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Sample records for practice faculty evaluated

  1. The Evaluation of Music Faculty in Higher Education: Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkes, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to ascertain the methods used to evaluate music faculty and whether achievement measures, or student progress, impact the evaluations made about teacher effectiveness for music faculty in the higher education context. The author surveyed Chairs of Departments or Directors of Schools of Music (n = 412) listed as…

  2. Faculty development in general practice in Germany: experiences, evaluations, perspectives.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Markus; Lichte, Thomas; Von Unger, Hella; Gulich, Markus; Waechtler, Hannelore; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Wilm, Stefan

    2007-03-01

    From 1999 to 2001, the German Society of General Practice and Family Medicine (DEGAM) pioneered a faculty development programme to help general practitioners (GPs) interested in an academic career to develop their skills in teaching, primary care, quality assurance and research. The programme involves five weekend-training sessions over 18 months and applies a learner-centred approach. Participants choose the learning formats and switch between the roles of learners, teachers, chair persons and programme organizers. This article evaluates the acceptability and feasibility of the programme. Data were collected over a two-year period from the 16 participants who completed the first training programme. The evaluation involved a focus group, telephone interviews and email questionnaires. Participants appreciated the learner centred format of the programme and gained new teaching and research skills. They also learned to better assess and critically reflect on their professional work as GPs and reported improved academic 'survival skills' due to collaborative networks with colleagues. The faculty development programme proved advantageous for the personal and professional development of the participating GPs. It constitutes a promising tool for the further development of General Practice as an academic discipline that is still in the process of establishing itself at medical schools in Germany.

  3. Evaluating Virtual Communities of Practice for Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Ann F.; Johnson, Amy M.; Yoder, Brian; Chavela Guerra, Rocio C.; Pimmel, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Communities of practice, which enable sustained collaboration among fellow practitioners, have potential for advancement of faculty development, but traditionally employ face-to-face meetings with inherent economic and geographical limitations. Our virtual community of practice (VCP) model exposes engineering instructors from across the country to…

  4. Contractual Issues for Faculty Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, M. Dee; Gregg, Andrea C.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses contractual issues surrounding nursing faculty's clinical practice, such as competent participants, offer, consideration, and acceptance. Addresses evaluation of faculty practice contracts and alternatives for problem resolution. (Contains 24 references.) (SK)

  5. Evaluation of a multidisciplinary faculty to support learning in surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Brigley, Stephen; Jasper, Melanie

    2010-07-01

    The Theatre Faculty Project was a programme of education seminars, personal study and workplace educational activities for surgeons, operating theatre staff and surgical trainees at a hospital in north-west England. Its aim was to create a multidisciplinary faculty with an understanding of implicit aspects of surgical practice, of how these enter clinical thinking and professional judgement and are used to enhance the learning, teaching and assessment of surgeons. A qualitative evaluation of the faculty project showed improved educational understanding and multidisciplinary awareness among its participants. Refinements of the programme were identified to help those (surgeons in particular) having difficulty conceptually or practically with clinical reflective writing and with portfolio building. However, the support of Trust management at the host hospital will be vital in extending the programme beyond its initial group of volunteers and in integrating the multidisciplinary faculty into its organizational structures.

  6. Processes and Metrics to Evaluate Faculty Practice Activities at US Schools of Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Haines, Stuart T; Sicat, Brigitte L; Haines, Seena L; MacLaughlin, Eric J; Van Amburgh, Jenny A

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To determine what processes and metrics are employed to measure and evaluate pharmacy practice faculty members at colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. Methods. A 23-item web-based questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy practice department chairs at schools of pharmacy fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) (n=114). Results. Ninety-three pharmacy practice chairs or designees from 92 institutions responded. Seventy-six percent reported that more than 60% of the department's faculty members were engaged in practice-related activities at least eight hours per week. Fewer than half (47%) had written policies and procedures for conducting practice evaluations. Institutions commonly collected data regarding committee service at practice sites, community service events, educational programs, and number of hours engaged in practice-related activities; however, only 24% used a tool to longitudinally collect practice-related data. Publicly funded institutions were more likely than private schools to have written procedures. Conclusion. Data collection tools and best practice recommendations for conducting faculty practice evaluations are needed.

  7. Processes and Metrics to Evaluate Faculty Practice Activities at US Schools of Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Brigitte L.; Haines, Seena L.; MacLaughlin, Eric J.; Van Amburgh, Jenny A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine what processes and metrics are employed to measure and evaluate pharmacy practice faculty members at colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. Methods. A 23-item web-based questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy practice department chairs at schools of pharmacy fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) (n=114). Results. Ninety-three pharmacy practice chairs or designees from 92 institutions responded. Seventy-six percent reported that more than 60% of the department’s faculty members were engaged in practice-related activities at least eight hours per week. Fewer than half (47%) had written policies and procedures for conducting practice evaluations. Institutions commonly collected data regarding committee service at practice sites, community service events, educational programs, and number of hours engaged in practice-related activities; however, only 24% used a tool to longitudinally collect practice-related data. Publicly funded institutions were more likely than private schools to have written procedures. Conclusion. Data collection tools and best practice recommendations for conducting faculty practice evaluations are needed. PMID:27293227

  8. Contractual issues for faculty practice.

    PubMed

    Gregg, A C; Williams, M D

    2001-01-01

    Contracts are a common foundation for faculty practice relationships between a college of nursing and other agencies. Although the legal format of a contract is relatively standardized, the process of contracting entails decisions and issues that increase its complexity. Little is available in the faculty practice literature that addresses contracts and contractual issues as a comprehensive whole. This article contains discussions of nursing faculty practice contractual issues such as the elements of a contract as a framework, including competent parties, offer, consideration, and acceptance. Evaluation of contract performance is addressed and alternatives for decision making and problem resolutions are suggested throughout. J Prof Nurs 17:173-179, 2001.

  9. Evaluation of research training and productivity among junior pharmacy practice faculty in the United States.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kelly C; El-Ibiary, Shareen Y; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the extent of research training and productivity among junior faculty in US schools of pharmacy. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted to characterize junior faculty's (a) research training and productivity, (b) perceived ability to meet research demands, (c) confidence and resources for research, and (d) interest in receiving further research training. Surveys were completed by 349 faculty members (36.7% response). More than 60% completed a pharmacy practice residency and fewer than 15% completed a fellowship. Respondents reported lack of formal training in most research skills during their postgraduate training. Most reported that they are able to meet the teaching, clinical, and service expectations of their departments; however, fewer than half believed that they are able to meet the research expectations. Study respondents reported lack of adequate research training during their postgraduate experiences and current faculty positions. Confidence among faculty to conduct research was also low compared to their confidence to fulfill other expectations of their position. Adequate preparation of current and future academicians is critical to ensuring the success and retention of faculty in the United States.

  10. Faculty Evaluation System: Teaching Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Louis Community Coll., MO.

    This manual provides a series of forms and instruments and outlines the procedures used by St. Louis Community College in its annual evaluation of instructional faculty performance. First, general information is provided in lists of the performance indicators and other criteria upon which the assessments of teachers, counselors, and instructional…

  11. Students Evaluation of Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thawabieh, Ahmad M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate how students evaluate their faculty and the effect of gender, expected grade, and college on students' evaluation. The study sample consisted of 5291 students from Tafila Technical University Faculty evaluation scale was used to collect data. The results indicated that student evaluation of faculty was high (mean =…

  12. Faculty Practice: Something for Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Carol

    1985-01-01

    Faculty practice (a clinical practice based in the educational institution and staffed and directed by faculty who participate in that practice) is examined as it applies to nursing educators. Elements discussed include faculty responsibility and group functioning, director role, clinical secretary role, clinical setting, patient characteristics,…

  13. Correlates of Faculty and Student Attitudes toward Evaluation in Behavioral Aspects of Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Leonard; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Current attitudes of students and faculty toward incorporation of behavioral skills such as patient management, patient motivation, control of patient and dentist stress, and communication skills into clinical practice education are reported. (MSE)

  14. Faculty Productivity: Practice and Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, E. James

    Information was obtained on current or recently proposed legislation, administrative regulations, policies, practices, reports or studies on any aspect of faculty productivity, faculty workload or teaching load, or faculty activity analysis. Responses were obtained from 34 states. Responses for the 14 states that provided reference material are…

  15. Faculty Evaluation and Reward.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lucy R.; Mandell, Alan

    The need for objectivity in evaluating faculty is briefly addressed, and a model by which professional activities may be quantified is presented. A list of possible activities ranked in groups of equal point value, by which faculty can generate merit points, is presented. An attempt was made to equalize the potential point production values in…

  16. Orientating nonpharmacist faculty members to pharmacy practice.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Peter; Calderon, Bianca; Sheridan, Leah; Sucher, Brandon

    2014-06-17

    To design, implement, and evaluate a faculty development program intended to orient nonpharmacist faculty members to pharmacy practice. A multifaceted program was implemented in 2012 that included 4 shadowing experiences in which faculty members visited acute care, ambulatory care, hospital, and community pharmacy settings under the guidance of licensed preceptors. Itineraries for each visit were based on objective lists of anticipated practice experiences that define the role of the pharmacist in each setting. The 4 shadowing experiences culminated with reflection and completion of a survey to assess the impact of the program. All of the faculty participants agreed that the experience improved their conceptual understanding of contemporary pharmacy practice and the role of the pharmacist in the healthcare setting. The experience also improved faculty comfort with creating practice-relevant classroom activities. A shadowing experience is an effective way of orienting nonpharmacist faculty members to the practice of pharmacy. This program inspired the creation of an experience to introduce pharmacy practice faculty to pharmaceutical science faculty research initiatives.

  17. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  18. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  19. Faculty Models in Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahata, Milap C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The report of an American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy task force examines the strengths and limitations of two faculty models, one of teaching and practice and the other focusing on teaching and research. Recommendations are made to pharmacy departments about future directions for the role of faculty. (MSE)

  20. Does quantity ensure quality? Standardized OSCE-stations for outcome-oriented evaluation of practical skills at different medical faculties.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Iris; Leitner, Karsten; Juenger, Jana; Moeltner, Andreas; Ruesseler, Miriam; Bender, Bernd; Sterz, Jasmina; Stibane, Tina; Koenig, Sarah; Frankenhauser, Susanne; Kreuder, Joachim Gerhard

    2017-07-01

    Practical skills are often assessed using Objective Structured Clinical Skill Exams (OSCE). Nevertheless, in Germany, interchange and agreement between different medical faculties or a general agreement on the minimum standard for passing is lacking. We developed standardized OSCE-stations for assessing structured clinical examination of knee and shoulder joint with identical checklists and evaluation standards. These were implemented into the OSCE-course at five different medical faculties. Learning objectives for passing the stations were agreed beforehand. At each faculty, one reference examiner scored independently of the local examiner. Outcome of the students at the standardized station was compared between faculties and correlated to their total outcome at the OSCE, to their results at the Part One of the National Medical Licensing Examination as a reference test during medical studies and to their previous amount of lessons in examining joints. Comparing the results of the reference examiner, outcome at the station differed significantly between some of the participating medical faculties. Depending on the faculty, mean total results at the knee-examination-station differed from 64.4% to 77.9% and at the shoulder-examination-station from 62.6% to 79.2%. Differences were seen in knowledge-based items and also in competencies like communication and professional manner. There was a weak correlation between outcome at the joint-examination-OSCE-station and Part One of the National Medical Licensing Examination, and a modest correlation between outcome at the joint-examination-station and total OSCE-result. Correlation to the previous amount of lessons in examining joint was also weak. Although addressing approved learning objectives, different outcomes were achieved when testing a clinical skill at different medical faculties with a standardized OSCE-station. Results can be used as a tool for evaluating lessons, training and curricula at the different sites

  1. Faculty Development for Continuing Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Ivan L.; Leslie, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a framework for faculty development in continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) and collaborative practice. The framework is built on best practices in faculty development and CIPE. It was informed by local experience in the development, delivery, and evaluation of a faculty development program to promote capacity for…

  2. Faculty development: principles and practices.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Yvonne; Mann, Karen V

    2006-01-01

    Instructors in the health professions today must acquire knowledge and competencies that go beyond disciplinary expertise. It is now generally accepted that educational training as a teacher is essential to a faculty member's effectiveness as an educator. The educational challenges across the health professions share many similarities. In this article, we draw on the medical education literature and focus on faculty development designed to enhance teaching effectiveness. We first address commonly included faculty development topics, including instructional improvement, organizational development, the development of professional academic skills, and the teaching of specific content areas. We then review a variety of educational approaches and formats that are described in the literature. Included in this discussion are commonly used workshops, seminars, short courses, and fellowships, as well as longitudinal programs, peer coaching, mentorship, self-directed learning, and computer-aided instruction. We also briefly explore learning at work and in communities of practice, and we discuss several frequently encountered challenges in designing and implementing faculty development activities, including motivating colleagues and assessing program effectiveness. We conclude the discussion by presenting a set of guidelines for the design of effective faculty development programs.

  3. Faculty Evaluation for Improved Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Summarized in the first part of the report are the deliberations of the Southern Regional Education Board's Task Force on Faculty Evaluation and Institutional Reward Structures during 1976-77. The group assisted the SREB staff to analyze procedures currently used by institutions to judge faculty effectiveness, drew conclusions, and arrived at a…

  4. Evaluating Faculty Pedagogic Practices to Inform Strategic Academic Professional Development: A Case of Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Steve; Klopper, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken into how a process involving peer review and observation of teaching can be used to enhance academics' teaching practices and inform professional development activities at an organization level. We describe an innovative and highly structured approach to gathering evidence of pedagogic practice from academic…

  5. Faculty Evaluation: A Positive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stier, William F., Jr.

    The objectives and techniques of faculty evaluation are examined. It is suggested that the reasons for the evaluation process play a significant role in how such evaluations are perceived by all involved and how successful the process will be in reaching the objectives of the evaluation process. Four specific competencies that can be evaluated…

  6. Practical Aspects of Faculty Practice: A Model for Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Leanne C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    In the nurse practitioner-managed primary health care clinic at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, flexible faculty workloads have been established to facilitate faculty practice at the clinic. (Author/JOW)

  7. Faculty Practice in a Teaching Nursing Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferington, Felicitus; Panicucci, Carol

    1986-01-01

    Describes two approaches used to define and develop faculty practice in a teaching nursing home. Problems include role conflicts, communication gaps, and differences between faculty and nursing staff goals. Benefits include availability of new nursing care services and increased opportunities for conducting clinical research. (Author/ABB)

  8. Faculty ethics: ideal principles with practical applications.

    PubMed

    Reybold, L Earle

    2009-01-01

    Ethics in higher education is the subject of intense public attention, with considerable focus on faculty roles and responsibilities. Media reports and scholarly research have documented egregious misconduct that includes plagiarism, falsification of data, illicit teacher-student relationships, and grading bias. These accounts of wrongdoing often portray faculty ethicality as only a legal issue of obeying rules and regulations, especially in the teaching and research roles. My discussion challenges this narrow perspective and argues that characterizations of faculty ethicality should take into account broader expectations for professionalism such as collegiality, respect, and freedom of inquiry. First, I review the general principles of faculty ethics developed by the American Association of University Professors, as well as professional codes of ethics in specific professional fields. Second, I juxtapose the experiences of women and minority faculty members in relation to these general codes of ethics. This section examines three issues that particularly affect women and minority faculty experiences of ethicality: "chilly and alienating" academic climates, "cultural taxation" of minority identity, and the snare of conventional reward systems. Third, I suggest practical strategies to reconcile faculty practice with codes of ethics. My challenge is to the faculty as a community of practice to engage professional ethics as social and political events, not just legal and moral failures.

  9. What Faculty Members Value in Practice Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Wilton H.; Siegler, Anna H.

    1987-01-01

    Discussions with physicians at Loyola University and the University of Chicago medical schools about faculty practice plans are described. Interviews disclosed a desire for professional goals to be in balance with the institution's goals. (Author/MLW)

  10. Toward Objectivity in Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, H. W.

    2008-01-01

    The productivity of faculty members often figures prominently in annual evaluations, post-tenure reviews, and decisions about tenure, promotion, merit pay, release time, awards, and other kinds of recognition. Yet the procedures and instruments that institutions use to assess productivity and merit vary, leaving little that unifies the evaluation…

  11. Faculty practice in a private teaching institution in a developing country: embracing the possibilities.

    PubMed

    Premji, Shahirose Sadrudin; Lalani, Naureen; Ajani, Khairulnissa; Lakhani, Arusa; Moez, Salima; Dias, Jacqueline Maria

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses a case study on implementing faculty practice in a private teaching institution in a developing country where direct 'hands-on' care is undervalued by nurses. In Pakistan, faculty practice is not well known and related to indirect care. In the institution studied, faculty practice has been a major consideration to strengthen relationships between clinical and academic sectors. MEDLINE and CINHAL were searched (1979 to July 2009). A consultative process was used by the faculty practice committee members and involved open discussions with academic and clinical service faculty in the institution studied. There is no empirical evidence to identify effective models for implementing faculty practice. A formalized faculty practice plan was identified as an important organization factor to promote faculty practice. Identifying a definition of faculty practice and scholarship was an important step to ensure conceptual clarity. Consistent with the literature, workload, remuneration and performance appraisal were identified as perceived threats. The hierarchy in nursing is a unique organizational factor that will need to be addressed. Given the lack of research on the effectiveness of faculty practice and its models, evaluation is imperative. Dissonance is an overall theme of the literature and stems from the perceived threats/risks of faculty practice. Faculty practice may fulfil institutional, personal and professional needs of individual faculty members. Faculty practice offers an opportunity to change attitudes, beliefs and values related to direct care in the institution studied and influence other institutions in Pakistan. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Excellence in Faculty Evaluation...Includes Faculty Buy-in!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.; Erwin, John

    This document presents the results of a forum on faculty evaluation that took place at the 1999 conference of the American Association of Community Colleges. Thirty-four persons participated in the dialogue, including 31 Deans, Vice-Presidents of Instruction or Students, and Presidents; and 3 faculty members. Participants were asked to respond to…

  13. Diversity of faculty practice in workshop classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Scott V.; Chapman, Tricia

    2013-01-01

    We present a temporally fine-grained characterization of faculty practice in workshop-style introductory physics courses. Practice is binned in five minute intervals and coded through two complementary observational protocols: the Reform Teaching Observation Protocol provides a summative assessment of fidelity to reform-teaching principles, while the Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol records direct practice. We find that the TDOP's direct coding of practice explains nuances in the holistic RTOP score, with higher RTOP scores corresponding to less lecture, but not necessarily more student-directed activities. Despite using similar materials, faculty show significant differences in practice that manifests in both TDOP and RTOP scores. We also find a significant dependence of practice on course subject reflected in both RTOP and TDOP scores, with Electricity & Magnetism using more instructor-centered practices (lecture, illustration, etc.) than Mechanics courses.

  14. Evidence-Based Teaching Practice in Nursing Education: Faculty Perspectives and Practices.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Kathleen A; O'Conner-Von, Susan K; Brockway, Christine; Rierson, Cindy L; Sendelbach, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This national online study was conducted to describe nursing faculty perspectives and practices about evidence-based teaching practice (EBTP). Professional standards for nurse educator practice stress the importance of EBTP; however, the use of evidence by faculty in curriculum design, evaluation and educational measurement, and program development has not been reported. Nurse administrators of accredited nursing programs in the United States (N = 1,586) were emailed information about the study, including the research consent form and anonymous survey link, and invited to forward information to nursing faculty. Respondents (551 faculty and nurse administrators) described the importance of EBTP in nursing education, used multiple sources of evidence in their faculty responsibilities, and identified factors that influence their ability to use EBTP. EBTP in nursing education requires sustained institutional, administrative, and collegial support to promote faculty effectiveness and student learning.

  15. Improving Faculty Evaluation and Reward Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Douglas

    1982-01-01

    Ways for improving college level faculty evaluation are examined. Three criteria are discussed: research performance, teaching performance, and administrative performance. Desirable features of faculty rewards systems are also described. (RM)

  16. An Operational Systems Approach Toward the Evaluation of Library School Faculty: The Fried Transdisciplinary Model of Technological and Social Organization Applied to the Academic Institution's Policies and Practices Related to Faculty Performance and Working Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHart, Florence E.

    Present evaluation techniques depend heavily upon student input, with little or no reference to the circumstances under which faculty work. Using the Fried Transdisciplinary Model in evaluating faculty would do much to alleviate this situation. Questions about quality of performance would still be considered under the Task Requisites Zone of the…

  17. Issues in developing a faculty evaluation system.

    PubMed

    Arreola, R A

    1999-01-01

    The increasing demands for accountability in higher education are resulting in calls for important personnel decisions--such as promotion, tenure, pay, and continuation--to be based directly on the outcomes of systematic faculty evaluations. This article provides a step-by-step procedure for developing a fair and meaningful faculty evaluation system on which such personnel decisions can be based. The procedure systematically involves faculty and administrators in the design and development of a faculty evaluation program that reflects the unique values, priorities, and heritage of an institution. The resultant faculty evaluation system integrates data from students, peers, and administrators to provide meaningful evaluative information for both faculty use in self-improvement efforts and administrative use in making personnel decisions that are based on a valid and reliable faculty performance record.

  18. Faculty and Student Evaluations of College Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estabrook, Marina

    All 100 general assignment classrooms at a major university were evaluated by faculty and students, using faculty and student questionnaires. Respondents rated the classrooms they were currently occupying on a number of specific features and indicated what they liked the most and the least about the classroom. Thirty percent of the faculty found…

  19. Faculty Communication with Governing Boards: Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiede, Hans-Joerg; Gerber, Larry G.; Turkel, Gerald M.; Kreiser, B. Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a statement prepared by a subcommittee of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) regarding best practices for communication between college faculty and governing boards of colleges. Based on a consideration of relevant AAUP documents and in view of the current climate in higher education, this statement…

  20. Faculty Communication with Governing Boards: Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiede, Hans-Joerg; Gerber, Larry G.; Turkel, Gerald M.; Kreiser, B. Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a statement prepared by a subcommittee of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) regarding best practices for communication between college faculty and governing boards of colleges. Based on a consideration of relevant AAUP documents and in view of the current climate in higher education, this statement…

  1. Faculty Mentoring Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Welch, Julie; Sawtelle, Stacy; Cheng, David; Perkins, Tony; Ownbey, Misha; MacNeill, Emily; Hockberger, Robert; Rusyniak, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Mentoring is considered a fundamental component of career success and satisfaction in academic medicine. However, there is no national standard for faculty mentoring in academic emergency medicine (EM) and a paucity of literature on the subject. The objective was to conduct a descriptive study of faculty mentoring programs and practices in academic departments of EM. An electronic survey instrument was sent to 135 department chairs of EM in the United States. The survey queried faculty demographics, mentoring practices, structure, training, expectations, and outcome measures. Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used to compare metrics of mentoring effectiveness (i.e., number of publications and National Institutes of Health [NIH] funding) across mentoring variables of interest. Thirty-nine of 135 departments completed the survey, with a heterogeneous mix of faculty classifications. While only 43.6% of departments had formal mentoring programs, many augmented faculty mentoring with project or skills-based mentoring (66.7%), peer mentoring (53.8%), and mentoring committees (18%). Although the majority of departments expected faculty to participate in mentoring relationships, only half offered some form of mentoring training. The mean number of faculty publications per department per year was 52.8, and 11 departments fell within the top 35 NIH-funded EM departments. There was an association between higher levels of perceived mentoring success and both higher NIH funding (p = 0.022) and higher departmental publications rates (p = 0.022). In addition, higher NIH funding was associated with mentoring relationships that were assigned (80%), self-identified (20%), or mixed (22%; p = 0.026). Our findings help to characterize the variability of faculty mentoring in EM, identify opportunities for improvement, and underscore the need to learn from other successful mentoring programs. This study can serve as a basis to share mentoring practices and stimulate

  2. Mentoring and the Faculty-TA Relationship: Faculty Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Susanna; Kelley, Matthew R.

    2005-01-01

    The current investigation was designed to examine faculty perceptions and practices of mentoring in the faculty-TA (teaching assistant) relationship. A survey of faculty members at a large Midwestern research institution revealed that most faculty members considered themselves to be, or wished to be, mentors to their teaching assistants. The…

  3. MBO: Faculty Evaluation and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Betty Jo

    1986-01-01

    Examines a faculty development program that is based on management by objectives. (Includes forms or outlines for making recommendations for reappointment, promotion, or tenure; a development plan for the academic year; and a faculty performance review and development report.) (PD)

  4. Evaluation of the PMA-Coordinated Industry Program for Pharmacy Administration Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Edward T.; Herman, Colman M.

    1978-01-01

    The Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association sponsored a program in 1976 to acquaint faculty with "pharmaceutical industry practices and policies, particularly those related to the marketing function." Results of faculty and company evaluation questionnaires of faculty visitation are presented. Most of the faculty were interested in…

  5. Evaluation of the PMA-Coordinated Industry Program for Pharmacy Administration Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Edward T.; Herman, Colman M.

    1978-01-01

    The Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association sponsored a program in 1976 to acquaint faculty with "pharmaceutical industry practices and policies, particularly those related to the marketing function." Results of faculty and company evaluation questionnaires of faculty visitation are presented. Most of the faculty were interested in…

  6. Improving Faculty Evaluation and Reward Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Douglas

    1982-01-01

    Describes a theoretical model for evaluating college faculty that can improve faculty performance and resource allocation. Characteristics of the model, appropriate evaluation criteria for teaching, research, administrative, and other activities, and departmental procedures for determining evaluation criteria and weights are discussed. (AM)

  7. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-07-10

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy.

  8. An Investigation of Faculty Perceptions of the Use of a Student Evaluation of Faculty Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulgham, Julie Cordell

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the faculty perception of the use of a student evaluation of faculty instrument. The areas considered were use of the current Student Evaluation of Faculty (SEF) instrument to measure teaching effectiveness; use of the current instrument for annual faculty review; faculty involvement in developing the instrument; utilizing…

  9. A Guide to Faculty Development: Practical Advice, Examples, and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Kay Herr, Ed.

    Chapters in this guide provide practical guidance and useful information and resources relating to important aspects of faculty development, from setting up a faculty development program to assessing teaching practices. The chapters are: (1) "Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development: Options and Choices" (Robert M. Diamond); (2) "Ten…

  10. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  11. Business Students' Ethical Evaluations of Faculty Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Sean; Kidwell, Roland E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to gauge business school student perceptions of the academic conduct of college professors, to determine students' ethical evaluations of certain potential faculty behaviors. The relationships between perceived faculty misconduct and several student demographic characteristics including sex and academic classification were…

  12. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  13. Faculty Evaluation in a Professional School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManigal, Shirley A.

    This paper describes the faculty evaluation process at the Health Sciences Center at Texas Tech University. It covers the Center's five disciplines: allied health, dentistry, medicine, nursing, and pharmacy. Faculty members in these disciplines must usually have certification and/or licensure in the profession as well as typical academic…

  14. Administrative Evaluation for Faculty Retention. A Systematic Approach to Faculty Evaluation and Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Clifford M.; Chrestman, Charles; Armstrong, Larry

    To maintain a high level of trust between faculty and administration at Itawamba Community College (ICC), a system of faculty evaluation for purposes of contract renewal has been developed. At ICC, the faculty review process, a system for the improvement of teaching and learning, is defined as a different function. This report provides an overview…

  15. A 5-year analysis of peer-reviewed journal article publications of pharmacy practice faculty members.

    PubMed

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina; Martin, Jennifer R; Wyles, Christina; Ehrman, Clara; Schlesselman, Lauren S

    2012-09-10

    To evaluate scholarship, as represented by peer-reviewed journal articles, among US pharmacy practice faculty members; contribute evidence that may better inform benchmarking by academic pharmacy practice departments; and examine factors that may be related to publication rates. Journal articles published by all pharmacy practice faculty members between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010, were identified. College and school publication rates were compared based on public vs. private status, being part of a health science campus, having a graduate program, and having doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) faculty members funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Pharmacy practice faculty members published 6,101 articles during the 5-year study period, and a pharmacy practice faculty member was the primary author on 2,698 of the articles. Pharmacy practice faculty members published an average of 0.51 articles per year. Pharmacy colleges and schools affiliated with health science campuses, at public institutions, with NIH-funded PharmD faculty members, and with graduate programs had significantly higher total publication rates compared with those that did not have these characteristics (p<0.006). Pharmacy practice faculty members contributed nearly 6,000 unique publications over the 5-year period studied. However, this reflects a rate of less than 1 publication per faculty member per year, suggesting that a limited number of faculty members produced the majority of publications.

  16. A 5-Year Analysis of Peer-Reviewed Journal Article Publications of Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Spivey, Christina; Martin, Jennifer R.; Wyles, Christina; Ehrman, Clara; Schlesselman, Lauren S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate scholarship, as represented by peer-reviewed journal articles, among US pharmacy practice faculty members; contribute evidence that may better inform benchmarking by academic pharmacy practice departments; and examine factors that may be related to publication rates. Methods. Journal articles published by all pharmacy practice faculty members between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010, were identified. College and school publication rates were compared based on public vs. private status, being part of a health science campus, having a graduate program, and having doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) faculty members funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results. Pharmacy practice faculty members published 6,101 articles during the 5-year study period, and a pharmacy practice faculty member was the primary author on 2,698 of the articles. Pharmacy practice faculty members published an average of 0.51 articles per year. Pharmacy colleges and schools affiliated with health science campuses, at public institutions, with NIH-funded PharmD faculty members, and with graduate programs had significantly higher total publication rates compared with those that did not have these characteristics (p<0.006). Conclusion. Pharmacy practice faculty members contributed nearly 6,000 unique publications over the 5-year period studied. However, this reflects a rate of less than 1 publication per faculty member per year, suggesting that a limited number of faculty members produced the majority of publications. PMID:23049099

  17. Doctor of Nursing Practice programs: opportunities for faculty development.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Juliann G; White Delaney, Connie

    2013-08-01

    This article examines development opportunities for faculty teaching in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs. Although faculty development for DNP programs is similar to that of other academic programs, faculty may need different strategies for teaching, scholarship, and service because DNP programs focus on translation of science into practice, systems-level changes, clinical scholarship, and the highest levels of advanced nursing practice. Faculty and student collaboration across DNP and PhD programs provide new approaches for translating research into practice and generating practice questions in need of further scientific development. Specific faculty development strategies for facilitating this collaboration are essential. Capstone projects pose special opportunities for faculty development due to the integration of these projects within diverse practice environments, with differing expectations, regulations, and pacing compared with research. Linking new care delivery models with health informatics is expected to facilitate rapid translation of research and development of improvements in practice.

  18. Evaluation of Faculty in Higher Education: A Handbook for Faculty Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronk, Annie K.; Shipka, Thomas A.

    Aspects of faculty evaluation that directly affect employment decisions are considered to assist faculty members, and especially faculty leaders. Advantages and disadvantages of the following five methods of evaluating faculty are examined: self-evaluation, student rating, administrator observation and visitation, colleague review, and evidence of…

  19. Faculty Load Policies and Practices in Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Research Div.

    Institutions granting 4-year or higher degrees were asked in 1970-71 to supply basic information about faculty load policies and practices. Responses were received from 1,101 institutions that employed 222,053 faculty. The most frequently reported base used to define faculty load is the semester hour, followed by the quarter hour and contact hour.…

  20. Faculty Practice in Nursing Education Programs in Rural States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkram, Gelene Marie

    1998-01-01

    This descriptive study identified demographic, organizational, and satisfaction data of faculty in nursing education programs in rural states who do and do not engage in faculty practice. Out of a total of 509 surveys which were sent to faculty from 35 nursing schools located in twelve rural states, 366 surveys were returned for a 72% response…

  1. Student Power and Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harari, Herbert; And Others

    1975-01-01

    One-hundred and four college students were randomly assigned to eight experimental conditions allowing them the power to hire and maintain faculty members. The greatest amount of leniency was shown toward the incumbent professor, regardless of her student-rated quality of teaching. (Author)

  2. Influences of faculty evaluating system on educational performance of medical school faculty

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The promotion of educators is challenged by the lack of accepted standards to evaluate the quality and impact of educational activities. Traditionally, promotion is related to research productivity. This study developed an evaluation tool for educational performance of medical school faculty using educator portfolios (EPs). Methods: Design principles and quantitative items for EPs were developed in a consensus workshop. These principles were tested in a simulation and revised based on feedback. The changes of total educational activities following introduction of the system were analyzed. Results: A total of 71% faculty members answered the simulation of the system and the score distributed widely (mean±standard deviation, 65.43±68.64). The introduction of new system significantly increased the total educational activities, especially in assistant professors. Conclusion: The authors offer comprehensive and practical tool for enhancing educational participation of faculty members. Further research for development of qualitative evaluation systems is needed. PMID:27363501

  3. The serendipity of faculty practice: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Novak, D A

    1999-01-01

    The contemporary social issues impacting healthcare coupled with the increasing demands for academic units to generate income have contributed to the emergence of faculty practice as an integral component of the nurse educator's role. As a result, faculty are encouraged increasingly to assume entrepreneurial joint appointments with the service industry. For nurse educators who engage in faculty practice, serendipity occurs when they immerse themselves in situations and emerge from the experience making unexpected discoveries. The author shares practical recommendations and strategies resulting from a successful 9-month faculty practice.

  4. Supporting Online Faculty through Communities of Practice: Finding the Faculty Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Faculty development efforts for supporting online instructors represent a growing concern for higher education administrators. Providing online faculty with enriching experiences designed to improve practice, combat isolation, and share knowledge and resources is a challenge. This review examines the use of a community of practice (CoP) approach…

  5. Part-Time Faculty Evaluation: A Mirage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of faculty evaluation in continuing education and community service programs. Discusses the shortcomings of student evaluations. Identifies key steps in evaluation (i.e., establishing minimum qualifications, providing orientation to teaching, conducting in-class observations and evaluations, and taking follow-up action).…

  6. Part-Time Faculty Evaluation: A Mirage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of faculty evaluation in continuing education and community service programs. Discusses the shortcomings of student evaluations. Identifies key steps in evaluation (i.e., establishing minimum qualifications, providing orientation to teaching, conducting in-class observations and evaluations, and taking follow-up action).…

  7. Faculty-Librarian Collaboration for Library Services in the Online Classroom: Student Evaluation Results and Recommended Practices for Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figa, Elizabeth; Bone, Tonda; Macpherson, Janet R.

    2009-01-01

    Student success is influenced by their ability to access, evaluate, and use resources. Traditionally, academic librarianship has provided students with these information literacy skills. The increase in distance learning options has created the need for libraries to provide both reference services equitable to those available onsite and access to…

  8. Description of a Faculty-Student Group Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colangelo, Gary A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Dental schools are facing budgetary constraints, decreasing clinic patient populations, and increasing competition. The Dental Practice Systems (DPS) Program of the University of Maryland, a partially self-supported student-faculty group practice, is described. (Author/MLW)

  9. Faculty Development Programs: Assessing the Impact on Instructional Practices, and Student Learning and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosino, Roberta; Peel, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Demonstrating the impact of faculty development activities is difficult and infrequently attempted beyond assessing participant satisfaction. This study examines how faculty development activities affect instructional practices and the impact on student learning and motivation in accordance with Kirkpatrick's levels of evaluation. Ten instructors…

  10. Faculty Practice and Roles of Staff Nurses and Clinical Faculty in Nursing Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, Joanne C.

    2003-01-01

    Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 15 clinical faculty, 4 nursing education administrators, 22 nurses, and 4 hospital administrators involved in clinical placements. When nurses worked with practicing faculty, they experienced less role overload, conflict, and ambiguity. Lack of communication of expectations among administrators,…

  11. Evaluating Faculty and Staff. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 41.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Al, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The articles in this collection focus on processes for evaluating community college faculty and staff and highlight successful and unsuccessful evaluation practices. The collection includes: (1) "A Conceptual Framework for Staff Evaluation," by Al Smith; (2) "Evaluation of Full-Time Faculty," by Lawrence H. Poole and Donald A. Dellow; (3)…

  12. Faculty Development for Educators: A Realist Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorinola, Olanrewaju O.; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Davies, David; Peile, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of faculty development (FD) activities for educators in UK medical schools remains underexplored. This study used a realist approach to evaluate FD and to test the hypothesis that motivation, engagement and perception are key mechanisms of effective FD activities. The authors observed and interviewed 33 course participants at one…

  13. Faculty Ratings: Procedures for Interpreting Student Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingles, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    The author contends that student evaluations of faculty should be adjusted before use in tenure, salary, and promotion decisions to eliminate irrelevant course and teacher attributes which color students' opinions and confound analysis. To eliminate possible bias, a multiple regression analysis procedure for the adjustment of student evaluations…

  14. Publishing Practices of NIH-Funded Faculty at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Courtney; Duranceau, Ellen Finnie; Gabridge, Tracy A.; Green, Remlee S.; Kajosalo, Erja; Noga, Michael M.; Silver, Howard J.; Stout, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Faculty and researchers who receive substantial funding from NIH were interviewed about their publication practices. Qualitative data was collected from interviews of eleven faculty members and one researcher representing six academic departments who received NIH funding. Interview responses were analyzed to identify a representative publication…

  15. An evaluation of the elements of internal medicine physiopathology curriculum in general practice based on the perspectives of faculty members of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    ESLAMI, JAMSHID; KHADEMI, MOHSEN

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An evaluation of the curriculum elements can be recognized as a necessity in curriculum dynamic and improvement. This study aimed at evaluating five main elements of a physiopathology curriculum in internal medicine (objectives, content, methods, evaluation, and management). Method The present study is of a descriptive-analytical type, and the studypopulation consisted of a total of 48 faculty members of internal medicine physiopathology departmentat Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Participants wereselected using Cochran’s sample size formula andthrough simple random sampling.Thedatawere collected using a 58-item questionnaire devised by the researcher, usingcurriculum planning experts. Face and content validity of the scale were obtained throughexpert views and modifications provided by 10 professors and experts in medical curriculum evaluation. Also, research reliability was calculated using Alpha Cronbachto be 0.99. Reliability value and coefficient was acceptable.Moreover, One-sample t-test, Independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for data analysis. Results Based on the faculty members’ views, of the five curriculum elements, objectives and content were in relatively good conditions (at an average level) while other elements including method, evaluation and management were in poor conditions (lower than average). According to results oftwo-way ANOVA, there wasa significant relationship between faculty members with various work experiencein terms of curriculum evaluation. Conclusion According to research findings, a comparative examination of the curriculum elements and their characteristics in physiopathology course can be conducted, resulting in identification of curriculum weaknesses and their pitfalls. Also, with regard to teaching, evaluation, management methods, weak and strong pointsof the course,efficiency, and effectiveness of the elements were identified. PMID:25927069

  16. Professor in residence program: a nursing faculty practice.

    PubMed

    Forrester, David Anthony; O'Keefe, Trish; Torres, Sara

    2008-01-01

    The Interdisciplinary Health Research Consultant-Professor in Residence Program is a partnership between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) School of Nursing (SN), the New Jersey Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Center for Evidence Based Practice, and Morristown Memorial Hospital/Atlantic Health (MMH/AH). It provides MMH with the expert research and evidence-based practice (EBP) consultation and affiliation of a UMDNJ-SN faculty member and the resources of the New Jersey JBI Center for Evidence Based Practice. For the participating SN faculty member, it provides a clinical laboratory to pursue an individualized program of scientific research and scholarly publication. This research scholar works closely with the MMH/AH to (a) identify and evaluate existing mechanisms to support interdisciplinary health research and EBP at MMH; (b) develop and implement new mechanisms to support interdisciplinary health research and EBP; (c) implement the findings of published research using EBP strategies; (d) replicate interdisciplinary research studies; (e) conduct original interdisciplinary research studies; (f) seek intra- or extramural funding to support interdisciplinary research studies; and (g) support requirements for American Nurses' Credentialing Center accreditation for Magnet designation. The program has been successful in its first year of implementation.

