Science.gov

Sample records for pp 2988-3037 national

  1. {omega} production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, G.; Vidya, M.S.; Deepak, P.N.; Balasubramanyam, J.; Venkataraya

    2005-09-01

    A model-independent irreducible tensor formalism that was developed earlier to analyze measurements of p-vectorp-vector{yields}pp{pi} deg. is extended to present a theoretical discussion of p-vectorp-vector{yields}pp{omega} and of {omega} polarization in pp{yields}pp{omega}-vector and in pp-vector{yields}pp{omega}-vector. The recent measurement of an unpolarized differential cross section for pp{yields}pp{omega} is analyzed by use of this theoretical formalism.

  2. PP prune users guide.

    Treesearch

    N.A. Bolon; R.D. Fight; J.M. Cahill

    1992-01-01

    The PP PRUNE program allows users to conduct a financial analysis of pruning ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.). The increase in product value and rate of return from pruning the butt 16.5-foot log can be estimated. Lumber recovery information is based on actual mill experience with pruned and unpruned logs. Users supply lumber prices...

  3. Exclusive pp{yields}pp{pi}{sup +{pi}-} reaction: From the threshold to LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Lebiedowicz, P.; Szczurek, A.

    2010-02-01

    We evaluate differential distributions for the four-body pp{yields}pp{pi}{sup +{pi}-} (and pp{yields}pp{pi}{sup +{pi}-}) reaction which constitutes an irreducible background to three-body processes pp{yields}ppM, where M are a broad resonances in the {pi}{sup +{pi}-} channel, e.g., M={sigma}, {rho}{sup 0}, f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 2}(1275), f{sub 0}(1500). We include both double-diffractive contribution (both Pomeron and Reggeon exchanges) as well as pion-pion rescattering contribution. The first process dominates at higher energies and small pion-pion invariant masses while the second becomes important at lower energies and higher pion-pion invariant masses. The amplitude(s) is(are) calculated in the Regge approach. We compare our results with measured cross sections for the Intersecting Storage Ring and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiments. We make predictions for future experiments at the anti-Proton ANnihilation at DArmstadt (PANDA), Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, Tevatron, and LHC energies. Differential distributions in invariant two-pion mass, pion rapidities and transverse momenta of pions are presented. The two-dimensional distribution in (y{sub {pi}}{sup +},y{sub {pi}}{sup -}) is particularly interesting. The higher the incident energy, the higher preference for the same-hemisphere emission of pions. The processes considered constitute a sizeable contribution to the total nucleon-nucleon cross section as well as to pion inclusive cross section.

  4. Study of e+e-→pp¯ via initial-state radiation at BABAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-05-01

    The process e+e-→pp¯γ is studied using 469fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, at an e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.6 GeV. From the analysis of the pp¯ invariant mass spectrum, the energy dependence of the cross section for e+e-→pp¯ is measured from threshold to 4.5 GeV. The energy dependence of the ratio of electric and magnetic form factors, |GE/GM|, and the asymmetry in the proton angular distribution are measured for pp¯ masses below 3 GeV. The branching fractions for the decays J/ψ→pp¯ and ψ(2S)→pp¯ are also determined.

  5. Locally homogeneous pp-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globke, Wolfgang; Leistner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We show that every n-dimensional locally homogeneous pp-wave is a plane wave, provided it is indecomposable and its curvature operator, when acting on 2-forms, has rank greater than one. As a consequence we obtain that indecomposable, Ricci-flat locally homogeneous pp-waves are plane waves. This generalises a classical result by Jordan, Ehlers and Kundt in dimension 4. Several examples show that our assumptions on indecomposability and the rank of the curvature are essential.

  6. KSC-01pp1251

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Chinese foreign nationals (center and right), who arrived unannounced on Kennedy Space Center grounds, wait for representatives of Immigration and Naturalization Services to transport them to an office in Orlando for processing

  7. KSC-01pp1252

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- These Chinese foreign nationals, part of a larger group who arrived unannounced on Kennedy Space Center grounds, wait for representatives of Immigration and Naturalization Services to transport them to an office in Orlando for processing

  8. KSC-01pp1249

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Chinese foreign nationals (on right), who arrived unannounced on Kennedy Space Center grounds, wait for representatives of Immigration and Naturalization Services to transport them to an office in Orlando for processing

  9. KSC-02pp1759

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During an administrator's briefing at the IMAX 2 theatre, Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel of the Chickasaw Nation (far left) presents a blanket with the seal of the Chickasaw Nation to NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (second from right). Next to O'Keefe is Chickasaw Gov. Bill Anoatubby. Next to Gov. Keel is Mrs. Laura O'Keefe. STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is a tribally enrolled Chickasaw and the world's first Native American astronaut. Kennedy Space Center hosted more than 350 Native Americans in STS-113 prelaunch events surrounding the historic mission assignment of Herrington.

  10. KSC-01pp1253

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-06

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- This group of Chinese foreign nationals (foreground) are part of a larger group who arrived unannounced on Kennedy Space Center grounds. They are waiting for representatives of Immigration and Naturalization Services to transport them to an office in Orlando for processing

  11. KSC-02pp1747

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Chickasaw Nation Cultural Resources Director Haskell Alexander (left) presents a gift to Joyce and James Herrington, parents of John Herrington, mission specialist on mission STS-113. Herrington is the first Native American to be going into space.

  12. KSC-02pp1746

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody, the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the "Star Spangled Banner" in her native language. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  13. KSC-01PP1006

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seen on Blackpoint Wildlife Drive, part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, robins enjoy a feast of red berries. Robins range throughout North America, preferring gardens, open woodland, agricultural land, as well as towns. The birds are usually considered a harbinger of spring, and can be seen in large flocks throughout Florida in January and February, especially as they gather for northern migration. Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  14. KSC-99pp0834

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    KSC's Director of Public Affairs Joe Gordon (left) applauds as Ed Gormel and Chris Fairey are named recipients of the Hammer Award at a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Presenting the award is Morley Winograd (at the podium), director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Gormel and Fairey are co-chairs of the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base

  15. KSC-99pp0831

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    Ed Gormel (left) and Chris Fairey (center) display the Hammer Award they received at a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. At the podium is Morley Winograd director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government, who presented the award. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Fairey and Gormel are co-chairs of the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base

  16. KSC-99pp0833

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    Commander of the Air Force Space Command, General Richard B. Myers (left) joins Ed Gormel (center) and Commander of the 45th Space Wing Brig. Gen. F. Randall Starbuck (right) after the presentation of the Hammer Award. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. Morley Winograd, director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government, presented the award to the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Gormel is a co-chair of the SEB. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the J-BOSC SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base

  17. KSC-99pp0832

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    At a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, KSC and 45th Space Wing employees share the honors as recipients of the Hammer Award. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. Morley Winograd, director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government, presented the award to Ed Gormel and Chris Fairey, co-chairs of the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the J-BOSC SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base

  18. KSC-99pp0835

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    Ed Gormel (left) and Chris Fairey (center) accept the Hammer Award at a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Presenting the award is Morley Winograd (right), director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Gormel and Fairey are co-chairs of the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base

  19. KSC-99pp0836

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    Morley Winograd (right), director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government, presents the Hammer Award to Ed Gormel (left) and Chris Fairey (center) at a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Gormel and Fairey are co-chairs of the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base

  20. KSC-99pp0226

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Rough-legged Hawk fans its wings as it gently lands in a tree in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. This type of hawk is rarely seen in Florida, ranging from northern Alaska through Manitoba and Newfoundland and wintering from California east to Virginia. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center, is habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles

  1. KSC01pp0680

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Sea World workers wade into the Banana River carrying a young manatee they are releasing. The site is on the north side of the NASA Causeway, near Kennedy Space Center. The calf was one of two manatees being released after recovering from injuries. Manatees are frequently seen in the waters around Kennedy Space Center, which is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  2. KSC01pp0684

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Sea World workers wade into the Banana River while they steady the hoist and sling carrying a manatee. The site is on the north side of the NASA Causeway, near Kennedy Space Center. The manatee is one of two released after recovering at Sea World from injuries. Manatees are frequently seen in the waters around Kennedy Space Center, which is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  3. KSC01pp0678

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers from Sea World, Orlando, Fla., remove a young manatee from the van in order to release it into the Banana River on the north side of the NASA Causeway near KSC. The calf was one of two manatees being released after recovering from injuries. Manatees are frequently seen in the waters around Kennedy Space Center, which is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  4. KSC01pp0681

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A large adult manatee requires many helpers to lift it out of the van that brought it from Sea World for release into the Banana River. The site is on the north side of the NASA Causeway, near Kennedy Space Center. A calf was also released at the site. Manatees are frequently seen in the waters around Kennedy Space Center, which is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  5. KSC01pp0685

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Sea World workers coax a manatee into the Banana River after the hoist and sling it was in relaxes in the water. The site is on the north side of the NASA Causeway, near Kennedy Space Center. The manatee is one of two released after recovering at Sea World from injuries. Manatees are frequently seen in the waters around Kennedy Space Center, which is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  6. KSC-00pp0158

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-04

    Clothed in her traditional African garb, Michelle Amos, mistress of ceremonies, welcomes the audience on Feb. 3 at the kick-off of African-American History Month. The theme for this year’s observation is "Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century." February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation

  7. KSC00pp0158

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-04

    Clothed in her traditional African garb, Michelle Amos, mistress of ceremonies, welcomes the audience on Feb. 3 at the kick-off of African-American History Month. The theme for this year’s observation is "Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century." February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation

  8. KSC-99pp0227

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Rough-legged hawk stares at the landscape from a perch in a tree in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. This type of hawk is rarely seen in Florida, ranging from northern Alaska through Manitoba and Newfoundland and wintering from California east to Virginia. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center, is habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles

  9. KSC-99pp1406

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour, on its mobile launcher platform, is transferred to Launch Pad 39A for mission STS-99. Named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), it involves an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. The SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled

  10. KSC-02pp1744

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody (right) , the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the "Star Spangled Banner" in her native language. With her is her grandmother. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  11. KSC-02pp1745

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An elder of her Navaho tribe, Dorothy Cody shares the stage with her granddaughter Radmilla Cody (not shown), the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, who is singing the "Star Spangled Banner" in her native language during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  12. Properties of nanocomposite PP fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smole, Majda S.; Stakne, Kristina; Svetec, Diana G.; Kleinschek, Karin S.; Ribitsch, Volker

    2005-06-01

    PP-based nanocomposite fibres were prepared by direct polymer melt intercalation. With the intention to determine the size and dispersion of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix, fibres were plasma etched and SEM observations were performed. The influence of nanofiller content and coupling agent on electrokinetic properties was studied. PP monofilament fibres exhibit hydrophobe character with negative zeta potential value. The zeta potential value of co-polymer PP fibre decreases with increasing PPAA content and the isoelectric point IEP of co-polymer samples shifts towards acid region. Addition of modified montmorillonite due to the particles electropositive character, affects the reduction of zeta potential value and a slight shift of IEP towards neutral region is observed. Nano-particles content influences electrokinetic fibres properties, i.e. ZP value is changed, however IE point is not significantly changed by different concentrations of nanofiller. In addition to, mechanical properties of nanocomposite fibres were determined.

  13. Φ Production in pp Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibirtsev, Alexander

    The data for near-threshold cross section for the reaction pppp published by the DISTO and ANKE Collaboration are analyzed in order to evaluate the OZI ratio at low energies by taking into account corrections from the kinematics and the final-state interaction. Combining these new data with the few measurements available at higher energies the limit for the OZI rule violation is evaluated and the possible contribution from a five-quark baryonic resonance coupled to the p system is estimated.

  14. KSC-00pp1621

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-27

    In hope of catching a large monitor lizard seen in the area, state-licensed animal trappers Dewey Kessler and James Dean (at left), with Gary Povitch (kneeling) of the U.S. Wildlife and Dan Turner (standing) set up a trap on KSC. The lizard has been spotted recently near S.R. 3, a route into the Center, by several area residents. Turner is a monitor expert. The lizard is not a native of the area, and possibly a released pet. Dean is working with the cooperation of KSC and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  15. KSC00pp1621

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-27

    In hope of catching a large monitor lizard seen in the area, state-licensed animal trappers Dewey Kessler and James Dean (at left), with Gary Povitch (kneeling) of the U.S. Wildlife and Dan Turner (standing) set up a trap on KSC. The lizard has been spotted recently near S.R. 3, a route into the Center, by several area residents. Turner is a monitor expert. The lizard is not a native of the area, and possibly a released pet. Dean is working with the cooperation of KSC and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  16. KSC-99pp1407

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Framed by branches of oak leaves in this photo, Space Shuttle Endeavour, on its mobile launcher platform, is transferred to Launch Pad 39A for mission STS-99. The van behind it is barely noticeable next to the gigantic stature of the moving vehicle. Named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), it involves an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. The SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled

  17. KSC01pp0683

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-03

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Spectators and photographers gather around the adult manatee Sea World workers are releasing into the Banana River in the background. The site is on the north side of the NASA Causeway, near Kennedy Space Center. On the horizon at left can be seen the Vehicle Assembly Building. The weight of the manatee requires a hoist to lift it. Earlier, workers released a calf. The two manatees recovered from injuries at Sea World. Manatees are frequently seen in the waters around Kennedy Space Center, which is surrounded by the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  18. KSC-01pp1187

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-06-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An aerial view of Launch Complex 39 shows the south and west sides of the Vehicle Assembly Building. The curved roadway heading to the VAB leads to the high bay 2, the Safe Haven facility constructed in 2000. The white building in the foreground is the Processing Control Center. Beyond it is the Orbiter Processing Facility, bays 1 and 2. The OPF bay 3 is farther still, closer to the VAB. Farther in the background are the waters of Banana Creek in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  19. KSC00pp0157

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-04

    Michelle Amos, mistress of ceremonies for the kick-off of African-American History Month, works with the audience to assist them in the pronunciation of a few token words in native Swahili. The theme for this year’s observation is "Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century." February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation

  20. KSC-00pp0157

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-04

    Michelle Amos, mistress of ceremonies for the kick-off of African-American History Month, works with the audience to assist them in the pronunciation of a few token words in native Swahili. The theme for this year’s observation is "Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century." February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation

  1. KSC00pp0600

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-27

    Two manatees swim leisurely in waters on Kennedy Space Center. They gather in Florida's warm water rivers and inland springs during the winter. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  2. KSC-02pp1760

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mr. and Mrs. Sean O'Keefe (center) pose with officials of the Chickasaw Nation. Second from left is Lt. Gov. Jefferson Keel with his wife, Carol (far left). Second from right is Gov. Bill Anoatubby with his wife, Janice (far right). STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is a tribally enrolled Chickasaw and the world's first Native American astronaut. Kennedy Space Center hosted more than 350 Native Americans in STS-113 prelaunch events surrounding the historic mission assignment of Herrington.

  3. KSC-00pp0427

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, lifting of the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry is completed. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  4. KSC00pp0427

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, lifting of the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry is completed. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  5. KSC-99pp0404

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the grand opening of the newly expanded KSC Visitor Complex, Center Director Roy Bridges addresses guests and the media. The $13 million addition to the Visitor Complex includes an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks, a new information center, films, and exhibits. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  6. KSC-00pp0600

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-27

    Two manatees swim leisurely in waters on Kennedy Space Center. They gather in Florida's warm water rivers and inland springs during the winter. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  7. KSC-00pp0599

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-27

    In waters on Kennedy Space Center, two manatees are seen leisurely swimming. In winter they gather in Florida's warm water rivers and inland springs. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  8. KSC00pp0599

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-27

    In waters on Kennedy Space Center, two manatees are seen leisurely swimming. In winter they gather in Florida's warm water rivers and inland springs. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  9. KSC00pp0439

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-30

    Looking northeast, several elements of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) can be seen. The road on the bottom left corner is the tow-way road, connecting the Orbiter Processing Facility with the landing strip, seen at upper left. The building in the center is the remote launch vehicle (RLV) hangar, still under construction, at the south end of the SLF. Next to the multi-purpose RLV hangar are facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. Beyond them is the parking tarmac with its mate-demate device. The lush grounds of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with KSC, extend beyond

  10. KSC-00pp0439

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-30

    Looking northeast, several elements of the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) can be seen. The road on the bottom left corner is the tow-way road, connecting the Orbiter Processing Facility with the landing strip, seen at upper left. The building in the center is the remote launch vehicle (RLV) hangar, still under construction, at the south end of the SLF. Next to the multi-purpose RLV hangar are facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. Beyond them is the parking tarmac with its mate-demate device. The lush grounds of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with KSC, extend beyond

  11. KSC-00pp1428

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-12

    In the early morning skies, flocks of birds soar over KSC wetlands. Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge that encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  12. KSC00pp1428

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-12

    In the early morning skies, flocks of birds soar over KSC wetlands. Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge that encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  13. KSC-00pp0435

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-30

    This broad aerial view shows the runway at KSC (top), the parking facility with the mate/demate device (center), and the remote launch vehicle (RLV) hangar, at right, still under construction at the south end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Next to the multi-purpose RLV hangar are facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The tow-way stretches from the runway past the hangar to lower right in the photo. Stretching toward the horizon are the grounds of the Merritt island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with KSC

  14. KSC00pp0435

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-30

    This broad aerial view shows the runway at KSC (top), the parking facility with the mate/demate device (center), and the remote launch vehicle (RLV) hangar, at right, still under construction at the south end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Next to the multi-purpose RLV hangar are facilities for related ground support equipment and administrative/technical support. The tow-way stretches from the runway past the hangar to lower right in the photo. Stretching toward the horizon are the grounds of the Merritt island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with KSC

  15. KSC-99pp0331

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-22

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) sits uncovered inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  16. KSC-99pp1405

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The doors of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) are open for the transfer of Space Shuttle Endeavour, on its mobile launcher platform, to Launch Pad 39A for mission STS-99. Named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), it involves an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. The SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled

  17. KSC-00pp0540

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    The GOES-L satellite arrives on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas IIA rocket is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  18. KSC00pp0540

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    The GOES-L satellite arrives on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas IIA rocket is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  19. KSC-99pp1408

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour is viewed between two tree trunks in this photo during the Shuttle's rollout to Launch Pad 39A for launch of mission STS-99. Named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), it involves an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. The SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled

  20. KSC-99pp1452

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-17

    Under a rain-filled sky, Mark Epstein holds a rescued white pelican while Kat Royer fixes a leg band on it before releasing it at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Epstein and Royer are with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The bird was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. The pelican, dubbed "Fisheater" by its rescuers, will be let go to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  1. KSC-99pp1455

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-17

    A white pelican named "Fisheater" by its rescuers, beats its wings as it flies to freedom at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released today to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. Before its release, however, Kat Royer, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  2. KSC-99pp0391

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-06

    On the site of Launch Complex 34, key participants sign a Memorandum of Agreement, formalizing cooperative efforts of NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and federal agencies in ground-water cleanup initiatives. Seated at the table, from left to right, are Timothy Oppelt, director, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Tom Heenan, assistant manager of environmental management, Savannah River Site, U.S. Department of Energy; Col. James Heald, Vice Commander, Air Force Research Laboratory, U.S. Air Force; Gerald Boyd, acting deputy assistant secretary, Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy; James Fiore, acting deputy assistant secretary, Office of Environmental Restoration, Department of Energy; Brig. Gen. Randall R. Starbuck, Commander 45th Space Wing, U.S. Air Force; Roy Bridges Jr., director of John F. Kennedy Space Center; Walter Kovalick Jr., Ph.D., director, Technology Innovation Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. NASA, the U.S. Air Force and the agencies have formed a consortium and are participating in a comparative study of three innovative techniques to be used in cleaning a contaminated area of Launch Complex 34. The study will be used to help improve groundwater cleanup processes nationally

  3. KSC-99pp0389

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-06

    Walter W. Kovalick Jr., Ph.D., director of Technology Innovation Office for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, addresses representatives from Kennedy Space Center, the 45th Space Wing, and various federal environmental agencies gathered to attend a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) signing, taking place at the site of Launch Complex 34. The MOA formalizes the cooperative efforts of the federal agencies in ground-water cleanup initiatives. NASA, the U.S. Air Force and the agencies have formed a consortium and are participating in a comparative study of three innovative techniques to be used in cleaning a contaminated area of Launch Complex 34. The study will be used to help improve groundwater cleanup processes nationally. Other attendees included Timothy Oppelt, director, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Tom Heenan, assistant manager of environmental management, Savannah River Site, U.S. Department of Energy; Col. James Heald, Vice Commander, Air Force Research Laboratory, U.S. Air Force; Gerald Boyd, acting deputy assistant secretary, Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy; James Fiore, acting deputy assistant secretary, Office of Environmental Restoration, Department of Energy; Brig. Gen. Randall R. Starbuck, Commander 45th Space Wing, U.S. Air Force; and Roy Bridges Jr., director of John F. Kennedy Space Center

  4. KSC-99pp0390

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-06

    On the site of Launch Complex 34, key participants sign a Memorandum of Agreement, formalizing cooperative efforts of NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and federal agencies in ground-water cleanup initiatives. Seated from left to right are Timothy Oppelt, director, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Tom Heenan, assistant manager of environmental management, Savannah River Site, U.S. Department of Energy; Col. James Heald, Vice Commander, Air Force Research Laboratory, U.S. Air Force; Gerald Boyd, acting deputy assistant secretary, Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy; James Fiore, acting deputy assistant secretary, Office of Environmental Restoration, Department of Energy; Brig. Gen. Randall R. Starbuck, Commander 45th Space Wing, U.S. Air Force; Roy Bridges Jr., director of John F. Kennedy Space Center; Walter Kovalick Jr., Ph.D., director, Technology Innovation Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. NASA, the U.S. Air Force and the agencies have formed a consortium and are participating in a comparative study of three innovative techniques to be used in cleaning a contaminated area of Launch Complex 34. The study will be used to help improve groundwater cleanup processes nationally

  5. KSC-99pp0392

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-06

    Key participants in the signing of a Memorandum of Agreement, formalizing cooperative efforts of NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and federal agencies in ground-water cleanup initiatives, gather on top of the block house at Launch Complex 34. Motioning at right is Skip Chamberlain, program manager, Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy. Others on the tour include Timothy Oppelt, director, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Tom Heenan, assistant manager of environmental management, Savannah River Site, U.S. Department of Energy; Col. James Heald, Vice Commander, Air Force Research Laboratory, U.S. Air Force; Gerald Boyd, acting deputy assistant secretary, Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy; James Fiore, acting deputy assistant secretary, Office of Environmental Restoration, Department of Energy; Brig. Gen. Randall R. Starbuck, Commander 45th Space Wing, U.S. Air Force; Roy Bridges Jr., director of John F. Kennedy Space Center; Walter Kovalick Jr., Ph.D., director, Technology Innovation Office, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. NASA, the U.S. Air Force and the agencies have formed a consortium and are participating in a comparative study of three innovative techniques to be used in cleaning a contaminated area of Launch Complex 34. The study will be used to help improve groundwater cleanup processes nationally

  6. KSC-99pp0838

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    At a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, the Hammer Award is presented to Kennedy Space Center and the 45th Space Wing. Among the attendees in the audience are (center) Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr., flanked by (at left) Commander of the 45th Space Wing Brig. Gen. F. Randall Starbuck and (at right) Commander of the Air Force Space Command General Richard B. Myers. Standing second from right is NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin. At the far right is Morley Winograd, director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government, who presented the award. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Ed Gormel and Chris Fairey, co-chairs of the SEB, accepted the awards for the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base

  7. KSC-99pp0837

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    At a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, the Hammer Award is presented to Kennedy Space Center and the 45th Space Wing. Present for the awards are (left to right) Commander of the Air Force Space Command General Richard B. Myers, Ed Gormel, Chris Fairey, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, and Director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government, Morley Winograd, who presented the award. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Gormel and Fairey are co-chairs of the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base

  8. KSC-99pp1417

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Space Shuttle Endeavour is viewed atop the mobile launcher platform on its way to Launch Pad 39A for launch of mission STS-99. Named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 involves an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from its payload bay, to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. STS-99 is scheduled for launch in January 2000

  9. KSC-99pp1418

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Under breaking clouds, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile launcher platform and crawler-transporter, crawls its way to Launch Pad 39A for mission STS-99. Named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 involves an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from its payload bay, to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. STS-99 is scheduled for launch in January 2000

  10. KSC-99pp1188

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-05

    On the grounds of Kennedy Space Center, a female Golden-Silk Spider repairs its web. During the day spider hands head downward from the underside of the web near the center. Its web may measure two to three feet across and it repairs the webbing each day, replacing half but never the whole web at one time. The center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a 92,000-acre refuge that is a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  11. KSC-99pp0384

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-06

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure an Atlas IIA rocket on a transporter after offloading it from a U.S. Air Force C-5c (left). The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites

  12. KSC-99pp0387

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-06

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers secure a Centaur upper stage on a transporter after offloading it from a U.S. Air Force C-5c (right). After being mated with the Atlas IIA lower stage, the rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites

  13. KSC-99pp1231

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-20

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, "Opening Doors to Ability." Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services

  14. KSC-99pp1230

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-20

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to talk to one of the vendors at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. With him at the far left is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG, and Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair; at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, "Opening Doors to Ability." Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services

  15. KSC-99pp0385

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-06

    An Atlas IIA rocket is transported from Cape Canaveral Air Station after its arrival aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5c. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36A on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites

  16. KSC-99pp0383

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-06

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, workers begin offloading an Atlas IIA rocket from a U.S. Air Force C-5c. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite from Launch Pad 36B on May 15. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites

  17. KSC-99pp0256

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A snowy egret wades the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Ranging from northern California, Oklahoma and Maine to southern South America, the snowy egret winters north to California and South Carolina. In the East, they are best known as salt marsh birds. Once an endangered species, their numbers have increased again. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  18. KSC-99pp0416

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-14

    The one-inch mirror shown here is one of nearly nine hundred polished by dozens of students teams of elementary, middle and high school students across the nation as part of STARSHINE, a student spacecraft built by the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. After being coated with a protective transparent layer of Silicon Dioxide at Hill Air Force Base, they are being mounted on the surface of the spacecraft. STARSHINE is being deployed into a highly inclined low-earth orbit from a Hitchhiker canister on mission STS-96, targeted to launch May 20. After deployment from the Shuttle in May, the spacecraft will reflect flashes of sunlight to observers on the earth during the mission. This twinkling satellite will be naked-eye visible against the star background for about six months during recurring morning and evening twilight periods to student observers around the world

  19. KSC-99pp0828

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins poses for photographers in the early morning sun after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (background). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  20. KSC-99pp0826

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    Center Director Roy D. Bridges Jr. greets STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins after her arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (behind her). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  1. KSC-99pp0866

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    The STS-93 crew gathers for breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. Space Shuttle Columbia is due to launch Tuesday, July 20, at 12:36 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission

  2. KSC-99pp0822

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins waves to spectators after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  3. KSC-99pp0825

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) shows her sense of humor upon arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. She and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Coleman is making her second Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  4. KSC-99pp0862

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    Space Shuttle Columbia catches the rising sun after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39-B. Columbia waits for the launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  5. KSC-99pp0864

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    The rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on launch Pad 39-B reveals Space Shuttle Columbia on its mobile launcher platform, waiting for the launch of mission STS-93 on July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  6. KSC-99pp0824

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), prepares to leave the T-38 jet aircraft that brought him to KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) are arriving for pre-launch activities. Tognini is making his inaugural Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  7. KSC-99pp0829

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    STS-93 Commander Eileen Collins peers into the eastern early morning sky after landing at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft (background). She and other crew members Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. This is her third Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  8. KSC-99pp0861

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    The Rotating Service Structure is rolled back from Space Shuttle Columbia on Launch Pad 39-B, in preparation for launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  9. KSC-99pp0830

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    The STS-93 crew leave the Shuttle Landing Facility after answering questions for the media and posing for photographers, whose shadows stretch across the SLF. From left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who is with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins (waving), Mission Specialist Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.), and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby. The crew arrived at KSC for pre-launch activities. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  10. KSC-99pp0823

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby lands at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) aboard a T-38 jet aircraft. He and other crew members Commander Eileen Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), are arriving for pre-launch activities. STS-93 is Ashby's inaugural Shuttle flight. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  11. KSC-00pp0169

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-07

    A smiling STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri of Japan arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft eager to prepare for the second launch attempt of Endeavour Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. Mohri is with the Japanese National Space Development Agency (NASDA). The earlier launch scheduled for Jan. 31 was scrubbed due to poor weather and a faulty Enhanced Master Events Controller in the orbiter's aft compartment. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST

  12. KSC00pp0169

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-07

    A smiling STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri of Japan arrives at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft eager to prepare for the second launch attempt of Endeavour Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. Mohri is with the Japanese National Space Development Agency (NASDA). The earlier launch scheduled for Jan. 31 was scrubbed due to poor weather and a faulty Enhanced Master Events Controller in the orbiter's aft compartment. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST

