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Sample records for practice faculty evaluated

  1. Contractual Issues for Faculty Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, M. Dee; Gregg, Andrea C.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses contractual issues surrounding nursing faculty's clinical practice, such as competent participants, offer, consideration, and acceptance. Addresses evaluation of faculty practice contracts and alternatives for problem resolution. (Contains 24 references.) (SK)

  2. Contractual issues for faculty practice.

    PubMed

    Gregg, A C; Williams, M D

    2001-01-01

    Contracts are a common foundation for faculty practice relationships between a college of nursing and other agencies. Although the legal format of a contract is relatively standardized, the process of contracting entails decisions and issues that increase its complexity. Little is available in the faculty practice literature that addresses contracts and contractual issues as a comprehensive whole. This article contains discussions of nursing faculty practice contractual issues such as the elements of a contract as a framework, including competent parties, offer, consideration, and acceptance. Evaluation of contract performance is addressed and alternatives for decision making and problem resolutions are suggested throughout. J Prof Nurs 17:173-179, 2001. PMID:11464338

  3. Institutionalizing Faculty Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagin, Claire M.

    1986-01-01

    This article places efforts to institutionalize practice in the context of their historical antecedents. It also describes developments at the University of Pennsylvania in what the authors are calling a partnership. The clinician-educator faculty position is examined at length. (CT)

  4. Evaluation of University Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parramore, Barbara M.

    1979-01-01

    Faculty evaluation guidelines, which have been in effect for five years at North Carolina State University's School of Education, are described. Outcomes of this system are summarized, as well as some of the problems associated with it. (GDC)

  5. Orientating Nonpharmacist Faculty Members to Pharmacy Practice

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Bianca; Sheridan, Leah; Sucher, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To design, implement, and evaluate a faculty development program intended to orient nonpharmacist faculty members to pharmacy practice. Design. A multifaceted program was implemented in 2012 that included 4 shadowing experiences in which faculty members visited acute care, ambulatory care, hospital, and community pharmacy settings under the guidance of licensed preceptors. Itineraries for each visit were based on objective lists of anticipated practice experiences that define the role of the pharmacist in each setting. Assessment. The 4 shadowing experiences culminated with reflection and completion of a survey to assess the impact of the program. All of the faculty participants agreed that the experience improved their conceptual understanding of contemporary pharmacy practice and the role of the pharmacist in the healthcare setting. The experience also improved faculty comfort with creating practice-relevant classroom activities. Conclusions. A shadowing experience is an effective way of orienting nonpharmacist faculty members to the practice of pharmacy. This program inspired the creation of an experience to introduce pharmacy practice faculty to pharmaceutical science faculty research initiatives. PMID:24954946

  6. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  7. Faculty practice: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Klooster, J

    1978-10-01

    In considering the advantages and disadvantages of full-time dental faculty members involved in private practice, some suggestions for coping with problems represented by the disadvantages have been cited. Faculty members may find a more satisfactory climate for the patient service aspect of their professional activity in a system where several options are made available from which a teacher may select his preferred office environment and practice style.

  8. Faculty Practice: Criterion for Academic Advancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dolores J.

    1993-01-01

    Although nursing educators must use academic criteria for faculty advancement, they should customized them to reflect the need of nursing faculty not only to be good teachers and researchers but also to maintain expertise in nursing practice. (SK)

  9. Evaluating Faculty Pedagogic Practices to Inform Strategic Academic Professional Development: A Case of Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Steve; Klopper, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken into how a process involving peer review and observation of teaching can be used to enhance academics' teaching practices and inform professional development activities at an organization level. We describe an innovative and highly structured approach to gathering evidence of pedagogic practice from academic…

  10. Dominant Teaching Practices of FCS College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Madhumita; Hausafus, Cheryl O.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines characteristics of family and consumer sciences (FCS) collegiate faculty who do and do not incorporate service-learning in their teaching and determines their dominant mode of teaching practice. Survey results from 368 faculty members in institutions of higher education across the United States demonstrate that FCS faculty…

  11. Toward Objectivity in Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, H. W.

    2008-01-01

    The productivity of faculty members often figures prominently in annual evaluations, post-tenure reviews, and decisions about tenure, promotion, merit pay, release time, awards, and other kinds of recognition. Yet the procedures and instruments that institutions use to assess productivity and merit vary, leaving little that unifies the evaluation…

  12. Workshops for Faculty Development in Family Medicine. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reineke, Robert A.; Welch, Wayne W.

    An evaluation was conducted of four faculty development workshops sponsored by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine for faculty in family practice residency programs. Objectives of the evaluation were to determine the extent to which the workshops achieved the specified educational objectives and to assess the operational aspects of the…

  13. Faculty Communication with Governing Boards: Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiede, Hans-Joerg; Gerber, Larry G.; Turkel, Gerald M.; Kreiser, B. Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a statement prepared by a subcommittee of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) regarding best practices for communication between college faculty and governing boards of colleges. Based on a consideration of relevant AAUP documents and in view of the current climate in higher education, this statement…

  14. Mentoring and the Faculty-TA Relationship: Faculty Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Susanna; Kelley, Matthew R.

    2005-01-01

    The current investigation was designed to examine faculty perceptions and practices of mentoring in the faculty-TA (teaching assistant) relationship. A survey of faculty members at a large Midwestern research institution revealed that most faculty members considered themselves to be, or wished to be, mentors to their teaching assistants. The…

  15. Faculty practice in a small liberal arts college.

    PubMed

    Speziale, H J

    2001-01-01

    Small liberal arts colleges are challenged to find ways to participate in faculty practice. With limited access to large healthcare centers, small liberal arts colleges must create innovative faculty practice models. The author shares one college's experience in faculty practice that can be used by others, detailing practice development, funding, developmental challenges, and future goals.

  16. Issues and Dilemmas of Developing a New Faculty Practice Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Shirley; Mossberg, Kurt A.; Rahr, Richard R.

    2001-01-01

    There are benefits to allied health faculty's participation in clinical practice, but faculty practice plans should include philosophy and bylaws that safeguard the quality of teaching. Plans should address fees, income distribution, incentives, and other administrative issues. (SK)

  17. Ethical Perspectives on Evaluating Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stumpf, Dan; King, Stephanie; Blendinger, Jack; Davis, Ed

    2013-01-01

    Because the process of faculty evaluation in the community college gives rise to ethical concerns about what is evaluated, who is involved in the process, and how data are collected and used, the purpose of this paper is to provide a meaningful ethical perspective for conducting faculty evaluation. The authors discuss ethical issues that arise in…

  18. Evaluation of the PMA-Coordinated Industry Program for Pharmacy Administration Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Edward T.; Herman, Colman M.

    1978-01-01

    The Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association sponsored a program in 1976 to acquaint faculty with "pharmaceutical industry practices and policies, particularly those related to the marketing function." Results of faculty and company evaluation questionnaires of faculty visitation are presented. Most of the faculty were interested in participating…

  19. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-07-10

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy.

  20. Faculty Evaluation Within Collective Bargaining Constraints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catania, James C.

    The author urges administrators to be prepared for collective bargaining by recognizing the importance of teacher evaluation to the process. Citing as a bargaining error the agreement to form a cooperative administrative-faculty committee to develop a system for evaluating faculty at Waukesha County Technical Institute (Wisconsin), he then…

  1. Teaching Evaluations: Perceptions of Students and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukherji, Sandip; Rustagi, Narendra

    2008-01-01

    This study conducts a survey of students and faculty at a business school on critical issues regarding student evaluations of teaching and identifies several significant differences between their perceptions. Students agreed more strongly than faculty that evaluations are higher in courses where the instructor teaches effectively and students…

  2. A Guide to Faculty Development: Practical Advice, Examples, and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Kay Herr, Ed.

    Chapters in this guide provide practical guidance and useful information and resources relating to important aspects of faculty development, from setting up a faculty development program to assessing teaching practices. The chapters are: (1) "Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development: Options and Choices" (Robert M. Diamond); (2) "Ten…

  3. Faculty evaluation at the University of Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Smith, T A; Cooper, T M; Packer, M W

    1977-06-01

    Faculty at the University of Kentucky College of Dentistry are now evaluated through the use of a negotiated Distribution of Effort Agreement. This document, negotiated at the beginning of each academic year, must satisfy both department objectives and the professional and personal requirements of the individual faculty member. It may be modified during the year if both the faculty member and his department chairman agree to the change. This document states work objectives for the year similar to learning objectives in a course. At the end of the year, each faculty member is evaluated on how well he has met his individual objectives. Information relevant to teaching, university service, and student service is gathered by college administrators and forwarded to department chairmen. Together with information on research accomplishment, these data are used by the chairman in the evaluation of each faculty member. The college has clearly charged department chairmen with the direct responsibility for faculty evaluation. The Appointments, Promotions, and Tenure Committee also plays a role in faculty development and evaluation by recommending to the dean ways of improving individual faculty performance. PMID:267124

  4. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  5. Business Students' Ethical Evaluations of Faculty Misconduct

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Sean; Kidwell, Roland E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to gauge business school student perceptions of the academic conduct of college professors, to determine students' ethical evaluations of certain potential faculty behaviors. The relationships between perceived faculty misconduct and several student demographic characteristics including sex and academic classification were…

  6. Evaluating faculty performance: a systematically designed and assessed approach.

    PubMed

    Bland, Carole J; Wersal, Lisa; VanLoy, Wendy; Jacott, William

    2002-01-01

    The authors explain how the Department of Family Practice and Community Health (DFPCH) at the University of Minnesota School of Medicine has responded to the need to create for its faculty an evaluation system that provides information for both feedback and merit-pay decisions. The development process, begun in 1996, is described, and its present format detailed. Also presented are the results of a 1999 assessment of the system, which found high satisfaction among the faculty and the department head. In particular, this system has allowed the department head to have a more objective basis for making salary decisions, to increase his role as coach, and to commit more time to career correction and/or development. Other observed outcomes include an enhanced ability to track faculty productivity, increased clarity in organizational structure and goals, increased research productivity, and early retirement of senior faculty receiving low evaluations. The key components of the DFPCH system mirror recommended elements for the design of faculty evaluation systems offered by evaluation professionals. Specific elements that the DFPCH found critical to success were stable and supportive departmental and project leadership, supportive faculty, skilled staff, a willingness to weather resistance to change, tailoring of the system to the department's specific needs and culture, and a willingness to allow the process to evolve. A key question that the evaluation system has evoked at the DFPCH is whether "merit" equals "worth"; that is, does the collective meritorious work of faculty members effectively address program and departmental goals? PMID:11788318

  7. Influences of faculty evaluating system on educational performance of medical school faculty

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The promotion of educators is challenged by the lack of accepted standards to evaluate the quality and impact of educational activities. Traditionally, promotion is related to research productivity. This study developed an evaluation tool for educational performance of medical school faculty using educator portfolios (EPs). Methods: Design principles and quantitative items for EPs were developed in a consensus workshop. These principles were tested in a simulation and revised based on feedback. The changes of total educational activities following introduction of the system were analyzed. Results: A total of 71% faculty members answered the simulation of the system and the score distributed widely (mean±standard deviation, 65.43±68.64). The introduction of new system significantly increased the total educational activities, especially in assistant professors. Conclusion: The authors offer comprehensive and practical tool for enhancing educational participation of faculty members. Further research for development of qualitative evaluation systems is needed. PMID:27363501

  8. Supporting Online Faculty through Communities of Practice: Finding the Faculty Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Faculty development efforts for supporting online instructors represent a growing concern for higher education administrators. Providing online faculty with enriching experiences designed to improve practice, combat isolation, and share knowledge and resources is a challenge. This review examines the use of a community of practice (CoP) approach…

  9. Part-Time Faculty Evaluation: A Mirage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of faculty evaluation in continuing education and community service programs. Discusses the shortcomings of student evaluations. Identifies key steps in evaluation (i.e., establishing minimum qualifications, providing orientation to teaching, conducting in-class observations and evaluations, and taking follow-up action).…

  10. Faculty Development Programs: Assessing the Impact on Instructional Practices, and Student Learning and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosino, Roberta; Peel, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Demonstrating the impact of faculty development activities is difficult and infrequently attempted beyond assessing participant satisfaction. This study examines how faculty development activities affect instructional practices and the impact on student learning and motivation in accordance with Kirkpatrick's levels of evaluation. Ten instructors…

  11. Nursing faculty collaboration viewed through feminist process. Charleston Faculty Practice Conference Group.

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    The process of evolution experienced by a faculty practice group is viewed through feminist process. A decision to write an article describing their model focused group efforts and served as a catalyst for clarifying needs, values, expectations, and feelings about the group and group process. The group, which began as a support group for nursing faculty, used feminist methods in reviewing the process that led to the writing of an article describing a model for faculty practice and the creation of an environment in which collaborative, collegial relationships could flourish. These ideas were useful in viewing the struggle over issues of leadership, authorship, credit, power, participation, and responsibility experienced by group members.

  12. Publishing Practices of NIH-Funded Faculty at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crummett, Courtney; Duranceau, Ellen Finnie; Gabridge, Tracy A.; Green, Remlee S.; Kajosalo, Erja; Noga, Michael M.; Silver, Howard J.; Stout, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Faculty and researchers who receive substantial funding from NIH were interviewed about their publication practices. Qualitative data was collected from interviews of eleven faculty members and one researcher representing six academic departments who received NIH funding. Interview responses were analyzed to identify a representative publication…

  13. A Theoretical Model for Faculty "Peer" Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauter, Robert C.; Walker, James K.

    1976-01-01

    The current state of research by the authors into the development of a peer evaluation instrument for faculty is reported. Appraisal areas include: clarity and appropriateness of course objectives; agreement between objectives and course content; instructional material; mastery of content; communication skills; student encouragement; organization;…

  14. Faculty Development for Educators: A Realist Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorinola, Olanrewaju O.; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Davies, David; Peile, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of faculty development (FD) activities for educators in UK medical schools remains underexplored. This study used a realist approach to evaluate FD and to test the hypothesis that motivation, engagement and perception are key mechanisms of effective FD activities. The authors observed and interviewed 33 course participants at one…

  15. Chief Academic Officers' Perceptions about Faculty Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kent F.; Rhodes, T. Michael

    The perceptions of chief academic officers (CAOs) at four-year colleges and universities and specialized institutions were examined to determine the criteria used to evaluate faculty teaching, college and community service, scholarship, and overall performance by Carnegie classification, type of control (public or private), and faculty…

  16. Faculty Ratings: Procedures for Interpreting Student Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingles, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    The author contends that student evaluations of faculty should be adjusted before use in tenure, salary, and promotion decisions to eliminate irrelevant course and teacher attributes which color students' opinions and confound analysis. To eliminate possible bias, a multiple regression analysis procedure for the adjustment of student evaluations…

  17. An evaluation of the elements of internal medicine physiopathology curriculum in general practice based on the perspectives of faculty members of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    ESLAMI, JAMSHID; KHADEMI, MOHSEN

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An evaluation of the curriculum elements can be recognized as a necessity in curriculum dynamic and improvement. This study aimed at evaluating five main elements of a physiopathology curriculum in internal medicine (objectives, content, methods, evaluation, and management). Method The present study is of a descriptive-analytical type, and the studypopulation consisted of a total of 48 faculty members of internal medicine physiopathology departmentat Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Participants wereselected using Cochran’s sample size formula andthrough simple random sampling.Thedatawere collected using a 58-item questionnaire devised by the researcher, usingcurriculum planning experts. Face and content validity of the scale were obtained throughexpert views and modifications provided by 10 professors and experts in medical curriculum evaluation. Also, research reliability was calculated using Alpha Cronbachto be 0.99. Reliability value and coefficient was acceptable.Moreover, One-sample t-test, Independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for data analysis. Results Based on the faculty members’ views, of the five curriculum elements, objectives and content were in relatively good conditions (at an average level) while other elements including method, evaluation and management were in poor conditions (lower than average). According to results oftwo-way ANOVA, there wasa significant relationship between faculty members with various work experiencein terms of curriculum evaluation. Conclusion According to research findings, a comparative examination of the curriculum elements and their characteristics in physiopathology course can be conducted, resulting in identification of curriculum weaknesses and their pitfalls. Also, with regard to teaching, evaluation, management methods, weak and strong pointsof the course,efficiency, and effectiveness of the elements were identified. PMID:25927069

  18. Southern Regional Education Board Faculty Evaluation Project: Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wergin, Jon F.; And Others

    A summary is presented of an intensive assessment of the impact of a two-year effort to assist 30 colleges and universities to improve their faculty evaluation procedures. The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), supported by a grant from the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, worked closely with teams of faculty and…

  19. What We Have Learned about Extension Faculty Adoption of Evaluation as a Basis for Program Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerhill, W. R.; Taylor, C. L.

    Substantial emphasis has been placed on Florida Extension faculty evaluating their educational programs for impact and the utilization of these data for program accountability, yet little is known of the extent to which the faculty have accepted this responsibility. In order to assess the stage of adoption of impact evaluation as a practice, and…

  20. Perceptions and Use of iPad Technology by Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Zgarrick, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the potential of tablet technology to address the specific workload challenges of pharmacy practice faculty members and to evaluate tablet usage after a department-wide iPad initiative. Methods. After conducting a needs assessment to determine pharmacy faculty attitudes towards tablet technology and to identify potential usage scenarios, all faculty members in a department of pharmacy practice received an iPad. After iPad distribution, training sessions and virtual tutorials were provided. An anonymous survey was administered to evaluate the pilot. Results. The needs assessment survey revealed positive attitudes towards iPad technology, identified use scenarios, and led to a department-wide iPad pilot program. Most faculty members used iPads for connectivity with students (86%), paper/project annotation (68%), assessment (57%), and demonstration of tools used in practice (36%). For teaching, 61% of faculty members used iPads in seminars/laboratories, 57% used iPads in the experiential setting, and 43% used iPads in the classroom. Use of iPads for patient-care activities varied and depended on site support for mobile technology. The 23 faculty members with external practice sites used iPads to a greater extent and had more positive attitudes towards this technology compared with campus-based faculty members. Conclusion. Integration of tablet technology into the pharmacy education setting resulted in faculty-reported increased productivity and decreased paper waste. It also allowed faculty members to experiment with new teaching strategies in the classroom and experiential setting. Administrators at institutions exploring the use of tablet technology should allocate resources based on faculty needs and usage patterns. PMID:24761013

  1. Experiential Learning Practices in Higher Education: Influences on Faculty Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Although an association between high-impact experiential learning (HIEL) practices and university students' attainment of employability skills has been documented, factors related to implementation of HIEL practices such as faculty stages of concern, barriers faced, and resources needed from the institution to enhance implementation of HIEL…

  2. White Faculty Transforming Whiteness in the Classroom through Pedagogical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charbeneau, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this qualitative study is to present a conceptual framework of pedagogical practices reported by white faculty that serve to challenge the hegemony of whiteness in the university classroom. These transformative teaching practices surfaced through a review of racialized pedagogies discussed in the literature and in…

  3. Institutional Policies and Practices Regarding Faculty in Higher Education. 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF-93). Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshstein, Rita J.; And Others

    This is the second publication released from the 1993 National Study of Postsecondary Faculty (NSOPF), a study about faculty and instructional staff in U.S. higher education institutions. The document presents findings from the institution survey of NSOPF-93 regarding their policies and practices toward faculty and staff, including: full-time,…

  4. Institutionalizing Equitable Policies and Practices for Contingent Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Sam, Cecile

    2013-01-01

    This study is a qualitative inquiry into the institutionalization of equitable policies for non-tenure-track faculty. Through the theoretical framework of institutionalization, we examine factors and strategies forwarding various policies and practices and the challenges that arise. The results highlight themes throughout the stages of…

  5. Current Faculty Development Practices for Alternative Delivery Systems in Christian Higher Education Institutions: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Steven Lowell

    2009-01-01

    This research study was an investigation of current faculty development practices for alternative delivery systems. Attention was given to faculty development in general as well as specific facets of faculty development for alternative delivery systems. Future or intended faculty development practices were pursued, along with factors that…

  6. Faculty Evaluation and Merit Pay at Mountain Empire Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain Empire Community Coll., Big Stone Gap, VA.