  17. Setting the Groundwork for Quality Faculty Development Evaluation: A Five-Step Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge faced by today's faculty developers is how to move beyond the perpetual use of simplistic program evaluation practices and adopt an approach that empowers faculty developers and administrators to implement a mission-based, result-oriented program evaluation model. This article reveals the five most common elements contributing to…

  18. What We Have Learned about Extension Faculty Adoption of Evaluation as a Basis for Program Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerhill, W. R.; Taylor, C. L.

    Substantial emphasis has been placed on Florida Extension faculty evaluating their educational programs for impact and the utilization of these data for program accountability, yet little is known of the extent to which the faculty have accepted this responsibility. In order to assess the stage of adoption of impact evaluation as a practice, and…

  19. Perceptions and Use of iPad Technology by Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Zgarrick, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the potential of tablet technology to address the specific workload challenges of pharmacy practice faculty members and to evaluate tablet usage after a department-wide iPad initiative. Methods. After conducting a needs assessment to determine pharmacy faculty attitudes towards tablet technology and to identify potential usage scenarios, all faculty members in a department of pharmacy practice received an iPad. After iPad distribution, training sessions and virtual tutorials were provided. An anonymous survey was administered to evaluate the pilot. Results. The needs assessment survey revealed positive attitudes towards iPad technology, identified use scenarios, and led to a department-wide iPad pilot program. Most faculty members used iPads for connectivity with students (86%), paper/project annotation (68%), assessment (57%), and demonstration of tools used in practice (36%). For teaching, 61% of faculty members used iPads in seminars/laboratories, 57% used iPads in the experiential setting, and 43% used iPads in the classroom. Use of iPads for patient-care activities varied and depended on site support for mobile technology. The 23 faculty members with external practice sites used iPads to a greater extent and had more positive attitudes towards this technology compared with campus-based faculty members. Conclusion. Integration of tablet technology into the pharmacy education setting resulted in faculty-reported increased productivity and decreased paper waste. It also allowed faculty members to experiment with new teaching strategies in the classroom and experiential setting. Administrators at institutions exploring the use of tablet technology should allocate resources based on faculty needs and usage patterns. PMID:24761013

  20. Perceptions and use of iPad technology by pharmacy practice faculty members.

    PubMed

    DiVall, Margarita V; Zgarrick, David P

    2014-04-17

    To explore the potential of tablet technology to address the specific workload challenges of pharmacy practice faculty members and to evaluate tablet usage after a department-wide iPad initiative. After conducting a needs assessment to determine pharmacy faculty attitudes towards tablet technology and to identify potential usage scenarios, all faculty members in a department of pharmacy practice received an iPad. After iPad distribution, training sessions and virtual tutorials were provided. An anonymous survey was administered to evaluate the pilot. The needs assessment survey revealed positive attitudes towards iPad technology, identified use scenarios, and led to a department-wide iPad pilot program. Most faculty members used iPads for connectivity with students (86%), paper/project annotation (68%), assessment (57%), and demonstration of tools used in practice (36%). For teaching, 61% of faculty members used iPads in seminars/laboratories, 57% used iPads in the experiential setting, and 43% used iPads in the classroom. Use of iPads for patient-care activities varied and depended on site support for mobile technology. The 23 faculty members with external practice sites used iPads to a greater extent and had more positive attitudes towards this technology compared with campus-based faculty members. Integration of tablet technology into the pharmacy education setting resulted in faculty-reported increased productivity and decreased paper waste. It also allowed faculty members to experiment with new teaching strategies in the classroom and experiential setting. Administrators at institutions exploring the use of tablet technology should allocate resources based on faculty needs and usage patterns.

  1. Institutional Practices and Faculty Who Leave.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Carl V.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of incentives offered to faculty to leave an institution in difficult financial circumstances are outlined. They include: liberalizing the actuarial pension reduction, lump-sum severance payments, annuity enhancements, phased retirement, retirement perquisites, retraining for outplacement, paid retraining, and earnings supplements during…

  2. Evaluating Emergency Medicine Faculty at End-of-Shift

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Regina A.; Griffen, David L.; Francis, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Faculty often evaluate learners in the emergency department (ED) at the end of each shift. In contrast, learners usually evaluate faculty only at the end of a rotation. In December 2007 Southern Illinois University School of Medicine changed its evaluation process, requiring ED trainees to complete end-of-shift evaluations of faculty. Objective Determine the feasibility and acceptance of end-of-shift evaluations for emergency medicine faculty. Methods We conducted this one-year observational study at two hospitals with 120,000 combined annual ED visits. Trainees (residents and students) anonymously completed seven-item shift evaluations and placed them in a locked box. Trainees and faculty completed a survey about the new process. Results During the study, trainees were assigned 699 shifts, and 633 end-of-shift evaluations were collected for a completion rate of 91%. The median number of ratings per faculty was 31, and the median number of comments was 11 for each faculty. The survey was completed by 16/22 (73%) faculty and 41/69 (59%) trainees. A majority of faculty (86%) and trainees (76%) felt comfortable being evaluated at end-of-shift. No trainees felt it was a time burden. Conclusion Evaluating faculty following an ED shift is feasible. End-of-shift faculty evaluations are accepted by trainees and faculty. PMID:21293771

  3. Faculty Annual Merit Evaluation at Oregon Institute of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, John G.

    This paper describes the approach taken at the Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) for the evaluation of its faculty in conjunction with the OIT administrator evaluation methods. A set of Annual Faculty Objectives (AFO) are established by both faculty and department chairmen. They review divisional and departmental goals and agree on specific…

  4. A Successful Revision of a Faculty Evaluation Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, James W.

    In 1979, El Camino College revised its faculty evaluation procedure, impelled by concerns over the severe consequences and resultant rarity of unsatisfactory ratings, the reluctance of faculty to evaluate their peers, and the high requirements of faculty time. The new procedure includes the following components: (1) options allowing tenured…

  5. A Successful Revision of a Faculty Evaluation Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, James W.

    In 1979, El Camino College revised its faculty evaluation procedure, impelled by concerns over the severe consequences and resultant rarity of unsatisfactory ratings, the reluctance of faculty to evaluate their peers, and the high requirements of faculty time. The new procedure includes the following components: (1) options allowing tenured…

  6. Faculty Annual Merit Evaluation at Oregon Institute of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, John G.

    This paper describes the approach taken at the Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) for the evaluation of its faculty in conjunction with the OIT administrator evaluation methods. A set of Annual Faculty Objectives (AFO) are established by both faculty and department chairmen. They review divisional and departmental goals and agree on specific…

  7. White Faculty Transforming Whiteness in the Classroom through Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charbeneau, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this qualitative study is to present a conceptual framework of pedagogical practices reported by white faculty that serve to challenge the hegemony of whiteness in the university classroom. These transformative teaching practices surfaced through a review of racialized pedagogies discussed in the literature and in…

  8. Broadening horizons: engaging advanced practice nursing students in faculty research.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Josie A

    2009-01-01

    Inviting advanced practice nursing students to participate in faculty research can be an innovative way to interest students in using current evidence as the basis for their practice. The author discusses strategies for effectively engaging graduate nursing students into research projects in ways that broaden the students' perspectives and strengthen their healthcare decision-making skills.

  9. Experiential Learning Practices in Higher Education: Influences on Faculty Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Although an association between high-impact experiential learning (HIEL) practices and university students' attainment of employability skills has been documented, factors related to implementation of HIEL practices such as faculty stages of concern, barriers faced, and resources needed from the institution to enhance implementation of HIEL…

  10. Student Evaluation of Faculty Physicians: Gender Differences in Teaching Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Helen K; Purkiss, Joel A; Porter, Annie C; Lypson, Monica L; Santen, Sally A; Christner, Jennifer G; Grum, Cyril M; Hammoud, Maya M

    2016-05-01

    To investigate whether there is a difference in medical student teaching evaluations for male and female clinical physician faculty. The authors examined all teaching evaluations completed by clinical students at one North American medical school in the surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, and internal medicine clinical rotations from 2008 to 2012. The authors focused on how students rated physician faculty on their "overall quality of teaching" using a 5-point response scale (1 = Poor to 5 = Excellent). Linear mixed-effects models provided estimated mean differences in evaluation outcomes by faculty gender. There were 14,107 teaching evaluations of 965 physician faculty. Of these evaluations, 7688 (54%) were for male physician faculty and 6419 (46%) were for female physician faculty. Female physicians received significantly lower mean evaluation scores in all four rotations. The discrepancy was largest in the surgery rotation (males = 4.23, females = 4.01, p = 0.003). Pediatrics showed the next greatest difference (males = 4.44, females = 4.29, p = 0.009), followed by obstetrics and gynecology (males = 4.38, females = 4.26, p = 0.026), and internal medicine (males = 4.35, females = 4.27, p = 0.043). Female physicians received lower teaching evaluations in all four core clinical rotations. This comprehensive examination adds to the medical literature by illuminating subtle differences in evaluations based on physician gender, and provides further evidence of disparities for women in academic medicine.

  11. What Goes Into a Decision? How Nursing Faculty Decide Which Best Practices to Use for Classroom Testing.

    PubMed

    Killingsworth, Erin; Kimble, Laura P; Sudia, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    To explore the decision-making process of BSN faculty when determining which best practices to use for classroom testing. A descriptive, correlational study was conducted with a national sample (N = 127) of full-time BSN faculty. Participants completed a web-based survey incorporating instruments that measured beliefs about evaluation, decision-making, and best practices for item analysis and constructing and revising classroom tests. Study participants represented 31 states and were primarily middle-aged white women. In multiple linear regression analyses, faculty beliefs, contextual factors for decision-making, and decision-making processes accounted for statistically significant amounts of the variance in item analysis and test construction and revision. Strong faculty beliefs that rules were important when evaluating students was a significant predictor of increased use of best practices. Results support that understanding faculty beliefs around classroom testing is important in promoting the use of best practices.

  12. Faculty development for the evaluation system: a dual agenda

    PubMed Central

    Oller, Kellee L; Mai, Cuc T; Ledford, Robert J; O’Brien, Kevin E

    2017-01-01

    Faculty development for the evaluation process serves two distinct goals. The first goal is to improve the quality of the evaluations submitted by the faculty. Providing an accurate assessment of a learner’s capabilities is a skill and, similar to other skills, can be developed with training. Frame-of-reference training serves to calibrate the faculty’s standard of performance and build a uniform language of the evaluation. Second, areas for faculty professional growth can be identified from data generated from learners’ evaluations of the faculty using narrative comments, item-level comparison reports, and comparative rank list information. This paper presents an innovative model, grounded in institutional experience and review of the literature, to provide feedback to faculty evaluators, thereby improving the reliability of the evaluation process, and motivating the professional growth of faculty as educators. PMID:28331382

  13. Current Faculty Development Practices for Alternative Delivery Systems in Christian Higher Education Institutions: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Steven Lowell

    2009-01-01

    This research study was an investigation of current faculty development practices for alternative delivery systems. Attention was given to faculty development in general as well as specific facets of faculty development for alternative delivery systems. Future or intended faculty development practices were pursued, along with factors that…

  14. Current Faculty Development Practices for Alternative Delivery Systems in Christian Higher Education Institutions: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Steven Lowell

    2009-01-01

    This research study was an investigation of current faculty development practices for alternative delivery systems. Attention was given to faculty development in general as well as specific facets of faculty development for alternative delivery systems. Future or intended faculty development practices were pursued, along with factors that…

  15. Institutionalizing Equitable Policies and Practices for Contingent Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Sam, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    This study is a qualitative inquiry into the institutionalization of equitable policies for non-tenure-track faculty. Through the theoretical framework of institutionalization, we examine factors and strategies forwarding various policies and practices and the challenges that arise. The results highlight themes throughout the stages of…

  16. Best Practices in the Training of Faculty to Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patricia D.

    2006-01-01

    Distance education is often used as a cost-efficient way to train employees. This research focuses on training for teaching online. A comprehensive literature review revealed the scarcity of scholarly work in this area. To determine best practices in training for teaching online, a faculty training program was examined and experts were…

  17. Institutionalizing Equitable Policies and Practices for Contingent Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Sam, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    This study is a qualitative inquiry into the institutionalization of equitable policies for non-tenure-track faculty. Through the theoretical framework of institutionalization, we examine factors and strategies forwarding various policies and practices and the challenges that arise. The results highlight themes throughout the stages of…

  18. Best Practices in the Training of Faculty to Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patricia D.

    2006-01-01

    Distance education is often used as a cost-efficient way to train employees. This research focuses on training for teaching online. A comprehensive literature review revealed the scarcity of scholarly work in this area. To determine best practices in training for teaching online, a faculty training program was examined and experts were…

  19. Psychiatric Nursing Faculty Practice: Care within the Community Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Mary Fern; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Psychiatric nursing faculty practice offers the academic nurse opportunity to generate salary support and integrate students into the real world of mental health care. It promotes scholarship and knowledge-building and has a direct impact on the lives of patients. (Author/JOW)

  20. Communities of Practice as Agents of Future Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Audriana M.; Smith, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    The need for faculty development continues to increase despite the limited resources of many developers to serve growing demands. To address this conundrum, we explore existing literature about communities of practice (CoPs) in higher education and case studies of CoPs at our institution as an avenue to extend and supplement future professional…

  1. Faculty Evaluation and Merit Pay at Mountain Empire Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain Empire Community Coll., Big Stone Gap, VA.

    Information is provided on various aspects of the faculty evaluation and development system at Mountain Empire Community College (MECC). The compilation includes: (1) a statement of the purposes of the faculty evaluation and development system; (2) evaluation procedures; (3) definitions of key terms; (4) an explanation of the Index of Success…

  2. How Universities Evaluate Faculty Performance: A Survey of Department Heads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centra, John A.

    Department heads from 134 institutions (mainly universities) indicated the weight they generally give to various criteria for evaluating individual faculty members. The questionnaire they responded to included: criteria used for evaluating overall faculty performance; sources of information for evaluating teaching; and kinds of information used…

  3. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust.

  4. Rigorous Evaluations of Faculty Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucsera, John V.; Svinicki, Marilla

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has called for rigorous evaluations of programs designed to improve college teaching, mostly in response to the missing literature supporting its practice. The purpose of this review was to explore whether such evaluations have taken place since the last examination in 1991. From a systematic review of nine leading publication…

  5. Comparison of differences in performance evaluation of faculty by students with faculty's self-assessment.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Kourosh; Aghamolaei, Teamur; Parsa, Nader; Dabbaghmanesh, Tahereh

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to compare self-assessment forms of coursework taught in the school of public health at undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels and students' evaluation of the performance of the faculty members at these levels. The subjects in this cross-sectional study were the faculty members and students of the School of Public Health and Nutrition, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. The data were collected using a socio-demographic information form and evaluation forms of professors prepared by the Educational Development Center (EDC). The faculty members were assessed by the students in undergraduate and graduate classes. Among the study subjects, 23 faculty members filled out the self-assessment forms which were then evaluated by 23 students. Then, the data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical 14. Paired t-test was used to compare the students' evaluation of the faculty members' performance and the professors' self-assessment. The mean score of self-assessment of the faculty members who taught undergraduate courses was 289.7±8.3, while that of the students' evaluation was 281.3±16.1; the difference was statistically significant (t=3.56, p=0.001). Besides, the mean score of the self-assessment of the faculty members who taught graduate courses was 269.0±9.7, while that of the students' evaluation was 265.7±14.6 but the difference was not statistically significant (t=1.09, p=0.28). Teaching performance perceptions of the faculty were similar to those of the graduate students as compared to the undergraduate ones. This may reflect better understanding of coursework at this level compared to the undergraduate students. Faculty members may need to adjust teaching methods to improve students' performance and understanding especially in the undergraduate level.

  6. Radical Change in Faculty and Student Evaluation: A Justifiable Heresy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the connection between two continuing trends in higher education: semester evaluation of faculty by students (SE's) and grade inflation. The two phenomena are explored historically; then a two-part plan is proposed to enhance the evaluation of both students and faculty. This solution does not replace current evaluation…

  7. Part-Time Faculty Evaluation: A Campus Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James P.

    For the past 13 years, the Verde Valley Campus of Yavapai College, in Arizona, has used the same system to evaluate part-time faculty in an effort to both maintain quality control and provide feedback to part-time faculty and address their concerns. The system utilizes two instruments to gather evaluative data. The first is used to determine…

  8. Design and Development of a Faculty Technology Practices Directory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    As one part of a quality enhancement plan, North Carolina State University implemented a technology initiative with an initial focus on evaluating and improving classroom technology, piloting technology-rich workspaces for student projects, and initiating an internal grants program for faculty. An advisory committee directs the initiative with…

  9. Design and Development of a Faculty Technology Practices Directory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    As one part of a quality enhancement plan, North Carolina State University implemented a technology initiative with an initial focus on evaluating and improving classroom technology, piloting technology-rich workspaces for student projects, and initiating an internal grants program for faculty. An advisory committee directs the initiative with…

  10. Best Faculty Practice Plan Model for a Small College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Sharyn Neiman

    2010-01-01

    Bridging the gap between theory and practice has been a priority with universities and colleges of nursing. A mechanism for bridging this gap has been the establishment of faculty practices. Faculty practices have provided nurse practitioner faculty opportunities to mentor students, augment income, implement evidence-based research, provide…

  11. The Opinion of Students and Faculty Members about the Effect of the Faculty Performance Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ghahrani, Nassim; Siamian, Hasan; Balaghafari, Azita; Aligolbandi, Kobra; Vahedi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the most common ways that in most countries and Iran in determining the status of teacher training is the evaluation by students. The most common method of evaluation is the survey questionnaire provided to the study subjects, comprised of questions about educational activities. The researchers plan to evaluate the opinion of students and faculty members about the effect of the faculty performance evaluation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-15. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional survey of attitudes of students and professors base their evaluation on the impact on their academic performance, have been studied. The populations were 3904 students and 149 faculty members of basic sciences Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Sample of 350 students and 107 students using Cochran formula faculty members through proportional stratified random sampling was performed. The data of the questionnaire with 28 questions on a Likert Spectrum, respectively. Statistical Analysis Data are descriptive and inferential statistics using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test is done. Results: Based on the results obtained from total of 350 students, 309 students and from total of 107 faculty members, 76 faculty of basic sciences, participated in this study. The most of the students, 80 (25.9%) of the Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences and most of the faculty of basic sciences, 33 (4.43) of the medicine science faculty. Comments Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in comparison to the scope of the evaluation should test using Binominal test; we can conclude that in the field of regulatory, scientific, educational, and communications arena, there were no significant differences between the views of students. The greatest supporter of the education of 193 (62%) and most challengers of exam 147 (48%), respectively. Regarding the viewpoints of the faculty members at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences towards the evaluation

  12. The Opinion of Students and Faculty Members about the Effect of the Faculty Performance Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ghahrani, Nassim; Siamian, Hasan; Balaghafari, Azita; Aligolbandi, Kobra; Vahedi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common ways that in most countries and Iran in determining the status of teacher training is the evaluation by students. The most common method of evaluation is the survey questionnaire provided to the study subjects, comprised of questions about educational activities. The researchers plan to evaluate the opinion of students and faculty members about the effect of the faculty performance evaluation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-15. In this descriptive cross-sectional survey of attitudes of students and professors base their evaluation on the impact on their academic performance, have been studied. The populations were 3904 students and 149 faculty members of basic sciences Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Sample of 350 students and 107 students using Cochran formula faculty members through proportional stratified random sampling was performed. The data of the questionnaire with 28 questions on a Likert Spectrum, respectively. Statistical Analysis Data are descriptive and inferential statistics using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test is done. Based on the results obtained from total of 350 students, 309 students and from total of 107 faculty members, 76 faculty of basic sciences, participated in this study. The most of the students, 80 (25.9%) of the Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences and most of the faculty of basic sciences, 33 (4.43) of the medicine science faculty. Comments Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in comparison to the scope of the evaluation should test using Binominal test; we can conclude that in the field of regulatory, scientific, educational, and communications arena, there were no significant differences between the views of students. The greatest supporter of the education of 193 (62%) and most challengers of exam 147 (48%), respectively. Regarding the viewpoints of the faculty members at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences towards the evaluation domains, using binomial test

  13. Faculty-led faculty development: evaluation and reflections on a distributed educational leadership model.

    PubMed

    Elzubeir, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This report describes and explores the impact of a series of faculty-led faculty development programs underpinned by principles of distributed educational leadership. We aimed to prepare faculty for their roles as facilitators and assessors in a newly implemented problem-based (PBL) graduate entry medical program. We asked participants attending a series of faculty development programs to evaluate workshops attended using an in-house designed survey. Overall descriptive statistics for all workshops and qualitative feedback for PBL workshops alone were examined. It was concluded that clinical faculty who are not specialized in medical education can offer high-quality, well-accepted training for their peers. Faculty development, underpinned by a distributed leadership approach which supports learning organization tenets, imaginative, flexible and democratic approaches to developing and nurturing expertise at all levels of the organization, is likely to lead to improvements in medical education. Despite the limitations of the survey approach to evaluation of faculty development programs, the information provided is useful both as a basis for decision making and program improvement.

  14. On faculty development of STEM inclusive teaching practices.

    PubMed

    Dewsbury, Bryan M

    2017-10-02

    Faculty development of inclusive teaching practices has become more common in response to significant differences in STEM student retention between underrepresented minorities in the USA and students from other ethnic groups. Approaches to solve this have shifted from focusing on student deficits to changing campus culture, including the mindsets of instructors who teach STEM courses. In this article, I argue that based on the literature informing the conceptual frameworks used for faculty development in inclusive teaching, faculty developers should reframe the message of their workshops to focus participants more on the scope of the journey, and shift the direction of overall efforts some to redevelop pedagogical training at the graduate and postdoc levels. Informed by historical as well as recent theories on the role of higher education to society, I highlight the areas of the literature that can effectively inform our current approaches to inclusion. I also briefly review the reasons why this approach is needed, and include suggestions for new faculty development approaches for long-term sustainable change in STEM inclusive education at the postsecondary level. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Faculty Development Initiatives to Advance Research Literacy and Evidence-Based Practice at CAM Academic Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Deborah L.; Hammerschlag, Richard; Delagran, Louise; Peterson, David H.; Berlin, Michelle; Evans, Roni L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To present the varied approaches of 9 complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institutions (all grantees of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) used to develop faculty expertise in research literacy and evidence-based practice (EBP) in order to integrate these concepts into CAM curricula. Design: A survey to elicit information on the faculty development initiatives was administered via e-mail to the 9 program directors. All 9 completed the survey, and 8 grantees provided narrative summaries of faculty training outcomes. Results: The grantees found the following strategies for implementing their programs most useful: assess needs, develop and adopt research literacy and EBP competencies, target early adopters and change leaders, employ best practices in teaching and education, provide meaningful incentives, capitalize on resources provided by grant partners, provide external training opportunities, and garner support from institutional leadership. Instructional approaches varied considerably across grantees. The most common were workshops, online resources, in-person short courses, and in-depth seminar series developed by the grantees. Many also sent faculty to intensive multiday extramural training programs. Program evaluation included measuring participation rates and satisfaction and the integration of research literacy and EBP learning objectives throughout the academic curricula. Most grantees measured longitudinal changes in beliefs, attitudes, opinions, and competencies with repeated faculty surveys. Conclusions: A common need across all 9 CAM grantee institutions was foundational training for faculty in research literacy and EBP. Therefore, each grantee institution developed and implemented a faculty development program. In developing the framework for their programs, grantees used strategies that were viewed critical for success, including making them multifaceted and unique to their specific

  16. Faculty development initiatives to advance research literacy and evidence-based practice at CAM academic institutions.

    PubMed

    Long, Cynthia R; Ackerman, Deborah L; Hammerschlag, Richard; Delagran, Louise; Peterson, David H; Berlin, Michelle; Evans, Roni L

    2014-07-01

    To present the varied approaches of 9 complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institutions (all grantees of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine) used to develop faculty expertise in research literacy and evidence-based practice (EBP) in order to integrate these concepts into CAM curricula. A survey to elicit information on the faculty development initiatives was administered via e-mail to the 9 program directors. All 9 completed the survey, and 8 grantees provided narrative summaries of faculty training outcomes. The grantees found the following strategies for implementing their programs most useful: assess needs, develop and adopt research literacy and EBP competencies, target early adopters and change leaders, employ best practices in teaching and education, provide meaningful incentives, capitalize on resources provided by grant partners, provide external training opportunities, and garner support from institutional leadership. Instructional approaches varied considerably across grantees. The most common were workshops, online resources, in-person short courses, and in-depth seminar series developed by the grantees. Many also sent faculty to intensive multiday extramural training programs. Program evaluation included measuring participation rates and satisfaction and the integration of research literacy and EBP learning objectives throughout the academic curricula. Most grantees measured longitudinal changes in beliefs, attitudes, opinions, and competencies with repeated faculty surveys. A common need across all 9 CAM grantee institutions was foundational training for faculty in research literacy and EBP. Therefore, each grantee institution developed and implemented a faculty development program. In developing the framework for their programs, grantees used strategies that were viewed critical for success, including making them multifaceted and unique to their specific institutional needs. These strategies, in conjunction with the

  17. A Case Study: Evaluating Faculty at Bowling Green State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partin, Ronald L.

    1984-01-01

    A system of evaluating faculty performance in research and scholarly activity, service, and teaching by awarding points for specific activities is outlined. The point system is used to distribute merit monies allotted by the university. Advantages of the system include predictability, specificity, and flexibility for faculty to develop individual…

  18. Faculty Salary Increases and Evaluation of Selected Performance Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, T. Wayne

    At a university of about 800 faculty members offering baccalaureate, masters, and doctorate programs a study was conducted to determine the relationships between recommended salary increases and evaluation of performance. Salary increase proposals were submitted for faculty by department chairpersons. Among other items of information, the…

  19. Factors That Influence Student Completion of Course and Faculty Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine if there is a relationship between students’ grades, gender, age, or ethnicity and their completion of course and/or faculty evaluations. Methods. Data were collected and analyzed for relationships among students’ gender, age, ethnicity, and course grade on their completion rates of course and faculty evaluations. Results. The grade a student received in a course was not related to completion rates for course or faculty evaluations. Students born in 1987 or earlier were significantly more likely to complete course or faculty evaluations. Significant differences in completion rates were also found based on the course taken and the gender and ethnicity of the students. Conclusions. Several demographic characteristics were identified that correlated with the completion of course and/or faculty evaluations. However, no correlation was found with the grade a student receives in a course and completion of either course or faculty evaluations. In order to improve course and faculty evaluation rates, further analysis of the influence of demographics on completion rates is warranted. PMID:23519650

  20. College Students with Disabilities in Teacher Education: Faculty Attitudes and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyser, Yona; Greenberger, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students with disabilities are enrolled in post-secondary institutions. This study examined faculty attitudes and practices regarding students with disabilities in teacher education. Participants were 188 faculty in seven colleges, in Israel, who responded to a survey instrument about attitudes and practices. Faculty reported…

  1. A Set of Descriptive Case Studies of Four Dance Faculty Members' Pedagogical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Meredith; Erwin, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Dance faculty members come from a variety of backgrounds, which lead to varied knowledge bases and varied teaching practices. More information is needed about the current pedagogical practices of higher education dance faculty. This study sought to provide a description of four faculty members' pedagogical approaches to a dance technique class in…

  2. Investigating the faculty evaluation system in Iranian Medical Universities

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Farahnaz; Yamani, Nikoo; Changiz, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To achieve a valid evaluation of faculty members, it is necessary to develop an inclusive and dynamic system of evaluation addressing all the activities and responsibilities of faculty members. Among these responsibilities, educational activities comprise an important part which needs to be investigated. This study aimed to investigate the current system of evaluating the faculty members’ educational duties. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a checklist for investigating the current evaluation system and was developed confirmed by a focus group. The data for checklist were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire and interview with eight experts of faculty evaluation that worked in different Iranian Medical Universities. For completion of information, the available documents and records were studied. Finally, the current evaluation system of different universities was depicted. Results: The developed checklist had six themes and 123 subthemes. The extracted themes included: Tools, evaluators, processes, appropriateness of faculty field of work with evaluation, feedback status, and university status regarding decisions made based on faculty evaluation results. As for comprehensiveness, all evaluation items except for evaluation and assessment skills and religiosity from personality traits subtheme were fully investigated. The evaluation tools were not enough for different types of education such as clinical education. In six universities, the feedbacks provided were only for making inter/intra department comparison, and no scientific suggestions were included. The results of evaluations were used only for the faculties’ promotions. Discussion: Suitability between evaluation and performance components is a necessity in every evaluation system. The study showed this does not exist in Iranian Universities. For instance, there was no appropriate tool for the evaluation of clinical education. Also, the results of the faculty

  3. Faculty Practice: What Do the Data Show? Findings from the NONPF Faculty Practice Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Joanne M.; Duderstadt, Karen; Tolve-Schoeneberger, Candice; Uphold, Constance R.; Hartig, Margaret Thorman

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 452 nurse practitioner educators (343 in clinical practice) found that 70% have doctorates, but only 37% of those in clinical practice are tenured; 51% reported that practice is not considered in promotion and tenure decisions at their institutions. (SK)

  4. Recruiting Female Faculty Members in Science and Engineering: Preliminary Evaluation of One Intervention Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Abigail J.; La Vaque-Manty, Danielle; Malley, Janet E.

    The representation of female faculty members in science and engineering fields lags behind that of their counterparts in the social sciences and humanities and also fails to keep pace with the production of female science and engineering doctorates. Research has shown that equity cannot be achieved by waiting for women to fill the applicant pool; instead, institutions must intervene by changing hiring practices and retention policies. This article describes and evaluates early results of one intervention at the University of Michigan: the creation of a faculty committee designed to improve the recruitment and hiring of female faculty members through peer education. One hiring cycle after the committee's creation, the authors found (a) reports of changed practices in some search committees and departments, (b) an increase in the number and proportion of new hires who were women, and (c) a substantial increase in the knowledge and motivation of the members of the recruitment committee with respect to improving the climate for female faculty members.

  5. Project-based faculty development by international health professions educators: practical strategies.

    PubMed

    Mennin, Stewart; Kalishman, Summers; Eklund, Mary Ann; Friedman, Stacey; Morahan, Page S; Burdick, William

    2013-01-01

    Project design and implementation, applied to real life situations, is emerging as an educational strategy for application of health professions faculty development learning within a supportive environment. We conducted a retrospective analysis of project evolution to identify common experiences, challenges, and successful strategies of 54 mid-career faculty members from 18 developing countries who attended the Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research Institute between 2001 and 2006 and designed, conducted, and evaluated education innovations at their home institutions. Chronological analysis of the evolution of 54 projects over the initial 16-18 months of the 2-year Fellowship was based on an iterative qualitative analysis of 324 reports and individual interview transcripts collected over 6 years. Useful skill areas for project implementation included educational methods, leadership and management, and relationships/collaboration. Common challenges included competing responsibilities, lack of protected time, and limited resources. Themes identified with the evolution and success of education innovation projects included leadership and organization, collaboration, personal professional growth, and awareness of the relevant societal context. Common challenges and success factors in project-based faculty development were identified. Twelve practical strategies to promote successful project-based faculty development emerged that can be generalized for faculty development.

  6. A Community of Practice Model for Introducing Mobile Tablets to University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle; Vartanian, Lesa Rae; Birk, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of a community of practice (CoP) model for introducing tablets to 139 faculty members at a higher education institution. Using a CoP within a systems model, we used large- and small-group mentorship to foster collaboration among faculty members. Most faculty members agreed that the project was well organized and…

  7. Student-Faculty Partnership in Explorations of Pedagogical Practice: A Threshold Concept in Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Student-faculty partnerships position students as informants, participants, and change agents in collaboration with faculty members. Enacting one form of such collaboration, Bryn Mawr College's SaLT program pairs faculty members and undergraduate students in explorations of pedagogical practice. The program provides both context and case study for…

  8. Student-Faculty Partnership in Explorations of Pedagogical Practice: A Threshold Concept in Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Student-faculty partnerships position students as informants, participants, and change agents in collaboration with faculty members. Enacting one form of such collaboration, Bryn Mawr College's SaLT program pairs faculty members and undergraduate students in explorations of pedagogical practice. The program provides both context and case study for…

  9. A Community of Practice Model for Introducing Mobile Tablets to University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle; Vartanian, Lesa Rae; Birk, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of a community of practice (CoP) model for introducing tablets to 139 faculty members at a higher education institution. Using a CoP within a systems model, we used large- and small-group mentorship to foster collaboration among faculty members. Most faculty members agreed that the project was well organized and…

  10. Learning styles and teaching perspectives of Canadian pharmacy practice residents and faculty preceptors.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter S; Jelescu-Bodos, Anca

    2013-10-14

    To characterize and compare learning styles of pharmacy practice residents and their faculty preceptors, and identify teaching perspectives of faculty preceptors. Twenty-nine pharmacy residents and 306 pharmacy faculty members in British Columbia were invited to complete the Pharmacists' Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS). Faculty preceptors also were asked to complete the Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI). One hundred percent of residents and 61% of faculty members completed the PILS, and 31% of faculty members completed the TPI. The most common dominant learning style among residents and faculty preceptors was assimilator, and 93% were assimilators, convergers, or both. The distribution of dominant learning styles between residents and faculty members was not different (p=0.77). The most common dominant teaching perspective among faculty members was apprenticeship. Residents and preceptors mostly exhibited learning styles associated with abstract over concrete thinking or watching over doing. Residency programs should steer residents more toward active learning and doing, and maximize interactions with patients and other caregivers.

  11. Evaluating Faculty Work: Expectations and Standards of Faculty Performance in Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia; Cox, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Expectations and the way they are communicated can influence employees' motivation and performance. Previous research has demonstrated individual effects of workplace climate and individual differences on faculty productivity. The present study focused on the characteristics of institutional performance standards, evaluation processes and…

  12. The Role of Curriculum and Faculty Evaluation in Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Richard S.

    1981-01-01

    A goal-oriented evaluation system for dental education is seen as a necessity. Focusing on priority issues and showing responsiveness to the needs of society, it is suggested, will increase the likelihood of a competitive advantage for dentistry. Recommendations for changing the role of curriculum and faculty evaluation evaluation are provided.…

  13. Student Evaluations of Faculty: Concerns and Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Student evaluations of university instruction have long been used to evaluate the teaching performance of instructors of all ranks. In spite of the widespread use of the data acquired from student evaluations for the purpose of determining faculty teaching effectiveness, a review of the literature in the area indicates that questions concerning…

  14. Evaluation of Teaching. Memo to the Faculty; Memo No. 53 February 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, James A.; Ericksen, Stanford C.

    Departments, schools, and colleges within the University of Michigan differ widely in the procedures used to evaluate members of their faculties. In some instances student rating forms are used but practices differ as to the kind of information obtained and the weight given to these assessments. Each set of procedures is designed to serve local…

  15. Evaluating Faculty for Promotion and Tenure. The Jossey Bass Higher Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Richard I.

    Practical recommendations are offered for implementing an effective faculty evaluation system, based on the idea that quality promotion and tenure decisions are impossible without one. Weaknesses of current systems are described, including casual approaches and inadequate attention to decision making. Eight characteristics of effective systems are…

  16. Evaluating the performance of clinical pharmacy faculty: putting the ACCP template to use.

    PubMed

    Schumock, G T; Crawford, S Y; Giusto, D A; Hutchinson, R A

    1993-01-01

    The responsibilities of clinical faculty members are often multifaceted and may include direct patient care, didactic and experiential teaching, research, and administrative duties. Specialization, poorly defined standards of care, and lack of direct supervision have traditionally made performance evaluation difficult. We implemented a method to evaluate clinical faculty as they carried out patient care activities using a revised template for the evaluation of a clinical pharmacist developed by the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Clinical Practice Affairs Committee. In addition, it allows individuals to report and evaluate their own performance in the areas of patient care, instructional activity, university and public service, research and scholarly activities, and administrative duties. Teaching evaluations from clerkship students and residents are also submitted and assessed during the annual interview. To determine the usefulness of the evaluation, including the template, we surveyed the opinions of clinical faculty (nontenured) at four primary practice sites (response rate 92%). Mean scores for responses suggested agreement with statements as to the merits of the evaluation system; however, there was some variation among practice sites. Incorporating the template into a broad evaluation system was effective in facilitating improved job performance and career development. Adaptation of the template may be practice site dependent and should be coordinated by a participative approach. Additional assessment may be facilitated by physician, nurse, or peer evaluation.