  13. KSC-00pp0150

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  14. KSC00pp0150

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  15. KSC00pp0594

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-92 Pilot Pamela A. Melroy gets a close look at the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 that will fly on the mission, the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. Other crew members are Commander Brian Duffy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chaio, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  16. KSC-00pp0594

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, STS-92 Pilot Pamela A. Melroy gets a close look at the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 that will fly on the mission, the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. Other crew members are Commander Brian Duffy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chaio, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  17. KSC-99pp1187

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of Kennedy Space Center, a female Golden-Silk Spider repairs its web. The female can be identified by its brownish-green abdomen with a white spotted irregular pattern. The golden-silk spider repairs the webbing each day, replacing half but never the whole web at one time. Its web may measure two to three feet across. The center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a 92,000-acre refuge that is a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  18. KSC-06pp0947

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-24

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Flames and smoke billow out from under the Boeing Delta IV rocket at liftoff, carrying the GOES-N satellite. Liftoff from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station was on time at 6:11 p.m. EDT. GOES-N is the latest in the Earth-monitoring series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites developed by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. By maintaining a stationary orbit, hovering over one position on the Earth's surface, GOES will be able to provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric "triggers" for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Terry

  19. KSC-06pp0948

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-24

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Flames and smoke billow out from under the Boeing Delta IV rocket at liftoff, carrying the GOES-N satellite. Liftoff from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station was on time at 6:11 p.m. EDT. GOES-N is the latest in the Earth-monitoring series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites developed by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. By maintaining a stationary orbit, hovering over one position on the Earth's surface, GOES will be able to provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric "triggers" for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms and hurricanes. Photo credit: NASA/Tim Terry

  20. KSC-99pp0952

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The fiery launch of Space Shuttle Columbia casts ghost-like shadows on the clouds of smoke and steam surrounding it. Liftoff occurred at 12:31 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT

  1. KSC-99pp0954

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Clouds of smoke and steam spiral away from Space Shuttle Columbia as it shoots through the night sky on its successful liftoff from Launch Pad 39-B on mission STS-93. After two unsuccessful attempts on previous nights, liftoff occurred at 12:31 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT

  2. KSC-99pp0958

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Billowing clouds of smoke and steam rise with the roaring Space Shuttle Columbia as it launches into the night sky on mission STS-93. After two unsuccessful attempts on previous nights, liftoff occurred at 12:31 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Space Shuttle. The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT

  3. KSC00pp0303

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This Broad-Winged Hawk is ready for flight from its perch on a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. This hawk's habitat is chiefly deciduous woodland, ranging from southern Canada south throughout the eastern United States, including a small area of Central Florida. It winters in tropical South America. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a haven and habitat for more than 331 species of birds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are also a habitat for 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  4. KSC-00pp0303

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This Broad-Winged Hawk is ready for flight from its perch on a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. This hawk's habitat is chiefly deciduous woodland, ranging from southern Canada south throughout the eastern United States, including a small area of Central Florida. It winters in tropical South America. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a haven and habitat for more than 331 species of birds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are also a habitat for 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  5. KSC-00pp0194

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A dolphin glides through the water looking for fish in the turn basin, which is located east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway. Dolphins inhabit the waters, known as the Indian River Lagoon, around Kennedy Space Center, along with many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish and shellfish. Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west make up a special type of estuary called a lagoon, a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  6. KSC-00pp0197

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Hundreds of birds, especially gray and white pelicans and cormorants, cover the water in the turn basin, located east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway. The basin is teeming with fish, attracting the crowd for a meal. The turn basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America, plus many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish, shellfish and dolphins. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  7. KSC00pp0197

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Hundreds of birds, especially gray and white pelicans and cormorants, cover the water in the turn basin, located east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway. The basin is teeming with fish, attracting the crowd for a meal. The turn basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America, plus many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish, shellfish and dolphins. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  8. KSC-00pp0190

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, a mother dolphin guides her baby through the water to search for food. Dolphins inhabit the waters around Kennedy Space Center, along with many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish and shellfish. Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west make up a special type of estuary called a lagoon, a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth. Nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally

  9. KSC-00pp0193

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, a mother dolphin guides her baby through the water to search for food. Dolphins inhabit the waters around Kennedy Space Center, along with many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish and shellfish. Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west make up a special type of estuary called a lagoon, a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  10. KSC00pp0191

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, a mother dolphin guides her baby through the water to search for food. Next to them on a rock is an osprey eating a fish. Dolphins inhabit the waters around Kennedy Space Center, along with many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish and shellfish. Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west make up a special type of estuary called a lagoon, a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth. Nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally. The lagoon also has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America

  11. KSC00pp0198

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The water in the turn basin, located east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, teems with fish and draws white pelicans, gray pelicans, cormorants, sea gulls and one of several dolphins looking for a meal. The turn basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America, plus many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish, shellfish and dolphins. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  12. KSC-00pp0191

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, a mother dolphin guides her baby through the water to search for food. Next to them on a rock is an osprey eating a fish. Dolphins inhabit the waters around Kennedy Space Center, along with many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish and shellfish. Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west make up a special type of estuary called a lagoon, a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth. Nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally. The lagoon also has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America

  13. KSC-00pp0196

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A gray and a white pelican glide down to the water near a dolphin and cormorant in the turn basin to search for a meal in the fish-teeming water. Sea gulls also approach. The turn basin, which is east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America, plus many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish, shellfish and dolphins. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  14. KSC00pp0193

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, a mother dolphin guides her baby through the water to search for food. Dolphins inhabit the waters around Kennedy Space Center, along with many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish and shellfish. Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west make up a special type of estuary called a lagoon, a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  15. KSC00pp0196

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A gray and a white pelican glide down to the water near a dolphin and cormorant in the turn basin to search for a meal in the fish-teeming water. Sea gulls also approach. The turn basin, which is east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America, plus many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish, shellfish and dolphins. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  16. KSC00pp0195

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The water in the turn basin, east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, teems with fish and draws white pelicans, gray pelicans, cormorants, sea gulls and more looking for a meal. The turn basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  17. KSC-00pp0198

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The water in the turn basin, located east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, teems with fish and draws white pelicans, gray pelicans, cormorants, sea gulls and one of several dolphins looking for a meal. The turn basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America, plus many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish, shellfish and dolphins. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  18. KSC-00pp0195

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The water in the turn basin, east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, teems with fish and draws white pelicans, gray pelicans, cormorants, sea gulls and more looking for a meal. The turn basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, composed of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  19. KSC00pp0194

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A dolphin glides through the water looking for fish in the turn basin, which is located east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway. Dolphins inhabit the waters, known as the Indian River Lagoon, around Kennedy Space Center, along with many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish and shellfish. Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west make up a special type of estuary called a lagoon, a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  20. KSC00pp0190

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building and next to the crawlerway, a mother dolphin guides her baby through the water to search for food. Dolphins inhabit the waters around Kennedy Space Center, along with many different species of oceanic and lagoon fish and shellfish. Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west make up a special type of estuary called a lagoon, a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth. Nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the Lagoon seasonally

  1. KSC00pp0245

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This immature red-shouldered hawk on the roadside at Kennedy Space Center appears to be eyeing the photographer. The red-shouldered hawk's range extends from Minnesota and New Brunswick south to the Gulf Coast and on the Pacific Coast from northern California to Baja California. This hawk is often found in lowlands, especially swampy woods and bogs. It feeds on small snakes, frogs, insects and small mammals. Kennedy shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  2. KSC-00pp0245

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This immature red-shouldered hawk on the roadside at Kennedy Space Center appears to be eyeing the photographer. The red-shouldered hawk's range extends from Minnesota and New Brunswick south to the Gulf Coast and on the Pacific Coast from northern California to Baja California. This hawk is often found in lowlands, especially swampy woods and bogs. It feeds on small snakes, frogs, insects and small mammals. Kennedy shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  3. KSC-99pp1521

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A loggerhead shrike perches on a branch in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The loggerhead shrike prefers grasslands, orchards and open areas with scattered trees throughout a range extending from southern Canada to southern Florida and the Gulf Coast. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  4. KSC-99pp0398

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, and honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other new attractions are an information center, a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  5. KSC-99pp0246

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A belted kingfisher perches on a twig in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center. The pigeon-sized, blue-gray male is identified by the blue-gray breast band; females show a chestnut belly band. The belted kingfisher ranges throughout the United States and Canada, wintering south to Panama and the West Indies. They dive into the water for fish and may also take crabs, crayfish, salamanders, lizards, mice and insects. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  6. KSC-99pp0405

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the grand opening of the newly expanded KSC Visitor Complex, Center Director Roy Bridges presents Deep Space Nine star Avery Brooks with a plaque, recognizing his contribution to advancing the public's understanding of NASA and the search for life elsewhere in the universe. Brooks narrates the new film Quest for Life at the Visitor Center. The $ 13 million addition to the Visitor Complex now includes an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks, a new information center, films, and exhibits. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  7. KSC-99pp0406

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the grand opening of the newly expanded KSC Visitor Complex, Center Director Roy Bridges presents Deep Space Nine star Avery Brooks with a plaque, NASA jacket and hat. Brooks narrates the new film Quest for Life at the Visitor Center. Brooks was recognized for his contribution to advancing the public's understanding of NASA and the search for life elsewhere in the universe. The Complex now includes an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks, a new foyer, films, and exhibits. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  8. KSC-99pp0407

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The newly added Robot Scouts exhibit at the KSC Visitor Complex is situated next to the Rocket Garden. Part of the $13 million expansion to the Visitor Complex, the exhibit helps describe for visitors the accomplishments of unsung space heroes space probes and their role in space exploration. It also includes a display of how data from robotic probes might be used to build a human habitat for Mars. Visitors can witness a simulated Martian sunset. Other additions include a new foyer, films, and an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

  9. KSC-99pp0865

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves to her family nearby, a last meeting before launch of mission STS-93 on July 20. Liftoff is scheduled for 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  10. KSC-99pp0257

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A glossy ibis searches for food in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Identified by its chestnut plumage and green wings, the glossy ibis ranges on or near the coast from Maine to Florida and Texas. It inhabits marshes, swamps, flooded fields, coastal bays, and estuaries. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  11. KSC-99pp0255

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The furious beating wings of a blue-winged teal launch it from the water as another swims calmly beneath it in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Inhabiting marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, the teal winters as far south as South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  12. KSC-00PP-0237

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, attract coots, ducks, herons and other water birds as shown here. Coots are readily identified by their slate-gray bodies and conspicuous white bill. They inhabit open ponds and marshes from southern Canada to northern South America. Excellent swimmers and divers, they eat various aquatic plants, but also feed on seeds grass and waste grain on land. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  13. KSC00PP-0237

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, attract coots, ducks, herons and other water birds as shown here. Coots are readily identified by their slate-gray bodies and conspicuous white bill. They inhabit open ponds and marshes from southern Canada to northern South America. Excellent swimmers and divers, they eat various aquatic plants, but also feed on seeds grass and waste grain on land. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  14. KSC-99pp0955

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The fiery launch of Space Shuttle Columbia is reflected in the water near the Launch Complex . After two unsuccessful attempts on previous nights, liftoff occurred at 12:31 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT

  15. KSC-99pp0957

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Reflected in the waters near Launch Pad 39-B, Space Shuttle Columbia rockets into the night sky on mission STS-93. After two unsuccessful attempts on previous nights, liftoff occurred at 12:31 a.m. EDT.. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT

  16. KSC00pp0344

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-11

    At the conclusion of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex, KSC Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings speaks to the teams and other attendees. At left is Gregg Gale, with Walt Disney World, which is the site of the national competition (at EPCOT) April 6-8. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville

  17. KSC-00pp0344

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-11

    At the conclusion of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex, KSC Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings speaks to the teams and other attendees. At left is Gregg Gale, with Walt Disney World, which is the site of the national competition (at EPCOT) April 6-8. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville

  18. KSC-99pp0249

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- White pelicans search for a meal in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The habitat of white pelicans are marshy lakes along the Pacific and Texas coasts, wintering chiefly in coastal lagoons such as this one. They often capture fish cooperatively, forming a long line, beating their wings and driving the prey into shallow water. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  19. KSC-99pp0250

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- White pelicans soaring over the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge reveal the black wing feathers that are hidden when folded. The habitat of white pelicans are marshy lakes along the Pacific and Texas coasts, wintering chiefly in coastal lagoons such as this one. They often capture fish cooperatively, forming a long line, beating their wings and driving the prey into shallow water. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  20. KSC-99pp0248

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- White pelicans are joined by a few egrets at a feeding frenzy in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Pelicans in flight display their black wing tips, which are hidden when folded. The habitat of white pelicans are marshy lakes along the Pacific and Texas coasts, wintering chiefly in coastal lagoons such as this one. They often capture fish cooperatively, forming a long line, beating their wings and driving the prey into shallow water. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  1. KSC-99pp0251

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A white pelican stretches its eight-foot wing span as it prepares for flight. The black wing feathers, hidden when folded, appear as shadows against the dappled waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The habitat of white pelicans are marshy lakes along the Pacific and Texas coasts, wintering chiefly in coastal lagoons such as this one. They often capture fish cooperatively, forming a long line, beating their wings and driving the prey into shallow water. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  2. KSC-99pp0945

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-22

    For the third time, during final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) waves after donning his launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  3. KSC-99pp0944

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-22

    For the third time, in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Tognini. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  4. KSC-99pp0946

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-22

    During the third launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves while having her launch and entry suit checked. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  5. KSC-00pp0154

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female roseate spoonbill displays her colorful wings in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  6. KSC-99pp0365

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two roseate spoonbills wade in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  7. KSC-00pp0151

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill searches the water for food. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  8. KSC-00pp0152

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, two roseate spoonbills mirror each other as they preen their lipstick-colored feathers. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  9. KSC-00pp0155

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female roseate spoonbill (left) displays her colorful wings to the male at right in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  10. KSC00pp0153

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill squawks at nearby intruders. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  11. KSC00pp0151

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill searches the water for food. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  12. KSC-99pp0364

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A roseate spoonbill balancing on one leg is reflected in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  13. KSC-99pp0247

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-02-26

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female red-breasted merganser paddles in the rippled water of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center. Male mergansers have a green head, gray sides, white neck ring and rusty breast. One of three mergansers commonly found on salt water, it ranges from northern lakes and tundra ponds, wintering principally on the ocean and in salt bays. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  14. KSC-99pp0303

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-15

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Black-necked Stilt hunts for food in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The stilt is identified by its distinct head pattern of black and white, its very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. The stilt's habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  15. KSC-99pp0626

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-04

    STS-93 Mission Specialists Catherine Coleman (left) and Michel Tognini of France (right), representing the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), look over material on the mission payload behind them, the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Chandra is being mated with the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) before testing to validate the IUS/Chandra connections and to check the orbiter avionics interfaces. Following that, an end-to-end test (ETE) will be conducted to verify the communications path to Chandra, commanding it as if it were in space. With the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 22 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93

  16. KSC-99pp0627

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-04

    STS-93 Mission Specialists Catherine Coleman (left) and Michel Tognini of France (right), who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), look over the controls for the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Chandra is being mated with the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) before testing to validate the IUS/Chandra connections and to check the orbiter avionics interfaces. Following that, an end-to-end test (ETE) will be conducted to verify the communications path to Chandra, commanding it as if it were in space. With the world's most powerful X-ray telescope, Chandra will allow scientists from around the world to see previously invisible black holes and high-temperature gas clouds, giving the observatory the potential to rewrite the books on the structure and evolution of our universe. Chandra is scheduled for launch July 22 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, on mission STS-93

  17. KSC-00pp0304

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In a wooded area of Kennedy Space Center, robins gather on a tree branch just beginning to show new Spring growth. A member of the thrush family, robins inhabit towns, gardens, open woodlands and agricultural lands. They range through most of North America, spending winters in large roosts mostly in the United States but also Newfoundland, southern Ontario and British Columbia. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a haven and habitat for more than 331 species of birds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are also a habitat for 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  18. KSC00pp0304

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In a wooded area of Kennedy Space Center, robins gather on a tree branch just beginning to show new Spring growth. A member of the thrush family, robins inhabit towns, gardens, open woodlands and agricultural lands. They range through most of North America, spending winters in large roosts mostly in the United States but also Newfoundland, southern Ontario and British Columbia. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a haven and habitat for more than 331 species of birds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are also a habitat for 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  19. KSC-99pp0502

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-07

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is moved into the Space Station Processing Facility to prepare it for launch targeted for September 1999. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  20. KSC-99pp0329

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-24

    Inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is revealed after the lid of its container was removed. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  1. KSC-99pp0311

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-23

    In the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, Mary Reaves and Richard Rainen, with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, work on the carrier and horizontal antenna mast for the STS-99 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) while Larry Broms watches. The SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during an 11-day mission in September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  2. KSC-99pp0503

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-07

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is maneuvered into place to prepare it for launch targeted for September 1999. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  3. KSC-99pp0330

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-24

    The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) sits inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility after the SRTM's cover was removed. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  4. KSC-99pp0327

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-24

    Inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, the lid covering the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is lifted. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  5. KSC-99pp0326

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-24

    The vehicle carrying the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) arrives at the Multi-Payload Processing Facility. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  6. KSC-99pp0328

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-24

    Inside the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, the lid covering the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is lifted from the crate. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  7. KSC-99pp0312

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-23

    In the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, Beverly St. Ange, with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, wires a biopod, a component of the STS-99 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during an 11-day mission in September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  8. KSC-99pp0313

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-23

    In the Multi-Payload Processing Facility, Mary Reaves (left) and Richard Rainen, with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, check out the carrier and horizontal antenna mast for the STS-99 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during an 11-day mission in September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  9. KSC-99pp0505

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-07

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), workers (lower right) disconnect the transport vehicle from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) after moving it into the building for pre-launch preparations. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission targeted for launch in September 1999. This radar system will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. Its objective is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth

  10. KSC-00pp0305

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An algae-covered alligator keeps a wary eye open as it rests in one of the ponds at Kennedy Space Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  11. KSC00pp0305

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An algae-covered alligator keeps a wary eye open as it rests in one of the ponds at Kennedy Space Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  12. KSC00pp0152

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, two roseate spoonbills mirror each other as they preen their lipstick-colored feathers. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  13. KSC-00pp0153

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill squawks at nearby intruders. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  14. KSC00pp0155

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female roseate spoonbill (left) displays her colorful wings to the male at right in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  15. KSC00pp0154

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-20

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A female roseate spoonbill displays her colorful wings in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  16. KSC-01pp1013

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Roseate Spoonbills stride across the lawn in front of the KSC Headquarters building. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, usually feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  17. KSC-00pp0544

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-23

    The GOES-L satellite approaches the end of its journey up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket. The Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  18. KSC00pp0544

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-23

    The GOES-L satellite approaches the end of its journey up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket. The Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  19. KSC00pp0543

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-23

    The GOES-L satellite is about midway in its journey up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas IIA rocket is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  20. KSC-00pp0543

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-23

    The GOES-L satellite is about midway in its journey up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas IIA rocket is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  1. KSC00pp0542

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    The GOES-L satellite is ready for mating with the lower stages of the Atlas IIA rocket on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  2. KSC-00pp0542

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    The GOES-L satellite is ready for mating with the lower stages of the Atlas IIA rocket on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  3. KSC-00pp0541

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    The GOES-L satellite is lifted up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. the Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  4. KSC00pp0541

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    The GOES-L satellite is lifted up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. the Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  5. KSC-00pp0545

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-23

    The GOES-L satellite, after being lifted up to the top of the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, is ready for mating with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket. Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  6. KSC00pp0545

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-23

    The GOES-L satellite, after being lifted up to the top of the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, is ready for mating with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket. Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3

  7. KSC00pp0313

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-08

    In the water near Kennedy Space Center, a mother alligator gathers her six offspring. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  8. KSC-00pp0312

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-08

    American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  9. KSC-00pp0313

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-08

    In the water near Kennedy Space Center, a mother alligator gathers her six offspring. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  10. KSC-00pp0625

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-08

    A Sandhill Crane searches for food with its still-fuzzy fledgling by its side. The two, along with another adult crane, have been seen wandering the grassy areas in the KSC Launch Complex 39 area. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  11. KSC00pp0672

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-18

    While the sandhill crane parents search for food in front of the Vehicle Assembly Building, their still-featherless baby nearby tests its voice. The cranes have been a constant sight in the Launch Complex 39 area during the month of May. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  12. KSC00pp0671

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-18

    A family of sandhill cranes searches for food on the grounds near the Vehicle Assembly Building. The cranes have been a constant sight in the Launch Complex 39 area during the month of May. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  13. KSC00pp0625

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-08

    A Sandhill Crane searches for food with its still-fuzzy fledgling by its side. The two, along with another adult crane, have been seen wandering the grassy areas in the KSC Launch Complex 39 area. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  14. KSC-00pp0624

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-08

    A pair of Sandhill Cranes searches for food with their still-fluffy fledgling close by. The trio have been seen wandering the grassy areas in the KSC Launch Complex 39 area. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  15. KSC00pp0624

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-08

    A pair of Sandhill Cranes searches for food with their still-fluffy fledgling close by. The trio have been seen wandering the grassy areas in the KSC Launch Complex 39 area. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  16. KSC-00pp0672

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-18

    While the sandhill crane parents search for food in front of the Vehicle Assembly Building, their still-featherless baby nearby tests its voice. The cranes have been a constant sight in the Launch Complex 39 area during the month of May. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  17. KSC-00pp0671

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-05-18

    A family of sandhill cranes searches for food on the grounds near the Vehicle Assembly Building. The cranes have been a constant sight in the Launch Complex 39 area during the month of May. Sandhill cranes range from Siberia, Alaska and Arctic islands to Michigan, Minnesota and California; from Florida to Texas. They prefer large freshwater marshes, prairie ponds and marshy tundra. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  18. KSC-00pp0416

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is nearing erection in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  19. KSC-00pp0425

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  20. KSC-00pp0415

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is slowly raised in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  1. KSC00pp0423

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station watch as the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is raised to a vertical position in front of the gantry on pad 36-A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  2. KSC00pp0417

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    The first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket stands erect in the launch gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  3. KSC00pp0424

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers check over the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket before it is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  4. KSC-00pp0423

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station watch as the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is raised to a vertical position in front of the gantry on pad 36-A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  5. KSC-00pp0421

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    The second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket arrives on pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  6. KSC00pp0416

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is nearing erection in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  7. KSC00pp0412

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  8. KSC-00pp0426

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, cables help guide the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket as it is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  9. KSC-00pp0414

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket begins erection in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  10. KSC00pp0422

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    The second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is raised to a vertical position in front of the gantry on pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  11. KSC00pp0414

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket begins erection in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  12. KSC-00pp0424

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers check over the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket before it is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  13. KSC00pp0415

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is slowly raised in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  14. KSC00pp0421

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    The second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket arrives on pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  15. KSC-00pp0417

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    The first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket stands erect in the launch gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  16. KSC-00pp0413

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Shown are the rocket thrusters. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  17. KSC00pp0425

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  18. KSC-00pp0412

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  19. KSC00pp0413

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-27

    Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Shown are the rocket thrusters. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  20. KSC-00pp0422

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-29

    The second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is raised to a vertical position in front of the gantry on pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing

  1. KSC-00pp0159

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-04

    Mack McKinney, chief, program resources management at NASA and chairperson for African-American History Month, presents a plaque to Bhetty Waldron at the kick-off ceremony of African-American History Month on Feb. 3 at the NASA Training Auditorium. The award was given in thanks for Waldron’s portrayal of Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and Zora Neal Hurston during the ceremony. The theme for this year’s observation is "Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century." February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation

  2. KSC00pp0159

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-04

    Mack McKinney, chief, program resources management at NASA and chairperson for African-American History Month, presents a plaque to Bhetty Waldron at the kick-off ceremony of African-American History Month on Feb. 3 at the NASA Training Auditorium. The award was given in thanks for Waldron’s portrayal of Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and Zora Neal Hurston during the ceremony. The theme for this year’s observation is "Heritage and Horizons: The African-American Legacy and the Challenges of the 21st Century." February is designated each year as a time to celebrate the achievements and contributions of African Americans to Kennedy Space Center, NASA and the nation

  3. KSC-99pp1454

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-17

    A rescued white pelican, dubbed "Fisheater" by his rescuers, takes a tentative step and stretches its wings after being let go at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Looking on is Mark Epstein, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, who had held the bird while Kat Royer, also with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  4. KSC-99pp1453

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-17

    Under a rain-filled sky, Mark Epstein, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, gets ready to release a rescued white pelican. At right is Kat Royer, also with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, who has fixed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. In the background is Christine Wise who is involved with rescue and rehabilitation of Florida wild animals. Wise brought the pelican to the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge for its release. The bird was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. The pelican, dubbed "Fisheater" by its rescuers, is being let go to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  5. KSC-99pp1451

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-17

    Mark Epstein, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, holds a white pelican that will be released under a rain-filled sky at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The bird was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Center in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. After Kat Royer, who is with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, fits the bird with a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory, the pelican will be let go to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  6. KSC-99pp1456

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-17

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A white pelican named "Fisheater" by its rescuers soars to open water in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge as it flies to freedom. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released today to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge, some of which are nearby. Before its release, however, Kat Royer, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  7. Study of {psi}(2S) decays to {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp, and search for pp threshold enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Sun, W. M.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.

    2010-11-01

    The decays of {psi}(2S) into {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp have been studied with the CLEO-c detector using a sample of 24.5x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events obtained from e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}(s)=3686 MeV. The data show evidence for the excitation of several N{sup *} resonances in p{pi}{sup 0} and p{eta} channels in {pi}{sup 0}pp and {eta}pp decays, and f{sub 2} states in {gamma}pp decay. Branching fractions for decays of {psi}(2S) to {gamma}pp, {pi}{sup 0}pp, and {eta}pp have been determined. No evidence for pp threshold enhancements was found in the reactions {psi}(2S){yields}Xpp, where X={gamma}, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta}. We do, however, find confirming evidence for a pp threshold enhancement in J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}pp as previously reported by BES.

  8. {lambda}0 Polarization in Exclusive pp Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, J.

    2006-09-25

    Among all properties of baryons, the polarization they acquire when created from unpolarized p-nucleus collisions is the most recent discovered one; so far, the origin of this polarization remains unexplained in spite of the experimental evidences accumulated in the past thirty years. Up to these days, {lambda}0 is the most studied baryon for polarization, due to it is very easy to produce {lambda}0's at the energies of the principal high energy physics accelerators of the world. This article is a review of the experimental experience accumulated on the polarization of {lambda}0 in unpolarized exclusive pp collisions as function of xF, PT, and M({lambda}0K+) in the past fifteen years here at the Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, inside Fermilab e690 and Brookhaven National Laboratory e766 collaborations.

