible displays on polymers. Low-thermal-budget processes are generically required to protect adjacent functional films. Excimer lasers provide short UV wavelength and short pulse duration required for highly-localized energy coupling. The high output power of excimer lasers enables a large processing footprint and the high-throughput rates needed in mass manufacturing.

  1. Heavy Lift Vehicle (HLV) Avionics Flight Computing Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.; Chen, Yuan; Morgan, Dwayne R.; Butler, A. Marc; Sdhuh, Joseph M.; Petelle, Jennifer K.; Gwaltney, David A.; Coe, Lisa D.; Koelbl, Terry G.; Nguyen, Hai D.

    2011-01-01

    A NASA multi-Center study team was assembled from LaRC, MSFC, KSC, JSC and WFF to examine potential flight computing architectures for a Heavy Lift Vehicle (HLV) to better understand avionics drivers. The study examined Design Reference Missions (DRMs) and vehicle requirements that could impact the vehicles avionics. The study considered multiple self-checking and voting architectural variants and examined reliability, fault-tolerance, mass, power, and redundancy management impacts. Furthermore, a goal of the study was to develop the skills and tools needed to rapidly assess additional architectures should requirements or assumptions change.

  2. Effects of heel lifting on transtibial amputee gait before and after treadmill walking: a case study.

    PubMed

    Yeung, L F; Leung, Aaron K L; Zhang, Ming; Lee, Winson C C

    2013-08-01

    Prosthetic alignment is usually unchanged once optimized. However, a previous study indicated that long-distance walking significantly altered gait patterns, suggesting some alignment adjustments after walking are required. This study investigated the effects of alignment changes (by inserting a heel lift) on gait of a transtibial amputee before and after treadmill walking. The subject walked, without heel lifts, on a treadmill until perception of fatigue. Gait changes upon heel lifting at the prosthetic side were studied before and after the treadmill walking For this subject before the treadmill walking, heel lifting induced drop-off with increased prosthetic-side knee flexion at mid-stance and pre-swing. The sound limb outreached to stabilize the gait. After the treadmill walking, the same heel lift did not induce drop-off. It reduced the plantar flexor power generation, potentially delaying its fatigue. After walking prosthetic-side heel lifting could be beneficial. Many lower-limb amputees have difficulties in long-distance walking due to muscle fatigue. This case study proposes that appropriate alignment changes after some walking potentially relieve fatigue and encourage them to walk longer distances.

  3. 49 CFR 178.811 - Bottom lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Bottom lift test. (a) General. The bottom lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC.... (c) Test method. All IBC design types must be raised and lowered twice by a lift truck with the forks... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bottom lift test. 178.811 Section...

  4. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of... distributed. (c) Test method. (1) A Large Packaging must be lifted in the manner for which it is designed... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section...

  5. 49 CFR 178.811 - Bottom lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... evenly distributed. (c) Test method. All IBC design types must be raised and lowered twice by a lift... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bottom lift test. 178.811 Section 178.811... Testing of IBCs § 178.811 Bottom lift test. (a) General. The bottom lift test must be conducted for...

  6. 49 CFR 178.811 - Bottom lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Bottom lift test. (a) General. The bottom lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC.... (c) Test method. All IBC design types must be raised and lowered twice by a lift truck with the forks... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bottom lift test. 178.811 Section...

  7. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Testing of IBCs § 178.812 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the.... (b) Special preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBC design...

  8. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by an...

  9. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Testing of Large Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for... Large Packagings, from the side. (b) Special preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal and rigid...

  10. 49 CFR 178.970 - Bottom lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bottom lift test. 178.970 Section 178.970... Testing of Large Packagings § 178.970 Bottom lift test. (a) General. The bottom lift test must be...) Special preparation for the bottom lift test. The Large Packaging must be loaded to 1.25 times its maximum...

  11. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... preparation for the top lift test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBC design types must be loaded to... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all...

  12. 49 CFR 178.812 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.812 Section 178.812... Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types designed to be lifted from the top or, for flexible IBCs, from the side. (b)...

  13. 49 CFR 178.975 - Top lift test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Top lift test. 178.975 Section 178.975... Packagings § 178.975 Top lift test. (a) General. The top lift test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Large Packagings design types to be lifted from the top or, for flexible Large Packagings,...

  14. The Selection of a Van Lift or a Scooter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, John H.

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter issue describes 3-wheeled scooters and van lifts that can assist a person with a disability to drive independently or have access to transportation. The section on van lifts compares hydraulic lifts and electric lifts, lists manufacturers, and offers an "assessment quiz" outlining factors to consider in selecting a van…

  15. Aerodynamic characteristics of a large scale lift fan transport model with podded fans forward and lift cruise fans mounted above the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, J. V.; Dickinson, S. O.; Hall, L. P.; Coffman, M. G.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a large scale V/STOL transport model powered by tip-turbine driven lift fans were investigated. The model had four fans; the forward fans were mounted in pods forward of the wing at midsemispan. The aft fans were placed in cruise nacelles behind and above the wing. A cascade of variable camber exit louvers was placed behind each of the lift-cruise fans to turn the fan flow in the lift direction for hover and transition to wing supported flight. The wing of the model was mounted above the fuselage, had an aspect ratio of 5.8, sweepback of 35 deg at the quarter chord line and a taper ratio of 0.3. Various configurations of the model were tested to explore the transition speed range. Fan performance, turning effectiveness of the variable camber exit louvers, longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics with fan operation in crossflow are presented.

  16. Childhood Powered Mobility: Developmental, Technical and Clinical Perspectives. Proceedings of the RESNA Northwest Regional Conference (1st, Seattle, Washington, March 6, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Kenneth M., Ed.