  17. Administrative Evaluation of Online Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Douglas Duane

    2012-01-01

    Policy and procedure haven't kept up with institutional practices at community colleges. With over 5.5 million college students taking online courses, 29% of college students are taking an online course. As student numbers taking online courses have increased, so have the number of faculty teaching online. The purpose of this study is to…

  18. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  19. Student Evaluations of Faculty Members: A Call for Analytical Prudence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitry, Darryl J.; Smith, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this article express concern about the use of parametric techniques to report faculty performance based on categorical Likert survey data gleaned from student responses to teaching evaluations. They argue that these surveys often violate primary statistical requirements for evaluative application. Therefore, the conclusions drawn…

  20. Innovation in Faculty-Course Evaluation and Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whetstone, Robert D.

    This is a report of the development of a Faculty-Course Questionnaire (FCQ) evaluation instrument at the University of Colorado. The evaluation process is computer based and is similar in several ways to that used for processing and reporting the results of the Strong Vocational Interest Blank at the University of Colorado. A computerized feedback…

  1. When Faculty Assess Integrative Learning: Faculty Inquiry to Improve Learning Community Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lardner, Emily; Malnarich, Gillies

    2009-01-01

    The "little blue book"--an affectionate title used by admirers of Student Assessment-as-Learning at Alverno College--is written (rather stunningly) "by the Alverno College Faculty." The story behind this paradigm-shifting work on assessment underscores the vital role faculty inquiry plays in institutional and system-wide…

  2. Assessing Instructional Documents: A Comparison of Writing Faculty, Engineering Faculty and Workplace Technical Communicator Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napierkowski, Harriet

    A study examined the assessment of instructional documents written by undergraduate engineering students in a 300-level technical writing course. The six documents were independently ranked by nine readers--three writing faculty, three engineering faculty, and three technical writing professionals. Besides ranking the documents, the nine readers…

  3. An Exploration of Global Leadership Practices Implemented by Successful Higher Education Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Vicki Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative research study explored global leadership practices implemented by higher education faculty members from eight different states in the U.S. who lead in a global environment. Four research questions guided the exploration of personal and scholarly practices that successful higher education faculty members implement. A purposeful,…

  4. Ten Engineers Reading: Disjunctions between Preference and Practice in Civil Engineering Faculty Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Summer Smith; Patton, Martha D.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that engineering faculty do not follow best practices when commenting on students' technical writing. However, it is unclear whether the faculty prefer to comment in these ineffective ways, or whether they prefer more effective practices but simply do not enact them. This study adapts a well known study of response…

  5. Ten Engineers Reading: Disjunctions between Preference and Practice in Civil Engineering Faculty Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Summer Smith; Patton, Martha D.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that engineering faculty do not follow best practices when commenting on students' technical writing. However, it is unclear whether the faculty prefer to comment in these ineffective ways, or whether they prefer more effective practices but simply do not enact them. This study adapts a well known study of response…

  6. Investigating Faculty Development Program Assessment Practices: What's Being Done and How Can It Be Improved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Susan R.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated faculty development program assessment practices through one-on-one interviews with 20 faculty developers in public and private colleges and universities in a state in the Upper Midwest. Findings from this study indicated program assessment continues to be a routine practice predominantly focused on superficial measures.…

  7. An Exploration of Global Leadership Practices Implemented by Successful Higher Education Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Vicki Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative research study explored global leadership practices implemented by higher education faculty members from eight different states in the U.S. who lead in a global environment. Four research questions guided the exploration of personal and scholarly practices that successful higher education faculty members implement. A purposeful,…

  8. Barriers to Scholarship in Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy Practice Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jennifer S.; Brazeau, Gayle A.; Weber, Robert J.; Matthews, Hewitt W.; Das, Sudip K.

    2007-01-01

    There has been an increased emphasis on scholarly activities by health sciences faculty members given the importance of the promotion of public health over the last 50 years. Consequently, faculty members are required to place greater emphasis on scholarly activities while maintaining their teaching and service responsibilities. This increasing requirement of scholarly activities has placed great demands on clinical practice faculty members and it has made their management of clinical practice, teaching responsibilities, and expectations for promotion and tenure a difficult task. This retrospective literature review identifies barriers to the scholarship activities of clinical faculty members in dentistry, medicine, nursing, and pharmacy and discusses strategies for enabling faculty members to pursue scholarly activities in the current health science academic environment. The review indicates commonalities of barriers across these 4 disciplines and suggests strategies that could be implemented by all of these disciplines to enable clinical practice faculty members to pursue scholarly activities. PMID:17998988

  9. Pharmacy Practice Department Chairs’ Perspectives on Part-Time Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Susan R.; Mai, Thy

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To identify the benefits and consequences of having part-time faculty members in departments of pharmacy practice from the department chair’s perspective. Methods. A stratified purposive sample of 12 pharmacy practice department chairs was selected. Eleven telephone interviews were conducted. Two investigators independently read interview notes and categorized and enumerated responses to determine major themes using content analysis. The investigators jointly reviewed the data and came to consensus on major themes. Results. Benefits of allowing full-time faculty members to reduce their position to part-time included faculty retention and improved individual faculty work/life balance. Consequences of allowing part-time faculty positions included the challenges of managing individual and departmental workloads, the risk of marginalizing part-time faculty members, and the challenges of promotion and tenure issues. All requests to switch to part-time status were faculty-driven and most were approved. Conclusions. There are a variety of benefits and consequences of having part-time faculty in pharmacy practice departments from the chair’s perspective. Clear faculty and departmental expectations of part-time faculty members need to be established to ensure optimal success of this working arrangement. PMID:22611268

  10. Faculty Evaluation of Educational Strategies in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Mandira; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate faculty opinion of existing medical curricula in two medical schools in different countries in terms of six educational strategies using the "SPICES continuum." Significant differences between existing educational plans of the two medical schools were identified. (LZ)

  11. Faculty Performance Evaluation: The CIPP-SAPS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitcham, Maralynne

    1981-01-01

    The issues of faculty performance evaluation for allied health professionals are addressed. Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP (content-imput-process-product) model is introduced and its development into a CIPP-SAPS (self-administrative-peer- student) model is pursued. (Author/CT)

  12. Dimensions of Teacher Credibility and Faculty-Course Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdridge, William E.

    The author begins with a general review of source credibility research, as an introduction to his study on the dimensions of credibility for teachers in the classroom and the dimensions of faculty-course evaluation questionnaires. His investigation utilized 46 semantic differential scales for the concepts "this teacher" and "this class," using as…

  13. Faculty Evaluation of Educational Strategies in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Mandira; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate faculty opinion of existing medical curricula in two medical schools in different countries in terms of six educational strategies using the "SPICES continuum." Significant differences between existing educational plans of the two medical schools were identified. (LZ)

  14. Evaluating Sources: Strategies for Faculty-Librarian-Student Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons-O'Neill, Elizabeth

    In one university, bibliographic labs were developed to help students retrieve and evaluate sources in the disciplines of history and literature. The labs were designed not only to provide training in the skills necessary for preparing a research presentation and paper, but to build on the foundation of faculty-librarian-student collaboration to…

  15. Usefulness of a personal digital assistant-based advanced practice nursing student clinical log: Faculty stakeholder exemplars.

    PubMed

    Bakken, Suzanne; Jenkins, Melinda; Choi, Jeeyae; Hyun, Sookyung; John, Ritamarie; Joyce, Myra; Lee, Nam-Ju; Roberts, Wm Dan; Soupios, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The number of health sciences educational programs that are integrating personal digital assistants (PDAs) into their curricula is on the rise. In this paper, we report an evaluation of the usefulness of a PDA-based advanced practice nursing (APN) student clinical log through faculty stakeholder exemplars in three areas: pediatric asthma care; procedures of Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (NP) students; and diagnostic and screening procedures of Women's Health NP students. We generated descriptive data through routine queries and through custom SQL queries at the request of a specific faculty member who wished to examine a particular aspect of an educational program. In addition, we discussed the potential implications of the data with the respective faculty members. The exemplars provide evidence that faculty stakeholders found the APN student clinical log to be useful for a variety of purposes including monitoring of student performance, benchmarking, and quality of care assessments.

  16. Evaluation Tools: Student's Assessment of Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David Lile; Hayes, Evelyn R.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses tools for student evaluation of college teaching in the nursing profession. Because much of the teaching is done in teams rather than by individuals, and much of it occurs outside the traditional classroom, special evaluation tools have been devised and are described. (JOW)

  17. Current Supervisory and Evaluation Practices: Paradoxes and Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stephen A.

    Principals' supervisory and evaluation practices are assessed in this study. Mailed questionnaires to all K-12 principals in a county within the Detroit metropolitan area yielded an overall 94 percent response rate. Principals were asked for numbers of total faculty, faculty observed, minutes of observation, types of data used to make judgments,…

  18. From Theory to Practice: Faculty Training in Business Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatright, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Claims that training business faculty in ethics is a critical component of including ethics in the business curriculum. Includes suggestions concerning what business faculty should know about ethical theory, how to include theory, and curricular and teaching issues. Describes research projects, publications, and workshops. (DK)

  19. Comparing Chemistry Faculty Beliefs about Grading with Grading Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutambuki, Jacinta; Fynewever, Herb

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we seek to understand the beliefs that chemistry faculty hold when grading student solutions in problem solving situations. We are particularly interested in examining whether a conflict exists between the chemistry faculty beliefs and the score they assign to students' solutions. The three categorical values identified in a similar…

  20. From Theory to Practice: Faculty Training in Business Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatright, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Claims that training business faculty in ethics is a critical component of including ethics in the business curriculum. Includes suggestions concerning what business faculty should know about ethical theory, how to include theory, and curricular and teaching issues. Describes research projects, publications, and workshops. (DK)

  1. Cultivating Faculty Support for Institutional Effectiveness Activities: Benchmarking Best Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, John F.; Metcalf, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Measured the impact of four predictor variables on faculty perceptions about the importance of institutional effectiveness activities. Found that three variables are critical to faculty support for institutional effectiveness activities: (1) institutional motivation for pursuing these activities; (2) level of involvement or participation in…

  2. Service-Learning Is... How Faculty Explain Their Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Niehaus, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers have explored faculty engagement in service-learning. However, scholarship rarely considers ways in which the discourses used by faculty to describe service-learning--the stories they tell about what it is they are doing and why--construct images of subject positions, problems, and solutions that inform our beliefs about…

  3. Mentoring Functions Practiced by Undergraduate Faculty in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Ashley J.; Retallick, Michael S.; Martin, Robert; Steiner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The literature has indicated that faculty and administrators are often uncertain about how to foster effective mentoring relationships with undergraduate students. This study analyzed the mentoring functions of faculty in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University regarding the undergraduate mentoring process. Six…

  4. An Exploration of Faculty Hiring Practices in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, Suzanne; Jones, Barbara R.; Moore Jr., William

    2004-01-01

    With the average age of faculty members exceeding 55, it is expected that "large numbers of community college faculty may retire at virtually the same time and in the near future" (Gahn & Twombly, 2001, p. 260). In the wake of their exodus, it is a reasonable assumption that community colleges will be faced with hiring many new full-…

  5. An Exploration of Faculty Hiring Practices in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, Suzanne; Jones, Barbara; Moore, William

    2004-01-01

    With the average age of faculty members exceeding 55, it is expected that "large numbers of community college faculty may retire at virtually the same time and in the near future" (Gahn & Twombly, 2001, p. 260). In the wake of their exodus, it is a reasonable assumption that community colleges will be faced with hiring many new full- and part-time…

  6. Institutionalizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Storms, Stephanie Burrell; Lopez, Paula Gill; Colwell, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    In higher education, faculty work is typically enacted--and rewarded--on an individual basis. Efforts to promote collaboration run counter to the individual and competitive reward systems that characterize higher education. Mentoring initiatives that promote faculty collaboration and support also defy the structural and cultural norms of higher…

  7. Faculty Work Practices in Material Environments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Aaron M.; Berger, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    There is an extensive and well-developed body of literature on the nature of faculty work (e.g., Blackburn & Lawrence, 1996; Schuster & Finkelstein, 2006) that has examined numerous aspects of faculty work and sources of influence on that work (e.g., intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, personal characteristics, disciplinary affiliation,…

  8. Faculty Work Practices in Material Environments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Aaron M.; Berger, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    There is an extensive and well-developed body of literature on the nature of faculty work (e.g., Blackburn & Lawrence, 1996; Schuster & Finkelstein, 2006) that has examined numerous aspects of faculty work and sources of influence on that work (e.g., intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, personal characteristics, disciplinary affiliation,…

  9. Institutionalizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Storms, Stephanie Burrell; Lopez, Paula Gill; Colwell, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    In higher education, faculty work is typically enacted--and rewarded--on an individual basis. Efforts to promote collaboration run counter to the individual and competitive reward systems that characterize higher education. Mentoring initiatives that promote faculty collaboration and support also defy the structural and cultural norms of higher…

  10. Adjunct Faculty in Developmental Education: Best Practices, Challenges, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datray, Jennifer L.; Saxon, D. Patrick; Martirosyan, Nara M.

    2014-01-01

    Adjunct and part-time faculty are an important resource for developmental education programs. Developmental courses and services are developed to serve underprepared, at-risk college students typically near the beginning of their college matriculation. According to Schults (2001), approximately 65% of the faculty teaching developmental education…

  11. Faculty Practice in Joint Appointments: Implications for Nursing Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitz, Janice M.; Heinzer, Marjorie M.

    2000-01-01

    Nursing faculty's joint appointments may involve clinical, research, or administrative roles. These dual responsibilities have many benefits but pose challenges in prioritizing work and dealing with workload increases and fatigue. Joint appointments give faculty the opportunity to provide staff development to clinical nurses. (SK)

  12. Culturally Responsive Teaching Knowledge and Practices of Online Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitner, Keri L.; Jennings, Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Cultural differences between faculty and their students can create important challenges that affect the quality and efficacy of online teaching and learning. The objectives of this study were to: (a) create and pilot test an assessment for online faculty to measure culturally responsive teaching knowledge (CRT) and culturally responsive…

  13. Effective Faculty Evaluation at the Teaching-Centered University: Building a Fair and Authentic Portfolio of Faculty Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the most fair, authentic, and reliable elements to include in a portfolio of faculty work, specifically at teaching-centered institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper examines and evaluates relevant literature pertaining to faculty portfolios of work and recommends portfolio formats…

  14. Effective Faculty Evaluation at the Teaching-Centered University: Building a Fair and Authentic Portfolio of Faculty Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the most fair, authentic, and reliable elements to include in a portfolio of faculty work, specifically at teaching-centered institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper examines and evaluates relevant literature pertaining to faculty portfolios of work and recommends portfolio formats…

  15. Evaluating Art: Policies and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Samuel L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed administrators of theatre programs to determine the importance and value of artistic work by theatre faculty to institutional goals and in tenure decisions. Found (1) great variations in the degree to which artistic quality is valued and (2) dissatisfaction with the criteria and procedures for evaluating theatre faculty. (PD)

  16. A survey of the views of US veterinary teaching faculty to owned cat housing practices.

    PubMed

    Salo, Allen L; Stone, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    According to the American Pet Products Association, in the USA there are an estimated 86.4 million owned cats, and approximately 40% of these are allowed to roam outdoors. Little has been written about the contribution of owned cats to problems attributed to feral cats, including wildlife predation, spread of zoonotic diseases and overpopulation. A recent study found that 64% of cats have visited the veterinarian within the past year, suggesting frequent opportunity for veterinarians to communicate risks and benefits of indoor vs outdoor living. We conducted the following survey to evaluate current views about this role of veterinarians, by surveying veterinary school faculty (n = 158). Our objectives were to assess (i) the degree to which veterinary teaching faculty believe that the issue of clients maintaining owned cats indoors vs outdoors is appropriate for discussion with students within the veterinary school curriculum; (ii) the degree of agreement and understanding there is among the faculty as to the reasons that clients maintain cats either inside or outside the home; and (iii) the degree to which veterinary faculty believe owned cats that are allowed to go outdoors contribute to various identified problems. The results indicated that many participants believed that the discussion of maintaining cats indoors is relevant to the profession, that it belongs in the veterinary school curriculum, that they understand client motivations, that they feel that more practicing veterinarians should discuss cat housing practices with clients and that cat overpopulation continues to be a significant concern for owned cats being outdoors. Additional ways to help maintain the health and wellbeing of cats that are primarily housed indoors is briefly discussed, including through such means as environmental enrichment or by providing cats access to safe areas while outdoors.

  17. Faculty Use and Perception of Mobile Information and Communication Technology (m-ICT) for Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Chung, Chung Joo; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider faculty use and perception of mobile information and communication technology (m-ICT) for teaching practices. The researchers examined qualitative responses about specific m-ICT use and efficiency amongst Korean and US faculty (n = 59) at three different institutions. Findings from multi-level textual…

  18. Data Management Practices and Perspectives of Atmospheric Scientists and Engineering Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Christie; Mischo, William H.

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes 21 in-depth interviews of engineering and atmospheric science faculty at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) to determine faculty data management practices and needs within the context of their research activities. A detailed literature review of previous large-scale and institutional surveys and interviews…

  19. Perceptions of Faculty Development Practices and Structures that Influence Teaching at High Performance Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Perceptions of faculty development practices and structures were compared between 13 high performing schools identified in the DEEP study (Kuh, Kinzie, Schuh, Whitt, 2005) to clarify the relationship between faculty development variables and effective teaching. A phenomenological design was employed to triangulate quantitative and qualitative data…

  20. Application of Community of Practice Theory to the Preparation of Engineering Graduate Students for Faculty Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crede, Erin D.; Borrego, Maura; McNair, Lisa D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how theory can inform the design of a program to prepare graduate students for faculty careers. Preparing Future Faculty programs within and beyond engineering are not new, but explicit application of Communities of Practice and related literature is novel. We describe a prestigious teaching fellowship program that…

  1. Faculty Use and Perception of Mobile Information and Communication Technology (m-ICT) for Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Chung, Chung Joo; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider faculty use and perception of mobile information and communication technology (m-ICT) for teaching practices. The researchers examined qualitative responses about specific m-ICT use and efficiency amongst Korean and US faculty (n = 59) at three different institutions. Findings from multi-level textual…

  2. Transferring Information from Faculty Development to Classroom Practice: A Mixed-Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winslow, Matthew P.; Skubik-Peplaski, Camille; Burkett, Barry

    2017-01-01

    Professional learning communities (PLCs) are an effective way for faculty to learn about pedagogical topics and tactics. However, less is known about how effective they are at changing the teaching practices of the faculty participants and ultimately student learning. This article describes a mixed-method study of such a transfer of knowledge. In…

  3. The Influence and Outcomes of a STEM Education Research Faculty Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.

    2016-01-01

    To address the need to increase STEM faculty member expertise in STEM education research I developed a faculty community of practice (FCP) focused on increasing knowledge and experience in STEM education research. The STEM Education Research Scholars Group (SERSG) met every other week during the academic year to study and engage in education…

  4. Lessons in Higher Education: Five Pedagogical Practices that Promote Active Learning for Faculty and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Active learning by faculty members complements and promotes active learning for students. Through The Andrew W. Mellon Teaching and Learning Institute at Bryn Mawr College, faculty members actively engage with one another and with undergraduate students positioned as pedagogical consultants to explore and to practice a wide range of pedagogies. In…

  5. Data Management Practices and Perspectives of Atmospheric Scientists and Engineering Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Christie; Mischo, William H.

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes 21 in-depth interviews of engineering and atmospheric science faculty at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) to determine faculty data management practices and needs within the context of their research activities. A detailed literature review of previous large-scale and institutional surveys and interviews…

  6. The Influence and Outcomes of a STEM Education Research Faculty Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.

    2016-01-01

    To address the need to increase STEM faculty member expertise in STEM education research I developed a faculty community of practice (FCP) focused on increasing knowledge and experience in STEM education research. The STEM Education Research Scholars Group (SERSG) met every other week during the academic year to study and engage in education…

  7. Perceptions of Faculty Development Practices and Structures that Influence Teaching at High Performance Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Perceptions of faculty development practices and structures were compared between 13 high performing schools identified in the DEEP study (Kuh, Kinzie, Schuh, Whitt, 2005) to clarify the relationship between faculty development variables and effective teaching. A phenomenological design was employed to triangulate quantitative and qualitative data…

  8. Assessing Interprofessional education in a student-faculty collaborative practice network.

    PubMed

    Young, Grace J; Cohen, Marya J; Blanchfield, Bonnie B; Jones, Meissa M; Reidy, Patricia A; Weinstein, Amy R

    2017-07-01

    Although interprofessional relationships are ubiquitous in clinical practice, undergraduate medical students have limited opportunities to develop these relationships in the clinical setting. A few student-faculty collaborative practice networks (SFCPNs) have been working to address this issue, but limited data exist examining the nature and extent of these practices. A systematic survey at a Harvard-affiliated SFCPN is utilised to evaluate the quantity and quality of interprofessional interactions, isolate improvements, and identify challenges in undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE). Our data corroborate previous findings in which interprofessional clinical learning was shown to have positive effects on student development and align with all four domains of Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies, including interprofessional ethics and values, roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication, and teams and teamwork. These results highlight the unique opportunity and growing necessity of integrating IPE in SFCPNs to endorse the development of collaborative and professional competencies in clinical modalities of patient care.

  9. New Clinical Faculty Training Program: Transforming Practicing Dentists into Part-Time Dental Faculty Members.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brooke N; Kirkup, Michele L; Willis, Lisa H; Reifeis, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    At Indiana University School of Dentistry, a New Clinical Faculty Training (NCFT) program was created with the primary goals of informing new part-time faculty members of clinical policies and assessment guidelines and thus developing qualified and satisfied faculty members. The aim of this study was to determine if participation in the training program improved the participants' satisfaction and competence in comparison to their colleagues who did not participate in the program. Two cohorts were compared: a control group of part-time faculty members who did not receive formal training when they were hired (n=21; response rate 58.3%); and the intervention group, who had participated in the NCFT program (n=12; response rate 80%). A survey of faculty members in the control group gathered information on their experiences when initially hired, and a pretest was administered to measure their knowledge of clinical policies. After the control group was given an overview of the program, their feedback was collected through post surveys, and a posttest identical to the pretest was given that found statistically significant increases on questions one (p=0.003) and four (p=0.025). In February 2014, 15 new faculty members participated in the pilot implementation of the NCFT program. Of those 15, 12 (the intervention group) completed follow-up surveys identical to the pre survey used with the control group. Statistically significant differences were found for the factors clinical teaching (p=0.005) and assessment training (p=0.008) with better responses for the NCFT group. These results suggest that participation in the program was associated with improved clinical teaching knowledge and job satisfaction.

  10. A nursing faculty practice for the severely mentally ill: merging practice with research.

    PubMed

    Chafetz, Linda; Collins-Bride, Geraldine M; White, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This Faculty Practice developed in response to increasing medical complexity among severely mentally ill adults in community programs. It represents collaboration between an academic nursing program and Progress Foundation, a residential care provider in San Francisco for the severely mentally ill (SMI). Over ten years, the practice and research agenda have evolved together, through a commitment to mutual collaboration by clinicians and researchers from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing, and the mental health community. Initial efforts at research focused on description of clients and practice. Research efforts have broadened and evolve to include an on-going clinical trial that tests the value of adding active health promotion to primary care. Factors contributing to success included trust among research and clinical faculty and community partners, use of clinical data in the service of practice and education, and relative freedom from fiscal administration. The merging of practice and research increases visibility of nursing contributions and will allow testing of models for care.

  11. Faculty performance evaluation: the CIPP-SAPS model.

    PubMed

    Mitcham, M

    1981-11-01

    The issues of faculty performance evaluation for allied health professionals are addressed. Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP (content-input-process-product) model is introduced and its development in a CIPP-SAPS (self-administrative-peer-student) model is pursued. Data sources for the SAPS portion of the model are discussed. A suggestion for the use of the CIPP-SAPS model within a teaching contract plan is explored.

  12. The Evaluation of Burnout Levels of Sports Sciences Faculty Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocaeksi, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the burnout levels of sports sciences faculty students in terms of some other variables. 46 Female (Age, M: 20.88 ± 1.86) and 107 male (Age, M: 22.15 ± 2.15) in total 153 students participated in this research. Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Form (MBI-SF) was used for data collection. Descriptive…

  13. Changing assessment practice through in situ faculty development.

    PubMed

    Pickworth, G E; Snyman, W D

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the process of an in situ staff development process with the objective to influence change in assessment practice. An in situ training course focusing on writing questions for written examinations, but also including some contextual aspects of assessment practice, was therefore developed and implemented. The anticipated change was measured against Kirkpatrick's four levels for evaluating training programmes. As a whole, the reaction from the participants was positive (Kirkpatrick Level 1), and in a number of instances, learning, which includes changes in attitude, knowledge and skills (Kirkpatrick Level 2) and change in behaviour (Kirkpatrick Level 3), was observed. To conclude, the staff development initiative in the form of in situ assessment training facilitated change resulting in an improvement in assessment practice in the School in a relatively short period of time.

  14. Faculty development efforts to promote screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) in an internal medicine faculty-resident practice.

    PubMed

    Stone, Alanna; Wamsley, Maria; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Satterfield, Jason; Satre, Derek D; Julian, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is a practical means to address substance misuse in primary care. Important barriers to implementing SBIRT include adequacy of training and provider confidence as well as logistical hurdles and time constraints. A faculty development initiative aimed at increasing SBIRT knowledge and treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) should lead to increased use of SBIRT by faculty and the residents they teach. This study examined how a faculty development program to promote SBIRT influenced faculty practice and resident teaching. This was a cross-sectional study of faculty exposed to multiple SBIRT educational interventions over a 5-year period in an academic faculty-resident general medicine practice. Participants completed a brief online survey followed by a semistructured interview. Quantitative responses were examined descriptively. Qualitative questions were reviewed to identify key themes. Fifteen of 29 faculty (52%) completed the survey and 13 (45%) completed the interviews regarding faculty development interventions. Faculty thought that SBIRT was an important skill and had confidence in screening for substance use disorders, although confidence in making treatment referrals and prescribing pharmacotherapy were rated lower. Many faculty reported screening more frequently for SUDs after attending faculty development sessions. However, several reported that the training did not improve their SBIRT teaching to residents during clinic precepting sessions. To improve uptake of SBIRT, a majority of faculty recommended electronic health record (EHR) alerts. SBIRT is a highly valued set of skills, and training may enhance rates of screening for substance misuse. However, participants did not report a substantial change in SBIRT teaching as a result of faculty development. In the future, small, targeted faculty development sessions, potentially involving strategies for using the electronic health record (EHR

  15. Nursing faculty mentors as facilitators for evidence-based nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jeffers, Brenda Recchia; Robinson, Sherry; Luxner, Karla; Redding, Donna

    2008-01-01

    Increasing use of evidence-based practice (EBP) within complex healthcare organizations requires the identification of individuals who will support and facilitate new practice patterns. In a large Midwestern hospital, a diverse group of academic nursing faculty functioning as mentors to develop clinical nurses' skills in the use of EBP has demonstrated early success. This article highlights the context, challenges, and successes of faculty mentors for developing nursing staff's involvement in and use of EBP.

  16. Implementing faculty evaluation of written sign-out.

    PubMed

    Bump, Gregory M; Jacob, Jerry; Abisse, Saddam S; Bost, James E; Elnicki, D Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recently the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education mandated decreased shift duration for intern physicians to no more than 16 hours. Such work-hour restrictions are likely to increase patient care hand-offs. It is well accepted that sign-out (i.e., hand-off) processes are error prone and lack standardization. Moreover, many residency programs do not evaluate sign-out. We designed and tested whether a sign-out evaluation process could be implemented to improve written sign-out. Based on observed sign-out deficiencies at our institution we adapted a simple curriculum incorporating the SIGNOUT mnemonic, which we paired with weekly faculty member evaluation and feedback on sign-out using a structured sign-out evaluation tool. Later in the week, written sign-out was independently scored by 2-blinded senior resident reviewers who compared the inclusion of sign-out content, organization, and readability. Compared to baseline data in 128 written sign-outs, the pairing of a 1-page curriculum with weekly faculty member evaluation of written sign-out improved the inclusion of advanced directives from 38% to 69% (p < .001) and anticipatory guidance from a mean score of 1.8 (SD = 1.2) to 2.3 (SD = 1.5) on a 5-point scale (p = .01) in 177 written sign-outs. Readability and organization were unchanged. A simple curriculum paired with structured faculty evaluation and feedback can improve some parameters of sign-out. Structured evaluative sign-out tools may be useful to improve and teach sign-out skills.

  17. Learning Styles and Teaching Perspectives of Canadian Pharmacy Practice Residents and Faculty Preceptors

    PubMed Central

    Jelescu-Bodos, Anca

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To characterize and compare learning styles of pharmacy practice residents and their faculty preceptors, and identify teaching perspectives of faculty preceptors. Methods. Twenty-nine pharmacy residents and 306 pharmacy faculty members in British Columbia were invited to complete the Pharmacists’ Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS). Faculty preceptors also were asked to complete the Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI). Results. One hundred percent of residents and 61% of faculty members completed the PILS, and 31% of faculty members completed the TPI. The most common dominant learning style among residents and faculty preceptors was assimilator, and 93% were assimilators, convergers, or both. The distribution of dominant learning styles between residents and faculty members was not different (p=0.77). The most common dominant teaching perspective among faculty members was apprenticeship. Conclusion. Residents and preceptors mostly exhibited learning styles associated with abstract over concrete thinking or watching over doing. Residency programs should steer residents more toward active learning and doing, and maximize interactions with patients and other caregivers. PMID:24159204

  18. Rewarding Collegiality: The Use of Collegiality as a Factor in Faculty Evaluation and Employment Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship-Knox, Ann E.; Platt, R. Eric; Read, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    As part of the promotion and tenure process, colleges and universities have primarily evaluated faculty members on three key functional areas: research, teaching, and service. In this article, we examine how the use of collegiality as a possible fourth criterion for faculty evaluation affects faculty power dynamics, how U.S. courts have addressed…

  19. Fostering Educational Research among Medical Teachers: Evaluation of a Faculty Development Program in India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Tripti K; Waghmare, Lalitbhushan S; Rawekar, Alka; Mishra, Ved Prakash

    2016-12-01

    Medical education can be enormously benefitted from research. Since clinicians/medical teachers are directly involved in teaching learning processes, they should participate in Educational Research (ER) practices to generate evidence and insights about teaching learning. Faculty Development Program (FDP) has a positive influence amongst health professionals and therefore can prove to be of consequence in instilling a strong educational research culture. Present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of a Faculty Development Fellowship Program in Medical Education to foster educational research culture amongst medical teachers. Study utilized the Kirkpatrick model of program evaluation for evaluating the fellowship program. It aimed to evaluate the third level of the model i.e., "Change in Behaviour" of participants (n=40) after completion of the course. The tool used was a pre-validated survey questionnaire consisting of five items. Study population was sparsely aware about educational research and had never attempted the same (100%) before joining the fellowship program. A 32.5% faculty with average professional experience of seven years undertook new educational projects after the fellowship and knowledge gained during fellowship program helped them in guiding educational research (coded into four categories) at their workplaces. There is a need, to direct effort towards focused training for educational research through FDPs for medical teachers. This will encourage academicians and clinicians to become active in ER and guide policies in Teaching Learning Practices in Medical Education.

  20. Fostering Educational Research among Medical Teachers: Evaluation of a Faculty Development Program in India

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Lalitbhushan S; Rawekar, Alka; Mishra, Ved Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Medical education can be enormously benefitted from research. Since clinicians/medical teachers are directly involved in teaching learning processes, they should participate in Educational Research (ER) practices to generate evidence and insights about teaching learning. Faculty Development Program (FDP) has a positive influence amongst health professionals and therefore can prove to be of consequence in instilling a strong educational research culture. Aim Present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of a Faculty Development Fellowship Program in Medical Education to foster educational research culture amongst medical teachers. Materials and Methods Study utilized the Kirkpatrick model of program evaluation for evaluating the fellowship program. It aimed to evaluate the third level of the model i.e., “Change in Behaviour” of participants (n=40) after completion of the course. The tool used was a pre-validated survey questionnaire consisting of five items. Results Study population was sparsely aware about educational research and had never attempted the same (100%) before joining the fellowship program. A 32.5% faculty with average professional experience of seven years undertook new educational projects after the fellowship and knowledge gained during fellowship program helped them in guiding educational research (coded into four categories) at their workplaces. Conclusion There is a need, to direct effort towards focused training for educational research through FDPs for medical teachers. This will encourage academicians and clinicians to become active in ER and guide policies in Teaching Learning Practices in Medical Education. PMID:28208883

  1. Work-life balance of nursing faculty in research- and practice-focused doctoral programs.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Jenkinson, Amanda; Nthenge, Serah

    2015-01-01

    The growing shortage of nursing faculty and the need for faculty to teach doctoral students to address the shortage call for examination of factors that may contribute to the shortage, including those that are potentially modifiable, including work-life balance.This descriptive study examined work-life balance of a national sample of nursing faculty teaching in research-focused and practice-focused doctoral programs. Data were collected through an online survey of 554 doctoral program faculty members to identify their perceptions of work-life balance and predictors of work-life balance. Work-life balance scores indicated better work-life balance than expected. Factors associated with good work-life balance included higher academic rank, having tenure, older age, years in education, current faculty position, and no involvement in clinical practice. Current faculty position was the best predictor of work-life balance. Although work-life balance was viewed positively by study participants, efforts are needed to strengthen factors related to positive work/life in view of the increasing workload of doctoral faculty as the numbers of doctoral students increase and the number of seasoned faculty decrease with anticipated waves of retirements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Delphi Study: Exploring Faculty Perceptions of the Best Practices Influencing Student Persistence in Blended Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Kim Elise

    2010-01-01

    This Delphi study explored the instructional practices of community college faculty who were teaching blended or Web-assisted courses and how these practices influenced student persistence. The Delphi method provided qualitative data in the form of expert advice through consensus building on the instructional practices most likely to influence…

  3. Mentoring within a Community of Practice for Faculty Development: Adding Value to a CTL Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Patricia E.; Klaf, Suzanna

    2015-01-01

    E. R. Smith, P. E. Calderwood, F. Dohm, and P. Gill Lopez's (2013) model of integrated mentoring within a community of practice framework draws attention to how mentoring as practice, identity, and process gives shape and character to a community of practice for higher education faculty and alerts us to several challenges such a framework makes…

  4. Mentoring within a Community of Practice for Faculty Development: Adding Value to a CTL Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Patricia E.; Klaf, Suzanna

    2015-01-01

    E. R. Smith, P. E. Calderwood, F. Dohm, and P. Gill Lopez's (2013) model of integrated mentoring within a community of practice framework draws attention to how mentoring as practice, identity, and process gives shape and character to a community of practice for higher education faculty and alerts us to several challenges such a framework makes…

  5. Aligning teaching practices with an understanding of quality teaching: a faculty development agenda.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Hiromi; Hitchcock, Maurice A

    2011-01-01

    To guide the future faculty development practices in a better manner, it is important to determine how clinical teachers perceive their own skill development. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which clinical teachers aligned their teaching practices, as measured with a self-rating instrument, with their understanding of what constitutes good clinical teaching. A sample of 1523 residents and 737 faculty members completed the clinical teaching perception inventory (CTPI) online and ranked 28 single-word descriptors that characterized clinical teachers along a seven-point scale in two measures, "My Ideal Teacher" and "Myself as a Teacher." Faculty and residents showed strikingly similar discrepancies, in both their magnitudes and directions, between their ratings of "My Ideal Teacher" and those of "Myself as a Teacher." Both residents and faculty found it most difficult to develop the stimulating, well-read, and innovative nature to meet their own standards. Data did not support our hypothesis that faculty would demonstrate stronger congruence between "My Ideal Teacher" and "Myself as a Teacher" than residents. Medical faculty would benefit from future faculty development practices that are designed to assist them in becoming stimulating, well-read, and innovative teachers, while using less control and caution in their teaching.

  6. A faculty trainer model: increasing knowledge and changing practice to improve perinatal HIV prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Burr, Carolyn K; Storm, Deborah S; Gross, Elaine

    2006-03-01

    Although routine counseling and HIV testing of pregnant women is recommended, it is not yet universally offered. This paper reports on a project that trained health care providers from 2000 to 2002 using a faculty trainer (or train-the-trainer) model. The goals of the projects were to increase knowledge and change practice, increase HIV counseling and testing in prenatal care, and improve management of HIV in pregnant women. In four jurisdictions of the southeastern United States, 193 health care providers attended faculty trainer workshops using a standardized curriculum. Eighteen providers used the curriculum to train an additional 545 health care providers over 2 years. Participants in both faculty trainer workshops and trainerled seminars reported significant increases in perceived knowledge in all content areas and the intention to change clinical practice. The number of providers who became faculty trainers and then led seminars varied widely among the jurisdictions. Six-month follow-up of faculty trainers, although limited by a 63% response rate, found that over 90% of respondents reported the workshop had a positive impact on their care of women with and at risk for HIV. Our findings indicate the faculty trainer model is an effective way to educate practicing clinicians. Key elements to successful implementation were: ongoing support of faculty trainers by acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) educators, involvement of local HIV experts as trainers and resource persons, and use of a standardized curriculum based on national guidelines.