    Information is provided on various aspects of the faculty evaluation and development system at Mountain Empire Community College (MECC). The compilation includes: (1) a statement of the purposes of the faculty evaluation and development system; (2) evaluation procedures; (3) definitions of key terms; (4) an explanation of the Index of Success…

  7. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust. PMID:26427777

  8. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust.

  9. Charges by Residents and Faculty Physicians in a University Hospital Pediatric Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkelhamer, Jay E.

    1986-01-01

    The impact of pediatric residents on total patient charges generated in the outpatient pediatric practice of a university hospital was evaluated. Average charges for visits to residents were greater than for visits to faculty pediatricians. The difference was attributable to the higher number of hospital laboratory tests ordered by residents.…

  10. Rigorous Evaluations of Faculty Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucsera, John V.; Svinicki, Marilla

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has called for rigorous evaluations of programs designed to improve college teaching, mostly in response to the missing literature supporting its practice. The purpose of this review was to explore whether such evaluations have taken place since the last examination in 1991. From a systematic review of nine leading publication…

  11. Design and Development of a Faculty Technology Practices Directory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    As one part of a quality enhancement plan, North Carolina State University implemented a technology initiative with an initial focus on evaluating and improving classroom technology, piloting technology-rich workspaces for student projects, and initiating an internal grants program for faculty. An advisory committee directs the initiative with…

  12. Radical Change in Faculty and Student Evaluation: A Justifiable Heresy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the connection between two continuing trends in higher education: semester evaluation of faculty by students (SE's) and grade inflation. The two phenomena are explored historically; then a two-part plan is proposed to enhance the evaluation of both students and faculty. This solution does not replace current evaluation…

  13. A FACULTY OFFICE STUDY. DESIGN AND EVALUATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARPENTER, C.R.; AND OTHERS

    ASSUMING THAT ADEQUATE OFFICES FOR SERVING THE NEEDS OF FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS SHOULD BE PLANNED AND CONSTRUCTED AS INTEGRAL PARTS OF FACILITIES, RESEARCH WAS CONDUCTED AND RESULTS REPORTED ON THE DESIGN OF A TWO-PERSON FACULTY AND/OR STAFF OFFICE. A FULL SCALE, PROTOTYPE MODEL WAS DEVELOPED FOR THE TWO-PERSON OFFICE AND TESTED FOR ECONOMICAL…

  14. The Opinion of Students and Faculty Members about the Effect of the Faculty Performance Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ghahrani, Nassim; Siamian, Hasan; Balaghafari, Azita; Aligolbandi, Kobra; Vahedi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the most common ways that in most countries and Iran in determining the status of teacher training is the evaluation by students. The most common method of evaluation is the survey questionnaire provided to the study subjects, comprised of questions about educational activities. The researchers plan to evaluate the opinion of students and faculty members about the effect of the faculty performance evaluation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-15. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional survey of attitudes of students and professors base their evaluation on the impact on their academic performance, have been studied. The populations were 3904 students and 149 faculty members of basic sciences Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Sample of 350 students and 107 students using Cochran formula faculty members through proportional stratified random sampling was performed. The data of the questionnaire with 28 questions on a Likert Spectrum, respectively. Statistical Analysis Data are descriptive and inferential statistics using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test is done. Results: Based on the results obtained from total of 350 students, 309 students and from total of 107 faculty members, 76 faculty of basic sciences, participated in this study. The most of the students, 80 (25.9%) of the Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences and most of the faculty of basic sciences, 33 (4.43) of the medicine science faculty. Comments Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in comparison to the scope of the evaluation should test using Binominal test; we can conclude that in the field of regulatory, scientific, educational, and communications arena, there were no significant differences between the views of students. The greatest supporter of the education of 193 (62%) and most challengers of exam 147 (48%), respectively. Regarding the viewpoints of the faculty members at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences towards the evaluation

  15. Best Faculty Practice Plan Model for a Small College of Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Sharyn Neiman

    2010-01-01

    Bridging the gap between theory and practice has been a priority with universities and colleges of nursing. A mechanism for bridging this gap has been the establishment of faculty practices. Faculty practices have provided nurse practitioner faculty opportunities to mentor students, augment income, implement evidence-based research, provide…

  16. Revised Faculty Compensation, Evaluation, and Advancement Plan. March, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Joe

    This report provides the revised faculty compensation, evaluation, and advancement plan for Pueblo Community College (PCC) in Colorado. Section 1 contains the PCC three-level salary plan and discusses guidelines for initial appointment and level placement of faculty, initial salary computations, and minimum initial employment requirements. Section…

  17. Sustaining Educational Innovation: engaging traditional faculty in transformed practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Steven; Finkelstein, Noah

    2007-03-01

    Over the past five years CU Physics has engaged in an experimental study of what it means to transform our introductory physics sequence to employ the tools and practices shown to be productive by physics education research. We have previously reported on the successful transformation of the courses to make them student centered, interactive and post high learning gains on conceptual surveys. [1] In an effort to understand the long-term potential of these course transformations, we now examine what happens when the course is transferred to new faculty. We demonstrate that it is possible to maintain high learning gains with new faculty and find two critical factors that contribute to the sustained success of these course transformations: 1) faculty background and beliefs and 2) particular curricular materials and practices selected to use. We also present a model (the Learning Assistant program) designed for sustaining these reforms and for increasing student interest and retention in teaching. [2] [1] N.D. Finkelstein and S.J. Pollock, ``Replicating and Understanding Successful Innovations: Implementing Tutorials in Introductory Physics'' Physical Review, Spec Top: Physics Education Research, 1, 010101 (2005). [2] V.Otero, N.D. Finkelstein, R. McCray, and S. Pollock, ``Who is Responsible for Preparing Science Teachers?'' Science. 313(5786), 445-446 (2006).

  18. A Set of Descriptive Case Studies of Four Dance Faculty Members' Pedagogical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Meredith; Erwin, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Dance faculty members come from a variety of backgrounds, which lead to varied knowledge bases and varied teaching practices. More information is needed about the current pedagogical practices of higher education dance faculty. This study sought to provide a description of four faculty members' pedagogical approaches to a dance technique class in…

  19. Interprofessional practice in healthcare: Experiences of a faculty learning community.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Dooley, Vanessa; Nichols, Quienton

    2016-07-01

    Healthcare reform has had its impact on many health professionals as well as clinical settings, particularly with the enactment of the Affordable Care Act. In healthcare settings, healthcare teams are challenged with new systems of care and changing philosophies of management. However, healthcare providers retain a distinctive sense that they cannot always provide care without some form of collaboration. This article presents the results of a pilot study, which measured the effectiveness of a model of practice utilised at a faculty-practitioner operated university community clinic. The purpose of the study was to measure the perceived effectiveness of a practice model, client satisfaction, and students' perceptions of learning. Implications of this pilot study include providing an interprofessional practice model, which can be replicated in any healthcare setting. This study also provides an opportunity to improve student learning in degree programmes where practice is a significant aspect of the learning process. PMID:27191474

  20. Investigating the faculty evaluation system in Iranian Medical Universities

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Farahnaz; Yamani, Nikoo; Changiz, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To achieve a valid evaluation of faculty members, it is necessary to develop an inclusive and dynamic system of evaluation addressing all the activities and responsibilities of faculty members. Among these responsibilities, educational activities comprise an important part which needs to be investigated. This study aimed to investigate the current system of evaluating the faculty members’ educational duties. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a checklist for investigating the current evaluation system and was developed confirmed by a focus group. The data for checklist were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire and interview with eight experts of faculty evaluation that worked in different Iranian Medical Universities. For completion of information, the available documents and records were studied. Finally, the current evaluation system of different universities was depicted. Results: The developed checklist had six themes and 123 subthemes. The extracted themes included: Tools, evaluators, processes, appropriateness of faculty field of work with evaluation, feedback status, and university status regarding decisions made based on faculty evaluation results. As for comprehensiveness, all evaluation items except for evaluation and assessment skills and religiosity from personality traits subtheme were fully investigated. The evaluation tools were not enough for different types of education such as clinical education. In six universities, the feedbacks provided were only for making inter/intra department comparison, and no scientific suggestions were included. The results of evaluations were used only for the faculties’ promotions. Discussion: Suitability between evaluation and performance components is a necessity in every evaluation system. The study showed this does not exist in Iranian Universities. For instance, there was no appropriate tool for the evaluation of clinical education. Also, the results of the faculty

  1. Faculty Practice: What Do the Data Show? Findings from the NONPF Faculty Practice Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Joanne M.; Duderstadt, Karen; Tolve-Schoeneberger, Candice; Uphold, Constance R.; Hartig, Margaret Thorman

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 452 nurse practitioner educators (343 in clinical practice) found that 70% have doctorates, but only 37% of those in clinical practice are tenured; 51% reported that practice is not considered in promotion and tenure decisions at their institutions. (SK)

  2. Pharmacy Student Perception of Characteristics and Activities of Pharmacy Faculty; Basic Science Compared with Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, Paul L.; House, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    Student attitudes toward pharmacy faculty were measured. Areas of inquiry included faculty characteristics such as age, sex, academic rank, education, licensure, experience, teaching, research, service and credibility. Analysis of data involved a comparision of student answers for pharmacy practice and basic science faculty. (Author/MLW)

  3. Student-Faculty Partnership in Explorations of Pedagogical Practice: A Threshold Concept in Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Student-faculty partnerships position students as informants, participants, and change agents in collaboration with faculty members. Enacting one form of such collaboration, Bryn Mawr College's SaLT program pairs faculty members and undergraduate students in explorations of pedagogical practice. The program provides both context and case…

  4. A Community of Practice Model for Introducing Mobile Tablets to University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle; Vartanian, Lesa Rae; Birk, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of a community of practice (CoP) model for introducing tablets to 139 faculty members at a higher education institution. Using a CoP within a systems model, we used large- and small-group mentorship to foster collaboration among faculty members. Most faculty members agreed that the project was well organized and…

  5. Evaluating Faculty Work: Expectations and Standards of Faculty Performance in Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia; Cox, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Expectations and the way they are communicated can influence employees' motivation and performance. Previous research has demonstrated individual effects of workplace climate and individual differences on faculty productivity. The present study focused on the characteristics of institutional performance standards, evaluation processes and…

  6. Student Evaluations of Faculty: Concerns and Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozub, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Student evaluations of university instruction have long been used to evaluate the teaching performance of instructors of all ranks. In spite of the widespread use of the data acquired from student evaluations for the purpose of determining faculty teaching effectiveness, a review of the literature in the area indicates that questions concerning…

  7. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  8. Administrative Evaluation of Online Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Douglas Duane

    2012-01-01

    Policy and procedure haven't kept up with institutional practices at community colleges. With over 5.5 million college students taking online courses, 29% of college students are taking an online course. As student numbers taking online courses have increased, so have the number of faculty teaching online. The purpose of this study is to…

  9. Instructional Diagnosis: Effective Open-Ended Faculty Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Tim; And Others

    A faculty evaluation technique was used to classify responses from open-ended evaluations to determine elements of university teaching that were of greatest concern to students and to determine the feasibility of comparing subgroups by instructor gender, class size, and school. Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (SGID) was used--a form of course…

  10. The Role of Faculty Evaluation in Transformative Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chisholm, Mervin; Hayes, Edward J.; LaBrecque, Suzanne; Smith, Don

    2011-01-01

    Faculty-evaluation systems are critical to successful transformation in the culture of an institution or any division of it; but modifying the criteria and priorities that have traditionally defined the evaluation process is possible only if one understands and respects the dynamics, difficulties, trade-offs, and complexities involved, especially…

  11. The Changing Faculty and Student Success: Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Promising Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Maxey, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the American academic workforce has fundamentally shifted over the past several decades. Whereas full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty were once the norm, more than two-thirds of the professoriate in non-profit postsecondary education is now comprised of non-tenure-track faculty. New hires across all institutional types are now…

  12. Ten Engineers Reading: Disjunctions between Preference and Practice in Civil Engineering Faculty Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Summer Smith; Patton, Martha D.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that engineering faculty do not follow best practices when commenting on students' technical writing. However, it is unclear whether the faculty prefer to comment in these ineffective ways, or whether they prefer more effective practices but simply do not enact them. This study adapts a well known study of response…

  13. Student Faculty Evaluation (SFE) at Jordanian Universities: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asassfeh, Sahail; Al-Ebous, Hana'; Khwaileh, Faisal; Al-Zoubi, Zohair

    2014-01-01

    This study is the first to address student evaluation of faculty members (SFE) from a student perspective at a major Jordanian public university using a comprehensive (71-item) questionnaire administered to 620 undergraduates. Addressed are students' perceptions of the SFE process in terms of: (a) their paper-based vs. online-format…

  14. Faculty Performance Evaluation: The CIPP-SAPS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitcham, Maralynne

    1981-01-01

    The issues of faculty performance evaluation for allied health professionals are addressed. Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP (content-imput-process-product) model is introduced and its development into a CIPP-SAPS (self-administrative-peer- student) model is pursued. (Author/CT)

  15. Faculty Evaluation of Educational Strategies in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Mandira; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate faculty opinion of existing medical curricula in two medical schools in different countries in terms of six educational strategies using the "SPICES continuum." Significant differences between existing educational plans of the two medical schools were identified. (LZ)

  16. The Impact of Electronic Media on Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkhi, Reza; Williams, Paul

    2010-01-01

    With the proliferation of computer networks and the increased use of Internet-based applications, many forms of social interactions now take place in an on-line context through "Computer-Mediated Communication" (CMC). Many universities are now reaping the benefits of using CMC applications to collect data on student evaluations of faculty, rather…

  17. Faculty Work Practices in Material Environments: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Aaron M.; Berger, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    There is an extensive and well-developed body of literature on the nature of faculty work (e.g., Blackburn & Lawrence, 1996; Schuster & Finkelstein, 2006) that has examined numerous aspects of faculty work and sources of influence on that work (e.g., intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, personal characteristics, disciplinary affiliation,…

  18. Service-Learning Is... How Faculty Explain Their Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Niehaus, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers have explored faculty engagement in service-learning. However, scholarship rarely considers ways in which the discourses used by faculty to describe service-learning--the stories they tell about what it is they are doing and why--construct images of subject positions, problems, and solutions that inform our beliefs about…

  19. Comparing Chemistry Faculty Beliefs about Grading with Grading Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutambuki, Jacinta; Fynewever, Herb

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we seek to understand the beliefs that chemistry faculty hold when grading student solutions in problem solving situations. We are particularly interested in examining whether a conflict exists between the chemistry faculty beliefs and the score they assign to students' solutions. The three categorical values identified in a similar…

  20. An Exploration of Faculty Hiring Practices in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, Suzanne; Jones, Barbara R.; Moore Jr., William

    2004-01-01

    With the average age of faculty members exceeding 55, it is expected that "large numbers of community college faculty may retire at virtually the same time and in the near future" (Gahn & Twombly, 2001, p. 260). In the wake of their exodus, it is a reasonable assumption that community colleges will be faced with hiring many new full- and part-time…

  1. Institutionalizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Storms, Stephanie Burrell; Lopez, Paula Gill; Colwell, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    In higher education, faculty work is typically enacted--and rewarded--on an individual basis. Efforts to promote collaboration run counter to the individual and competitive reward systems that characterize higher education. Mentoring initiatives that promote faculty collaboration and support also defy the structural and cultural norms of higher…

  2. Mentoring Functions Practiced by Undergraduate Faculty in Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Ashley J.; Retallick, Michael S.; Martin, Robert; Steiner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The literature has indicated that faculty and administrators are often uncertain about how to foster effective mentoring relationships with undergraduate students. This study analyzed the mentoring functions of faculty in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University regarding the undergraduate mentoring process. Six…

  3. Effective Faculty Evaluation at the Teaching-Centered University: Building a Fair and Authentic Portfolio of Faculty Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the most fair, authentic, and reliable elements to include in a portfolio of faculty work, specifically at teaching-centered institutions. Design/methodology/approach: This paper examines and evaluates relevant literature pertaining to faculty portfolios of work and recommends portfolio formats…

  4. Faculty Use and Perception of Mobile Information and Communication Technology (m-ICT) for Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Chung, Chung Joo; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider faculty use and perception of mobile information and communication technology (m-ICT) for teaching practices. The researchers examined qualitative responses about specific m-ICT use and efficiency amongst Korean and US faculty (n = 59) at three different institutions. Findings from multi-level textual…

  5. Perceptions of Faculty Development Practices and Structures that Influence Teaching at High Performance Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Perceptions of faculty development practices and structures were compared between 13 high performing schools identified in the DEEP study (Kuh, Kinzie, Schuh, Whitt, 2005) to clarify the relationship between faculty development variables and effective teaching. A phenomenological design was employed to triangulate quantitative and qualitative data…

  6. Scholarly Performance and Related Variables: A Comparison of Pharmacy Practice Faculty and Department Chairpersons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungnickel, Paul W.

    1997-01-01

    Comparison of 296 pharmacy practice faculty and 57 department heads concerning scholarship found differences between the groups in age, experience, tenure, and workload. Administrators found the department environment more supportive and resources more satisfactory than did faculty. The groups produced about the same amount of scholarly work.…

  7. Lessons in Higher Education: Five Pedagogical Practices that Promote Active Learning for Faculty and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Active learning by faculty members complements and promotes active learning for students. Through The Andrew W. Mellon Teaching and Learning Institute at Bryn Mawr College, faculty members actively engage with one another and with undergraduate students positioned as pedagogical consultants to explore and to practice a wide range of pedagogies. In…

  8. The Influence and Outcomes of a STEM Education Research Faculty Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.

    2016-01-01

    To address the need to increase STEM faculty member expertise in STEM education research I developed a faculty community of practice (FCP) focused on increasing knowledge and experience in STEM education research. The STEM Education Research Scholars Group (SERSG) met every other week during the academic year to study and engage in education…

  9. Application of Community of Practice Theory to the Preparation of Engineering Graduate Students for Faculty Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crede, Erin D.; Borrego, Maura; McNair, Lisa D.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how theory can inform the design of a program to prepare graduate students for faculty careers. Preparing Future Faculty programs within and beyond engineering are not new, but explicit application of Communities of Practice and related literature is novel. We describe a prestigious teaching fellowship program that…

  10. A nursing faculty practice for the severely mentally ill: merging practice with research.

    PubMed

    Chafetz, Linda; Collins-Bride, Geraldine M; White, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This Faculty Practice developed in response to increasing medical complexity among severely mentally ill adults in community programs. It represents collaboration between an academic nursing program and Progress Foundation, a residential care provider in San Francisco for the severely mentally ill (SMI). Over ten years, the practice and research agenda have evolved together, through a commitment to mutual collaboration by clinicians and researchers from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing, and the mental health community. Initial efforts at research focused on description of clients and practice. Research efforts have broadened and evolve to include an on-going clinical trial that tests the value of adding active health promotion to primary care. Factors contributing to success included trust among research and clinical faculty and community partners, use of clinical data in the service of practice and education, and relative freedom from fiscal administration. The merging of practice and research increases visibility of nursing contributions and will allow testing of models for care.