    The eight papers presented at the conference stress the importance of self-produced locomotion for the normal development of cognitive processes, particularly spatial understanding. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Childhood Motor Impairments: Clinical Overview and Scope of the Problem" (Ross Hays); "Locomotion and Psychological…

  17. The 60th ASCD Annual Conference and Exhibit Show 2005, 2-4 April 2005: "Voices of Education--Unleashing the Power, Passion and Promise"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Aims to report on the 60th ASCD Annual Conference and Exhibit Show 2005, held in Orlando Florida, 2-4 April 2005 by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Design/methodology/approach: Discusses the presentations such as the obesity epidemic in children, educational progress in schools, creating capacity for learning,…

  18. People Power: A Report of the National Citizens Conference on Rehabilitation of the Disabled and Disadvantaged (Washington, D.C., June 24-27, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social and Rehabilitation Service (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Described are the proceedings of the National Citizens Conference on Rehabilitation including brief opening remarks and the text of the keynote address by Whitney M. Young. Topics of reported sessions are the unmet needs of special groups, case finding through public service advertising, environmental barriers and transportation, consumer…

  19. Report of the National Invitational Working Conference on Holding Power and Dropouts (New York, New York, February 13-15, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Dale

    The conference summarized here brought together participants from 12 public school districts and 34 observers from government agencies, foundations and community organizations. The attendees addressed the concern that the reform agenda of American public schooling is insufficiently sensitive to needy children who have dropped out of school or who…

  20. "The Responsibility to Inform, The Power to Act": A Conference for New England College Newspaper Editors on the Role of the Campus Press in Addressing Substance Use Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Henry; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes pilot conference held to help New England college newspaper editors perceive importance of their role in educating their peers about substance use and other health-related issues and to offer concrete suggestions regarding how they can incorporate these topics into an activist campus press. (Author/NB)

  1. Childhood Powered Mobility: Developmental, Technical and Clinical Perspectives. Proceedings of the RESNA Northwest Regional Conference (1st, Seattle, Washington, March 6, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Kenneth M., Ed.

    The eight papers presented at the conference stress the importance of self-produced locomotion for the normal development of cognitive processes, particularly spatial understanding. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Childhood Motor Impairments: Clinical Overview and Scope of the Problem" (Ross Hays); "Locomotion and Psychological…

  2. Conference Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Cait

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes an original conference, organised by the Child Care Research Forum (http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/ccrf/), which brought together experts from all over Northern Ireland to showcase some of the wealth of research with children and young people that is going on in the country today. Developed around the six high-level outcomes of…

  3. The conference

    Treesearch

    Gordon M. Heisler; Lee P. Herrington

    1977-01-01

    This is a report on the Conference on Metropolitan Physical Environment, held in August 1975 at Syracuse, N.Y., where some 160 scientists and planners met to discuss the use of vegetation, space, and structures to improve the amenities for people who live in metropolitan areas.

  4. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  5. Conference Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillett, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The following is an exploration of the spatial configurations (and their implications) within a typical panel session at an academic conference. The presenter initially takes up different roles and hyperbolically describes some possible messages that the spatial arrangement sends. Eventually, the presenter engages the audience members in atypical…

  6. Lifting teams in health care facilities: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Haiduven, Donna

    2003-05-01

    1. Manual lifting and transfer activities are job tasks frequently associated with back injuries in nursing personnel. One approach with potential to decrease these injuries is the lifting team. 2. In program evaluations completed to date, there have been numerous benefits and several limitations attributed to use of lifting teams in health care facilities. 3. Benefits of lifting teams include reductions in lost time workdays, restricted workdays, workers' compensation claims, and injuries to lifting team members; satisfaction of patients, staff, and lifting team members; and capacity of the lifting team to absorb the majority of high risk lifts and transfers on shifts in which they operate. 4. Lifting teams may not be appropriate for all settings, require infrastructure and lifting team equipment to support their use, and require careful consideration related to staffing. However, when their use is appropriate, efforts to overcome their limitations can be accomplished with careful evaluation of outcome measures and indicators.

  7. Rural Energy Conference Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Shannon Watson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska remains, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a place with many widely scattered, small, remote communities, well beyond the end of both the road system and the power grid. These communities have the highest energy costs of any place in the United States, despite the best efforts of the utilities that service them. This is due to the widespread dependence on diesel electric generators, which require small capital investments, but recent increases in crude oil prices have resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of power. In the enabling legislation for the Arctic Energy Office in 2001, specific inclusion was made for the study of ways of reducing the cost of electrical power in these remote communities. As part of this mandate, the University of Alaska has, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, the Denali Commission and the Alaska Energy Authority, organized a series of rural energy conferences, held approximately every 18 months. The goal of these meeting was to bring together rural utility operators, rural community leaders, government agency representatives, equipment suppliers, and researchers from universities and national laboratories to discuss the current state of the art in rural power generation, to discuss current projects, including successes as well as near successes. Many of the conference presenters were from industry and not accustomed to writing technical papers, so the typical method of organizing a conference by requesting abstracts and publishing proceedings was not considered viable. Instead, the organizing committee solicited presentations from appropriate individuals, and requested that (if they were comfortable with computers) prepare Power point presentations that were collected and posted on the web. This has become a repository of many presentations, and may be the best single source of information about current projects in the state of Alaska.

  8. Heavy Lift Army Landing Craft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    CONTROL SYSTEM 0.3 W256 CIRC + COOL SEA WATER SYSTEM 0.4 31 W259 UPTAKES (INNER CASING) 1.4 W260 PROPUL SUP SYS- FUEL, LUBE OIL 1.0 W261 FUEL...SERVICE SYSTEM 0.7 W264 LUBE OIL HANDLING 0.3 W300 ELECTRIC PLANT, GENERAL 6.3 W310 ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION 5.0 W311 SHIP SERVICE POWER GENERATION...weight estimate should be refined along with the center of gravity of the design, as the design progresses. A more detailed analysis of the hull

  9. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Turnquist, Norman; Qi, Xuele; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Salas, Ken; Samudrala, Omprakash; Shah, Manoj; Van Dam, Jeremy; Yin, Weijun; Zia, Jalal

    2013-12-20

    This report summarizes the progress made during the April 01, 2010 – December 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-EE0002752 for the U.S. Department of Energy entitled “High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems.” The overall objective of this program is to advance the technology for well fluids lifting systems to meet the foreseeable pressure, temperature, and longevity needs of the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) industry for the coming ten years. In this program, lifting system requirements for EGS wells were established via consultation with industry experts and site visits. A number of artificial lift technologies were evaluated with regard to their applicability to EGS applications; it was determined that a system based on electric submersible pump (ESP) technology was best suited to EGS. Technical barriers were identified and a component-level technology development program was undertaken to address each barrier, with the most challenging being the development of a power-dense, small diameter motor that can operate reliably in a 300°C environment for up to three years. Some of the targeted individual component technologies include permanent magnet motor construction, high-temperature insulation, dielectrics, bearings, seals, thrust washers, and pump impellers/diffusers. Advances were also made in thermal management of electric motors. In addition to the overall system design for a full-scale EGS application, a subscale prototype was designed and fabricated. Like the full-scale design, the subscale prototype features a novel “flow-through-the-bore” permanent magnet electric motor that combines the use of high temperature materials with an internal cooling scheme that limits peak internal temperatures to <330°C. While the full-scale high-volume multi-stage pump is designed to lift up to 80 kg/s of process water, the subscale prototype is based on a production design that can pump 20 kg/s and has been modified