  7. Reconceptualizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Dohm, Faith A.; Gill Lopez, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing knowledge base on mentoring in academia, providing effective mentoring for faculty presents several complex dilemmas for academic units charged with facilitating mentoring. How do we institutionalize voluntary and spontaneous mentoring interaction? How do we support a collaborative climate in an inherently individual and…

  8. Factors Influencing Satisfaction for Family Practice Residency Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Lawrence E.; D'Amico, Frank

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 383 faculty in family medical-residency programs explored perceptions of 60 professional, scheduling, compensation, and regional factors as they related to overall job satisfaction and career plans, and 59 factors related to the initial decision to enter academic family medicine. Results indicate high levels of satisfaction, feeling…

  9. Reconceptualizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Dohm, Faith A.; Gill Lopez, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing knowledge base on mentoring in academia, providing effective mentoring for faculty presents several complex dilemmas for academic units charged with facilitating mentoring. How do we institutionalize voluntary and spontaneous mentoring interaction? How do we support a collaborative climate in an inherently individual and…

  10. Teaching the teachers: helping faculty in a family practice residency improve their informatics skills.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Cynthia A; Korsen, Neil; Urbach, Lynn E

    2002-05-01

    Faculty members in family practice residencies are increasingly being asked to help residents develop skills in the use of informatics and evidence-based medicine (EBM). In order to do this successfully the teachers themselves must be skilled in the use of these tools. Recognizing the need for such training, the Maine Medical Center Family Practice Residency Program designed a faculty development project to increase knowledge and skills in the use of information technology. This project, which was carried out in 1999-2001, utilized a multifaceted approach that included improving the residency's technology infrastructure, conducting two instructional workshops, and offering EBM mentoring for preceptors. Faculty members also designed and carried out independent informatics projects. Pre- and post-project assessments of faculty members demonstrated a significant improvement in computer and EBM skills, and informal feedback from residents indicates that these skills have been successfully applied to the faculty members' teaching of residents and their practice of family medicine. This project had a positive impact on the faculty members in the residency program, increasing both their ability to employ information technology in individual and group teaching sessions and their use of EBM in clinical practice. Also, the culture within the residency program has been changed to one of utilizing computers and the Internet as principal resources for up-to-date information.

  11. Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide No. 1; Developing faculty to effectively facilitate interprofessional education

    PubMed Central

    Zierler, Brenda K.

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of interprofessional education (IPE) and practice in health professional schools, faculty members are being asked to assume new roles in leading or delivering interprofessional curriculum. Many existing faculty members feel ill-prepared to face the challenges of this curricular innovation. From 2012–2013, University of Missouri – Columbia and University of Washington partnered with six additional academic health centers to pilot a faculty development course to prepare faculty leaders for IPE. Using a variety of techniques, including didactic teaching, small group exercises, immersion participation in interprofessional education, local implementation of new IPE projects, and peer learning, the program positioned each site to successfully introduce an interprofessional innovation. Participating faculty confirmed the value of the program, and suggested that more widespread similar efforts were worthwhile. This guide briefly describes this faculty development program and identifies key lessons learned from the initiative. Peer learning arising from a faculty development community, adaptation of curricula to fit local context, experiential learning, and ongoing coaching/mentoring, especially as it related to actual participation in IPE activities, were among the key elements of this successful faculty development activity. PMID:25019466

  12. Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide No. 1: developing faculty to effectively facilitate interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Hall, Leslie Walter; Zierler, Brenda K

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of interprofessional education (IPE) and practice in health professional schools, faculty members are being asked to assume new roles in leading or delivering interprofessional curriculum. Many existing faculty members feel ill-prepared to face the challenges of this curricular innovation. From 2012-2013, University of Missouri - Columbia and University of Washington partnered with six additional academic health centers to pilot a faculty development course to prepare faculty leaders for IPE. Using a variety of techniques, including didactic teaching, small group exercises, immersion participation in interprofessional education, local implementation of new IPE projects, and peer learning, the program positioned each site to successfully introduce an interprofessional innovation. Participating faculty confirmed the value of the program, and suggested that more widespread similar efforts were worthwhile. This guide briefly describes this faculty development program and identifies key lessons learned from the initiative. Peer learning arising from a faculty development community, adaptation of curricula to fit local context, experiential learning, and ongoing coaching/mentoring, especially as it related to actual participation in IPE activities, were among the key elements of this successful faculty development activity.

  13. Number and impact of published scholarly works by pharmacy practice faculty members at accredited US colleges and schools of pharmacy (2001-2003).

    PubMed

    Coleman, Craig I; Schlesselman, Lauren S; Lao, Eang; White, C Michael

    2007-06-15

    To evaluate the quantity and quality of published literature conducted by pharmacy practice faculty members in US colleges and schools of pharmacy for the years 2001-2003. The Web of Science bibliographic database was used to identify publication citations for the years 2001-2003, which were then evaluated in a number of different ways. Faculty members were identified using American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy rosters for the 2000-2001, 2001-2002, and 2002-2003 academic years. Two thousand three hundred seventy-four pharmacy practice faculty members generated 1,896 publications in Web of Science searchable journals. A small number of faculty members (2.1%) were responsible for a large proportion of publications (30.6%), and only 4.9% of faculty members published 2 or more publications in these journals per year. The average impact factor for the top 200 publications was 7.6. Pharmacy practice faculty members contributed substantially to the biomedical literature and their work has had an important impact. A substantial portion of this work has come from a small subset of faculty members.

  14. An Examination of the Use of Portfolios for Faculty Evaluation at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sain, Becky; Williams, Mitchell R.

    2009-01-01

    This study provides community college leaders with insights regarding how administrators and faculty members perceive faculty portfolios as an evaluation tool in two-year colleges. Utilizing a qualitative design, this study focused on perceptions of administrators and faculty members regarding the use of portfolios as the primary instrument for…

  15. An Examination of the Use of Portfolios for Faculty Evaluation at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sain, Becky; Williams, Mitchell R.

    2009-01-01

    This study provides community college leaders with insights regarding how administrators and faculty members perceive faculty portfolios as an evaluation tool in two-year colleges. Utilizing a qualitative design, this study focused on perceptions of administrators and faculty members regarding the use of portfolios as the primary instrument for…

  16. Five Year Follow-up Evaluation of a Faculty Development Program: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennill, Marcia Marie

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative follow-up evaluation explored the long-term impact of a faculty development program on participants who were five years post program. This study focused on 12 faculty members who participated in the University of Missouri's New Faculty Teaching Scholars program. The nine month program focused on creating a culture of teaching…

  17. Faculty survey to assess research literacy and evidence-informed practice interest and support at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Belinda J; Kligler, Benjamin; Taylor, Barry; Cohen, Hillel W; Marantz, Paul R

    2014-09-01

    Educating healthcare practitioners to understand, critically evaluate, and apply evidence to the clinical practice of complementary and alternative medicine has been an important initiative for the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. To determine the self-assessed research skills and interest of faculty at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine (New York campus) and their likely support of, and participatory interest in, an evidence-based medicine (EBM) training program. The survey was administered in Survey Monkey. All questions were close-ended with 5-point Likert answers, except for one open-ended question at the end of the survey. One of three campuses of Pacific College of Oriental Medicine (PCOM), the largest Chinese medicine college in the United States. 102 faculty employed at PCOM. The response rate was 88.7%. Responses illustrated a generally high degree of interest and support for research, EBM, and institutional participation in research activities. Faculty who responded to the open-ended question (19.6% of respondents) expressed concerns about the relevance of research to Chinese medicine and the possibility of co-option by biomedicine. While faculty were overall supportive and interested in research and EBM, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that success of EBM training programs could be enhanced by soliciting and addressing faculty concerns and by being inclusive of approaches that honor the traditions of Chinese medicine and its own forms of clinical evidence.

  18. Faculty Survey to Assess Research Literacy and Evidence-Informed Practice Interest and Support at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kligler, Benjamin; Taylor, Barry; Cohen, Hillel W.; Marantz, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Context: Educating healthcare practitioners to understand, critically evaluate, and apply evidence to the clinical practice of complementary and alternative medicine has been an important initiative for the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Objective: To determine the self-assessed research skills and interest of faculty at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine (New York campus) and their likely support of, and participatory interest in, an evidence-based medicine (EBM) training program. Design: The survey was administered in Survey Monkey. All questions were close-ended with 5-point Likert answers, except for one open-ended question at the end of the survey. Setting: One of three campuses of Pacific College of Oriental Medicine (PCOM), the largest Chinese medicine college in the United States. Participants: 102 faculty employed at PCOM. Results: The response rate was 88.7%. Responses illustrated a generally high degree of interest and support for research, EBM, and institutional participation in research activities. Faculty who responded to the open-ended question (19.6% of respondents) expressed concerns about the relevance of research to Chinese medicine and the possibility of co-option by biomedicine. Conclusions: While faculty were overall supportive and interested in research and EBM, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that success of EBM training programs could be enhanced by soliciting and addressing faculty concerns and by being inclusive of approaches that honor the traditions of Chinese medicine and its own forms of clinical evidence. PMID:25120170

  19. The impact of the Georgia Health Sciences University nursing faculty practice on tobacco cessation rates.

    PubMed

    Heath, Janie; Inglett, Sandra; Young, Sara; Joshua, Thomas V; Sakievich, Nita; Hawkins, James; Andrews, Jeannette O; Tingen, Martha S

    2012-03-01

    Nursing faculty practice groups can play a vital role in tobacco cessation in academic medical centers. Outcomes from the Georgia Health Sciences University Nursing Faculty Practice Group Tobacco Cessation Program revealed 64% abstinence outcomes at the end of treatment (N = 160) over a 2-year period from the campus-wide tobacco-free policy initiation. A nurse-led, evidence-based, interdisciplinary approach can be an effective strategy to make a difference in the lives of tobacco-dependent individuals, while at the same time integrating practice with education and research. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Faculty Best Practices to Support Students in the "Virtual Doctoral Land"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deshpande, Anant

    2017-01-01

    Online students face numerous challenges in successfully completing doctoral programmes. The aim of this article is to explore the best practices that can be employed by faculty to support students in achieving this. It also seeks to categorize and identify the best practices emerging from literature into themes. An exploratory research method was…

  1. A Survey of Faculty Practice Plans in United States and Canadian Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shnorhokian, Hovhanness; Zullo, Thomas G.

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-eight U.S. and 10 Canadian dental schools responded to a questionnaire concerning whether they had operational Faculty Practice Plans (FPPs) and to describe their plan's characteristics. Results revealed FPPs had little impact on the school's teaching and research functions and a less than harmonious relationship with the practicing dental…

  2. Nursing Faculty Decision Making about Best Practices in Test Construction, Item Analysis, and Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of classroom exams in nursing education there is a great need for research on current practices in nursing education regarding this form of assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing faculty members make decisions about using best practices in classroom test construction, item analysis, and revision in…

  3. Nursing Faculty Decision Making about Best Practices in Test Construction, Item Analysis, and Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of classroom exams in nursing education there is a great need for research on current practices in nursing education regarding this form of assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing faculty members make decisions about using best practices in classroom test construction, item analysis, and revision in…

  4. Using Communities of Practice to Foster Faculty Development in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeter, Christopher; Fenton, Nancy; Nicholson, Karen; Flynn, Terry; Kim, Joseph; McKay, Muriel; O'Shaughnessy, Bridget; Vajoczki, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Communities of practice are becoming more widespread within higher education, yet little research has explored how these social learning networks can enhance faculty development. The focus of this paper is to describe the first-year experience of a community of practice initiative at McMaster University that was designed to engage groups of…

  5. Self-Archiving Journal Articles: A Case Study of Faculty Practice and Missed Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covey, Denise Troll

    2009-01-01

    Carnegie Mellon faculty Web pages and publisher policies were examined to understand self-archiving practice. The breadth of adoption and depth of commitment are not directly correlated within the disciplines. Determining when self-archiving has become a habit is difficult. The opportunity to self-archive far exceeds the practice, and much of what…

  6. Institutional Policies and Practices: Results from the 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF:99), Institution Survey. Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Andrea; Kirshstein, Rita; Rowe, Elizabeth

    This report presents findings from the "Institution Survey" of the 1999 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF). Institutions were asked about their policies and practices related to faculty as of fall 1998. The distribution of faculty across U.S. degree-granting postsecondary institutions reflects the diversity of postsecondary…

  7. The Influence of Orientation, Integration, and Evaluation on Intent to Stay in Part-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Joanne S.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which orientation, evaluation, and integration practices, along with other select job aspects and demographic characteristics, were correlated with and explained intent to stay among part-time clinical nursing faculty. A conceptual model was developed and tested. A researcher…

  8. Evaluation of Adjunct Faculty in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langen, Jill M.

    2011-01-01

    The role that part-time faculty play in higher education is changing. No longer are part-time faculty used on an occasional basis at a few institutions. These individuals now play a critical part in the delivery of higher education to students. This study was developed to answer questions regarding how the performance of adjunct faculty is…

  9. Stimulating Critical Thinking through Faculty Development: Design, Evaluation, and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Leonard E.; And Others

    A faculty development program designed to encourage critical thinking skills across the curriculum at the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire is described in this report. The program's goal was to stimulate faculty to add critical thinking to their pedagogical objectives. Faculty participants attended six 4-hour meetings designed to heighten their…

  10. Evaluation of Adjunct Faculty in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langen, Jill M.

    2011-01-01

    The role that part-time faculty play in higher education is changing. No longer are part-time faculty used on an occasional basis at a few institutions. These individuals now play a critical part in the delivery of higher education to students. This study was developed to answer questions regarding how the performance of adjunct faculty is…

  11. Evaluating Faculty Development and Clinical Training Programs in Substance Abuse: A Guide Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitzner, Michael; Stewart, Kathryn

    Intended to provide an overview of program evaluation as it applies to the evaluation of faculty development and clinical training programs in substance abuse for health and mental health professional schools, this guide enables program developers and other faculty to work as partners with evaluators in the development of evaluation designs that…

  12. Faculty Evaluation in Higher Education: A Review of Court Cases and Implications for the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Pamela M.

    A study of purposes, processes, and results of faculty evaluation in higher education looks at court litigation and the criteria used--or not used--in evaluation: student evaluation, peer evaluation, and faculty qualities examined in courts (defamation of character, immorality, overt undesirable behavior, incompetence, lack of qualifications).…

  13. Online Course Evaluations: Faculty Perspective and Strategies for Improved Response Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, Tena B.; Curtis, Dylan F.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of issues involved with traditional paper versus online course evaluations. Data were gathered from university faculty, who transitioned from traditional paper to online course evaluations. Faculty preferred traditional course evaluations versus online course evaluations by a small margin. However, faculty…

  14. Design and Implementation of an Evaluation Methodology for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, M. G.; Miller, M.; Freeman, M.; Watson, C.; Khalkho, M.; Smith, T.

    2005-12-01

    The NFFP was created in 2002 to accommodate the needs and capabilities of both NASA and the university community. The program combines aspects of two successful former NASA programs, the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the NASA/USRA JOint VEnture (JOVE) program. The NFFP contributes directly to NASA's strategic goal to "inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics", and NASA's Office of Education strategic objective to "strengthen NASA's involvement in higher education to enhance the nation's science and technology capability in NASA related fields to help meet NASA's future personnel needs." The primary goals of the NFFP are to increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to Agency research objectives; provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; involve faculty in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA's strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; facilitate interdisciplinary networking; and establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of the program. Participants are required to submit a research report and complete a program evaluation. The NFFP is evaluated using Web-based survey instruments in the NASA Education Evaluation Information System (NEEIS) that have been designed to collect data that measure program activities and accomplishments against program goals and NASA's education programs evaluation criteria. Data are collected from Faculty Fellows, NASA Colleagues, and students who accompanied Faculty Fellows. Participant Feedback Forms gather quantitative and qualitative information on research accomplishments, the benefits and impacts of the program, and overall program evaluation data. Follow-up feedback instruments are designed to

  15. Alternative Realities: Faculty and Student Perceptions of Instructional Practices in Laboratory Courses

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christopher W.; Blumer, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Curricular reform efforts depend on our ability to determine how courses are taught and how instructional practices affect student outcomes. In this study, we developed a 30-question survey on inquiry-based learning and assessment in undergraduate laboratory courses that was administered to 878 students in 54 courses (41 introductory level and 13 upper level) from 20 institutions (four community colleges, 11 liberal arts colleges, and five universities, of which four were minority-serving institutions). On the basis of an exploratory factor analysis, we defined five constructs: metacognition, feedback and assessment, scientific synthesis, science process skills, and instructor-directed teaching. Using our refined survey of 24 items, we compared student and faculty perceptions of instructional practices both across courses and across instructors. In general, faculty and student perceptions were not significantly related. Although mean perceptions were often similar, faculty perceptions were more variable than those of students, suggesting that faculty may have more nuanced views than students. In addition, student perceptions of some instructional practices were influenced by their previous experience in laboratory courses and their self-efficacy. As student outcomes, such as learning gains, are ultimately most important, future research should examine the degree to which faculty and student perceptions of instructional practices predict student outcomes in different contexts. PMID:27810867

  16. A One-Day Dental Faculty Workshop in Writing Multiple-Choice Questions: An Impact Evaluation.

    PubMed

    AlFaris, Eiad; Naeem, Naghma; Irfan, Farhana; Qureshi, Riaz; Saad, Hussain; Al Sadhan, Ra'ed; Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2015-11-01

    Long training workshops on the writing of exam questions have been shown to be effective; however, the effectiveness of short workshops needs to be demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a one-day, seven-hour faculty development workshop at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, on the quality of multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model was used. Participants' satisfaction (Kirkpatrick's Level 1) was evaluated with a post-workshop questionnaire. A quasi-experimental, randomized separate sample, pretest-posttest design was used to assess the learning effect (Kirkpatrick's Level 2). To evaluate transfer of learning to practice (Kirkpatrick's Level 3), MCQs created by ten faculty members as a result of the training were assessed. To assess Kirkpatrick's Level 4 regarding institutional change, interviews with three key leaders of the school were conducted, coded, and analyzed. A total of 72 course directors were invited to and attended some part of the workshop; all 52 who attended the entire workshop completed the satisfaction form; and 22 of the 36 participants in the experimental group completed the posttest. The results showed that all 52 participants were highly satisfied with the workshop, and significant positive changes were found in the faculty members' knowledge and the quality of their MCQs with effect sizes of 0.7 and 0.28, respectively. At the institutional level, the interviews demonstrated positive structural changes in the school's assessment system. Overall, this one-day item-writing faculty workshop resulted in positive changes at all four of Kirkpatrick's levels; these effects suggest that even a short training session can improve a dental school's assessment of its students.

  17. Reading between the lines: faculty interpretations of narrative evaluation comments.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Shiphra; Regehr, Glenn; Lingard, Lorelei; Eva, Kevin W

    2015-03-01

    Narrative comments are used routinely in many forms of rater-based assessment. Interpretation can be difficult as a result of idiosyncratic writing styles and disconnects between literal and intended meanings. Our purpose was to explore how faculty attendings interpret and make sense of the narrative comments on residents' in-training evaluation reports (ITERs) and to determine the language cues that appear to be influential in generating and justifying their interpretations. A group of 24 internal medicine (IM) faculty attendings each categorised a subgroup of postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and PGY2 IM residents based solely on ITER comments. They were then interviewed to determine how they had made their judgements. Constant comparative techniques from constructivist grounded theory were used to analyse the interviews and develop a framework to help in understanding how ITER language was interpreted. The overarching theme of 'reading between the lines' explained how participants read and interpreted ITER comments. Scanning for 'flags' was part of this strategy. Participants also described specific factors that shaped their judgements, including: consistency of comments; competency domain; specificity; quantity, and context (evaluator identity, rotation type and timing). There were several perceived purposes of ITER comments, including feedback to the resident, summative assessment and other more socially complex objectives. Participants made inferences based on what they thought evaluators intended by their comments and seemed to share an understanding of a 'hidden code'. Participants' ability to 'read between the lines' explains how comments can be effectively used to categorise and rank-order residents. However, it also suggests a mechanism whereby variable interpretations can arise. Our findings suggest that current assumptions about the purpose, value and effectiveness of ITER comments may be incomplete. Linguistic pragmatics and politeness theories may shed

  18. Part-time and job-share careers among pharmacy practice faculty members.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Brooke; Vest, Kathleen; Pohl, Shaunte; Mazan, Jennifer; Winkler, Susan

    2014-04-17

    Part-time and job-share policies may allow pharmacy practice faculty members to achieve work/life balance while pursuing their professional goals. Precedent for alternative work schedules within the health professions community can be found throughout the literature; however, little is known about part-time roles in academic pharmacy. The design and implementation of 3 different alternative faculty appointments are described and department chair and faculty perspectives are shared. Teaching, service, and scholarship responsibilities, as well as outcomes before and after changes in appointment, are described. Advantages and disadvantages, including advice for other colleges of pharmacy, are presented. Alternate appointments may be a key factor in retaining highly qualified faculty members who continue to bring their expertise to teaching, precepting, and scholarship within a college or school of pharmacy.

  19. Part-time and Job-Share Careers Among Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Vest, Kathleen; Pohl, Shaunte; Mazan, Jennifer; Winkler, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Part-time and job-share policies may allow pharmacy practice faculty members to achieve work/life balance while pursuing their professional goals. Precedent for alternative work schedules within the health professions community can be found throughout the literature; however, little is known about part-time roles in academic pharmacy. The design and implementation of 3 different alternative faculty appointments are described and department chair and faculty perspectives are shared. Teaching, service, and scholarship responsibilities, as well as outcomes before and after changes in appointment, are described. Advantages and disadvantages, including advice for other colleges of pharmacy, are presented. Alternate appointments may be a key factor in retaining highly qualified faculty members who continue to bring their expertise to teaching, precepting, and scholarship within a college or school of pharmacy. PMID:24761010

  20. Faculty-Specific Factors of Degree of HE Internationalization: An Evaluation of Four Faculties of a Post-1992 University in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Nan; Carpenter, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the difference in the process of higher education (HE) internationalization across faculties in a post-1992 university and to identify faculty-specific factors through evaluating the four faculties in the case study. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research is conducted in a post-1992…

  1. Building Capacity for Community-Engaged Scholarship: Evaluation of the Faculty Development Component of the Faculty for the Engaged Campus Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelmon, Sherril; Blanchard, Lynn; Ryan, Katharine; Seifer, Sarena D.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an evaluation of the faculty development component of the Faculty for the Engaged Campus initiative. For this component, the Community-Engaged Scholarship Faculty Development Charrette was attended by 20 university teams from across the United States, and six teams subsequently received 2 years of funding and…

  2. Faculty-Specific Factors of Degree of HE Internationalization: An Evaluation of Four Faculties of a Post-1992 University in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Nan; Carpenter, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the difference in the process of higher education (HE) internationalization across faculties in a post-1992 university and to identify faculty-specific factors through evaluating the four faculties in the case study. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research is conducted in a post-1992…

  3. Developing a comprehensive faculty development program to promote interprofessional education, practice and research at a free-standing academic health science center.

    PubMed

    Shrader, Sarah; Mauldin, Mary; Hammad, Sammar; Mitcham, Maralynee; Blue, Amy

    2015-03-01

    There is an on-going transformation in health professions education to prepare students to function as competent members of an interprofessional team in order to increase patient safety and improve patient care. Various methods of health education and practice directed toward students have been implemented, yet descriptions of faculty development initiatives designed to advance interprofessional education and practice are scarce. This article describes a faculty development program at the Medical University of South Carolina, USA, based on the conceptual framework of adult transformational learning theory. Three components comprise the faculty development program: an institute, fellowship and teaching series. Evaluations of the three components indicate that the faculty development program aided in the sustainability of the university's interprofessional program, and built capacity for improvement and growth in interprofessional endeavors.

  4. Evaluation of online course discussions. Faculty facilitation of active student learning.

    PubMed

    VandeVusse, L; Hanson, L

    2000-01-01

    Graduate nursing faculty evaluated their initial experiences with online course discussions after making the transition from traditional use of weekly face-to-face classroom discussions to primarily computer-based interactions with students at distant sites. The online discussion data were analyzed qualitatively. The ways the faculty member communicated to facilitate active student involvement in the online discussions were coded. Six categories were identified that describe the ways the faculty member communicated to facilitate active student involvement in online discussions: assist with navigation, explain expectations, clarify faculty role, stimulate critical thinking, share expertise, and provide encouragement. Examples of each were provided to demonstrate ways faculty promoted student learning in online discussions.

  5. A Standards-Driven Approach to Faculty Evaluation: The Conflict of Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Monika; MacKinnon, Fiona J. D.

    This case study explains the process that a newly created academic department used to develop a coherent system of faculty performance evaluation by combining three previous evaluation systems. The original procedures and criteria for faculty performance evaluation were of administrative and legal concern to the newly created department because…

  6. Summative Evaluation on the Hospital Wards. What Do Faculty Say to Learners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasley, Peggy B.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    No previous studies have described how faculty give summative evaluations to learners on the medical wards. The aim of this study was to describe summative evaluations on the medical wards. Participants were students, house staff and faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Ward rotation evaluative sessions were tape recorded. Feedback was…

  7. Summative Evaluation on the Hospital Wards. What Do Faculty Say to Learners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasley, Peggy B.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    No previous studies have described how faculty give summative evaluations to learners on the medical wards. The aim of this study was to describe summative evaluations on the medical wards. Participants were students, house staff and faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Ward rotation evaluative sessions were tape recorded. Feedback was…

  8. Knowledge and Competency of Nursing Faculty Regarding Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Orta, Roxana; Messmer, Patricia R; Valdes, Guillermo R; Turkel, Marian; Fields, Sheldon D; Wei, Christina Cardenas

    2016-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine recommended that 90% of clinical decisions should be evidenced based by 2020. Both the IOM and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses identified evidenced-based practice (EBP) as a core competency for practice. EBP can reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and ensure optimal nursing interventions. Because nursing faculty may have deficits in knowledge, attitudes, and competencies to teach EBP, few nursing students conduct EBP reviews. The purpose of this project was to develop EBP educational resources to increase nursing faculty knowledge and competency of EBP in a southeastern college with both a multicultural faculty and student body. A pre- and postsurvey design using Stevens' ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation and Evidence Based Practice Readiness Inventory (ACE-ERI) determined the effectiveness of the educational intervention. Results indicated that faculty's self-confidence about their competency in EBP increased significantly from presurvey to postsurvey, t(17) = -2.04, p = .028, but there was no significant change from pretest to posttest, t(17) = -0.576, p =.572, for the EBP knowledge component of ACE-ERI. The results of the study suggest that educational programs for RN-to-BSN faculty are vital in increasing participant's readiness for EBP. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(9):409-419.

  9. Instructional Practices in Introductory Geoscience Courses: Results of a National Faculty Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    The NAGT professional development program "On the Cutting Edge" recently surveyed 7000 geoscience faculty in the United States to develop a snapshot of current instructional practices in undergraduate geoscience courses, faculty strategies for learning new content and new teaching approaches, and faculty involvement in the geoscience education community. Over 2200 faculty responded to the survey which was conducted by the American Institute of Physics. Results for introductory courses (814 responses) indicate that lecture is the most common teaching strategy used in courses of all sizes. Many faculty incorporate some interactive activities in their courses. Most commonly, they use questioning, demonstrations, discussions, and in-class exercises. Less common, but not rare, are small group discussion or think-pair-share and classroom debates or role-playing. Activities involving problem solving, using quantitative skills, working with data and primarily literature, and structured collaboration are incorporated by many faculty in introductory courses, suggesting efforts to teach the process of science. Activities in which students address a problem of national or local interest, analyze their own data, or address problems of their own design are less common but not rare. Field experiences are common but not ubiquitous for students in introductory courses. A wide variety of assessment strategies are used in introductory courses of all sizes, including exams, quizzes, problem sets, papers, oral presentations, and portfolios. While papers are used for assessment more extensively in small classes, a significant number of faculty use papers in large classes (greater than 81 students). A majority of faculty use rubrics in grading. Faculty report that in the past two years, approximately one-third have made changes in the content of their introductory courses while just under half have changed the teaching methods they use. While faculty learn about both new content and

  10. Clinical Evaluation of Baccalaureate Nursing Students Using SBAR Format: Faculty versus Self Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saied, Hala; James, Joemol; Singh, Evangelin Jeya; Al Humaied, Lulawah

    2016-01-01

    Clinical training is of paramount importance in nursing education and clinical evaluation is one of the most challenging responsibilities of nursing faculty. The use of objective tools and criteria and involvement of the students in the evaluation process are some techniques to facilitate quality learning in the clinical setting. Aim: The aim of…

  11. Effectiveness of a focused educational intervention on resident evaluations from faculty a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Holmboe, E S; Fiebach, N H; Galaty, L A; Huot, S

    2001-07-01

    To improve the quality and specificity of written evaluations by faculty attendings of internal medicine residents during inpatient rotations. Prospective randomized controlled trial. Four hospitals: tertiary care university hospital, Veterans' Administration hospital, and two community hospitals. Eighty-eight faculty and 157 residents from categorical and primary-care internal medicine residency training programs rotating on inpatient general medicine teams. Focused 20-minute educational session on evaluation and feedback, accompanied by 3 by 5 reminder card and diary, given to faculty at the start of their attending month. 1) number of written comments from faculty specific to unique, preselected dimensions of competence; 2) number of written comments from faculty describing a specific resident behavior or providing a recommendation; and 3) resident Likert-scale ratings of the quantity and effect of feedback received from faculty. Faculty in the intervention group provided more written comments specific to defined dimensions of competence, a median of three comments per evaluation form versus two in the control group, but when adjusted for clustering by faculty, the difference was not statistically significant (P =.09). Regarding feedback, residents in the intervention group rated the quantity significantly higher (P =.04) and were significantly more likely to make changes in clinical management of patients than residents in the control group (P =.04). A brief, focused educational intervention delivered to faculty prior to the start of a ward rotation appears to have a modest effect on faculty behavior for written evaluations and promoted higher quality feedback given to house staff.

  12. Assessment of Burnout and Associated Risk Factors Among Pharmacy Practice Faculty in the United States.

    PubMed

    El-Ibiary, Shareen Y; Yam, Lily; Lee, Kelly C

    2017-05-01

    Objectives. To measure the level of burnout among pharmacy practice faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy and to identify factors associated with burnout. Methods. Using a cross-sectional, electronic, anonymous survey-design, we measured faculty burnout (n=2318) at US colleges and schools of pharmacy using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educators Survey (MBI-ES), which measures burnout dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. We assessed MBI-ES scores, demographics and possible predictors of burnout. Results. The response rate was 32.7% (n=758). Emotional exhaustion was identified in 41.3% and was higher in women, assistant professors, and those without a hobby. Participants without a mentor had higher scores of depersonalization. Those with children ages 1-12 years had higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalization compared to those with older children. Conclusion. Pharmacy practice faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy are suffering from burnout, exhibited mainly through emotional exhaustion.

  13. Strategies for improving teaching practices: a comprehensive approach to faculty development.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, L; Irby, D M

    1998-04-01

    Medical school faculty members are being asked to assume new academic duties for which they have received no formal training. These include time-efficient ambulatory care teaching, case-based tutorials, and new computer-based instructional programs. In order to succeed at these new teaching tasks, faculty development is essential. It is a tool for improving the educational vitality of academic institutions through attention to the competencies needed by individual teachers, and to the institutional policies required to promote academic excellence. Over the past three decades, strategies to improve teaching have been influenced by the prevailing theories of learning and research on instruction, which are described. Research on these strategies suggests that workshops and students' ratings of instruction, coupled with consultation and intensive fellowships, are effective strategies for changing teachers' actions. A comprehensive faculty development program should be built upon (1) professional development (new faculty members should be oriented to the university and to their various faculty roles); (2) instructional development (all faculty members should have access to teaching-improvement workshops, peer coaching, mentoring, and/or consultations); (3) leadership development (academic programs depend upon effective leaders and well-designed curricula; these leaders should develop the skills of scholarship to effectively evaluate and advance medical education); (4) organizational development (empowering faculty members to excel in their roles as educators requires organizational policies and procedures that encourage and reward teaching and continual learning). Comprehensive faculty development, which is more important today than ever before, empowers faculty members to excel as educators and to create vibrant academic communities that value teaching and learning.

  14. An Evaluation of a Training Program to Prepare Faculty for Online Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee-Swope, Kinyata

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of distance education makes it necessary for many faculty to take on the role of online instructor. As a result, higher education institutions face the challenge of training their faculty to make a shift from teaching in traditional to virtual environments. The Higher Learning Commission's Best Practices for Electronically Offered…

  15. Team-based learning from theory to practice: faculty reactions to the innovation.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Stephanie; Bahramifarid, Nasim; Jalali, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Limited studies have examined the factors associated with the implementation of team-based learning (TBL). The purpose of this study was to identify faculty reactions (successes and challenges) associated with the implementation of a modified TBL in undergraduate anatomy teaching. To obtain faculty reactions to the TBL approach, data collection included focus groups, observations, and document analysis. Using the constant comparative method, our analysis yielded four key themes. Four themes based on faculty reactions to the implementation of TBL included transportability and local adaptations, faculty/tutor role confusion, student preparedness, and teacher-targeted bullying. Future physicians will need educational programs that embrace the theory and practice of teamwork. Schools adopting team-based learning approaches will need to carefully consider their local environments so as to successfully transport innovative practices alongside local adaptations. As front-line implementers faculty will require initial and ongoing professional development. The TBL method is amenable to local modifications and holds promise as a pedagogical strategy to garner increased student engagement and student achievement in their learning.