  11. The consistency of change in the development of nursing faculty practice plans.

    PubMed

    McNiel, N O; Mackey, T A

    1995-01-01

    Nursing faculty practice plans need to be inherently flexible to meet the changing needs of nursing schools and the external clients of the practice plans. The University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center (UT-Houston) School of Nursing has constructed two integrated models of faculty practice to meet the challenges of change. Our linkage model with outside agencies and our academic nursing center provided in excess of one million dollars of support to the School of Nursing in fiscal year 1992-1993. Flexibility in our linkage model is discussed in such areas as the negotiation process for contracts with outside agencies, methods of payment for services, calculations of cost recoveries, methods of setting consultant rate levels, revisions of fund-disbursement policies, and development of fund-tracking systems. UT-Houston School of Nursing's nursing center model is based on a business plan and was established without outside funding assistance. Over time, the areas of concentration have changed because of changing community needs and market conditions. Its revenues depend on marketing efforts by the clinic staff. Evaluation and outcome research, to be based on computerized financial and patient record information systems, are considered critical elements in maintaining the UT-Houston cutting-edge leadership as an academic nursing center. PMID:7665797

  12. Faculty performance evaluation: the CIPP-SAPS model.

    PubMed

    Mitcham, M

    1981-11-01

    The issues of faculty performance evaluation for allied health professionals are addressed. Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP (content-input-process-product) model is introduced and its development in a CIPP-SAPS (self-administrative-peer-student) model is pursued. Data sources for the SAPS portion of the model are discussed. A suggestion for the use of the CIPP-SAPS model within a teaching contract plan is explored.

  13. The Evaluation of Burnout Levels of Sports Sciences Faculty Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocaeksi, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the burnout levels of sports sciences faculty students in terms of some other variables. 46 Female (Age, M: 20.88 ± 1.86) and 107 male (Age, M: 22.15 ± 2.15) in total 153 students participated in this research. Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Form (MBI-SF) was used for data collection. Descriptive…

  14. Removal of nursing faculty practice barriers in academia: an evidence-based model.

    PubMed

    Aquadro, Lynn C; Bailey, Birdie Irene

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this faculty practice model is to provide a clinical practice site for faculty and provide clinical instruction for baccalaureate nursing students and primary health care services to an underserved, uninsured population in a nonprofit outpatient clinic setting. Community partnerships include a regional university, the city housing authority, local hospitals, the tri-county dental association, the United Way, and other community organizations. The facility is provided by the city housing authority, and the laboratory and diagnostic services are provided by the local hospital. The clinic nurse practitioners are university faculty, and clinical time is part of the faculty workload. Many barriers have been overcome, including lack of funding, increased faculty workloads, and proration of the state's allocation for higher education. Because the organization was initially set up as a nonprofit organization, federal, state, and local grants are available. PMID:25350046

  15. Faculty Evaluation in the Division of HPERD at the University of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brassie, P. Stanley

    A faculty evaluation system at the University of Georgia identifies and differentiates meritorious performance of individual faculty members. The evaluation system, which is used for faculty in the Division of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (HPERD), incorporates the use of a job description, an annual report of activity, and an…

  16. Do Student Evaluations Influence the Teaching Skills of Clerkship Clinical Faculty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekhar, Arcot J.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Hoyt, Amy; McNulty, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Web-based student evaluations of clinical faculty were collected over an 8-year period. There were 19,881 medical student evaluations over the 8-year period for all clinical clerkships, representing a total of 952 faculty. Students used a 5-point Likert scale to rate the teaching effectiveness of faculty. Criterion-based methods and standard…

  17. Factors Influencing Satisfaction for Family Practice Residency Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Lawrence E.; D'Amico, Frank

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 383 faculty in family medical-residency programs explored perceptions of 60 professional, scheduling, compensation, and regional factors as they related to overall job satisfaction and career plans, and 59 factors related to the initial decision to enter academic family medicine. Results indicate high levels of satisfaction, feeling…

  18. Reconceptualizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Dohm, Faith A.; Gill Lopez, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing knowledge base on mentoring in academia, providing effective mentoring for faculty presents several complex dilemmas for academic units charged with facilitating mentoring. How do we institutionalize voluntary and spontaneous mentoring interaction? How do we support a collaborative climate in an inherently individual and…

  19. Mentoring within a Community of Practice for Faculty Development: Adding Value to a CTL Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderwood, Patricia E.; Klaf, Suzanna

    2015-01-01

    E. R. Smith, P. E. Calderwood, F. Dohm, and P. Gill Lopez's (2013) model of integrated mentoring within a community of practice framework draws attention to how mentoring as practice, identity, and process gives shape and character to a community of practice for higher education faculty and alerts us to several challenges such a framework makes…

  20. Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching.

  1. Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide No. 1: developing faculty to effectively facilitate interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Hall, Leslie Walter; Zierler, Brenda K

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of interprofessional education (IPE) and practice in health professional schools, faculty members are being asked to assume new roles in leading or delivering interprofessional curriculum. Many existing faculty members feel ill-prepared to face the challenges of this curricular innovation. From 2012-2013, University of Missouri - Columbia and University of Washington partnered with six additional academic health centers to pilot a faculty development course to prepare faculty leaders for IPE. Using a variety of techniques, including didactic teaching, small group exercises, immersion participation in interprofessional education, local implementation of new IPE projects, and peer learning, the program positioned each site to successfully introduce an interprofessional innovation. Participating faculty confirmed the value of the program, and suggested that more widespread similar efforts were worthwhile. This guide briefly describes this faculty development program and identifies key lessons learned from the initiative. Peer learning arising from a faculty development community, adaptation of curricula to fit local context, experiential learning, and ongoing coaching/mentoring, especially as it related to actual participation in IPE activities, were among the key elements of this successful faculty development activity.

  2. Five Year Follow-up Evaluation of a Faculty Development Program: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennill, Marcia Marie

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative follow-up evaluation explored the long-term impact of a faculty development program on participants who were five years post program. This study focused on 12 faculty members who participated in the University of Missouri's New Faculty Teaching Scholars program. The nine month program focused on creating a culture of teaching…

  3. Evaluation of a Faculty Development Model for Technology Use in Higher Education for Late Adopters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Jessica; Pred, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The design, implementation, and evaluation of the second phase in a two-year faculty development initiative by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Consortium on Higher Education (SEPCHE) is presented. The initiative addressed instruction of SEPCHE faculty in the use of technology in college teaching. Six workshops were conducted for faculty in specific…

  4. Using faculty development to solve a problem of evaluation and management coding: a case study.

    PubMed

    Rose, E A; Roth, L M; Werner, P T; Keshwani, A; Vallabhaneni, V

    2000-04-01

    Compliance with billing and coding rules put forth by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) is a challenge for practicing physicians, including those in academic settings. The authors, members of the academic practice at Wayne State University School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, designed and delivered a comprehensive curriculum as part of the practice's faculty development initiative surrounding the coding challenge. The authors defined outcomes expected on the way to achieving 100% compliance with HCFA's guidelines. Their curriculum covered topics of coding theory, chart auditing for coding, team building, effective meetings, and structured problem solving. The curriculum was delivered from January to May 1998. Chart audits of 251 charts (office notes) from before the intervention and 263 charts from after the intervention were performed to evaluate differences in coding accuracy. Errors were significantly reduced. The total error rate dropped from 50.2% to 31.1% (p < .05). Overcoding errors were reduced by one third (29.1% versus 19.7%), while undercoding errors were reduced by half (16.3% versus 8.4%). Other errors fell from 4.7% to 3%. The approach of defining and developing work teams and then using standard quality improvement tools may be an effective way to improve compliance with HCFA billing and coding rules. In addition, faculty development can be incorporated into the process of solving a problem that faces a faculty.

  5. Nursing Faculty Decision Making about Best Practices in Test Construction, Item Analysis, and Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killingsworth, Erin Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    With the widespread use of classroom exams in nursing education there is a great need for research on current practices in nursing education regarding this form of assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore how nursing faculty members make decisions about using best practices in classroom test construction, item analysis, and revision in…

  6. Multiplying Perspectives and Improving Practice: What Can Happen When Undergraduate Students Collaborate with College Faculty to Explore Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Traditional structures in higher education support a separation between faculty members' and students' perspectives on classroom practice. This is in part because student-faculty interactions are typically defined by a focus on content coverage and by a clear delineation between faculty and student roles in engaging that content. This…

  7. A Foundation for Faculty Evaluation: The Annual Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinari, Frank D.

    The W. Paul Stillman School of Business at Seton Hall University has implemented a model standardized annual Faculty Development Plan (FDP). A form was developed to collect data from each faculty member. The form is divided into the areas of teaching, research, and service, with several questions in each area asking faculty to specify their goals…

  8. Stimulating Critical Thinking through Faculty Development: Design, Evaluation, and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Leonard E.; And Others

    A faculty development program designed to encourage critical thinking skills across the curriculum at the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire is described in this report. The program's goal was to stimulate faculty to add critical thinking to their pedagogical objectives. Faculty participants attended six 4-hour meetings designed to heighten their…

  9. Evaluating Faculty Development and Clinical Training Programs in Substance Abuse: A Guide Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitzner, Michael; Stewart, Kathryn

    Intended to provide an overview of program evaluation as it applies to the evaluation of faculty development and clinical training programs in substance abuse for health and mental health professional schools, this guide enables program developers and other faculty to work as partners with evaluators in the development of evaluation designs that…

  10. Faculty Evaluation in Higher Education: A Review of Court Cases and Implications for the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Pamela M.

    A study of purposes, processes, and results of faculty evaluation in higher education looks at court litigation and the criteria used--or not used--in evaluation: student evaluation, peer evaluation, and faculty qualities examined in courts (defamation of character, immorality, overt undesirable behavior, incompetence, lack of qualifications).…

  11. Design and Implementation of an Evaluation Methodology for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, M. G.; Miller, M.; Freeman, M.; Watson, C.; Khalkho, M.; Smith, T.

    2005-12-01

    The NFFP was created in 2002 to accommodate the needs and capabilities of both NASA and the university community. The program combines aspects of two successful former NASA programs, the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the NASA/USRA JOint VEnture (JOVE) program. The NFFP contributes directly to NASA's strategic goal to "inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics", and NASA's Office of Education strategic objective to "strengthen NASA's involvement in higher education to enhance the nation's science and technology capability in NASA related fields to help meet NASA's future personnel needs." The primary goals of the NFFP are to increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to Agency research objectives; provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; involve faculty in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA's strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; facilitate interdisciplinary networking; and establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of the program. Participants are required to submit a research report and complete a program evaluation. The NFFP is evaluated using Web-based survey instruments in the NASA Education Evaluation Information System (NEEIS) that have been designed to collect data that measure program activities and accomplishments against program goals and NASA's education programs evaluation criteria. Data are collected from Faculty Fellows, NASA Colleagues, and students who accompanied Faculty Fellows. Participant Feedback Forms gather quantitative and qualitative information on research accomplishments, the benefits and impacts of the program, and overall program evaluation data. Follow-up feedback instruments are designed to

  12. Part-time and job-share careers among pharmacy practice faculty members.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Brooke; Vest, Kathleen; Pohl, Shaunte; Mazan, Jennifer; Winkler, Susan

    2014-04-17

    Part-time and job-share policies may allow pharmacy practice faculty members to achieve work/life balance while pursuing their professional goals. Precedent for alternative work schedules within the health professions community can be found throughout the literature; however, little is known about part-time roles in academic pharmacy. The design and implementation of 3 different alternative faculty appointments are described and department chair and faculty perspectives are shared. Teaching, service, and scholarship responsibilities, as well as outcomes before and after changes in appointment, are described. Advantages and disadvantages, including advice for other colleges of pharmacy, are presented. Alternate appointments may be a key factor in retaining highly qualified faculty members who continue to bring their expertise to teaching, precepting, and scholarship within a college or school of pharmacy.

  13. Part-time and job-share careers among pharmacy practice faculty members.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Brooke; Vest, Kathleen; Pohl, Shaunte; Mazan, Jennifer; Winkler, Susan

    2014-04-17

    Part-time and job-share policies may allow pharmacy practice faculty members to achieve work/life balance while pursuing their professional goals. Precedent for alternative work schedules within the health professions community can be found throughout the literature; however, little is known about part-time roles in academic pharmacy. The design and implementation of 3 different alternative faculty appointments are described and department chair and faculty perspectives are shared. Teaching, service, and scholarship responsibilities, as well as outcomes before and after changes in appointment, are described. Advantages and disadvantages, including advice for other colleges of pharmacy, are presented. Alternate appointments may be a key factor in retaining highly qualified faculty members who continue to bring their expertise to teaching, precepting, and scholarship within a college or school of pharmacy. PMID:24761010

  14. A One-Day Dental Faculty Workshop in Writing Multiple-Choice Questions: An Impact Evaluation.

    PubMed

    AlFaris, Eiad; Naeem, Naghma; Irfan, Farhana; Qureshi, Riaz; Saad, Hussain; Al Sadhan, Ra'ed; Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2015-11-01

    Long training workshops on the writing of exam questions have been shown to be effective; however, the effectiveness of short workshops needs to be demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a one-day, seven-hour faculty development workshop at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, on the quality of multiple-choice questions (MCQs). Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model was used. Participants' satisfaction (Kirkpatrick's Level 1) was evaluated with a post-workshop questionnaire. A quasi-experimental, randomized separate sample, pretest-posttest design was used to assess the learning effect (Kirkpatrick's Level 2). To evaluate transfer of learning to practice (Kirkpatrick's Level 3), MCQs created by ten faculty members as a result of the training were assessed. To assess Kirkpatrick's Level 4 regarding institutional change, interviews with three key leaders of the school were conducted, coded, and analyzed. A total of 72 course directors were invited to and attended some part of the workshop; all 52 who attended the entire workshop completed the satisfaction form; and 22 of the 36 participants in the experimental group completed the posttest. The results showed that all 52 participants were highly satisfied with the workshop, and significant positive changes were found in the faculty members' knowledge and the quality of their MCQs with effect sizes of 0.7 and 0.28, respectively. At the institutional level, the interviews demonstrated positive structural changes in the school's assessment system. Overall, this one-day item-writing faculty workshop resulted in positive changes at all four of Kirkpatrick's levels; these effects suggest that even a short training session can improve a dental school's assessment of its students.

  15. Faculty-Specific Factors of Degree of HE Internationalization: An Evaluation of Four Faculties of a Post-1992 University in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Nan; Carpenter, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the difference in the process of higher education (HE) internationalization across faculties in a post-1992 university and to identify faculty-specific factors through evaluating the four faculties in the case study. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research is conducted in a post-1992…

  16. Knowledge and Competency of Nursing Faculty Regarding Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Orta, Roxana; Messmer, Patricia R; Valdes, Guillermo R; Turkel, Marian; Fields, Sheldon D; Wei, Christina Cardenas

    2016-09-01

    The Institute of Medicine recommended that 90% of clinical decisions should be evidenced based by 2020. Both the IOM and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses identified evidenced-based practice (EBP) as a core competency for practice. EBP can reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and ensure optimal nursing interventions. Because nursing faculty may have deficits in knowledge, attitudes, and competencies to teach EBP, few nursing students conduct EBP reviews. The purpose of this project was to develop EBP educational resources to increase nursing faculty knowledge and competency of EBP in a southeastern college with both a multicultural faculty and student body. A pre- and postsurvey design using Stevens' ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation and Evidence Based Practice Readiness Inventory (ACE-ERI) determined the effectiveness of the educational intervention. Results indicated that faculty's self-confidence about their competency in EBP increased significantly from presurvey to postsurvey, t(17) = -2.04, p = .028, but there was no significant change from pretest to posttest, t(17) = -0.576, p =.572, for the EBP knowledge component of ACE-ERI. The results of the study suggest that educational programs for RN-to-BSN faculty are vital in increasing participant's readiness for EBP. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(9):409-419. PMID:27580508

  17. Instructional Practices in Introductory Geoscience Courses: Results of a National Faculty Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    The NAGT professional development program "On the Cutting Edge" recently surveyed 7000 geoscience faculty in the United States to develop a snapshot of current instructional practices in undergraduate geoscience courses, faculty strategies for learning new content and new teaching approaches, and faculty involvement in the geoscience education community. Over 2200 faculty responded to the survey which was conducted by the American Institute of Physics. Results for introductory courses (814 responses) indicate that lecture is the most common teaching strategy used in courses of all sizes. Many faculty incorporate some interactive activities in their courses. Most commonly, they use questioning, demonstrations, discussions, and in-class exercises. Less common, but not rare, are small group discussion or think-pair-share and classroom debates or role-playing. Activities involving problem solving, using quantitative skills, working with data and primarily literature, and structured collaboration are incorporated by many faculty in introductory courses, suggesting efforts to teach the process of science. Activities in which students address a problem of national or local interest, analyze their own data, or address problems of their own design are less common but not rare. Field experiences are common but not ubiquitous for students in introductory courses. A wide variety of assessment strategies are used in introductory courses of all sizes, including exams, quizzes, problem sets, papers, oral presentations, and portfolios. While papers are used for assessment more extensively in small classes, a significant number of faculty use papers in large classes (greater than 81 students). A majority of faculty use rubrics in grading. Faculty report that in the past two years, approximately one-third have made changes in the content of their introductory courses while just under half have changed the teaching methods they use. While faculty learn about both new content and

  18. Strategies for improving teaching practices: a comprehensive approach to faculty development.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, L; Irby, D M

    1998-04-01

    Medical school faculty members are being asked to assume new academic duties for which they have received no formal training. These include time-efficient ambulatory care teaching, case-based tutorials, and new computer-based instructional programs. In order to succeed at these new teaching tasks, faculty development is essential. It is a tool for improving the educational vitality of academic institutions through attention to the competencies needed by individual teachers, and to the institutional policies required to promote academic excellence. Over the past three decades, strategies to improve teaching have been influenced by the prevailing theories of learning and research on instruction, which are described. Research on these strategies suggests that workshops and students' ratings of instruction, coupled with consultation and intensive fellowships, are effective strategies for changing teachers' actions. A comprehensive faculty development program should be built upon (1) professional development (new faculty members should be oriented to the university and to their various faculty roles); (2) instructional development (all faculty members should have access to teaching-improvement workshops, peer coaching, mentoring, and/or consultations); (3) leadership development (academic programs depend upon effective leaders and well-designed curricula; these leaders should develop the skills of scholarship to effectively evaluate and advance medical education); (4) organizational development (empowering faculty members to excel in their roles as educators requires organizational policies and procedures that encourage and reward teaching and continual learning). Comprehensive faculty development, which is more important today than ever before, empowers faculty members to excel as educators and to create vibrant academic communities that value teaching and learning.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of Baccalaureate Nursing Students Using SBAR Format: Faculty versus Self Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saied, Hala; James, Joemol; Singh, Evangelin Jeya; Al Humaied, Lulawah

    2016-01-01

    Clinical training is of paramount importance in nursing education and clinical evaluation is one of the most challenging responsibilities of nursing faculty. The use of objective tools and criteria and involvement of the students in the evaluation process are some techniques to facilitate quality learning in the clinical setting. Aim: The aim of…

  20. Examining the Effects of a National League for Nursing Core Competencies Workshop as an Intervention to Improve Nurse Faculty Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanBever Wilson, Robin R.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complex challenges facing schools of nursing, a research study was implemented to introduce nurse faculty at one small rural northeastern Tennessee school of nursing to the NLN "Core Competencies for Nurse Educators". Utilizing Kalb's Nurse Faculty Self-Evaluation Tool as a pre- and post-intervention test, 30 nurse faculty members…