  10. [Analysis of surface electromyography on repetitive lifting task-induced fatigue of back muscles].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Ding, Jia-Shun; Wang, Zheng-Lun; Yang, Lei

    2004-12-01

    Using surface electromyography (SEMG) technique to evaluate repetitive lifting task-induced fatigue of back muscles. Thirteen volunteers lifted and lowered an 8 kg weight from floor to waist level for 100 times. Fatigue in the erector spinae muscles was quantified by comparing the frequency content of the EMG signal during static contractions performed before, and immediately after the 100 lifts. EMG average amplitude rose gradually during 100 lifts, the difference was significant at T10 right (P < 0.05) and L3 left (P < 0.01), the difference was not significant at T10 left and L3 right (P > 0.05). The median frequency intercept at T10 right, T10 left, L3 right, L3 left erector spinae muscles decreased by 2.0% (P > 0.05) 10.9% and 29.9% (P < 0.05), 27.9% (P < 0.01), respectively. The mean power frequency intercept decreased by 9% at L3 left erector spinae muscle (P < 0.05), the decrease was not statistically significant at other sites (P > 0.05). Repetitive lifting may induce measurable fatigue in the erector spinae muscles. Erector spinae muscle at L3 is more easily fatigued than at T10. Using the median frequency intercept to assess muscle fatigue is more sensitive than using mean power frequency intercept.

  11. Lifting Voices in the City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Amy E.; Ball, Arnetha F.

    2004-01-01

    Urban writing programs help frustrated city youth to gain interest and find power through writing. Education leaders and urban writing programs along with classroom teachers will have to work collaboratively in order to motivate and empower students through the written words.

  12. PESC '88 - Annual IEEE Power Electronics Specialists Conference, 19th, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, Apr. 11-14, 1988, Record. Volumes 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent advances in electric-power conditioning techniques and devices are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include high-frequency resonant converters, control of inverters and converters, device simulation, magnetic energy storage, converter topologies, servo motor control, high-power converters, superconductive energy storage, machine control strategies, and power-electronics modeling and analysis. Consideration is given to analysis of power-train elements, vector control for induction motors, power conversion techniques, magnetic and capacitive components, harmonic and reactive power compensation, and inverter-converters for ac motor drives.

  13. Facial thread lifting with suture suspension.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Joana de Pinho; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires; Torres, Rodolfo Prado; Bahmad, Fayez

    2017-05-09

    The increased interest in minimally-invasive treatments, such as the thread lifting, with lower risk of complications, minimum length of time away from work and effectiveness in correcting ptosis and aging characteristics has led many specialists to adopt this technique, but many doubts about its safety and effectiveness still limit its overall use. To analyze data published in the literature on the durability of results, their effectiveness, safety, and risk of serious adverse events associated with procedures using several types of threading sutures. Literature review using the key words "thread lift", "barbed suture", "suture suspension" and "APTOS". Due to the scarcity of literature, recent reports of facial lifting using threads were also selected, complemented with bibliographical references. The first outcomes of facial lifting with barbed sutures remain inconclusive. Adverse events may occur, although they are mostly minor, self-limiting, and short-lived. The data on the maximum effect of the correction, the durability of results, and the consequences of the long-term suture stay are yet to be clarified. Interest in thread lifting is currently high, but this review suggests that it should not yet be adopted as an alternative to rhytidectomy. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental Study of Lift-Generated Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The flow fields of vortices, whether bouyancy-driven or lift-generated, are fascinating fluid-dynamic phenomena which often possess intense swirl velocities and complex time-dependent behavior. As part of the on-going study of vortex behavior, this paper presents a historical overview of the research conducted on the structure and modification of the vortices generated by the lifting surfaces of subsonic transport aircraft. It is pointed out that the characteristics of lift-generated vortices are related to the aerodynamic shapes that produce them and that various arrangements of surfaces can be used to produce different vortex structures. The primary purpose of the research to be described is to find a way to reduce the hazard potential of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic transport aircraft in the vicinity of airports during landing and takeoff operations. It is stressed that lift-generated vortex wakes are so complex that progress towards a solution requires application of a combined theoretical and experimental research program because either alone often leads to incorrect conclusions. It is concluded that a satisfactory aerodynamic solution to the wake-vortex problem at airports has not yet been found but a reduction in the impact of the wake-vortex hazard on airport capacity may become available in the foreseeable future through wake-vortex avoidance concepts currently under study. The material to be presented in this overview is drawn from aerospace journals that are available publicly.

  15. Precision markedly attenuates repetitive lift capacity.

    PubMed

    Collier, Brooke R; Holland, Laura; McGhee, Deirdre; Sampson, John A; Bell, Alison; Stapley, Paul J; Groeller, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of precision on time to task failure in a repetitive whole-body manual handling task. Twelve participants were required to repetitively lift a box weighing 65% of their single repetition maximum to shoulder height using either precise or unconstrained box placement. Muscle activity, forces exerted at the ground, 2D body kinematics, box acceleration and psychophysical measures of performance were recorded until task failure was reached. With precision, time to task failure for repetitive lifting was reduced by 72%, whereas the duration taken to complete a single lift and anterior deltoid muscle activation increased by 39% and 25%, respectively. Yet, no significant difference was observed in ratings of perceived exertion or heart rate at task failure. In conclusion, our results suggest that when accuracy is a characteristic of a repetitive manual handling task, physical work capacity will decline markedly. The capacity to lift repetitively to shoulder height was reduced by 72% when increased accuracy was required to place a box upon a shelf. Lifting strategy and muscle activity were also modified, confirming practitioners should take into consideration movement precision when evaluating the demands of repetitive manual handling tasks.