  9. KSC-99pp1232

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-20

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to pet one of the dogs that serves with Canine Companions for Independence, a vendor displaying its capabilities at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Standing at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services; behind Bridges is Nancie Strott (left), a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair, and Sterling Walker (right), director of Engineering Development and chairman of DAAWG. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, "Opening Doors to Ability." Some of the other vendors participating are Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services

  10. KSC-99pp1229

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-20

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops at the Stewart Eye Institute table at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Behind Bridges is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG. At the near right are George and Marian Hall, who are with the Institute. At the left is Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, "Opening Doors to Ability." Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services

  11. KSC-00pp0045

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-13

    Inside the White Room attached to the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew pose at the entrance to the orbiter Endeavour. From left are Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele, Janice Voss (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri, Commander Kevin Kregel (standing) and Pilot Dominic Gorie (kneeling in front). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  12. KSC-99pp1419

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Under partly cloudy skies and the Atlantic Ocean as a backdrop, Space Shuttle Endeavour, atop the mobile launcher platform, arrives at Launch Pad 39A for mission STS-99. The white cubicle at left is the environmental chamber, the White Room, that provides entry into the orbiter for the astronauts. It is at the outer end of the Orbiter Access Arm on the Fixed Service Structure. STS-99, named the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), involves an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from its payload bay, to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. STS-99 is scheduled for launch in January 2000

  13. KSC00pp0075

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-14

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew pose for a photograph during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Standing left to right are Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele (Ph.D.). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  14. KSC-00pp0075

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-14

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the 195-foot level of the Fixed Service Structure on Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew pose for a photograph during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Standing left to right are Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele (Ph.D.). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  15. KSC-99pp0284

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-06

    At the award ceremony for the 1999 FIRST Southeastern Regional robotic competition held at KSC, Center Director Roy Bridges addresses the teams, encouraging them to continue their interest in engineering. Directly behind him (left) are Woody Flowers, national advisor to FIRST, and (right) former KSC Director of Shuttle Processing Robert Sieck, who served as one of the judges. At the far left, students gather around astronaut David Brown, who was present during the two days of matches. At right are other judges, including Deputy Director for Launch and Payload Processing Loren Shriver (third from right). FIRST is a nonprofit organization, For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, that sponsors the event pitting gladiator robots against each other in an athletic-style competition. The FIRST robotics competition is designed to provide students with a hands-on, inside look at engineering and other professional careers, pairing high school students with engineer mentors and corporations. The regional event comprised 27 teams. Along with the championship award, which went to high school teams in Miami and San German, Puerto Rico, 15 other awards were presented

  16. KSC-00pp0490

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seen here in a closeup is a GetAway Special (GAS) known as SEM, part of the payload on mission STS-101, in the payload bay on Space Shuttle Atlantis prior to door closure. The SEM program is student-developed, focusing on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Selected student experiments on this sixth venture are testing the effects of space on Idaho tubers, seeds, paint, yeast, film, liquids, electronics and magnetic chips. SEM-06 is one of two GAS experiments. The other is MARS, part of the KSC Space Life Sciences Outreach Program. It includes 20 participating schools (ranging from elementary to high school) from all over the nation and one in Canada who have been involved in KSC Space Life Sciences projects over the past seven years. The MARS payload has 20 tubes filled with materials for various classroom investigations designed by the MARS schools. The primary mission of STS-101 is to deliver logistics and supplies to the International Space Station, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A

  17. KSC-00pp0489

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two GetAway Special (GAS) experiments SEM-06 (left) and MARS (right), part of the payload on mission STS-101, are seen here in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Atlantis prior to door closure. The SEM program is student-developed, focusing on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Selected student experiments on this sixth venture are testing the effects of space on Idaho tubers, seeds, paint, yeast, film, liquids, electronics and magnetic chips. MARS is the name for part of the KSC Space Life Sciences Outreach Program. It includes 20 participating schools (ranging from elementary to high school) from all over the nation and one in Canada who have been involved in KSC Space Life Sciences projects over the past seven years. The MARS payload has 20 tubes filled with materials for various classroom investigations designed by the MARS schools. The primary mission of STS-101 is to deliver logistics and supplies to the International Space Station, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A

  18. KSC00pp0494

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Placed at the end of Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay are two GetAway Special (GAS) experiments, MARS (left) and SEM-06 (right). MARS is the name for part of the KSC Space Life Sciences Outreach Program. It includes 20 participating schools (ranging from elementary to high school) from all over the nation and one in Canada who have been involved in KSC Space Life Sciences projects over the past seven years. The MARS payload has 20 tubes filled with materials for various classroom investigations designed by the MARS schools. The SEM program is student-developed, focusing on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Selected student experiments on this sixth venture are testing the effects of space on Idaho tubers, seeds, paint, yeast, film, liquids, electronics and magnetic chips. The primary mission of STS-101 is to deliver logistics and supplies to the International Space Station, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A

  19. KSC00pp0490

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Seen here in a closeup is a GetAway Special (GAS) known as SEM, part of the payload on mission STS-101, in the payload bay on Space Shuttle Atlantis prior to door closure. The SEM program is student-developed, focusing on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Selected student experiments on this sixth venture are testing the effects of space on Idaho tubers, seeds, paint, yeast, film, liquids, electronics and magnetic chips. SEM-06 is one of two GAS experiments. The other is MARS, part of the KSC Space Life Sciences Outreach Program. It includes 20 participating schools (ranging from elementary to high school) from all over the nation and one in Canada who have been involved in KSC Space Life Sciences projects over the past seven years. The MARS payload has 20 tubes filled with materials for various classroom investigations designed by the MARS schools. The primary mission of STS-101 is to deliver logistics and supplies to the International Space Station, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A

  20. KSC-00pp0494

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Placed at the end of Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay are two GetAway Special (GAS) experiments, MARS (left) and SEM-06 (right). MARS is the name for part of the KSC Space Life Sciences Outreach Program. It includes 20 participating schools (ranging from elementary to high school) from all over the nation and one in Canada who have been involved in KSC Space Life Sciences projects over the past seven years. The MARS payload has 20 tubes filled with materials for various classroom investigations designed by the MARS schools. The SEM program is student-developed, focusing on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Selected student experiments on this sixth venture are testing the effects of space on Idaho tubers, seeds, paint, yeast, film, liquids, electronics and magnetic chips. The primary mission of STS-101 is to deliver logistics and supplies to the International Space Station, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A

  1. KSC00pp0489

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Two GetAway Special (GAS) experiments SEM-06 (left) and MARS (right), part of the payload on mission STS-101, are seen here in the payload bay of Space Shuttle Atlantis prior to door closure. The SEM program is student-developed, focusing on the science of zero-gravity and microgravity. Selected student experiments on this sixth venture are testing the effects of space on Idaho tubers, seeds, paint, yeast, film, liquids, electronics and magnetic chips. MARS is the name for part of the KSC Space Life Sciences Outreach Program. It includes 20 participating schools (ranging from elementary to high school) from all over the nation and one in Canada who have been involved in KSC Space Life Sciences projects over the past seven years. The MARS payload has 20 tubes filled with materials for various classroom investigations designed by the MARS schools. The primary mission of STS-101 is to deliver logistics and supplies to the International Space Station, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A

  2. KSC-00pp0243

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Southern Bald Eagle perched on top of a utility pole searches the area. About a dozen bald eagles live in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nest in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  3. KSC00pp0418

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-28

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A bald eagle joins two vultures at the site of an undetermined carcass on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  4. KSC00pp0243

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Southern Bald Eagle perched on top of a utility pole searches the area. About a dozen bald eagles live in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nest in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  5. KSC-00pp1535

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-29

    A pair of Florida bald eagles take advantage of a tower to rest and view the landscape near the intersection of the NASA Causeway and Kennedy Parkway North at Kennedy Space Center. This pair of eagles nests near Kennedy Parkway and is seen frequently by KSC commuters and visitors. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most southern Florida eagles nesting at KSC arrive during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. . Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  6. KSC-99pp0839

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    At a special presentation of the Hammer Award in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, former Apollo astronauts Neil Armstrong (left) and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin (second from right) applauded the recipients, Kennedy Space Center and the 45th Space Wing. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Ed Gormel and Chris Fairey, co-chairs of the SEB, accepted the awards for the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base. Armstrong and Aldrin were at KSC to attend a banquet and other activities for the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, which landed the first man on the moon

  7. KSC00pp0244

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Near a road at Kennedy Space Center, a red-shouldered hawk perches on a weathered tree stump. Red-shouldered hawks are large, long-winged, with rust-barred underparts, reddish shoulders, a narrowly banded tail, and a translucent area ner the tip of the wing. It ranges from Minnesota and New Brunswick south to the Gulf Coast, including Florida. It prefers deciduous woodlands, especially where there is standing water as in swampy woods and bogs. Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge that is a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  8. KSC-00pp0244

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Near a road at Kennedy Space Center, a red-shouldered hawk perches on a weathered tree stump. Red-shouldered hawks are large, long-winged, with rust-barred underparts, reddish shoulders, a narrowly banded tail, and a translucent area ner the tip of the wing. It ranges from Minnesota and New Brunswick south to the Gulf Coast, including Florida. It prefers deciduous woodlands, especially where there is standing water as in swampy woods and bogs. Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge that is a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  9. KSC-02pp0124

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-02

    JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- EXPEDITION FIVE CREW INSIGNIA (ISS05-S-001) -- The International Space Station (ISS) Expedition Five patch depicts the Station in its completed configuration and represents the vision of mankind's first step as a permanent human presence in space. The United States and Russian flags are joined together in a Roman numeral V to represent both the nationalities of the crew and the fifth crew to live aboard the ISS. Crew members' names are shown in the border of this patch. This increment encompasses a new phase in growth for the Station, with three Shuttle crews delivering critical components and building blocks to the ISS. To signify the participation of each crew member, the Shuttle is docked to the Station beneath a constellation of 17 stars symbolizing all those visiting and living aboard Station during this increment. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced.

  10. KSC-99pp0827

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    After arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-93 crew speak to the media about their mission. From left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who is with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), and Catherine G. "Cady" Coleman (Ph.D.), Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Commander Eileen M. Collins. Hawley has the most Shuttle flights, this being his fifth. Collins is making her third flight (the first as a commander), Coleman is making her second flight, and Ashby and Tognini are making their first flights. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected to unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes

  11. KSC-99pp0919

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves after donning her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  12. KSC-99pp0727

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-22

    STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby pauses for the photographer before climbing into an M-113 armored personnel carrier at the launch pad to take part in emergency egress training. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew are Commander Eileen M. Collins and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  13. KSC-99pp0873

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk to the "Astrovan," which will transport them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:31 p.m. EDT

  14. KSC-99pp0728

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-22

    STS-93 Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), pauses for the photographer before climbing into an M-113 armored personnel carrier at the launch pad to take part in emergency egress training. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew are Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  15. KSC-99pp0731

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-22

    STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) smiles for the photographer before climbing into an M-113 armored personnel carrier at the launch pad to take part in emergency egress training. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew are Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  16. KSC-99pp0870

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waits after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his helmet. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT

  17. KSC-99pp0869

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Tognini. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT

  18. KSC-99pp0715

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-21

    The STS-93 crew pose for photographers and the media after arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Tests (TCDT) this week. From left are Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, Commander Eileen M. Collins at the microphone, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. Tognini represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). TCDT activities familiarize the crew with the mission, provide training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe

  19. KSC-99pp0726

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-22

    STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins climbs into an M-113 armored personnel carrier at the launch pad to take part in emergency egress training. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  20. KSC-99pp0712

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-21

    STS-93 Michel Tognini of France arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Tests (TCDT) this week. TCDT activities familiarize the crew with the mission, provide training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Joining Tognini are Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.). Tognini represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe

  1. KSC-99pp0918

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) gets help with her launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  2. KSC-99pp0710

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-21

    STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins smiles on her arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet aircraft to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Tests (TCDT) this week. TCDT activities familiarize the crew with the mission, provide training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Joining Collins are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe

  3. KSC-99pp0711

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-21

    STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) grins on her arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard a T-38 jet to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Tests (TCDT) this week. TCDT activities familiarize the crew with the mission, provide training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Joining Coleman are Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, who is with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe

  4. KSC-99pp0922

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    Flanked by security, the STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they head for the "Astrovan" a second time to take them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After the July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission

  5. KSC-99pp0863

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    Space Shuttle Columbia, sitting on its mobile launcher platform, is framed against the early morning sky after the rollback of the Rotating Service Structure on Launch Pad 39-B. Columbia waits for the launch of mission STS-93 July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT. The primary payload of STS-93 is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  6. KSC-99pp0713

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-21

    STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) grins as he steps down from a T-38 jet aircraft after landing at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. The STS-93 crew are at KSC to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Tests (TCDT) this week. TCDT activities familiarize the crew with the mission, provide training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Joining Hawley are Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe

  7. KSC-99pp0871

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) waves after donning her launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Coleman and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT

  8. KSC-99pp0917

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), waves after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations for the second time. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Tognini. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  9. KSC-99pp0868

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins waves while a suit tech adjusts her boot, part of the launch and entry suit, during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT

  10. KSC-99pp0729

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-22

    STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) smiles for the photographer before climbing into an M-113 armored personnel carrier at the launch pad to take part in emergency egress training. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Others in the crew are Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a mission commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  11. KSC-99pp0714

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-21

    STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins talks to the media after arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility to participate in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Tests (TCDT) this week. TCDT activities familiarize the crew with the mission, provide training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. Joining Collins are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe

  12. KSC-99pp0914

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    The STS-93 crew gathers a second time for a pre-launch breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT

  13. KSC-99pp0725

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-22

    During emergency egress training inside an M-113 armored personnel carrier at the launch pad, Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France and Commander Eileen M. Collins share a light moment. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew are participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Also at KSC are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. Tognini represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  14. KSC-99pp0916

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    In the Operations and Checkout Building during final launch preparations for the second time, STS-93 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby waves after donning his launch and entry suit while a suit tech adjusts his boot. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  15. KSC-99pp0723

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-22

    The STS-93 crew pose in front of an M-113, an armored personnel carrier, which they will use for emergency egress training from the launch pad. From left are Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, Commander Eileen M. Collins and Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). Collins is the first woman to serve as mission commander. Tognini represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). TCDT activities familiarize the crew with the mission, provide training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and include a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. Chandra is expected to provide unique and crucial information on the nature of objects ranging from comets in our solar system to quasars at the edge of the observable universe. Since X-rays are absorbed by the Earth's atmosphere, space-based observatories are necessary to study these phenomena and allow scientists to analyze some of the greatest mysteries of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  16. KSC-99pp0921

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building for the second time enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission

  17. KSC-99pp0920

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    During final launch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.)gets help donning his launch and entry suit from a suit tech. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  18. KSC-99pp0915

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-21

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Commander Eileen M. Collins gets help donning her launch and entry suit. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission

  19. KSC-99pp0872

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; Mission Specialist Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.); and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:31 p.m. EDT

  20. KSC-99pp0867

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-93 Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.) smiles after donning his launch and entry suit during final launch preparations. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. The STS-93 crew numbers five: Commander Eileen M. Collins, Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, and Mission Specialists Hawley, Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Michel Tognini of France, with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:30 p.m. EDT

  1. KSC-00pp0112

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-27

    After arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-99 crew pause to greet the media and Commander Kevin Kregel (right) introduces his crew: (from left) Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.); Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Janice Voss (Ph.D.). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  2. KSC-00pp0113

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-27

    After the crew arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), at right, talks to the media. At left is Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele (Ph.D.). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  3. KSC00pp0112

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-27

    After arriving at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-99 crew pause to greet the media and Commander Kevin Kregel (right) introduces his crew: (from left) Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.); Pilot Dominic Gorie; and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Janice Voss (Ph.D.). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  4. KSC00pp0108

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-27

    STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, waves on his arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft to prepare for launch of Endeavour Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety

  5. KSC-00pp0114

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-27

    The STS-99 crew pose for a photograph after their arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility to prepare for launch. From left are Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele (Ph.D.) and Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Behind them are the T-38 jets in which they arrived, and the mate/demate device. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  6. KSC00pp0113

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-27

    After the crew arrival at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), at right, talks to the media. At left is Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele (Ph.D.). Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  7. KSC-00pp0108

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-27

    STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, waves on his arrival at KSC aboard a T-38 jet aircraft to prepare for launch of Endeavour Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety

  8. KSC-00pp0203

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-11

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, an eager and smiling STS-99 crew gathers for breakfast before suiting up for launch. From left are Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri and Janice Voss, Pilot Dominic Gorie, Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Janet Lynn Kavandi and Gerhard Thiele. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour

  9. KSC-99pp0941

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-22

    The STS-93 crew gathers a third time for a pre-launch breakfast in the Operations and Checkout Building before suiting up for launch. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 22 launch attempt was scrubbed due to the weather, the launch was rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. Seated from left are Mission Specialists Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Commander Eileen M. Collins; Mission Specialist Michel Tognini, of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES); and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT

  10. KSC00pp0588

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get a close look at some of the equipment, such as the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, to fly on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. At left is Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan . The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Other crew members are Mission Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pamela A. Melroy, and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  11. KSC00pp0592

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-92 crew pose in front of the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an element of the International Space Station that will be part of the mission payload. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. Standing left to right are Mission Specialists William S. McArthur Jr., Leroy Chiao, and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria; Pilot Pamela A. Melroy; Mission Specialists Peter J.K. Wisoff and Koichi Wakata; and Commander Brian Duffy. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  12. KSC-00pp0589

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get a close look at some of the equipment, such as the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, to fly on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. At left is Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The other crew members are Mission Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pamela A. Melroy, and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  13. KSC00pp0591

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get a close look at some of the equipment, such as the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, to fly on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. At left is Commander Brian Duffy; with their backs to the camera are Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata and Pilot Pamela A. Melroy. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The other crew members are Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  14. KSC-00pp0595

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get a close look at the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, part of the payload on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. The crew comprises Mission Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pamela A. Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  15. KSC-00pp0592

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-92 crew pose in front of the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, an element of the International Space Station that will be part of the mission payload. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. Standing left to right are Mission Specialists William S. McArthur Jr., Leroy Chiao, and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria; Pilot Pamela A. Melroy; Mission Specialists Peter J.K. Wisoff and Koichi Wakata; and Commander Brian Duffy. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  16. KSC00pp0587

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get hands-on experience with some of the equipment, such as the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, to fly on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The crew comprises Mission Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pamela A. Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  17. KSC-00pp0588

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get a close look at some of the equipment, such as the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, to fly on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. At left is Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan . The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Other crew members are Mission Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pamela A. Melroy, and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  18. KSC-00pp0590

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get a close look at some of the equipment, such as the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, to fly on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. At left is Pilot Pamela A. Melroy; at right is Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata, who is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The other crew members are Mission Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  19. KSC00pp0595

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get a close look at the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, part of the payload on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. The crew comprises Mission Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pamela A. Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  20. KSC-00pp0587

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-21

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, members of the STS-92 crew get hands-on experience with some of the equipment, such as the Integrated Truss Structure Z1, to fly on their mission. STS-92 is the fifth U.S. flight in the construction of the International Space Station. The Z1 is an early exterior framework to allow the first U.S. solar arrays on a future flight to be temporarily installed on Unity for early power. Another part of the payload is a pressurized mating adapter, PMA-3, to provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The crew comprises Mission Commander Brian Duffy, Pilot Pamela A. Melroy, and Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata, Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. Wisoff, Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, and William S. McArthur Jr. Wakata is with the National Space Development Agency of Japan. Launch of STS-92 is scheduled for Sept. 21, 2000

  1. KSC-99pp1523

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A white pelican and several small egrets rest on the bank of a pond in in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The range of the egret includes southern and eastern states, Mexico, Central and South America, and the West Indies. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  2. KSC-01pp1300

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-06-30

    JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- EXPEDITION THREE INSIGNIA -- The Expedition Three crew members -- astronaut Frank L. Culbertson Jr., commander, and cosmonauts Vladimir N. Dezhurov and Mikhail Tyurin -- had the following to say about the insignia for their scheduled mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS): "The book of space history turns from the chapter written onboard the Russian Mir Station and the U.S. Space Shuttle to the next new chapter, one that will be written on the blank pages of the future by space explorers working for the benefit of the entire world. The space walker signifies the human element of this endeavor. The star representing the members of the third expedition, and the entire multi-national Space Station building team, streaks into the dawning era of cooperative space exploration, represented by the image of the International Space Station as it nears completion." The insignia design for ISS flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and cosmonauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator and NASA's international partners may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced

  3. KSC00pp0306

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Florida Redbelly Turtle casts a suspicious look as he is being photographed on the grounds of Kennedy Space Center. The Redbelly turtle inhabits ponds, lakes, sloughs, marshes and mangrove-bordered creeks, in a range that encompasses Florida from the southern tip north to the Apalachicola area of the panhandle. Active year-round, it is often seen basking on logs or floating mats of vegetation. Adults prefer a diet of aquatic plants. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  4. KSC-00pp0306

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Florida Redbelly Turtle casts a suspicious look as he is being photographed on the grounds of Kennedy Space Center. The Redbelly turtle inhabits ponds, lakes, sloughs, marshes and mangrove-bordered creeks, in a range that encompasses Florida from the southern tip north to the Apalachicola area of the panhandle. Active year-round, it is often seen basking on logs or floating mats of vegetation. Adults prefer a diet of aquatic plants. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  5. KSC-00pp0051

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the bunker at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew try on oxygen masks. From left are Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard Thiele. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  6. KSC00pp0051

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the bunker at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-99 crew try on oxygen masks. From left are Pilot Dominic Gorie, Mission Specialist Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Commander Kevin Kregel, and Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Gerhard Thiele. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  7. KSC00pp0192

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Birds by the score, especially gray and white pelicans, cormorants, sea gulls, herons and ospreys, flock to the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building in a feeding frenzy as schools of fish fill the waters. In the background is Launch Pad A with Space Shuttle Endeavour waiting for launch on Friday, Feb. 11 for mission STS-99. The basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, which is made up of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. It is called a lagoon because it is a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  8. KSC-00pp0192

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-08

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Birds by the score, especially gray and white pelicans, cormorants, sea gulls, herons and ospreys, flock to the turn basin east of the Vehicle Assembly Building in a feeding frenzy as schools of fish fill the waters. In the background is Launch Pad A with Space Shuttle Endeavour waiting for launch on Friday, Feb. 11 for mission STS-99. The basin is part of the Indian River Lagoon, which is made up of Mosquito Lagoon to the north, Banana River and Creek to the south and the Indian River to the west. It is called a lagoon because it is a body of water separated from the ocean by barrier islands, with limited exchange with the ocean through inlets. The Indian River Lagoon has one of the most diverse bird populations anywhere in America. Also, nearly one-third of the nation's manatee population lives here or migrates through the lagoon seasonally. The lagoon varies in width from ½ mile to 5 miles and averages only 3 feet in depth

  9. KSC-00pp0048

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Near the bunker at Launch Pad 39A, STS-99 Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri check out the slidewire basket used for emergency egress. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  10. KSC00pp0048

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Near the bunker at Launch Pad 39A, STS-99 Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri check out the slidewire basket used for emergency egress. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  11. KSC00pp0419

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-28

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, a bald eagle takes wing away from two vultures at the site of an undetermined carcass. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  12. KSC-00pp0041

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pair of nesting bald eagles share a utility pole on Kennedy Parkway North. Nearby is their 11-foot-deep nest, in a pine tree, which has been home to one or more pairs of eagles for two dozen years. It is one of a dozen eagle nests in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  13. KSC00pp0242

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Southern Bald Eagle perches on top of a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. About a dozen bald eagles live in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nest in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insect

  14. KSC00pp0420

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-28

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- High in a pine tree on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, a bald eagle perches on a branch. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  15. KSC-00pp0418

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-28

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A bald eagle joins two vultures at the site of an undetermined carcass on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  16. KSC-00pp0419

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-28

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, a bald eagle takes wing away from two vultures at the site of an undetermined carcass. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  17. KSC-00pp1536

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-29

    This pair of bald eagles appear unhappy as the focus of the camera while they perch together on the top of a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. The Center counts more than half a dozen bald eagles among the denizens of its site, especially since KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The Southern bald eagle is no stranger to Florida as it ranges throughout the state and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana and south Atlantic states. Most southern Florida eagles nesting at KSC arrive during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  18. KSC00pp0041

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-12

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pair of nesting bald eagles share a utility pole on Kennedy Parkway North. Nearby is their 11-foot-deep nest, in a pine tree, which has been home to one or more pairs of eagles for two dozen years. It is one of a dozen eagle nests in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  19. KSC-00pp0420

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-03-28

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- High in a pine tree on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, a bald eagle perches on a branch. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  20. KSC-00pp0242

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Southern Bald Eagle perches on top of a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. About a dozen bald eagles live in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nest in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insect

  1. KSC00pp1535

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-29

    A pair of Florida bald eagles take advantage of a tower to rest and view the landscape near the intersection of the NASA Causeway and Kennedy Parkway North at Kennedy Space Center. This pair of eagles nests near Kennedy Parkway and is seen frequently by KSC commuters and visitors. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most southern Florida eagles nesting at KSC arrive during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. . Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  2. KSC00pp1536

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-29

    This pair of bald eagles appear unhappy as the focus of the camera while they perch together on the top of a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. The Center counts more than half a dozen bald eagles among the denizens of its site, especially since KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The Southern bald eagle is no stranger to Florida as it ranges throughout the state and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana and south Atlantic states. Most southern Florida eagles nesting at KSC arrive during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  3. KSC00pp1740

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the top of a utility pole, a red-tailed hawk launches into flight, perhaps after spotting prey, typically a small rodent. Ranging in height from 18 inches to 25 inches, the species has a stocky build with a whitish breast and rust-colored tail. It has a high-pitched descending scream with a hoarse quality. The hawk inhabits mainly deciduous forest and adjacent open country from Alaska and Nova Scotia south to Panama. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  4. KSC-00pp1740

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From the top of a utility pole, a red-tailed hawk launches into flight, perhaps after spotting prey, typically a small rodent. Ranging in height from 18 inches to 25 inches, the species has a stocky build with a whitish breast and rust-colored tail. It has a high-pitched descending scream with a hoarse quality. The hawk inhabits mainly deciduous forest and adjacent open country from Alaska and Nova Scotia south to Panama. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  5. KSC-00pp1739

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC, a red-tailed hawk waits on top of a utility pole for the slightest movement in the grass below. It feeds mostly on small rodents. Ranging in height from 18 inches to 25 inches, the species has a stocky build with a whitish breast and rust-colored tail. It has a high-pitched descending scream with a hoarse quality. The hawk inhabits mainly deciduous forest and adjacent open country from Alaska and Nova Scotia south to Panama. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  6. KSC00pp1739

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC, a red-tailed hawk waits on top of a utility pole for the slightest movement in the grass below. It feeds mostly on small rodents. Ranging in height from 18 inches to 25 inches, the species has a stocky build with a whitish breast and rust-colored tail. It has a high-pitched descending scream with a hoarse quality. The hawk inhabits mainly deciduous forest and adjacent open country from Alaska and Nova Scotia south to Panama. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  7. KSC01pp0761

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-06

    The 12th annual Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award Dinner gathered these distinguished guests: (from left), Center Director Roy Bridges, who received the 2001 Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award, Maxwell King, Lee Solid, JoAnn Morgan, Bob Sieck, Forrest McCartney and Ernie Briel. Solid is the former vice president and general manager of Space Systems Division, Florida Operations, Rockwell International. Morgan is the director of KSC’s External Relations & Business Development Directorate; Bob Sieck is the former director of Shuttle Processing at KSC. McCartney, center director of KSC from 1986-1991, received the first Debus award ever given to a KSC director. Bridges was given the honor for his progressive, visionary leadership and contributions to space technology and exploration. The Florida Committee of the National Space Club presented the award. The Debus Award was first given in 1980. Created to recognize significant achievements and contributions made in Florida to the American aerospace effort, the award is named for the KSC’s first Director, Dr. Kurt H. Debus

  8. KSC00pp0307

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The greenish iridescence of a male Anhinga nearly blends into the green vegetation behind it on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center. The mostly black-bodied bird is also known as a "snakebird" because, when swimming, only its head and long, slender neck are visible above water. The anhinga inhabits freshwater ponds and swamps with thick vegetation and ranges the Atlantic and Gulf coasts from North Carolina to Texas, the Mississippi Valley north to Arkansas and Tennessee, and south to southern South America. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  9. KSC-00pp0307

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-29

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The greenish iridescence of a male Anhinga nearly blends into the green vegetation behind it on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center. The mostly black-bodied bird is also known as a "snakebird" because, when swimming, only its head and long, slender neck are visible above water. The anhinga inhabits freshwater ponds and swamps with thick vegetation and ranges the Atlantic and Gulf coasts from North Carolina to Texas, the Mississippi Valley north to Arkansas and Tennessee, and south to southern South America. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  10. KSC00pp0238

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Coots draw together (foreground) in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. They are often seen in the Indian River and Banana Creek swimming together in large groups such as these. Other birds, mainly ducks, swim nearby. Coots are readily identified by their slate-gray bodies and conspicuous white bill. They inhabit open ponds and marshes from southern Canada to northern South America. Excellent swimmers and divers, they eat various aquatic plants, but also feed on seeds grass and waste grain on land. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  11. KSC-00pp0238

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-11

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Coots draw together (foreground) in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. They are often seen in the Indian River and Banana Creek swimming together in large groups such as these. Other birds, mainly ducks, swim nearby. Coots are readily identified by their slate-gray bodies and conspicuous white bill. They inhabit open ponds and marshes from southern Canada to northern South America. Excellent swimmers and divers, they eat various aquatic plants, but also feed on seeds grass and waste grain on land. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  12. KSC00pp0016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-12

    STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie, under the watchful eye of Capt. George Hoggard, a trainer with the KSC Fire Department, practices driving the M-113, an armored personnel carrier. Part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, the M-113 could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. Riding in the rear are Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Janice Voss (Ph.D.). TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  13. KSC-00pp0016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-12

    STS-99 Pilot Dominic Gorie, under the watchful eye of Capt. George Hoggard, a trainer with the KSC Fire Department, practices driving the M-113, an armored personnel carrier. Part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, the M-113 could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. Riding in the rear are Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.) and Janice Voss (Ph.D.). TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  14. KSC-00pp0013

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-12

    STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, practices driving an armored personnel carrier under the watchful eye of Capt. George Hoggard (riding on the front), trainer with the KSC Fire Department. The vehicle is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities and could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. Riding in the rear of the carrier are Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele (center), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Commander Kevin Kregel. TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  15. KSC00pp0013

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-12

    STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, practices driving an armored personnel carrier under the watchful eye of Capt. George Hoggard (riding on the front), trainer with the KSC Fire Department. The vehicle is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities and could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. Riding in the rear of the carrier are Mission Specialists Gerhard Thiele (center), Janice Voss (Ph.D.), and Commander Kevin Kregel. TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  16. KSC-00pp0012

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-12

    STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri, who is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, smiles during training on the M-113, an armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. TCDT provides the crew with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  17. KSC-99pp0948

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-22

    The STS-93 crew wave and smile at onlookers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building for the third time enroute to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 27, 1999, at 11:20 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission

  18. KSC-99pp0426

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-19

    At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is lifted up the gantry for mating with the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket already in place. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites

  19. KSC-99pp0428

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-19

    At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is moved into place above the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites

  20. KSC-99pp0427

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-19

    At Launch Pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, a Centaur upper stage is lifted up the gantry for mating with the lower stage Lockheed Martin Atlas IIA rocket seen behind it. The Lockheed Martin-manufactured Centaur IIA is powered by two Pratt & Whitney turbopump-fed engines, producing a total thrust of 41,600 pounds. The rocket is scheduled to launch the NASA GOES-L satellite on May 15, at the opening of a launch window which extends from 2:23 to 4:41 a.m. EDT. Once in orbit, the satellite will become GOES-11, joining GOES-8, GOES-9 and GOES-10 in space. The fourth of a new advanced series of geostationary weather satellites for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), GOES-L is a three-axis inertially stabilized spacecraft that will provide pictures and perform atmospheric sounding at the same time. Once launched, the satellite will undergo checkout and then provide backup capabilities for the existing, aging operational satellites

  1. KSC-99pp1522

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-12-13

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A flock of American avocets take time to feed in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Avocets are not commonly seen in the East, but range from Washington and Manitoba south to Texas and California. However, avocets may stray eastward to the Atlantic coast during their southward migration in the fall. Their common habitat is freshwater marshes and shallow marshy lakes. Much like spoonbills, they sweep their bills from side to side along the surface of the water to pick up crustaceans, aquatic insects and floating seeds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  2. KSC-01pp1033

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-24

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, an adult black-necked stilt and its chick wander along the bank. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and a straight, very thin bill. They usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly aggressive. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware to northern South America in the East, and in the West freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  3. KSC-01pp1016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An adult Black-necked Stilt seems to be giving its chick a dancing lesson. The chick already displays the long neck and legs of the adult. The species inhabits salt marshes and shallow coastal bays in the East, as well as freshwater marshes in the West. They are found along the Atlantic Coast from Delaware to northern South America. The black and white markings, long red legs and straight, very thin bill make the stilt very recognizable. This pair was photographed in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  4. KSC-01pp1015

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- An adult Black-necked Stilt keeps a wary eye out for intruders. The species inhabits salt marshes and shallow coastal bays in the East, as well as freshwater marshes in the West. They are found along the Atlantic Coast from Delaware to northern South America. The black and white markings, long red legs and straight, very thin bill make the stilt very recognizable. This stilt was photographed in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  5. KSC-99pp0508

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A black-necked stilt waits near its nesting mate nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  6. KSC-99pp0507

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A pair of black-necked stilts protect their grass-lined nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  7. KSC-99pp0506

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Black-necked Stilt sits on its nest in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. They usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  8. KSC-99pp0523

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-13

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, workers at each end of a workstand watch as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) begins its descent onto it. The SRTM, which is the primary payload on mission STS-99, consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle

  9. KSC-99pp0521

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-13

    After being lifted off the transporter (lower right) in the Space Station Processing Facility, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) moves across the floor toward a workstand. The SRTM, which is the primary payload on mission STS-99, consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle

  10. KSC-99pp0524

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-13

    The move of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is nearly complete as it is lowered onto the workstand in the Space Station Processing Facility. The SRTM, which is the primary payload on mission STS-99, consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle

  11. KSC-99pp0520

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-13

    Workers inside the Space Station Processing Facility keep watch as an overhead crane begins lifting the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) from the transporter below. The SRTM is being moved to a workstand. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle

  12. KSC-99pp0522

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-13

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is maneuvered by an overhead crane toward a workstand below. The SRTM, which is the primary payload on mission STS-99, consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle

  13. KSC-99pp0519

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-13

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility, workers watch as an overhead crane is lowered for lifting the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) from the transporter it is resting on. The SRTM is being moved to a workstand. The primary payload on mission STS-99, the SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will fly onboard the Space Shuttle during the 11-day mission scheduled for launch in September 1999. The objective of this radar system is to obtain the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of the Earth. It will gather data that will result in the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM is an international project spearheaded by the National Imagery and Mapping Agency and NASA, with participation of the German Aerospace Center DLR. SRTM will be making use of a technique called radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation, or change. To get two radar images taken from different locations, the SRTM hardware will consist of one radar antenna in the shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) out from the shuttle

  14. KSC-99pp0660

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A mother gallinule (right) calls her two chicks to enter the algae-covered water in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Gallinules, called Moorhens in the Old World, are duck-like swimming birds that constantly bob their heads while moving. They are identified by the prominent red bill with yellow tip and red frontal shield as well as white feathers under the tail, as shown here on the mother. Gallinules range throughout the Americas, from southern Canada to southern South America, inhabiting freshwater marshes and ponds with cattails and other aquatic vegetation. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  15. KSC00pp0266

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On top of what may be a nest on the edge of an algae-coated canal near Schwartz Rd. at Kennedy Space Center, a moss-covered alligator rests while keeping a wary eye open for trespassers. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds, and waterways throughout the Center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and usually lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  16. KSC-00pp0266

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On top of what may be a nest on the edge of an algae-coated canal near Schwartz Rd. at Kennedy Space Center, a moss-covered alligator rests while keeping a wary eye open for trespassers. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds, and waterways throughout the Center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and usually lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  17. KSC-99pp0745

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-23

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the "White Room" at Launch Pad 39B, the STS-93 crew poses for a photo before passing through the hatch on the orbiter Columbia. In the back row are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby, Commander Eileen M. Collins and Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Kneeling in front are Mission Specialists Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.), and Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.). The White Room is an environmentally controlled chamber that abuts the orbiter hatch. In preparation for their mission, the STS-93 crew members are participating in a Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test, which familiarizes them with the mission, provides training in emergency exit from the orbiter and launch pad, and includes a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  18. KSC00pp0265

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This pond near Schwartz Rd. at Kennedy Space Center is host to a least the nine alligators shown on the banks and in the water. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds, and waterways throughout the Center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  19. KSC-00pp0265

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- This pond near Schwartz Rd. at Kennedy Space Center is host to a least the nine alligators shown on the banks and in the water. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds, and waterways throughout the Center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  20. KSC00pp0264

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the bank of a levee near Schwartz Rd. at Kennedy Space Center, an alligator suns itself with a wary eye out for trespassers. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds, and waterways throughout the Center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  1. KSC-00pp0264

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-02-16

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On the bank of a levee near Schwartz Rd. at Kennedy Space Center, an alligator suns itself with a wary eye out for trespassers. Nearly 5,000 alligators can be found in canals, ponds, and waterways throughout the Center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Wildlife Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects

  2. KSC-00pp0047

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-13

    At Launch Pad 39A, members of the STS-99 crew and others look over part of the safety equipment. Standing left to right (in uniform) are Commander Kevin Kregel, Pilot Dominic Gorie, and Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Mamoru Mohri. Thiele is with the European Space Agency and Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The crew are taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which provide them with simulated countdown exercises, emergency egress training, and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will chart a new course, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. Launch of Endeavour on the 11-day mission is scheduled for Jan. 31 at 12:47 p.m. EST

  3. KSC-99pp0305

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-03-15

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A Roseate Spoonbill sweeps the water for food in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The brilliant pink bird is named for its straight bill with the broad spatulate tip. Preferring a habitat of mangroves, it is usually found on the coasts of southern Florida and Texas, occasionally in Louisiana., in the West Indies, Mexico and Central and South America. Spoonbills feed on shrimps and fish in shallow waters, sweeping their bills from side to side and scooping up whatever they encounter. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds

  4. KSC-00pp1406

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-19

    The overhead crane lowers the Joint Airlock Module inside the vacuum chamber in the Operations and Checkout Building. The airlock is being tested for leaks. The module is the gateway from which crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) will enter and exit the 470-ton orbiting research facility. The airlock is a critical element of the ISS because of design differences between American and Russian spacesuits. The Joint Airlock Module provides a chamber where astronauts from every nation can suit up for space walks to conduct maintenance and construction work or to do science experiments outside the Station. The Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the airlock to orbit on mission STS-104, the 10th International Space Station flight, currently targeted for liftoff in May 2001. The Shuttle crew will secure the airlock to the right side of Unity, the American-built connecting node that currently comprises one-third of the current Space Station, along with the Russian modules Zarya and Zvezda

  5. KSC-00pp1402

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-19

    The Joint Airlock Module waits on a stand in the Operations and Checkout Building to be lifted and moved into a vacuum chamber for testing. The module is the gateway from which crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) will enter and exit the 470-ton orbiting research facility. The airlock is a critical element of the ISS because of design differences between American and Russian spacesuits. The Joint Airlock Module is specially designed to accommodate both suits, providing a chamber where astronauts from every nation can suit up for space walks to conduct maintenance and construction work or to do science experiments outside the Station. The Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the airlock to orbit on mission STS-104, the 10th International Space Station flight, currently targeted for liftoff in May 2001. The Shuttle crew will secure the airlock to the right side of Unity, the American-built connecting node that currently comprises one-third of the current Space Station, along with the Russian modules Zarya and Zvezda

  6. KSC-00pp1404

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-19

    In the Operations and Checkout Building, an overhead crane lifts the Joint Airlock Module to move it to a vacuum chamber for testing. The module is the gateway from which crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) will enter and exit the 470-ton orbiting research facility. The airlock is a critical element of the ISS because of design differences between American and Russian spacesuits. The Joint Airlock Module is specially designed to accommodate both suits, providing a chamber where astronauts from every nation can suit up for space walks to conduct maintenance and construction work or to do science experiments outside the Station. The Space Shuttle Atlantis will carry the airlock to orbit on mission STS-104, the 10th International Space Station flight, currently targeted for liftoff in May 2001. The Shuttle crew will secure the airlock to the right side of Unity, the American-built connecting node that currently comprises one-third of the current Space Station, along with the Russian modules Zarya and Zvezda

  7. KSC-99pp0758

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-06-24

    On Launch Pad 39B, (right) STS-93 Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.) gives a thumbs up to Mission Specialist Michel Tognini of France (left) to pull the lever that will release the slidewire basket they are in. Also in the basket is Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.). The baskets are part of an emergency escape route for persons in the Shuttle and on the Rotating Service Structure. During the exercise, which is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities, the basket is wired in place. The TCDT also includes a launch-day dress rehearsal culminating with a simulated main engine cut-off. Other crew members participating are Commander Eileen M. Collins and Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby. Tognini represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). Collins is the first woman to serve as a Shuttle commander. The primary mission of STS-93 is the release of the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to obtain unprecedented X-ray images of exotic environments in space to help understand the structure and evolution of the universe. The targeted launch date for STS-93 is no earlier than July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B

  8. KSC-02pp0125

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-02

    JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS - STS-111 INSIGNIA -- The STS-111 patch symbolizes the hardware, people, and partner nations that contribute to the flight. The Space Shuttle rises on the plume of the Astronaut Office symbol, carrying the Canadian Mobile Base System (MBS) for installation while docked to the International Space Station (ISS). The mission is named UF-2 for ISS Utilization Flight number two. The ISS orbit completes the Astronaut Office symbol and is colored red, white, and blue to represent the flags of the United States, Russia, France, and Costa Rica. The Earth background shows Italy, which contributes the Multi Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) used on this flight to re-supply ISS. The ten stars in the sky represent the ten astronauts and cosmonauts on orbit during the flight, and the star at the top of the patch represents the Johnson Space Center, in the state of Texas, from which the flight is managed. The names of the STS-111 crew border the upper part of the patch, and the Expedition Five (going up) and Expedition Four (coming down) crews' names form the bottom of the patch. The NASA insignia design for Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. The NASA insignia design for Space Shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced

  9. Analysis of Vernier Scans during the PP2PP run in 2009 (pp at 100 GeV/beam)

    SciTech Connect

    Drees, A.

    2011-12-13

    At the end of RHIC's 2009 operation a dedicated run for the PP2PP experiment (part of the STAR experiment) took place from Jun 29 to Jul 06 2009. Polarized protons were accelerated to 100 GeV using ramp-file pp100-90pp2pp with a {beta}* = 22 m in IR6. Since only transverse polarization was required no rotator ramp was in use. The PP2PP experiment consists mainly of two Roman Pot detectors (one horizontal and one vertical) on either side of IR6 in the outgoing-beam arms between the Q3 and Q4 magnets. The yellow pots are in sector 5, the blue ones in sector 6. Roman Pot type detectors are installed inside the beampipe causing an accelerator safety concern. To address this concern there is a limit to the allowable total beam current in the machine while Roman Pots are enabled to move closer to the beam. This limit was set to a motion limit of 5 mm from the center of the beampipe and 50 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} beam current per ring. In order to reduce the background in the detectors, beams were scraped using the RHIC collimator system prior to moving the pots closer. This was typically repeated several times throughout a store since beam halo reforms over the course of hours.

  10. The PP2PP experiment at RHIC: silicon detectors installed in Roman Pots for forward proton detection close to the beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bültmann, S.; Chen, W.; Chiang, I. H.; Chrien, R. E.; Drees, A.; Gill, R. L.; Guryn, W.; Landgraf, J.; Li, Z.; Ljubicic, T. A.; Lynn, D.; Pearson, C.; Pile, P.; Radeka, V.; Rusek, A.; Sakitt, M.; Scheetz, R.; Tepikian, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Pawlik, B.; Haguenauer, M.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Nurushev, S. B.; Runtzo, M. F.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Alekseev, I. G.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Svirida, D. N.; Khodinov, A.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Tang, C.; Whitehead, L.; Yeung, S.; De, K.; Guler, N.; Li, J.; Öztürk, N.; Sandacz, A.

    2004-12-01

    The PP2PP experiment is one of five experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Long Island, New York. It is designed to measure the elastic scattering of protons at √{s} = 50-500 GeV. The detector consists of silicon strip detectors mounted in Roman Pots and installed in the RHIC ring 60 m from the interaction region. During the engineering run of 2002 and physics run of 2003 the detectors were inserted as close as 15 mm from the proton beam. An overview of the experiment and details of the detector design and performance will be presented.

  11. Generation IV PR and PP Methods and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bari,R.A.

    2008-10-13

    This paper presents an evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems (NESs). For a proposed NES design, the methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges to the NES are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant States or sub-national adversaries). The characteristics of Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate the response of the system and determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of six measures for PR and three measures for PP, which are the high-level PR&PP characteristics of the NES. The methodology is organized to allow evaluations to be performed at the earliest stages of system design and to become more detailed and more representative as design progresses. Uncertainty of results are recognized and incorporated into the evaluation at all stages. The results are intended for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. Particular current relevant activities will be discussed in this regard. The methodology has been illustrated in a series of demonstration and case studies and these will be summarized in the paper.

  12. Differential regulation of single CFTR channels by PP2C, PP2A, and other phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Pato, M D; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1998-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel activity declines rapidly when excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) or human airway cells because of membrane-associated phosphatase activity. In the present study, we found that CFTR channels usually remained active in patches excised from baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing CFTR. Those patches with stable channel activity were used to investigate the regulation of CFTR by exogenous protein phosphatases (PP). Adding PP2A, PP2C, or alkaline phosphatase to excised patches reduced CFTR channel activity by > 90% but did not abolish it completely. PP2B caused weak deactivation, whereas PP1 had no detectable effect on open probability (Po). Interestingly, the time course of deactivation by PP2C was identical to that of the spontaneous rundown observed in some patches after excision. PP2C and PP2A had distinct effects on channel gating Po declined during exposure to exogenous PP2C (and during spontaneous rundown, when it was observed) without any change in mean burst duration. By contrast, deactivation by exogenous PP2A was associated with a dramatic shortening of burst duration similar to that reported previously in patches from cardiac cells during deactivation of CFTR by endogenous phosphatases. Rundown of CFTR-mediated current across intact T84 epithelial cell monolayers was insensitive to toxic levels of the PP2A inhibitor calyculin A. These results demonstrate that exogenous PP2C is a potent regulator of CFTR activity, that its effects on single-channel gating are distinct from those of PP2A but similar to those of endogenous phosphatases in CHO, BHK, and T84 epithelial cells, and that multiple protein phosphatases may be required for complete deactivation of CFTR channels.

  13. Progesterone-associated proteins PP12 and PP14 in the human endometrium.

    PubMed

    Rutanen, E M; Koistinen, R; Seppälä, M; Julkunen, M; Suikkari, A M; Huhtala, M L

    1987-01-01

    Two proteins, designated as PP12 and PP14 were originally isolated from soluble extracts of the human placenta and its adjacent membranes. We have shown that they are synthesized by decidualized/secretory endometrium and not by placenta. Both proteins occur at high concentrations in human amniotic fluid, which is therefore an excellent source for purification. PP12 is a 34-kDa glycoprotein, which has an N-terminal amino acid sequence of Ala-Pro-Trp-Gln-Cys-Ala-Pro-Cys-Ser-Ala. This is identical with that of somatomedin-binding protein purified from the amniotic fluid. PP12 too binds somatomedin-C, or IGF-I (insulin-like growth factor-I). Human secretory endometrium synthesizes and secretes PP12, and progesterone stimulates its secretion. PP14 is a 28-kDa glycoprotein. Its N-terminal sequence shows homology to that of beta-lactoglobulins from various species. We have found PP14 in the human endometrium, serum and milk. Immunologically, PP14 is related to progestagen-associated endometrial protein (PEP), alpha-2 pregnancy-associated endometrial protein (alpha-2, PEG), endometrial protein 15 (EP15), alpha-uterine protein (AUP) and chorionic alpha-2 microglobulin (CAG-2). In ovulatory menstrual cycles, the concentration of PP14 increases in endometrial tissue as the secretory changes advance. In serum, the PP14 concentration begins to rise later than the progesterone levels, and high serum PP14 levels are maintained for the first days of the next cycle. By contrast, no elevation of serum PP14 level is seen in anovulatory cycles. Our results show that progesterone-associated proteins are synthesized by the human endometrium and appear in the peripheral circulation, where they can be quantitatively measured using immunochemical techniques.

  14. Spinning, structure and properties of PP/CNTs and PP/carbon black composite fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcincin, A.; Hricova, M.; Ujhelyiova, A.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of the compatibilisers-dispersants and other nanofillers on melt spinning of the polypropylene (PP) composites, containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and carbon black pigment (CBP) has been investigated. Further, the structure and selected properties of composite fibers, such as mechanical and electrical have been studied. The results revealed, that percolation threshold for PP/CBP composite fibres was situated within the concentration of 15 - 20 wt%, what is several times higher than for PP/CNTs fibers.

  15. Texturing of polypropylene (PP) with nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Soto, R.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Quintero, F.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a biocompatible and biostable polymer, showing good mechanical properties that has been recently introduced in the biomedical field for bone repairing applications; however, its poor surface properties due to its low surface energy limit their use in biomedical applications. In this work, we have studied the topographical modification of polypropylene (PP) laser textured with Nd:YVO4 nanosecond lasers emitting at λ = 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm. First, optical response of this material under these laser wavelengths was determined. The application of an absorbing coating was also studied. The influence of the laser processing parameters on the surface modification of PP was investigated by means of statistically designed experiments. Processing maps to tailor the roughness, and wettability, the main parameters affecting cell adhesion characteristics of implants, were also determined. Microhardness measurements were performed to discern the impact of laser treatment on the final mechanical properties of PP.

  16. The Popularity of P&P

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    2006-01-01

    "Principles and Practices" (P&P), a real estate pre-licensing class, is one of the most popular courses in adult education, because it can literally be the key to the dual American dreams: striking it rich and owning a home. One of the things that makes the P&P class unique is that it is taught in so many different venues. The…

  17. The Popularity of P&P

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    2006-01-01

    "Principles and Practices" (P&P), a real estate pre-licensing class, is one of the most popular courses in adult education, because it can literally be the key to the dual American dreams: striking it rich and owning a home. One of the things that makes the P&P class unique is that it is taught in so many different venues. The…

  18. Measurement and analysis of the pp{yields}pp{gamma} reaction at 310 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, A.; Haberzettl, H.; Nakayama, K.; Wilkin, C.

    2011-05-15

    The pp{yields}pp{gamma} reaction has been studied at a beam energy of 310 MeV by detecting both final protons at the PROMICE-WASA facility and identifying the photon through the resulting missing-mass peak. The photon angular distribution in the center-of-mass system and those of the proton-proton relative momentum with respect to the beam direction and to that of the recoil photon were determined reliably up to a final pp excitation energy of E{sub pp}{approx}30 MeV. Except for very small E{sub pp} values, the behavior of these distributions with excitation energy is well reproduced by a new refined model of the hard bremsstrahlung process. The model reproduces absolutely the total cross section and its energy dependence to within the experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  19. ICI/BASF PP for acrylics swap

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-27

    ICI (London) and BASF (Ludwigshafen) have announced their long-awaited polypropylene (PP) for acrylics swap deal. ICI is buying BASF's European acrylic resin business, and the German firm will acquire ICI's European PP operations. The deal is due for completion by mid-1993, subject to regulatory approvals. BASF, hitherto a small-scale PP producer, doubles capacity to 600,000 m.t./year and moves up the European PP league to number three, behind Himont and Shell. BASF, whose process is used in the plants, secures a foothold in the UK PP market, where Shell - planning a merger with Himont - is the only other producer, with 170,000 m.t./year. ICI's purchase involves BASF's Resart GmbH and Critesa SA subsidiaries, located at Mainz, Germany and near Barcelona, Spain, respectively. The business - which will add about [Brit pounds]60 million ($93 million) to ICI Acrylics [Brit pounds]300-million revenues - employs 400 people, who will transfer to ICI.

  20. The 1933 National Guard Bill.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-14

    states rights. ŝ This reluctance was in spite of the increasing federal funding provided to the militia. In his book, Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith observed...1987) pp. 12-13. ~8. U.S. Congress, H.Rept. 141, p. 2. z 9. Derthick, p. 44. J 10. Adam Smith , The Wealth of Nations (London: Routledge, -- -’ 1913) p

  1. {Delta} isobars and (p,p') reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sammarruca, F.; Stephenson, E. J.

    2001-09-01

    We explore the role of coupling to {Delta} isobars (in both the N{Delta} and {Delta}{Delta} channels) in medium modifications of the effective NN interaction that drives 200-MeV proton inelastic scattering. A comparison of the predictions to natural-parity (p,p') cross section and analyzing power data show that isobar degrees of freedom in the medium generate overly repulsive effective interactions. Furthermore, this model extension is unable to resolve difficulties observed earlier describing polarization transfer measurements in some high-spin, unnatural-parity (p,p') transitions.

  2. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Fostriecin, Cytostatin, and Key Analogs, with PP1, PP2A, PP5, and (β12–β13)-Chimeras (PP1/PP2A and PP5/PP2A), Provide Further Insight into the Inhibitory Actions of Fostriecin Family Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Swingle, Mark R.; Amable, Lauren; Lawhorn, Brian G.; Buck, Suzanne B.; Burke, Christopher P.; Ratti, Pukar; Fischer, Kimberly L.; Boger, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Fostriecin and cytostatin are structurally related natural inhibitors of serine/threonine phosphatases, with promising antitumor activity. The total synthesis of these antitumor agents has enabled the production of structural analogs, which are useful to explore the biological significance of features contained in the parent compounds. Here, the inhibitory activity of fostriecin, cytostatin, and 10 key structural analogs were tested in side-by-side phosphatase assays to further characterize their inhibitory activity against PP1c (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit), PP2Ac (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit), PP5c (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 5 catalytic subunit), and chimeras of PP1 (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1) and PP5 (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 5), in which key residues predicted for inhibitor contact with PP2A (Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A) were introduced into PP1 and PP5 using site-directed mutagenesis. The data confirm the importance of the C9-phosphate and C11-alcohol for general inhibition and further demonstrate the importance of a predicted C3 interaction with a unique cysteine (Cys269) in the β12–β13 loop of PP2A. The data also indicate that additional features beyond the unsaturated lactone contribute to inhibitory potency and selectivity. Notably, a derivative of fostriecin lacking the entire lactone subunit demonstrated marked potency and selectivity for PP2A, while having substantially reduced and similar activity against PP1 and PP1/PP2A- PP5/PP2A-chimeras that have greatly increased sensitivity to both fostriecin and cytostatin. This suggests that other features [e.g., the (Z,Z,E)-triene] also contribute to inhibitory selectivity. When considered together with previous data, these studies suggest that, despite the high structural conservation of the catalytic site in PP1, PP2A and PP5, the development of highly selective catalytic inhibitors should be feasible. PMID:19592665

  3. KSC-01pp1187Crop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-06-20

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – An aerial view of Launch Complex 39 shows the south and west sides of the Vehicle Assembly Building. The curved roadway heading to the VAB leads to high bay 2, the Safe Haven facility constructed in 2000. Beyond it is the Orbiter Processing Facility, bays 1 and 2. The OPF bay 3 is farther still, closer to the VAB. Farther in the background are the waters of the Banana Creek in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Photo credit: NASA

  4. New boundaries for the "ppK-" production in p+p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epple, Eliane

    2014-11-01

    The HADES collaboration has searched for the anti-kaonic nuclear cluster "ppK-" in p+p collisions by its decay into pΛ. In the course of this analysis several cross checks had to be performed. This report discusses two examples thereof. In one test it was checked whether the presence of background events could introduce a bias on the applied partial wave analysis. The second item discussed here is the extraction of the total pK+Λ production cross section necessary to derive the absolute upper limit on the "ppK-" production cross section.

  5. Regulation of PP2A by Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Joshua; Ogretmen, Besim

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is a primary regulator of cellular proliferation through targeting of proliferative kinases, cell cycle regulators, and apoptosis inhibitors. It is through the regulation of these regulatory elements that gives PP2A tumor suppressor functions. In addition to mutations on the regulatory subunits, the phosphatase/tumor suppressing activity of PP2A is also inhibited in several cancer types due to overexpression or modification of the endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as SET/I2PP2A. This review focuses on the current literature regarding the interactions between the lipid signaling molecules, selectively sphingolipids, and the PP2A inhibitor SET for the regulation of PP2A, and the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids as PP2A activators for tumor suppression via targeting SET oncoprotein. PMID:25642418

  6. Regulation of PP2A by Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Joshua; Ogretmen, Besim

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is a primary regulator of cellular proliferation through targeting of proliferative kinases, cell cycle regulators, and apoptosis inhibitors. It is through the regulation of these regulatory elements that gives PP2A tumor suppressor functions. In addition to mutations on the regulatory subunits, the phosphatase/tumor suppressing activity of PP2A is also inhibited in several cancer types due to overexpression or modification of the endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as SET/I2PP2A. This review focuses on the current literature regarding the interactions between the lipid signaling molecules, selectively sphingolipids, and the PP2A inhibitor SET for the regulation of PP2A, and the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids as PP2A activators for tumor suppression via targeting SET oncoprotein.

  7. Heavy quark production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, P.L.; Quack, E.; Ruuskanen, P.V. |

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive single heavy quark and heavy-quark pair production cross sections in pp collisions is presented for RHIC and LHC energies. We compare with existing data when possible. The dependence of the rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. Predictions of the cross sections are given for two different sets of parton distribution functions.

  8. Status of K-pp Search Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagae, Tomofumi

    After the claims on the experimental evidence of the "K-pp" bound state by the FINUDA and DISTO collaborations, there are several new data recently reported. Some of them observed signals, while some others not. These results are introduced and the consistency and sensitivities among these data are briefly discussed.

  9. Leishmania donovani phosphoproteins pp41 and pp29 re-establishes host protective immune response in visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Das, Pranati; Amit, Ajay; Singh, Shubhankar Kumar; Chaudhary, Rajesh; Dikhit, Manas Ranjan; Yadav, Anupam; Pandey, Krishna; Das, Vidya Nand Rabi; Sundram, Shanty; Das, P; Bimal, Sanjiva

    2015-02-01

    As phospho proteins are reported to be involved in virulence and survival, the ability of Leishmania to inhibit macrophage effector functions may result from a direct interference of leishmanial molecules with macrophage signal transduction pathways. Several such proteins such as pp63, pp41 and pp29 have also been identified as a Th1 stimulatory protein in the Leishmania donovani. In the present study, the immunogenicity of a cocktail of pp63+pp41+pp29 was assessed by estimation of serum antibody titre, nitric oxide(NO) production, estimation of Th1 cytokine(IFN-γ) as well as Th2 cytokines(IL-4), and determination of parasite load in L. donovani infected mice. In the group immunized with antigenic cocktail there was a sharp rise in antibody titer up to Day 20 which reduced considerably by Day 50. Groups of mice vaccinated with pp63, pp41, pp29 and the antigenic cocktail expressed 10-fold, 16-fold, 22-fold and 25-fold increase respectively in NO production by splenocytes. The animal groups immunized with pp63, pp41, pp29 and the antigenic cocktail showed reduced parasite load in the liver and spleen, as well as increased IFN-gamma production in the spleen. Furthermore immunized animals remained with a normal hematological profile, whereas L. donovani in unimmunized mice lead to significant anemia.

  10. Branching fractions for {chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{pi}{sup 0}, pp{eta}, and pp{omega}

    SciTech Connect

    Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hunt, J. M.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Ledoux, J.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.