  1. Faculty Best Practices Using Blended Learning in E-Learning and Face-to-Face Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortera-Gutierrez, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Presenting a higher education case study from Mexico: "Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey" (ITESM-CCM) College, Mexico city campus, describing faculty best and worst practices using a blended learning approach in e-learning and face-to-face instruction. The article comments on conceptual definitions of blended learning,…

  2. Culturally Relevant Pedagogical Practice among White College Faculty: A Narrative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Susan F.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty contribute to the campus racial climate for all students, but particularly for students of color, and play a significant role in shaping intellectual, social, and behavioral standards through their pedagogical practice (Hurtado, Milem, Clayton-Petersen, & Allen, 1998; Solózano, Ceja, & Yosso, 2000; Rankin & Reason, 2005).…

  3. Beliefs and Practices of Expert Respiratory Care Faculty on Critical-Thinking Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, James Leland

    2009-01-01

    Problem. The development of critical-thinking skills during the professional training of respiratory therapists is imperative for good practice. Research evidence suggests that interactive instructional strategies are far more effective than traditional lectures. Missing from the literature are thick descriptions of how faculty organize the…

  4. Digital Ethnography: Understanding Faculty Use of an Online Community of Practice for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    This doctoral thesis explored how faculty members in higher education use an online community of practice for professional development in teaching and, if so, in what ways and for what purposes? Answering this inquiry involved the knowledge of social constructivism, higher education, teaching, professional development, and online communities.…

  5. The Influence of Leadership Practices on Faculty Job Satisfaction in Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afam, Clifford C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a correlational, cross-sectional study design with self-administered questionnaires, this study explored the extent to which leadership practices of deans and department heads influence faculty job satisfaction in baccalaureate degree nursing programs. Using a simple random sampling technique, the study survey was sent to 400 faculty…

  6. Alternative Methods by Which Basic Science Pharmacy Faculty Can Relate to Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabat, Hugh F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A panel of pharmacy faculty ranked a broad inventory of basic pharmaceutical science topics in terms of their applicability to clinical pharmacy practice. The panel concluded that basic pharmaceutical sciences are essentially applications of foundation areas in biological, physical, and social sciences. (Author/MLW)

  7. Work-Life: Policy and Practice Impacting LG Faculty and Staff in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munn, Sunny L.; Hornsby, Eunice Ellen

    2008-01-01

    The work-life policies and benefits practices of public universities and the extent to which lesbian and gay (LG) faculty, staff and families receive different work-life benefits than their heterosexual married counterparts are examined. The analysis was conducted by searching university work-life benefits websites. Major benefits for domestic…

  8. Critical Mentoring Practices to Support Diverse Students in Higher Education: Chicana/Latina Faculty Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueroa, Julie López; Rodriguez, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter outlines critical practices that emerged from utilizing social justice frameworks to mentor first-generation, underrepresented minority students at the undergraduate to doctoral levels. The mentoring strategies include helping students to reframe instances when faculty and peers unconsciously conflate academic rigor with color-blind…

  9. Practice Brief: Faculty Perspectives on Professional Development to Improve Efficacy when Teaching Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hye Jin; Roberts, Kelly D.; Stodden, Robert

    2012-01-01

    "Innovative and Sustainable Teaching Methods and Strategies" project staff provided professional development to instructional faculty to enhance their attitudes, knowledge, and skills in meeting the diverse needs of students with disabilities. This practice brief describes one of the professional development programs, delivered over the course of…

  10. The Impact of Faculty Teaching Practices on the Development of Students' Critical Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Woo-jeong; Walczak, Kelley

    2012-01-01

    Colleges and universities recognize that one of the primary goals of higher education is to promote students' ability to think critically. Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education (WNS), this study examined the relationship between faculty teaching practices and the development of students' critical thinking skills,…

  11. Teaching Practices Prior and Subsequent to 1998 in Turkey: Gazi University Vocational Education Faculty Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpan, Gulgun; Erdamar, Gurcu

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare teaching practice before and after 1998 in Turkey. Participants were 10 academics from the Department of Educational Sciences, Vocational Education Faculty, Gazi University and nine vocational high school cooperating teachers. Semi-structured interviews were analysed by using content analysis. The most significant…

  12. Accounting Practitioners Reflect on Faculty Impact: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    A gap exists between the perception of accounting education in the classroom and accounting as it is practiced. This study explores qualitatively the perceptions and experiences of mid-career accounting professionals with respect to the impact of academic faculty on their careers in accounting. The study identifies a perception gap in the…

  13. A Motivation Perspective on Faculty Mentoring: The Notion of "Non-Intrusive" Mentoring Practices in Science and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechuga, Vicente M.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have offered numerous approaches and best practices for mentoring faculty, many of which have provided valuable insight into the complex nature of the mentoring process. Yet, little attention has been paid to how faculty mentoring practices can influence a mentee's intrinsic motivation. Through a series of 15 interviews with faculty…

  14. Promoting instructional change in new faculty: An evaluation of the physics and astronomy new faculty workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Charles

    2008-02-01

    An important finding of physics and astronomy education research (PAER) is that traditional, transmission-based instructional approaches are not effective in promoting meaningful student learning. Instead, PAER research suggests that physics and astronomy should be taught using more interactive instructional methods. These ways of teaching require significant changes in the way faculty think about teaching and learning and corresponding changes in their teaching behavior. Although the research base and corresponding pedagogies and strategies are well documented and widely available, widespread changes in physics and astronomy teaching at the college level has yet to occur. The Workshop for New Physics and Astronomy Faculty has been working to address this problem since 1996. This workshop, which is jointly administered by the American Association of Physics Teachers, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society, has attracted approximately 25% of all new physics and astronomy faculty each year to a four-day workshop designed to introduce new faculty to PAER-based instructional ideas and materials. This paper describes the impact of the Workshop as measured by surveys of Workshop participants and physics and astronomy department chairs. The results indicate that the Workshop is successful in meeting its goals and might be significantly contributing to the spread and acceptance of PAER-based instructional ideas and materials.

  15. The Effect of Faculty Self-Promotion on Student Evaluations of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farreras, Ingrid G.; Boyle, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect that varying degrees of faculty self-promotion had on 322 student evaluations. As high student evaluations are correlated with greater student learning, it is imperative that we assess how faculty's presentation style is perceived by students so as to enhance instruction and therefore student learning. Students…

  16. R&D Priorities for Educational Testing and Evaluation: The Testimony of the CRESST National Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Joan L., Ed.

    At the 1989 meeting of the National Faculty of the Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST), faculty members were invited to present testimony on what they viewed as the most pressing research and policy issues in the fields of testing, evaluation, and standards. These views are expressed in this document,…

  17. "A Desire for Growth": Online Full-Time Faculty's Perceptions of Evaluation Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCosta, Meredith; Bergquist, Emily; Holbeck, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Post-secondary educational institutions use various means to evaluate the teaching performance of faculty members. There are benefits to effective faculty evaluation, including advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning, as well as improving the functionality and innovation of courses, curriculum, departments, and ultimately the broader…

  18. A Community of Practice: Web Portals and Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Patricia A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a Web portal constructed by Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology dedicated to improving middle school science, mathematics, and technology instruction. The portal emulates emerging corporate practices of knowledge management and process reinvention through information technology, and offers middle school teachers across Indiana a…

  19. Web Accessibility Theory and Practice: An Introduction for University Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbard, David A.; Peters, Cara

    2010-01-01

    Web accessibility is the practice of making Web sites accessible to all, particularly those with disabilities. As the Internet becomes a central part of post-secondary instruction, it is imperative that instructional Web sites be designed for accessibility to meet the needs of disabled students. The purpose of this article is to introduce Web…

  20. Educational Practice for Small Size Class in Fundamental Education of Faculty of Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Hirano, Kimitaka; Honda, Chikahisa

    An educational practice for small size class in fundamental education of our faculty has been carried out using a special fund from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology since fiscal year 2005. The fundamental subjects such as Mathematics and Physics are very important for the students of Faculty of Engineering. In order to achieve the aim of each subject for students with insufficient understanding, we wrestle with the project of the education for small size class. Some projects are described in this paper.

  1. A Handbook for Contracts, Promotion, and Evaluation. A Faculty Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Roger M.; And Others

    In January 1986, the faculty and administration at New Mexico State University at Alamogordo (NMSU) decided that the Senior Faculty Advisory Committee would serve as the Branch Promotion and Tenure Committee to advise the administration in the awarding of specific temporary contracts, continuous contracts (tenure), and promotions. The Committee…

  2. Recommendations for the successful pursuit of scholarship by pharmacy practice faculty members.

    PubMed

    Bosso, John A; Hastings, Jan K; Speedie, Marilyn K; Rodriguez de Bittner, Magaly

    2015-02-17

    Scholarship has long been a basic expectation of faculty members at institutions of higher learning in the United States and elsewhere. This expectation is no less assumed in academic pharmacy. A number of organizations have verbalized and enforced this precept over the years.(1-3) For example, this expectation is spoken to directly in the American Council for Pharmacy Education's Accreditation Standards and Guidelines.(4) This expectation is further emphasized in the draft document of the accreditation standards to be implemented in 2016, in Standard 20. Specifically, Element 20.2 states: "The college or school must create an environment that both requires and promotes scholarship, and must also develop mechanisms to assess both the quantity and quality of faculty scholarly productivity."(5) The successful pursuit of scholarship by clinical faculty members (those engaged in both clinical practice and teaching, without regard to tenure or clinical track status) is challenging. (6-10) Thus, faculty member job descriptions or models should be designed so clinical faculty members can successfully meet all academic job expectations, including productive and meaningful scholarship. In 2012, an AACP Section of Teachers of Pharmacy Practice task force was charged with examining this issue and providing recommendations for models for clinical faculty members that would allow the successful pursuit of scholarship. The task force gathered information relating to the current state of affairs at a number of colleges and reviewed relevant literature. This information, along with personal experiences and much discussion and contemplation, led to some general observations as well as specific recommendations. This paper reiterates the task force's observations and recommendations and provides further detail regarding our interpretation of the findings and basis for the eventual recommendations to the section.

  3. Librarians and occupational therapy faculty: a collaboration for teaching evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Kimberly A

    2012-01-01

    Students in allied health educational programs learn evidence-based practice (EBP) skills, yet often do not consistently utilize these skills as practitioners. Barriers to implementing EBP include time pressures and lack of skill. This descriptive study explains how librarians can teach information literacy skills and strengthen knowledge of EBP in graduate occupational therapy (OT) students. The goal of the study was to evaluate students' perception of the effectiveness of learning activities about EBP, and librarians' perception of the value of teaching in an OT curriculum. Sixty-three students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio read articles and learned didactic information from OT faculty and librarians about EBP. Students researched intervention questions and electronically sent searches to librarians for feedback. Students applied skills by researching an intervention of their choice. Evaluative data were collected from students in 2009 and 2010 and from librarians in 2009. Both groups rated the learning experiences highly. Students felt the learning experiences improved their effectiveness in carrying out EBP. Librarians valued the experience of teaching information literacy to OT students. These results support other studies showing librarians' effectiveness in developing EBP skills in students. Recommendations are given about using journal clubs and secondary literature to ensure the use of EBP at the workplace. PMID:22544409

  4. Development of an interprofessional and interdisciplinary collaborative research practice for clinical faculty.

    PubMed

    Hager, Keri; St Hill, Catherine; Prunuske, Jacob; Swanoski, Michael; Anderson, Grant; Lutfiyya, May Nawal

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an interprofessional collaborative research practice fellowship designed to foster the research skills of clinical faculty. The year-long fellowship was grounded in big data analysis and the triangle of informatics--knowledge, information, and data. Fellows were selected to include diverse perspectives, training, and knowledge but had limited experience in team science or being a member of an interprofessional research team. The underlying philosophy of the fellowship was experiential learning. Protected time and formal mentorship were necessary factors for developing the interprofessional research practice and the skills to participate in an interprofessional research team. We believe that this innovative interprofessional faculty research fellowship is a viable option for supporting scholarly activity and research collaboration. The findings could inform interprofessional clinical practice and be implemented for patient care. Engagement in interprofessional collaborative research and incorporation of the perspectives, knowledge and expertise of multiple professions, is a model to de silo knowledge creation. PMID:26934068

  5. A model for cultivating dental hygiene faculty development within a community of practice.

    PubMed

    Tax, Cara L; Doucette, Heather; Neish, Nancy R; Maillet, J Peggy

    2012-03-01

    There is a need to explore approaches in faculty development that will foster change in actual teaching practices. The literature suggests that there should be more deliberate use of theory in faculty development research. This study addressed this gap in the literature by exploring social learning theory in the context of communities of practice and applying this theory to a dental hygiene faculty development program. The purpose of the study was to determine if participation in a community of practice helped dental hygiene clinical instructors implement new teaching strategies by providing ongoing support for their learning. In addition, the study explored whether the level of participation in the community changed over time. A retrospective self-assessment questionnaire consisting of four open-ended questions was administered to a group of clinical dental hygiene instructors at the end of the 2010 academic year. The narrative data were analyzed thematically using qualitative methodology. The results indicated that participation in the community of practice helped clinical instructors make effective changes in their teaching practices by optimizing social learning opportunities. The responses also revealed that instructors became more comfortable participating in discussions as they identified with other members of this unique community. PMID:22383599

  6. A National Survey of Faculty Development Evaluation Outcome Measures and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their evaluation procedures and outcome measures for faculty development for online teaching conducted during 2011-2012. The survey results found that over 90% of institutions used measures of the faculty person's…

  7. Expansion of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Faculty College: Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, William A.

    A project, sponsored by the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, was conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh to expand the Faculty College program, which is an on-going series of faculty development workshops and seminars. The project was designed to: implement and evaluate a series of in-depth special focus sessions that…

  8. What We Say Is Not What We Do: Effective Evaluation of Faculty Professional Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert-May, Diane; Derting, Terry L.; Hodder, Janet; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Long, Tammy M.; Jardeleza, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    Professional development (PD) workshops designed to help faculty move from teacher- to learner-centered science courses for undergraduates are typically evaluated with self-reported surveys that address faculty's satisfaction with a workshop, what they learned, and what they applied in the classroom. Professional development outcomes are seldom…

  9. Integrating Systematic Chronic Care for Diabetes into an Academic General Internal Medicine Resident-Faculty Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Kelso, Christine; Bowen, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    Background The quality of care for diabetes continues to fall short of recommended guidelines and results. Models for improving the care of chronic illnesses advocate a multidisciplinary team approach. Yet little is known about the effectiveness of such models in an academic setting with a diverse patient population and resident physicians participating in clinical care. Objective To implement a chronic illness management (CIM) practice within an academic setting with part-time providers, and evaluate its impact on the completion of diabetes-specific care processes and on the achievement of recommended outcomes for patients with diabetes mellitus. Design Retrospective cohort study Subjects Patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus who receive their primary care in an academic general internal medicine resident-faculty practice. Measurements Process and outcomes measures in patients exposed to the CIM practice were compared with non-exposed patients receiving usual care. Main Results Five hundred and sixty-five patients met inclusion criteria. Patients in the CIM practice experienced a significant increase in completion of care processes compared to control patients for measurement of annual low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7–5.7), urine microalbumin (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.1–5.5), blood pressure (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–2.8), retinal examination (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.3–2.7), foot monofilament examination (OR 4.2, 95% CI 3.0–6.1) and administration of pneumococcal vaccination (OR 5.2, 95% CI 3.0–9.3). CIM-exposed patients were also more likely to achieve improvements in clinical outcomes of glycemic and blood pressure control reflected by hemoglobin A1c less than 7.0% (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.02–3) and blood pressure less than 130/80 (OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1–4.5) compared to controls. Conclusions A systematic chronic care model can be successfully integrated into an academic general internal medicine practice and may result in improved

  10. Innovation in Faculty Practice: A College of Nursing and Juvenile Justice Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Jennifer M; Roberts, Leissa A

    2016-01-01

    Residential Juvenile Justice Services (JJS) facilities are located in every state and, in general, represent an underserved and diverse adolescent population. The JJS centers present an exciting and innovative opportunity for collaboration with colleges of nursing to initiate faculty practice sites. The University of Utah College of Nursing has been serving 5 JJS centers for 14 years and recently doubled its services to incorporate 10 different JJS Centers in the state of Utah. Each center offers a unique patient population and setting providing the student with an opportunity to learn health assessment and physical examination skills not typically presented in more traditional hospital or outpatient facilities. This type of community collaboration affords an opportunity for faculty practice, education, research, and service. An interprofessional focus enriches the experience. PMID:27000193

  11. Interprofessional faculty development: integration of oral health into the geriatric diabetes curriculum, from theory to practice

    PubMed Central

    Dounis, Georgia; Ditmyer, Marcia; VanBeuge, Susan; Schuerman, Sue; McClain, Mildred; Dounis, Kiki; Mobley, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Background Health care workforce shortages and an increase demand for health care services by an older demographic challenged by oral–systemic conditions are being recognized across health care systems. Demands are placed on health care professionals to render coordinated delivery of services. Management of oral–systemic conditions requires a trained health care workforce to render interprofessional patient-centered and coordinated delivery of health care services. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interprofessional health care faculty training program. Methods A statewide comprehensive type 2 diabetes training program was developed and offered to multidisciplinary health care faculty using innovative educational methods. Video-recorded clinically simulated patient encounters concentrated on the oral–systemic interactions between type 2 diabetes and comorbidities. Post-encounter instructors facilitated debriefing focused on preconceptions, self-assessment, and peer discussions, to develop a joint interprofessional care plan. Furthermore, the health care faculty explored nonhierarchical opportunities to bridge common health care themes and concepts, as well as opportunities to translate information into classroom instruction and patient care. Results Thirty-six health care faculty from six disciplines completed the pre-research and post-research assessment survey to evaluate attitudes, knowledge, and perceptions following the interprofessional health care faculty training program. Post-training interprofessional team building knowledge improved significantly. The health care faculty post-training attitude scores improved significantly, with heightened awareness of the unique oral–systemic care needs of older adults with type 2 diabetes, supporting an interprofessional team approach to care management. In addition, the health care faculty viewed communication across disciplines as being essential and interprofessional

  12. Pediatric faculty and residents’ perspectives on In-Training Evaluation Reports (ITERs)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rikin; Drover, Anne; Chafe, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background In-training evaluation reports (ITERs) are used by over 90% of postgraduate medical training programs in Canada for resident assessment. Our study examined the perspectives of faculty and residents in one pediatric program as a means to improve the ITER as an evaluation tool. Method Two separate focus groups were conducted, one with eight pediatric residents and one with nine clinical faculty within the pediatrics program of Memorial University’s Faculty of Medicine to discuss their perceptions of, and suggestions for improving, the use of ITERs. Results Residents and faculty shared many similar suggestions for improving the ITER as an evaluation tool. Both the faculty and residents emphasized the importance of written feedback, contextualizing the evaluation and timely follow-up. The biggest challenge appears to be the discrepancy in the quality of feedback sought by the residents and the faculty members’ ability to do so in a time effective manner. Others concerns related to the need for better engagement in setting rotation objectives and more direct observation by the faculty member completing the ITER. Conclusions The ITER is a useful tool in resident evaluations, but a number of issues relating to its actual use could improve the quality of feedback which residents receive. PMID:27004076

  13. Perceptions of Virginia Community College System Faculty and Administrators on the Purposes for and Composition of a Comprehensive Evaluation System for Teaching Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightower, William H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed to measure community college faculty and administrator views on the faculty evaluation process. Responses were then compared based on demographic characteristics such as primary area of instruction, supervisory responsibility, years of experience, and gender. Open-ended survey questions asked respondents to…

  14. Evaluating Online Dictionaries From Faculty Prospective: A Case Study Performed On English Faculty Members At King Saud University--Wadi Aldawaser Branch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate online dictionaries from faculty prospective. The study tried to obtain in depth information about various forms of dictionaries the faculty used; degree of awareness and accessing online dictionaries; types of online dictionaries accessed; basic features of information provided; major benefits gained…

  15. Teaching while learning while practicing: reframing faculty development for the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Clay, Michael A; Sikon, Andrea L; Lypson, Monica L; Gomez, Arthur; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Bowen, Judith L

    2013-09-01

    Soaring costs of health care, patients living longer with chronic illnesses, and continued attrition of interest in primary care contribute to the urgency of developing an improved model of health care delivery. Out of this need, the concept of the team-based, patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has developed. Amidst implementation in academic settings, clinical teachers face complex challenges not previously encountered: teaching while simultaneously learning about the PCMH model, redesigning clinical delivery systems while simultaneously delivering care within them, and working more closely in expanded interprofessional teams.To address these challenges, the authors reviewed three existing faculty development models and recommended four important adaptations for preparing clinical teachers for their roles as system change agents and facilitators of learning in these new settings. First, many faculty find themselves in the awkward position of teaching concepts they have yet to master themselves. Professional development programs must recognize that, at least initially, health professions learners and faculty will be learning system redesign content and skills together while practicing in the evolving workplace. Second, all care delivery team members influence learning in the workplace. Thus, the definition of faculty must expand to include nurses, pharmacists, social workers, medical assistants, patients, and others. These team members will need to accept their roles as educators. Third, learning to deliver health care in teams will require support of both interprofessional collaboration and intraprofessional identity development. Fourth, learning to manage change and uncertainty should be part of the core content of any faculty development program within the PCMH. PMID:23887006

  16. Faculty Acceptance of Instructional Technology: Attitudes toward Educational Practices and Computer-Assisted Instruction at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderman, Donald L.; Mahler, William A.