  16. Noise impact of advanced high lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmer, Kevin R.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of advanced high lift systems on aircraft size, performance, direct operating cost and noise were evaluated for short-to-medium and medium-to-long range aircraft with high bypass ratio and very high bypass ratio engines. The benefit of advanced high lift systems in reducing noise was found to be less than 1 effective-perceived-noise decibel level (EPNdB) when the aircraft were sized to minimize takeoff gross weight. These aircraft did, however, have smaller wings and lower engine thrusts for the same mission than aircraft with conventional high lift systems. When the advanced high lift system was implemented without reducing wing size and simultaneously using lower flap angles that provide higher L/D at approach a cumulative noise reduction of as much as 4 EPNdB was obtained. Comparison of aircraft configurations that have similar approach speeds showed cumulative noise reduction of 2.6 EPNdB that is purely the result of incorporating advanced high lift system in the aircraft design.

  17. Noise impact of advanced high lift systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, Kevin R.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-03-01

    The impact of advanced high lift systems on aircraft size, performance, direct operating cost and noise were evaluated for short-to-medium and medium-to-long range aircraft with high bypass ratio and very high bypass ratio engines. The benefit of advanced high lift systems in reducing noise was found to be less than 1 effective-perceived-noise decibel level (EPNdB) when the aircraft were sized to minimize takeoff gross weight. These aircraft did, however, have smaller wings and lower engine thrusts for the same mission than aircraft with conventional high lift systems. When the advanced high lift system was implemented without reducing wing size and simultaneously using lower flap angles that provide higher L/D at approach a cumulative noise reduction of as much as 4 EPNdB was obtained. Comparison of aircraft configurations that have similar approach speeds showed cumulative noise reduction of 2.6 EPNdB that is purely the result of incorporating advanced high lift system in the aircraft design.

  18. Lift mechanics of downhill skiing and snowboarding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Igci, Yesim; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2005-11-01

    A simplified mathematical model is derived to describe the lift mechanics of downhill skiing and snowboarding, where the lift contributions due to both the transiently trapped air and the compressed snow crystals are determined for the first time. Using Shimizu's empirical relation to predict the local variation in snow permeability, we employ force and moment analysis to predict the angle of attack of the planing surface, the penetration depth at the leading edge and the shift in the center of pressure for two typical snow types, fresh and wind-packed snow. We present numerical solutions for snowboarding and asymptotic analytic solutions for skiing for the case where there are no edging or turning maneuvers, which shows that approximately 50% of the total lift force is generated by the trapped air in the case of wind-packed snow for snowboarding and 40% for skiing. For highly permeable fresh powder snow the lift contribution from the pore air pressure drops to < 20%. This new theory is an extension of the series of studies on lift generation in highly compressible porous media.

  19. Effects of Psychophysical Lifting Training on Maximal Repetitive Lifting Capacity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Estimation from Skinfold Thicknesses ; Measurements on 481 Men and Women Aged from 16 to 72 Years. Br. J. Nutr. 32:77-96 (1974). 5. Teves, M.A., J.M...weight=76.3 * 11.5 kg and percent body fat=14.1 * 4.7%. Percent body fat was determined from the sum of four skinfold measurements ’V’s 4 p.1 1g...outlined in Table I. During week 1 descriptive measures of muscular strength and endurance, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power were made. Adequate

  20. Simulation test results for lift/cruise fan research and technology aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, M. P.; Konsewicz, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    A flight simulation program was conducted on the flight simulator for advanced aircraft (FSAA). The flight simulation was a part of a contracted effort to provide a lift/cruise fan V/STOL aircraft mathematical model for flight simulation. The simulated aircraft is a configuration of the Lift/Cruise Fan V/STOL research technology aircraft (RTA). The aircraft was powered by three gas generators driving three fans. One lift fan was installed in the nose of the aircraft, and two lift/cruise fans at the wing root. The thrust of these fans was modulated to provide pitch and roll control, and vectored to provide yaw, side force control, and longitudinal translation. Two versions of the RTA were defined. One was powered by the GE J97/LF460 propulsion system which was gas-coupled for power transfer between fans for control. The other version was powered by DDA XT701 gas generators driving 62 inch variable pitch fans. The flight control system in both versions of the RTA was the same.

  1. Oscillating Flap Lift Enhancement Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-23

    34 RPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour...NUMBER Samuel Greenhalgh 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...the connection of the interest in unsteady aerodynamics in several areas of ai power means of FIG. 1 to the solid rod; and vehicle research from

  2. Coriolis effects enhance lift on revolving wings.

    PubMed

    Jardin, T; David, L

    2015-03-01

    At high angles of attack, an aircraft wing stalls. This dreaded event is characterized by the development of a leading edge vortex on the upper surface of the wing, followed by its shedding which causes a drastic drop in the aerodynamic lift. At similar angles of attack, the leading edge vortex on an insect wing or an autorotating seed membrane remains robustly attached, ensuring high sustained lift. What are the mechanisms responsible for both leading edge vortex attachment and high lift generation on revolving wings? We review the three main hypotheses that attempt to explain this specificity and, using direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations, we show that the latter originates in Coriolis effects.

  3. NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Watts, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation examined in depth several rotorcraft configurations for large civil transport, designed to meet the technology goals of the NASA Vehicle Systems Program. The investigation identified the Large Civil Tiltrotor as the configuration with the best potential to meet the technology goals. The design presented was economically competitive, with the potential for substantial impact on the air transportation system. The keys to achieving a competitive aircraft were low drag airframe and low disk loading rotors; structural weight reduction, for both airframe and rotors; drive system weight reduction; improved engine efficiency; low maintenance design; and manufacturing cost comparable to fixed-wing aircraft. Risk reduction plans were developed to provide the strategic direction to support a heavy-lift rotorcraft development. The following high risk areas were identified for heavy lift rotorcraft: high torque, light weight drive system; high performance, structurally efficient rotor/wing system; low noise aircraft; and super-integrated vehicle management system.

  4. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-11-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower2 produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights (the measured values of L) to the lower end of a string passing over a pulley and connected to the other end of the rotating platform (Fig. 2). Our homemade airfoils are similar to those tested by the Wright brothers in 1901. From our lift plots in Fig. 3, we can draw the same conclusions as the Wrights about the influence of an airfoil's curvature and shape on lift.

  5. TMI-2 reactor vessel plenum final lift

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D C

    1986-01-01

    Removal of the plenum assembly from the TMI-2 reactor vessel was necessary to gain access to the core region for defueling. The plenum was lifted from the reactor vessel by the polar crane using three specially designed pendant assemblies. It was then transferred in air to the flooded deep end of the refueling canal and lowered onto a storage stand where it will remain throughout the defueling effort. The lift and transfer were successfully accomplished on May 15, 1985 in just under three hours by a lift team located in a shielded area within the reactor building. The success of the program is attributed to extensive mockup and training activities plus thorough preparations to address potential problems. 54 refs.