    2010-07-01

    Using a sample of 25.9x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) decays acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we report branching fractions for the decays {chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{pi}{sup 0}, pp{eta}, and pp{omega}, with J=0, 1, 2. Our results for B({chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{pi}{sup 0}) and B({chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{eta}) are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements. Furthermore, we include the first measurement of B({chi}{sub cJ{yields}}pp{omega}).

  11. pp interactions in extended air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendi Kohara, A.; Ferreira, Erasmo; Kodama, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Applying the recently constructed analytic representation for the pp scattering amplitudes, we present a study of p-air cross sections, with comparison to the data from Extensive Air Shower (EAS) measurements. The amplitudes describe with precision all available accelerator data at ISR, SPS and LHC energies, and its theoretical basis, together with the very smooth energy dependence of parameters controlled by unitarity and dispersion relations, permit reliable extrapolation to higher energies and to asymptotic ranges. The comparison with cosmic ray data is very satisfactory in the whole pp energy interval from 1 to 100 TeV. High energy asymptotic behaviour of cross sections is investigated in view of the geometric scaling property of the amplitudes. The amplitudes predict that the proton does not behave as a black disk even at asymptotically high enegies, and we discuss possible non-trivial consequences of this fact for pA collision cross sections at higher energies.

  12. Structure investigations of PP-PA blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Jaroslaw; Wlochowicz, Andrzej; Slusarczyk, Czeslaw

    1997-02-01

    In the paper we have used the SAXS method in order to determine the supermolecular structure parameters, including the transition layer thickness, of polypropylene/polyamide-6 (PP/PA) blends. The transition layer thickness has been obtained by means of two methods elaborated by Koberstein and co-workers and by Ruland, respectively. Both these methods assume that changes of the electron density in the transition region can be described by a Gaussian function with a standard deviation (sigma) . The parameter (sigma) have been determined graphically from the appropriate plots. Then, the thickness of the phase boundary E was estimated as (root)12(sigma) . The investigated PP/PA blends are multiphase systems and the problem of determination of the boundary width is more complicated because the meaning of Porod's law must be considered with caution. This problem is discussed based on wide range of the investigated samples prepared over various pressure and crystallization temperature conditions.

  13. PP: A Lisp Pretty Printing System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    level :length :lines :array :radix :circle :case : gensym This function is like PRIN1 except that it does not force ,PRINT-ESCAPE, to be T. The...PRINT-CASE, and ,PRINT- GENSYM , respectively. (’llhe last four of these variables are not supported by release 5 of the I isp Machine System...variables. PP:SET-INTERACTIVE-CONTROL-VARIABLES &key :escape :base :pretty :level :length :lines :array :radix :circle :case : gensym This function specifies

  14. Nuclear trafficking of the human cytomegalovirus pp71 (ppUL82) tegument protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Weiping; Westgard, Elizabeth; Huang Liqun; Ward, Michael D.; Osborn, Jodi L.; Chau, Nha H.; Collins, Lindsay; Marcum, Benjamin; Koach, Margaret A.; Bibbs, Jennifer; Semmes, O. John; Kerry, Julie A.

    2008-06-20

    The human cytomegalovirus tegument protein pp71 localizes to the nucleus immediately upon infection, and functions to initiate viral gene expression. Analysis of a series of random insertion mutations revealed that sequences within the mid region (MR) of pp71 are important for localization to the nucleus. Fusion of MR sequences with eGFP revealed that amino acids 94 to 300 were sufficient to target proteins to the nucleus. Random substitution mutagenesis within this domain resulted in two double substitution mutants, pp71P203T/T223M and pp71T228M/L275Q, with a predominantly cytoplasmic localization. Disruption of nuclear targeting resulted in relocalization of the fusion proteins to a distinct perinuclear region. Using tandem mass spectrometry, we determined that threonine 223 can be phosphorylated. Mutation of this residue to a phosphomimetic amino acid resulted in abrogation of nuclear targeting. These results strongly suggest that the intracellular trafficking of pp71 is regulated by phosphorylation.

  15. Inner Core Imaging Using P'P'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; Ward, J. A.; Bastow, I. D.; Irving, J. C. E.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's inner core is a surprisingly complex region of our planet. Simple models of inner core solidification and evolution would lead us to expect a layered structure, which has "frozen in" in information about the state of the core at the time of solidification. However, seismic observations of Earth's inner core are not dominated by a radial "tree-ring" like pattern, but instead have revealed a hemispherical dichotomy in addition to depth dependent variations. There is a degree-one structure in isotropic and anisotropic velocities and in attenuation between the so-called eastern and western hemispheres of the inner core, with different depth distributions proposed for these varying phenomena. A range of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the hemispherical differences. These include models that require differences between the two hemispheres at the time of formation, post-solidification texturing, convection in the inner core, or hybrid mechanisms. Regional observations of the inner core suggest that a simple division between East and West may not be able to fully capture the structure present in the inner core. More detailed seismic observations will help us to understand the puzzle of the inner core's evolution. In this study we focus on updating observations of the seismic phase P'P', an inner core sensitive body wave with a more complex path than those typically used to study the inner core. By making new measurements of P'P' we illuminate new regions of the core with a high frequency phase that is sensitive to small scale structures. We examine the differential travel times of the different branches of P'P' (PKIKPPKIKP and PKPPKP), comparing the arrival time of inner core turning branch, P'P'df, with the arrival times of branches that turn in the outer core. P'P' is a relatively small amplitude phase, so we use both linear and non-linear stacking methods to make observations of the P'P' signals. These measurements are sensitive to the broad scale

  16. Cytomegalovirus pp65 limits dissemination but is dispensable for persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Marshall, Emily E.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Xu, Guangwu; Kreklywich, Craig; Whizin, Nathan; Fischer, Miranda; Legasse, Alfred W.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Siess, Don; Camp, David G.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Kahl, Christoph; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Smith, Richard D.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    The tegument phosphoprotein pp65 (UL83) is the most abundant virion protein in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Since pp65 is immunodominant in persistently infected individuals, subunit vaccines against HCMV often include pp65 as T cell stimulatory component. Although HCMV pp65 is non-essential for viral growth in vitro it is thought to have an important role in primary and persistent infection since pp65 displays multiple immunomodulatory functions. To determine whether pp65 is required for infection and to evaluate its role in natural and vaccination-induced immunity we generated a rhesus CMV lacking both homologues, pp65a (Rh111) and pp65b (Rh112). Lack of pp65 resulted in a slight growth defect in vitro and an increase of defective particle formation. However, most pp65-deleted virions in the supernatant were phenotypically normal and proteomics analysis revealed that the ratios of the remaining viral proteins were largely unchanged. RhCMV Δpp65ab was able to persistently infect CMV-negative rhesus macaques (RM) and to super-infect RM previously infected with CMV. To determine whether T cells against pp65 are essential for protection against CMV, we challenged Δpp65ab-infected animals with RhCMV ΔUS2-11, a viral recombinant that lacks inhibitors of MHC-I antigen presentation and is thus unable to overcome CMV-specific T cell immunity. Despite a complete lack of pp65-specific T cells, Δpp65ab protected against ΔUS2-11 challenge suggesting that pp65-specific T cells are not essential for T cell immunity against CMV. Using the same approach we further demonstrate that pp65b-specific T cells, induced by heterologous prime/boost vaccination, are not sufficient to protect against ΔUS2-11 challenge. Our data provides a new approach to test the efficacy of subunit vaccine candidates and suggest that pp65 vaccines are insufficient to induce a T cell response that recapitulates the protective effect of natural infection.

  17. Comparison of the pp → π+pn and pp → π+d production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fäldt, G.; Wilkin, C.

    2017-07-01

    Fully constrained bubble chamber data on the pp →π+ pn and pp →π+ d reactions are used to investigate the ratio of the counting rates for the two processes at low pn excitation energies. Whereas the ratio is in tolerable agreement with that found in a high resolution spectrometer experiment, the angular distribution in the final pn rest frame shows that the deviation from the predictions of final state interaction theory must originate primarily from higher partial waves in the pn system. These considerations might also be significant for the determination of the S-wave Λp scattering length from data on the pp →K+ Λp reaction.

  18. Cytomegalovirus pp65 limits dissemination but is dispensable for persistence

    PubMed Central

    Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Marshall, Emily E.; Hughes, Colette M.; Ventura, Abigail B.; Gilbride, Roxanne M.; Lewis, Matthew S.; Xu, Guangwu; Kreklywich, Craig; Whizin, Nathan; Fischer, Miranda; Legasse, Alfred W.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Siess, Don; Camp, David G.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Kahl, Christoph; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Smith, Richard D.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Picker, Louis J.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The most abundantly produced virion protein in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the immunodominant phosphoprotein 65 (pp65), which is frequently included in CMV vaccines. Although it is nonessential for in vitro CMV growth, pp65 displays immunomodulatory functions that support a potential role in primary and/or persistent infection. To determine the contribution of pp65 to CMV infection and immunity, we generated a rhesus CMV lacking both pp65 orthologs (RhCMVΔpp65ab). While deletion of pp65ab slightly reduced growth in vitro and increased defective particle formation, the protein composition of secreted virions was largely unchanged. Interestingly, pp65 was not required for primary and persistent infection in animals. Immune responses induced by RhCMVΔpp65ab did not prevent reinfection with rhesus CMV; however, reinfection with RhCMVΔUS2-11, which lacks viral-encoded MHC-I antigen presentation inhibitors, was prevented. Unexpectedly, induction of pp65b-specific T cells alone did not protect against RhCMVΔUS2-11 challenge, suggesting that T cells targeting multiple CMV antigens are required for protection. However, pp65-specific immunity was crucial for controlling viral dissemination during primary infection, as indicated by the marked increase of RhCMVΔpp65ab genome copies in CMV-naive, but not CMV-immune, animals. Our data provide rationale for inclusion of pp65 into CMV vaccines but also demonstrate that pp65-induced T cell responses alone do not recapitulate the protective effect of natural infection. PMID:24691437

  19. Spin transfer measurements for pp-->pp at 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, M. W.; Bonner, B. E.; Cornelius, W. D.; Hoffman, E. W.; van Dyck, O. B.; York, R. L.; Ransome, R. D.; Hollas, C. L.; Riley, P. J.; Toshioka, K.

    1982-04-01

    The spin depolarization parameters DNN, DSS, DLS, and the spin transfer parameters KNN, KSS, KLS have been measured for pp-->pp at 800 MeV. Angular range is 21 to 90° c.m. for the D parameters, and 46 to 90° c.m. for the K parameters. Typical uncertainties are about +/-0.025. These data, when combined with previous data make possible a complete isovector phase shift and amplitude analysis at 800 MeV. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 1H(p,p)1H, E=800 MeV, measured DNN, DSS, DLS, KNN, KSS, KLS, θ=21 to 90° c.m.

  20. Chiral power counting and pp {r_arrow} pp{pi}{sup 0} near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kolck, U.; Miller, G.A.

    1995-10-01

    The pp {r_arrow} pp{pi}{sup 0} reaction is studied near threshold using power counting arguments based on chiral perturbation theory with an explicit {Delta} degree of freedom. Important contributions include the so-called impulse term, rescattering via the {Delta} and rescattering via the (off-shell) seagull term responsible for s-wave pion-nucleon scattering. These contributions largely cancel so that their sum greatly underpredicts the total cross-section. Other mechanisms are also discussed. The inclusion of the previously proposed {sigma} meson exchange mechanism is not sufficient to resolve the discrepancy with experiment.

  1. Receptors on phaeochromocytoma cells for two members of the PP-fold family--NPY and PP.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, T W; Sheikh, S P; O'Hare, M M

    1987-12-10

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) belong to a family of regulatory peptides which hold a distinct tertiary structure, the PP-fold, even in dilute aqueous solution. High-affinity receptors, specific for both PP and NPY, are described on the rat phaeochromocytoma cell line, PC-12. The binding of [125I-Tyr36]PP to PC-12 cells was inhibited by concentrations of unlabeled PP which correspond to physiological concentrations of the hormone, 10(-11)-10(-9) mol/l. The affinity of the receptor for the neuropeptide, NPY, was 10(2)-times lower than that of the PP receptor. C-terminal fragments of both PP (PP24-36) and NPY (NPY13-36) were between 10(2)- and 10(3)-times less potent in displacing the radiolabeled 36-amino-acid peptides from their respective receptors. It is concluded that PC-12 cells are suited for structure-function studies of the PP-fold peptides and studies on the cellular events following cellular binding of PP-fold peptides.

  2. PP-O and PP-V, Monascus pigment homologues, production, and phylogenetic analysis in Penicillium purpurogenum.

    PubMed

    Arai, Teppei; Kojima, Ryo; Motegi, Yoshiki; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi; Ogihara, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The production of pigments as secondary metabolites by microbes is known to vary by species and by physiological conditions within a single strain. The fungus strain Penicillium purpurogenum IAM15392 has been found to produce violet pigment (PP-V) and orange pigment (PP-O),Monascus azaphilone pigment homologues, when grown under specific culture conditions. In this study, we analysed PP-V and PP-O production capability in seven strains of P. purpurogenum in addition to strain IAM15392 under specific culture conditions. The pigment production pattern of five strains cultivated in PP-V production medium was similar to that of strain IAM15392, and all violet pigments produced by these five strains were confirmed to be PP-V. Strains that did not produce pigment were also identified. In addition, two strains cultivated in PP-O production medium produced a violet pigment identified as PP-V. The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences from the eight P. purpurogenum strains were sequenced and used to construct a neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree. PP-O and PP-V production of P. purpurogenum was shown to be related to phylogenetic placement based on rDNA ITS sequence. Based on these results, two hypotheses for the alteration of pigment production of P. purpurogenum in evolution were proposed.

  3. Development and characterization of antibacterial nanocomposite fiber based on PP/PET/nanosilver compatibilized with PP-g-MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar, A.; Golshan Ebrahimi, N.

    2010-03-01

    The polypropylene (PP) /polyethylene terephthalate (PET) /Nanosilver (Ag) nanocomposite fibers were prepared for the achievement of permanent antibacterial activity to common synthetic textile. The fibers were melt-spun by co-extrusion of PP/PET with compatibilizer (PP-g-MA) as core and PP/Ag master-batches as sheath and vice versa then fiber formation was carried out through the spinneret. The effects of content PP-g-MA as compatibilizer were also investigated. The morphology and mechanical properties of uncompatibilized and compatibilized PP/PET fibers were comprehensively assessed utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile test experiments. It was observed that the fibrillar distributed morphology achieved at 3.5 Wt% of PP-g-MA has a significant performance. The antibacterial activity of nanosilver in fibers was evaluated after certain contact time and calculated by percent reduction of two kinds of bacteria; Staphylococus aureus and Escherichia coli. The antibacterial efficacy of spun fibers was excellent when the masterbatch used as the sheath. The SEM micrograph of these fibers (PP/ PP-g-MA/PET)/(PP/Nanosilver) shows nearly good distribution of nanosilver particles with little aggregation. Mechanical and antibacterial properties data have also shown that the fiber has a significant performance when the master-batch used as the sheath.

  4. The extended PP1 toolkit: designed to create specificity

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Mathieu; Peti, Wolfgang; Ragusa, Michael J.; Beullens, Monique

    2011-01-01

    Protein Ser/Thr phosphatase-1 (PP1) catalyzes the majority of eukaryotic protein dephosphorylation reactions in a highly regulated and selective manner. Recent studies have identified an unusually diversified PP1 interactome with the properties of a regulatory toolkit. PP1-interacting proteins (PIPs) function as targeting subunits, substrates and/or inhibitors. As targeting subunits, PIPs contribute to substrate selection by bringing PP1 into the vicinity of specific substrates and by modulating substrate specificity via additional substrate docking sites or blocking substrate-binding channels. Many of the nearly 200 established mammalian PIPs are predicted to be intrinsically disordered, a property that facilitates their binding to a large surface area of PP1 via multiple docking motifs. These novel insights offer perspectives for the therapeutic targeting of PP1 by interfering with the binding of PIPs or substrates. PMID:20399103

  5. Leading neutrons from polarized pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, J.

    2008-10-13

    We calculate the cross section and single-spin azimuthal asymmetry, A{sub n}(t) for inclusive neutron production in pp collisions at forward rapidities relative to the polarized proton. Absorptive corrections to the pion pole generate a relative phase between the spin-flip and non-flip amplitudes, which leads to an appreciable spin asymmetry. However, the asymmetry observed recently in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC at very small |t|{approx}0.01 GeV{sup 2} cannot be explained by this mechanism.

  6. Collective phenomena in pp and ep scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celiberto, Francesco Giovanni; Fiore, Roberto; Jenkovszky, László

    2017-03-01

    Bjorken scaling violation in deep inelastic electron-proton scattering (DIS) is related to the rise of hadronic cross sections by using the additive quark model. Of special interest is the connection between saturation in the low-x behavior of the DIS structure functions (SF) and possible slow-down of the pp cross section rise due to saturation effects. We also identify saturation effects in the DIS SF with phase transition that can be described by the Van der Waals equation of state.

  7. Psychosine induces the dephosphorylation of neurofilaments by deregulation of PP1 and PP2A phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ludovico; Zhu, Hongling; Givogri, Maria I.; Chidavaenzi, Robstein L.; Lopez-Rosas, Aurora; Bongarzone, Ernesto R.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Krabbe disease, a genetic demyelinating syndrome caused by deficiency of galactosyl-ceramidase and the resulting accumulation of galactosyl-sphingolipids, develop signs of a dying-back axonopathy compounded by a deficiency of large-caliber axons. Here, we show that axonal caliber in Twitcher mice, an animal model for Krabbe disease, is impaired in peripheral axons and is accompanied by a progressive reduction in the abundance and phosphorylation of the three neurofilament (NF) subunits. These changes correlate with an increase in the density of NFs per cross-sectional area in numerous mutant peripheral axons and abnormal increases in the activity of two serine/threonine phosphatases (PP1 and PP2A) in mutant tissue. Similarly, acutely isolated mutant cortical neurons show abnormal phosphorylation of NFs. Psychosine, the neurotoxin accumulated in Krabbe disease, was sufficient to induce abnormal dephosphorylation of NF subunits in a normal motor neuron cell line as well as in acutely isolated normal cortical neurons. This in vitro effect was mediated by PP1 and PP2A, which specifically dephosphorylated NFs. These results demonstrate that the reduced caliber observed in some axons in Krabbe disease involves abnormal dephosphorylation of NFs. We propose that a psychosine-driven pathogenic mechanism through deregulated phosphotransferase activities may be involved in this process. PMID:22326830

  8. Study of the decay mechanism for B→pp¯K and B→pp¯π

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle Collaboration; Wei, J.-T.; Wang, M.-Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Chen, K.-F.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Cole, S.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Fratina, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, K.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Lin, S.-W.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; Matsumoto, T.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Shiu, J.-G.; Singh, J. B.; Sokolov, A.; Somov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tajima, O.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tian, X. C.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Won, E.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2008-01-01

    We study the characteristics of the low mass pp¯ enhancements near threshold in the three-body decays B→pp¯K and B→pp¯π. We observe that the proton polar angle distributions in the pp¯ helicity frame in the two decays have the opposite polarity, and measure the forward-backward asymmetries as a function of the pp¯ mass for the pp¯K mode. We also search for the intermediate two-body decays, B→p¯Δ and B→pΔ, and set upper limits on their branching fractions. These results are obtained from a 414 fb data sample that contains 449×10BB¯ events collected near the ϒ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy ee collider.

  9. U.S. National Security and Strategy: A Selected Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    National Security and the Threat of Climate Change . Alexandria: CNA Corpora- tion, 2007. 68pp. (UA23. N171 2007) http://securityandclimate.cna.org/report...2005) Schwartz, Peter, and Doug Randall. An Abrupt Climate Change Scenario and Its Implications for United States National Security. New York: Time...CSIS Press, 2004. 73pp. (DS79.76 .C567 2004) Cordesman, Anthony H., and Ionut C. Popescu. The Changing Challenges of U.S. Defense Spend- ing

  10. Damping of forward neutrons in pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Soffer, J.

    2008-07-01

    We calculate absorptive corrections to single pion exchange in the production of leading neutrons in pp collisions. Contrary to the usual procedure of convolving the survival probability with the cross section, we apply corrections to the spin amplitudes. The nonflip amplitude turns out to be much more suppressed by absorption than the spin-flip one. We identify the projectile proton Fock state responsible for the absorptive corrections as a color octet-octet 5-quarks configuration. Calculations within two very different models, color-dipole light-cone description, and in hadronic representation, lead to rather similar absorptive corrections. We found a much stronger damping of leading neutrons than in some of previous estimates. Correspondingly, the cross section is considerably smaller than was measured at ISR. However, comparison with recent measurements by the ZEUS collaboration of neutron production in deep-inelastic scattering provides a strong motivation for challenging the normalization of the ISR data. This conjecture is also supported by preliminary data from the NA49 experiment for neutron production in pp collisions at SPS.

  11. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; ...

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore » effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  12. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  13. Strangeness production in AA and pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Boost-invariant hadron production in high-energy collisions occurs in causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) are conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. Their size is determined by two time scales: the equilibration time specifying the formation of a quark-gluon plasma, and the hadronization time, specifying the onset of confinement. The expected values for these scales provide the theoretical basis for the suppression observed for strangeness production in elementary interactions ( pp , e^+e^- below LHC energies. In contrast, the space-time superposition of individual collisions in high-energy heavy-ion interactions leads to higher energy densities, resulting in much later hadronization and hence much larger hadronization volumes. This largely removes the causality constraints and results in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full chemical equilibrium. In the present paper, we determine the collision energies needed for that; we also estimate when pp collisions reach comparable hadronization volumes and thus determine when strangeness suppression should disappear there as well.

  14. Isoliensinine induces dephosphorylation of NF-kB p65 subunit at Ser536 via a PP2A-dependent mechanism in hepatocellular carcinoma cells: roles of impairing PP2A/I2PP2A interaction.

    PubMed

    Shu, Guangwen; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Shanqing; Cheng, Zhuo; Wang, Guan; Huang, Xu; Yang, Xinzhou

    2016-06-28

    Our previous study discovered that isoliensinine (isolie) triggers hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis via inducing p65 dephosphorylation at Ser536 and inhibition of NF-κB. Here, we showed that isolie promoted p65/PP2A interaction in vitro and in vivo. Repression of PP2A activity or knockdown of the expression of PP2A-C (the catalytic subunit of PP2A) abrogated isolie-provoked p65 dephosphorylation. I2PP2A is an endogenous PP2A inhibitor. Isolie directly impaired PP2A/I2PP2A interaction. Knockdown of I2PP2A boosted p65/PP2A association and p65 dephosphorylation. Overexpression of I2PP2A restrained isolie-induced p65 dephosphorylation. Untransformed hepatocytes were insensitive to isolie-induced NF-κB inhibition and cell apoptosis. In these cells, basal levels of I2PP2A and p65 phosphorylation at Ser536 were lower than in HCC cells. These findings collectively indicated that isolie suppresses NF-κB in HCC cells through impairing PP2A/I2PP2A interaction and stimulating PP2A-dependent p65 dephosphorylation at Ser536.

  15. Isoliensinine induces dephosphorylation of NF-κB p65 subunit at Ser536 via a PP2A-dependent mechanism in hepatocellular carcinoma cells: roles of impairing PP2A/I2PP2A interaction

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Guangwen; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Shanqing; Cheng, Zhuo; Wang, Guan; Huang, Xu; Yang, Xinzhou

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study discovered that isoliensinine (isolie) triggers hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis via inducing p65 dephosphorylation at Ser536 and inhibition of NF-κB. Here, we showed that isolie promoted p65/PP2A interaction in vitro and in vivo. Repression of PP2A activity or knockdown of the expression of PP2A-C (the catalytic subunit of PP2A) abrogated isolie-provoked p65 dephosphorylation. I2PP2A is an endogenous PP2A inhibitor. Isolie directly impaired PP2A/I2PP2A interaction. Knockdown of I2PP2A boosted p65/PP2A association and p65 dephosphorylation. Overexpression of I2PP2A restrained isolie-induced p65 dephosphorylation. Untransformed hepatocytes were insensitive to isolie-induced NF-κB inhibition and cell apoptosis. In these cells, basal levels of I2PP2A and p65 phosphorylation at Ser536 were lower than in HCC cells. These findings collectively indicated that isolie suppresses NF-κB in HCC cells through impairing PP2A/I2PP2A interaction and stimulating PP2A-dependent p65 dephosphorylation at Ser536. PMID:27244888

  16. A new dynamic selection rule for pp into two mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niskanen, J. A.; Myhrer, F.

    1985-07-01

    We show that quark-antiquark annihilation into gluons gives a suppression of pp annihilating into π+/-ϱ+- from pp 1S0 and 3P states at threshold. Permanent address: Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.

  17. Structural basis for transcription regulation by alarmone ppGpp.

    PubMed

    Artsimovitch, Irina; Patlan, Vsevolod; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Vassylyeva, Marina N; Hosaka, Takeshi; Ochi, Kozo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Vassylyev, Dmitry G

    2004-04-30

    Guanosine-tetraphosphate (ppGpp) is a major regulator of stringent control, an adaptive response of bacteria to amino acid starvation. The 2.7 A resolution structure of the Thermus thermophilus RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme in complex with ppGpp reveals that ppGpp binds to the same site near the active center in both independent RNAP molecules in the crystal but in strikingly distinct orientations. Binding is symmetrical with respect to the two diphosphates of ppGpp and is relaxed with respect to the orientation of the nucleotide base. Different modes of ppGpp binding are coupled with asymmetry of the active site configurations. The results suggest that base pairing of ppGpp with cytosines in the nontemplate DNA strand might be an essential component of transcription control by ppGpp. We present experimental evidence highlighting the importance of base-specific contacts between ppGpp and specific cytosine residues during both transcription initiation and elongation.

  18. /bar p/p collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1989-03-01

    This note encompasses a set of six lectures given at the summer school held at Campos Do Jordao in January of 1989 near Sao Paulo, Brazil. The intent of the lectures was to describe the physics of /bar p/p at CERN and Fermilab. Particular attention has been paid to making a self contained presentation to a prospective audience of graduate students. Since large Monte Carlo codes might not be available to all members of this audience, great reliance was placed on ''back of the envelope estimates.'' Emphasis was also placed on experimental data rather than theoretical speculation, since predictions for, for example, supersymmetric particle production are easily obtained by transcription of formulae already obtained. 9 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Spin transfer measurements for pp-->pp at 647 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaughton, M. W.; Bonner, B. E.; Hoffman, E. W.; van Dyck, O. B.; Hollas, C. L.; Riley, P. J.; McNaughton, K. H.; Imai, K.; Toshioka, K.; Roberts, J.; Turpin, S. E.; Aas, B.; Rahbar, A.

    1982-07-01

    Measurements have been made of the spin depolarization parameters DNN, DSS, and DLS (27°<=θc.m.<=90°) and the spin transfer parameters KNN, KSS, and KLS (56°<=θc.m.<=90°) for pp-->pp at 647 MeV. Typical uncertainties are about 0.03 compared with about 0.1 for previous data. Previous data are reviewed. The present data are in agreement with corrected previous data, and are in agreement with Arndt's phase-shift solutions. NUCLEAR REACTIONS 1H(p, p,)1H, E=647 MeV, measured DNN, DSS, DLS, KNN, KSS, KLS, θ=27° to 90° c.m.

  20. The PP2A inhibitor I2PP2A is essential for sister chromatid segregation in oocyte meiosis II.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Jean-Philippe; Touati, Sandra A; Berneau, Stéphane; Cladière, Damien; Hebras, Céline; Groeme, Rachel; McDougall, Alex; Wassmann, Katja

    2013-03-18

    Haploid gametes are generated through two consecutive meiotic divisions, with the segregation of chromosome pairs in meiosis I and sister chromatids in meiosis II. Separase-mediated stepwise removal of cohesion, first from chromosome arms and later from the centromere region, is a prerequisite for maintaining sister chromatids together until their separation in meiosis II [1]. In all model organisms, centromeric cohesin is protected from separase-dependent removal in meiosis I through the activity of PP2A-B56 phosphatase, which is recruited to centromeres by shugoshin/MEI-S332 (Sgo) [2-5]. How this protection of centromeric cohesin is removed in meiosis II is not entirely clear; we find that all the PP2A subunits remain colocalized with the cohesin subunit Rec8 at the centromere of metaphase II chromosomes. Here, we show that sister chromatid separation in oocytes depends on a PP2A inhibitor, namely I2PP2A. I2PP2A colocalizes with the PP2A enzyme at centromeres at metaphase II, independently of bipolar attachment. When I2PP2A is depleted, sister chromatids fail to segregate during meiosis II. Our findings demonstrate that in oocytes I2PP2A is essential for faithful sister chromatid segregation by mediating deprotection of centromeric cohesin in meiosis II.

  1. Properties of PP/MWCNT-COOH /PP composites made by melt mixing versus solution cast /melt mixing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinholds, I.; Roja, Z.; Zicans, J.; Merijs Meri, R.; Bitenieks, J.