  16. The Role of Evidence-Based Practice in Collaborations between Academic Librarians and Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Nancy E.; Gaffney, Maureen A.; Lynn, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study describes collaborations between academic librarians and faculty in education-related disciplines involving evidence-based practice (EBP), an approach that combines the best available research with the professional's experience and expertise. The authors analyzed narratives of academic librarians and their educator partners…

  17. Critical Mentoring Practices to Support Diverse Students in Higher Education: Chicana/Latina Faculty Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueroa, Julie López; Rodriguez, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines critical practices that emerged from utilizing social justice frameworks to mentor first-generation, underrepresented minority students at the undergraduate to doctoral levels. The mentoring strategies include helping students to reframe instances when faculty and peers unconsciously conflate academic rigor with color-blind…

  18. Accounting Practitioners Reflect on Faculty Impact: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    A gap exists between the perception of accounting education in the classroom and accounting as it is practiced. This study explores qualitatively the perceptions and experiences of mid-career accounting professionals with respect to the impact of academic faculty on their careers in accounting. The study identifies a perception gap in the…

  19. 2002 SUCCEED Faculty Survey of Teaching Practices and Perceptions of Institutional Attitudes toward Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brawner, Catherine E.; Felder, Richard M.; Allen, Rodney; Brent, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    SUCCEED (Southeastern University and College Coalition for Engineering Education) is an eight-campus coalition of engineering schools formed in 1992 under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation. In 1997, a faculty survey of instructional practices and attitudes regarding the climate for teaching on the Coalition campuses was designed…

  20. Culturally Relevant Pedagogical Practice among White College Faculty: A Narrative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan F.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty contribute to the campus racial climate for all students, but particularly for students of color, and play a significant role in shaping intellectual, social, and behavioral standards through their pedagogical practice (Hurtado, Milem, Clayton-Petersen, & Allen, 1998; Solózano, Ceja, & Yosso, 2000; Rankin & Reason, 2005).…

  1. Digital Ethnography: Understanding Faculty Use of an Online Community of Practice for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    This doctoral thesis explored how faculty members in higher education use an online community of practice for professional development in teaching and, if so, in what ways and for what purposes? Answering this inquiry involved the knowledge of social constructivism, higher education, teaching, professional development, and online communities.…

  2. Critical Mentoring Practices to Support Diverse Students in Higher Education: Chicana/Latina Faculty Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueroa, Julie López; Rodriguez, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines critical practices that emerged from utilizing social justice frameworks to mentor first-generation, underrepresented minority students at the undergraduate to doctoral levels. The mentoring strategies include helping students to reframe instances when faculty and peers unconsciously conflate academic rigor with color-blind…

  3. Faculty Best Practices Using Blended Learning in E-Learning and Face-to-Face Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortera-Gutierrez, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Presenting a higher education case study from Mexico: "Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey" (ITESM-CCM) College, Mexico city campus, describing faculty best and worst practices using a blended learning approach in e-learning and face-to-face instruction. The article comments on conceptual definitions of blended…

  4. Creating Enabling Environment for Student Engagement: Faculty Practices of Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassum, Shanaz Hussein; Gul, Raisa Begum

    2017-01-01

    Critical thinking (CT) is considered an important attribute in practice disciplines and faculty members in nursing, medicine, and education are expected to facilitate the development of CT in their graduates so that these individuals can be critical, reflective, competent, and caring professionals and service providers. When students are actively…

  5. Use of an Innovation Component Configuration Map to Measure Technology Integration Practices of Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javeri, Manisha; Persichitte, Kay

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will focus on the use of a custom developed Innovation Component Configuration Map (ICCM) to measure technology integration practices of faculty in Schools, Colleges, and Departments of Education (SCDEs). This study investigated the relationship between the level of technology integration fidelity (high, moderate or low) by SCDE…

  6. Practice Brief: Faculty Perspectives on Professional Development to Improve Efficacy when Teaching Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hye Jin; Roberts, Kelly D.; Stodden, Robert

    2012-01-01

    "Innovative and Sustainable Teaching Methods and Strategies" project staff provided professional development to instructional faculty to enhance their attitudes, knowledge, and skills in meeting the diverse needs of students with disabilities. This practice brief describes one of the professional development programs, delivered over the course of…

  7. Designing for Change: Engaging Faculty Through a Blended Certificate in University Teaching Program. Report of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroluk, Jaymie; Atkins, Bridgette; Stranach, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    A key role of teaching and learning centres at postsecondary education institutions is to provide professional development for faculty and staff. A challenge for teaching and learning centre staff is to design, develop, and deliver professional development programs that are engaging and relevant to participants. This Report of Practice describes…

  8. How Academic Leaders Conceptualize the Phenomenon of Faculty Performance Appraisal Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soo Kim, Tatum

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the phenomenon of how academic leaders conceptualize faculty performance practices. Qualitative research methods were used to explore the experiences of 11 academic leaders from 4-year higher education institutions in the metropolitan area of New York, NY. Each academic leader had direct responsibility for faculty…

  9. Community College Faculty Recruitment Practices: The Effects of Applicant Gender, Instructional Programs, and Job Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a study that applied marketing and advertising theory to recruit community-college business faculty. The reactions of male and female target applicants to recruitment advertisements and job descriptions were assessed, with differences found between the two groups. Discusses results, and implications for practice, theory and research. (36…

  10. The Influence of Leadership Practices on Faculty Job Satisfaction in Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afam, Clifford C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a correlational, cross-sectional study design with self-administered questionnaires, this study explored the extent to which leadership practices of deans and department heads influence faculty job satisfaction in baccalaureate degree nursing programs. Using a simple random sampling technique, the study survey was sent to 400 faculty…

  11. Beliefs and Practices of Expert Respiratory Care Faculty on Critical-Thinking Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, James Leland

    2009-01-01

    Problem. The development of critical-thinking skills during the professional training of respiratory therapists is imperative for good practice. Research evidence suggests that interactive instructional strategies are far more effective than traditional lectures. Missing from the literature are thick descriptions of how faculty organize the…

  12. Alternative Methods by Which Basic Science Pharmacy Faculty Can Relate to Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabat, Hugh F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A panel of pharmacy faculty ranked a broad inventory of basic pharmaceutical science topics in terms of their applicability to clinical pharmacy practice. The panel concluded that basic pharmaceutical sciences are essentially applications of foundation areas in biological, physical, and social sciences. (Author/MLW)

  13. Alternative Methods by Which Basic Science Pharmacy Faculty Can Relate to Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabat, Hugh F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A panel of pharmacy faculty ranked a broad inventory of basic pharmaceutical science topics in terms of their applicability to clinical pharmacy practice. The panel concluded that basic pharmaceutical sciences are essentially applications of foundation areas in biological, physical, and social sciences. (Author/MLW)

  14. Digital Ethnography: Understanding Faculty Use of an Online Community of Practice for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    This doctoral thesis explored how faculty members in higher education use an online community of practice for professional development in teaching and, if so, in what ways and for what purposes? Answering this inquiry involved the knowledge of social constructivism, higher education, teaching, professional development, and online communities.…

  15. How Academic Leaders Conceptualize the Phenomenon of Faculty Performance Appraisal Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soo Kim, Tatum

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the phenomenon of how academic leaders conceptualize faculty performance practices. Qualitative research methods were used to explore the experiences of 11 academic leaders from 4-year higher education institutions in the metropolitan area of New York, NY. Each academic leader had direct responsibility for faculty…

  16. The Role of Evidence-Based Practice in Collaborations between Academic Librarians and Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Nancy E.; Gaffney, Maureen A.; Lynn, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study describes collaborations between academic librarians and faculty in education-related disciplines involving evidence-based practice (EBP), an approach that combines the best available research with the professional's experience and expertise. The authors analyzed narratives of academic librarians and their educator partners…

  17. Beliefs and Practices of Expert Respiratory Care Faculty on Critical-Thinking Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, James Leland

    2009-01-01

    Problem. The development of critical-thinking skills during the professional training of respiratory therapists is imperative for good practice. Research evidence suggests that interactive instructional strategies are far more effective than traditional lectures. Missing from the literature are thick descriptions of how faculty organize the…

  18. Survey of Current Academic Practices for Full-Time Postlicensure Nursing Faculty Who Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanford, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine current academic practices of compensation, workload, rewards, and tenure and promotion for nursing faculty who teach graduate and postlicensure programs that are delivered 50% to 100% online. Deans and directors who are members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) were the…

  19. A Faculty and House-Staff Group Practice: Report of an Operational Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Frederic B., IV

    1978-01-01

    The implementation of a model internal medicine group practice at the University of Colorado Medical Center is described, and the first 19 months of its operation are reported. It was formed to improve house staff experience in ambulatory internal medicine, allowing six residents to participate with two faculty internists in full-time continuous…

  20. Good Practices in Undergraduate Education from the Students' and Faculty's View: Consensus or Disagreement. AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negron-Morales, Patricia; And Others

    This study examined teaching practices in undergraduate education by surveying 180 undergraduate students and 29 faculty, most in the school of education, at the Rio Piedras Campus of the University of Puerto Rico. Factors investigated include: (1) degree of agreement between faculty and students on good teaching practices; (2) relationship…

  1. A Motivation Perspective on Faculty Mentoring: The Notion of "Non-Intrusive" Mentoring Practices in Science and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechuga, Vicente M.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have offered numerous approaches and best practices for mentoring faculty, many of which have provided valuable insight into the complex nature of the mentoring process. Yet, little attention has been paid to how faculty mentoring practices can influence a mentee's intrinsic motivation. Through a series of 15 interviews with faculty…

  2. Contextual adaptation of the Personnel Evaluation Standards for assessing faculty evaluation systems in developing countries: the case of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmady, Soleiman; Changiz, Tahereh; Brommels, Mats; Gaffney, F Andrew; Thor, Johan; Masiello, Italo

    2009-01-01

    Background Faculty evaluations can identify needs to be addressed in effective development programs. Generic evaluation models exist, but these require adaptation to a particular context of interest. We report on one approach to such adaptation in the context of medical education in Iran, which is integrated into the delivery and management of healthcare services nationwide. Methods Using a triangulation design, interviews with senior faculty leaders were conducted to identify relevant areas for faculty evaluation. We then adapted the published checklist of the Personnel Evaluation Standards to fit the Iranian medical universities' context by considering faculty members' diverse roles. Then the adapted instrument was administered to faculty at twelve medical schools in Iran. Results The interviews revealed poor linkages between existing forms of development and evaluation, imbalance between the faculty work components and evaluated areas, inappropriate feedback and use of information in decision making. The principles of Personnel Evaluation Standards addressed almost all of these concerns and were used to assess the existing faculty evaluation system and also adapted to evaluate the core faculty roles. The survey response rate was 74%. Responses showed that the four principles in all faculty members' roles were met occasionally to frequently. Evaluation of teaching and research had the highest mean scores, while clinical and healthcare services, institutional administration, and self-development had the lowest mean scores. There were statistically significant differences between small medium and large medical schools (p < 0.000). Conclusion The adapted Personnel Evaluation Standards appears to be valid and applicable for monitoring and continuous improvement of a faculty evaluation system in the context of medical universities in Iran. The approach developed here provides a more balanced assessment of multiple faculty roles, including educational, clinical and

  3. The Effect of Faculty Self-Promotion on Student Evaluations of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farreras, Ingrid G.; Boyle, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect that varying degrees of faculty self-promotion had on 322 student evaluations. As high student evaluations are correlated with greater student learning, it is imperative that we assess how faculty's presentation style is perceived by students so as to enhance instruction and therefore student learning. Students…

  4. R&D Priorities for Educational Testing and Evaluation: The Testimony of the CRESST National Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Joan L., Ed.

    At the 1989 meeting of the National Faculty of the Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST), faculty members were invited to present testimony on what they viewed as the most pressing research and policy issues in the fields of testing, evaluation, and standards. These views are expressed in this document,…

  5. A Mandala of Faculty Development: Using Theory-Based Evaluation to Explore Contexts, Mechanisms and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyura, Betty; Ng, Stella L.; Baker, Lindsay R.; Lieff, Susan; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Mori, Brenda

    2017-01-01

    Demonstrating the impact of faculty development, is an increasingly mandated and ever elusive goal. Questions have been raised about the adequacy of current approaches. Here, we integrate realist and theory-driven evaluation approaches, to evaluate an intensive longitudinal program. Our aim is to elucidate how faculty development can work to…

  6. The Use of Individualized Contract Plans as a Method of Performance Evaluation for Allied Health Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitcham, Maralynne D.; Vericella, Biagio J.

    1985-01-01

    Results from a two-year study of the individualized contract plan (ICP) approach to faculty evaluation indicate this is a workable method of performance evaluation for allied health faculty. The ICP was found to be individualized, systematic, flexible, and objective. Five major recommendations were made regarding the continued use of the ICP and…

  7. "A Desire for Growth": Online Full-Time Faculty's Perceptions of Evaluation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCosta, Meredith; Bergquist, Emily; Holbeck, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Post-secondary educational institutions use various means to evaluate the teaching performance of faculty members. There are benefits to effective faculty evaluation, including advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning, as well as improving the functionality and innovation of courses, curriculum, departments, and ultimately the broader…

  8. A Desire for Growth: Online Full-Time Faculty's Perceptions of Evaluation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCosta, Meredith; Bergquist, Emily; Holbeck, Rick; Greenberger, Scott

    2016-01-01

    College and universities evaluate the teaching performance of faculty members in a variety of ways. Benefits to effective faculty evaluation include advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning, as well as improving the functionality and innovation of courses, curriculum, departments, and ultimately the broader community (Boyer, 1990;…

  9. The Effect of Faculty Self-Promotion on Student Evaluations of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farreras, Ingrid G.; Boyle, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect that varying degrees of faculty self-promotion had on 322 student evaluations. As high student evaluations are correlated with greater student learning, it is imperative that we assess how faculty's presentation style is perceived by students so as to enhance instruction and therefore student learning. Students…

  10. Evaluation of Faculty Transition into a Community-Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Susan McClennan; Mawn, Barbara; Scollin, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Ten nursing faculty who had experienced transition to a new community-based curriculum rated the transition process. Conditions receiving higher ratings included self-expectations; low ratings were given to the level of transition planning and the transition environment. Some faculty experienced high stress. Anticipatory planning and faculty…

  11. Validating dental and medical students' evaluations of faculty teaching in an integrated, multi-instructor course.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Terry D; Witzke, Donald B; Freund, Mary Jane; Wilson, Martha T; Jacob, Robert J

    2005-06-01

    As more students from various health professions are combined into integrated courses, evaluating the teaching quality of individual faculty in these typically large, multi-instructor contexts becomes increasingly difficult. Indeed, students who lack sufficient recall of a given faculty member or are not committed to the evaluation process may respond by marking identical responses to all evaluation items (e.g., 3-3-3-3-3), regardless of the specific content of the items on the faculty evaluation questionnaire. These "straight-lining" behaviors-more formally referred to as monotonic response patterns (MRPs)-often reflect students' inattention to the task at hand or lack of motivation to be discriminating, which may result in invalid data. This study examines the prevalence of MRP ratings in relation to indicators reflective of students' lack of attention to evaluating the quality of faculty teaching. Dental and medical students in a required, second-year (medicine) basic science course conducted by the medical school and taught primarily by medical school faculty completed seven-item faculty evaluation forms, along with an anonymous questionnaire measuring their need to evaluate, attitudes toward faculty evaluation, and recall of instructors. MRP ratings failed to correlate significantly with students' need to evaluate or their attitudes toward faculty evaluation. However, among medical students, MRP "straight-line" responses were more prevalent for raters who recalled faculty members "very well" (p=.04). For dental students, MRPs were associated with less accurate recall (p=.01). As such, the validity of faculty evaluations within integrated, multi-instructor courses may vary when students rate distinct aspects of a teacher's performance identically. In this case-in which medical students' greater recall of instructors coincides with MRPs-ratings may suffice as global, holistic assessments of an instructor's teaching. For dental students, similar ratings may be

  12. Educational Practice for Small Size Class in Fundamental Education of Faculty of Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Hirano, Kimitaka; Honda, Chikahisa

    An educational practice for small size class in fundamental education of our faculty has been carried out using a special fund from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology since fiscal year 2005. The fundamental subjects such as Mathematics and Physics are very important for the students of Faculty of Engineering. In order to achieve the aim of each subject for students with insufficient understanding, we wrestle with the project of the education for small size class. Some projects are described in this paper.

  13. The Role of a Medical Faculty in Reorganizing Family Practice to Meet Current Community Needs

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Reginald M.; Kraus, Arthur S.; Steele, Robert

    1970-01-01

    There exists a crisis in the delivery of medical services, particularly by family doctors of whom there is an apparent shortage. A study of family practice in Kingston, Ontario, and in the nearby countryside indicates three critical needs in family practice: professional assistants for the family doctors, efficient office facilities and new methods of delivering family medical care in rural areas. The Faculty of Medicine at Queen's University has involved itself in a study of these matters and is developing a program to help solve them, by research into the nature of the problems and into methods for alleviating them, by keeping practising physicians informed through research reports and the continuing education program of the Medical School, by the development of pilot projects, and by the evaluation of new services aimed at these problems, independently launched by physicians in the community. Pilot projects to date include two designed to study the use of registered nurses as doctor assistants and another which involves the organization and operation of a university-sponsored community health centre. Last, but by no mean least, the Provincial Government is continually briefed on all these activities. PMID:5455274

  14. Web Accessibility Theory and Practice: An Introduction for University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbard, David A.; Peters, Cara

    2010-01-01

    Web accessibility is the practice of making Web sites accessible to all, particularly those with disabilities. As the Internet becomes a central part of post-secondary instruction, it is imperative that instructional Web sites be designed for accessibility to meet the needs of disabled students. The purpose of this article is to introduce Web…

  15. Writing across the Curriculum: Faculty Workshop Practices (1977-1997)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Owen Brian

    2010-01-01

    During the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement's formative years, programs were launched at hundreds of higher education institutions across North America. WAC programs incorporated workshops as the primary delivery mechanism to introduce participants to WAC pedagogy. To explore how workshops changed teaching practices, this study…

  16. Executive skills for medical faculty: a workshop description and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Yvonne; Nasmith, Louise; Daigle, Norma

    2003-11-01

    As the healthcare system continues to change, healthcare professionals will need to assume an increasing number of administrative and management responsibilities. The goal of this article is to describe a two-day workshop on Executive Skills for Medical Faculty and the results of an evaluation conducted one year later. This workshop consisted of specific modules on analyzing time-management skills, determining goals and priorities, improving time-management strategies, assessing leadership styles and skills, and conducting effective meetings. The workshop evaluation consisted of an immediate post-workshop questionnaire administered to all of the participants, and semi-structured interviews, conducted on the telephone, with half of the attendees. Both evaluations were designed to assess perceptions of the workshop's usefulness and areas of individual change. Feedback from the participants immediately after the workshop indicated an overall satisfaction with the workshop content and methodology and a desire to try new time-management strategies. Evaluation of the workshop one year later indicated that the majority of the participants had determined their priorities more clearly, altered their time-management strategies, and planned more effective meetings. Less change was noted in the area of leadership styles and skills. Both the immediate and delayed workshop evaluations indicated that the most useful sessions were those devoted to determining goals and priorities, time management and effective meetings. These results suggest that a two-day workshop can improve health care professionals' administrative and management skills in certain areas. A longer workshop and built-in 'follow-up' activities would enhance the potential for change.

  17. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Alternative Realities: Faculty and Student Perceptions of Instructional Practices in Laboratory Courses.

    PubMed

    Beck, Christopher W; Blumer, Lawrence S

    2016-01-01

    Curricular reform efforts depend on our ability to determine how courses are taught and how instructional practices affect student outcomes. In this study, we developed a 30-question survey on inquiry-based learning and assessment in undergraduate laboratory courses that was administered to 878 students in 54 courses (41 introductory level and 13 upper level) from 20 institutions (four community colleges, 11 liberal arts colleges, and five universities, of which four were minority-serving institutions). On the basis of an exploratory factor analysis, we defined five constructs: metacognition, feedback and assessment, scientific synthesis, science process skills, and instructor-directed teaching. Using our refined survey of 24 items, we compared student and faculty perceptions of instructional practices both across courses and across instructors. In general, faculty and student perceptions were not significantly related. Although mean perceptions were often similar, faculty perceptions were more variable than those of students, suggesting that faculty may have more nuanced views than students. In addition, student perceptions of some instructional practices were influenced by their previous experience in laboratory courses and their self-efficacy. As student outcomes, such as learning gains, are ultimately most important, future research should examine the degree to which faculty and student perceptions of instructional practices predict student outcomes in different contexts. © 2016 C. W. Beck and L. S. Blumer. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Teaching while learning while practicing: reframing faculty development for the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Clay, Michael A; Sikon, Andrea L; Lypson, Monica L; Gomez, Arthur; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Bowen, Judith L

    2013-09-01

    Soaring costs of health care, patients living longer with chronic illnesses, and continued attrition of interest in primary care contribute to the urgency of developing an improved model of health care delivery. Out of this need, the concept of the team-based, patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has developed. Amidst implementation in academic settings, clinical teachers face complex challenges not previously encountered: teaching while simultaneously learning about the PCMH model, redesigning clinical delivery systems while simultaneously delivering care within them, and working more closely in expanded interprofessional teams.To address these challenges, the authors reviewed three existing faculty development models and recommended four important adaptations for preparing clinical teachers for their roles as system change agents and facilitators of learning in these new settings. First, many faculty find themselves in the awkward position of teaching concepts they have yet to master themselves. Professional development programs must recognize that, at least initially, health professions learners and faculty will be learning system redesign content and skills together while practicing in the evolving workplace. Second, all care delivery team members influence learning in the workplace. Thus, the definition of faculty must expand to include nurses, pharmacists, social workers, medical assistants, patients, and others. These team members will need to accept their roles as educators. Third, learning to deliver health care in teams will require support of both interprofessional collaboration and intraprofessional identity development. Fourth, learning to manage change and uncertainty should be part of the core content of any faculty development program within the PCMH.

  20. Recommendations for the Successful Pursuit of Scholarship by Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Jan K.; Speedie, Marilyn K.; Rodriguez de Bittner, Magaly

    2015-01-01

    Scholarship has long been a basic expectation of faculty members at institutions of higher learning in the United States and elsewhere. This expectation is no less assumed in academic pharmacy. A number of organizations have verbalized and enforced this precept over the years.1-3 For example, this expectation is spoken to directly in the American Council for Pharmacy Education’s Accreditation Standards and Guidelines.4 This expectation is further emphasized in the draft document of the accreditation standards to be implemented in 2016, in Standard 20. Specifically, Element 20.2 states: “The college or school must create an environment that both requires and promotes scholarship, and must also develop mechanisms to assess both the quantity and quality of faculty scholarly productivity.”5 The successful pursuit of scholarship by clinical faculty members (those engaged in both clinical practice and teaching, without regard to tenure or clinical track status) is challenging. 6-10 Thus, faculty member job descriptions or models should be designed so clinical faculty members can successfully meet all academic job expectations, including productive and meaningful scholarship. In 2012, an AACP Section of Teachers of Pharmacy Practice task force was charged with examining this issue and providing recommendations for models for clinical faculty members that would allow the successful pursuit of scholarship. The task force gathered information relating to the current state of affairs at a number of colleges and reviewed relevant literature. This information, along with personal experiences and much discussion and contemplation, led to some general observations as well as specific recommendations. This paper reiterates the task force’s observations and recommendations and provides further detail regarding our interpretation of the findings and basis for the eventual recommendations to the section. PMID:25741020

  1. Recommendations for the successful pursuit of scholarship by pharmacy practice faculty members.

    PubMed

    Bosso, John A; Hastings, Jan K; Speedie, Marilyn K; Rodriguez de Bittner, Magaly

    2015-02-17

    Scholarship has long been a basic expectation of faculty members at institutions of higher learning in the United States and elsewhere. This expectation is no less assumed in academic pharmacy. A number of organizations have verbalized and enforced this precept over the years.(1-3) For example, this expectation is spoken to directly in the American Council for Pharmacy Education's Accreditation Standards and Guidelines.(4) This expectation is further emphasized in the draft document of the accreditation standards to be implemented in 2016, in Standard 20. Specifically, Element 20.2 states: "The college or school must create an environment that both requires and promotes scholarship, and must also develop mechanisms to assess both the quantity and quality of faculty scholarly productivity."(5) The successful pursuit of scholarship by clinical faculty members (those engaged in both clinical practice and teaching, without regard to tenure or clinical track status) is challenging. (6-10) Thus, faculty member job descriptions or models should be designed so clinical faculty members can successfully meet all academic job expectations, including productive and meaningful scholarship. In 2012, an AACP Section of Teachers of Pharmacy Practice task force was charged with examining this issue and providing recommendations for models for clinical faculty members that would allow the successful pursuit of scholarship. The task force gathered information relating to the current state of affairs at a number of colleges and reviewed relevant literature. This information, along with personal experiences and much discussion and contemplation, led to some general observations as well as specific recommendations. This paper reiterates the task force's observations and recommendations and provides further detail regarding our interpretation of the findings and basis for the eventual recommendations to the section.

  2. Librarians and occupational therapy faculty: a collaboration for teaching evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Kimberly A

    2012-01-01

    Students in allied health educational programs learn evidence-based practice (EBP) skills, yet often do not consistently utilize these skills as practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP include time pressures and lack of skill. This descriptive study explains how librarians can teach information literacy skills and strengthen knowledge of EBP in graduate occupational therapy (OT) students. The goal of the study was to evaluate students' perception of the effectiveness of learning activities about EBP, and librarians' perception of the value of teaching in an OT curriculum. Sixty-three students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio read articles and learned didactic information from OT faculty and librarians about EBP. Students researched intervention questions and electronically sent searches to librarians for feedback. Students applied skills by researching an intervention of their choice. Evaluative data were collected from students in 2009 and 2010 and from librarians in 2009. Both groups rated the learning experiences highly. Students felt the learning experiences improved their effectiveness in carrying out EBP. Librarians valued the experience of teaching information literacy to OT students. These results support other studies showing librarians' effectiveness in developing EBP skills in students. Recommendations are given about using journal clubs and secondary literature to ensure the use of EBP at the workplace.

  3. Development of an interprofessional and interdisciplinary collaborative research practice for clinical faculty.

    PubMed

    Hager, Keri; St Hill, Catherine; Prunuske, Jacob; Swanoski, Michael; Anderson, Grant; Lutfiyya, May Nawal

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an interprofessional collaborative research practice fellowship designed to foster the research skills of clinical faculty. The year-long fellowship was grounded in big data analysis and the triangle of informatics--knowledge, information, and data. Fellows were selected to include diverse perspectives, training, and knowledge but had limited experience in team science or being a member of an interprofessional research team. The underlying philosophy of the fellowship was experiential learning. Protected time and formal mentorship were necessary factors for developing the interprofessional research practice and the skills to participate in an interprofessional research team. We believe that this innovative interprofessional faculty research fellowship is a viable option for supporting scholarly activity and research collaboration. The findings could inform interprofessional clinical practice and be implemented for patient care. Engagement in interprofessional collaborative research and incorporation of the perspectives, knowledge and expertise of multiple professions, is a model to de silo knowledge creation.

  4. Effect of the learning climate of residency programs on faculty's teaching performance as evaluated by residents.

    PubMed

    Lombarts, Kiki M J M H; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Arah, Onyebuchi A

    2014-01-01

    To understand teaching performance of individual faculty, the climate in which residents' learning takes place, the learning climate, may be important. There is emerging evidence that specific climates do predict specific outcomes. Until now, the effect of learning climate on the performance of the individual faculty who actually do the teaching was unknown. THIS STUDY: (i) tested the hypothesis that a positive learning climate was associated with better teaching performance of individual faculty as evaluated by residents, and (ii) explored which dimensions of learning climate were associated with faculty's teaching performance. We conducted two cross-sectional questionnaire surveys amongst residents from 45 residency training programs and multiple specialties in 17 hospitals in the Netherlands. Residents evaluated the teaching performance of individual faculty using the robust System for Evaluating Teaching Qualities (SETQ) and evaluated the learning climate of residency programs using the Dutch Residency Educational Climate Test (D-RECT). The validated D-RECT questionnaire consisted of 11 subscales of learning climate. Main outcome measure was faculty's overall teaching (SETQ) score. We used multivariable adjusted linear mixed models to estimate the separate associations of overall learning climate and each of its subscales with faculty's teaching performance. In total 451 residents completed 3569 SETQ evaluations of 502 faculty. Residents also evaluated the learning climate of 45 residency programs in 17 hospitals in the Netherlands. Overall learning climate was positively associated with faculty's teaching performance (regression coefficient 0.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.37 to 0.71; P<0.001). Three out of 11 learning climate subscales were substantially associated with better teaching performance: 'coaching and assessment', 'work is adapted to residents' competence', and 'formal education'. Individual faculty's teaching performance evaluations are positively

  5. Faculty Practice as Partnership with a Community Coalition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Betty J.

    1998-01-01

    A coalition of community agencies and a nursing school involves nursing students in nontraditional delivery of health-care services to the elderly. Elders report satisfaction with the program but not as much ownership, despite the goal of involving them in program planning and evaluation. (SK)

  6. Lifelong Learning Programs of Education Faculty in Sinop: Evaluation of Participants' Problems and Worries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usakli, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper Lifelong Learning Program of Education Faculty in Sinop was evaluated in terms of interrelations between LLP and cultural shock. The barriers of LLP in Education Faculty in Sinop can be examined in two main parts: difficulties of finding suitable partner and students' difficulty in deciding whether to apply or not. These two main…

  7. Commentary: Evaluating faculty productivity in research: an interesting approach, but questions remain.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Keith A

    2009-11-01

    Academic institutions must have strategies for evaluating research productivity by faculty. Such strategies are useful in guiding resource allocations for the research enterprise, for decisions on faculty promotions, and for broader institutional planning, including program development. Commonly, decisions about research space utilization, and funding to support the space, are considered within the purview of the institutional administration. Peer review, in manuscript and grant submissions and the promotions process, is more commonly used to evaluate the impact of faculty research. The article by Iyengar et al in this issue of Academic Medicine takes an interesting approach to evaluate research productivity of individual faculty by integrating benchmarks for research funding and publication impact. The strategy of using these benchmarks to partition faculty into quadrants to guide faculty development activities is clever and useful. Less clear are the philosophy and long-term utility of the approach. The applicability to the stated goal of promoting multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary translational research is not obvious, nor is it apparent that faculty will continue to view decisions as transparent and fair over the longer term. Nevertheless, the authors' article is a welcome contribution at a time when many institutions are struggling with issues of evaluating faculty investigators and allocating resources for research.

  8. Online vs. Paper Evaluations of Faculty: When Less Is Just as Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fike, David S.; Doyle, Denise J.; Connelly, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of teaching effectiveness is considered a critical element in determining whether or not faculty members are retained at higher education institutions; academic milestones such as tenure and promotion often require documentation of the quality of faculty teaching. As methods of assessing teaching effectiveness evolve, concerns about the…

  9. Follow-Up Evaluation of a Faculty Training Program in Aging Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Chandra M.

    2006-01-01

    In collaboration with distinguished scholars and National Institute on Aging (NIA) staff, we designed, implemented, and evaluated a research training program in aging for psychology faculty from 4-year colleges. The goal of the program was to build and sustain a community of college faculty committed to conducting aging research, incorporating…

  10. Performance Evaluation: The Use of a Single Instrument for University Librarians and Teaching Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Patricia M.

    1986-01-01

    Performance evaluation used for both faculty and librarians for 2 years included rating of performance standards, professional achievement, and auxiliary services. After careful application to ensure equitability of the original and revised forms, faculty questioned the implications of emphasis on research and publication, achievement, salaries,…

  11. Toward Systematic Faculty Evaluation. Regional Spotlight, Vol. 13, No. 2, January, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prodgers, Stephen B., Ed.

    The need for more consistent and comprehensive procedures for evaluating faculty performance is discussed in this newsletter. Declining student enrollments and financial restraints have created a "no growth" climate on campuses and it is suggested that this environment will require a two-thirds drop in the demand for new faculty at a time when the…

  12. Follow-Up Evaluation of a Faculty Training Program in Aging Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Chandra M.

    2006-01-01

    In collaboration with distinguished scholars and National Institute on Aging (NIA) staff, we designed, implemented, and evaluated a research training program in aging for psychology faculty from 4-year colleges. The goal of the program was to build and sustain a community of college faculty committed to conducting aging research, incorporating…

  13. A National Survey of Faculty Development Evaluation Outcome Measures and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their evaluation procedures and outcome measures for faculty development for online teaching conducted during 2011-2012. The survey results found that over 90% of institutions used measures of the faculty person's…

  14. Becoming a Community of Practice--The Blurred Identity of Clinical Faculty Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poyas, Yael; Smith, Kari

    2007-01-01

    The study discusses the professional identity and aspects of professional development of Clinical Faculty Teacher Educators (CFTEs) teaching methods courses in a College of Education during a time of change. The above aspects were revealed while analyzing data collected to evaluate an in-service professional development course for CFTEs. Data…

  15. The Multidimensional Character of Teaching Effectiveness: A Comparative Analysis of Student Evaluation Responses of Full and Part-Time Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obiekwe, Jerry C.

    This study compared college students' responses on their evaluations of the effectiveness of full- and part-time college faculty. A group of 1,101 students completed evaluation instruments for all courses taught by full-time faculty, and 2,067 students completed evaluations for all courses taught by part-time faculty in spring 1998. In fall 1998,…

  16. Integrating Systematic Chronic Care for Diabetes into an Academic General Internal Medicine Resident-Faculty Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Kelso, Christine; Bowen, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The quality of care for diabetes continues to fall short of recommended guidelines and results. Models for improving the care of chronic illnesses advocate a multidisciplinary team approach. Yet little is known about the effectiveness of such models in an academic setting with a diverse patient population and resident physicians participating in clinical care. Objective To implement a chronic illness management (CIM) practice within an academic setting with part-time providers, and evaluate its impact on the completion of diabetes-specific care processes and on the achievement of recommended outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus. Design Retrospective cohort study Subjects Patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who receive their primary care in an academic general internal medicine resident-faculty practice. Measurements Process and outcomes measures in patients exposed to the CIM practice were compared with non-exposed patients receiving usual care. Main Results Five hundred and sixty-five patients met inclusion criteria. Patients in the CIM practice experienced a significant increase in completion of care processes compared to control patients for measurement of annual low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7–5.7), urine microalbumin (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.1–5.5), blood pressure (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–2.8), retinal examination (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3–2.7), foot monofilament examination (OR 4.2, 95% CI 3.0–6.1) and administration of pneumococcal vaccination (OR 5.2, 95% CI 3.0–9.3). CIM-exposed patients were also more likely to achieve improvements in clinical outcomes of glycemic and blood pressure control reflected by hemoglobin A1c less than 7.0% (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.02–3) and blood pressure less than 130/80 (OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1–4.5) compared to controls. Conclusions A systematic chronic care model can be successfully integrated into an academic general internal medicine practice and may result in improved

  17. Comparing teaching practices about humor among nursing faculty: an international collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Adamle, Kathleen N; Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny; Ludwick, Ruth; Zeller, Richard A; Brown, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Humor has been recognized by nurse researchers as a therapeutic intervention known to have positive psychological and physiological outcomes for patients. There is, however, no research that examines how nurses learn about humor. The purpose of this preliminary study was to examine nursing faculty members' teaching practices about humor education in the classroom and in clinical settings. Nursing faculty members from four nursing programs, two in the United States, one in Northern Ireland, and one in Taiwan, were surveyed about the inclusion of humor in the nursing curriculum. Findings revealed that substantially more humor education was included in clinical settings in the USA and Northern Ireland than in the classroom. In Taiwan, however, humor education was included more in the classroom than in clinical settings. Older and more experienced nurses with higher levels of education reported using less humor in teaching practices.

  18. When University Faculty Nurture Teacher Leadership: "Horizontal" Practices and Values in a Professor's Work with Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Anne Elrod

    2013-01-01

    Content-area university faculty can play a critical role in the trajectories of K-12 teachers into leadership. The purpose of this study is to examine the practices and values of one university faculty member with a long record of work with K-12 teachers, with an aim to offer some guiding considerations as to the potential role of university…

  19. Factors influencing residents' evaluations of clinical faculty member teaching qualities and role model status.

    PubMed

    Arah, Onyebuchi A; Heineman, Maas J; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2012-04-01

    Evaluations of faculty members are widely used to identify excellent or substandard teaching performance. In order to enable such evaluations to be properly interpreted and used in faculty development, it is essential to understand the factors that influence resident doctors' (residents) evaluations of the teaching qualities of faculty members and their perceptions of faculty members as role-model specialists.   We carried out a cross-sectional survey within a longitudinal study of the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ) of clinical teachers. The study sample included 889 residents and 1014 faculty members in 61 teaching programmes spanning 22 specialties in 20 hospitals in the Netherlands. Main outcome measures included residents' (i) global and (ii) specific ratings of faculty member teaching qualities, and (iii) global ratings of faculty members as role-model specialists. Statistical analysis was conducted using adjusted multivariable logistic generalised estimating equations.   In total, 690 residents (77.6%) completed 6485 evaluations of 962 faculty members, 848 (83.6%) of whom also self-evaluated. More recently certified faculty members, those who had attended a teacher training programme, and those who spent more time teaching than seeing patients or conducting research were more likely to score highly on most teaching qualities. However, faculty members who had undergone teacher training were less likely to be seen as role models (odds ratio [OR] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.88). In addition, faculty members were evaluated slightly higher by male than female residents on core teaching domains and overall teaching quality, but were less likely to be seen as role models by male residents (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67-0.97). Lastly, faculty members had higher odds of receiving top scores in specific teaching domains from residents in the first 4 years of residency and were less likely to be considered as role models by more

  20. Initial performance of a modified milestones global evaluation tool for semiannual evaluation of residents by faculty.

    PubMed

    Borman, Karen R; Augustine, Rebecca; Leibrandt, Thomas; Pezzi, Christopher M; Kukora, John S

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether faculty could successfully evaluate residents using a competency-based modified Milestones global evaluation tool. A program's leadership team modified a draft Surgery Milestones Working Group summative global assessment instrument into a modified Milestones tool (MMT) for local use during faculty meetings devoted to semiannual resident review. Residents were scored on 15 items spanning all competencies using an 8-point graphic response scale; unstructured comments also were solicited. Arithmetic means were computed at the resident and postgraduate year cohort levels for items and competency item sets. Score ranges (highest minus lowest score) were calculated; variability was termed "low" (range <2.0 points), "moderate" (range = 2.0), or "high" (range >2.0). A subset of "low" was designated "small" (1.0-1.9). Trends were sought among item, competency, and total Milestones scores. MMT correlations with examination scores and multisource (360°) assessments were explored. The success of implementing MMT was judged using published criteria for educational assessment methods. Fully accredited, independently sponsored residency. Program leaders and 22 faculty members (71% voluntary, mean 12y of experience). Twenty-six residents were assessed, yielding 7 to 13 evaluations for MMT per categorical resident and 3 to 6 per preliminary trainee. Scores spanned the entire response scale. All MMT evaluations included narrative comments. Individual resident score variability was low (96% within competencies and 92% across competencies). Subset analysis showed that small variations were common (35% within competencies and 54% across competencies). Postgraduate year cohort variability was higher (61% moderate or high within competencies and 50% across competencies). Cohort scores at the item, competency, and total score levels exhibited rising trajectories, suggesting MMT construct validity. MMT scores did not demonstrate concurrent validity, correlating poorly

  1. Faculty Grading of Quantitative Problems: A Mismatch between Values and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petcovic, Heather L.; Fynewever, Herb; Henderson, Charles; Mutambuki, Jacinta M.; Barney, Jeffrey A.

    2013-04-01

    Grading practices can send a powerful message to students about course expectations. A study by Henderson et al. (American Journal of Physics 72:164-169, 2004) in physics education has identified a misalignment between what college instructors say they value and their actual scoring of quantitative student solutions. This work identified three values that guide grading decisions: (1) a desire to see students' reasoning, (2) a readiness to deduct points from solutions with obvious errors and a reluctance to deduct points from solutions that might be correct, and (3) a tendency to assume correct reasoning when solutions are ambiguous. These authors propose that when values are in conflict, the conflict is resolved by placing the burden of proof on either the instructor or the student. Here, we extend the results of the physics study to earth science ( n = 7) and chemistry ( n = 10) instructors in a think-aloud interview study. Our results suggest that both the previously identified three values and the misalignment between values and grading practices exist among science faculty more generally. Furthermore, we identified a fourth value not previously recognized. Although all of the faculty across both studies stated that they valued seeing student reasoning, the combined effect suggests that only 49% of faculty across the three disciplines graded work in such a way that would actually encourage students to show their reasoning, and 34% of instructors could be viewed as penalizing students for showing their work. This research may contribute toward a better alignment between values and practice in faculty development.

  2. Evaluating Faculty Workload: An Application of Process Control Charts with Supplementary Run Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, R. S. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a method for evaluating faculty workload (measured by time spent in teaching, research, and service) by using process control charts with supplementary run rules that can identify potential overload or underload. (SK)

  3. The Influence of Students' Values and Educational Attitudes on Their Evaluation of Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Curtis; Johnson, James F.

    1977-01-01

    Results of a survey of 65 graduate students suggest that students' values and attitudes play a major role in their evaluation of faculty and should be recognized by teachers when interpreting the data from such ratings. (Author/LBH)

  4. The Definition of Scholarship and Service Used to Evaluate Industrial Teacher Education Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Everett N.

    1984-01-01

    Offers a definition of scholarship and service that might be used by an industrial education department chairperson and/or faculty to evaluate productivity and identifies acceptable products for each criterion. (JOW)

  5. Evaluation of Faculty Competencies in the Delivery of Contracted Workforce Training with Recommendations for Faculty Development at Fox Valley Technical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Susan A.