  6. Unsteady lifting-line theory with applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmadi, A. R.; Widnall, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Unsteady lifting-line theory is developed for a flexible unswept wing of large aspect ratio oscillating at low frequency in inviscid incompressible flow. The theory is formulated in terms of the acceleration potential and treated by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The wing displacements are prescribed and the pressure field, airloads, and unsteady induced downwash are obtained in closed form. Sample numerical calculations are presented. The present work identifies and resolves errors in the unsteady lifting-line theory of James and points out a limitation in that of Van Holten. Comparison of the results of Reissner's approximate unsteady lifting-surface theory with those of the present work shows favorable agreement. The present work thus provides some formal justification for Reissner's ad hoc theory. For engineering purposes, the region of applicability of the theory in the reduced frequency-aspect ratio domain is identified approximately and found to cover most cases of practical interest.

  7. Soccer ball lift coefficients via trajectory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Carré, Matt J.

    2010-07-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin parameters that have not been obtained by today's wind tunnels. Our trajectory analysis technique is not only a valuable tool for professional sports scientists, it is also accessible to students with a background in undergraduate-level classical mechanics.

  8. Ontogeny of lift and drag production in ground birds

    PubMed Central

    Heers, Ashley M.; Tobalske, Bret W.; Dial, Kenneth P.

    2011-01-01

    The juvenile period is often a crucial interval for selective pressure on locomotor ability. Although flight is central to avian biology, little is known about factors that limit flight performance during development. To improve understanding of flight ontogeny, we used a propeller (revolving wing) model to test how wing shape and feather structure influence aerodynamic performance during development in the precocial chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar, 4 to >100 days post hatching). We spun wings in mid-downstroke posture and measured lift (L) and drag (D) using a force plate upon which the propeller assembly was mounted. Our findings demonstrate a clear relationship between feather morphology and aerodynamic performance. Independent of size and velocity, older wings with stiffer and more asymmetrical feathers, high numbers of barbicels and a high degree of overlap between barbules generate greater L and L:D ratios than younger wings with flexible, relatively symmetrical and less cohesive feathers. The gradual transition from immature feathers and drag-based performance to more mature feathers and lift-based performance appears to coincide with ontogenetic transitions in locomotor capacity. Younger birds engage in behaviors that require little aerodynamic force and that allow D to contribute to weight support, whereas older birds may expand their behavioral repertoire by flapping with higher tip velocities and generating greater L. Incipient wings are, therefore, uniquely but immediately functional and provide flight-incapable juveniles with access to three-dimensional environments and refugia. Such access may have conferred selective advantages to theropods with protowings during the evolution of avian flight. PMID:21307057

  9. Ontogeny of lift and drag production in ground birds.

    PubMed

    Heers, Ashley M; Tobalske, Bret W; Dial, Kenneth P

    2011-03-01

    The juvenile period is often a crucial interval for selective pressure on locomotor ability. Although flight is central to avian biology, little is known about factors that limit flight performance during development. To improve understanding of flight ontogeny, we used a propeller (revolving wing) model to test how wing shape and feather structure influence aerodynamic performance during development in the precocial chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar, 4 to >100 days post hatching). We spun wings in mid-downstroke posture and measured lift (L) and drag (D) using a force plate upon which the propeller assembly was mounted. Our findings demonstrate a clear relationship between feather morphology and aerodynamic performance. Independent of size and velocity, older wings with stiffer and more asymmetrical feathers, high numbers of barbicels and a high degree of overlap between barbules generate greater L and L:D ratios than younger wings with flexible, relatively symmetrical and less cohesive feathers. The gradual transition from immature feathers and drag-based performance to more mature feathers and lift-based performance appears to coincide with ontogenetic transitions in locomotor capacity. Younger birds engage in behaviors that require little aerodynamic force and that allow D to contribute to weight support, whereas older birds may expand their behavioral repertoire by flapping with higher tip velocities and generating greater L. Incipient wings are, therefore, uniquely but immediately functional and provide flight-incapable juveniles with access to three-dimensional environments and refugia. Such access may have conferred selective advantages to theropods with protowings during the evolution of avian flight.

  10. Proceedings of IEEE Southeastcon 87 conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which considered image processing and artificial intelligence. Topics covered at the conference included computer vision, VLSI, software design, electromagnetic theory, communication networks, failure mode analysis, computer architecture, fault tolerant computers, signal processing, robotics, the computerized simulation of electric power systems, and expert systems in engineering.

  11. Proceedings of the 1985 winter simulation conference

    SciTech Connect

    Gantz, D.T.; Blais, G.C.; Solomon, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which considered supercomputers and multiprocessors. Topics covered at the conference included artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic in simulation, gaming and simulation, improving a multistage/multiprocessor flow-shop problem of numerous technological constraints through scheduling, the general simulation of multiprocessor interconnection networks, the simulation of a pyramid computer, and alternate structures for public power systems.

  12. Conference as Journey: Honouring Our Pedagogical Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asfeldt, Morten; Beames, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Most educators have spent many days and thousands of dollars attending academic conferences around the world, only to find themselves sitting in ballrooms, listening to speakers and watching PowerPoint presentations. In most cases, this conference format represents a profound pedagogical contradiction for outdoor and experiential educators. This…

  13. A program for calculating turbofan-driven lift-fan propulsion system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, M. E.; Fuhs, A. E.; Paterson, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of a turbofan-powered lift fan propulsion system for vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft is calculated. The program formulation consists of taking bleed air from a turbofan engine, heating the bleed air in an interburner, and passing it through a tip turbine to drive a lift fan. Two options are available: bleed air from the engine exhaust, or bleed air that has passed through the engine fan only. This computer program will benefit persons unfamiliar with the thermodynamics of engine cycle analysis.