    2015-03-01

    An approach on improvement of the properties of polypropylene / carbon nanotube (PP/CNT) composites is reported. PP blend compositions with carboxylic acid functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT-COOH) at filler content 1.0 wt.% were researched. One part of the composites was manufactured by direct thermoplastic mixing PP with the filler, but the other one was made from solution casted masterbatch with the following thermoplastic mixing. An increase of mechanical properties (Young's modulus, storage modulus and tensile strength), compared to an increase of glass transition temperature indicated a reinforcement effect of CNTs on PP matrix, determined from the tensile tests and differential mechanical analysis (DMA), while the elongation was reduced, compared to PP matrix. By differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, the effect of nanofiller on the reorganization of PP crystallites was observed. A noticeable enhanced effect on increase of the crystallization temperature was indicated for masterbatch manufactured composite. An increase of thermal stability was also observed, compared to pristine PP and the composite made by direct thermoplastic mixing PP with the filler.

  2. Comparison of forward and backward pp pair knockout in 3He(e,e'pp)n

    DOE PAGES

    Baghdasaryan, H.; Weinstein, L. B.; Laget, J. M.; ...

    2012-06-21

    Measuring nucleon-nucleon Short Range Correlations (SRC) has been a goal of the nuclear physics community for many years. They are an important part of the nuclear wavefunction, accounting for almost all of the high-momentum strength. They are closely related to the EMC effect. While their overall probability has been measured, measuring their momentum distributions is more difficult. In order to determine the best configuration for studying SRC momentum distributions, we measured the 3He(e,e'pp)n reaction, looking at events with high momentum protons (pp > 0.35 GeV/c) and a low momentum neutron (pn < 0.2 GeV/c). We examined two angular configurations: eithermore » both protons emitted forward or one proton emitted forward and one backward (with respect to the momentum transfer, →q). Thus, the measured relative momentum distribution of the events with one forward and one backward proton was much closer to the calculated initial-state pp relative momentum distribution, indicating that this is the preferred configuration for measuring SRC.« less

  3. Setting the scale of the pp and pp total cross sections using AdS/QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Domokos, Sophia K.; Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Mann, Nelia

    2010-11-15

    This paper is an addendum to earlier work where we computed the Pomeron contribution to pp and pp scattering in AdS/QCD. Our model for pp scattering in the Regge regime depends on four parameters: the slope and intercept of the Pomeron trajectory {alpha}{sub c}{sup '}, {alpha}{sub c}(0), a mass scale M{sub d}, which determines a form factor entering into matrix elements of the energy-momentum tensor, and a coupling {lambda}{sub P} between the lightest spin-two glueball and the proton, which sets the overall scale of the total cross section. Here we perform a more detailed computation of {lambda}{sub P} in the Sakai-Sugimoto model by using the construction of nucleons as instantons of the dual 5D gauge theory and an effective 5D fermion description of these nucleons which has been successfully used to compute a variety of nucleon-meson couplings. We find {lambda}{sub P,SS{approx_equal}}6.38 GeV{sup -1}, which is in reasonable agreement with the value {lambda}{sub P,fit}=8.28 GeV{sup -1} determined by fitting single Pomeron exchange to data.

  4. Comparison of forward and backward pp pair knockout in 3He(e,e'pp)n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, H.; Weinstein, L. B.; Laget, J. M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Sanctis, E.; De Vita, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hafidi, K.; Hicks, K.; Hyde, C. E.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pisano, S.; Pozdniakov, S.; Procureur, S.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Saini, M. S.; Saylor, N. A.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tkachenko, S.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhao, B.

    2012-06-01

    Measuring nucleon-nucleon short range correlations (SRCs) has been a goal of the nuclear physics community for many years. They are an important part of the nuclear wave function, accounting for almost all of the high-momentum strength. They are closely related to the EMC effect. While their overall probability has been measured, measuring their momentum distributions is more difficult. In order to determine the best configuration for studying SRC momentum distributions, we measured the 3He(e,e'pp)n reaction, looking at events with high-momentum protons (pp>0.35 GeV/c) and a low-momentum neutron (pn<0.2 GeV/c). We examined two angular configurations: either both protons emitted forward or one proton emitted forward and one backward (with respect to the momentum transfer, q⃗). The measured relative momentum distribution of the events with one forward and one backward proton was much closer to the calculated initial-state pp relative momentum distribution, indicating that this is the preferred configuration for measuring SRC.

  5. Intracellular uptake and behavior of two types zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) micelles, SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP as anticancer agents; unique intracellular disintegration of SMA micelles.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Gahininath, Bharate; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2011-11-07

    SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP are micellar drugs, encapsulating zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) with styrene maleic acid copolymer (SMA) and covalent conjugate of ZnPP with polyethylene glycol (PEG) respectively. Their intracellular uptake rate and subcellular localization were investigated. We found SMA-ZnPP showed higher and more efficient (about 2.5 times) intracellular uptake rate than PEG-ZnPP, although both SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP micelles were localized at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and inhibited the target enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) similarly. Both micellar ZnPP were taken up into the tumor cells by endocytosis. Furthermore SMA-ZnPP and PEG-ZnPP were examined for their drug releasing mechanisms. Liberation of ZnPP from the SMA micelle appears to depend on cellular amphiphilic components such as lecithin, while that for PEG-ZnPP depends on hydrolytic cleavage. These results indicate that these micelle formulations make water insoluble ZnPP to water soluble practical anticancer agents.

  6. Expression of human cytomegalovirus pp150 gene in transgenic Vicia faba L. and immunogenicity of pp150 protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hua; Yan, Huishen; Li, Guocai; Gong, Weijuan; Jiao, Hongmei; Chen, Hongju; Ji, Mingchun

    2010-03-01

    The pp150 gene of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) was transferred into Vicia faba plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Three of five hygromycin resistant V. faba plants were identified as positive by PCR and dot-blot hybridization. The ELISA results indicated that pp150 protein from three plants of transformed V. faba leaves and seeds made up 0.005-0.015% of the total soluble protein. The results of detection by immunoblot and inhibition of immunofluorescent assay (IFA) showed that pp150 soluble protein had immunity activity. HCMV pp150-specific antibody (IgG, IgA) and IFN-gamma producing T cells were detected in 100% of the mice immunized with pp150 transgenic V. faba seeds by ELISA and intracellular staining and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The transgenic V. faba plants will provide new material for the development of edible vaccination against HCMV infection.

  7. DSC study of the isothermal crystallization of iPP-CNF nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipara, Dorina M.; Chipara, Mircea

    2013-03-01

    Nanocomposite materials have been obtained by dispersing vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCNFs) with diameters ranging between 60 and 100 nm and lengths between 30,000 and 100,000 nm supplied by Pyrograf Products, Inc (PR-24AG) within a polymer matrix - isotactic polypropylene (iPP) - type Marlex HLN-120-01 with density 0.906 g/cm3 and melt flow rate at 230 oC of 12 g/10 min, supplied by Philips Sumika Polypropylene Company. VGCNFs have been purified and disentangled by reflux in dichloromethane and deionized water followed by vacuum filtering (for 24 h) and drying at 110 oC for 24h. The nanocomposites were obtained by melt mixing at 180 oC for 9 minutes with a speed of 65 rpm followed by an additional mixing at 90 rpm for 5 minutes, using a HAAKE Rheomix, Nanocomposites loaded with various amounts of VGCNFs (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% wt.) have been prepared and investigated by TA DSC Q-500. Isothermal crystallization was investigated in detail and analyzed by using an expression derived from the Avrami equation. The effect of the filler on the isothermal crystallization of iPP is discussed in detail. The research is focused on the effect of VGCNF on the degree of crystallization of iPP, crystallization rate, and dimensionality of the crystallization process. This research has been supported by National Science Foundation under DMR. Contract grant number 0934157.

  8. Improvement of polypropylene (PP)-modified bitumen through lignin addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuanita, E.; Hendrasetyawan, B. E.; Firdaus, D. F.; Chalid, M.

    2017-07-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is usually added to bitumen to improve its mechanical properties, however, both of them have different chemical properties. To achieve best mechanical properties of the mixture, coupling agent such as lignin is importantly required. Lignin is an amorphous biopolymer, has bipolar characteristic due to its distinct chemical function which has carbonyl, carboxyl, hydroxyl and phenol chemical function. Otherwise, bitumen and PP have polar and non-polar characteristic, respectively. In the previous research, it is found that lignin is potential to be used as coupling agent. In order to confirm the potential of lignin as a coupling agent, there are various compounds of lignin on PP-bitumen mixtures used in this research. This experiment consists of several stages, ranging from sample preparation, characterization of raw materials, mixing, and characterization of the PP-Modified Bitumen. This experiment used hot melt mixing to mix lignin, PP, and bitumen. The result of this experimental was analyzed by using FTIR and FESEM. The addition of lignin make Polymer Modified Bitumen (PMB) getting better mixing and increase mechanical properties. Furthermore, FESEM characterization indicated that the addition of lignin gave better mixing of PP-Bitumen. FTIR showed a new chemical structure due to the addition of lignin. From this experiment, the addition of lignin can improve mixing between PP and Bitumen. So, we can use lignin as coupling agent.

  9. ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence in epileptogenic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleen, Jonathan K.; Valdes, Pablo A.; Harris, Brent T.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.

    2011-03-01

    Astrogliotic tissue displays markedly increased levels of ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence, making it useful for fluorescence-guided resection in glioma surgery. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and corresponding animal models, there are areas of astrogliosis that often co-localize with the epileptic focus, which can be resected to eliminate seizures in the majority of treated patients. If this epileptogenic tissue can exhibit PpIX fluorescence that is sufficiently localized, it could potentially help identify margins in epilepsy surgery. We tested the hypothesis that ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence could visually accentuate epileptogenic tissue, using an established animal model of chronic TLE. An acute dose of pilocarpine was used to induce chronic seizure activity in a rat. This rat and a normal control were given ALA, euthanized, and brains examined post-mortem for PpIX fluorescence and neuropathology. Preliminary evidence indicates increased PpIX fluorescence in areas associated with chronic epileptic changes and seizure generation in TLE, including the hippocampus and parahippocampal areas. In addition, strong PpIX fluorescence was clearly observed in layer II of the piriform cortex, a region known for epileptic reorganization and involvement in the generation of seizures in animal studies. We are further investigating whether ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence can consistently identify epileptogenic zones, which could warrant the extension of this technique to clinical studies for use as an adjuvant guidance technology in the resection of epileptic tissue.

  10. Protein phosphatase 2A family members (PP2A and PP6) associate with U1 snRNP and the spliceosome during pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, Malek; Filali, Mohammed; Murray, Michael V.; Awasthi, Sita; Wadzinski, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are both important for multiple steps in the splicing pathway. Members of the PP1 and PP2A subfamilies of phospho-serine/threonine phosphatases play essential but redundant roles in the second step of the splicing reaction. PP6, a member of the PP2A subfamily, is the mammalian homologue of yeast Sit4p and ppe1, which are involved in cell cycle regulation; however, the involvement of PP6 in the splicing pathway remains unclear. Here we show that PP2A family members physically associate with the spliceosome throughout the splicing reaction. PP2A holoenzyme and PP6 were found stably associated with U1 snRNP. Together our findings indicate that these phosphatases regulate splicing catalysis involving U1 snRNP and suggest an important evolutionary conserved role of PP2A family phosphatases in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24064353

  11. PP and PS interferometric images of near-seafloor sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    I present interferometric processing examples from an ocean-bottom cable OBC dataset collected at a water depth of 800 m in the Gulf of Mexico. Virtual source and receiver gathers created through cross-correlation of full wavefields show clear PP reflections and PS conversions from near-seafloor layers of interest. Virtual gathers from wavefield-separated data show improved PP and PS arrivals. PP and PS brute stacks from the wavefield-separated data compare favorably with images from a non-interferometric processing flow. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Ambient Metrics for n-Dimensional pp-Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistner, Thomas; Nurowski, Pawel

    2010-06-01

    We provide an explicit formula for the Fefferman-Graham ambient metric of an n-dimensional conformal pp-wave in those cases where it exists. In even dimensions we calculate the obstruction explicitly. Furthermore, we describe all 4-dimensional pp-waves that are Bach-flat, and give a large class of Bach-flat examples which are conformally Cotton-flat, but not conformally Einstein. Finally, as an application, we use the obtained ambient metric to show that even-dimensional pp-waves have vanishing critical Q-curvature.

  13. Micro-canonical pentaquark production in ee and pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fu-Ming; Werner, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The existence of pentaquarks became questionable, because the Θ peak is observed in some p+p collisions, but not in ee annihilations. People think initial baryon number is necessary to produce pentaquarks. In this paper, we estimate and compare the production of Θ(1540) and Ξ(1860) in ee and pp collisions at different energies using Fermi statistical model as originally proposed in its microcanonical form. We find that both Θ(1540) and Ξ(1860) yield more in ee at LEP energies than in pp collisions at SPS and RHIC energies, if pentaquarks do exist. Initial baryon number is not necessary for pentaquark production.

  14. EMODnet Physical Parameters (EMODNet PP) Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novellino, A.; Schaap, D.; Manzella, G. M. R.; Pouliquen, S.; Gorringe, P.

    2012-04-01

    In December 2007 the European Parliament and Council adopted a common text for the Marine Strategy Framework Directive which aims to achieve environmentally healthy marine waters by 2020. This Directive includes an initiative for an overarching European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODNet). During the one-year consultation phase that followed the release of the EU Green Paper on a Future Maritime Policy for the European Union, stakeholders gave an overwhelming positive response. Facilitating access to high quality marine data will resolve difficulties and stimulate an expansion of value-added public and commercial services, lay the foundations for sound governance and reduce uncertainties on human impact on the planet as well as of forecasts relating to the future state of the marine environment. Better and linked marine data will have an immediate impact on the planning of environmental policy and mitigation measures, and will also facilitate impact assessments and scientific work. The overall objectives of the EMODnet Physical Parameters (EMODNet PP) preparatory action is to provide access to archived and near real-time data on physical conditions in Europe's seas and oceans by means of a dedicated Pilot Portal and to determine how well the data meet the needs of users from industry, public authorities and scientists. The latter implicates that it is also an objective to identify data gaps and arguments why these gaps should be filled in future monitoring. This project will contribute towards the definition of an operational European Marine Observation and Data Network (EMODnet). This is done done by: 1. providing through a portal: a. access to marine data from measurement stations and ferryboxes. Both near real-time and archived data of time series are to be made available. b. metadata for these data sets using EMODnet/INSPIRE standards. c. metadata maps and overviews for whole sea-basins showing the availability of data and monitoring intensity of that

  15. Synthesis of PP-g-MA as compatibilizer for PP/PLA biocomposites: Thermal, mechanical and biodegradability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghozali, Muhammad; Rohmah, Elfi Nur

    2017-01-01

    A synthesis of polypropylene-graft-maleic anhydride (PP-g-MA) with benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as an initiator has been conducted in a stainless-steel reactor at 120°C for 1 hours. The composition of maleic anhydride (MA) was varied between 10-40 phr, whereas BPO was between 0.5-2.0 phr. The grafting degree (GD) was determined by calculating the MA monomer grafted into polypropylene (PP). Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis was performed to study the functional group in the copolymer PP-g-MA. The result shows that the highest GD of 11.85% was obtained when the use of MA and BPO are 40 phr and 1 phr, respectively. PP/PLA biocomposites have been manufactured by adding polypropylene (PP), polylactic acid (PLA) and PP-g-MA as compatibilizer into rheomix at a temperature of 200-210°C with a stirring speed of 25 rpm for 7-10 minutes. PP/PLA biocomposites were varied at a ratio of 0/100, 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, 80/20 and 100/0. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Ultimate Testing Machine (UTM), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and biodegradation analysis were performed to determine the functional groups, thermal stability, tensile strength and the biodegradability level of PP/PLA biocomposites, respectively. Thermal and mechanical analysis results indicate that the addition of PLA into PP/PLA biocomposites can reduce the thermal stability and mechanical properties, however the biodegradability is increased.

  16. PP composites with Hybrid Nanofillers: NTC phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlin, Juha; Immonen, Kirsi

    2010-06-01

    Electric conductive plastic composites have a wide potential for commercial applications, some examples are EMI shielding housings and components in automotive industry and in consumer electronics, equipments in health care sector and fuel cell components. A phenomenon in conductive composites, especially in composites with carbon based fillers, is change of thermal induced change in conductivity as a result of morphological transitions. Usually the observed changes are practically irreversible. The phenomenon may cause increasing resistivity, usually called as "positive temperature coefficient" (PTC) or decreasing resistivity, called "negative temperature coefficient (NTC), where the new morphology created by heat treatment is more favorable for electric conductivity compared to the original state. The existence of NTC is a sing of the lost potential in material design and processing. Therefore detailed information about the phenomenon gives us tools to develop high performance conductive materials. It this paper we discuss about NTC phenomenon observed in PP composites with CNT or in-situ synthesized CNT-PANi hybrid nanofiller with an amphiphilic dispersing agent. The goal of the paper is not to present a comprehensive model of this phenomenon; we present some experimental results which may be related to polymer-filler interactions. These details are a part of this complicated phenomenon.

  17. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    López-Buendía, Angel M.; Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores; Climent, Verónica

    2013-12-15

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  18. High p{sub T} jet production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Eskola, K.J.; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Production rates of large p{sub T} jets in pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies are studied using the next-to-leading order calculation of S. D. Ellis, Z. Zunszt and D. Soper. The computed inclusive one-jet cross sections are compared against the CERN and Fermilab jet data from p{bar p} and pp collisions. The dependence of the results on the choice of the parton distributions and renormalization/factorization scales is investigated.

  19. pp-waves with torsion and metric-affine gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasic, Vedad; Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2005-10-01

    A classical pp-wave is a four-dimensional Lorentzian spacetime which admits a nonvanishing parallel spinor field; here the connection is assumed to be Levi-Civita. We generalize this definition to metric compatible spacetimes with torsion and describe basic properties of such spacetimes. We use our generalized pp-waves for constructing new explicit vacuum solutions of quadratic metric-affine gravity.

  20. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-08-29

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55's dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis.

  1. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55’s dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis. PMID:27551057

  2. Distribution of Oil in a PP/EPDM Thermoplastic Elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yutaka; Okada, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takashi

    Distribution of oil in a commercial PP(polypropylene)/EPDM(ethylene-propyrene-diene rubber) thermoplastic elastomer was analyzed by light scattering. It was shown that the oil preferentially stays in EPDM particles at low temperatures and it migrates to PP matrix at high temperatures. That is, the oil is expected to play a dual role; softener at ambient temperature and plasticizer at processing temperature. The temperature dependence of oil distribution was nicely interpreted by a thermodynamic discussion.

  3. Rac GTPase signaling through the PP5 protein phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Saverio; Darden, Thomas; Erxleben, Christian; Romeo, Charles; Russo, Angela; Martin, Negin; Rossie, Sandra; Armstrong, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the Rac-dependent mechanism of KCNH2 channel stimulation by thyroid hormone in a rat pituitary cell line, GH4C1, with the patch-clamp technique. Here we present physiological evidence for the protein serine/threonine phosphatase, PP5, as an effector of Rac GTPase signaling. We also propose and test a specific molecular mechanism for PP5 stimulation by Rac-GTP. Inhibition of PP5 with the microbial toxin, okadaic acid, blocked channel stimulation by thyroid hormone and by Rac, but signaling was restored by expression of a toxin-insensitive mutant of PP5, Y451A, which we engineered. PP5 is unique among protein phosphatases in that it contains an N-terminal regulatory domain with three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) that inhibit its activity. Expression of the TPR domain coupled to GFP blocked channel stimulation by the thyroid hormone. We also show that the published structures of the PP5 TPR domain and the TPR domain of p67, the Rac-binding subunit of NADPH oxidase, superimpose over 92 α carbons. Mutation of the PP5 TPR domain at two predicted contact points with Rac-GTP prevents the TPR domain from functioning as a dominant negative and blocks the ability of Y451A to rescue signaling in the presence of okadaic acid. PP5 stimulation by Rac provides a unique molecular mechanism for the antagonism of Rho-dependent signaling through protein kinases in many cellular processes, including metastasis, immune cell chemotaxis, and neuronal development. PMID:16549782

  4. K restriction inhibits protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B) and suppression of PP2B decreases ROMK channel activity in the CCD

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Dao-Hong; Wang, Zhi-Jian; Jin, Yan; Yang, Baofeng; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2009-01-01

    We used Western blot analysis to examine the effect of dietary K intake on the expression of serine/threonine protein phosphatase in the kidney. K restriction significantly decreased the expression of catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase (PP)2B but increased the expression of PP2B regulatory subunit in both rat and mouse kidney. However, K depletion did not affect the expression of PP1 and PP2A. Treatment of M-1 cells, mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells, or 293T cells with glucose oxidase (GO), which generates superoxide anions through glucose metabolism, mimicked the effect of K restriction on PP2B expression and significantly decreased expression of PP2B catalytic subunits. However, GO treatment increased expression of regulatory subunit of PP2B and had no effect on expression of PP1, PP2A, and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1D. Moreover, deletion of gp91-containing NADPH oxidase abolished the effect of K depletion on PP2B. Thus superoxide anions or related products may mediate the inhibitory effect of K restriction on the expression of PP2B catalytic subunit. We also used patch-clamp technique to study the effect of inhibiting PP2B on renal outer medullary K (ROMK) channels in the CCD. Application of cyclosporin A or FK506, inhibitors of PP2B, significantly decreased ROMK channels, and the effect of PP2B inhibitors was abolished by blocking p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and ERK. Furthermore, Western blot demonstrated that inhibition of PP2B with cyclosporin A or small interfering RNA increased the phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK. We conclude that K restriction suppresses the expression of PP2B catalytic subunits and that inhibition of PP2B decreases ROMK channel activity through stimulation of MAPK in the CCD. PMID:18184875

  5. Evidence for a J/{psi}pp Pauli strong coupling?

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.; Li, X.; Roberts, W.

    2008-03-01

    The couplings of charmonia and charmonium hybrids (generically {psi}) to pp are of great interest in view of future plans to study these states using an antiproton storage ring at GSI. These low to moderate energy {psi}pp couplings are not well understood theoretically, and currently must be determined from experiment. In this paper we note that the two independent Dirac ({gamma}{sub {mu}}) and Pauli ({sigma}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}) pp couplings of the J/{psi} and {psi}{sup '} can be constrained by the angular distribution of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}(J/{psi},{psi}{sup '}){yields}pp on resonance. A comparison of our theoretical results to recent unpolarized data allows estimates of the pp couplings; in the better determined J/{psi} case the data is inconsistent with a pure Dirac ({gamma}{sub {mu}}) coupling, and can be explained by the presence of a {sigma}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}} term. This Pauli coupling may significantly affect the cross section of the PANDA process pp{yields}{pi}{sup 0}J/{psi} near threshold. There is a phase ambiguity that makes it impossible to uniquely determine the magnitudes and relative phase of the Dirac and Pauli couplings from the unpolarized angular distributions alone; we show in detail how this can be resolved through a study of the polarized reactions.

  6. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; ...

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more » TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  7. PP2A Regulates HDAC4 Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Paroni, Gabriela; Cernotta, Nadia; Dello Russo, Claudio; Gallinari, Paola; Pallaoro, Michele; Foti, Carmela; Talamo, Fabio; Orsatti, Laura; Steinkühler, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Different signal-regulated serine/threonine kinases phosphorylate class II histone deacetylases (HDACs) to promote nuclear export, cytosolic accumulation, and activation of gene transcription. However, little is known about mechanisms operating in the opposite direction, which, possibly through phosphatases, should promote class II HDACs nuclear entry and subsequent gene repression. Here we show that HDAC4 forms a complex with the PP2A holoenzyme Cα, Aα, B/PR55α. In vitro and in vivo binding studies demonstrate that the N-terminus of HDAC4 interacts with the catalytic subunit of PP2A. HDAC4 is dephosphorylated by PP2A and experiments using okadaic acid or RNA interference have revealed that PP2A controls HDAC4 nuclear import. Moreover, we identified serine 298 as a putative phosphorylation site important for HDAC4 nuclear import. The HDAC4 mutant mimicking phosphorylation of serine 298 is defective in nuclear import. Mutation of serine 298 to alanine partially rescues the defect in HDAC4 nuclear import observed in cells with down-regulated PP2A. These observations suggest that PP2A, via the dephosphorylation of multiple serines including the 14-3-3 binding sites and serine 298, controls HDAC4 nuclear import. PMID:18045992

  8. Ecotoxicity of pp'DDE to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bettinetti, Roberta; Croce, Valeria; Noè, Francesca; Ponti, Benedetta; Quadroni, Silvia; Galassi, Silvana

    2013-10-01

    pp'-Dichlorodiphenyl-dichloroethylene (pp'DDE), a metabolite of pp'-dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane poses a risk for many ecosystems in spite of the banning of the parent compound because of its persistence and bioaccumulability. Nevertheless, the knowledge of acute and chronic toxicity on aquatic organisms is still very poor. In the present study, Daphnia magna was exposed to varying concentrations of pp'DDE in water and through diet to determine both acute toxicity and potential for effects on reproduction and survivability. The 48 h IC50 was 5.08 μg L(-1) (3.76-7.01 μg L(-1)). As pp'DDE concentration in water was not stable and the amount assumed by food cannot be established with certainty, the results of chronic toxicity tests were expressed as the concentration in the organism which caused a negative effect. Grazing activity was affected with a pp'DDE concentration in the organism of 24 ng mg(-1) d.w., while the lowest observed effect concentration for fecundity reduction was 109 ng mg(-1) d.w.

  9. pp-->pΛK+ reaction in search for the K-pp state - quest for a kaonic nuclei -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ken; Kienle, Paul; Maggiora, Marco; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    2011-10-01

    The dibaryonic kaonic nuclear bound state, K-pp is searched by studying an exclusive p+p→p+Λ+K+ process at several beam energies. A signature of the K-pp is explored in a p+p→X(≡K-pp)+K+ reaction that follows a decay of the X into p+Λ. We found in a missing-mass ΔM(K+) spectrum and a Λp invariant-mass M(Λp) spectrum of DISTO data at 2.85 GeV a resonance with M = 2267 MeV/c2 and Γ = 118 MeV. Those events are found to be associated with a mono energetic kaon. We investigate this resonance as a candidate of the K-pp further also with a different beam energies.

  10. Synthesis of Highly Selective Submicromolar Microcystin‐Based Inhibitors of Protein Phosphatase (PP)2A over PP1

    PubMed Central

    Fontanillo, Miriam; Zemskov, Ivan; Häfner, Maximilian; Uhrig, Ulrike; Salvi, Francesca; Simon, Bernd; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Research and therapeutic targeting of the phosphoserine/threonine phosphatases PP1 and PP2A is hindered by the lack of selective inhibitors. The microcystin (MC) natural toxins target both phosphatases with equal potency, and their complex synthesis has complicated structure–activity relationship studies in the past. We report herein the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of 11 MC analogues, which was accomplished through an efficient strategy combining solid‐ and solution‐phase approaches. Our approach led to the first MC analogue with submicromolar inhibitory potency that is strongly selective for PP2A over PP1 and does not require the complex lipophilic Adda group. Through mutational and structural analyses, we identified a new key element for binding, as well as reasons for the selectivity. This work gives unprecedented insight into how selectivity between these phosphatases can be achieved with MC analogues. PMID:27723199

  11. Overexpression of a novel Arabidopsis PP2C isoform, AtPP2CF1, enhances plant biomass production by increasing inflorescence stem growth

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Hiroki; Kondo, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tomoko; Imamura, Chie; Muramoto, Nobuhiko; Hattori, Etsuko; Ogawa, Ken’ichi; Mitsukawa, Norihiro; Ohto, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, higher plants have evolved to express diverse protein phosphatase 2Cs (PP2Cs). Of all Arabidopsis thaliana PP2Cs, members of PP2C subfamily A, including ABI1, have been shown to be key negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) signalling pathways, which regulate plant growth and development as well as tolerance to adverse environmental conditions. However, little is known about the enzymatic and signalling roles of other PP2C subfamilies. Here, we report a novel Arabidopsis subfamily E PP2C gene, At3g05640, designated AtPP2CF1. AtPP2CF1 was dramatically expressed in response to exogenous ABA and was expressed in vascular tissues and guard cells, similar to most subfamily A PP2C genes. In vitro enzymatic activity assays showed that AtPP2CF1 possessed functional PP2C activity. However, yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that AtPP2CF1 did not interact with PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors or three SnRK2 kinases, which are ABI1-interacting proteins. This was supported by homology-based structural modelling demonstrating that the putative active- and substrate-binding site of AtPP2CF1 differed from that of ABI1. Furthermore, while overexpression of ABI1 in plants induced an ABA-insensitive phenotype, Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtPP2CF1 (AtPP2CF1oe) were weakly hypersensitive to ABA during seed germination and drought stress. Unexpectedly, AtPP2CF1oe plants also exhibited increased biomass yield, mainly due to accelerated growth of inflorescence stems through the activation of cell proliferation and expansion. Our results provide new insights into the physiological significance of AtPP2CF1 as a candidate gene for plant growth production and for potential application in the sustainable supply of plant biomass. PMID:25038254

  12. Site specificity of DSP-PP cleavage by BMP1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Robert T; Lim, Glendale L; Yee, Colin T; Fuller, Robert S; Ritchie, Helena H

    2014-08-01

    Bone morphogenic protein 1 (BMP1), a metalloproteinase, is known to cleave a wide variety of extracellular matrix proteins, suggesting that a consensus substrate cleavage amino acid sequence might exist. However, while such a consensus sequence has been proposed based on P4 to P4' (i.e. the four amino acids flanking either side of the BMP1 cleavage site; P4P3P2P1|P1'P2'P3'P4') sequence homologies between two BMP1 substrates, dentin matrix protein 1 and dentin sialoprotein phosphophoryn (DSP-PP) (i.e. xMQx|DDP), no direct testing has so far been attempted. Using an Sf9 cell expression system, we have been able to produce large amounts of uncleaved DSP-PP. Point mutations introduced into this recombinant DSP-PP were then tested for their effects on DSP-PP cleavage by either Sf9 endogenous tolloid-related protein 1 (TLR-1) or by its human homolog, BMP1. Here, we have measured DSP-PP cleavage efficiencies after modifications based on P4-P4' sequence comparisons with dentin matrix protein 1, as well as for prolysyl oxidase and chordin, two other BMP1 substrates. Our results demonstrate that any mutations within or outside of the DSP-PP P4 to P4' cleavage site can block, impair or accelerate DSP-PP cleavage, and suggest that its BMP1 cleavage site is highly conserved in order to regulate its cleavage efficiency, possibly with additional assistance from its conserved exosites. Thus, BMP1 cleavage cannot be based on a consensus substrate cleavage site.