    This document describes an evaluation of the competencies of faculty who deliver contracted workforce training at Fox Valley Technical College (FVTC). A self-assessment questionnaire was administered to FVTC's 150 full-time and adjunct faculty who conduct workforce training; in addition, 157 employers who were clients of the college in the…

  6. Evaluating Online Dictionaries From Faculty Prospective: A Case Study Performed On English Faculty Members At King Saud University--Wadi Aldawaser Branch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate online dictionaries from faculty prospective. The study tried to obtain in depth information about various forms of dictionaries the faculty used; degree of awareness and accessing online dictionaries; types of online dictionaries accessed; basic features of information provided; major benefits gained…

  7. Perceptions of Virginia Community College System Faculty and Administrators on the Purposes for and Composition of a Comprehensive Evaluation System for Teaching Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightower, William H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed to measure community college faculty and administrator views on the faculty evaluation process. Responses were then compared based on demographic characteristics such as primary area of instruction, supervisory responsibility, years of experience, and gender. Open-ended survey questions asked respondents to…

  8. Perceptions of Virginia Community College System Faculty and Administrators on the Purposes for and Composition of a Comprehensive Evaluation System for Teaching Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightower, William H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed to measure community college faculty and administrator views on the faculty evaluation process. Responses were then compared based on demographic characteristics such as primary area of instruction, supervisory responsibility, years of experience, and gender. Open-ended survey questions asked respondents to…

  9. Assessing Faculty Performance Using the Student Evaluation of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Dale E.; McKinnon, Norma Cole

    This study examined the effects of class size, course level and absenteeism on college student ratings of college faculty teaching performance at a small liberal arts institution, Atlantic Baptist College (New Brunswick, Canada). A rating scale was completed by students in each course offered during the fall semester of the 1993-94 academic year.…

  10. 1981 and 1982 Faculty and Student Research Participation Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Lee

    This publication was developed as a basic tool to measure success of Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) University Programs Division in achieving goals of the Faculty and Student Research Participation Programs operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Three questionnaires were created to directly address the goals and objectives of…

  11. Formalizing Evaluation Procedures for Marketing Faculty Research Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Dennis R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Results of a national survey of marketing department heads (n=142) indicate that few marketing departments have formalized the development and communication of research performance standards to faculty. Guidelines and methods to accomplish those procedures most efficiently were proposed. (Author/JOW)

  12. Faculty perceptions and practices regarding carrying concealed handguns on university campuses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Amy; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph; Teeple, Karen

    2013-04-01

    The presence of firearms in an environment significantly increases firearm trauma. So far, four states have passed legislation permitting the carrying of concealed handguns on university campuses and several other states are considering such legislation. The purpose of this study to assess the perceptions and practices of college faculty regarding support for carrying concealed handguns on their campuses. A valid and reliable questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 1,125 faculty at 15 randomly selected state universities in five Great Lakes states. A two wave postal mailing in the Spring of 2012 was conducted to help ensure an adequate response rate. A total of 791 (70 %) of the faculty responded. The vast majority felt safe on their campuses (98 %) and were not supportive of people carrying concealed handguns on their campuses (94 %). Seven of the eight potential disadvantages of carrying concealed handguns on campus were supported by the majority of faculty members. Those who were significantly more likely to perceive there to be disadvantages to carrying concealed handguns on campus were: those who did not own a firearm (OR = 4.89), Democrats (OR = 4.52) or Independents (OR = 2.25), Asians (OR = 2.49), and females (OR = 1.51). The vast majority of faculty felt safe on their campuses and perceived that carrying concealed handguns on campuses create more risks than benefits to the campus environment. Aggressive efforts are needed to help maintain the uniquely safe environment of college campuses.

  13. Social Work Gerontological Practice: The Need for Faculty Development in the New Millennium.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Barbara; Silverstone, Barbara; June Simmons, W; Volland, Patricia J; Howe, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need to upgrade the gerontological knowledge and skills of practicing social workers. Geriatrics and gerontology, as specialized fields of knowledge, have not been sufficiently integrated into formal academic training programs. There are major trends in the health care environment which impact on social work education, including technological advances, a shift from inpatient to outpatient and community care settings, increasing diversity of the older population, and client and family participation in decisionmaking. These trends necessitate social work education to emphasize new content areas in gerontology and the development of new skills in clinical, case management, care coordination, and teamwork. A significant obstacle to the preparation of future social workers to deliver the complex services needed by older adults and their families is a serious shortage of social work faculty in gerontology. Sustained and broad initiatives, such as the John A. Hartford Foundation funded Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholars Program, are needed to develop academic and practice-based faculty in gerontology. This is crucial if social work is to maintain an important service role in the new millennium.

  14. New Tools for Systematic Evaluation of Teaching Qualities of Medical Faculty: Results of an Ongoing Multi-Center Survey

    PubMed Central

    Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Bos, Albert P.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Tools for the evaluation, improvement and promotion of the teaching excellence of faculty remain elusive in residency settings. This study investigates (i) the reliability and validity of the data yielded by using two new instruments for evaluating the teaching qualities of medical faculty, (ii) the instruments' potential for differentiating between faculty, and (iii) the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to reliably use the instruments. Methods and Materials Multicenter cross-sectional survey among 546 residents and 629 medical faculty representing 29 medical (non-surgical) specialty training programs in the Netherlands. Two instruments—one completed by residents and one by faculty—for measuring teaching qualities of faculty were developed. Statistical analyses included factor analysis, reliability and validity exploration using standard psychometric methods, calculation of the numbers of residents' evaluations needed per faculty to achieve reliable assessments and variance components and threshold analyses. Results A total of 403 (73.8%) residents completed 3575 evaluations of 570 medical faculty while 494 (78.5%) faculty self-evaluated. In both instruments five composite-scales of faculty teaching qualities were detected with high internal consistency and reliability: learning climate (Cronbach's alpha of 0.85 for residents' instrument, 0.71 for self-evaluation instrument, professional attitude and behavior (0.84/0.75), communication of goals (0.90/0.84), evaluation of residents (0.91/0.81), and feedback (0.91/0.85). Faculty tended to evaluate themselves higher than did the residents. Up to a third of the total variance in various teaching qualities can be attributed to between-faculty differences. Some seven residents' evaluations per faculty are needed for assessments to attain a reliability level of 0.90. Conclusions The instruments for evaluating teaching qualities of medical faculty appear to yield reliable and valid data

  15. Fostering Change from Within: Influencing Teaching Practices of Departmental Colleagues by Science Faculty with Education Specialties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Globally, calls for the improvement of science education are frequent and fervent. In parallel, the phenomenon of having Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES) within science departments appears to have grown in recent decades. In the context of an interview study of a randomized, stratified sample of SFES from across the United States, we discovered that most SFES interviewed (82%) perceived having professional impacts in the realm of improving undergraduate science education, more so than in research in science education or K-12 science education. While SFES reported a rich variety of efforts towards improving undergraduate science education, the most prevalent reported impact by far was influencing the teaching practices of their departmental colleagues. Since college and university science faculty continue to be hired with little to no training in effective science teaching, the seeding of science departments with science education specialists holds promise for fostering change in science education from within biology, chemistry, geoscience, and physics departments. PMID:26954776

  16. Fostering Change from Within: Influencing Teaching Practices of Departmental Colleagues by Science Faculty with Education Specialties.

    PubMed

    Bush, Seth D; Rudd, James A; Stevens, Michael T; Tanner, Kimberly D; Williams, Kathy S

    2016-01-01

    Globally, calls for the improvement of science education are frequent and fervent. In parallel, the phenomenon of having Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES) within science departments appears to have grown in recent decades. In the context of an interview study of a randomized, stratified sample of SFES from across the United States, we discovered that most SFES interviewed (82%) perceived having professional impacts in the realm of improving undergraduate science education, more so than in research in science education or K-12 science education. While SFES reported a rich variety of efforts towards improving undergraduate science education, the most prevalent reported impact by far was influencing the teaching practices of their departmental colleagues. Since college and university science faculty continue to be hired with little to no training in effective science teaching, the seeding of science departments with science education specialists holds promise for fostering change in science education from within biology, chemistry, geoscience, and physics departments.

  17. Combating Grade Inflation in Nephrology Clinical Rotation Evaluations Using Faculty Education and a 5-Point Centered Rating Scale.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Christina M; Nee, Robert; Abbott, Kevin C; Oliver, James D

    2016-05-01

    Background From 2010 to 2011, more than 70% of the clinical rotation competency evaluations for nephrology fellows in our program were rated "superior" using a 9-point Likert scale, suggesting some degree of "grade inflation." Objective We sought to assess the efficacy of a 5-point centered rotation evaluation in reducing grade inflation. Methods This retrospective cohort study of the impact of faculty education and a 5-point rotation evaluation on grade inflation was measured by superior item rating frequency and proportion of evaluations without superior ratings. The 5-point evaluation centered performance at the level expected for stage of training. Faculty education began in 2011-2012. The 5-point centered evaluation was introduced in 2012-2013 and used exclusively thereafter. A total of 68 evaluations, using the 9-point Likert scale, and 63 evaluations, using the 5-point centered scale, were performed after first-year fellow clinical rotations. Nine to 12 faculty members participated yearly. Results Faculty education alone was associated with fewer superior ratings from 2010-2011 to 2011-2012 (70.5% versus 48.3%, P = .001), declining further with 5-point centered scale introduction (2012-2013; 48.3% versus 35.6%; P = .012). Superior ratings declined with 5-point centered versus 9-point Likert scales (37.3% versus 59.3%, P = .001), specifically for medical knowledge, patient care, practice-based learning and improvement, and professionalism. On logistic regression, evaluations without superior scores were more likely for 5-point centered versus 9-point Likert scales (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 8.26; 95% CI 1.53-44.64; P = .014) and associated with faculty identifier (aOR= 1.18; 95% CI 1.03-1.35; P = .013), but not fellow identifier or training year quarter. Grade inflation was reduced with faculty education and the 5-point centered evaluation scale.

  18. Preparing for practice: Nursing intern and faculty perceptions on clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    AlThiga, Hanan; Mohidin, Sharifah; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2017-04-01

    Clinical experience and exposure to real patients are required elements of nursing education. Trainees in nursing are expected to be prepared adequately for the hard-working environment, increasing patient complexity, and higher-level competencies. This study investigates differences between nursing interns and clinical faculty on actual and perceived importance of educational preparation and development of clinical competencies, focusing on the nursing curriculum and transition to practice. A convenient sampling technique with a mixed-methods design was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data, by surveying and interviewing nursing interns and faculty members from King Abdul-Aziz University in Saudi Arabia; data collection occurred in December 2015. The survey (23 items) and focused interviews measured perceptions of clinical instruction and experience. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze differences in mean ratings between actual and perceived importance. Themes collected from narrative interview data were summarized. Significant differences were found between nursing interns (n = 46) and faculty (n = 29) perceptions of actual clinical teaching and experiences and its importance including the clinical teaching and the development of clinical competence, p < .01. Moreover, nursing interns rated actual experiences of knowledge base and skills significantly lower than faculty perceptions, p = .001. Narrative data provided in-depth information on factors contributing and hindering the learning and teaching environment. Findings from this study call for clinical instruction and experiences to take a step further to meet current practice standards and to improve patient safety in the health professions education of nurses.

  19. Faculty Evaluation: The Use of Explicit Criteria for Promotion, Retention, and Tenure. AAHE-ERIC/Higher Education Research Report No. 2, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Neal; Weiss, Elaine

    The use of explicit, written criteria to evaluate college and university faculty is examined. Four major issues concerning faculty evaluation are as follows: the desired outcomes of faculty evaluation; the functions of faculty activity that are to be evaluated; the criteria that should be used for each area evaluated; and the procedures for…

  20. A comparison of students' self-assessments with faculty evaluations of their communication skills.

    PubMed

    Lundquist, Lisa M; Shogbon, Angela O; Momary, Kathryn M; Rogers, Hannah K

    2013-05-13

    To compare students' self-assessment of their communication skills with faculty members' formal evaluation of their skills in a therapeutics course. Over a 3-year period, faculty members evaluated second-year pharmacy students' communication skills as part of a requirement in a therapeutics course. Immediately following an individual oral assessment and again following a group oral assessment, students self-assessed their communication skills using the same rubric the faculty members had used. Students' self-assessments were then compared with faculty members' evaluation of students' communication skills. Four hundred one (97.3%) students consented to participate in this study. Faculty evaluation scores of students for both the individual and group oral assessments were significantly higher than students' self-assessment scores. Students' self-assessment scores of their communication skills increased from the individual to the group oral assessment. Students' self-assessments of communication skills were consistently lower than faculty members' evaluations. Greater use of oral assessments throughout the pharmacy curriculum may help to improve students' confidence in and self-assessment of their communication skills.

  1. Balance of academic responsibilities of clinical track pharmacy faculty in the United States: a survey of select American College of Clinical Pharmacy Practice and Research Network Members.

    PubMed

    Nutescu, Edith A; Engle, Janet P; Bathija, Sacheeta; Grim, Shellee A; Chan, Juliana; Mucksavage, Jeffrey J; Ohler, Kirsten H; Tesoro, Eljim P; Thielke, James J; Shapiro, Nancy L; Donnelly, Andrew J; Garofalo, John; DiDomenico, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    To characterize the balance of clinical and academic responsibilities of clinical track pharmacy faculty in the United States and evaluate organizational structures that promote satisfactory balance between these responsibilities. Prospective cross-sectional survey. A 22-item online survey was developed and distributed via Qualtrics software. Clinical faculty members of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Adult Medicine, Ambulatory Care, Cardiology, Critical Care, Gastrointestinal/Liver/Nutrition, Immunology/Transplantation, Infectious Disease, and Pediatrics Practice and Research Networks (PRNs) were invited to participate via the PRN electronic mailing list. The survey comprised questions related to demographics, organizational structure, and balance of clinical and academic responsibilities. A total of 344 participants responded to some or all of the survey questions. The demographics were relatively equally balanced between faculty at state and private academic institutions, academic rank, and practice setting. Expected and actual effort allocations were similar for each of the clinical and academic responsibilities, with direct patient care and clinical teaching representing more than 50% effort allocation cumulatively. Clinical faculty at state institutions devoted a larger proportion of time to clinical service, whereas clinical faculty at private institutions devoted a greater proportion of time to didactic teaching. When asked about time constraints, 157 (69.8%) of the 225 survey participants responding to this question did not believe they had sufficient time to fulfill their nonclinical academic needs. Clinical faculty who were provided "protected time" away from clinical service had a significantly more favorable opinion of this question. Most of the clinical track pharmacy faculty indicated that they have insufficient time to fulfill their nonclinical academic responsibilities. Provision of protected time may alleviate some of these time

  2. Examining the Effects of a National League for Nursing Core Competencies Workshop as an Intervention to Improve Nurse Faculty Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBever Wilson, Robin R.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complex challenges facing schools of nursing, a research study was implemented to introduce nurse faculty at one small rural northeastern Tennessee school of nursing to the NLN "Core Competencies for Nurse Educators". Utilizing Kalb's Nurse Faculty Self-Evaluation Tool as a pre- and post-intervention test, 30 nurse faculty…

  3. A survey of nursing faculty needs for training in use of new technologies for education and practice.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Diane N; Zierler, Brenda; Nguyen, Huong Q

    2011-04-01

    This study describes nursing faculty's use, knowledge of, and training needs associated with distance learning, simulation, telehealth, and informatics tools in nursing education and practice. Web-based surveys were completed by 193 faculty members from nursing schools in the western United States. More than half of the respondents were frequent users of distance learning and informatics tools. Approximately 66% of faculty reported they were competent with distance learning and informatics tools. Training and technical support for the use of distance learning was highest, yet 69% of faculty still reported a need for additional training. The availability of training and financial and technical support was associated with greater use of distance learning technologies (p < 0.05 for all). Although a key limitation of this survey was the overlapping definitions across the four technologies, the findings suggest nursing faculty perceive a need for training and support to effectively use educational technologies in nursing education.

  4. Faculty Scholarship Has a Profound Positive Association with Student Evaluations of Teaching--Except When It Doesn't

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that research-productive faculty are also the finest instructors. But, is this commonly held belief correct? In the current study, the notion that faculty scholarship exhibits a positive association with teaching evaluations is investigated. Reflecting the data structure of faculty nested within university, the current…

  5. Faculty Scholarship Has a Profound Positive Association with Student Evaluations of Teaching--Except When It Doesn't

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that research-productive faculty are also the finest instructors. But, is this commonly held belief correct? In the current study, the notion that faculty scholarship exhibits a positive association with teaching evaluations is investigated. Reflecting the data structure of faculty nested within university, the current…

  6. Perception of Locus of Control as a Predictor of Attitude Toward Students' Evaluation of University Faculty. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Emmett T.; Christal, Melodie E.

    Student and faculty attitudes about faculty evaluation and the relationship of the attitudes to the concept of locus of control were investigated. Student respondents consisted of 172 males and 256 females, and 108 faculty responses were received. The measure of locus of control closely resembles the Rotter Internal-External Control Scale. Student…

  7. Differences in Student Evaluations of Principles and Other Economics Courses and The Allocation of Faculty across Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragan, James F., Jr.; Walia, Bhavneet

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze 19 semesters of student evaluations at Kansas State University. Faculty member fixed effects are sizable and indicate that among faculty members who teach both types of courses, the best principles teachers also tend to be the best nonprinciples teachers. Estimates that ignore faculty effects are biased because principles…

  8. Perception of Locus of Control as a Predictor of Attitude Toward Students' Evaluation of University Faculty. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Emmett T.; Christal, Melodie E.

    Student and faculty attitudes about faculty evaluation and the relationship of the attitudes to the concept of locus of control were investigated. Student respondents consisted of 172 males and 256 females, and 108 faculty responses were received. The measure of locus of control closely resembles the Rotter Internal-External Control Scale. Student…

  9. Differences in Student Evaluations of Principles and Other Economics Courses and The Allocation of Faculty across Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragan, James F., Jr.; Walia, Bhavneet

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze 19 semesters of student evaluations at Kansas State University. Faculty member fixed effects are sizable and indicate that among faculty members who teach both types of courses, the best principles teachers also tend to be the best nonprinciples teachers. Estimates that ignore faculty effects are biased because principles…

  10. Epistemological Beliefs and Practices of Science Faculty with Education Specialties: Combining Teaching Scholarship and Interdisciplinarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addy, Tracie Marcella

    2011-12-01

    Across the United States institutions of higher education address educational reform by valuing scholarship that focuses on teaching and learning, especially in STEM fields. University science departments can encourage teaching scholarship by hiring science faculty with education specialties (SFES), individuals who have expertise in both science and science education. The goal of this study was to understand how the epistemological beliefs and teaching practices of SFES relate to national reform efforts in science teaching promoting student-centered instruction. The research questions guiding this investigation were: (1) What epistemological belief systems do science faculty with education specialties espouse concerning the teaching and learning of science?; and (2) What are the classroom practices of science faculty with education specialties? How are these practices congruent with the reform efforts described by the National Research Council (1996, 2001, 2003)? The theoretical framework guiding the study was interdisciplinarity, the integration of knowledge between two or more disciplines (science and science pedagogy). The research design employed mixed (qualitative and quantitative) approaches and focused on 25 volunteer SFES participants. The TBI, ATI, and RTOP were used to triangulate self-report and videotaped teaching vignettes, and develop profiles of SFES. Of the 25 SFES participants, 82 percent of their beliefs were transitional or student-centered beliefs. Seventy-two percent of the 25 SFES espoused more student-focused than teacher focused approaches. The classroom practices of 10 SFES were on average transitional in nature (at the boundary of student-focused and teacher-focused). The beliefs of SFES appeared to be influenced by the sizes of their courses, and were positive correlated with reform-based teaching practices. There was a relationship between the degree to which they implemented reform-based practice and their perceived level of

  11. Impact of a faculty development programme for teaching communication skills on participants' practice.

    PubMed

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Cullati, Stephane; Hudelson, Patricia; Nendaz, Mathieu; Dolmans, Diana; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2014-05-01

    A 6-month faculty development programme was designed to improve supervisors' feedback to junior doctors on their clinical communication skills (CS) and included both CS and teaching skills training. The aim of this study was to assess supervisors' views on the impact of the programme on their subsequent teaching and communication practice. 28 clinical supervisors at the Geneva University Hospitals, from either inpatient or outpatient settings (general internists or primary care specialists), undertook a six-session faculty development programme, between 2009 and 2011, and each completed a short questionnaire before and 1 month after the course. Between 3 and 6 months after the course, the participants were interviewed about their views on the impact of the course on their practice using a semistructured interview. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. The percentage of participants who reported teaching CS at least once a week had increased from 5/26 (19%) to 8/26 (30%), p=0.07. Participants reported using teaching skills, especially giving structured feedback. Use of newly acquired teaching skills was more likely when participants had protected time for teaching or were involved in formal teaching activities. Even participants who reported minimal teaching activity found the newly acquired CS to be useful, both with their own patients and in other professional situations. The few participants who explicitly reported teaching regularly CS in practice had generally become formal teachers in CS training. A faculty development programme on how to teach CS is perceived to be useful by clinical supervisors to acquire new skills, but using them in the workplace appears to depend on creation of a supportive environment with protected time for teaching. Involving supervisors in formal communication teaching may be one way to ensure continued use of newly learned teaching skills.

  12. Integrating oral health into professional nursing practice: an interprofessional faculty tool kit.

    PubMed

    Dolce, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Millions of children and adults in the United States have unmet oral health care needs, and professional nurses can play a central role in reducing oral health disparities and expanding access to care. Interprofessional education is requisite to improving oral health care outcomes. Baccalaureate nursing programs need to prepare collaborative practice-ready professional nurses to improve oral health care especially for vulnerable and underserved individuals, communities, and populations. This article presents an interprofessional faculty tool kit that builds upon The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework for preparing professional nurses with basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes in oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention across the life cycle. Expectations for professional nursing practice are described within the context of The Essentials and contemporary oral health care issues. Exemplars of interprofessional teaching-learning strategies are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral health into baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Nurse educators are called to prioritize oral health as an essential component of overall health and well-being, increase the visibility of evidence-based oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention in baccalaureate nursing curricula, and support interprofessional oral health education and collaborative care.

  13. Guarding against Potential Bias in Student Evaluations: What Every Faculty Member Needs to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Tamara; Blattner, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Course evaluations are used by many institutions in promotion, tenure, and merit decisions. This article discusses the influences on those evaluations and how faculty can combat those biases to ensure accurate portrayal of their teaching effectiveness. Alternative evaluation methods are reviewed, including portfolios, peer feedback sessions, and…

  14. Staging a Pre-Emptive Strike: Turning Student Evaluation of Faculty from Threat to Asset.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Margaret H.

    Many college and university teachers across the United States remain hostile, at least privately, to student evaluation of faculty performance despite the general use of such evaluation in the academy for the past three decades. However, professionals can use student evaluations to their advantage if they "stage a pre-emptive strike"--in other…

  15. Faculty Teaching Performance: Perceptions of a Multi-Source Method for Evaluation (MME)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyde, Adrian R.; Grieshaber, David C.; Byrns, George

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating college and university faculty teaching performance is necessary for multiple reasons, including assurance of student learning and informing administrative decision-making. A holistic system of evaluating university teaching is necessary for reasons including the limitations of student evaluations and the complexity of assessing…

  16. Evaluating Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leshem, Shosh; Bar-Hama, Rivka

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of observed lessons has been the subject of much debate in the field of teacher training. Teacher trainers have tried to define quality in relation to teaching and to find ways to measure it in a reliable way. Can we evaluate the quality of teaching by observable behaviour and measurable components, in which case, can the lesson be…

  17. A Chronic Disease Management Student-Faculty Collaborative Practice: Educating Students on Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Remus, Kristin E; Honigberg, Michael; Tummalapalli, Sri Lekha; Cohen, Laura P; Fazio, Sara; Weinstein, Amy R

    2016-07-01

    In the current transformative health care landscape, it is imperative that clinician educators inspire future clinicians to practice primary care in a dynamic environment. A focus on patient-centered, goal-oriented care for patients with chronic conditions is critical. In 2009, Harvard Medical School founded the Crimson Care Collaborative, a student-faculty collaborative practice (SFCP) network. With the aim of expanding clinical and educational opportunities for medical students and improving patient control of chronic disease (i.e., hypertension, obesity, and diabetes) in an innovative learning environment, in 2012, the authors developed a novel SFCP at their hospital-based academic primary care practice. In this SFCP, students learn to explore patient priorities, provide focused counseling and education, and assist patients with self-management goals during clinical visits. From 2012 to 2014, 250 student volunteers participated in the SFCP as clinicians, innovators, educators, and leaders, with between 80 and 95 medical students engaging each semester. Between January 2012 and March 2014, there were 476 urgent care or chronic disease management visits. Patients with chronic diseases were seen at least twice on average, and by 2014, chronic disease management visits accounted for approximately 74% of visits. Work is under way to create assessment tools to evaluate the practice's educa tional impact and student understanding of the current health care system, develop interdisciplinary care teams, expand efforts in registry management and broaden the patient recruitment scope, further emphasize patient engage ment and retention, and evaluate chronic disease management and patient satisfaction effectiveness.

  18. Improving consistency in student evaluation at affiliated family practice centers.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, H K

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Family Medicine at Jefferson Medical College has since 1974 been successful in administering a required third-year family medicine clerkship, providing students with a structured, didactic, and experiential curriculum in six affiliated family practice centers. Prior analysis (1976-1981) had indicated, however, that variation existed in evaluating similar students, depending on the clerkship training site, i.e., three sites graded students in a significantly different fashion than the three other sites. Utilizing these data to focus on the evaluation process, a comprehensive and specific six-point plan was developed to improve consistency in evaluations at the different training sites. This plan consisted of a yearly meeting of affiliate faculty, assigning predoctoral training administrative responsibility to one faculty member at each training site, increased telephone communication, affiliate-faculty attendance at the university site evaluation session, faculty rotation to spend time at other training sites, and financial reimbursement to the affiliate training sites. After intervention, analysis (1981-1983) indicated that five of the six clerkship sites now grade students in a consistent fashion, with only one affiliate using different grading standards. The intervention was therefore judged to be successful for five of the six training sites, allowing for better communication and more critical and consistent evaluation of medical students.

  19. Evidence-based practice instruction by faculty members and librarians in North American optometry and ophthalmology programs.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Katherine A; Hrynchak, Patricia K; Spafford, Marlee M

    2014-07-01

    North American optometry and ophthalmology faculty members and vision science librarians were surveyed online (14% response rate) about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP). Similar to studies of other health care programs, all five EBP steps (Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply, Assess) were taught to varying degrees. Optometry and ophthalmology EBP educators may want to place further emphasis on (1) the Apply and Assess steps, (2) faculty- and student-generated questions and self-assessment in clinical settings, (3) online teaching strategies, (4) programmatic integration of EBP learning objectives, and (5) collaboration between faculty members and librarians.

  20. Perceived Barriers to Scholarship and Research Among Pharmacy Practice Faculty: Survey Report from the AACP Scholarship/Research Faculty Development Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Robles, J. R.; Youmans, Sharon L.; Byrd, Debbie C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To identify problems that pharmacy practice faculty members face in pursuing scholarship and to develop and recommend solutions. Methods Department chairs were asked to forward a Web-based survey instrument to their faculty members. Global responses and responses stratified by demographics were summarized and analyzed. Results Between 312 and 340 faculty members answered questions that identified barriers to scholarship and recommended corrective strategies to these barriers. The most common barrier was insufficient time (57%), and the most common recommendation was for help to “identify a research question and how to answer it.” Sixty percent reported that scholarship was required for advancement but only 32% thought scholarship should be required. Forty-one percent reported that the importance of scholarship is overemphasized. Conclusions These survey results provide guidance to improve the quantity and quality of scholarship for faculty members who wish to pursue scholarship, although many of the survey respondents indicated they did not regard scholarship as a priority. PMID:19513155

  1. Academic Freedom in Al Al-Bayt University and the Level of Practicing It from the View Point of the Faculty Members Based on Some Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Madi, Bayan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the level of practicing academic freedom by the faculty members of Al al-Bayt University. The study population included all the faculty members (297) of Al al-Bayt University, during the academic year, 2010/2011. The study sample was randomly selected and included 250 faculty members. To achieve the aims of…

  2. Academic Freedom in Al Al-Bayt University and the Level of Practicing It from the View Point of the Faculty Members Based on Some Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Madi, Bayan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the level of practicing academic freedom by the faculty members of Al al-Bayt University. The study population included all the faculty members (297) of Al al-Bayt University, during the academic year, 2010/2011. The study sample was randomly selected and included 250 faculty members. To achieve the aims of…

  3. Beyond Satisfaction: Toward an Outcomes-Based, Procedural Model of Faculty Development Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, D. Christopher; Marsh, Lauren; Wilcox, Kimerly; Cohen, Brad

    2011-01-01

    In response to the well-documented need for rigorous evaluations of faculty development programs and increasing demands for institutional accountability, University of Minnesota's Office of Information Technology (OIT) researchers have developed an approach to program evaluation that assesses individual level changes to participants' attitudes,…

  4. An Analysis of Grades, Class Level and Faculty Evaluation Scores in the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Lee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the results of a student evaluation of faculty against the grades awarded and the level of the course for a higher education institution in the United Arab Emirates. The purpose of the study was to determine if the grades awarded in the course and/or level of the course impacted the evaluation scores awarded to the faculty…

  5. Beyond Satisfaction: Toward an Outcomes-Based, Procedural Model of Faculty Development Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, D. Christopher; Marsh, Lauren; Wilcox, Kimerly; Cohen, Brad

    2011-01-01

    In response to the well-documented need for rigorous evaluations of faculty development programs and increasing demands for institutional accountability, University of Minnesota's Office of Information Technology (OIT) researchers have developed an approach to program evaluation that assesses individual level changes to participants' attitudes,…

  6. Mentoring University Faculty to become High Quality Online Educators: A Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixon, Emily; Barczyk, Casimir; Buckenmeyer, Janet; Feldman, Lori

    2011-01-01

    This study summarizes the results of a program evaluation of the Distance Education Mentoring Program (DEMP), an ongoing initiative at Purdue University Calumet, Indiana (USA) designed to enhance the development of online courses by mentoring faculty in instructional design principles and technology. The evaluation covers a four year period and is…

  7. Follow-up assessment of a faculty peer observation and evaluation program.

    PubMed

    DiVall, Margarita; Barr, Judith; Gonyeau, Michael; Matthews, S James; Van Amburgh, Jenny; Qualters, Donna; Trujillo, Jennifer

    2012-05-10

    To assess a previously described peer observation and evaluation program 2 years after implementation. An pre-implementation survey assessed faculty needs and attitudes related to peer evaluation. Two years after implementation, the survey was repeated and additional questions asked regarding adherence to peer observation and evaluation policies and procedures, feedback received, and impact on teaching. Faculty attitudes towards peer evaluation stayed the same or improved post-implementation. Adherence to the initial 3 steps of the process was high (100%, 100%, and 94%, respectively); however, step 4, which required a final discussion after student assessments were finished, was completed by only 47% of the respondents. All faculty members reported receiving a balance of positive and constructive feedback; 78% agreed that peer observation and evaluation gave them concrete suggestions for improving their teaching; and 89% felt that the benefits of peer observation and evaluation outweighed the effort of participating. Faculty members adhered to the policies and procedures of peer observation and evaluation and found peer feedback was beneficial.

  8. Prevalence of and factors that influence board certification among pharmacy practice faculty at United States colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Kimberly A; Watson, Kristin; Marrs, Joel C; Sturpe, Deborah A; Anderson, Sarah L; Haines, Stuart T

    2013-01-01

    Board certification is a means of demonstrating expertise above the minimum licensing standards. For many health care professionals, this credential is a necessity. As pharmacists become involved in more advanced patient care services, board certification becomes an essential component to ensuring quality care. The prevalence of United States pharmacy practice faculty members who are board certified, however, is unknown. In addition, to our knowledge, factors that serve to motivate or discourage faculty from obtaining board certification have not been previously described; thus, 900 pharmacy practice faculty members listed in the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) online directory were invited to complete an online survey regarding motivators and barriers for board certification. In addition, a list of board-certified pharmacists, obtained from the Board of Pharmacy Specialties, was used to check the board certification status of all pharmacy practice faculty members listed in the AACP directory. In 2011, the prevalence of board certification among the 2867 pharmacy practice faculty members was 37% (1063 pharmacists), with the highest prevalence found among assistant professors (39.4%). A total of 322 faculty members (36% response rate) completed the survey; of these, 308 self-identified as pharmacy practice faculty, and their responses were included in the analysis. Current board certification in pharmacy specialties was reported by 163 respondents (52.9%); 14 (4.5%) were previously certified. Among the 308 respondents, the most common perceived reason why pharmacy practice faculty become board certified was the desire to be recognized as an expert in the field (71.5%). Those who were currently board certified indicated personal growth as the most important reason (60.1%). Those previously certified indicated no perceived benefit as the most common reason for not recertifying (71.4%). Among those never certified, no perceived need (52.0%) or

  9. Disciplinary Logics in Doctoral Admissions: Understanding Patterns of Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posselt, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Ph.D. attainment rates by race and gender vary widely across the disciplines, and previous research has found disciplinary variation in graduate admissions criteria and practices. To better understand how disciplines shape admissions preferences and practices, which in turn may shape student access to graduate education, this article uncovers…

  10. Practical Strategies for Evaluating Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinger, Ruth D.; Deming, Basil S.

    1982-01-01

    Describes six practical ways of answering critical questions about the effectiveness of training. These evaluation methods are: (1) delayed treatment, (2) modified critical incident, (3) followup, (4) performance analysis, (5) time-series evaluation, and (6) cost-benefit analysis. (JOW)

  11. Management Review of Evaluation Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, Jonathan

    Evaluation practice within state education agencies (SEAs) is reviewed from a management consultant's perspective. The study is based upon a review of literature, discussions with the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory Research on Evaluation Program, and visits to SEAs in California, Montana and Washington. The main findings of the study…

  12. Repaying in Kind: Examination of the Reciprocity Effect in Faculty and Resident Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Aimee K; Scott, Daniel J

    Although the reciprocity hypothesis (that trainees have a tendency to modify evaluations based on the grades they receive from instructors) has been documented in other fields, very little work has examined this phenomenon in the surgical residency environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which lenient-grading faculty receive higher evaluations from surgery residents. Evaluation data from 2 consecutive academic years were collected retrospectively at a large university-based General Surgery residency program. Monthly faculty evaluations of residents (15 items) and resident evaluations of faculty (8 items; 1 = never demonstrates, 10 = always demonstrates) were included. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted with SPSS version 22 (IBM; Chicago, IL). A total of 2274 faculty assessments and 1480 resident assessments were included in this study, representing 2 years of evaluations for 32 core faculty members responsible for completing all resident evaluations and 68 PGY1-5 general surgery residents. Faculty (63% men, 13.5 ± 9.8 years out of training) represented 5 different divisions (general surgery, surgical oncology, transplant, trauma critical care, and vascular) within the general surgery department. Faculty received an average of 71.1 ± 33.9 evaluations from residents over the course of 2 years. The average rating of faculty teaching by residents was 9.5 ± 0.4. Residents received an average of 21.8 ± 0.5 evaluations with average ratings of 4.2 ± 0.4. Correlation analyses indicated a positive relationship between the average rating received from residents and the number of years since faculty completed training (r = 0.44, p = 0.01). Additionally, a significant relationship emerged between ratings received from residents and ratings given to residents (r = 0.40, p = 0.04). Regression analyses indicated that when both variables (years since training, ratings given to residents) were included in the model, only ratings

  13. Factors influencing intentions to integrate tobacco education among advanced practice nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Heath, Janie; Crowell, Nancy A

    2007-01-01

    We report on the findings of a national survey that examined factors that influence faculty's intentions to integrate tobacco education in their advanced practice nursing curricula. The addiction component of tobacco use is taking its toll on the health of 48 million smokers in the United States. Several national health authorities recommend and/or mandate that tobacco prevention and tobacco cessation be addressed at every point of entry in the health care delivery system. However, there is increasing evidence that health care providers may not be adequately prepared to meet national goals and/or standards. One hundred sixty-one advanced practice nursing faculty in the United States completed an 88-item survey regarding external factors (e.g., personal history of tobacco use, clinical practice, and current tobacco topics taught) and components of the Theory of Reasoned Action model (including perceived self-efficacy, behavioral beliefs, subjective norms, and control beliefs related to tobacco education). Descriptive statistics, chi(2) analysis, Pearson correlation, and linear regression were used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that sex (chi(2) = 7.949, P = .024), level of education (chi(2) = 26.853, P = .0005), years of academic teaching (chi(2) = 19.418, P = .013), and combined clinical and course responsibility (chi(2) = 10.430, P = .0236) were significant external (demographic) factors and that behavioral beliefs (attitude about tobacco education) demonstrated the strongest relationship with intention scores (r = 0.876, P < .0005). Overall, 62.7% of nurse practitioners reported high scores (>or=5, on a scale of 1-7) for intentions to integrate tobacco education, as compared with 37.5% of nurse midwives, 30.3% of clinical nurse specialists, and 8.7% of nurse anesthetists. This study adds to the growing body of evidence that nursing curricular gaps with tobacco education exist and that national efforts are needed to ensure that widespread changes occur

  14. Faculty achievement tracking tool.

    PubMed

    Pettus, Sarah; Reifschneider, Ellen; Burruss, Nancy

    2009-03-01

    Faculty development and scholarship is an expectation of nurse educators. Accrediting institutions, such as the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, and the Higher Learning Commission, all have criteria regarding faculty achievement. A faculty achievement tracking tool (FATT) was developed to facilitate documentation of accreditation criteria attainment. Based on criteria from accrediting organizations, the roles that are addressed include scholarship, service, and practice. Definitions and benchmarks for the faculty as an aggregate are included. Undergoing reviews from different accrediting organizations, the FATT has been used once for accreditation of the undergraduate program and once for accreditation of the graduate program. The FATT is easy to use and has become an excellent adjunct for the preparation for accreditation reports. In addition, the FATT may be used for yearly evaluations, advancement, and merit.