  14. Observing object lifting errors modulates cortico-spinal excitability and improves object lifting performance.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Gavin; Wong, Jeremy D; Tang, Minnie; Gribble, Paul L; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2014-01-01

    Observing the actions of others has been shown to modulate cortico-spinal excitability and affect behaviour. However, the sensorimotor consequences of observing errors are not well understood. Here, participants watched actors lift identically weighted large and small cubes which typically elicit expectation-based fingertip force errors. One group of participants observed the standard overestimation and underestimation-style errors that characterise early lifts with these cubes (Error video--EV). Another group watched the same actors performing the well-adapted error-free lifts that characterise later, well-practiced lifts with these cubes (No error video--NEV). We then examined actual object lifting performance in the subjects who watched the EV and NEV. Despite having similar cognitive expectations and perceptions of heaviness, the group that watched novice lifters making errors themselves made fewer overestimation-style errors than those who watched the expert lifts. To determine how the observation of errors alters cortico-spinal excitability, we measured motor evoked potentials in separate group of participants while they passively observed these EV and NEV. Here, we noted a novel size-based modulation of cortico-spinal excitability when observing the expert lifts, which was eradicated when watching errors. Together, these findings suggest that individuals' sensorimotor systems are sensitive to the subtle visual differences between observing novice and expert performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  16. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  17. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  18. Use of Heavy Lift Ship as a Maintenance and Repair Vessel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    of storage for MAR equipment and supplies • Provision of all required over the side services o Electrical power o High/low pressure air o Distilled...for Navy ships [15]. Training for this program includes the following capabilities: • Air compressor repair • Air conditioning and refrigeration...and an air conditioner [9]. Each unit can be supplied either by excess power from the heavy lift ship or by additional 30 kW generators. An internal

  19. Wind tunnel investigation of rotor lift and propulsive force at high speed: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchugh, F.; Clark, R.; Soloman, M.

    1977-01-01

    The basic test data obtained during the lift-propulsive force limit wind tunnel test conducted on a scale model CH-47b rotor are analyzed. Included are the rotor control positions, blade loads and six components of rotor force and moment, corrected for hub tares. Performance and blade loads are presented as the rotor lift limit is approached at fixed levels of rotor propulsive force coefficients and rotor tip speeds. Performance and blade load trends are documented for fixed levels of rotor lift coefficient as propulsive force is increased to the maximum obtainable by the model rotor. Test data is also included that defines the effect of stall proximity on rotor control power. The basic test data plots are presented in volumes 2 and 3.

  20. Performance of Advanced Heavy-Lift, High-Speed Rotorcraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Acree, C. W., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of rotorcraft designed for heavy-lift and high-speed cruise is examined. Configurations considered include the tiltrotor, the compound helicopter, and the lift-offset rotor. Design conditions are hover and 250-350 knot cruise, at 5k/ISA+20oC (civil) or 4k/95oF (military); with cruise conditions at 4000 or 30,000 ft. The performance was calculated using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II, emphasizing rotor optimization and performance, including wing-rotor interference. Aircraft performance was calculated using estimates of the aircraft drag and auxiliary propulsion efficiency. The performance metric is total power, in terms of equivalent aircraft lift-to-drag ratio L/D = WV/P for cruise, and figure of merit for hover.

  1. O.H. Module Vacuum Lifting Fixture

    SciTech Connect

    McGivern, Paul; /Fermilab

    1987-12-31

    In order to move the 800 lb. copper plates that make up the O.H. modules a vacuum lifting device has been made that will lift the plates safely. The purpose of this report is to provide documentation for the structural integrity of the system and to make sure that it passes all of the safety requirements that have been established for a system of this nature. The vacuum system is composed of a PIAB model M125 vacuum pump that has the pumping capacity of 27 in. Hg. This pump will produce vacuum for three 8 1/2 in. diameter suction cups or pads. A pressure gauge is fixed on the unit to allow the operator to continually monitor the pressure during all lifts. An additional safety feature is a mechanical vacuum monitoring device that is set to emit a shrill tone if the system vacuum falls below 24 in. Hg. A 'bleed' valve fixed on the unit will be used to let the system go to atmospheric pressure once the lift is complete. A 3 psi. check valve and a vacuum reserve of 384 in. is used to insure that the device will not just drop the object if the pump fails. A schematic for the pumping system is given in Figure 1.

  2. Computation of Lifting Wing-Flap Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian; Kwak, Dochan

    1996-01-01

    Research has been carried out on the computation of lifting wing-flap configurations. The long term goal of the research is to develop improved computational tools for the analysis and design of high lift systems. Results show that state-of-the-art computational methods are sufficient to predict time-averaged lift and overall flow field characteristics on simple high-lift configurations. Recently there has been an increased interest in the problem of airframe generated noise and experiments carried out in the 7 x 10 wind tunnel at NASA Ames have identified the flap edge as an important source of noise. A follow-on set of experiments will be conducted toward the end of 1995. The computations being carried out under this project are coordinated with these experiments. In particular, the model geometry being used in the computations is the same as that in the experiments. The geometry consists of a NACA 63-215 Mod B airfoil section which spans the 7 x lO tunnel. The wing is unswept and has an aspect ratio of two. A 30% chord Fowler flap is deployed modifications of the flap edge geometry have been shown to be effective in reducing noise and the existing code is currently being used to compute the effect of a modified geometry on the edge flow.

  3. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Qualification Procedure, AWS B3.0-41. (ii) Recommended Practices for Automotive Welding Design, AWS D8.4-61... 22, 1973 shall be designed and constructed in conformance with the applicable requirements of the... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Qualification Procedure, AWS B3.0-41. (ii) Recommended Practices for Automotive Welding Design, AWS D8.4-61... 22, 1973 shall be designed and constructed in conformance with the applicable requirements of the... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  5. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights…

  6. Compound Channels, Transition Expectations, and Liftings

    SciTech Connect

    Accardi, L.; Ohya, M.

    1999-01-15

    In Section 1 we introduce the notion of lifting as a generalization of the notion of compound state introduced in [21] and [22] and we show that this notion allows a unified approach to the problems of quantum measurement and of signal transmission through quantum channels. The dual of a linear lifting is a transition expectation in the sense of [3] and we characterize those transition expectations which arise from compound states in the sense of [22]. In Section 2 we characterize those liftings whose range is contained in the closed convex hull of product states and we prove that the corresponding quantum Markov chains [2] are uniquely determined by a classical generalization of both the quantum random walks of [4] and the locally diagonalizable states considered in [3]. In Section 4, as a first application of the above results, we prove that the attenuation (beam splitting) process for optical communication treated in [21] can be described in a simpler and more general way in terms of liftings and of transition expectations. The error probabilty of information transmission in the attenuation process is rederived from our new description. We also obtain some new results concerning the explicit computation of error probabilities in the squeezing case.