  13. Overexpression of RelA/SpoT homologs, PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b, induces the growth suppression of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Sato, Michio; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Ochi, Kozo; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Nabeta, Kensuke; Takahashi, Kosaku

    2015-01-01

    Two genes encoding RelA/SpoT homologs, PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b, which are involved in the synthesis of bacterial alarmone guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) for the stringent response, were isolated from the moss, Physcomitrella patens. A complementary analysis of PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b in Escherichia coli showed that these genes had ppGpp biosynthetic activity. The recombinant PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b were also shown to synthesize ppGpp in vitro. Both proteins were localized to the chloroplasts of P. patens. Expression of the PpRSH genes was induced upon treatment with abscisic acid or abiotic stresses, such as dehydration and UV irradiation. Overexpression of PpRSH2a and PpRSH2b caused suppression of the growth in response to 1% (w/v) of glucose. The present study suggests the existence of a mechanism to regulate the growth of P. patens, which is governed by plant RSH in chloroplasts.

  14. Auxin promotes the transition from chloronema to caulonema in moss protonema by positively regulating PpRSL1and PpRSL2 in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Jang, Geupil; Dolan, Liam

    2011-10-01

    Protonemata are multicellular filamentous networks that develop following the germination of a haploid moss spore and comprise two different cell types - chloronema and caulonema. The ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE1 (PpRSL1) and PpRSL2 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and auxin promote the development of caulonema in Physcomitrella patens but the mechanism by which these regulators interact during development is unknown. We characterized the role of auxin in regulating the function of PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 in the chloronema-to-caulonema transition during protonema development. Here, we showed that a gradient of cell identity developed along protonemal filaments; cells were chloronemal in proximal regions near the site of spore germination becoming progressively more caulonemal distally as filaments elongated. Auxin controlled this transition by positively regulating the expression of PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 genes. Auxin did not induce caulonemal development in Pprsl1 Pprsl2 double mutants that lack PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 gene activity while constitutive co-expression of PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 in the absence of auxin was sufficient to program constitutive caulonema development. Together, these data indicate that auxin positively regulates PpRSL1 and PpRSL2 whose expression is sufficient to promote caulonema differentiation in moss protonema.

  15. The Brazilian national system of forest permanent plots

    Treesearch

    Yeda Maria Malheiros de Oliveira; Maria Augusta Doetzer Rosot; Patricia Povoa de Mottos; Joberto Veloso de Freitas; Guilherme Luis Augusto Gomide; < i> et al< /i>

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian National System of Forest Permanent Plots (SisPP) is a governmental initiative designed and being implemented in partnership by the Ministry of Environment (MMA), represented by the National Forest Programme (PNF) and the Brazilian Forest Service (SFB) and the Embrapa Forestry (a research center of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa...

  16. Silencing I2PP2A Rescues Tau Pathologies and Memory Deficits through Rescuing PP2A and Inhibiting GSK-3β Signaling in Human Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Ma, Rong-Hong; Li, Xia-Chun; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Shi, Hai-Rong; Wei, Wei; Luo, Dan-Ju; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Increase of inhibitor-2 of protein phosphatase-2A I2PP2A is associated with protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) inhibition and tau hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Down-regulating I2PP2A attenuated amyloidogenesis and improved the cognitive functions in transgenic mice expressing amyloid precursor protein (tg2576). Here, we found that silencing I2PP2A by hippocampal infusion of Lenti - siI2PP2A down-regulated I2PP2A (~45%) with reduction of tau phosphorylation/accumulation, improvement of memory deficits, and dendritic plasticity in 12-month-old human tau transgenic mice. Silencing I2PP2A not only restored PP2A activity but also inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) with a significant activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Akt. In HEK293/tau and N2a/tau cells, silencing I2PP2A by pSUPER - siI2PP2A also significantly reduced tau hyperphosphorylation with restoration of PP2A activity and inhibition of GSK-3β, demonstrated by the decreased GSK-3β total protein and mRNA levels, and the increased inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β at serine-9. Furthermore, activation of PKA but not Akt mediated the inhibition of GSK-3β by I2PP2A silencing. We conclude that targeting I2PP2A can improve tau pathologies and memory deficits in human tau transgenic mice, and activation of PKA contributes to GSK-3β inhibition induced by silencing I2PP2A in vitro, suggesting that I2PP2A is a promising multiple target of AD. PMID:24987368

  17. Ectopic expression of inhibitors of protein phosphatase type 1 (PP1) can be used to analyze roles of PP1 in Drosophila development.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Daimark; Szöor, Balázs; Gross, Sascha; Vereshchagina, Natalia; Alphey, Luke

    2003-01-01

    We have identified two proteins that bind with high specificity to type 1 serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP1) and have exploited their inhibitory properties to develop an efficient and flexible strategy for conditional inactivation of PP1 in vivo. We show that modest overexpression of Drosophila homologs of I-2 and NIPP1 (I-2Dm and NIPP1Dm) reduces the level of PP1 activity and phenotypically resembles known PP1 mutants. These phenotypes, which include lethality, abnormal mitotic figures, and defects in muscle development, are suppressed by coexpression of PP1, indicating that the effect is due specifically to loss of PP1 activity. Reactivation of I-2Dm:PP1c complexes suggests that inhibition of PP1 activity in vivo does not result in a compensating increase in synthesis of active PP1. PP1 mutants enhance the wing overgrowth phenotype caused by ectopic expression of the type II TGF beta superfamily signaling receptor Punt. Using I-2Dm, which has a less severe effect than NIPP1Dm, we show that lowering the level of PP1 activity specifically in cells overexpressing Punt is sufficient for wing overgrowth and that the interaction between PP1 and Punt requires the type I receptor Thick-veins (Tkv) but is not strongly sensitive to the level of the ligand, Decapentaplegic (Dpp), nor to that of the other type I receptors. This is consistent with a role for PP1 in antagonizing Punt by preventing phosphorylation of Tkv. These studies demonstrate that inhibitors of PP1 can be used in a tissue- and developmental-specific manner to examine the developmental roles of PP1. PMID:12750335

  18. Review of hydrophilic PP membrane for organic waste removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariono, Danu; Wardani, Anita Kusuma

    2017-05-01

    The acceleration of industrialization in developing countries has given an impact of environmental pollution rapidly, such as contamination of groundwater with organic waste. To solve this problem, some membrane techniques have been performed to remove organic waste from water, such as membrane contactors, membrane bioreactors, and supported liquid membranes. Polypropylene (PP) membrane is one of the promising candidates for these membrane processes due to its chemical stability, low cost, good mechanical resistance, and being easily available. However, different processes require membranes with different surface properties. Hydrophobic PP membranes with excellent chemical stability can be directly used in membrane contactors, in which the organic phase wets the porous membrane and slightly excessive pressure applied to the other phase. On the other hand, hydrophilization of PP membrane is necessary for some other processes, such as for fouling reduction on membrane bioreactors due to organic matters deposition. The aim of this paper is to give a brief overview of removal of organic waste by PP membrane. Moreover, the effects of PP surface hydrophilization on antifouling properties are also discussed.

  19. PP2C gamma: a human protein phosphatase with a unique acidic domain.

    PubMed

    Travis, S M; Welsh, M J

    1997-08-04

    We have cloned a novel cDNA from human skeletal muscle which encodes a protein phosphatase with a unique acidic domain. It is 34% identical to mammalian PP2C alpha and PP2C beta and we call it PP2C gamma. It more closely resembles PP2Cs from Paramecium tetraurelia and Schizosaccharomyces pombe than mammalian PP2Cs. Northern blot analysis shows that PP2C gamma is widely expressed, and is most abundant in testis, skeletal muscle, and heart. Like known PP2Cs, recombinant PP2C gamma requires Mg2+ or Mn2+ for activity. Unlike any other known phosphatase, PP2C gamma has a highly acidic domain: 75% of the 54 residues are glutamate or aspartate.

  20. Modern geothermal power: GeoPP with geothermal steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Shipkov, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The first part of the review presents information on the scale and specific features of geothermal energy development in various countries. The classification of geothermal power plant (GeoPP) process flow diagrams by a phase state of the primary heat source (a geothermal fluid), thermodynamic cycle, and applicable turbines is proposed. Features of geothermal plants using methods of flashing and steam separation in the process loop and a flowsheet and thermodynamic process of a geothermal fluid heat-to-power conversion in a GeoPP of the most widespread type using a double-flash separation are considered. It is shown that, for combined cycle power units, the specific power-to-consumption geothermal fluid ratio is 20-25% higher than that for traditional single-loop GeoPP. Information about basic chemical components and their concentration range for geothermal fluids of various formations around the world is presented. Three historic stages of improving geothermal energy technologies are determined, such as development of high-temperature geothermal resources (dry, superheated steam) and application of a two-phase wet-steam geothermal fluid in GeoPP power units with one or two expansion pressures and development of binary cycle GeoPPs. A current trend of more active use of binary power plants in GeoPP technological processes is noted. Design features of GeoPP's steam turbines and steam separating devices, determined by the use of low-potential geothermal saturated steam as a working medium, which is characterized by corrosion aggressiveness and a tendency to form deposits, are considered. Most promising Russian geothermal energy projects are determined. A list of today's most advanced geothermal turbine performance technologies is presented. By an example of a 25 MW steam turbine design, made by JSC Kaluga Turbine Works, advantages of the internal moisture separation with a special turbine-separator stage are shown.

  1. Molecular mechanism of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1cα-PP1r7) in spermatogenesis of Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guang Xu; Zhou, Rong Qiong; Song, Zhen Hui; Zhu, Hong Hong; Zhou, Zuo Yong; Zeng, Yuan Qin

    2015-09-01

    Toxocariasis is one of the most important, but neglected, zoonoses, which is mainly caused by Toxocara canis. To better understand the role of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) in reproductive processes of male adult T. canis, differential expression analysis was used to reveal the profiles of PP1 catalytic subunit α (PP1cα) gene Tc-stp-1 and PP1 regulatory subunit 7 (PP1r7) gene TcM-1309. Indirect fluorescence immunocytochemistry was carried out to determine the subcellular distribution of PP1cα. Double-stranded RNA interference (RNAi) assays were employed to illustrate the function and mechanism of PP1cα in male adult reproduction. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed transcriptional consistency of Tc-stp-1 and TcM-1309 in sperm-producing germline tissues and localization research showed cytoplasmic distribution of PP1cα in sf9 cells, which indicated relevant involvements of PP1cα and PP1r7 in spermatogenesis. Moreover, spatiotemporal transcriptional differences of Tc-stp-1 were determined by gene knockdown analysis, which revealed abnormal morphologies and blocked meiotic divisions of spermatocytes by phenotypic aberration scanning, thereby highlighting the crucial involvement of PP1cα in spermatogenesis. These results revealed a PP1cα-PP1r7 mechanism by which PP1 regulates kinetochore-microtubule interactions in spermatogenesis and provided important clues to identify novel drug or vaccine targets for toxocariasis control.

  2. pp wave big bangs: Matrix strings and shrinking fuzzy spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumit R.; Michelson, Jeremy

    2005-10-15

    We find pp wave solutions in string theory with null-like linear dilatons. These provide toy models of big bang cosmologies. We formulate matrix string theory in these backgrounds. Near the big bang 'singularity', the string theory becomes strongly coupled but the Yang-Mills description of the matrix string is weakly coupled. The presence of a second length scale allows us to focus on a specific class of non-Abelian configurations, viz. fuzzy cylinders, for a suitable regime of parameters. We show that, for a class of pp waves, fuzzy cylinders which start out big at early times dynamically shrink into usual strings at sufficiently late times.

  3. Near-Threshold Production of ϕ Mesons in pp Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, M.; Maeda, Y.; Keshelashvili, I.; Koch, H. R.; Mikirtytchiants, S.; Barsov, S.; Borgs, W.; Büscher, M.; Dimitrov, V. I.; Dymov, S.; Hejny, V.; Kleber, V.; Koptev, V.; Kulessa, P.; Mersmann, T.; Merzliakov, S.; Mussgiller, A.; Nekipelov, M.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Pysz, K.; Schleichert, R.; Stein, H. J.; Ströher, H.; Watzlawik, K.-H.; Wüstner, P.

    2006-06-01

    The pp→ppϕ reaction has been studied at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY-Jülich, using the internal beam and ANKE facility. Total cross sections have been determined at three excess energies γ near the production threshold. The differential cross section closest to threshold at γ=18.5MeV exhibits a clear S wave dominance as well as a noticeable effect due to the proton-proton final-state interaction. Taken together with data for ppω production, a significant enhancement of the ϕ/ω ratio of a factor 8 is found compared to predictions based on the Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka rule.

  4. ρ0 Meson Production in the pp Reactions with Disto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabura, P.; Balestra, F.; Bedfer, Y.; Bertini, R.; Bland, L. C.; Brenschede, A.; Brochard, F.; Bussa, M. P.; Choi, Seonho; Colantoni, M. L.; Dressler, R.; Dzemidzic, M.; Faivre, J.-Cl.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Foryciarz, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Grasso, A.; Heinz, S.; Jacobs, W. W.; Kühn, W.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Manara, A.; Panzieri, D.; Pfaff, H.-W.; Piragino, G.; Popov, A.; Ritman, J.; Tchalyshev, V.; Tosello, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Zosi, G.

    2003-01-01

    Total and differential cross sections for the exclusive reaction ppppρ0 observed via the π+π- decay channel have been measured at pbeam= 3.67 GeV/c. The observed total meson production cross section is determined to be (23.4 ± 0.8 ± 8)μb and is significantly lower than typical cross sections used in model calculations for heavy ion collisions. The differential cross sections measured indicate a strong anisotropy ( ˜ \\cos2 θ ρ0^ CM) in the ρ0 meson production.

  5. PP13, Maternal ABO Blood Groups and the Risk Assessment of Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nandor Gabor; Romero, Roberto; Meiri, Hamutal; Erez, Offer; Xu, Yi; Tarquini, Federica; Barna, Laszlo; Szilagyi, Andras; Ackerman, Ron; Sammar, Marei; Fule, Tibor; Karaszi, Katalin; Kovalszky, Ilona; Dong, Zhong; Kim, Chong Jai; Zavodszky, Peter; Papp, Zoltan; Gonen, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Background Placental Protein 13 (PP13), an early biomarker of preeclampsia, is a placenta-specific galectin that binds beta-galactosides, building-blocks of ABO blood-group antigens, possibly affecting its bioavailability in blood. Methods and Findings We studied PP13-binding to erythrocytes, maternal blood-group effect on serum PP13 and its performance as a predictor of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Datasets of maternal serum PP13 in Caucasian (n = 1078) and Hispanic (n = 242) women were analyzed according to blood groups. In vivo, in vitro and in silico PP13-binding to ABO blood-group antigens and erythrocytes were studied by PP13-immunostainings of placental tissue-microarrays, flow-cytometry of erythrocyte-bound PP13, and model-building of PP13 - blood-group H antigen complex, respectively. Women with blood group AB had the lowest serum PP13 in the first trimester, while those with blood group B had the highest PP13 throughout pregnancy. In accordance, PP13-binding was the strongest to blood-group AB erythrocytes and weakest to blood-group B erythrocytes. PP13-staining of maternal and fetal erythrocytes was revealed, and a plausible molecular model of PP13 complexed with blood-group H antigen was built. Adjustment of PP13 MoMs to maternal ABO blood group improved the prediction accuracy of first trimester maternal serum PP13 MoMs for preeclampsia and IUGR. Conclusions ABO blood group can alter PP13-bioavailability in blood, and it may also be a key determinant for other lectins' bioavailability in the circulation. The adjustment of PP13 MoMs to ABO blood group improves the predictive accuracy of this test. PMID:21799738

  6. Polarisations of the Z and W bosons in the processes pp → ZH and pp → W ± H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Junya

    2017-08-01

    The Z boson in the process pp → ZH and the W + and W - in the process pp → W ± H can be in polarised states. The polarisation density matrix of the Z ( W) boson contains the complete information about a state of polarisation of the Z ( W) boson, and HZZ, HZγ and HWW interactions may be studied in detail from a careful analysis of these matrices. In this paper, a systematic approach to analyse these polarisation density matrices is presented. With the aim of making maximum use of the polarisation information, all of the elements of the polarisation density matrices are related with observables, which are measurable at the environment of pp collisions. Consequences of non-standard HZZ, HZγ and HWW interactions for these observables are discussed.

  7. Characterization of phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases from the moss Physcomitrella patens: PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Laura; Balbi, Virginia; Dove, Stephen K; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Mikami, Koji; Sommarin, Marianne

    2009-03-01

    Phosphoinositides (PIs) play a major role in eukaryotic cells, despite being a minor component of most membranes. This is the first report on PI metabolism in a bryophyte, the moss Physcomitrella patens. Moss PI composition is similar to that of other land plants growing under normal conditions. In contrast to the large number of PIPK genes present in flowering plants, the P. patens genome encodes only two type I/II PIPK genes, PpPIPK1 and PpPIPK2, which are very similar at both the nucleotide and protein product levels. However, the expression of the two genes is differentially regulated, and in vitro biochemical characterization shows that the resulting enzymes have different substrate specificities. PpPIPK1 uses PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P with similar preference and also metabolizes PtdIns(3,4)P(2) to produce PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3), a PI not yet detected in intact plant cells. PpPIPK2 prefers PtdIns as substrate and is much less active towards PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P. Thus, PpPIPK2 shows properties reminiscent of both PtdInsP-kinase and PtdIns-kinases. Moreover, a substitution of glutamic acid by alanine in the activation loop drastically reduced PpPIPK1 activity and altered the substrate specificity to PtdIns5P being the preferred substrate compared with PtdIns4P and PtdIns3P. These findings demonstrate that the substrate specificity of plant PIPKs is determined in a plant-specific manner, which provides new insights into the regulatory modes of PIPK activity in plants.

  8. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Aluminum setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-10-02

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Aluminum stores.

  9. Polarized proton parameters for the 2015 PP-on-Au setup in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-08-25

    Values are given for RHIC circumference shifts due to snakes for various situations. Relevant parameters are tabulated for polarized protons (PP) in the booster and in AGS and RHIC for PP-on-Au stores.

  10. An Ultra-High-Throughput Screen for Catalytic Inhibitors of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatases Types 1 and 5 (PP1C and PP5C).

    PubMed

    Swingle, Mark; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Saldanha, S Adrian; Chase, Peter; Eberhart, Christina; Salter, Edward A; D'Arcy, Brandon; Schroeder, Chad E; Golden, Jennifer E; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Hodder, Peter; Honkanen, Richard E

    2017-01-01

    Although there has been substantial success in the development of specific inhibitors for protein kinases, little progress has been made in the identification of specific inhibitors for their protein phosphatase counterparts. Inhibitors of PP1 and PP5 are desired as probes for research and to test their potential for drug development. We developed and miniaturized (1536-well plate format) nearly identical homogeneous, fluorescence intensity (FLINT) enzymatic assays to detect inhibitors of PP1 or PP5. The assays were used in an ultra-high-throughput screening (uHTS) campaign, testing >315,000 small-molecule compounds. Both assays demonstrated robust performance, with a Z' of 0.92 ± 0.03 and 0.95 ± 0.01 for the PP1 and PP5 assays, respectively. Screening the same library with both assays aided the identification of class inhibitors and assay artifacts. Confirmation screening and hit prioritization assays used [(32)P/(33)P]-radiolabel protein substrates, revealing excellent agreement between the FLINT and radiolabel assays. This screening campaign led to the discovery of four novel unrelated small-molecule inhibitors of PP1 and ~30 related small-molecule inhibitors of PP5. The results suggest that this uHTS approach is suitable for identifying selective chemical probes that inhibit PP1 or PP5 activity, and it is likely that similar assays can be developed for other PPP-family phosphatases.

  11. The Cloning and Functional Characterization of Peach CONSTANS and FLOWERING LOCUS T Homologous Genes PpCO and PpFT

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Hung; Liang, Huike; Wang, Rui; Liu, Xiayan; Li, Tianhong; Qi, Yafei; Yu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Flowering is an essential stage of plant growth and development. The successful transition to flowering not only ensures the completion of plant life cycles, it also serves as the basis for the production of economically important seeds and fruits. CONSTANS (CO) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) are two genes playing critical roles in flowering time control in Arabidopsis. Through homology-based cloning and rapid-amplifications of cDNA ends (RACE), we obtained full-lengths cDNA sequences of Prunus persica CO (PpCO) and Prunus persica FT (PpFT) from peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) and investigated their functions in flowering time regulation. PpCO and PpFT showed high homologies to Arabidopsis CO and FT at DNA, mRNA and protein levels. We showed that PpCO and PpFT were nucleus-localized and both showed transcriptional activation activities in yeast cells, consistent with their potential roles as transcription activators. Moreover, we established that the over-expression of PpCO could restore the late flowering phenotype of the Arabidopsis co-2 mutant, and the late flowering defect of the Arabidopsis ft-1 mutant can be rescued by the over-expression of PpFT, suggesting functional conservations of CO and FT genes in peach and Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that PpCO and PpFT are homologous genes of CO and FT in peach and they may function in regulating plant flowering time. PMID:25905637

  12. Genetic characterization of two fully sequenced multi-drug resistant plasmids pP10164-2 and pP10164-3 from Leclercia adecarboxylata

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fengjun; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Qiang; Luo, Wenbo; Tong, Yigang; Zhang, Defu; Wang, Qian; Feng, Wei; Chen, Weijun; Fan, Yahan; Xia, Peiyuan

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported the complete sequence of the resistance plasmid pP10164-NDM, harboring blaNDM (conferring carbapenem resistance) and bleMBL (conferring bleomycin resistance), which is recovered from a clinical Leclercia adecarboxylata isolate P10164 from China. This follow-up work disclosed that there were still two multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmids pP10164-2 and pP10164-3 coexisting in this strain. pP10164-2 and pP10164-3 were completely sequenced and shown to carry a wealth of resistance genes, which encoded the resistance to at least 10 classes of antibiotics (β-lactams. macrolides, quinolones, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, amphenicols, quaternary ammonium compounds, sulphonamides, trimethoprim, and rifampicin) and 7 kinds of heavy mental (mercury, silver, copper, nickel, chromate, arsenic, and tellurium). All of these antibiotic resistance genes are associated with mobile elements such as transposons, integrons, and insertion sequence-based transposable units, constituting a total of three novel MDR regions, two in pP10164-2 and the other one in pP10164-3. Coexistence of three resistance plasmids pP10164-NDM, pP10164-2 and pP10164-3 makes L. adecarboxylata P10164 tend to become extensively drug-resistant. PMID:27658354

  13. The Hyperon {Lambda}(1405) in p+p reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Siebenson, Johannes

    2011-10-21

    We present an analysis of the hyperon {Lambda}(1405) for p+p reactions at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy. The data were taken with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). A {Lambda}(1405) signal could be reconstructed in both charged decay channels ({Lambda}(1405){yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}).

  14. Optical screw-wrench for interlocking 2PP-microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Zyla, G.; Ksouri, S. I.; Esen, C.; Ostendorf, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon polymerization (2PP) has emerged as a powerful platform for processing three-dimensional microstructures with high resolution. Furthermore, by adding nanoparticles of different materials to the photopolymer the microstructures can be functionalized, e.g. magnetic or electric properties can be adjusted. However, to combine different functions within one microstructure or to manufacture complex microsystems, assembling techniques for multiple 2PP written building blocks are required. In this paper a qualitative approach for assembling microstructures utilizing optical forces is presented. Therefore, screw and nut shaped microstructures are produced by 2PP-technique and screwed together using a holographic optical tweezer (HOT). The interlocking structures are trapped and rotated into each other to cause connection. In this paper the used parameters and possible designs of the interlocking connection are discussed. These findings provide not only the assembling of building blocks to complex microstructures, rather different functionalized 2PP-microstructures can be combined by simply screwing them together with the use of optical forces.

  15. Evidence for collectivity in pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Sharma, A.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Da Silveira, G. G.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, T.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Liu, Z.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhao, J.; Ban, Y.; Chen, G.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; González Hernández, C. F.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Sculac, T.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Susa, T.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdelalim, A. A.; El-khateeb, E.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Ghosh, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Kucher, I.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Albert, A.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hamer, M.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Flügge, G.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Müller, T.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eren, E.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Garutti, E.; Gonzalez, D.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Shvetsov, I.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Makovec, A.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bahinipati, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Hegde, V.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Behnamian, H.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. 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T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. 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F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Lange, D.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mei, K.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Agapitos, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; De Guio, F.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Peltola, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-02-01

    Measurements of two- and multi-particle angular correlations in pp collisions at √{ s} = 5 , 7, and 13TeV are presented as a function of charged-particle multiplicity. The data, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1.0pb-1 (5 TeV), 6.2pb-1 (7 TeV), and 0.7pb-1 (13 TeV), were collected using the CMS detector at the LHC. The second-order (v2) and third-order (v3) azimuthal anisotropy harmonics of unidentified charged particles, as well as v2 of KS0 and Λ / Λ ‾ particles, are extracted from long-range two-particle correlations as functions of particle multiplicity and transverse momentum. For high-multiplicity pp events, a mass ordering is observed for the v2 values of charged hadrons (mostly pions), KS0 , and Λ / Λ ‾, with lighter particle species exhibiting a stronger azimuthal anisotropy signal below pT ≈ 2GeV/ c. For 13 TeV data, the v2 signals are also extracted from four- and six-particle correlations for the first time in pp collisions, with comparable magnitude to those from two-particle correlations. These observations are similar to those seen in pPb and PbPb collisions, and support the interpretation of a collective origin for the observed long-range correlations in high-multiplicity pp collisions.

  16. Associated strangeness production in pp collisions near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, P.

    2004-08-01

    Motivated by the ongoing discussion concerning the nature of the scalar resonances f0(980) and a0(980), the COSY-11 collaboration has taken exclusive data on the ppppK+K- reaction near the production threshold. A first total cross section σ = (1.80 ± 0.27-0.35+0.28) nb for the excess energy Q = 17 MeV has been determined. In contrary to the η, ω, and η' single meson production studies which clearly show the strong pp final state interaction (FSI), the cross section values obtained at COSY-11 and DISTO can be both described by a fit with a four-body phase space including the proton-proton final state interaction as well as with one-meson exchange calculations neglecting FSI effects. Therefore, one might think about a compensation of the strong pp interaction through a pK- FSI effect or an additional degree of freedom caused by the four-body final state. In the latter case, strong FSI effects can be expected at Q-values very close to the K+K- production threshold. Such a motivation triggered — in combination with the investigation of the KK¯ interaction being relevant to the structure of the f0 (980) — further measurements at the excess energies Q = 10 and Q = 28 MeV at COSY-11.

  17. Toughening of wood plastic composite based on X-PP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meekum, U.; Khongrit, A.