  15. Evaluation of orientation program for fresh MBBS entrants: Faculty and students’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Rajiv; Gupta, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Context: One-day orientation program (OP) for fresh MBBS entrants is running in our institute since 2010, but has never been evaluated. Aims and Objectives: To evaluate the OP from students’ and faculty perspectives and to recommend a revised program. Methodology: Totally 439 students of three MBBS batches were enrolled in the study. Students were asked to fill an anonymous semi-structured, pretested questionnaire. Views of faculty members were recorded by conducting three focus group discussions. Results: More than half of the students have never attended the institutional OP due to timings issue. Overall rating of the program was good, but many students and faculty members suggested changes in the duration, timings and course content of the OP. A revised OP was proposed to the authorities. Conclusion: The current institutional program though rated good, requires a lot of amendments. The revised proposed OP should be implemented from the coming session. PMID:26380212

  16. Effective Evaluation of Teaching: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kite, Mary E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book compiles several essays about effective evaluation of teaching. Contents of this publication include: (1) Conducting Research on Student Evaluations of Teaching (William E. Addison and Jeffrey R. Stowell); (2) Choosing an Instrument for Student Evaluation of Instruction (Jared W. Keeley); (3) Formative Teaching Evaluations: Is Student…

  17. Effective Evaluation of Teaching: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kite, Mary E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book compiles several essays about effective evaluation of teaching. Contents of this publication include: (1) Conducting Research on Student Evaluations of Teaching (William E. Addison and Jeffrey R. Stowell); (2) Choosing an Instrument for Student Evaluation of Instruction (Jared W. Keeley); (3) Formative Teaching Evaluations: Is Student…

  18. Teaching practices of the undergraduate introductory biomechanics faculty: a North American survey.

    PubMed

    Garceau, Luke R; Ebben, William P; Knudson, Duane V

    2012-11-01

    Instruction and assessment strategies of undergraduate introductory biomechanics instructors have yet to be comprehensively examined. The purpose of this study was to identify the current instruction and assessment practices of North American undergraduate introductory biomechanics instructors and equipment needed for effective instruction in lecture and laboratory sessions. One hundred and sixty-five respondents (age: 42.5 +/- 10.3 years) who currently teach or have taught an introductory biomechanics course in North America were recruited by electronic mail. Subjects completed a web-based survey, consisting of 60 open- and closed-ended questions. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to assess relationships between instructor's familiarity with either the Biomechanics Concept Inventory or the NASPE Guidelines for Undergraduate Biomechanics, and instructor and course characteristics (number of years teaching, age, faculty rank, number of quizzes given, etc.) A number of variables were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated. Answers to open-ended questions were processed using content analysis, with results categorized in content areas including: instructor and course characteristics; lecture instruction; assessment and equipment; laboratory instruction; assessment and equipment; and instructor's perspectives. Many active learning strategies for lecture and laboratory instruction were identified by faculty. Limited student preparation and limited resources were noted as the instructor's most common challenges.

  19. Evaluation of a team-building retreat to promote nursing faculty cohesion and job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Birx, Ellen; Lasala, Kathleen B; Wagstaff, Mark

    2011-01-01

    With the growing global shortage of nursing faculty, there is increased need to develop and evaluate strategies to promote nursing faculty job satisfaction. Using quantitative and qualitative research methods, a team-building faculty retreat including challenge course activities was evaluated to determine its effects on group cohesion and job satisfaction. Mean Job in General scores for the sample (n = 29) at the start of the study were comparable with national norms for employees with graduate degrees. There were statistically significant increases in Job in General scores and group cohesion scores from pretest to posttest on the day of the retreat. However, the positive changes were not maintained at the end of the semester when follow-up data were gathered. Content analysis of the retreat day reflections revealed the following themes: getting to know each other better, seeing commonalities and differences, spending time together, developing trust, and working as a group. Several themes were identified in the end of the semester reflections: getting to know each other, feeling closer as a group, setting a friendlier tone for the semester, and that the retreat was a positive experience. Based on these findings, we recommend the use of a faculty retreat with challenge course activities to promote nursing faculty cohesion and job satisfaction. However, follow-up activities are recommended to maintain positive results over time.

  20. [Knowledge, attitudes, practices and education among students in a faculty of health].

    PubMed

    Wilches-Luna, Esther C; Hernández, Nasly L; Hernández, Olga M; Pérez-Vélez, Carlos M

    2016-02-01

    Objective To determine tuberculosis (TB) knowledge, attitudes, practices, education and Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) positivity among Colombian health professions students in their last year of study. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-reported questionnaire about TB knowledge, attitudes, practices and education with 193 students of medicine, nursing, dentistry, physical therapy, speech and language therapy, occupational therapy, clinical laboratory studies and emergency care. A TST was performed on 153 of the students. Results Although most of survey respondents perceived the TB education they received to be "sufficient", the results regarding their knowledge of TB do not support such perceptions: 35.2% of participants did not identify TB risk factors, 33.7 % of participants identified Colombian TB incidence, and only 1.6 % identified appropriate initial treatment for TB. In regards to practices, 50 % of respondents admitted that they would take care of a patient without a high efficiency mask. The TST was positive in 35 % of participants. Conclusions Our results show that there are opportunities to improve TB education in this health faculty, there is also a need to improve safety practices in the facilities where students work in order to reduce their risk of conversion.

  1. The Socialization of Black College Faculty: Implications for Policy and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Barbara J.; Harvey, William

    2002-01-01

    Explored the faculty socialization process at Black colleges, reporting how faculty perceive the tenure process and working conditions, how they learn what is necessary for success in the promotion and tenure process, and the barriers they encounter. (EV)

  2. The Socialization of Black College Faculty: Implications for Policy and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Barbara J.; Harvey, William

    2002-01-01

    Explored the faculty socialization process at Black colleges, reporting how faculty perceive the tenure process and working conditions, how they learn what is necessary for success in the promotion and tenure process, and the barriers they encounter. (EV)

  3. Teaching the Teachers: Faculty Preparedness and Evaluation of a Retreat in Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Julie W.; Broyles, Lauren M.; Hanusa, Barbara H.; Kraemer, Kevin L.; Conigliaro, Joseph; Spagnoletti, Carla; McNeil, Melissa; Gordon, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Effective clinical faculty are essential for disseminating substance abuse screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). The authors developed an 8-hour SBIRT training for internal medicine faculty preceptors. Trainers conducted SBIRT lectures and small-group communication practice sessions. The authors assessed participants'…

  4. Teaching the Teachers: Faculty Preparedness and Evaluation of a Retreat in Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Julie W.; Broyles, Lauren M.; Hanusa, Barbara H.; Kraemer, Kevin L.; Conigliaro, Joseph; Spagnoletti, Carla; McNeil, Melissa; Gordon, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Effective clinical faculty are essential for disseminating substance abuse screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). The authors developed an 8-hour SBIRT training for internal medicine faculty preceptors. Trainers conducted SBIRT lectures and small-group communication practice sessions. The authors assessed participants'…

  5. Kansas State University Faculty Perspective, Opinions, and Practices Concerning Undergraduate Student Academic Dishonesty and Moral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoux, Helene Elizabeth

    A study with both quantitative and qualitative components was conducted with undergraduate teaching faculty at Kansas State University for fall 1999 to spring 2001 to study faculty role in addressing cheating at the collegiate level and faculty awareness of the University's honor system and cheating policies. Data were gathered through a variety…

  6. Standards of Practice for California Community College Library Faculty and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Libraries and library faculty play a significant role in supporting college curriculum and helping students succeed academically. In particular, libraries are the primary location both physically and remotely for supporting faculty and students in their research and information needs. Over the years, this role of libraries and library faculty has…

  7. An Investigation into the Faculty Development Practices in Chiropractic Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaringe, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A descriptive case study design using a cross-sectional quantitative survey method was used to investigate the impact of faculty development programs on teaching effectiveness perceived by faculty teaching at chiropractic colleges in the United States. The availability of faculty development programs related to teaching and student learning was…

  8. An Investigation into the Faculty Development Practices in Chiropractic Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaringe, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A descriptive case study design using a cross-sectional quantitative survey method was used to investigate the impact of faculty development programs on teaching effectiveness perceived by faculty teaching at chiropractic colleges in the United States. The availability of faculty development programs related to teaching and student learning was…

  9. Triple Gain: Practical Ideas for Maximizing Connections between Students, Faculty, and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Duffy, Lauren N.; Stone, Garrett; Pinckney, Harrison P., IV.; Tucker, Teresa; Cathey, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This document highlights numerous ideas that faculty can implement to provide a triple gain, that is, a gain for students, professionals and faculty through collaborative work. We will explore traditional and innovative connections that can be made between recreation professionals, students, and faculty, within parks, recreation, and tourism…

  10. Triple Gain: Practical Ideas for Maximizing Connections between Students, Faculty, and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Duffy, Lauren N.; Stone, Garrett; Pinckney, Harrison P., IV.; Tucker, Teresa; Cathey, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This document highlights numerous ideas that faculty can implement to provide a triple gain, that is, a gain for students, professionals and faculty through collaborative work. We will explore traditional and innovative connections that can be made between recreation professionals, students, and faculty, within parks, recreation, and tourism…

  11. Multicultural Competence and Practices of Undergraduate Faculty and Their Relationships to Racial Identity, Education, and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauter, John P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Trends in higher education indicate a growing diversification of student populations. However, faculty racial and gender diversity lags behind the nation. Given this difference, this study proposed an exploration of multicultural competence among undergraduate faculty to offer insight into how higher education, and faculty in particular, might…

  12. Multicultural Competence and Practices of Undergraduate Faculty and Their Relationships to Racial Identity, Education, and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauter, John P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Trends in higher education indicate a growing diversification of student populations. However, faculty racial and gender diversity lags behind the nation. Given this difference, this study proposed an exploration of multicultural competence among undergraduate faculty to offer insight into how higher education, and faculty in particular, might…

  13. The impact of a faculty development program: evaluation based on the self-assessment of medical educators from preclinical and clinical disciplines.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, Ozlem; Kalaca, Sibel; Yegen, Berrak C; Cali, Sanda

    2010-06-01

    Self-assessment tools have previously been used to assess the impact of a faculty development program on the teaching skills of medical educators. In this study, we aimed to assess the impact of a faculty development program on the teaching performances of faculty members in relation to their medical disciplines and academic positions. A faculty-training program consisted of "training skills" and "student assessment instruments" courses. The impact of the program was evaluated by self-reporting of faculty members (a total of 225 reports) 1-2 yr after the program. Both courses were found to be beneficial by nearly all of the attendants. Clinicians benefited more from some topics in the student assessment course and could apply the structured learning and assessment guides, structured oral examination, and objective structured clinical examination more efficiently than their peers from preclinical departments. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that the participants of the faculty development program modified their teaching activities according to the demands of their clinical practice. The correlations between the benefits and behavioral changes were statistically significant.

  14. Grade Inflation and Student Individual Differences as Systematic Bias in Faculty Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Marie-Line; Scandura, Terri A.

    2005-01-01

    The media has recently exposed that grade inflation is a concern for higher education in North America. Grade inflation may be due to consumerism by universities that now compete for students. Keeping students happy (and paying) may have been emphasized more than learning. We review the literature on faculty evaluation and present a model that…

  15. Management by Results: Student Evaluation of Faculty Teaching and the Mis-Measurement of Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langbein, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Using data on 4 years of courses at American University, regression results show that actual grades have a significant, positive effect on student evaluations of teaching (SETs), controlling for expected grade and fixed effects for both faculty and courses, and for possible endogeneity. Implications are that the SET is a faulty measure of teaching…

  16. Grade Inflation and Student Individual Differences as Systematic Bias in Faculty Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Marie-Line; Scandura, Terri A.

    2005-01-01

    The media has recently exposed that grade inflation is a concern for higher education in North America. Grade inflation may be due to consumerism by universities that now compete for students. Keeping students happy (and paying) may have been emphasized more than learning. We review the literature on faculty evaluation and present a model that…

  17. Evaluating Service Learning from Multiple Perspectives: Faculty, Community Partners, and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin-King, Vadrin

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the efficacy of service learning through the lens of faculty members, community partners, and student learning outcomes at a midsized community college in North Carolina. As a teaching tool integrating community service with instruction, service learning depends on the collaboration of multiple stakeholders and…

  18. TQM and Faculty Evaluation: Ever the Twain Shall Meet? ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    Although Total Quality Management (TQM) has been adopted at a number of community colleges in the areas of financial aid, admissions and registration, and staff performance, its use is almost non-existent in the evaluation of classroom teaching. Barriers to its application to the classroom include faculty resistance to the idea of students as…

  19. Student vs. Faculty Perspectives on Quality Instruction: Gender Bias, "Hotness," and "Easiness" in Evaluating Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehmer, Devin M.; Wood, William C.

    2017-01-01

    This article systematically examines differences between student and faculty perspectives on quality instruction, using local data for a regional university's college of business matched to RateMyProfessors.com evaluations. Particular attention is focused on gender bias, "hotness," and "easiness." In addition to documenting a…

  20. Are Teacher Course Evaluations Biased against Faculty That Teach Quantitative Methods Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Stockdale, Myrah R.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated graduate students' responses to teacher/course evaluations (TCE) to determine if students' responses were inherently biased against faculty who teach quantitative methods courses. Item response theory (IRT) and Differential Item Functioning (DIF) techniques were utilized for data analysis. Results indicate students…

  1. Business Faculty Performance Evaluation Based on the New AACSB Accreditation Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehie, Ike C.; Karathanos, Demetrius

    1994-01-01

    Responses from 208 of 663 business school deans showed, in applying new accreditation standards of American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business to 3 faculty evaluation factors, there is change in favor of perceived importance of teaching. Accredited institutions rate teaching less important than intellectual contributions. Mission emphasis…

  2. Thought Processes College Students Use When Evaluating Faculty: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Mary Beth; Mansfield, Phylis M.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the thought processes college students use when answering survey questions on standardized course/faculty evaluations. Thought processes are categorized as: System One or System Two, based on the framework developed by Kahneman (2003) and Stanovich and West (2000). System One processes are typically hurried, superficial,…

  3. Revisiting the AAUP Recommendation: The Viability of Collegiality as a Fourth Criterion for University Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Pattie C.; Schimmel, Tammy; O'Hara, Hunter

    2012-01-01

    Legal rulings have called for the inclusion of collegiality as a fourth evaluation category for university faculty. Collegiality is considered to be any extra-role behavior that represents individuals' behavior that is discretionary, not recognized by the formal reward system and that, in the aggregate, promotes the effective functioning of the…

  4. Student Response to Faculty Instruction (SRFI): An Empirically Derived Instrument to Measure Student Evaluations of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitzel, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    The Student Response to Faculty Instruction (SRFI) is an instrument designed to measure the student perspective on courses in higher education. The SRFI was derived from decades of empirical studies of student evaluations of teaching. This article describes the development of the SRFI and its psychometric attributes demonstrated in two pilot study…

  5. Web Site Projects Evaluation: A Case Study of Romanian Faculties of Economics Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    vultur, Sidonia Otilia; Marincas, Delia Adriana

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an evaluation of web sites regarded like projects is discussed. We give an overview of the Web Assessment Index (WAI), by presenting a web sites of Romanian Faculties of Economics case study. The WAI contains five categories: accessibility, access speed, navigability, content and reliability. We analyzed and presented a detailed…

  6. Quantitative evaluation of the requirements for the promotion as associate professor at German Medical Faculties

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Heiko; Knobloch, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Background: First quantitative evaluation of the requirements for the promotion as associate professor (AP) at German Medical Faculties Material and methods: Analysis of the AP-regulations of German Medical Faculties according to a validated scoring system, which has been adapted to this study. Results: The overall scoring for the AP-requirements at 35 German Medical Faculties was 13.5±0.6 of 20 possible scoring points (95% confidence interval 12.2-14.7). More than 88% of the AP-regulations demand sufficient performance in teaching and research with adequate scientific publication. Furthermore, 83% of the faculties expect an expert review of the candidate´s performance. Conference presentations required as an assistant professor as well as the reduction of the minimum time as an assistant professor do only play minor roles. Conclusion: The requirements for assistant professors to get nominated as an associate professor at German Medical Faculties are high with an only small range. In detail, however, it can be seen that there still exists large heterogeneity, which hinders equal opportunities and career possibilities. These data might be used for the ongoing objective discussion. PMID:23255964

  7. Quantitative evaluation of the requirements for the promotion as associate professor at German medical faculties.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Heiko; Knobloch, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    First quantitative evaluation of the requirements for the promotion as associate professor (AP) at German medical faculties. Analysis of the AP-regulations of German medical faculties according to a validated scoring system, which has been adapted to this study. The overall scoring for the AP-requirements at 35 German medical faculties was 13.5±0.6 of 20 possible scoring points (95% confidence interval 12.2-14.7). More than 88% of the AP-regulations demand sufficient performance in teaching and research with adequate scientific publication. Furthermore, 83% of the faculties expect an expert review of the candidate's performance. Conference presentations required as an assistant professor as well as the reduction of the minimum time as an assistant professor do only play minor roles. The requirements for assistant professors to get nominated as an associate professor at German medical faculties are high with an only small range. In detail, however, it can be seen that there still exists large heterogeneity, which hinders equal opportunities and career possibilities. These data might be used for the ongoing objective discussion.

  8. Management Practices of Cats Owned by Faculty, Staff, and Students at Two Midwest Veterinary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cat owners' housing, care, and management practices is important for promoting cat welfare. A survey study was conducted on the housing and management practices used for cats by students, faculty, and staff of The Ohio State University and Purdue University veterinary colleges. Subjects were 138 cat-owner dyads. Most cats (74%) were housed strictly indoors in keeping with common US veterinary recommendations. However, many did not implement best practices outlined for behavior and other welfare needs of indoor cats. The percentage of respondents placing resources where cats could be disrupted while using them was 31%, 53%, and 30% for resting areas, food/water dishes, and litter boxes, respectively. Many cats were not provided a litter box in a private area (35%), in multiple areas of the house (51%), or that was regularly washed (73%). Horizontal scratching opportunities were not provided to 38% of cats; 32% were not provided toys that mimic prey and 91% of cats were fed a diet consisting of >75% dry food. These findings suggest a need for more concerted efforts to educate owners about meeting their cats' welfare needs so as to attenuate risks and improve cat physical and behavioral welfare outcomes. PMID:28090571

  9. Quality in-training evaluation reports--does feedback drive faculty performance?

    PubMed

    Dudek, Nancy L; Marks, Meridith B; Bandiera, Glen; White, Jonathan; Wood, Timothy J

    2013-08-01

    Clinical faculty often complete in-training evaluation reports (ITERs) poorly. Faculty development (FD) strategies should address this problem. An FD workshop was shown to improve ITER quality, but few physicians attend traditional FD workshops. To reach more faculty, the authors developed an "at-home" FD program offering participants various types of feedback on their ITER quality based on the workshop content. Program impact is evaluated here. Ninety-eight participants from four medical schools, all clinical supervisors, were recruited in 2009-2010; 37 participants completed the study. These were randomized into five groups: a control group and four other groups with different feedback conditions. ITER quality was assessed by two raters using a validated tool: the completed clinical evaluation report rating (CCERR). Participants were given feedback on their ITER quality based on group assignment. Six months later, participants submitted new ITERs. These ITERs were assessed using the CCERR, and feedback was sent to participants on the basis of their group assignment. This process was repeated two more times, ending in 2012. CCERR scores from the participants in all feedback groups were collapsed (n=27) and compared with scores from the control group (n=10). Mean CCERR scores significantly increased over time for the feedback group but not the control group. The results suggest that faculty are able to improve ITER quality following a minimal "at-home" FD intervention. This also adds to the growing literature that has found success with improving the quality of trainee assessments following rater training.

  10. Connecting High-Impact Practices, Scholarly and Creative Teaching, and Faculty Development: An Interview with Dr. Aaron Thompson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Courtnie; Stanley, Candace

    2017-01-01

    Building upon Kuh's (2008) research on high-impact educational practices, the authors interviewed Dr. Aaron Thompson to discuss effective implementation of these teaching and learning initiatives and the advancement of faculty development programming to support them. Dr. Thompson is the Interim President of Kentucky State University and Council on…

  11. A Progress Report on a Department of Psychiatry Faculty Practice Plan Designed to Reward Educational and Research Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Robert E.; Shahrokh, Narriman C.; Servis, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors provide a progress report on a faculty practice plan that assigns a monetary value to administrative duties, teaching, scholarship, community service, and research. Methods: Modifications to the original plan are described and quantifiable results in the areas of scholarship and research are summarized. Results: During a…

  12. Understanding Faculty and Non-Traditional Student Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning in a Practical Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to identify and investigate nursing faculty and student perspectives of self-directed learning in a practical nursing program. It also explored the degree to which student's perceptions of self-directed learning exhibited factors consistent with that of critical thinking. This study is important because self-directed…

  13. Views of Evidence-Based Practice among Faculty in Master of Social Work Programs: A National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Allen; Parrish, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A national online survey assessed the views of 973 faculty members in master of social work programs regarding their receptivity toward, definition of, and views of disparate sources of evidence pertinent to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the teaching of EBP. Method: Due to Internet-related technical difficulties, the response rate…

  14. Comparison of Male vs Female Resident Milestone Evaluations by Faculty During Emergency Medicine Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Arjun; O'Connor, Daniel M; Qadri, Usama; Arora, Vineet M

    2017-05-01

    Although implicit bias in medical training has long been suspected, it has been difficult to study using objective measures, and the influence of sex and gender in the evaluation of medical trainees is unknown. The emergency medicine (EM) milestones provide a standardized framework for longitudinal resident assessment, allowing for analysis of resident performance across all years and programs at a scope and level of detail never previously possible. To compare faculty-observed training milestone attainment of male vs female residency training. This multicenter, longitudinal, retrospective cohort study took place at 8 community and academic EM training programs across the United States from July 1, 2013, to July 1, 2015, using a real-time, mobile-based, direct-observation evaluation tool. The study examined 33 456 direct-observation subcompetency evaluations of 359 EM residents by 285 faculty members. Milestone attainment for male and female EM residents as observed by male and female faculty throughout residency and analyzed using multilevel mixed-effects linear regression modeling. A total of 33 456 direct-observation evaluations were collected from 359 EM residents (237 men [66.0%] and 122 women [34.0%]) by 285 faculty members (194 men [68.1%] and 91 women [31.9%]) during the study period. Female and male residents achieved similar milestone levels during the first year of residency. However, the rate of milestone attainment was 12.7% (0.07 levels per year) higher for male residents through all of residency (95% CI, 0.04-0.09). By graduation, men scored approximately 0.15 milestone levels higher than women, which is equivalent to 3 to 4 months of additional training, given that the average resident gains approximately 0.52 levels per year using our model (95% CI, 0.49-0.54). No statistically significant differences in scores were found based on faculty evaluator gender (effect size difference, 0.02 milestone levels; 95% CI for males, -0.09 to 0.11) or

  15. Guidelines for evaluating the educational performance of medical school faculty: priming a national conversation.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Constance; Chandran, Latha; Gusic, Maryellen

    2011-01-01

    The academic community needs a sound framework for the promotion and advancement of educators. The Group on Educational Affairs of the Association of American Medical Colleges organized a consensus conference that affirmed the use of five domains for documenting the quantity and quality of scholarly engagement in educational activities: teaching, curriculum, advising/mentoring, educational leadership/administration, and learner assessment. In this article, we offer detailed guidelines to evaluate these five domains of educator performance and the essential elements of scholarly activity. The guidelines are adapted from our developmental educator portfolio template and educator portfolio analysis tool, previously published in MedEdPORTAL. A short tool for educator performance evaluation that summarizes items in the guidelines is proposed for discussion. Our goal in this article is to itemize criteria for systematic faculty evaluation that can be applied in any institutional setting to assist promotion decision makers in their task of evaluating medical school faculty.

  16. Student Evaluations of Teaching: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Andrew C; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore dental and dental hygiene students' and faculty members' perceptions of student evaluations of teaching (SET) and determine whether dental vs. dental hygiene student, beginning vs. advanced student, and faculty vs. student responses differed. Perceived benefits, challenges, and suggestions for conducting SETs optimally were also assessed. Survey data were collected from 329 dental students (D1: 108; D2: 91; D3&4: 130) and 68 dental hygiene students (DH2: 26; DH3: 19; DH4: 23) (overall response rates 76%/92%) and 56 dental and eight dental hygiene faculty members (response rates 41%/100%). Faculty respondents were more positive about SETs than students (five-point scale with 1=disagree: 3.85 vs. 3.39; p<0.001), with seniors being the least positive (mean 2.42). Respondents agreed that all students should complete SETs (3.87 vs. 3.61; p=0.068), with faculty agreeing more strongly than students that all courses should be evaluated (4.32/4.04; p=0.046). Students agreed more strongly than faculty that SETs should occur during regular class time (3.97/3.44; p<0.001) and are too long (3.47/3.09; p=0.010) and that results should be shared with students (4.03/3.57; p=0.002). Open-ended responses showed that students perceived more benefits of SETs for faculty members than for students and that the most frequently mentioned problem was that SETs do not result in changes. Faculty members were generally more positive than students (especially seniors) about SETs. These findings suggest that, according to these respondents, SETs should be completed by all students for all courses, be short, provide opportunities for open-ended comments, and be administered in class to improve response rate. In addition, SET results and how SETs are used to improve courses should be shared with students.

  17. Evaluation of a Faculty Development Program Aimed at Increasing Residents' Active Learning in Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Desselle, Bonnie C.; English, Robin; Hescock, George; Hauser, Andrea; Roy, Melissa; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Active engagement in the learning process is important to enhance learners' knowledge acquisition and retention and the development of their thinking skills. This study evaluated whether a 1-hour faculty development workshop increased the use of active teaching strategies and enhanced residents' active learning and thinking. Methods Faculty teaching in a pediatrics residency participated in a 1-hour workshop (intervention) approximately 1 month before a scheduled lecture. Participants' responses to a preworkshop/postworkshop questionnaire targeted self-efficacy (confidence) for facilitating active learning and thinking and providing feedback about workshop quality. Trained observers assessed each lecture (3-month baseline phase and 3-month intervention phase) using an 8-item scale for use of active learning strategies and a 7-item scale for residents' engagement in active learning. Observers also assessed lecturer-resident interactions and the extent to which residents were asked to justify their answers. Results Responses to the workshop questionnaire (n  =  32/34; 94%) demonstrated effectiveness and increased confidence. Faculty in the intervention phase demonstrated increased use of interactive teaching strategies for 6 items, with 5 reaching statistical significance (P ≤ .01). Residents' active learning behaviors in lectures were higher in the intervention arm for all 7 items, with 5 reaching statistical significance. Faculty in the intervention group demonstrated increased use of higher-order questioning (P  =  .02) and solicited justifications for answers (P  =  .01). Conclusion A 1-hour faculty development program increased faculty use of active learning strategies and residents' engagement in active learning during resident core curriculum lectures. PMID:24294432

  18. The Impact of Electronic Media on Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkhi, Reza; Williams, Paul

    2010-01-01

    With the proliferation of computer networks and the increased use of Internet-based applications, many forms of social interactions now take place in an on-line context through "Computer-Mediated Communication" (CMC). Many universities are now reaping the benefits of using CMC applications to collect data on student evaluations of…

  19. Computerized Statistical Analysis of Student Evaluation of Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bichara, Kamal F.; Hazard, Francis E.

    An instrument for measuring student evaluation of teacher performance is described. The questionnaire, consisting of two parts of fourteen and seven questions, respectively, covers the following scales: analytic-synthetic approach, organization-clarity, instructor-group interaction, instructor-individual student interaction, dynamism-enthusiasm,…

  20. Examining Student Evaluations of Black College Faculty: Does Race Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bettye P.; Hawkins, Billy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to describe the undergraduate student ratings of teaching effectiveness based on the traditional 36-item end-of-course evaluation form used in the College of Education (COE) at a southeastern Research Extensive predominantly White institution. Second, using critical race theory (CRT) to compare the…

  1. Dissonance as a Factor in College Student Evaluation of Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Abraham D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper finds that, in general, college students give lower ratings to professors with whom they have normative dissonance. It suggests that dissonance should be given more consideration, raising the possibility of "matching" students and professors. This would also increase the objectivity of student evaluations. (Author/BP)

  2. The Impact of Electronic Media on Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkhi, Reza; Williams, Paul

    2010-01-01

    With the proliferation of computer networks and the increased use of Internet-based applications, many forms of social interactions now take place in an on-line context through "Computer-Mediated Communication" (CMC). Many universities are now reaping the benefits of using CMC applications to collect data on student evaluations of…

  3. Examining Student Evaluations of Black College Faculty: Does Race Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bettye P.; Hawkins, Billy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to describe the undergraduate student ratings of teaching effectiveness based on the traditional 36-item end-of-course evaluation form used in the College of Education (COE) at a southeastern Research Extensive predominantly White institution. Second, using critical race theory (CRT) to compare the…

  4. Utility of factor analysis in optimization of resident assessment and faculty evaluation.

    PubMed

    Teman, Nicholas R; Minter, Rebecca M; Kasten, Steven J

    2016-06-01

    Increasing focus on more granular assessment in medical education has led to more lengthy instruments, with concern that the increased complexity undermines the utility of these tools. This study evaluated the relative contribution of individual questions in an assessment of resident performance and a faculty performance evaluation by residents. The authors performed factor analysis on the individual items in the resident assessment instrument (3,009 assessments of 71 residents) and faculty evaluations (7,328 evaluations of 61 faculty) collected from 2006 to 2012. Factor analysis of the resident assessment tool revealed that 1 component was responsible for 96.6% of the variance. This component encompassed each question from the assessment form, and could also be termed "overall resident competency." Factor analysis of the attending evaluation form revealed 2 unique components, representing "clinical care" and "interpersonal skills," which accounted for 89.9% of variance. Three components accounted for 90% to 97% of the observed variance in our analysis. Factor analysis represents a useful strategy for analyzing the utility of data obtained from individual items in the assessment and evaluation instruments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Student-Faculty Evaluation: What Place in Academe?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    attributable to factors other than a professor’s teaching quality and, finally, that a student’s anticipated c6urse grade or cumulative grade point average has...the variation in SOP ratings is attributable to factors other than a pro- fessor’s teaching quality and, finally, that a student’s anticipated course...1S 8 .2. I. INTRODUCTION A. MOTIVATION In recent years, a great deal of interest has been expressed about evaluating the quality of instruction

  6. Resource Guide to the Evaluation of the Faculty Development Program in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. Part I: Overview of the Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Inst. for Research and Evaluation, Walnut Creek, CA.

    This is an overview of an evaluation model developed to be used with the Faculty Development Program in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse clinical training program for professional school faculty in medicine, nursing and social work. The evaluation model is in two major parts, a national evaluation which examines program process and outcome across all…

  7. Resource Guide to the Evaluation of the Faculty Development Program in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. Part I: Overview of the Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Inst. for Research and Evaluation, Walnut Creek, CA.

    This is an overview of an evaluation model developed to be used with the Faculty Development Program in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse clinical training program for professional school faculty in medicine, nursing and social work. The evaluation model is in two major parts, a national evaluation which examines program process and outcome across all…

  8. Implementation Evaluation Study: Flipped Classroom Professional Development with Faculty Members to Enhance Students' Engagement in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alebrahim, Fatimah Hussain

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore student engagement in higher education by evaluating training provided by experienced faculty members for those faculty desiring to implement a flipped classroom. A case study was utilized; data were collected in the form of online observation, in-class observation, student focus group…

  9. The Library and the Faculty Senate: Legitimizing the Serials Evaluation Process Using the Department of Biology Subscriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Sandhya D.; Harpelburke, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    This article documents the process used by the Hofstra University's Library and Faculty Senate to evaluate current serials title lists for different academic departments. The library has found that initiating this effort through the auspices of the Faculty Senate Library Subcommittee (FSLS) allows it to create an environment of legitimate concern…

  10. The Examination of Strength and Weakness of Online Evaluation of Faculty Members Teaching by Students in the University of Isfahan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryam, Ansary; Alireza, Shavakhi; Reza, Nasr Ahmad; Azizollah, Arbabisarjou

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of faculty members' teaching is a device for recognition of their ability in teaching, assessing, the student's learning and it can improve efficiency of faculty members in teaching. In terms of growth of computer's technologies improvement of universities and its effect on achievement and information processing, it is necessary to use…

  11. Why professional judgment is better than objective description in dental faculty evaluations of student performance.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W; Labarre, Eugene E

    2014-05-01

    Practices intended to increase the appearance of objectivity in grading may work at cross purposes with professional judgment. In this study, an analysis of two removable prosthodontics technique projects in one U.S. dental school found that the use of component criteria (checklist) grading was less consistent than overall judgments of the same work and less predictive of dental students' future learning. A factor analysis revealed latent structures in both projects that would make it inappropriate to use a component criteria approach for grading. Common defenses of objectivity-such as scientific foundation, the relationship between reliability and validity, and legal requirements-are questioned in this article, and it is shown how simple adjustments to judgment scores can be made more effective than checklists, faculty calibration, or deselecting faculty members and with better measurement and teaching features.

  12. Psychometric evaluation of a new instrument in Spanish to measure the wellness of university nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Pardos, Barbara; Casas, Irma; Lluch-Canut, Teresa; Moreno-Arroyo, Carmen; Nebot-Bergua, Carlos; Roldán-Merino, Juan

    2016-10-20

    The aim of this study was to design and validate an instrument to measure the wellness among university nursing faculty. The study was performed in two phases. Phase I consisted of the development of the instrument with discussion groups and participant consensus. We designed an instrument including the 21 items or psychosocial risk factors identified and estimated an index by evaluating the frequency and intensity of each item. The items were grouped into 3 dimensions: teaching work demands, curricular demands, and organizational difficulties. Phase II, we evaluated the psychometric properties of the tool in a sample of 263 participants. Exploratory factor analysis showed a 3-factor structure that explained 53% of the total variance. The internal consistency of the instrument was 0.91 for the whole instrument. The results indicate that the tool developed is valid and reliable and may be a good instrument to monitor the wellness of university nursing faculty.

  13. Effort of Course Evaluation Survey and Its Characteristics at Faculty of Engineering of Kyoto University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Yusaku; Matsushita, Kayo; Yuasa, Taiichi; Araki, Mituhiko

    At Faculty of Engineering of Kyoto University, the course evaluation survey was carried out to 120 lectures in the second semester of the 2004 fiscal year. In this paper, the structure of the course evaluation questionnaire was clarified, and the feature of the education of the faculty was described based on the results. Although the lectures seem generally to be well-organized and the students had attended the classes seriously, some problems also had been observed. For example, the wide variation of class means would suggest some lectures might not be so effective. Besides, the lack of active self-study of the students was shown. For improvement of engineering education in Kyoto University, it was suggested that a further follow-up survey from entrance to graduation should be carried out.

  14. The Impact of Faculty Perceived Reconfigurability of Learning Management Systems on Effective Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jianfeng; Doll, William J.; Deng, Xiaodong; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Ma Ga

    2013-01-01

    This study explores whether learning management systems (LMSs) enable faculty course developers to use the reconfigurable characteristics of the software to implement the seven principles of effective teaching (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). If LMSs are to be considered pedagogically effective, these systems must help engage faculty in effective…

  15. Faculty Perspectives and Needs in Supporting Adult English Learners: Linking Measurement to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Jane; Lentini, Jennifer; Molloy, Hillary; Steinberg, Jonathan; Holtzman, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Results from a survey of 227 adult English learner (EL) faculty in community and technical colleges in the United States reveal a clear desire to better serve adult ELs, but a lack of resources specifically designed to do so. Faculty want and need more resources to support the teaching and learning process, in the form of thoughtful assessments,…

  16. Faculty Development for E-Learning: A Multi-Campus Community of Practice (COP) Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Janet Resop; Vandenhouten, Christine; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Ralston-Berg, Penny

    2012-01-01

    Faculty development is a critical process, enabling instructors to remain abreast of new discipline specific content and innovations in the scholarship of teaching and learning. The explosion of online higher education and advances in technology provide examples and rationale for why faculty development for e-learning is needed. Literature on…

  17. Living in the Gray Zone: Faculty Views on University Striving and Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2013-01-01

    "Striving" is a concept that describes colleges and universities seeking to reposition themselves as more prestigious, often more research-focused institutions (O'Meara, 2007). The goal of this paper is to explore faculty members' views of a striving university context. My analysis revealed that faculty assigned both rewards…

  18. Institutional Ethical Practices and Faculty Professional Self-Esteem: Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Leonard F.

    In November 1990, 25 community colleges participated in a study of variables known to have a significant influence on the professional self-esteem of faculty and which in turn should affect the quality of the teaching and learning environment. Questionnaires were distributed to all full-time faculty members (N=2,162) and chief executive officers…

  19. Supporting the Academic Majority: Policies and Practices Related to Part-Time Faculty's Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagan, M. Kevin, Jr.; Jaeger, Audrey J.; Grantham, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    The academic workforce in higher education has shifted in the last several decades from consisting of mostly full-time, tenure-track faculty to one comprised predominantly of contingent, non-tenure-track faculty. This substantial shift toward part-time academic labor has not corresponded with institutions implementing more supportive policies and…

  20. Supporting the Academic Majority: Policies and Practices Related to Part-Time Faculty's Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagan, M. Kevin, Jr.; Jaeger, Audrey J.; Grantham, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    The academic workforce in higher education has shifted in the last several decades from consisting of mostly full-time, tenure-track faculty to one comprised predominantly of contingent, non-tenure-track faculty. This substantial shift toward part-time academic labor has not corresponded with institutions implementing more supportive policies and…

  1. The Impact of Faculty Perceived Reconfigurability of Learning Management Systems on Effective Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jianfeng; Doll, William J.; Deng, Xiaodong; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Ma Ga

    2013-01-01

    This study explores whether learning management systems (LMSs) enable faculty course developers to use the reconfigurable characteristics of the software to implement the seven principles of effective teaching (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). If LMSs are to be considered pedagogically effective, these systems must help engage faculty in effective…

  2. The Student Perception of Faculty Scale: Development, Testing and Practical Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Thomas S.