    1977-01-01

    Completed surveys from about 300 faculty members at six community colleges indicated current opinions about educational practices and provided a baseline of initial attitudes towards CAI. The data was factor analysed. (BD)

  17. Evaluation of online course discussions. Faculty facilitation of active student learning.

    PubMed

    VandeVusse, L; Hanson, L

    2000-01-01

    Graduate nursing faculty evaluated their initial experiences with online course discussions after making the transition from traditional use of weekly face-to-face classroom discussions to primarily computer-based interactions with students at distant sites. The online discussion data were analyzed qualitatively. The ways the faculty member communicated to facilitate active student involvement in the online discussions were coded. Six categories were identified that describe the ways the faculty member communicated to facilitate active student involvement in online discussions: assist with navigation, explain expectations, clarify faculty role, stimulate critical thinking, share expertise, and provide encouragement. Examples of each were provided to demonstrate ways faculty promoted student learning in online discussions. PMID:10939187

  18. 1981 and 1982 Faculty and Student Research Participation Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Lee

    This publication was developed as a basic tool to measure success of Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) University Programs Division in achieving goals of the Faculty and Student Research Participation Programs operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Three questionnaires were created to directly address the goals and objectives of…

  19. Social Work Gerontological Practice: The Need for Faculty Development in the New Millennium.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Barbara; Silverstone, Barbara; June Simmons, W; Volland, Patricia J; Howe, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need to upgrade the gerontological knowledge and skills of practicing social workers. Geriatrics and gerontology, as specialized fields of knowledge, have not been sufficiently integrated into formal academic training programs. There are major trends in the health care environment which impact on social work education, including technological advances, a shift from inpatient to outpatient and community care settings, increasing diversity of the older population, and client and family participation in decisionmaking. These trends necessitate social work education to emphasize new content areas in gerontology and the development of new skills in clinical, case management, care coordination, and teamwork. A significant obstacle to the preparation of future social workers to deliver the complex services needed by older adults and their families is a serious shortage of social work faculty in gerontology. Sustained and broad initiatives, such as the John A. Hartford Foundation funded Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholars Program, are needed to develop academic and practice-based faculty in gerontology. This is crucial if social work is to maintain an important service role in the new millennium.

  20. Social Work Gerontological Practice: The Need for Faculty Development in the New Millennium.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Barbara; Silverstone, Barbara; June Simmons, W; Volland, Patricia J; Howe, Judith L

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need to upgrade the gerontological knowledge and skills of practicing social workers. Geriatrics and gerontology, as specialized fields of knowledge, have not been sufficiently integrated into formal academic training programs. There are major trends in the health care environment which impact on social work education, including technological advances, a shift from inpatient to outpatient and community care settings, increasing diversity of the older population, and client and family participation in decisionmaking. These trends necessitate social work education to emphasize new content areas in gerontology and the development of new skills in clinical, case management, care coordination, and teamwork. A significant obstacle to the preparation of future social workers to deliver the complex services needed by older adults and their families is a serious shortage of social work faculty in gerontology. Sustained and broad initiatives, such as the John A. Hartford Foundation funded Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholars Program, are needed to develop academic and practice-based faculty in gerontology. This is crucial if social work is to maintain an important service role in the new millennium. PMID:27135560

  1. Fostering Change from Within: Influencing Teaching Practices of Departmental Colleagues by Science Faculty with Education Specialties.

    PubMed

    Bush, Seth D; Rudd, James A; Stevens, Michael T; Tanner, Kimberly D; Williams, Kathy S

    2016-01-01

    Globally, calls for the improvement of science education are frequent and fervent. In parallel, the phenomenon of having Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES) within science departments appears to have grown in recent decades. In the context of an interview study of a randomized, stratified sample of SFES from across the United States, we discovered that most SFES interviewed (82%) perceived having professional impacts in the realm of improving undergraduate science education, more so than in research in science education or K-12 science education. While SFES reported a rich variety of efforts towards improving undergraduate science education, the most prevalent reported impact by far was influencing the teaching practices of their departmental colleagues. Since college and university science faculty continue to be hired with little to no training in effective science teaching, the seeding of science departments with science education specialists holds promise for fostering change in science education from within biology, chemistry, geoscience, and physics departments.

  2. Fostering Change from Within: Influencing Teaching Practices of Departmental Colleagues by Science Faculty with Education Specialties

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Globally, calls for the improvement of science education are frequent and fervent. In parallel, the phenomenon of having Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES) within science departments appears to have grown in recent decades. In the context of an interview study of a randomized, stratified sample of SFES from across the United States, we discovered that most SFES interviewed (82%) perceived having professional impacts in the realm of improving undergraduate science education, more so than in research in science education or K-12 science education. While SFES reported a rich variety of efforts towards improving undergraduate science education, the most prevalent reported impact by far was influencing the teaching practices of their departmental colleagues. Since college and university science faculty continue to be hired with little to no training in effective science teaching, the seeding of science departments with science education specialists holds promise for fostering change in science education from within biology, chemistry, geoscience, and physics departments. PMID:26954776

  3. Fostering Change from Within: Influencing Teaching Practices of Departmental Colleagues by Science Faculty with Education Specialties.

    PubMed

    Bush, Seth D; Rudd, James A; Stevens, Michael T; Tanner, Kimberly D; Williams, Kathy S

    2016-01-01

    Globally, calls for the improvement of science education are frequent and fervent. In parallel, the phenomenon of having Science Faculty with Education Specialties (SFES) within science departments appears to have grown in recent decades. In the context of an interview study of a randomized, stratified sample of SFES from across the United States, we discovered that most SFES interviewed (82%) perceived having professional impacts in the realm of improving undergraduate science education, more so than in research in science education or K-12 science education. While SFES reported a rich variety of efforts towards improving undergraduate science education, the most prevalent reported impact by far was influencing the teaching practices of their departmental colleagues. Since college and university science faculty continue to be hired with little to no training in effective science teaching, the seeding of science departments with science education specialists holds promise for fostering change in science education from within biology, chemistry, geoscience, and physics departments. PMID:26954776

  4. Epistemological Beliefs and Practices of Science Faculty with Education Specialties: Combining Teaching Scholarship and Interdisciplinarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addy, Tracie Marcella

    2011-12-01

    Across the United States institutions of higher education address educational reform by valuing scholarship that focuses on teaching and learning, especially in STEM fields. University science departments can encourage teaching scholarship by hiring science faculty with education specialties (SFES), individuals who have expertise in both science and science education. The goal of this study was to understand how the epistemological beliefs and teaching practices of SFES relate to national reform efforts in science teaching promoting student-centered instruction. The research questions guiding this investigation were: (1) What epistemological belief systems do science faculty with education specialties espouse concerning the teaching and learning of science?; and (2) What are the classroom practices of science faculty with education specialties? How are these practices congruent with the reform efforts described by the National Research Council (1996, 2001, 2003)? The theoretical framework guiding the study was interdisciplinarity, the integration of knowledge between two or more disciplines (science and science pedagogy). The research design employed mixed (qualitative and quantitative) approaches and focused on 25 volunteer SFES participants. The TBI, ATI, and RTOP were used to triangulate self-report and videotaped teaching vignettes, and develop profiles of SFES. Of the 25 SFES participants, 82 percent of their beliefs were transitional or student-centered beliefs. Seventy-two percent of the 25 SFES espoused more student-focused than teacher focused approaches. The classroom practices of 10 SFES were on average transitional in nature (at the boundary of student-focused and teacher-focused). The beliefs of SFES appeared to be influenced by the sizes of their courses, and were positive correlated with reform-based teaching practices. There was a relationship between the degree to which they implemented reform-based practice and their perceived level of

  5. Faculty Scholarship Has a Profound Positive Association with Student Evaluations of Teaching--Except When It Doesn't

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that research-productive faculty are also the finest instructors. But, is this commonly held belief correct? In the current study, the notion that faculty scholarship exhibits a positive association with teaching evaluations is investigated. Reflecting the data structure of faculty nested within university, the current…

  6. Differences in Student Evaluations of Principles and Other Economics Courses and The Allocation of Faculty across Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragan, James F., Jr.; Walia, Bhavneet

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze 19 semesters of student evaluations at Kansas State University. Faculty member fixed effects are sizable and indicate that among faculty members who teach both types of courses, the best principles teachers also tend to be the best nonprinciples teachers. Estimates that ignore faculty effects are biased because principles…

  7. Perception of Locus of Control as a Predictor of Attitude Toward Students' Evaluation of University Faculty. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Emmett T.; Christal, Melodie E.

    Student and faculty attitudes about faculty evaluation and the relationship of the attitudes to the concept of locus of control were investigated. Student respondents consisted of 172 males and 256 females, and 108 faculty responses were received. The measure of locus of control closely resembles the Rotter Internal-External Control Scale. Student…

  8. Faculty Teaching Performance: Perceptions of a Multi-Source Method for Evaluation (MME)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyde, Adrian R.; Grieshaber, David C.; Byrns, George

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating college and university faculty teaching performance is necessary for multiple reasons, including assurance of student learning and informing administrative decision-making. A holistic system of evaluating university teaching is necessary for reasons including the limitations of student evaluations and the complexity of assessing…

  9. Evidence-based practice instruction by faculty members and librarians in North American optometry and ophthalmology programs.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Katherine A; Hrynchak, Patricia K; Spafford, Marlee M

    2014-07-01

    North American optometry and ophthalmology faculty members and vision science librarians were surveyed online (14% response rate) about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP). Similar to studies of other health care programs, all five EBP steps (Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply, Assess) were taught to varying degrees. Optometry and ophthalmology EBP educators may want to place further emphasis on (1) the Apply and Assess steps, (2) faculty- and student-generated questions and self-assessment in clinical settings, (3) online teaching strategies, (4) programmatic integration of EBP learning objectives, and (5) collaboration between faculty members and librarians.

  10. Evidence-based practice instruction by faculty members and librarians in North American optometry and ophthalmology programs.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Katherine A; Hrynchak, Patricia K; Spafford, Marlee M

    2014-07-01

    North American optometry and ophthalmology faculty members and vision science librarians were surveyed online (14% response rate) about teaching evidence-based practice (EBP). Similar to studies of other health care programs, all five EBP steps (Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply, Assess) were taught to varying degrees. Optometry and ophthalmology EBP educators may want to place further emphasis on (1) the Apply and Assess steps, (2) faculty- and student-generated questions and self-assessment in clinical settings, (3) online teaching strategies, (4) programmatic integration of EBP learning objectives, and (5) collaboration between faculty members and librarians. PMID:25031564

  11. Academic Freedom in Al Al-Bayt University and the Level of Practicing It from the View Point of the Faculty Members Based on Some Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Madi, Bayan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the level of practicing academic freedom by the faculty members of Al al-Bayt University. The study population included all the faculty members (297) of Al al-Bayt University, during the academic year, 2010/2011. The study sample was randomly selected and included 250 faculty members. To achieve the aims of…

  12. Mentoring University Faculty to become High Quality Online Educators: A Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixon, Emily; Barczyk, Casimir; Buckenmeyer, Janet; Feldman, Lori

    2011-01-01

    This study summarizes the results of a program evaluation of the Distance Education Mentoring Program (DEMP), an ongoing initiative at Purdue University Calumet, Indiana (USA) designed to enhance the development of online courses by mentoring faculty in instructional design principles and technology. The evaluation covers a four year period and is…

  13. An Analysis of Grades, Class Level and Faculty Evaluation Scores in the United Arab Emirates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Lee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the results of a student evaluation of faculty against the grades awarded and the level of the course for a higher education institution in the United Arab Emirates. The purpose of the study was to determine if the grades awarded in the course and/or level of the course impacted the evaluation scores awarded to the faculty…

  14. Beyond Satisfaction: Toward an Outcomes-Based, Procedural Model of Faculty Development Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, D. Christopher; Marsh, Lauren; Wilcox, Kimerly; Cohen, Brad

    2011-01-01

    In response to the well-documented need for rigorous evaluations of faculty development programs and increasing demands for institutional accountability, University of Minnesota's Office of Information Technology (OIT) researchers have developed an approach to program evaluation that assesses individual level changes to participants' attitudes,…

  15. Triple jump examination evaluation of faculty examiners by dental student examinees.

    PubMed

    Navazesh, Mahvash; Rich, Sandra K; Keim, Robert G

    2014-05-01

    The triple jump examination (TJE) is an oral examination that poses challenges for objective assessment. Student satisfaction levels with faculty assessment can provide information on quality of teaching and students' perceptions of the learning environment. The purpose of this study was to determine scale and interrater reliability of an instrument used by approximately 576 first-year dental students at one U.S. dental school for assessment of their faculty evaluators following midterm and final TJEs over a three-year period. One hundred and one faculty members served as administrators of the TJE with a range of one to 187 times (mean=44.10, median=29, mode=11). The grand mean for six items on a six-point Likert scale was 5.39 with a pooled standard deviation of 1.01. Results indicate positive agreement toward performance of examiners with strong interrater reliability (Average Measures ICC=0.936, Single Measures ICC=0.708) (F5,23475 = 51.564, p<0.001) and consistency across all items (Cronbach's α=0.936). The a priori assumption that students would rate faculty higher as they gained experience over time was rejected (r=0.018, p=0.429). Indications are that faculty members, who are relatively inexperienced with TJE examining, can perform acceptable assessment from the students' perspective. Overall, these students expressed a high level of satisfaction with TJE faculty performance.

  16. Disciplinary Logics in Doctoral Admissions: Understanding Patterns of Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posselt, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Ph.D. attainment rates by race and gender vary widely across the disciplines, and previous research has found disciplinary variation in graduate admissions criteria and practices. To better understand how disciplines shape admissions preferences and practices, which in turn may shape student access to graduate education, this article uncovers…

  17. Resident and faculty perceptions of effective clinical teaching in family practice.

    PubMed

    Gjerde, C L; Coble, R J

    1982-02-01

    Increasing interest in clinical teaching has led to the realization that the unique subset of skills which characterizes effective clinical teaching needs to be identified. Such identification will lead to development of these skills and improvement in the quality of clinical teaching. Family practice faculty are vitally concerned with improving their clinical teaching skills, since clinical teaching is the core of education in family medicine and since many family physicians who become preceptors have had no formal training as teachers. In this investigation of effective clinical teaching behaviors, faculty and residents generally agree in their perceptions of the helpfulness of 58 clinical teaching behaviors. Neither group felt that emphasis on references and research is as important a factor in effective clinical teaching as are residents' active participation in the learning situation and positive preceptor attitudes toward teaching and residents. It was perceived that the ineffective clinical teacher has a negative attitude toward residents, is inaccessible, and lacks skills in providing feedback, while the effective clinical teacher has skills in two-way communication, creates an educational environment that facilitates learning, and provides constructive feedback to residents.