    2016-03-01

    Wood plastic composite(WPC) based on crosslinked polypropylene(X-PP)/wood flour was explored. The peroxide/silane was used as crosslinking system. The sauna incubation under moisture saturated oven was applied to accelerate the competition of the siloxy/moisture networking reaction. There were three parts of the research work; design of experiment, toughening of WPC and the effect of peroxide, silane and PP copolymer on properties of the WPC, respectively. In this published work, the toughness improvement of the composite was focused. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and Ethylene propylene diene terpolymer(EPDM) were employed to improve impact strength via blending with x-PP matrix. Composites were compounded into pellets by co-rotational twin screw extruder and test specimens were prepared by injection molding. Sauna incubation at 105°C for 12 hrs in oven chamber was performed to accelerate the final silane condensation crosslink reaction. MFI, impact strength, flexural properties and heat deflection temperature measurement were conducted. Impact strength, HDT and flexural modulus were improved with increasing UHMWPE content, and the optimal values around 5-10 phr of UHMWPE were achieved. Addition of EPDM elastomer to the matrix blends, reduced flexural strength and modulus but increased impact strength. While incorporation of EPDM into the PP/UHMWPE blends was exhibited much higher impact strength than that of the PP/UHMWPE binary blends. Silane crosslinked through sauna treatment improved the impact strength. HDT were also much risen for the crosslinked composite comparing with the non-crosslinked one.

  18. Visualization of the dynamic multimerization of human Cytomegalovirus pp65 in punctuate nuclear foci

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Zongqiang; Zhang Ke; Zhang Zhiping; Liu Yalan; Zhou Yafeng; Wei Hongping; Zhang Xian-En

    2009-09-30

    The phosphorylated protein pp65 of human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the predominant virion protein and the major tegument constituent. It plays important roles in HCMV infection and virion assembly. Live cell imaging and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis showed that HCMV pp65 accumulated dynamically in punctuate nuclear foci when transiently expressed in mammalian cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging disclosed that pp65 can self-interact in its localization foci. Yeast two-hybrid assay verified that pp65 is a self-associating protein, and the N-terminal amino acids 14-22 were determined to be essential for pp65 self-association. However, these amino acids were not related to pp65 localization in the specific nuclear foci. The interaction of pp65 and ppUL97 was also studied by FRET microscopy, and the result suggested that there is another signal sequence in pp65, being the ppUL97 phosphorylation site, that is responsible for localization of pp65 in nuclear foci. These results help to understand the function of pp65 in HCMV infection and virion morphogenesis.

  19. Improved murine glioma detection following modified diet and photobleaching of skin PpIX fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, Summer L.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pogue, Brian W.

    2007-02-01

    The Aminolevulinic Acid (ALA) - Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) system is unique in the world of photosensitizers in that the prodrug ALA is enzymatically transformed via the tissue of interest into fluorescently detectable levels of PpIX. This system can be used to monitor cellular metabolism of tumor tissue for applications such as therapy monitoring. Detecting PpIX fluorescence noninvasively has proven difficult due to the high levels of PpIX produced in the skin compared to other tissue both with and without ALA administration. In the current study, methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration have been examined. Use of a purified diet is found to decrease both skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration, while addition of a broad spectrum antibiotic to the water shows little effect. Following ALA administration, improved brain tumor detection is seen when skin PpIX fluorescence is photobleached via blue light prior to transmission spectroscopic measurements of tumor bearing and control animals. Both of these methods to decrease skin PpIX autofluorescence and skin PpIX fluorescence following ALA administration are shown to have a large effect on the ability to detect tumor tissue PpIX fluorescence noninvasively in vivo.

  20. Differential (p,p') and (p,d) Cross Sections of 89Y and 92Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeling, Molly; Burke, Jason; Koglin, Johnathon; McClory, John

    2016-03-01

    Differential cross sections for the (p,p') and (p,d) reactions on 89Y and 92Zr were measured using a 28.5-MeV proton beam at the 88-inch cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Angular distributions were obtained for the ground state and several excited states of each isotope using silicon detector telescopes over angles 10° to 140° in the reaction plane. Angular distributions for unresolved higher-energy states up to 22 MeV were also obtained. These data were obtained by fitting a Gaussian function to each peak in the energy spectra using the ROOT toolkit and integrating the number of counts under each peak. The cross sections will be included in nuclear structure models so that neutron and other particle reaction cross sections can be predicted for other isotopes, including eventually those farther from stability and those whose half-lives are too short to measure experimentally.

  1. Mechanism of Inhibition of PP2A Activity and Abnormal Hyperphosphorylation of Tau by I2PP2A/SET

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Lisette; Chen, She; Liu, Fei; Li, Bin; Khatoon, Sabiha; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) activity, which is compromised in Alzheimer disease brain, is regulated by two endogenous inhibitors, one of them being I2PP2A, a 277 amino acid long protein also known as SET. Here we report that both the amino terminal fragment (I2NTF; aa 1–175) and the carboxy terminal fragment (I2CTF; aa 176–277) of I2PP2A inhibit PP2A by binding to its catalytic subunit PP2Ac and cause hyperphosphorylation of tau. The C-terminal acidic region in I2CTF and Val 92 in I2NTF are essential for their association with PP2Ac and inhibition of the phosphatase activity. PMID:21806989

  2. Cloning and characterization of a novel mammalian PP2C isozyme.

    PubMed

    Tong, Y; Quirion, R; Shen, S H

    1998-12-25

    PP2C is a structurally diversified protein phosphatase family with a wide range of functions in cellular signal transduction. A novel PP2C subtype, designated PP2Cdelta, was identified from a rat cDNA clone, which encodes a protein of 392 amino acid residues. While PP2Cdelta shares approximately 30% sequence identity in its catalytic domain with the mammalian PP2C, it lacks a 90-residue carboxyl-terminal sequence conserved in mammalian PP2C. Northern blot analysis showed that PP2Cdelta is widely expressed in rat tissues. The transcription of the PP2Cdelta gene was activated in response to stress, such as the addition of ethanol to the culture medium or UV irradiation of cells. Recombinant PP2Cdelta purified from bacteria exhibited a potent Mn2+-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase activity. Unlike other members of the PP2C family, the activity of PP2Cdelta was inhibited, rather than stimulated, by Mg2+. Transfection with PP2Cdelta resulted in inhibition of cell growth, precluding generation of stable 293 or CHO transfectants. Using a modified tetracycline-regulated PP2Cdelta-GFP dicistronic expression cassette, it was revealed that overexpression of PP2Cdelta blocked cell cycle progression and arrested cells at early S phase, resulting in inhibition of DNA synthesis and leading to cell death. These results suggest that PP2Cdelta plays a role in regulation of cell cycle progression via dephosphorylation of its substrates whose appropriate phosphorylation states might be crucial for cell proliferation.

  3. Overexpression of a novel Arabidopsis PP2C isoform, AtPP2CF1, enhances plant biomass production by increasing inflorescence stem growth.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroki; Kondo, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tomoko; Imamura, Chie; Muramoto, Nobuhiko; Hattori, Etsuko; Ogawa, Ken'ichi; Mitsukawa, Norihiro; Ohto, Chikara

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to mammals, higher plants have evolved to express diverse protein phosphatase 2Cs (PP2Cs). Of all Arabidopsis thaliana PP2Cs, members of PP2C subfamily A, including ABI1, have been shown to be key negative regulators of abscisic acid (ABA) signalling pathways, which regulate plant growth and development as well as tolerance to adverse environmental conditions. However, little is known about the enzymatic and signalling roles of other PP2C subfamilies. Here, we report a novel Arabidopsis subfamily E PP2C gene, At3g05640, designated AtPP2CF1. AtPP2CF1 was dramatically expressed in response to exogenous ABA and was expressed in vascular tissues and guard cells, similar to most subfamily A PP2C genes. In vitro enzymatic activity assays showed that AtPP2CF1 possessed functional PP2C activity. However, yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed that AtPP2CF1 did not interact with PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors or three SnRK2 kinases, which are ABI1-interacting proteins. This was supported by homology-based structural modelling demonstrating that the putative active- and substrate-binding site of AtPP2CF1 differed from that of ABI1. Furthermore, while overexpression of ABI1 in plants induced an ABA-insensitive phenotype, Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtPP2CF1 (AtPP2CF1oe) were weakly hypersensitive to ABA during seed germination and drought stress. Unexpectedly, AtPP2CF1oe plants also exhibited increased biomass yield, mainly due to accelerated growth of inflorescence stems through the activation of cell proliferation and expansion. Our results provide new insights into the physiological significance of AtPP2CF1 as a candidate gene for plant growth production and for potential application in the sustainable supply of plant biomass. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Targeting of Protein Phosphatases PP2A and PP2B to the C-terminus of the L-type Calcium Channel Cav1.2†

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Ginsburg, Kenneth S.; Hall, Duane D.; Zimmermann, Maike; Stein, Ivar S.; Zhang, Mingxu; Tandan, Samvit; Hill, Joseph A.; Horne, Mary C.; Bers, Donald; Hell, Johannes W.

    2010-01-01

    The L-type Ca2+ channel Cav1.2 forms macromolecular signaling complexes that comprise the β2 adrenergic receptor, trimeric Gs protein, adenylyl cyclase, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA1) for efficient signaling in heart and brain. The protein phosphatases PP2A and PP2B are part of this complex. PP2A counteracts increase in Cav1.2 channel activity by PKA and other protein kinases, whereas PP2B can either augment or decrease Cav1.2 currents in cardiomyocytes depending on the precise experimental conditions. We found that PP2A binds to two regions in the C-terminus of the central, pore-forming α1 subunit of Cav1.2: one region spans residues 1795-1818 and the other residues 1965-1971. PP2B binds immediately downstream of residue 1971. Injection of a peptide that contained residues 1965-1971 and displaced PP2A but not PP2B from endogenous Cav1.2 increased basal and isoproterenol-stimulated L-type Ca2+ currents in acutely isolated cardiomyocytes. Together with our biochemical data, these physiological results indicate that anchoring of PP2A at this site of Cav1.2 in the heart negatively regulates cardiac L-type currents, likely by counterbalancing basal and stimulated phosphorylation that is mediated by PKA and possibly other kinases. PMID:21053940

  5. Combining polyethylene and polypropylene: Enhanced performance with PE/iPP multiblock polymers.

    PubMed

    Eagan, James M; Xu, Jun; Di Girolamo, Rocco; Thurber, Christopher M; Macosko, Christopher W; LaPointe, Anne M; Bates, Frank S; Coates, Geoffrey W

    2017-02-24

    Polyethylene (PE) and isotactic polypropylene (iPP) constitute nearly two-thirds of the world's plastic. Despite their similar hydrocarbon makeup, the polymers are immiscible with one another. Thus, common grades of PE and iPP do not adhere or blend, creating challenges for recycling these materials. We synthesized PE/iPP multiblock copolymers using an isoselective alkene polymerization initiator. These polymers can weld common grades of commercial PE and iPP together, depending on the molecular weights and architecture of the block copolymers. Interfacial compatibilization of phase-separated PE and iPP with tetrablock copolymers enables morphological control, transforming brittle materials into mechanically tough blends.

  6. PP2A inhibition as a novel therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, Paula; Cristóbal, Ion; Manso, Rebeca; Madoz-Gúrpide, Juan; García-Foncillas, Jesús; Rojo, Federico

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a well-known tumor suppressor frequently inhibited in human cancer. Alterations affecting PP2A subunits together with the deregulation of endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as CIP2A and SET have been described as contributing mechanisms to inactivate PP2A in prostate cancer. Moreover, recent findings highlight that functional inactivation of PP2A could represent a key event in the acquisition of castration-resistant phenotype and a novel molecular target with high impact at both clinical and therapeutic levels in prostate cancer.

  7. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activation promotes axonal growth and recovery in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Chen, Kun; Yu, Wei; Gao, Shutao; Hu, Shunze; Sun, Xuying; Huang, Hui

    2015-12-15

    Current treatments to restore neurological deficits caused by axonal disconnection following central nervous system (CNS) injury are extremely limited. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), one of the main serine-threonine phosphatases in mammalian cells, dephosphorylates collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) in the developing CNS. In our study, we found that the major CNS inhibiting substrates, including chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and myelin associated glycoproteins (MAG), activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but inactivated PP2A and downstream CRMP2. Both EGFR inactivation and PP2A activation promoted axon elongation in vitro in the presence of inhibitory substrates. EGFR blockage by AG1478 selectively attenuated the inactive form of PP2A in pY307 phosphorylation, thus increasing PP2A activity. EGFR activation by EGF attenuated PP2A activity, whereas mutation of Y307 to phenylalanine abolished the effect. Furthermore, PP2A activity was down-regulated immediately after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. Chronic application of d-erythro-sphingosine (DES), the PP2A agonist, to spinal cord-lesioned rats enhanced the activity of this phosphatase and dephosphorylated CRMP2 around the lesion. PP2A activation induced significant axon sprouting in the lesioned spinal cord and promoted function recovery after SCI. These findings suggest that PP2A works downstream of EGFR and dephosphorylates CRMP2 after CNS injury. Therefore, therapies targeting PP2A may be effective following SCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural basis of PP2A activation by PTPA, an ATP-dependent activation chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Feng; Stanevich, Vitali; Wlodarchak, Nathan; Sengupta, Rituparna; Jiang, Li; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Xing, Yongna

    2013-10-08

    Proper activation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit is central for the complex PP2A regulation and is crucial for broad aspects of cellular function. The crystal structure of PP2A bound to PP2A phosphatase activator (PTPA) and ATPγS reveals that PTPA makes broad contacts with the structural elements surrounding the PP2A active site and the adenine moiety of ATP. PTPA-binding stabilizes the protein fold of apo-PP2A required for activation, and orients ATP phosphoryl groups to bind directly to the PP2A active site. This allows ATP to modulate the metal-binding preferences of the PP2A active site and utilize the PP2A active site for ATP hydrolysis. In vitro, ATP selectively and drastically enhances binding of endogenous catalytic metal ions, which requires ATP hydrolysis and is crucial for acquisition of pSer/Thr-specific phosphatase activity. Furthermore, both PP2A- and ATP-binding are required for PTPA function in cell proliferation and survival. Our results suggest novel mechanisms of PTPA in PP2A activation with structural economy and a unique ATP-binding pocket that could potentially serve as a specific therapeutic target.

  9. The Role of the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of Placental Protein 13 (PP13) in Pregnancy Evaluated with Recombinant PP13 and the DelT221 PP13 Variant

    PubMed Central

    Sammar, Marei; Nisamblatt, Shahar; Gonen, Ron; Huppertz, Berthold; Gizurarson, Sveinbjorn; Osol, George; Meiri, Hamutal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Placental protein 13 (PP13), a placenta specific protein, is reduced in the first trimester of pregnancy in women who subsequently develop preeclampsia. A naturally occurring PP13 deletion of thymidine at position 221 (DelT221 or truncated variant) is associated with increased frequency of severe preeclampsia. In this study we compared the full length (wildtype) PP13 and the truncated variant. Methods Full length PP13 or its DelT221 variant were cloned, expressed and purified from E-Coli. Both variants were administrated into pregnant rats at day 8 of pregnancy for slow release (>5 days) through osmotic pumps and rat blood pressure was measured. Animals were sacrificed at day 15 or day 21 and their utero-placental vasculature was examined. Results The DelT221 variant (11 kDA) lacked exon 4 and a part of exon 3, and is short of 2 amino acids involved in the carbohydrate (CRD) binding of the wildtype (18 kDA). Unlike the wildtype PP13, purification of DelT221 variant required special refolding. PP13 specific poly- clonal antibodies recognized both PP13 and DelT221 but PP13 specific monoclonal antibodies recognized only the wildtype, indicating the loss of major epitopes. Wildtype PP13 mRNA and its respective proteins were both lower in PE patients compared to normal pregnancies. The DelT221 mutant was not found in a large Caucasian cohort. Pregnant rats exposed to wildtype or DelT221 PP13 variants had significantly lower blood pressure compared to control. The wildtype but not the DelT221 mutant caused extensive vein expansion. Conclusion This study revealed the importance of PP13 in regulating blood pressure and expanding the utero-placental vasculature in pregnant rats. PP13 mutant lacking amino acids of the PP13 CRD domain fails to cause vein expansion but did reduce blood pressure. The study provides a basis for replenishing patients at risk for preeclampsia by the full length but not the truncated PP13. PMID:25079598

  10. Cytosolic ppGpp accumulation induces retarded plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yuta; Masuda, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria a second messenger, guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp), synthesized upon nutrient starvation, controls many gene expressions and enzyme activities, which is necessary for growth under changeable environments. Recent studies have shown that ppGpp synthase and hydrolase are also conserved in eukaryotes, although their functions are not well understood. We recently showed that ppGpp-overaccumulation in Arabidopsis chloroplasts results in robust growth under nutrient-limited conditions, demonstrating that the bacterial-like stringent response at least functions in plastids. To test if ppGpp also functions in the cytosol, we constructed the transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Bacillus subtilis ppGpp synthase gene yjbM. Upon induction of the gene, the mutant synthesizes ∼10-20-fold higher levels of ppGpp, and its fresh weight was reduced to ˜80% that of the wild type. These results indicate that cytosolic ppGpp negatively regulates plant growth and development.

  11. Molecular mutagenesis of ppGpp: turning a RelA activator into an inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Beljantseva, Jelena; Kudrin, Pavel; Jimmy, Steffi; Ehn, Marcel; Pohl, Radek; Varik, Vallo; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Shingler, Victoria; Tenson, Tanel; Rejman, Dominik; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2017-01-01

    The alarmone nucleotide (p)ppGpp is a key regulator of bacterial metabolism, growth, stress tolerance and virulence, making (p)ppGpp-mediated signaling a promising target for development of antibacterials. Although ppGpp itself is an activator of the ribosome-associated ppGpp synthetase RelA, several ppGpp mimics have been developed as RelA inhibitors. However promising, the currently available ppGpp mimics are relatively inefficient, with IC50 in the sub-mM range. In an attempt to identify a potent and specific inhibitor of RelA capable of abrogating (p)ppGpp production in live bacterial cells, we have tested a targeted nucleotide library using a biochemical test system comprised of purified Escherichia coli components. While none of the compounds fulfilled this aim, the screen has yielded several potentially useful molecular tools for biochemical and structural work. PMID:28157202

  12. Superstring theory on pp waves with ADE geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abounasr, R.; Belhaj, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Saidi, E. H.

    2006-03-01

    We study the BMN correspondence between certain Penrose limits of type IIB superstrings on pp-wave orbifolds with ADE geometries and the set of four-dimensional {\\cal N}=2 superconformal field theories constructed as quiver gauge models classified by finite ADE Lie algebras and affine \\widehatADE Kac-Moody algebras. These models have 16 preserved supercharges and are based on systems of D3-branes and wrapped D5- and D7-branes. We derive explicitly the metrics of these pp-wave orbifolds and show that the BMN extension requires, in addition to D5-D5 open strings in bi-fundamental representations, D5-D7 open strings involving orientifolds with Sp(N) gauge symmetry. We also give the correspondence rule between leading string states and gauge-invariant operators in the {\\cal N}=2 quiver gauge models.

  13. Basal Levels of (p)ppGpp in Enterococcus faecalis: the Magic beyond the Stringent Response

    PubMed Central

    Gaca, Anthony O.; Kajfasz, Jessica K.; Miller, James H.; Liu, Kuanqing; Wang, Jue D.; Abranches, Jacqueline; Lemos, José A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The stringent response (SR), mediated by the alarmone (p)ppGpp, is a conserved bacterial adaptation system controlling broad metabolic alterations necessary for survival under adverse conditions. In Enterococcus faecalis, production of (p)ppGpp is controlled by the bifunctional protein RSH (for “Rel SpoT homologue”; also known as RelA) and by the monofunctional synthetase RelQ. Previous characterization of E. faecalis strains lacking rsh, relQ, or both revealed that RSH is responsible for activation of the SR and that alterations in (p)ppGpp production negatively impact bacterial stress survival and virulence. Despite its well-characterized role as the effector of the SR, the significance of (p)ppGpp during balanced growth remains poorly understood. Microarrays of E. faecalis strains producing different basal amounts of (p)ppGpp identified several genes and pathways regulated by modest changes in (p)ppGpp. Notably, expression of numerous genes involved in energy generation were induced in the ∆rsh ∆relQ [(p)ppGpp0] strain, suggesting that a lack of basal (p)ppGpp places the cell in a “transcriptionally relaxed” state. Alterations in the fermentation profile and increased production of H2O2 in the (p)ppGpp0 strain substantiate the observed transcriptional changes. We confirm that, similar to what is seen in Bacillus subtilis, (p)ppGpp directly inhibits the activity of enzymes involved in GTP biosynthesis, and complete loss of (p)ppGpp leads to dysregulation of GTP homeostasis. Finally, we show that the association of (p)ppGpp with antibiotic survival does not relate to the SR but rather relates to basal (p)ppGpp pools. Collectively, this study highlights the critical but still underappreciated role of basal (p)ppGpp pools under balanced growth conditions. PMID:24065631

  14. "PP2C7s", Genes Most Highly Elaborated in Photosynthetic Organisms, Reveal the Bacterial Origin and Stepwise Evolution of PPM/PP2C Protein Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kerk, David; Silver, Dylan; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B G

    2015-01-01

    Mg+2/Mn+2-dependent type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, mediating diverse cellular signaling processes through metal ion catalyzed dephosphorylation of target proteins. We have identified a distinct PP2C sequence class ("PP2C7s") which is nearly universally distributed in Eukaryotes, and therefore apparently ancient. PP2C7s are by far most prominent and diverse in plants and green algae. Combining phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization predictions, and a distillation of publically available gene expression data, we have traced the evolutionary trajectory of this gene family in photosynthetic eukaryotes, demonstrating two major sequence assemblages featuring a succession of increasingly derived sub-clades. These display predominant expression moving from an ancestral pattern in photosynthetic tissues toward non-photosynthetic, specialized and reproductive structures. Gene co-expression network composition strongly suggests a shifting pattern of PP2C7 gene functions, including possible regulation of starch metabolism for one homologue set in Arabidopsis and rice. Distinct plant PP2C7 sub-clades demonstrate novel amino terminal protein sequences upon motif analysis, consistent with a shifting pattern of regulation of protein function. More broadly, neither the major events in PP2C sequence evolution, nor the origin of the diversity of metal binding characteristics currently observed in different PP2C lineages, are clearly understood. Identification of the PP2C7 sequence clade has allowed us to provide a better understanding of both of these issues. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons using Hidden Markov Models strongly suggest that PP2Cs originated in Bacteria (Group II PP2C sequences), entered Eukaryotes through the ancestral mitochondrial endosymbiosis, elaborated in Eukaryotes, then re-entered Bacteria through an inter-domain gene transfer, ultimately producing bacterial Group I PP2C sequences. A key evolutionary

  15. "PP2C7s", Genes Most Highly Elaborated in Photosynthetic Organisms, Reveal the Bacterial Origin and Stepwise Evolution of PPM/PP2C Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Silver, Dylan; Uhrig, R. Glen; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2015-01-01

    Mg+2/Mn+2-dependent type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, mediating diverse cellular signaling processes through metal ion catalyzed dephosphorylation of target proteins. We have identified a distinct PP2C sequence class (“PP2C7s”) which is nearly universally distributed in Eukaryotes, and therefore apparently ancient. PP2C7s are by far most prominent and diverse in plants and green algae. Combining phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization predictions, and a distillation of publically available gene expression data, we have traced the evolutionary trajectory of this gene family in photosynthetic eukaryotes, demonstrating two major sequence assemblages featuring a succession of increasingly derived sub-clades. These display predominant expression moving from an ancestral pattern in photosynthetic tissues toward non-photosynthetic, specialized and reproductive structures. Gene co-expression network composition strongly suggests a shifting pattern of PP2C7 gene functions, including possible regulation of starch metabolism for one homologue set in Arabidopsis and rice. Distinct plant PP2C7 sub-clades demonstrate novel amino terminal protein sequences upon motif analysis, consistent with a shifting pattern of regulation of protein function. More broadly, neither the major events in PP2C sequence evolution, nor the origin of the diversity of metal binding characteristics currently observed in different PP2C lineages, are clearly understood. Identification of the PP2C7 sequence clade has allowed us to provide a better understanding of both of these issues. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons using Hidden Markov Models strongly suggest that PP2Cs originated in Bacteria (Group II PP2C sequences), entered Eukaryotes through the ancestral mitochondrial endosymbiosis, elaborated in Eukaryotes, then re-entered Bacteria through an inter-domain gene transfer, ultimately producing bacterial Group I PP2C sequences. A key

  16. Identified hadron production in pp collisions measured with ALICE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales Morales, Yasser; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    The production of identified hadrons in proton-proton collisions is frequently studied as a reference for the investigation of the strongly-interacting medium created in heavy-ion collisions. In addition, at LHC energies measurements in pp and p-Pb collisions as a function of the event multiplicity have shown some features reminiscent of those related to collective effects in Pb-Pb collisions. Thanks to its excellent PID capabilities and p Τ coverage, the ALICE detector offers a unique opportunity for the measurement of p Τ spectra, integrated yields (dN/dy) and mean transverse momenta (

    ) of identified light-flavour hadrons at midrapidity over a wide p Τ range. In this contribution, results on π, K, p, {{{K}}}{{S}}0, Λ, Ξ, Ω and K*0 as a function of multiplicity in pp collisions at \\sqrt{s}=7 {TeV} are presented. The results are compared with those measured in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions. A similar evolution of the spectral shape, the p Τ-differential particle ratios and the integrated yield ratios with the charged particle multiplicity in both small and large systems is observed. The production rates of strange hadrons in pp collisions increase more than those of non-strange particles, showing an enhancement pattern with multiplicity which is remarkably similar to the one measured in p-Pb collisions. In addition, results on the production of light flavour hadrons in pp collisions at \\sqrt{s}=13 {TeV}, the highest centre-of-mass energy reached so far in the laboratory, are also presented and the behaviour observed as a function of \\sqrt{s} are discussed.

  17. Prompt photon production in p-p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleymans, J.; Quack, E.; Redlich, K.

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive photon cross-section in p-p collisions is presented. The dependence of the {gamma} rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. A comparison is made with experimental data for centre-of-mass energies ranging from 23 GeV to 1.8 TeV. Predictions of the cross-sections are given for two different sets of structure functions for RHIC and LHC energies.

  18. Angular Distributions of η Meson Production in pp Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, I.; Balestra, F.; Bedfer, Y.; Bertini, R.; Bland, L. C.; Brenschede, A.; Brochard, F.; Bussa, M. P.; Choi, Seonho; Colantoni, M. L.; Dressler, R.; Dzemidzic, M.; Faivre, J.-Cl.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Foryciarz, J.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Grasso, A.; Heinz, S.; Jacobs, W. W.; Kühn, W.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Manara, A.; Panzieri, D.; Pfaff, H.-W.; Piragino, G.; Popov, A.; Ritman, J.; Salabura, P.; Tchalyshev, V.; Tosello, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Zosi, G.

    With the DISTO spectrometer, exclusive η production in pp collisions have been measured at kinetic energies of Tbeam=2.15, 2.50 and 2.85 GeV, respectively, via the π+π-π0 decay channel. The resulting angular distributions of the η are important for the interpretation of dilepton spectra obtained in elementary as well as heavy ion reactions.

  19. Evidence for collectivity in pp collisions at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-12-13

    Measurements of two- and multi-particle angular correlations in pp collisions at √s = 5,7, and 13TeV are presented as a function of charged-particle multiplicity. The data, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1.0pb–1 (5 TeV), 6.2pb–1 (7TeV), and 0.7pb–1 (13 TeV), were collected using the CMS detector at the LHC. The second-order (v2) and third-order (v3) azimuthal anisotropy harmonics of unidentified charged particles, as well as v2 of KS0 and Λ/Λ¯ particles, are extracted from long-range two-particle correlations as functions of particle multiplicity and transverse momentum. For high-multiplicity pp events, a mass ordering is observed for the v2 values of chargedmore » hadrons (mostly pions), KS0, and Λ/Λ¯, with lighter particle species exhibiting a stronger azimuthal anisotropy signal below pT ≈ 2GeV/c. For 13 TeV data, the v2 signals are also extracted from four- and six-particle correlations for the first time in pp collisions, with comparable magnitude to those from two-particle correlations. Finally, these observations are similar to those seen in pPb and PbPb collisions, and support the interpretation of a collective origin for the observed long-range correlations in high-multiplicity pp collisions.« less

  20. Associated charmonium production in low energy pp annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.; Li, X.

    2007-03-01

    The QCD mechanisms underlying the exclusive strong decays and hadronic production amplitudes of charmonium remain poorly understood, despite decades of study and an increasingly detailed body of experimental information. One set of hadronic channels of special interest are those that include baryon-antibaryon states. These are being investigated experimentally at BES and CLEO-c in terms of their baryon resonance content, and are also of interest for the future PANDA experiment, in which charmonium and charmonium hybrids will be produced in pp annihilation in association with light mesons. In this paper we develop a simple initial-state light meson emission model of the near-threshold associated charmonium production processes pp{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{psi}, and evaluate the differential and total cross sections for these reactions in this model. (Here we consider the states {psi}={eta}{sub c}, J/{psi}, {psi}{sup '}, {chi}{sub 0} and {chi}{sub 1}.) The predicted near-threshold cross section for pp{yields}{pi}{sup 0}J/{psi} is found to be numerically similar to two previous theoretical estimates, and is roughly comparable to the (sparse) existing data for this process. The theoretical charmonium angular distributions predicted by this model are far from isotropic, which may be of interest for PANDA detector design studies.