    2017-01-01

    This study involved a sample group of students residing in residential halls at a state university in a qualitative and quantitative analysis to measure their perceptions of the university's faculty. Exploratory, then confirmatory, factor analysis revealed a 3-factor model representing teaching faculty: a negative, emotionally challenging…

  3. Faculty Prayer in Catholic Schools: A Survey of Practices and Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayotte, Gail

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a research study that utilized a web-based survey to gather data about the communal prayer experiences of faculty members in Catholic elementary and secondary schools in the United States and the meaning that such prayer holds to its participants. Key findings show that faculty prayer experiences take place readily, though…

  4. Content analysis of resident evaluations of faculty anesthesiologists: supervision encompasses some attributes of the professionalism core competency.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Franklin; Szeluga, Debra; Hindman, Bradley J

    2017-05-01

    Anesthesiology departments need an instrument with which to assess practicing anesthesiologists' professionalism. The purpose of this retrospective analysis of the content of a cohort of resident evaluations of faculty anesthesiologists was to investigate the relationship between a clinical supervision scale and the multiple attributes of professionalism. From July 1, 2013 to the present, our department has utilized the de Oliveira Filho unidimensional nine-item supervision scale to assess the quality of clinical supervision of residents provided by our anesthesiologists. The "cohort" we examined included all 13,664 resident evaluations of all faculty anesthesiologists from July 1, 2013 through December 31, 2015, including 1,387 accompanying comments. Words and phrases associated with the core competency of professionalism were obtained from previous studies, and the supervision scale was analyzed for the presence of these words and phrases. The supervision scale assesses some attributes of anesthesiologists' professionalism as well as patient care and procedural skills and interpersonal and communication skills. The comments that residents provided with the below-average supervision scores included attributes of professionalism, although numerous words and phrases related to professionalism were not present in any of the residents' comments. The de Oliveira Filho clinical supervision scale includes some attributes of anesthesiologists' professionalism. The core competency of professionalism, however, is multidimensional, and the supervision scale and/or residents' comments did not address many of the other established attributes of professionalism.

  5. American Association of Colleges of Nursing essential values: national study of faculty perceptions, practices, and plans.

    PubMed

    Elfrink, V; Lutz, E M

    1991-01-01

    A representative national sample of bachelor's-degree nurse educators (N = 697) were surveyed about the seven professional values identified by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (1986) in Essentials of College and University Education for Professional Nursing. Participants agreed that these values were representative of values nurses need to use in practice, and that educational opportunities related to these values should be included in the curriculum. Eighty-six per cent of the sample perceived that they included some or all of these values predominantly through the informal lesson plan. Esthetics was the most frequently mentioned value that was not considered in any form in the nursing curriculum. Nurse educators teaching at religious-affiliated institutions, and those who had educational preparation in values, already included these values in their formal teaching (P less than .04 and P less than .0001, respectively) and they had discussions about including them differently in the future more frequently (P less than .005 and P less than .006) than did other educators. Faculty members teaching at religious-affiliated institutions also established more plans for including these values within the curriculum than those who taught at public institutions (P less than .0004). One conclusion from this study was that values may continue to be treated differently than other nursing education content, ie, predominantly through the informal lesson plan.

  6. College Governance: A Comparison of Faculty Evaluation in Public and Private Colleges with Implications for the Improvement of the Evaluation Process at Johnson and Wales College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, Joseph E.

    This study focuses on selected factors in the evaluation of faculty members in: (1) colleges accredited by the Association of Independent Colleges and Schools; (2) public junior and senior colleges; and (3) Rhode Island colleges. Results of the study indicate that faculty evaluation schemes must follow the basic goals and philosophy of the…

  7. Towards Contextual Experimentation: Creating a Faculty Learning Community to Cultivate Writing-to-Learn Practices (Hacia una experimentación contextual: Creando comunidades de aprendizaje docente para el cultivo de prácticas de escritura para el aprendizaje)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Mary K.; Rao, Kavita; Stewart, Maria L.; Farley, Cynthia A.; Li, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore ways to integrate new pedagogical practices, five faculty members created an informal faculty learning community focused on writing-to-learn practices, an inquiry and process-based writing pedagogy. The faculty members learned the writing-to-learn practices together, periodically met to discuss how they implemented the…

  8. Sources and Information. Community College Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotated bibliographic information related to community college faculty, focusing on faculty attitudes and perceptions, professional development, faculty evaluation, and recruitment. Covers 16 sources. (AUTH/NB)

  9. 21st century challenges faced by nursing faculty in educating for compassionate practice: embodied interpretation of phenomenological data.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine

    2013-07-01

    Nursing faculty are facing challenges in facilitating student learning of complex concepts such as compassionate practice. Compassion is a stated expectation of Registered Nurse (RN) and student nurse practice, and yet how it is enabled and learned within the challenging environments of university and health service provider organisations are not yet understood. There is currently an international concern that student nurses are not being adequately prepared for compassion to flourish and for compassionate practice to be sustained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate the experiences of nursing faculty in their preparation of student nurses for compassionate practice, an exploratory aesthetic phenomenological research study was undertaken using in depth interviews with five nurse teachers in the North of England. Findings from this study were analysed and presented using embodied interpretation, and indicate that nurse teachers recognise the importance of the professional ideal of compassionate practice alongside specific challenges this expectation presents. They have concerns about how the economically constrained and target driven practice reality faced by RNs promotes compassionate practice, and that students are left feeling vulnerable to dissonance between learned professional ideals and the RNs' practice reality they witness. Nurse teachers also experience dissonance within the university setting, between the pressures of managing large student groups and the time and opportunity required for small group discussion with students that enables compassion to develop in a meaningful and emotionally sustainable way. Teachers also express discomfort due to a perceived promotion of an 'unachievable utopia' within practice, identifying how the constraints within practice could be better managed to support professional ideals. The nurse teachers within this exploratory study identify the need for strong nurse leadership in practice to challenge

  10. Institutional Policies on Assessment of Pedagogy and Faculty Classroom Practices: Evidence from 4-Year Colleges and Universities in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carrie B.; Myers, Scott M.; Stewart, Tammy; Nynas, Suzette

    2015-01-01

    This study used a multi-theoretical approach to examine the associations between institutional policies on the assessment of faculty pedagogy and faculty's use of learner-centred assessment (LCA) practices in their undergraduate classrooms in the United States. We found strong evidence that it was not the number of methods but the types of methods…

  11. Institutional Policies on Assessment of Pedagogy and Faculty Classroom Practices: Evidence from 4-Year Colleges and Universities in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carrie B.; Myers, Scott M.; Stewart, Tammy; Nynas, Suzette

    2015-01-01

    This study used a multi-theoretical approach to examine the associations between institutional policies on the assessment of faculty pedagogy and faculty's use of learner-centred assessment (LCA) practices in their undergraduate classrooms in the United States. We found strong evidence that it was not the number of methods but the types of methods…

  12. The Impact of Whole-Faculty Study Groups on Student Achievement and Teacher Practices in Grades K-3 of a Nebraska School District: A Mixed Method Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendell, Cynthia F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of Whole Faculty Study Groups on student achievement and teacher practices in grades K-3 of a Nebraska school district. Whole-Faculty Study Groups (WFSG) are a type of professional learning community (PLC). Using a mixed method approach, both K-3 student scores on Dynamic Indicators of Basic…

  13. Systematic Evaluation of the Teaching Qualities of Obstetrics and Gynecology Faculty: Reliability and Validity of the SETQ Tools

    PubMed Central

    van der Leeuw, Renée; Lombarts, Kiki; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi

    2011-01-01

    Background The importance of effective clinical teaching for the quality of future patient care is globally understood. Due to recent changes in graduate medical education, new tools are needed to provide faculty with reliable and individualized feedback on their teaching qualities. This study validates two instruments underlying the System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ) aimed at measuring and improving the teaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional multi-center questionnaire study was set in seven general teaching hospitals and two academic medical centers in the Netherlands. Seventy-seven residents and 114 faculty were invited to complete the SETQ instruments in the duration of one month from September 2008 to September 2009. To assess reliability and validity of the instruments, we used exploratory factor analysis, inter-item correlation, reliability coefficient alpha and inter-scale correlations. We also compared composite scales from factor analysis to global ratings. Finally, the number of residents' evaluations needed per faculty for reliable assessments was calculated. A total of 613 evaluations were completed by 66 residents (85.7% response rate). 99 faculty (86.8% response rate) participated in self-evaluation. Factor analysis yielded five scales with high reliability (Cronbach's alpha for residents' and faculty): learning climate (0.86 and 0.75), professional attitude (0.89 and 0.81), communication of learning goals (0.89 and 0.82), evaluation of residents (0.87 and 0.79) and feedback (0.87 and 0.86). Item-total, inter-scale and scale-global rating correlation coefficients were significant (P<0.01). Four to six residents' evaluations are needed per faculty (reliability coefficient 0.60–0.80). Conclusions Both SETQ instruments were found reliable and valid for evaluating teaching qualities of obstetrics and gynecology faculty. Future research should examine improvement of teaching

  14. A Utilization-Focused Evaluation of a Community College Adjunct Faculty Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edenfield, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Nationally adjunct faculty comprise almost 70% of all two-year institution faculty while in the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) adjunct faculty teach 60% of the community college courses, and should past trends continue, the number of adjunct faculty members is expected to grow 10% within the next fifteen years (Caliber, 2007; Phillipe…

  15. A Utilization-Focused Evaluation of a Community College Adjunct Faculty Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edenfield, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Nationally adjunct faculty comprise almost 70% of all two-year institution faculty while in the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) adjunct faculty teach 60% of the community college courses, and should past trends continue, the number of adjunct faculty members is expected to grow 10% within the next fifteen years (Caliber, 2007; Phillipe…

  16. Cooperating Teacher Evaluation of Candidates in Clinical Practice and Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, David W.; Zhou, Yunfang

    2009-01-01

    The Investigators hypothesized cooperating teachers' evaluations of candidates in clinical practice and field experiences would possess higher scores than those provided by clinical and education division faculty. However, the reasons for the higher scores proved to be much more complex than originally thought. While it was assumed that teachers…

  17. Use of anecdotal notes by clinical nursing faculty: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mellisa A; Daly, Barbara J; Madigan, Elizabeth A

    2010-03-01

    Although the use of anecdotal notes by faculty to document clinical performance is thought to be a common practice, no empirical study of this evaluation tool has been conducted. To investigate the frequency and pattern of use, a faculty questionnaire was developed using the Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) evaluation model as a framework. The model was adapted to focus on clinical nursing education. Sixty-four nursing faculty from six schools participated in the regional study. A descriptive design was used to collect quantitative data from clinical faculty. Findings indicated that 97% of clinical faculty use anecdotal notes during the student evaluation process, and the majority of faculty do so on a weekly basis. Based on faculty feedback and the CIPP evaluation model, a clinical nursing faculty tool was developed after study completion to support clinical faculty in note use.

  18. Medical school deans' perceptions of organizational climate: useful indicators for advancement of women faculty and evaluation of a leadership program's impact.

    PubMed

    Dannels, Sharon; McLaughlin, Jean; Gleason, Katharine A; McDade, Sharon A; Richman, Rosalyn; Morahan, Page S

    2009-01-01

    The authors surveyed U.S. and Canadian medical school deans regarding organizational climate for faculty, policies affecting faculty, processes deans use for developing faculty leadership, and the impact of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women. The usable response rate was 58% (n = 83/142). Deans perceived gender equity in organizational climate as neutral, improving, or attained on most items and deficient on four. Only three family-friendly policies/benefits were available at more than 68% of medical schools; several policies specifically designed to increase gender equity were available at fewer than 14%. Women deans reported significantly more frequent use than men (P = .032) of practices used to develop faculty leadership. Deans' impressions regarding the impact of ELAM alumnae on their schools was positive (M = 5.62 out of 7), with those having more fellows reporting greater benefit (P = .01). The deans felt the ELAM program had a very positive influence on its alumnae (M = 6.27) and increased their eligibility for promotion (M = 5.7). This study provides a unique window into the perceptions of medical school deans, important policy leaders at their institutions. Their opinion adds to previous studies of organizational climate focused on faculty perceptions. Deans perceive the organizational climate for women to be improving, but they believe that certain interventions are still needed. Women deans seem more proactive in their use of practices to develop leadership. Finally, deans provide an important third-party judgment for program evaluation of the ELAM leadership intervention, reporting a positive impact on its alumnae and their schools.

  19. The utilization of the seven principles for good practices of full-time and adjunct faculty in teaching health & science in community colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaitif, Linda M.

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which undergraduate full-time and adjunct faculty members in the health and science programs at community colleges in Southern California utilize the seven principles of good practice as measured by the Faculty Inventory of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. A second purpose was to compare degree of utilization for gender and class size. Methodology. This is a quantitative study wherein there exists a systematic and mathematical assessment of data gathered through the use of a Likert scale survey to process and determine the mathematical model of the use of the principles by the target population of both full-time and adjunct faculty of health/science programs of community colleges in Southern California. Findings. Examination of the data revealed that both full-time and adjunct faculty members of Southern California community colleges perceive themselves a high degree of utilization of the seven principles of good practice. There was no statistically significant data to suggest a discrepancy between full-time and adjunct professors' perceptions among the utilization of the seven principles. Overall, male faculty members perceived themselves as utilizing the principles to a greater degree than female faculty. Data suggest that faculty with class size 60 or larger showed to utilize the seven principles more frequently than the professors with smaller class sizes. Conclusions. Full-time and adjunct professors of the health and sciences in Southern California community colleges perceive themselves as utilizing the seven principles of good practice to a high degree. Recommendations. This study suggests many recommendations for future research, including the degree to which negative economic factors such as budget cuts and demands affect the utilization of the seven principles. Also recommended is a study comparing students' perceptions of faculty's utilization of the seven

  20. Teaching evaluation practices in colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Candace W; Matthews, Hewitt W

    2009-10-01

    To document teaching evaluation practices in colleges and schools of pharmacy. A 51-item questionnaire was developed based on the instrument used in a previous study with modifications made to address changes in pharmacy education. An online survey service was used to distribute the electronic questionnaire to the deans of 98 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. Completed surveys were received from 89 colleges and schools of pharmacy. All colleges/schools administered student evaluations of classroom and experiential teaching. Faculty peer evaluation of classroom teaching was used by 66% of colleges/schools. Use of other evaluation methods had increased over the previous decade, including use of formalized self-appraisal of teaching, review of teaching portfolios, interviews with samples of students, and review by teaching experts. While the majority (55%) of colleges/schools administered classroom teaching evaluations at or near the conclusion of a course, 38% administered them at the midpoint and/or conclusion of a faculty member's teaching within a team-taught course. Completion of an online evaluation form was the most common method used for evaluation of classroom (54%) and experiential teaching (72%). Teaching evaluation methods used in colleges and schools of pharmacy expanded from 1996 to 2007 to include more evaluation of experiential teaching, review by peers, formalized self-appraisal of teaching, review of teaching portfolios, interviews with samples of students, review by teaching experts, and evaluation by alumni. Procedures for conducting student evaluations of teaching have adapted to address changes in curriculum delivery and technology.

  1. Teaching Evaluation Practices in Colleges and Schools of Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Hewitt W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To document teaching evaluation practices in colleges and schools of pharmacy. Methods A 51-item questionnaire was developed based on the instrument used in a previous study with modifications made to address changes in pharmacy education. An online survey service was used to distribute the electronic questionnaire to the deans of 98 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. Results Completed surveys were received from 89 colleges and schools of pharmacy. All colleges/schools administered student evaluations of classroom and experiential teaching. Faculty peer evaluation of classroom teaching was used by 66% of colleges/schools. Use of other evaluation methods had increased over the previous decade, including use of formalized self-appraisal of teaching, review of teaching portfolios, interviews with samples of students, and review by teaching experts. While the majority (55%) of colleges/schools administered classroom teaching evaluations at or near the conclusion of a course, 38% administered them at the midpoint and/or conclusion of a faculty member's teaching within a team-taught course. Completion of an online evaluation form was the most common method used for evaluation of classroom (54%) and experiential teaching (72%). Conclusion Teaching evaluation methods used in colleges and schools of pharmacy expanded from 1996 to 2007 to include more evaluation of experiential teaching, review by peers, formalized self-appraisal of teaching, review of teaching portfolios, interviews with samples of students, review by teaching experts, and evaluation by alumni. Procedures for conducting student evaluations of teaching have adapted to address changes in curriculum delivery and technology. PMID:19885072

  2. Evaluating pelvic examination training: does faculty involvement make a difference? A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Archana; Ebert, Gary; Brug, Pamela; Swee, David; Ananth, Cande V

    2010-10-01

    As medical schools continue to strive to deliver high quality education with diminishing resources, the need to evaluate long-standing teaching techniques becomes imperative. The use of gynecological teaching associates to teach pelvic exam skills to medical students is an example of an education intervention that deserves thorough evaluation. The objective was to evaluate effects of two pelvic examination training methods on OB/GYN clerkship students with respect to costs, students' performance, and perception. During the academic year 2007-08, 106 medical students were randomized to receive either pelvic examination training by a gynecological teaching associate (GTA) alone or a standardized patient (SP) accompanied by an obstetrics and gynecology faculty member. Students participated in an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) and completed questionnaires regarding the educational intervention at the end of the clerkship. The two training methods produced comparable OSCE scores, and students in both groups felt more confident after training and found the training sessions to be valuable. There was a significant cost-savings associated with using GTAs for pelvic exam training. Faculty time and effort need not be utilized for pelvic exam training exercises, since using GTAs for pelvic exam training produces comparable results.

  3. The Effects of the Practice of the Newstart Health Regimen on Faculty Stress among Faculty at Seventh-Day Adventist Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, George; Cort, Malcolm

    2007-01-01

    Utilizing an availability sample of (n = 124) faculty from three postsecondary Seventh-day Adventists institutions that promote a healthy lifestyle philosophy encapsulated in the acronym NEWSTART, this study explored effects of this health/religious regimen on faculty stress among this group. The findings reported in this paper indicate that three…

  4. Personnel Administration in Higher Education. Handbook of Faculty and Staff Personnel Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortunato, Ray T.; Waddell, D. Geneva

    Ways to develop and implement personnel policies and procedures are described that should prevent problems from becoming crises in higher education institutions. Based on the authors' more than 40 years of combined experience in higher education personnel administration, this handbook offers a detailed guide to the intricacies of faculty and staff…

  5. Science Faculty Improving Teaching Practice: Identifying Needs and Finding Meaningful Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwma-Gearhart, Jana

    2012-01-01

    While research into the effectiveness of teaching professional development for postsecondary educators has increased over the last 40 years, little is known about science faculty members' teaching professional development needs and their perceptions regarding what constitutes meaningful teaching professional development. Informed by an extensive…

  6. Supporting Faculty Efforts to Obtain Research Funding: Successful Practices and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiser, Robert A.; Moore, Alison L.; Bradley, Terra W.; Walker, Reddick; Zhao, Weinan

    2015-01-01

    Faculty members face increasing pressure to secure external research funding, and as a result, there is a critical need for professional development in this area. This paper describes a series of tools and services that have been designed and implemented by a College of Education Office of Research at a southeastern university in order to help…

  7. Health professional faculty perspectives on community-based research: implications for policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Seifer, Sarena D; Calleson, Diane C

    2004-11-01

    Community-based research (CBR) has become central to the understanding and elimination of health disparities within the USA and across the globe. The authors sought to determine the perspectives of health professional faculty on the factors affecting their involvement in CBR and the extent of community participation in that research. Faculty from 18 health professional schools in the USA identified by their deans as being leaders in CBR completed a written survey. Respondents reported that between 5-10% of faculty in their schools were involved in CBR. Public perception of the university, familiarity with community-based organization leaders and institutional leadership were cited as the most significant factors contributing to a school's involvement in CBR. Long-term community relationships, recognition in tenure and promotion policies and access to funding were cited as factors that support faculty in conducting CBR. The authors conclude that a more significant investment of public and private funds, the development of interdisciplinary institutional structures for community partnerships and a more inclusive definition of scholarship are needed to achieve a central role for CBR in efforts to understand and eliminate health disparities.

  8. Best Practices: A Triangulated Support Approach in Transitioning Faculty to Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, David; Petherbridge, Donna; Warren, Sarah Egan

    2005-01-01

    The English department at North Carolina State University faced a rapid, large-scale transition of a number of its professional writing courses from traditional classes to online courses. Recognizing that numerous barriers, including unresolved administrative issues, faculty resistance, and lack of training could impede this process,…

  9. Exposing Ideology within University Policies: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Faculty Hiring, Promotion and Remuneration Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuner-Smith, Sedef; Englander, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Using critical discourse analysis (CDA), this paper exposes the neoliberal ideology of the knowledge-based economy embedded within university policies, specifically those that regulate faculty hiring, promotion, and remuneration in two national contexts: Turkey and Mexico. The paper follows four stages of CDA: (1) focus upon a social wrong in its…

  10. Critical Thinking in Teacher Education: Perceptions and Practices of Teacher Candidates and College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagley, Spencer A.

    2013-01-01

    Educators at all levels are expected to provide instruction that promotes critical thinking, but faculty are hindered by time constraints, expertise, and the attitude that critical thinking is taught and learned automatically. From Socrates to Dewey to Bloom to Facione, a firm foundation has been set for critical thinking pedagogies. This study…

  11. Best Practices for Working Effectively with Your Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Positions held by faculty members at institutions offering NCAA-sponsored intercollegiate athletics, F acuity Athletics Representatives (or FARs) serve as a liaison between athletics and academics and play a critical role in the institutional control and academic integrity of athletics as well as the welfare of student-athletes on campus. Based on…

  12. Portfolio Partnerships between Faculty and WAC: Lessons from Disciplinary Practice, Reflection, and Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Brad; Robertson, Julie Fisher

    2007-01-01

    In portfolio assessment, WAC helps other disciplines increase programmatic integrity and accountability. This analysis of a portfolio partnership also shows composition faculty how a dynamic culture of assessment helps us protect what we do well, improve what we need to do better, and solve problems as writing instruction keeps pace with…

  13. Multicultural/Multilingual Instruction in Educational Programs: A Survey of Perceived Faculty Practices and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockman, Ida J.; Boult, Johanna; Robinson, Gregory C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the instructional strategies reported for multicultural/multilingual issues (MMI) education at programs in speech-language pathology and audiology and the perceived ease and effectiveness of doing so. Method: A 49-item questionnaire elicited anonymous responses from administrators, faculty, and teaching clinical supervisors at…

  14. Use of Innovation Component Configuration Map (ICCM) to Measure Technology Integration Practices of Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javeri, Manisha; Persichitte, Kay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the level of technology integration fidelity (high, moderate or low) by higher education faculty in Schools Colleges and Department of Education (SCDE), and a) access to technological infrastructure, b) support from human infrastructure, and c) personal attitude toward computer…

  15. State University of New York Maritime College Faculty Student Association--Selected Financial Management Practices. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit and State Financial Services.

    The Maritime College Faculty Student Association (FSA) is a campus-based, not-for-profit corporation that was formed to operate, manage, and promote educationally related services for the benefit of the campus community at the State University of New York Maritime College, which trains students to become licensed officers in the U.S. Merchant…

  16. Critical Thinking in Teacher Education: Perceptions and Practices of Teacher Candidates and College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagley, Spencer A.

    2013-01-01

    Educators at all levels are expected to provide instruction that promotes critical thinking, but faculty are hindered by time constraints, expertise, and the attitude that critical thinking is taught and learned automatically. From Socrates to Dewey to Bloom to Facione, a firm foundation has been set for critical thinking pedagogies. This study…

  17. Faculty Conceptions and Practices of Action Research in the NOVA Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenheimer, Carol Dianne

    This study examined approaches to action research held by science, education, and mathematics faculty and how they convert ideas to action research proposals and plan to gather and analyze their research data. The study also described some of the research outcomes of successful action research projects. Rubrics were used on a diverse set of…

  18. The Faculty Experience of Internationalization: Motivations for, Practices of, and Means for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klyberg, Sarah Grace Fuller

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, many U.S. colleges and universities have adopted policies of internationalization through which they have promoted such activities as study abroad, international student recruitment, curriculum development and/or reform, faculty exchanges, institutional linkages, and overseas campus development. Prior research has identified…

  19. Teaching Approaches of Community College Mathematics Faculty: Do They Relate to Classroom Practices?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa, Vilma; Celis, Sergio; Lande, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    We report on a qualitative investigation of the ways in which 14 faculty members in the mathematics department at a community college described their approaches to teaching and contrasted those with analyses of their mathematics lessons. We characterized instructors' teaching approaches as traditional, meaning-making, or student-support and…

  20. Exposing Ideology within University Policies: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Faculty Hiring, Promotion and Remuneration Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuner-Smith, Sedef; Englander, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Using critical discourse analysis (CDA), this paper exposes the neoliberal ideology of the knowledge-based economy embedded within university policies, specifically those that regulate faculty hiring, promotion, and remuneration in two national contexts: Turkey and Mexico. The paper follows four stages of CDA: (1) focus upon a social wrong in its…

  1. ISLLC/ELCC Standards Implementation: Do Educational Administration Faculty Practice What They Preach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Crystal

    2012-01-01

    Both the 1996 Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards and the 2002 Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards, adopted by preparation programs nationwide have a strong emphasis on democratic ideals. By aligning their programs with these standards education administration faculty have taken a step in the…

  2. Faculty Evaluations Correlate Poorly with Medical Student Examination Performance in a Fourth-Year Emergency Medicine Clerkship.

    PubMed

    Dubosh, Nicole M; Fisher, Jonathan; Lewis, Jason; Ullman, Edward A

    2017-06-01

    Clerkship directors routinely evaluate medical students using multiple modalities, including faculty assessment of clinical performance and written examinations. Both forms of evaluation often play a prominent role in final clerkship grade. The degree to which these modalities correlate in an emergency medicine (EM) clerkship is unclear. We sought to correlate faculty clinical evaluations with medical student performance on a written, standardized EM examination of medical knowledge. This is a retrospective study of fourth-year medical students in a 4-week EM elective at one academic medical center. EM faculty performed end of shift evaluations of students via a blinded online system using a 5-point Likert scale for 8 domains: data acquisition, data interpretation, medical knowledge base, professionalism, patient care and communication, initiative/reliability/dependability, procedural skills, and overall evaluation. All students completed the National EM M4 Examination in EM. Means, medians, and standard deviations for end of shift evaluation scores were calculated, and correlations with examination scores were assessed using a Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Thirty-nine medical students with 224 discrete faculty evaluations were included. The median number of evaluations completed per student was 6. The mean score (±SD) on the examination was 78.6% ± 6.1%. The examination score correlated poorly with faculty evaluations across all 8 domains (ρ 0.074-0.316). Faculty evaluations of medical students across multiple domains of competency correlate poorly with written examination performance during an EM clerkship. Educators need to consider the limitations of examination score in assessing students' ability to provide quality patient clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS): Differentiating Faculty Knowledge and Experience in Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David I.; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education reform efforts have called for widespread adoption of evidence-based teaching in which faculty members attend to student outcomes through assessment practice. Awareness about the importance of assessment has illuminated the need to understand what faculty members know and how they engage with assessment knowledge and practice. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS) is a new instrument for evaluating science faculty assessment knowledge and experience. Instrument validation was composed of two distinct studies: an empirical evaluation of the psychometric properties of the FRAS and a comparative known-groups validation to explore the ability of the FRAS to differentiate levels of faculty assessment experience. The FRAS was found to be highly reliable (α = 0.96). The dimensionality of the instrument enabled distinction of assessment knowledge into categories of program design, instrumentation, and validation. In the known-groups validation, the FRAS distinguished between faculty groups with differing levels of assessment experience. Faculty members with formal assessment experience self-reported higher levels of familiarity with assessment terms, higher frequencies of assessment activity, increased confidence in conducting assessment, and more positive attitudes toward assessment than faculty members who were novices in assessment. These results suggest that the FRAS can reliably and validly differentiate levels of expertise in faculty knowledge of assessment. PMID:25976653

  4. Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David, Ed.; Hricko, Mary, Ed.; Howell, Scott, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices" provides a view of the possibilities and challenges facing online educators and evaluators in the 21st Century. As technology evolves and online measurement and assessment follow, "Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices" uses…

  5. Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David, Ed.; Hricko, Mary, Ed.; Howell, Scott, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices" provides a view of the possibilities and challenges facing online educators and evaluators in the 21st Century. As technology evolves and online measurement and assessment follow, "Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices" uses…

  6. Faculty Model and Evaluation Strategies in Higher Education: The Ohio State University EAP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoer-Scaggs, Linda

    1990-01-01

    Ohio State University's Faculty and Staff Assistance Program uses two strategies to promote faculty use. The short-term plan generates awareness of the services through deans and key chairpersons, faculty, and staff. The long-term plan develops committees within departments and offices to create opportunities and options for using the services.…

  7. Education research at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht: fostering the interrelationship between professional and education practice.

    PubMed

    van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Dolmans, Diana H J M; de Grave, Willem S; van Luijk, Scheltus J; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Schuwirth, Lambert W T; Wolfhagen, Ineke H A P

    2004-10-01

    An academic department of education serving the entire university and a strategic choice by the Faculty of Medicine to support educational innovation through education research are the historical cornerstones of the education research program of the University of Maastricht. Over the years, the department's initial exclusive research focus on the evaluation of problem-based learning has widened to include theory-based applied research covering the broad domain of education. The program focuses on themes: the learning of students and teachers, characteristics of powerful learning environments, and assessment and evaluation of learning and teaching. Although modest in terms of resources, the program is firmly anchored within the Faculty's organizational structure. Educational relevance and professional alignment are the most prominent determinants of the success of the program. These features sustain the institutional mission of educational excellence as well as the high ranking of the Faculty of Medicine's medical training program among the training programs of the Netherlands' medical schools. A break in this self-perpetuating mechanism--due either to internal politics or to staffing problems--forms the main risk factor for the continuation of the department.

  8. Cost of Evaluating Faculty Performance at Antelope Valley Community College for the 1972-1973 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Donald M.; Brown, Jennings G.

    The costs incurred at Antelope Valley Community College (California) in evaluating the performance of college faculty members for the 1972-73 school year are summarized. Evaluation fell into two phases--implementation and operation. Implementation involved the issuance of written procedures, necessary forms, the purchase of equipment and supplies,…

  9. Faculty Development Needs

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Thomas K; Ferenchick, Gary S; Clark, Jeanne M; Bowen, Judith L; Branch, William T; Alguire, Patrick; Esham, Richard H; Clayton, Charles P; Kern, David E

    2004-01-01

    We compared prior training in 4 areas (general teaching skills, teaching specific content areas, teaching by specific methods and in specific settings, and general professional skills) among community-based teachers based in private practices (N = 61) compared with those in community sites operated by teaching institutions (N = 64) and hospital-based faculty (N = 291), all of whom attended one of three national faculty development conferences. The prevalence of prior training was low. Hospital-based faculty reported the most prior training in all 4 categories, teaching hospital affiliated community-based teachers an intermediate amount, and private practice community-based teachers the least (all P < .05). This association remained after multivariable adjustment for age, gender, and amount of time spent in teaching and clinical activities. Preferences for future training reported frequently by the private practice community-based teachers included: time management (48%); teaching evidence-based medicine (46%); evaluation of learners (38%); giving feedback (39%); outpatient precepting (38%); and “teaching in the presence of the patient” (39%). PMID:15061747

  10. Evaluation of Reflective Practice in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belvis, Esther; Pineda, Pilar; Armengol, Carme; Moreno, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education based on "reflective practice" consists of observing, analysing and reflecting on teacher performance in order to improve professional practice. This article presents the results of an evaluation of a programme on mathematics teaching carried out using reflective practice. It was targeted at 284 teachers in various…

  11. Evaluation of Reflective Practice in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belvis, Esther; Pineda, Pilar; Armengol, Carme; Moreno, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Teacher education based on "reflective practice" consists of observing, analysing and reflecting on teacher performance in order to improve professional practice. This article presents the results of an evaluation of a programme on mathematics teaching carried out using reflective practice. It was targeted at 284 teachers in various…

  12. Strategies for Postsecondary Students in Developmental Education: A Practice Guide for College and University Administrators, Advisors, and Faculty. NCEE 2017-4011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Thomas; Bashford, Joanne; Boatman, Angela; Squires, John; Weiss, Michael; Doyle, William; Valentine, Jeffrey C.; LaSota, Robin; Polanin, Joshua R.; Spinney, Elizabeth; Wilson, Wesley; Yelde, Martha; Young, Sarah H.

    2016-01-01

    This practice guide presents six evidence-based recommendations for college and university faculty, administrators, and advisors working to improve the success of students academically underprepared for college. Each recommendation includes an overview of the practice, a summary of evidence used in support of the evidence rating, guidance on how…

  13. The Effect of Previous Resident Interactions on the Assessment of Interpersonal and Communication Skills by Teaching Faculty: Are We the Best Evaluators?

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Andrew B; Berger, Jeffrey S; Papadimos, Thomas J; Capwell-Burns, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating resident interpersonal and communication skills (ICS) presents a significant challenge. Unlike the In-Training-Exam, an objective measure of knowledge, the evaluation of ICS is subjective. Previous interactions could influence how teaching faculty evaluate this competency leading to inaccurate assessment of resident ICS. Faculty groups from other residencies and non-physicians were enlisted to compare assessments with those by teaching faculty. A cross-sectional study was conducted comparing how different evaluator groups assessed the ICS of anesthesiology residents. Nine residents participated each in two Standardized Patient (SP) encounters that were video-recorded. The recordings were viewed by eleven evaluators representing four different evaluator groups, one non-blinded teaching faculty group, two blinded anesthesiology faculty groups from separate programs and one blinded non-physician group. They scored each encounter using a modified SEGUE framework evaluation form graded on a Likert scale. The mean score for each resident ICS encounter by evaluator group were as follows: non-blinded teaching faculty (57.89), non-physician group (57.42), and the blinded anesthesiology faculties (53.00) and (53.83) respectively. There was significant difference in how the evaluator groups scored the resident performances (p<0.001). Analysis of ranks showed excellent correlation comparing teaching faculty with the other anesthesiology faculty groups (r=0.764, p=0.017 and r=0.765, p=0.016, respectively). The highest ranked resident overall ranked high across all evaluator groups and the lowest ranked resident was ranked lowest across most evaluator groups. Though potential for biases from previous interactions exist, teaching faculty assessments of resident ICS are similar to the assessments of other anesthesiology faculty evaluator groups.

  14. Award-Winning Faculty at a Faith-Based Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Jennifer; Jun, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the development of excellent teachers could contribute to the revision of current practices in faculty recruitment, evaluation, workload expectations, and reward systems. This grounded theory study examined the professional careers of nine award-winning faculty members of a faith-based institution of higher education. The data, collected…

  15. Award-Winning Faculty at a Faith-Based Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Jennifer; Jun, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the development of excellent teachers could contribute to the revision of current practices in faculty recruitment, evaluation, workload expectations, and reward systems. This grounded theory study examined the professional careers of nine award-winning faculty members of a faith-based institution of higher education. The data, collected…

  16. Clinical psychology Ph.D. program rankings: evaluating eminence on faculty publications and citations.

    PubMed

    Matson, Johnny L; Malone, Carrie J; González, Melissa L; McClure, David R; Laud, Rinita B; Minshawi, Noha F

    2005-01-01

    Program rankings and their visibility have taken on greater and greater significance. Rarely is the accuracy of these rankings, which are typically based on a small subset of university faculty impressions, questioned. This paper presents a more comprehensive survey method based on quantifiable measures of faculty publications and citations. The most frequently published core clinical faculty across 157 APA-approved clinical programs are listed. The implications of these data are discussed.

  17. A Practical Guide for Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Larry

    This booklet has been prepared as a guide to evaluation for educational decision-makers. It is intended primarily for administrators although it may be appropriate to other decision-makers as well. The major purpose of this booklet has been to discuss the "what" and why" of evaluation rather than the "how to." After dealing with some basic…

  18. Self-Observation and Peer Feedback as a Faculty Development Approach for Problem-Based Learning Tutors: A Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Irène; James, Richard W; Bischof, Paul; Baroffio, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Good teaching requires spontaneous, immediate, and appropriate action in response to various situations. It is even more crucial in problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials, as the tutors, while directing students toward the identification and attainment of learning objectives, must stimulate them to contribute to the process and provide them with constructive feedback. PBL tutors in medicine lack opportunities to receive feedback from their peers on their teaching strategies. Moreover, as tutorials provide little or no time to stop and think, more could be learned by reflecting on the experience than from the experience itself. We designed and evaluated a faculty development approach to developing PBL tutors that combined self-reflection and peer feedback processes, both powerful techniques for improving performance in education. We developed an observation instrument for PBL facilitation to be used both by tutors to self-observe and reflect on own teaching strategies and by peers to observe and provide feedback to tutors. Twenty PBL sessions were video-recorded. Tutors completed the instrument immediately after their PBL session and again while watching their video-recorded session (self-observation). A group of three observers completed the instrument while watching each recorded session and provided feedback to each tutor (peer observation and feedback). We investigated tutors' perceptions of the feasibility and acceptability of the approach and gathered data on its effectiveness in enhancing tutors' facilitation skills. The preclinical medical curriculum at the University of Geneva is essentially taught by PBL. A new program of faculty development based on self-observation and peer feedback was offered to voluntary tutors and evaluated. Our results suggest that self-observation and peer feedback, supported by an instrument, can be effective in enhancing tutors' facilitation skills. Reflection on self-observation raised teachers' awareness of the effectiveness of

  19. Structuring Long-Term Faculty Training According to Needs Exhibited by Students' Written Comments in Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulkerth, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive adjunct faculty training program is described, whose aim is to improve student perceptions of courses and programs in a private, not-for-profit MBA and Law degree granting university in San Francisco, The program is somewhat novel in that it uses (a) student input from open-ended responses on course evaluations to determine faculty…

  20. Evaluation Study on Simulation CAL in the Science Faculty of the Open University. CAL REsearch Group Technical Report No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, P. J.; And Others

    This report describes evaluations of two courses which were conducted, primarily through participant observation, in 1981. A general introduction looks at simulation in computer assisted learning (CAL) and at use of simulation CAL in the Open University science faculty. The first study discussed was based largely on a tutor's observations of…