  7. High gantry for lifting and handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, J. J., Jr.; Tereniak, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Standard gantry has been inexpensively modified with standard pipes to allow lifting of heavy loads to distances between 14 and 30 ft. Addition of air mounts permits extensive and sensitive equipment to be moved smoothly and safely over smooth or moderately rough surfaces. Unit has been tested at 6000 pounds without yielding.

  8. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights…

  9. Effects of Mach Number on Maximum Lift

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-01-01

    raAruaKJ tablo, grapho Haeh nunber effect on r»\\irirmr> lift is datomlncd for unsuopt end onopt-back Dingo . Suopt-back ulngo oboa tho oarx> early tip...ulngo. &7opt-toack uingo ahan tho anm early tip stalling tondancioa at high opoede ae they do at leu opoede. For unsnopt Dingo tho Cj p^ of

  10. The Monoplane as a Lifting Vortex Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blenk, Hermann

    1947-01-01

    In Prandtl's airfoil theory the monoplane was replaced by a single lifting vortex line and yielded fairly practical results. However, the theory remained restricted to the straight wing. Yawed wings and those curved in flight direction could not be computed with this first approximation; for these the chordwise lift distribution must be taken into consideration. For the two-dimensional problem the transition from the lifting line to the lifting surface has been explained by Birnbaum. In the present report the transition to the three-dimensional problem is undertaken. The first fundamental problem involves the prediction of flow, profile, and drag for prescribed circulation distribution on the straight rectangular wing, the yawed wing for lateral boundaries parallel to the direction of flight, the swept-back wing, and the rectangular wing in slipping, with the necessary series developments for carrying through the calculations, the practical range of convergence of which does not comprise the wing tips or the break point of the swept-back wing. The second problem concerns the calculation of the circulation distribution with given profile for a slipping rectangular monoplane with flat profile and aspect ratio 6, and a rectangular wing with cambered profile and variable aspect ratio-the latter serving as check of the so-called conversion formulas of the airfoil theory.

  11. NASA HL-20 PLS Lifting Body (Mockup)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    NASA HL-20 PLS Lifting Body (Mockup): The HL-20 came into use at Langley in October 1990 and is a full-scale non-flying mockup. This mockup was used for engineering studies of maintainability of the vehicle, as testing crew positions, pilot visibility and other human factors considerations.

  12. Lift-Off Instability During the Impact of a Drop on a Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinski, John M.; Mahadevan, L.; Rubinstein, Shmuel M.

    2014-04-01

    We directly measure the rapid spreading dynamics succeeding the impact of a droplet of fluid on a solid, dry surface. Upon impact, the air separating the liquid from the solid surface fails to drain and wetting is delayed as the liquid rapidly spreads outwards over a nanometer thin film of air. We show that the approach of the spreading liquid front toward the surface is unstable and the spreading front lifts off away from the surface. Lift-off ensues well before the liquid contacts the surface, in contrast with prevailing paradigm where lift-off of the liquid is contingent on solid-liquid contact and the formation of a viscous boundary layer. Here we investigate the dynamics of liquid spreading over a thin film of air and its lift-off away from the surface over a large range of fluid viscosities and find that the lift-off instability is dependent on viscosity and occurs at a time that scales with the viscosity to the power of one half.

  13. Three-dimensional flow and lift characteristics of a hovering ruby-throated hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L

    2014-09-06

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation is performed for a ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) in hovering flight. Realistic wing kinematics are adopted in the numerical model by reconstructing the wing motion from high-speed imaging data of the bird. Lift history and the three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing in full stroke cycles are captured in the simulation. Significant asymmetry is observed for lift production within a stroke cycle. In particular, the downstroke generates about 2.5 times as much vertical force as the upstroke, a result that confirms the estimate based on the measurement of the circulation in a previous experimental study. Associated with lift production is the similar power imbalance between the two half strokes. Further analysis shows that in addition to the angle of attack, wing velocity and surface area, drag-based force and wing-wake interaction also contribute significantly to the lift asymmetry. Though the wing-wake interaction could be beneficial for lift enhancement, the isolated stroke simulation shows that this benefit is buried by other opposing effects, e.g. presence of downwash. The leading-edge vortex is stable during the downstroke but may shed during the upstroke. Finally, the full-body simulation result shows that the effects of wing-wing interaction and wing-body interaction are small. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Three-dimensional flow and lift characteristics of a hovering ruby-throated hummingbird

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jialei; Luo, Haoxiang; Hedrick, Tyson L.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation is performed for a ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) in hovering flight. Realistic wing kinematics are adopted in the numerical model by reconstructing the wing motion from high-speed imaging data of the bird. Lift history and the three-dimensional flow pattern around the wing in full stroke cycles are captured in the simulation. Significant asymmetry is observed for lift production within a stroke cycle. In particular, the downstroke generates about 2.5 times as much vertical force as the upstroke, a result that confirms the estimate based on the measurement of the circulation in a previous experimental study. Associated with lift production is the similar power imbalance between the two half strokes. Further analysis shows that in addition to the angle of attack, wing velocity and surface area, drag-based force and wing–wake interaction also contribute significantly to the lift asymmetry. Though the wing–wake interaction could be beneficial for lift enhancement, the isolated stroke simulation shows that this benefit is buried by other opposing effects, e.g. presence of downwash. The leading-edge vortex is stable during the downstroke but may shed during the upstroke. Finally, the full-body simulation result shows that the effects of wing–wing interaction and wing–body interaction are small. PMID:25008082

  15. Manual lifting load limit equation for adult Indian women workers based on physiological criteria.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Rina; Ray, G G

    2004-01-15

    A comprehensive equation for the evaluation of a maximum load limit for manual load lifting has been developed for the first time for Indian adult female workers, based on a physiological criterion due to the limitation of applicability of the NIOSH (1991) equation. Ten adult female workers, who had been engaged in building construction activities for at least 7 years participated in this study. The cut-off value was selected as the working heart rate corresponding to the 33% level of maximum aerobic power (i.e. V'O2 max.) of this population, which was equivalent to a heart rate of 101.6 beats x min(-1). An equation was developed based on the effects of the following three lifting parameters on working heart rate: vertical height (knee, waist, shoulder and maximum reach height), lifting frequency (1, 4, 7 and 14 lifts x min(-1)), and load weight (5, 10 and 15 kg). The variations of the specific lifting parameter values were selected from field observations. From this equation, the maximum load limit was calculated as 15.4 kg and the workers give this a psychophysical rating as in the moderate to heavy category.