  18. Effective Evaluation of Teaching: A Guide for Faculty and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kite, Mary E., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book compiles several essays about effective evaluation of teaching. Contents of this publication include: (1) Conducting Research on Student Evaluations of Teaching (William E. Addison and Jeffrey R. Stowell); (2) Choosing an Instrument for Student Evaluation of Instruction (Jared W. Keeley); (3) Formative Teaching Evaluations: Is Student…

  19. Getting Practical--The Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Ian; Reiss, Michael J.; Sharpe, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    The findings from the Improving Practical Work in Science (IPWiS) evaluation suggest that the project can, and did, bring about noticeable improvements in the effectiveness of practical work in school science. However, the extent of these improvements varied widely and appeared to be dependent on the departmental seniority of the person…

  20. The Socialization of Black College Faculty: Implications for Policy and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Barbara J.; Harvey, William

    2002-01-01

    Explored the faculty socialization process at Black colleges, reporting how faculty perceive the tenure process and working conditions, how they learn what is necessary for success in the promotion and tenure process, and the barriers they encounter. (EV)

  1. Multicultural Competence and Practices of Undergraduate Faculty and Their Relationships to Racial Identity, Education, and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauter, John P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Trends in higher education indicate a growing diversification of student populations. However, faculty racial and gender diversity lags behind the nation. Given this difference, this study proposed an exploration of multicultural competence among undergraduate faculty to offer insight into how higher education, and faculty in particular, might…

  2. Standards of Practice for California Community College Library Faculty and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Libraries and library faculty play a significant role in supporting college curriculum and helping students succeed academically. In particular, libraries are the primary location both physically and remotely for supporting faculty and students in their research and information needs. Over the years, this role of libraries and library faculty has…

  3. Triple Gain: Practical Ideas for Maximizing Connections between Students, Faculty, and Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Duffy, Lauren N.; Stone, Garrett; Pinckney, Harrison P., IV.; Tucker, Teresa; Cathey, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    This document highlights numerous ideas that faculty can implement to provide a triple gain, that is, a gain for students, professionals and faculty through collaborative work. We will explore traditional and innovative connections that can be made between recreation professionals, students, and faculty, within parks, recreation, and tourism…

  4. An Investigation into the Faculty Development Practices in Chiropractic Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaringe, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A descriptive case study design using a cross-sectional quantitative survey method was used to investigate the impact of faculty development programs on teaching effectiveness perceived by faculty teaching at chiropractic colleges in the United States. The availability of faculty development programs related to teaching and student learning was…

  5. Teaching the Teachers: Faculty Preparedness and Evaluation of a Retreat in Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Julie W.; Broyles, Lauren M.; Hanusa, Barbara H.; Kraemer, Kevin L.; Conigliaro, Joseph; Spagnoletti, Carla; McNeil, Melissa; Gordon, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Effective clinical faculty are essential for disseminating substance abuse screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). The authors developed an 8-hour SBIRT training for internal medicine faculty preceptors. Trainers conducted SBIRT lectures and small-group communication practice sessions. The authors assessed participants'…

  6. Revisiting the AAUP Recommendation: The Viability of Collegiality as a Fourth Criterion for University Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Pattie C.; Schimmel, Tammy; O'Hara, Hunter

    2012-01-01

    Legal rulings have called for the inclusion of collegiality as a fourth evaluation category for university faculty. Collegiality is considered to be any extra-role behavior that represents individuals' behavior that is discretionary, not recognized by the formal reward system and that, in the aggregate, promotes the effective functioning of the…

  7. Business Faculty Performance Evaluation Based on the New AACSB Accreditation Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehie, Ike C.; Karathanos, Demetrius

    1994-01-01

    Responses from 208 of 663 business school deans showed, in applying new accreditation standards of American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business to 3 faculty evaluation factors, there is change in favor of perceived importance of teaching. Accredited institutions rate teaching less important than intellectual contributions. Mission emphasis…

  8. Student Response to Faculty Instruction (SRFI): An Empirically Derived Instrument to Measure Student Evaluations of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitzel, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    The Student Response to Faculty Instruction (SRFI) is an instrument designed to measure the student perspective on courses in higher education. The SRFI was derived from decades of empirical studies of student evaluations of teaching. This article describes the development of the SRFI and its psychometric attributes demonstrated in two pilot study…

  9. Are Teacher Course Evaluations Biased against Faculty That Teach Quantitative Methods Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Stockdale, Myrah R.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated graduate students' responses to teacher/course evaluations (TCE) to determine if students' responses were inherently biased against faculty who teach quantitative methods courses. Item response theory (IRT) and Differential Item Functioning (DIF) techniques were utilized for data analysis. Results indicate students…

  10. Thought Processes College Students Use When Evaluating Faculty: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Mary Beth; Mansfield, Phylis M.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the thought processes college students use when answering survey questions on standardized course/faculty evaluations. Thought processes are categorized as: System One or System Two, based on the framework developed by Kahneman (2003) and Stanovich and West (2000). System One processes are typically hurried, superficial,…

  11. Faculty Attitudes Toward Required Evaluative Projects for Doctor of Pharmacy Candidates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes evaluative projects required of seniors in an entry-level pharmacy doctoral program, and faculty (n=57) attitudes toward them. Findings indicated 32 publications and 68 professional presentations resulted from the projects. Respondents agreed the research-related courses and projects are important and that the project improves analytical…

  12. The Relationship between Student Evaluation of Instruction Scores and Faculty Formal Educational Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellhase, Kristen C.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Emphasis is placed on athletic training educators' content area expertise and not on their formal training in educational concepts. Objective: The purposes of this study were to identify the amount of educational coursework completed by ATEP faculty and investigate the relationship between ATEP instructors' student evaluation of…

  13. Grade Inflation and Student Individual Differences as Systematic Bias in Faculty Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Marie-Line; Scandura, Terri A.

    2005-01-01

    The media has recently exposed that grade inflation is a concern for higher education in North America. Grade inflation may be due to consumerism by universities that now compete for students. Keeping students happy (and paying) may have been emphasized more than learning. We review the literature on faculty evaluation and present a model that…

  14. Teaching the teachers: faculty preparedness and evaluation of a retreat in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment.

    PubMed

    Childers, Julie W; Broyles, Lauren M; Hanusa, Barbara H; Kraemer, Kevin L; Conigliaro, Joseph; Spagnoletti, Carla; McNeil, Melissa; Gordon, Adam J

    2012-01-01

    Effective clinical faculty are essential for disseminating substance abuse screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT). The authors developed an 8-hour SBIRT training for internal medicine faculty preceptors. Trainers conducted SBIRT lectures and small-group communication practice sessions. The authors assessed participants' (n = 27) knowledge, skills, and attitudes using an enhanced Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perceptions Questionnaire (AAPPQ). Participants self-assessed their changes in SBIRT competence and comfort. Faculty trainees did not feel competent in SBIRT, particularly in intervention and referral to treatment. AAPPQ subscale scores were highest in Role Legitimacy and Motivation and lowest in Role Adequacy and Satisfaction. After training, faculty members reported greater likelihood of performing and teaching SBIRT. In some topic areas, faculty attending an SBIRT training reported limited knowledge and competence for treating drinkers; however, their interest and motivation for doing so was high. Ongoing faculty and organizational development efforts may help close these gaps. PMID:22738004

  15. The Relationship Between Students' Evaluations of Faculty and Instructional Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overall, Jesse U.; Marsh, Herbert W.

    A random half of the instructors of an introductory course in computer programming were given feedback from students' evaluations of instructional effectiveness conducted at the middle of the term. The impact of the feedback was assessed against three criteria: (1) change in students' evaluations between mid-quarter and end-of-quarter; (2)…

  16. Views of Evidence-Based Practice among Faculty in Master of Social Work Programs: A National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Allen; Parrish, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A national online survey assessed the views of 973 faculty members in master of social work programs regarding their receptivity toward, definition of, and views of disparate sources of evidence pertinent to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the teaching of EBP. Method: Due to Internet-related technical difficulties, the response rate…

  17. Understanding Faculty and Non-Traditional Student Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning in a Practical Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to identify and investigate nursing faculty and student perspectives of self-directed learning in a practical nursing program. It also explored the degree to which student's perceptions of self-directed learning exhibited factors consistent with that of critical thinking. This study is important because self-directed…

  18. A Progress Report on a Department of Psychiatry Faculty Practice Plan Designed to Reward Educational and Research Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Robert E.; Shahrokh, Narriman C.; Servis, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors provide a progress report on a faculty practice plan that assigns a monetary value to administrative duties, teaching, scholarship, community service, and research. Methods: Modifications to the original plan are described and quantifiable results in the areas of scholarship and research are summarized. Results: During a…

  19. The Utilization of the Seven Principles for Good Practices of Full-Time and Adjunct Faculty in Teaching Health & Science in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musaitif, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which undergraduate full-time and adjunct faculty members in the health and science programs at community colleges in Southern California utilize the seven principles of good practice as measured by the Faculty Inventory of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate…

  20. Student Evaluations of Teaching: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Andrew C; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore dental and dental hygiene students' and faculty members' perceptions of student evaluations of teaching (SET) and determine whether dental vs. dental hygiene student, beginning vs. advanced student, and faculty vs. student responses differed. Perceived benefits, challenges, and suggestions for conducting SETs optimally were also assessed. Survey data were collected from 329 dental students (D1: 108; D2: 91; D3&4: 130) and 68 dental hygiene students (DH2: 26; DH3: 19; DH4: 23) (overall response rates 76%/92%) and 56 dental and eight dental hygiene faculty members (response rates 41%/100%). Faculty respondents were more positive about SETs than students (five-point scale with 1=disagree: 3.85 vs. 3.39; p<0.001), with seniors being the least positive (mean 2.42). Respondents agreed that all students should complete SETs (3.87 vs. 3.61; p=0.068), with faculty agreeing more strongly than students that all courses should be evaluated (4.32/4.04; p=0.046). Students agreed more strongly than faculty that SETs should occur during regular class time (3.97/3.44; p<0.001) and are too long (3.47/3.09; p=0.010) and that results should be shared with students (4.03/3.57; p=0.002). Open-ended responses showed that students perceived more benefits of SETs for faculty members than for students and that the most frequently mentioned problem was that SETs do not result in changes. Faculty members were generally more positive than students (especially seniors) about SETs. These findings suggest that, according to these respondents, SETs should be completed by all students for all courses, be short, provide opportunities for open-ended comments, and be administered in class to improve response rate. In addition, SET results and how SETs are used to improve courses should be shared with students. PMID:27037452

  1. Student Evaluations of Teaching: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Andrew C; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore dental and dental hygiene students' and faculty members' perceptions of student evaluations of teaching (SET) and determine whether dental vs. dental hygiene student, beginning vs. advanced student, and faculty vs. student responses differed. Perceived benefits, challenges, and suggestions for conducting SETs optimally were also assessed. Survey data were collected from 329 dental students (D1: 108; D2: 91; D3&4: 130) and 68 dental hygiene students (DH2: 26; DH3: 19; DH4: 23) (overall response rates 76%/92%) and 56 dental and eight dental hygiene faculty members (response rates 41%/100%). Faculty respondents were more positive about SETs than students (five-point scale with 1=disagree: 3.85 vs. 3.39; p<0.001), with seniors being the least positive (mean 2.42). Respondents agreed that all students should complete SETs (3.87 vs. 3.61; p=0.068), with faculty agreeing more strongly than students that all courses should be evaluated (4.32/4.04; p=0.046). Students agreed more strongly than faculty that SETs should occur during regular class time (3.97/3.44; p<0.001) and are too long (3.47/3.09; p=0.010) and that results should be shared with students (4.03/3.57; p=0.002). Open-ended responses showed that students perceived more benefits of SETs for faculty members than for students and that the most frequently mentioned problem was that SETs do not result in changes. Faculty members were generally more positive than students (especially seniors) about SETs. These findings suggest that, according to these respondents, SETs should be completed by all students for all courses, be short, provide opportunities for open-ended comments, and be administered in class to improve response rate. In addition, SET results and how SETs are used to improve courses should be shared with students.

  2. Spillover in the Academy: Marriage Stability and Faculty Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, Larry H.; Alvarez-Salvat, Rose M.

    2001-01-01

    Studied the spillover between family and work by examining the link between marital status and work performance across marriage, divorce, and remarriage. A polynomial regression model was fit to the data from 78 evaluations of an individual professor, and a cubic curve through the 3 periods was statistically significant. (SLD)

  3. Dissonance as a Factor in College Student Evaluation of Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Abraham D.

    1977-01-01

    This paper finds that, in general, college students give lower ratings to professors with whom they have normative dissonance. It suggests that dissonance should be given more consideration, raising the possibility of "matching" students and professors. This would also increase the objectivity of student evaluations. (Author/BP)

  4. Resource Guide to the Evaluation of the Faculty Development Program in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. Part I: Overview of the Evaluation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Inst. for Research and Evaluation, Walnut Creek, CA.

    This is an overview of an evaluation model developed to be used with the Faculty Development Program in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse clinical training program for professional school faculty in medicine, nursing and social work. The evaluation model is in two major parts, a national evaluation which examines program process and outcome across all…

  5. The Library and the Faculty Senate: Legitimizing the Serials Evaluation Process Using the Department of Biology Subscriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Sandhya D.; Harpelburke, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    This article documents the process used by the Hofstra University's Library and Faculty Senate to evaluate current serials title lists for different academic departments. The library has found that initiating this effort through the auspices of the Faculty Senate Library Subcommittee (FSLS) allows it to create an environment of legitimate concern…

  6. The Examination of Strength and Weakness of Online Evaluation of Faculty Members Teaching by Students in the University of Isfahan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryam, Ansary; Alireza, Shavakhi; Reza, Nasr Ahmad; Azizollah, Arbabisarjou

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of faculty members' teaching is a device for recognition of their ability in teaching, assessing, the student's learning and it can improve efficiency of faculty members in teaching. In terms of growth of computer's technologies improvement of universities and its effect on achievement and information processing, it is necessary to use…

  7. Faculty Development for E-Learning: A Multi-Campus Community of Practice (COP) Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Janet Resop; Vandenhouten, Christine; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Ralston-Berg, Penny

    2012-01-01

    Faculty development is a critical process, enabling instructors to remain abreast of new discipline specific content and innovations in the scholarship of teaching and learning. The explosion of online higher education and advances in technology provide examples and rationale for why faculty development for e-learning is needed. Literature on…

  8. Supporting the Academic Majority: Policies and Practices Related to Part-Time Faculty's Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagan, M. Kevin, Jr.; Jaeger, Audrey J.; Grantham, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    The academic workforce in higher education has shifted in the last several decades from consisting of mostly full-time, tenure-track faculty to one comprised predominantly of contingent, non-tenure-track faculty. This substantial shift toward part-time academic labor has not corresponded with institutions implementing more supportive policies and…

  9. The Impact of Faculty Perceived Reconfigurability of Learning Management Systems on Effective Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jianfeng; Doll, William J.; Deng, Xiaodong; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Ma Ga

    2013-01-01

    This study explores whether learning management systems (LMSs) enable faculty course developers to use the reconfigurable characteristics of the software to implement the seven principles of effective teaching (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). If LMSs are to be considered pedagogically effective, these systems must help engage faculty in effective…

  10. Relationships among Central Administrators, Chairs, and Faculty: Academic Change Agents in Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickson, Mark, III

    2000-01-01

    Offers an empirically derived model (based on observations of administrative behavior at two institutions of higher education) describing relationships among central administrators, chairs, and faculty. Discusses change agents, the do-it-yourself approach, the rhetoric of change, the faculty retreat, hiring new and more administrators, creating…

  11. Faculty Perspectives and Needs in Supporting Adult English Learners: Linking Measurement to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Jane; Lentini, Jennifer; Molloy, Hillary; Steinberg, Jonathan; Holtzman, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Results from a survey of 227 adult English learner (EL) faculty in community and technical colleges in the United States reveal a clear desire to better serve adult ELs, but a lack of resources specifically designed to do so. Faculty want and need more resources to support the teaching and learning process, in the form of thoughtful assessments,…

  12. African American Faculty at Traditionally White Institutions: The Impact of the "Adams" Case on Hiring Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Joseph H., Sr.

    1990-01-01

    The "Adams v. Richardson" case required states to redress inequalities in employment opportunities for African American faculty at traditionally White institutions (TWIs). Studies the impact of the litigation in nine states affected by "Adams" and finds evidence of some positive effect. Calls for greater court oversight of TWI faculty hiring. (AF)

  13. Current Appointments and Tenure Practices: Their Impact on New Faculty Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Robert T.; Wylie, Neil R.

    1990-01-01

    The study tracked the careers of 753 untenured faculty at 12 colleges over a 7-year period. Results are presented in tabular and narrative forms for: the colleges' tenure condition; academic nomads; the status of women faculty; non-tenure-track trends; rates of achieving tenure; career paths; and women in non-tenure-track positions. (DB)

  14. American Association of Colleges of Nursing essential values: national study of faculty perceptions, practices, and plans.

    PubMed

    Elfrink, V; Lutz, E M

    1991-01-01

    A representative national sample of bachelor's-degree nurse educators (N = 697) were surveyed about the seven professional values identified by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (1986) in Essentials of College and University Education for Professional Nursing. Participants agreed that these values were representative of values nurses need to use in practice, and that educational opportunities related to these values should be included in the curriculum. Eighty-six per cent of the sample perceived that they included some or all of these values predominantly through the informal lesson plan. Esthetics was the most frequently mentioned value that was not considered in any form in the nursing curriculum. Nurse educators teaching at religious-affiliated institutions, and those who had educational preparation in values, already included these values in their formal teaching (P less than .04 and P less than .0001, respectively) and they had discussions about including them differently in the future more frequently (P less than .005 and P less than .006) than did other educators. Faculty members teaching at religious-affiliated institutions also established more plans for including these values within the curriculum than those who taught at public institutions (P less than .0004). One conclusion from this study was that values may continue to be treated differently than other nursing education content, ie, predominantly through the informal lesson plan.

  15. American Association of Colleges of Nursing essential values: national study of faculty perceptions, practices, and plans.

    PubMed

    Elfrink, V; Lutz, E M

    1991-01-01

    A representative national sample of bachelor's-degree nurse educators (N = 697) were surveyed about the seven professional values identified by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (1986) in Essentials of College and University Education for Professional Nursing. Participants agreed that these values were representative of values nurses need to use in practice, and that educational opportunities related to these values should be included in the curriculum. Eighty-six per cent of the sample perceived that they included some or all of these values predominantly through the informal lesson plan. Esthetics was the most frequently mentioned value that was not considered in any form in the nursing curriculum. Nurse educators teaching at religious-affiliated institutions, and those who had educational preparation in values, already included these values in their formal teaching (P less than .04 and P less than .0001, respectively) and they had discussions about including them differently in the future more frequently (P less than .005 and P less than .006) than did other educators. Faculty members teaching at religious-affiliated institutions also established more plans for including these values within the curriculum than those who taught at public institutions (P less than .0004). One conclusion from this study was that values may continue to be treated differently than other nursing education content, ie, predominantly through the informal lesson plan. PMID:1894844

  16. Clinical evaluation and grading practices in schools of nursing: national survey findings part II.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Yarbrough, Suzanne S; Saewert, Karen J; Ard, Nell; Charasika, Margie E

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how nurse educators evaluate and grade students' clinical practice, the Evaluation of Learning Advisory Council of the National League for Nursing conducted a survey of faculty (N = 1,573) in all types of prelicensure RN programs. This article describes the findings of that survey in relation to clinical evaluation and grading clinical practice. Nearly all faculty used a clinical evaluation tool to rate students' performance in the clinical setting (n = 1,534, 98 percent); most programs had the same basic tool in all courses, but modified to reflect the unique aspects of each course (n = 1,095, 70 percent). Faculty (n = 1,116, 83 percent) reported using pass/fail for grading in clinical courses rather than a letter or numerical grade.

  17. College Governance: A Comparison of Faculty Evaluation in Public and Private Colleges with Implications for the Improvement of the Evaluation Process at Johnson and Wales College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, Joseph E.

    This study focuses on selected factors in the evaluation of faculty members in: (1) colleges accredited by the Association of Independent Colleges and Schools; (2) public junior and senior colleges; and (3) Rhode Island colleges. Results of the study indicate that faculty evaluation schemes must follow the basic goals and philosophy of the…

  18. Sources and Information. Community College Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotated bibliographic information related to community college faculty, focusing on faculty attitudes and perceptions, professional development, faculty evaluation, and recruitment. Covers 16 sources. (AUTH/NB)

  19. Towards Contextual Experimentation: Creating a Faculty Learning Community to Cultivate Writing-to-Learn Practices (Hacia una experimentación contextual: Creando comunidades de aprendizaje docente para el cultivo de prácticas de escritura para el aprendizaje)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Mary K.; Rao, Kavita; Stewart, Maria L.; Farley, Cynthia A.; Li, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore ways to integrate new pedagogical practices, five faculty members created an informal faculty learning community focused on writing-to-learn practices, an inquiry and process-based writing pedagogy. The faculty members learned the writing-to-learn practices together, periodically met to discuss how they implemented the…

  20. 21st century challenges faced by nursing faculty in educating for compassionate practice: embodied interpretation of phenomenological data.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine

    2013-07-01

    Nursing faculty are facing challenges in facilitating student learning of complex concepts such as compassionate practice. Compassion is a stated expectation of Registered Nurse (RN) and student nurse practice, and yet how it is enabled and learned within the challenging environments of university and health service provider organisations are not yet understood. There is currently an international concern that student nurses are not being adequately prepared for compassion to flourish and for compassionate practice to be sustained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate the experiences of nursing faculty in their preparation of student nurses for compassionate practice, an exploratory aesthetic phenomenological research study was undertaken using in depth interviews with five nurse teachers in the North of England. Findings from this study were analysed and presented using embodied interpretation, and indicate that nurse teachers recognise the importance of the professional ideal of compassionate practice alongside specific challenges this expectation presents. They have concerns about how the economically constrained and target driven practice reality faced by RNs promotes compassionate practice, and that students are left feeling vulnerable to dissonance between learned professional ideals and the RNs' practice reality they witness. Nurse teachers also experience dissonance within the university setting, between the pressures of managing large student groups and the time and opportunity required for small group discussion with students that enables compassion to develop in a meaningful and emotionally sustainable way. Teachers also express discomfort due to a perceived promotion of an 'unachievable utopia' within practice, identifying how the constraints within practice could be better managed to support professional ideals. The nurse teachers within this exploratory study identify the need for strong nurse leadership in practice to challenge

  1. 21st century challenges faced by nursing faculty in educating for compassionate practice: embodied interpretation of phenomenological data.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Katherine

    2013-07-01

    Nursing faculty are facing challenges in facilitating student learning of complex concepts such as compassionate practice. Compassion is a stated expectation of Registered Nurse (RN) and student nurse practice, and yet how it is enabled and learned within the challenging environments of university and health service provider organisations are not yet understood. There is currently an international concern that student nurses are not being adequately prepared for compassion to flourish and for compassionate practice to be sustained upon professional qualification. In order to investigate the experiences of nursing faculty in their preparation of student nurses for compassionate practice, an exploratory aesthetic phenomenological research study was undertaken using in depth interviews with five nurse teachers in the North of England. Findings from this study were analysed and presented using embodied interpretation, and indicate that nurse teachers recognise the importance of the professional ideal of compassionate practice alongside specific challenges this expectation presents. They have concerns about how the economically constrained and target driven practice reality faced by RNs promotes compassionate practice, and that students are left feeling vulnerable to dissonance between learned professional ideals and the RNs' practice reality they witness. Nurse teachers also experience dissonance within the university setting, between the pressures of managing large student groups and the time and opportunity required for small group discussion with students that enables compassion to develop in a meaningful and emotionally sustainable way. Teachers also express discomfort due to a perceived promotion of an 'unachievable utopia' within practice, identifying how the constraints within practice could be better managed to support professional ideals. The nurse teachers within this exploratory study identify the need for strong nurse leadership in practice to challenge

  2. Evaluation of a University Faculty Mentoring Program: Its Effect on Latino College Adjustment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Silvia J.; Reigadas, Elena T.

    The Faculty Mentoring Program (FMP) at California State University, Dominguez Hills, provides faculty mentors to students defined as "at-risk." FMP aims to encourage faculty-student interaction through a mentoring relationship that will lead to improved student achievement, retention, and graduation and to better faculty understanding of at-risk…

  3. A Utilization-Focused Evaluation of a Community College Adjunct Faculty Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edenfield, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Nationally adjunct faculty comprise almost 70% of all two-year institution faculty while in the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) adjunct faculty teach 60% of the community college courses, and should past trends continue, the number of adjunct faculty members is expected to grow 10% within the next fifteen years (Caliber, 2007; Phillipe &…

  4. Use of anecdotal notes by clinical nursing faculty: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mellisa A; Daly, Barbara J; Madigan, Elizabeth A

    2010-03-01

    Although the use of anecdotal notes by faculty to document clinical performance is thought to be a common practice, no empirical study of this evaluation tool has been conducted. To investigate the frequency and pattern of use, a faculty questionnaire was developed using the Context, Input, Process, Product (CIPP) evaluation model as a framework. The model was adapted to focus on clinical nursing education. Sixty-four nursing faculty from six schools participated in the regional study. A descriptive design was used to collect quantitative data from clinical faculty. Findings indicated that 97% of clinical faculty use anecdotal notes during the student evaluation process, and the majority of faculty do so on a weekly basis. Based on faculty feedback and the CIPP evaluation model, a clinical nursing faculty tool was developed after study completion to support clinical faculty in note use.

  5. The utilization of the seven principles for good practices of full-time and adjunct faculty in teaching health & science in community colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaitif, Linda M.

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which undergraduate full-time and adjunct faculty members in the health and science programs at community colleges in Southern California utilize the seven principles of good practice as measured by the Faculty Inventory of the Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. A second purpose was to compare degree of utilization for gender and class size. Methodology. This is a quantitative study wherein there exists a systematic and mathematical assessment of data gathered through the use of a Likert scale survey to process and determine the mathematical model of the use of the principles by the target population of both full-time and adjunct faculty of health/science programs of community colleges in Southern California. Findings. Examination of the data revealed that both full-time and adjunct faculty members of Southern California community colleges perceive themselves a high degree of utilization of the seven principles of good practice. There was no statistically significant data to suggest a discrepancy between full-time and adjunct professors' perceptions among the utilization of the seven principles. Overall, male faculty members perceived themselves as utilizing the principles to a greater degree than female faculty. Data suggest that faculty with class size 60 or larger showed to utilize the seven principles more frequently than the professors with smaller class sizes. Conclusions. Full-time and adjunct professors of the health and sciences in Southern California community colleges perceive themselves as utilizing the seven principles of good practice to a high degree. Recommendations. This study suggests many recommendations for future research, including the degree to which negative economic factors such as budget cuts and demands affect the utilization of the seven principles. Also recommended is a study comparing students' perceptions of faculty's utilization of the seven

  6. Advising by Faculty. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Howard C.; Gardner, Robert E.

    A guide for faculty advisers is presented that addresses aspects of the advising process that are often not discussed. Objectives are to accomplish the following: to provide a working definition and theoretical framework for advising, to show with model conversations the theory in practice, to provide procedures for advisor self-evaluation, and to…

  7. ISLLC/ELCC Standards Implementation: Do Educational Administration Faculty Practice What They Preach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Crystal

    2012-01-01

    Both the 1996 Interstate School Leadership Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards and the 2002 Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC) standards, adopted by preparation programs nationwide have a strong emphasis on democratic ideals. By aligning their programs with these standards education administration faculty have taken a step in the…

  8. Exposing Ideology within University Policies: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Faculty Hiring, Promotion and Remuneration Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuner-Smith, Sedef; Englander, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Using critical discourse analysis (CDA), this paper exposes the neoliberal ideology of the knowledge-based economy embedded within university policies, specifically those that regulate faculty hiring, promotion, and remuneration in two national contexts: Turkey and Mexico. The paper follows four stages of CDA: (1) focus upon a social wrong in its…

  9. Best Practices for Working Effectively with Your Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munger, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Positions held by faculty members at institutions offering NCAA-sponsored intercollegiate athletics, F acuity Athletics Representatives (or FARs) serve as a liaison between athletics and academics and play a critical role in the institutional control and academic integrity of athletics as well as the welfare of student-athletes on campus. Based on…

  10. Multicultural/Multilingual Instruction in Educational Programs: A Survey of Perceived Faculty Practices and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockman, Ida J.; Boult, Johanna; Robinson, Gregory C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the instructional strategies reported for multicultural/multilingual issues (MMI) education at programs in speech-language pathology and audiology and the perceived ease and effectiveness of doing so. Method: A 49-item questionnaire elicited anonymous responses from administrators, faculty, and teaching clinical supervisors at…

  11. Critical Thinking in Teacher Education: Perceptions and Practices of Teacher Candidates and College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagley, Spencer A.

    2013-01-01

    Educators at all levels are expected to provide instruction that promotes critical thinking, but faculty are hindered by time constraints, expertise, and the attitude that critical thinking is taught and learned automatically. From Socrates to Dewey to Bloom to Facione, a firm foundation has been set for critical thinking pedagogies. This study…

  12. The Faculty Experience of Internationalization: Motivations for, Practices of, and Means for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klyberg, Sarah Grace Fuller

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, many U.S. colleges and universities have adopted policies of internationalization through which they have promoted such activities as study abroad, international student recruitment, curriculum development and/or reform, faculty exchanges, institutional linkages, and overseas campus development. Prior research has identified…

  13. Health professional faculty perspectives on community-based research: implications for policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Seifer, Sarena D; Calleson, Diane C

    2004-11-01

    Community-based research (CBR) has become central to the understanding and elimination of health disparities within the USA and across the globe. The authors sought to determine the perspectives of health professional faculty on the factors affecting their involvement in CBR and the extent of community participation in that research. Faculty from 18 health professional schools in the USA identified by their deans as being leaders in CBR completed a written survey. Respondents reported that between 5-10% of faculty in their schools were involved in CBR. Public perception of the university, familiarity with community-based organization leaders and institutional leadership were cited as the most significant factors contributing to a school's involvement in CBR. Long-term community relationships, recognition in tenure and promotion policies and access to funding were cited as factors that support faculty in conducting CBR. The authors conclude that a more significant investment of public and private funds, the development of interdisciplinary institutional structures for community partnerships and a more inclusive definition of scholarship are needed to achieve a central role for CBR in efforts to understand and eliminate health disparities.

  14. Use of Innovation Component Configuration Map (ICCM) to Measure Technology Integration Practices of Higher Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javeri, Manisha; Persichitte, Kay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the level of technology integration fidelity (high, moderate or low) by higher education faculty in Schools Colleges and Department of Education (SCDE), and a) access to technological infrastructure, b) support from human infrastructure, and c) personal attitude toward computer…

  15. State University of New York Maritime College Faculty Student Association--Selected Financial Management Practices. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit and State Financial Services.

    The Maritime College Faculty Student Association (FSA) is a campus-based, not-for-profit corporation that was formed to operate, manage, and promote educationally related services for the benefit of the campus community at the State University of New York Maritime College, which trains students to become licensed officers in the U.S. Merchant…

  16. Engaging Faculty in the Achieving the Dream Initiative. Principles and Practices of Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnback, Lara; Friedman, Will

    2009-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement is critical to the success of Achieving the Dream. Broad-based support for the college's student success agenda and institutional change efforts requires engaging faculty, staff, students, community members, and others in the change process. These stakeholders can bring to light critical obstacles to student success and help…

  17. The Faculty Role in the Reform of Intercollegiate Athletics: Principles and Recommended Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Univ. Professors, Washington, DC.

    The abuses and scandals in intercollegiate athletics programs have promoted the American Association of University Professors to revisit issues related to college athletics and to offer this report. Although it is addressed primarily to faculty, the report seeks to give guidance to all campus constituents on the principles that should inform sound…

  18. Full-Time Faculty Recruitment and Selection Strategies Practiced by Learning-Centered Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler-Hill, Sandra A.

    This report presents the results of a study of faculty recruitment and selection strategies used by self-reported learning-centered community colleges during the 1998-1999 academic year. The study examined six key principles of a learning college: (1) creates substantive change in learners; (2) engages students as partners in learning; (3) offers…

  19. Faculty Conceptions and Practices of Action Research in the NOVA Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenheimer, Carol Dianne

    This study examined approaches to action research held by science, education, and mathematics faculty and how they convert ideas to action research proposals and plan to gather and analyze their research data. The study also described some of the research outcomes of successful action research projects. Rubrics were used on a diverse set of…

  20. Science Faculty Improving Teaching Practice: Identifying Needs and Finding Meaningful Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouwma-Gearhart, Jana

    2012-01-01

    While research into the effectiveness of teaching professional development for postsecondary educators has increased over the last 40 years, little is known about science faculty members' teaching professional development needs and their perceptions regarding what constitutes meaningful teaching professional development. Informed by an extensive…

  1. A Study of Faculty Development Practices in Schools, Colleges and Departments of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlig, George; Haberman, Martin

    Member institutions of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education were surveyed to determine the nature and extent of faculty development activities. Responding institutions placed 27 specific developmental activities in rank order. The top five items were a system of sabbaticals, teaching awards, peer review, professional travel,…

  2. Ending the Disconnect between the Student Evaluation of Teaching and the Improvement of Teaching: A Faculty Developer's Plea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marincovich, Michele

    This paper offers eight steps institutions of higher education can take to improve teaching through the use of student evaluations. They are: (1) situate the evaluation system firmly within the academic context; (2) strive for quick processing and return of forms; (3) help faculty interpret the evaluation results; (4) create opportunities for peer…

  3. A model for evaluation of faculty members’ activities based on meta-evaluation of a 5-year experience in medical school

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Aeen; Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Mojtahedzadeh, Rita; Jalili, Mohammad; Valian, Hossein Keshavarz

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a global interest for deploying faculty members’ activities evaluation systems, however implementing a fair and reliable system is a challenging issue. In this study, the authors devised a model for evaluation of faculty members’ activities with regard to their viewpoints and meta-evaluation standards. Materials and Methods: The reliability of the current faculty members’ activities metrics system was investigated in Medical School of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2014. Then authors conducted semi-structured interviews regarding meta-evaluation standards and designed a questionnaire based on interviews’ results which were delivered to faculty members. Finally, they extracted the components of the model regarding interviews’ content analysis and questionnaire's factor analysis and finalized them in a focus group session with experts. Results: Reliability of the current system was 0.99 (P < 0.05). The final model had six dimensions (mission alignment, accuracy, explicit, satisfaction, appropriateness, and constructiveness) derived from factor analysis of the questionnaire and nine factors (consensus, self-reporting, web-based system, evaluation period, minimum expectancies, analysis intervals, verifiers, flexibility, and decision making) obtained via qualitative content analysis of the interviews. Conclusion: In this study, the authors presented a model for faculty members’ activities evaluation based on meta-evaluation of the existing system. The model covered conceptual and executive aspects. Faculty members’ viewpoints were the core component of this model, so it would be acceptable in a medical school to use the model for evaluating their activities. PMID:26600831

  4. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS): Differentiating Faculty Knowledge and Experience in Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David I.; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education reform efforts have called for widespread adoption of evidence-based teaching in which faculty members attend to student outcomes through assessment practice. Awareness about the importance of assessment has illuminated the need to understand what faculty members know and how they engage with assessment knowledge and practice. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS) is a new instrument for evaluating science faculty assessment knowledge and experience. Instrument validation was composed of two distinct studies: an empirical evaluation of the psychometric properties of the FRAS and a comparative known-groups validation to explore the ability of the FRAS to differentiate levels of faculty assessment experience. The FRAS was found to be highly reliable (α = 0.96). The dimensionality of the instrument enabled distinction of assessment knowledge into categories of program design, instrumentation, and validation. In the known-groups validation, the FRAS distinguished between faculty groups with differing levels of assessment experience. Faculty members with formal assessment experience self-reported higher levels of familiarity with assessment terms, higher frequencies of assessment activity, increased confidence in conducting assessment, and more positive attitudes toward assessment than faculty members who were novices in assessment. These results suggest that the FRAS can reliably and validly differentiate levels of expertise in faculty knowledge of assessment. PMID:25976653

  5. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS): differentiating faculty knowledge and experience in assessment.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, David I; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education reform efforts have called for widespread adoption of evidence-based teaching in which faculty members attend to student outcomes through assessment practice. Awareness about the importance of assessment has illuminated the need to understand what faculty members know and how they engage with assessment knowledge and practice. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS) is a new instrument for evaluating science faculty assessment knowledge and experience. Instrument validation was composed of two distinct studies: an empirical evaluation of the psychometric properties of the FRAS and a comparative known-groups validation to explore the ability of the FRAS to differentiate levels of faculty assessment experience. The FRAS was found to be highly reliable (α = 0.96). The dimensionality of the instrument enabled distinction of assessment knowledge into categories of program design, instrumentation, and validation. In the known-groups validation, the FRAS distinguished between faculty groups with differing levels of assessment experience. Faculty members with formal assessment experience self-reported higher levels of familiarity with assessment terms, higher frequencies of assessment activity, increased confidence in conducting assessment, and more positive attitudes toward assessment than faculty members who were novices in assessment. These results suggest that the FRAS can reliably and validly differentiate levels of expertise in faculty knowledge of assessment.

  6. Evaluation of Alcohol and Drug Use Attitudes and Behaviors in Pharmacy College Faculty: Part II. Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A national survey of pharmacy faculty members (n=1,326) found most members saw chemical dependencies as diseases and favored rehabilitation over exclusion for chemically dependent health professionals, assistance programs for faculty and students, retention of faculty in recovery, and strengthening substance abuse and wellness curricula by a…

  7. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice about Research Ethics among Dental Faculty in the North India

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Kiran Kumar; Walia, Rachit; TM, Chaitra Devi; Das, Maneesha; Sepolia, Shipra; Sethi, Priyank

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research activities in dentistry are increased greatly in India during the recent decade, but there is limited of information about the knowledge and attitude of dental faculty for research ethics. To assess the knowledge and attitudes of dental faculty of North India regarding research ethics. Materials and Methods: Through convenience sampling, a questionnaire was sent either via printed copies or E-mails to 1240 dental faculty, while protecting confidentiality and anonymity of all the participants. Results: Our response rate was 76% (942). Majority (>90%) are aware of ethical committee but have poor knowledge (8-35%) about various ethical guidelines laid down at international level; however almost 20% believe that research ethics committees would delay research. A large number of researchers (78%) want some training in research ethics. There is fair knowledge about informed consent among researchers. Conclusions: We conclude that ethical norms should be strictly followed by giving due respect to confidentiality or privacy of research participants to achieve the goal of minimal risks and maximum benefits to patients and there is need of training to researchers and students to make them aware about various research principles. PMID:26668482

  8. Faculty Development Needs

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Thomas K; Ferenchick, Gary S; Clark, Jeanne M; Bowen, Judith L; Branch, William T; Alguire, Patrick; Esham, Richard H; Clayton, Charles P; Kern, David E

    2004-01-01

    We compared prior training in 4 areas (general teaching skills, teaching specific content areas, teaching by specific methods and in specific settings, and general professional skills) among community-based teachers based in private practices (N = 61) compared with those in community sites operated by teaching institutions (N = 64) and hospital-based faculty (N = 291), all of whom attended one of three national faculty development conferences. The prevalence of prior training was low. Hospital-based faculty reported the most prior training in all 4 categories, teaching hospital affiliated community-based teachers an intermediate amount, and private practice community-based teachers the least (all P < .05). This association remained after multivariable adjustment for age, gender, and amount of time spent in teaching and clinical activities. Preferences for future training reported frequently by the private practice community-based teachers included: time management (48%); teaching evidence-based medicine (46%); evaluation of learners (38%); giving feedback (39%); outpatient precepting (38%); and “teaching in the presence of the patient” (39%). PMID:15061747

  9. Faculty development needs.

    PubMed

    Houston, Thomas K; Ferenchick, Gary S; Clark, Jeanne M; Bowen, Judith L; Branch, William T; Alguire, Patrick; Esham, Richard H; Clayton, Charles P; Kern, David E

    2004-04-01

    We compared prior training in 4 areas (general teaching skills, teaching specific content areas, teaching by specific methods and in specific settings, and general professional skills) among community-based teachers based in private practices (N = 61) compared with those in community sites operated by teaching institutions (N = 64) and hospital-based faculty (N = 291), all of whom attended one of three national faculty development conferences. The prevalence of prior training was low. Hospital-based faculty reported the most prior training in all 4 categories, teaching hospital affiliated community-based teachers an intermediate amount, and private practice community-based teachers the least (all P <.05). This association remained after multivariable adjustment for age, gender, and amount of time spent in teaching and clinical activities. Preferences for future training reported frequently by the private practice community-based teachers included: time management (48%); teaching evidence-based medicine (46%); evaluation of learners (38%); giving feedback (39%); outpatient precepting (38%); and "teaching in the presence of the patient" (39%).

  10. Cost of Evaluating Faculty Performance at Antelope Valley Community College for the 1972-1973 School Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Donald M.; Brown, Jennings G.