  16. Lift-off instability during the impact of a drop on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Kolinski, John M; Mahadevan, L; Rubinstein, Shmuel M

    2014-04-04

    We directly measure the rapid spreading dynamics succeeding the impact of a droplet of fluid on a solid, dry surface. Upon impact, the air separating the liquid from the solid surface fails to drain and wetting is delayed as the liquid rapidly spreads outwards over a nanometer thin film of air. We show that the approach of the spreading liquid front toward the surface is unstable and the spreading front lifts off away from the surface. Lift-off ensues well before the liquid contacts the surface, in contrast with prevailing paradigm where lift-off of the liquid is contingent on solid-liquid contact and the formation of a viscous boundary layer. Here we investigate the dynamics of liquid spreading over a thin film of air and its lift-off away from the surface over a large range of fluid viscosities and find that the lift-off instability is dependent on viscosity and occurs at a time that scales with the viscosity to the power of one half.

  17. Fish's Muscles Distortion and Pectoral Fins Propulsion of Lift-Based Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. B.; Han, X. Y.; Qiu, J.

    As a sort of MPF(median and/or paired fin propulsion), pectoral fins propulsion makes fish easier to maneuver than other propulsion, according to the well-established classification scheme proposed by Webb in 1984. Pectoral fins propulsion is classified into oscillatory propulsion, undulatory propulsion and compound propulsion. Pectoral fins oscillatory propulsion, is further ascribable to two modes: drag-based mode and lift-based mode. And fish exhibits strong cruise ability by using lift-based mode. Therefore to robot fish design using pectoral fins lift-based mode will bring a new revolution to resources exploration in blue sea. On the basis of the wave plate theory, a kinematic model of fish’s pectoral fins lift-based mode is established associated with the behaviors of cownose ray (Rhinoptera bonasus) in the present work. In view of the power of fish’s locomotion from muscle distortion, it would be helpful benefit to reveal the mechanism of fish’s locomotion variation dependent on muscles distortion. So this study puts forward the pattern of muscles distortion of pectoral fins according to the character of skeletons and muscles of cownose ray in morphology and simulates the kinematics of lift-based mode using nonlinear analysis software. In the symmetrical fluid field, the model is simulated left-right symmetrically or asymmetrically. The results qualitatively show how muscles distortion determines the performance of fish locomotion. Finally the efficient muscles distortion associated with the preliminary dynamics is induced.

  18. Blade Design Trade-Offs Using Low-Lift Airfoils for Stall-Regulated HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M. S.; Tangler, J. L.

    1999-04-08

    A systematic blade design study was conducted to explore the trade-offs in using low-lift airfoils for a 750-kilowatt stall-regulated wind turbine. Tip-region airfoils having a maximum lift coefficient ranging from 0.7-1.2 were considered in this study, with the main objective of identifying the practical lower limit for the maximum lift coefficient. Blades were optimized for both maximum annual energy production and minimum cost of energy using a method that takes into account aerodynamic and structural considerations. The results indicate that reducing the maximum lift coefficient below the upper limit considered in this study increases the cost of energy independently of the wind regime. As a consequence, higher maximum lift coefficient airfoils for the tip-region of the blade become more desirable as machine size increases, as long as they provide gentle stall characteristics. The conclusions are applicable to large wind turbines that use passive or active stall to regulate peak power.

  19. Comparative Kinematic Analysis of the Snatch Lifts in Elite Male Adolescent Weightlifters

    PubMed Central

    Harbili, Erbil; Alptekin, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the linear kinematics of the barbell and the angular kinematics of the lower limb during the snatch lifts of two different barbell weights in elite male adolescent weightlifters. In the national team level, nine elite male adolescent weightlifters participated in the study. The snatch lifts were recorded by two video cameras under competitive conditions in preparation period before the European Junior Championship (Sony MiniDv PAL- 50 field/s) and the two heaviest successful lifts were selected for kinematic analysis. The little toe, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder on the body and one point on the barbell were digitized using Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS, San Diego, CA, USA). Significant decreases were found in the maximum barbell height, the relative power output during the second pull, and the maximum vertical velocity of the barbell during the second pull of the heaviest lift (p < 0.05). Maximum extension velocity of the hip joint significantly increased during the first pull of the heaviest lift (p < 0.05). As the mass of the barbell increased, the maximum vertical velocity and the maximum height of the barbell and relative power output during the second pull decreased in the heaviest lift performed by adolescent weightlifters. Coaches should pay attention to assistant exercises to increase explosive strength during the second pull with maximum strength in male adolescent weightlifters. Key points The results demonstrate that the maximum strength of the extensor muscles of the hip during the first pull and their explosive strength during the second pull must be improved. Coaches should pay attention to assistant exercises to increase explosive strength during the second pull with maximum strength in male adolescent weightlifters. PMID:24790499

  20. Comparative kinematic analysis of the snatch lifts in elite male adolescent weightlifters.

    PubMed

    Harbili, Erbil; Alptekin, Ahmet

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the linear kinematics of the barbell and the angular kinematics of the lower limb during the snatch lifts of two different barbell weights in elite male adolescent weightlifters. In the national team level, nine elite male adolescent weightlifters participated in the study. The snatch lifts were recorded by two video cameras under competitive conditions in preparation period before the European Junior Championship (Sony MiniDv PAL- 50 field/s) and the two heaviest successful lifts were selected for kinematic analysis. The little toe, ankle, knee, hip, and shoulder on the body and one point on the barbell were digitized using Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS, San Diego, CA, USA). Significant decreases were found in the maximum barbell height, the relative power output during the second pull, and the maximum vertical velocity of the barbell during the second pull of the heaviest lift (p < 0.05). Maximum extension velocity of the hip joint significantly increased during the first pull of the heaviest lift (p < 0.05). As the mass of the barbell increased, the maximum vertical velocity and the maximum height of the barbell and relative power output during the second pull decreased in the heaviest lift performed by adolescent weightlifters. Coaches should pay attention to assistant exercises to increase explosive strength during the second pull with maximum strength in male adolescent weightlifters. Key pointsThe results demonstrate that the maximum strength of the extensor muscles of the hip during the first pull and their explosive strength during the second pull must be improved.Coaches should pay attention to assistant exercises to increase explosive strength during the second pull with maximum strength in male adolescent weightlifters.