    The costs incurred at Antelope Valley Community College (California) in evaluating the performance of college faculty members for the 1972-73 school year are summarized. Evaluation fell into two phases--implementation and operation. Implementation involved the issuance of written procedures, necessary forms, the purchase of equipment and supplies,…

  11. Using Faculty Evaluation to Improve Teaching Quality: A Longitudinal Case Study of Higher Education in Southeast Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of implementation of a new system of faculty teaching evaluation at a graduate school of business in Thailand. The research employed a non-experimental, longitudinal case study design in the analysis of student course evaluation data gathered over a period of 21 terms during a seven-year period. The report…

  12. Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, David, Ed.; Hricko, Mary, Ed.; Howell, Scott, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices" provides a view of the possibilities and challenges facing online educators and evaluators in the 21st Century. As technology evolves and online measurement and assessment follow, "Online Assessment, Measurement and Evaluation: Emerging Practices" uses established evaluation…

  13. A Summary: Responsive Evaluation and Family Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakel, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    The author feels that both responsive and preordinate methods would be useful in evaluating the family practice residency program at a medical school. Appropriate uses of both evaluation methods are suggested. (GDC)

  14. Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, Bob, Ed.; McFerrin, Karen, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on faculty development and technology: "Involving Faculty in Faculty Development" (Kristine Blair and Dan Madigan); "Technology Use in Higher Education: A Faculty Development Model" (Jessica Kahn); "A Faculty of Education as a Community of Learners: Growing to Meet the Demands of Instruction and…

  15. [Websites of dental practices evaluated].

    PubMed

    Poorterman, J H G; Tjiook, S P; Moeijes, S F S; Brand, H S

    2014-05-01

    In 2013, a dental practice without a website is almost unthinkable. Using a sample of309 dentists drawn from the list of members of the Dutch Dental Association in 2012, a study was carried out to find out whether the dental practice of the general dental practitioner had a website. The content of each website was subsequently inventoried using a questionnaire. Eighty-nine percent of the dental practices had a website. The content of the websites, however, varied enormously. An element such as the professional registration number with a reference to the professional register were absent in 73% of the websites and the date of the most recent update of the website was mentioned only once. The name of the dentist, his or her professional qualification and an email address were missing on respectively 9%, 20% and 9% of the websites. Contracts of the practice with insurance companies were rarely clearly indicated. The websites of many practices would benefit considerably from a significant improvement. PMID:24881254

  16. Evaluation Study on Simulation CAL in the Science Faculty of the Open University. CAL REsearch Group Technical Report No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, P. J.; And Others

    This report describes evaluations of two courses which were conducted, primarily through participant observation, in 1981. A general introduction looks at simulation in computer assisted learning (CAL) and at use of simulation CAL in the Open University science faculty. The first study discussed was based largely on a tutor's observations of…

  17. Structuring Long-Term Faculty Training According to Needs Exhibited by Students' Written Comments in Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulkerth, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive adjunct faculty training program is described, whose aim is to improve student perceptions of courses and programs in a private, not-for-profit MBA and Law degree granting university in San Francisco, The program is somewhat novel in that it uses (a) student input from open-ended responses on course evaluations to determine faculty…

  18. The Paradox of Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minter, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the weaknesses in university faculty development efforts when compared with corporate professional development practices. Suggestions are offered to think of faculty development as a process rather than as isolated development activities.

  19. Evaluating Faculty Performance Under the Equal Pay for Equal Work Doctrine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzan, Bert Carl; Hunt, Thomas Lynn

    1976-01-01

    Faculty promotion and salary policies at the University of Texas at Austin are analyzed to determine whether male and female faculty members are rewarded equally for equal academic qualifications and performances. This regression analysis tends to support the discrimination hypothesis with respect to both promotion and salary policies. (Author/LBH)

  20. Evaluating How Education Faculty Spend Their Time at a Private Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Michelle Silver

    2012-01-01

    Defining and measuring faculty productivity are among the most central issues for quality and accountability in higher education today, and it is the subject this study seeks to illuminate. This study first examines how the productivity of faculty in the School of Education at a private university differ according to different faculty…

  1. Hiring, Orientation, Professional Development, and Evaluation: The Administrative Support of Adjunct Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oprean, Celeste Pramik

    2012-01-01

    In North Carolina (NC) there are a total of 58 community colleges, each of which provides a unique approach to handling support for adjunct faculty. The NC Community College System provided a good setting to explore how one state in particular compares to current research on administrative support of adjunct faculty in the areas of hiring,…

  2. Faculty, Student, and Support Staff Participation in College Governance: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Dean D.

    In an effort to gather data on faculty, student, and support staff participation in the governance process, case studies were undertaken at three community colleges in Alberta, Canada. Interviews were conducted with 51 individuals at the colleges from the following categories: faculty, students, or support staff; public board members; college…

  3. Technology, Learning, and the Classroom: Longitudinal Evaluation of a Faculty Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Karen; Bolliger, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Technology, Learning, and the Classroom, a workshop designed to jump-start faculty's use of instructional technology in face-to-face classrooms, was offered as a week-long intensive workshop and once-a-week session over a semester. Faculty were interviewed five years after participation to determine the longitudinal effects, differences in opinion…

  4. Evaluation of a Crisis-Preparedness Training Program for the Faculty of a Private Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Marybeth N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a training program for the faculty of a private elementary school on executing the protocols, roles, and responsibilities defined in the institution's crisis-management plan. A formal training program for the faculty had not been developed, and administrators had no measure by which…

  5. Evaluation of a Training Program in Aging Research for Social Work Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Chandra M.; Townsend, Aloen; Berkman, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Since 2004, we have offered a postgraduate training program in aging research for social work faculty from across the country. The overarching goal of the program is to expand the pool of social work faculty engaged in aging research. This, in turn, will reinvigorate participants' teaching; prepare them to update aging-related content in the…

  6. Revealing Opportunities and Obstacles for Changing Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Practices: An Examination of Stakeholders' Awareness of Institutional Contradictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxey, Daniel; Kezar, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Over a period of several decades, non-tenure-track faculty members (NTTF) have become a majority of instructional faculty among nonprofit higher education institutions. A growing volume of research points to a relationship between the poor working conditions or lack of support these faculty members often experience and adverse effects on student…

  7. Values, Policies, and Practices Affecting the Hiring Process for Full-Time Arts and Sciences Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twombly, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    Community colleges employ over 100,000 full-time faculty members, or one fifth of all faculty members in U.S. post-secondary education (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES], 2001; Huber, 1998). These faculty members provide instruction in a wide range of programs for approximately 37% of all postsecondary students in the U.S., including…

  8. The Changing Faculty and Student Success: Review of Selected Policies and Practices and Connections to Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Maxey, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It is important for administrators, faculty, and policy makers to understand and consider how policies commonly associated with non-tenure-track faculty roles and working environments impact student learning. Many policies impede the ability of faculty to provide effective instruction that is aligned with departmental and institutional goals for…

  9. Supporting Graduate Students of Color in Educational Administration Preparation Programs: Faculty Perspectives on Best Practices, Possibilities, and Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michelle D.; Brooks, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Overview: This article presents findings from a study that examined faculty perspectives on how individual faculty members and institutions support graduate students of color in educational administration preparation programs. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify strategies that faculty members and institutions employ to support…

  10. Encouraging Faculty Attendance at Professional Development Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdick, Dakin; Doherty, Tim; Schoenfeld, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    For faculty development events to have the greatest impact on campus practice, faculty developers need to attract and include as many faculty members as possible at their events. This article describes the testing of a checklist regarding faculty attendance at professional development events through a survey of 238 faculty members at small…

  11. Legitimate Peripheral Participation in Communities of Practice: Participation Support Structures for Newcomers in Faculty Student Councils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Julia; Stegmann, Karsten; Fischer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Participating in communities of practice (CoPs) is an important way of learning. For newcomers in such communities, the learning process can be described as legitimate peripheral participation (LPP). Although a body of knowledge on LPP has been accumulated from qualitative case studies, mostly focusing on the use of practices, the concrete…

  12. Framing Faculty Agency inside Striving Universities: An Application of Bourdieu's Theory of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2014-01-01

    Drawn from a qualitative study and framed with Bourdieu's theory of practice, I present a three-pronged framework to describe how tenure-line professors assumed agency as their university strove to establish itself as a national research institution. Implications for practice and future research are offered.

  13. Faculty development: yesterday, today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    McLean, Michelle; Cilliers, Francois; Van Wyk, Jacqueline M

    2008-01-01

    Medical education has evolved to become a discipline in its own right. With demands on medical faculties to be socially responsible and accountable, there is now increasing pressure for the professionalisation of teaching practice. Developing a cadre of professional and competent teachers, educators, researchers and leaders for their new roles and responsibilities in medical education requires faculty development. Faculty development is, however, not an easy task. It requires supportive institutional leadership, appropriate resource allocation and recognition for teaching excellence. This guide is designed to assist those charged with preparing faculty for their many new roles in teaching and education in both medical and allied health science education. It provides a historical perspective of faculty development and draws on the medical, health science and higher education literature to provide a number of frameworks that may be useful for designing tailored faculty development programmes. These frameworks can be used by faculty developers to systematically plan, implement and evaluate their staff development programmes. This guide concludes with some of the major trends and driving forces in medical education that we believe will shape future faculty development.

  14. Tensions between Evaluations and Communication Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudel, Grit; Glaser, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    When publications are used in the evaluation of research performance, tensions between the simplifying, standardizing approaches of evaluations and the communication practices of scientific communities are likely to arise. An analysis of data gathered in an evaluation at the Australian National University demonstrates that many academic…

  15. Evaluation of Social Media Use by Emergency Medicine Residents and Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, David; Bond, Michael C.; Kegg, Jason; Pillow, Tyson; Hopson, Laura; Cooney, Robert; Garg, Manish; Khadpe, Jay; Runyon, Michael; Patterson, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Clinicians and residency programs are increasing their use of social media (SM) websites for educational and promotional uses, yet little is known about the use of these sites by residents and faculty. The objective of the study is to assess patterns of SM use for personal and professional purposes among emergency medicine (EM) residents and faculty. Methods In this multi-site study, an 18-question survey was sent by e-mail to the residents and faculty in 14 EM programs and to the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) listserv via the online tool SurveyMonkey™. We compiled descriptive statistics, including assessment with the chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test. StatsDirect software (v 2.8.0, StatsDirect, Cheshire, UK) was used for all analyses. Results We received 1,314 responses: 63% of respondents were male, 40% were <30 years of age, 39% were between the ages 31 and 40, and 21% were older than 40. The study group consisted of 772 residents and 542 faculty members (15% were program directors, 21% were assistant or associate PDs, 45% were core faculty, and 19% held other faculty positions. Forty-four percent of respondents completed residency more than 10 years ago. Residents used SM markedly more than faculty for social interactions with family and friends (83% vs 65% [p<0.0001]), entertainment (61% vs 47% [p<0.0001]), and videos (42% vs 23% [p=0.0006]). Residents used Facebook™ and YouTube™ more often than faculty (86% vs 67% [p<0.001]; 53% vs 46% [p=0.01]), whereas residents used Twitter™ (19% vs 26% [p=0.005]) and LinkedIn™ (15% vs 32% [p<0.0001]) less than faculty. Overall, residents used SM sites more than faculty, notably in daily use (30% vs 24% [p<0.001]). For professional use, residents were most interested in its use for open positions/hiring (30% vs 18% [p<0.0001]) and videos (33% vs 26% [p=0.005]) and less interested than faculty with award postings (22% vs 33% [p<0.0001]) or publications (30% vs 38% [p

  16. The Community of Practice among Mathematics and Mathematics Education Faculty Members at an Urban Minority Serving Institution in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jacqueline; Quander, Judith; Redl, Timothy; Leveille, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Using narrative inquiry as a research method, four mathematics and mathematics education faculty members explored the integration of theoretical perspectives into their personal narratives as they developed a community of practice. Initially their focus was strictly on improving their students' mathematical knowledge. As their community of…

  17. Commitment to practice change: an evaluator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Shershneva, Marianna B; Wang, Min-fen; Lindeman, Gary C; Savoy, Julia N; Olson, Curtis A

    2010-09-01

    A commitment to practice change (CTC) approach may be used in educational program evaluation to document practice changes, examine the educational impact relative to the instructional focus, and improve understanding of the learning-to-change continuum. The authors reviewed various components and procedures of this approach and discussed some practical aspects of its application using an example of a study evaluating a presentation on menopausal care for primary care physicians. The CTC approach is a valuable evaluation tool, but it requires supplementation with other data to have a complete picture of the impact of education on practice. From the evaluation perspective, the self-reported nature of the CTC data is a major limitation of this method.

  18. Faculty Perceptions of the National Undergraduate Teaching and Learning Evaluation at Regular Higher Education Institutions from 2003 to 2008 in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    An, Jumei

    2012-01-01

    This study explored how faculty members at regular higher education institutions in China perceived the National Undergraduate Teaching and Learning Evaluation (NUTLE). Specifically, this study examined how the NUTLE influenced faculty teaching and research and how the NUTLE influenced student learning outcomes. Primarily descriptive and…

  19. Faculty Grading of Quantitative Problems: A Mismatch between Values and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petcovic, Heather L.; Fynewever, Herb; Henderson, Charles; Mutambuki, Jacinta M.; Barney, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Grading practices can send a powerful message to students about course expectations. A study by Henderson et al. ("American Journal of Physics" 72:164-169, 2004) in physics education has identified a misalignment between what college instructors say they value and their actual scoring of quantitative student solutions. This work identified three…

  20. A Community of Practice That Supported the Transition from Doctoral Student to Faculty Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Robin J.; Hemphill, Michael A.; Beaudoin, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Professional collaboration is an important aspect of any field. It allows for individuals to share ideas and be part of a team. The TPSR Alliance has been a space for such professional collaborations where members have been able to both benefit from and contribute to it by sharing research and practices revolving around developing responsible…

  1. Current views and practice of faculty members and consultants regarding ‘Publications in India’: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kurdi, Madhuri S; Ramaswamy, Ashwini Halebid; Lokare, Laxmikant; Sutagatti, Jagadish G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: There is an increasing enthusiasm and pressure to submit scientific articles to journals for publication due to official policies. This has led to increased stress on authors and editors and in issues like plagiarism. We planned a cross-sectional study with an aim to explore the current publication related views and practice of faculty members and consultants. Methods: We conducted a questionnaire based prospective survey with 22 questions divided into parts. Print and electronic versions were sent to around 18,270 members in total, a majority of whom were anaesthesiologists and 600 members responded to our questionnaire. A database was created and analysed using Microsoft Excel. Results: About 80% felt that online journals were better read than print journals. Eighty eight percent agreed that publications improve academic skills. The Medical Council of India requirements to publish in reputed journals were cited as the main reasons for plagiarism. The publication rule had become a burden for 46% respondents. Review articles were most likely to be read though clinical investigations were considered to be of maximum academic significance. Review/publishing time followed by author requirements and journal indexing were the points our respondents liked to see most when choosing a journal for article submission. Conclusion: Our survey results depict the current author related views and trends in publication practice which may guide in evidence-based policy making. PMID:26903673

  2. The Baltic dental programme at the Faculty of Dentistry of The Karolinska Institute: first evaluation.

    PubMed

    Röding, K

    1997-02-01

    In 1992, The Faculty of Dentistry of The Karolinska Institute (KI) introduced a dental undergraduate programme specifically for Baltic students. Initiative for this programme came from both the Ministries of Health in Estonia and Latvia and a Member's Bill in the Swedish Committee for Foreign Affairs. The first 10 students were admitted in January 1992, and in 1994, a further 8 students were accepted. The main objective is to train Baltic students according to the Scandinavian model of dental education, in order to facilitate a positive development in dentistry in these countries. Candidates for the programme, dental students in Latvia or Estonia who had completed several preclinical years, were interviewed and tested in their home countries by a Swedish Admissions Committee. The curriculum comprises 7 semesters at the School of Dentistry, and includes complementary courses in basic science, preventive dentistry, and theoretical and practical courses in all fields of clinical dentistry. The students work with increasing independence, treating patients with a great variety of oral diseases and from different age groups. A course in Informatics is central and forms a base for a research-based assignment in collaboration with the respective home universities. The Baltic Programme is the first time KI has designed and implemented a specially tailored dental undergraduate curriculum in English for a selected group of foreign undergraduates. The students have proved to be ambitious and industrious, with very high academic standards. Their results in the written examinations were equal to or better than those of the home students. Of the 9 students who to date have completed the course, all are working as dentists in their respective countries and 6 are associated with their university.

  3. Practical guidance on undertaking a service evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moule, Pam; Armoogum, Julie; Dodd, Emily; Donskoy, Anne-Laure; Douglass, Emma; Taylor, Julie; Turton, Pat

    2016-07-01

    This article describes the basic principles of evaluation, focusing on the evaluation of healthcare services. It emphasises the importance of evaluation in the current healthcare environment and the requirement for nurses to understand the essential principles of evaluation. Evaluation is defined in contrast to audit and research, and the main theoretical approaches to evaluation are outlined, providing insights into the different types of evaluation that may be undertaken. The essential features of preparing for an evaluation are considered, and guidance provided on working ethically in the NHS. It is important to involve patients and the public in evaluation activity, offering essential guidance and principles of best practice. The authors discuss the main challenges of undertaking evaluations and offer recommendations to address these, drawing on their experience as evaluators.

  4. Practical Assessment, Research and Evaluation, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M., Ed.; Schafer, William D., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of articles 1 through 14 of volume 6 of "Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation": (1) "Seven Myths about Literacy in the United States" (Jeff McQuillan); (2) "Implementing Performance Assessment in the Classroom" (Amy Brualdi); (3) "Some Evaluation Questions" (William Shadish); (4) "Item Banking" (Lawrence Rudner); (5)…

  5. An Examination of the Teaching Strategies Practiced by the Full-Time Teaching Faculty at Manatee Junior College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raines, Roy H.

    A random sample (n=25) of full-time faculty at Manatee Junior College (Florida) were surveyed by open-ended questionnaire to determine what instructional techniques were being used and to ascertain if the faculty had acquired minimal training in teaching methods and learning theories. A total of 16 different teaching strategies were identified. Of…

  6. Follow the Leaders? An Analysis of Convergence and Innovation of Faculty Recruiting Practices in US Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, David; Deephouse, David L.; O'Reilly, Norm; Massie, Tyler; Hillenbrand, Carola

    2016-01-01

    The debate associated with the qualifications of business school faculty has raged since the 1959 release of the Gordon-Howell and Pierson reports, which encouraged business schools in the USA to enhance their legitimacy by increasing their faculties' doctoral qualifications and scholarly rigor. Today, the legitimacy of specific faculty…

  7. The Whole-Faculty Study Groups Fieldbook: Lessons Learned and Best Practices From Classrooms, Districts, and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lick, Dale W.; Murphy, Carlene U.

    2006-01-01

    The Whole-Faculty Study Group (WFSG) System is a student-centered, teacher-driven process for facilitating major staff development and schoolwide change. When applied properly, it has produced extraordinary results for thousands of educators and students in schools and school districts across the country. The Whole-Faculty Study Groups Fieldbook…

  8. Feedback Practices: Faculty Perception on the Influence of Course Design on Feedback Delivery in Higher Education Online Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinze, Laurie E.

    2013-01-01

    As the online education environment continues to grow and evolve, a greater understanding of faculty perception of the influence of course design features on providing feedback will inform course design decisions and suggest future improvements in the design and facilitation of online courses. This dissertation explored faculty feedback practices…

  9. Best Practices Mentoring New Full-Time Faculty: Reenergizing and Improving an Existing Formal Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edman, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring is often used in academic settings (deJanasz & Sullivan, 2004). There is though, a lack of evaluation of these mentoring programs (Savage, Karp & Logue, 2004). Hopkins and Grigoriu (2005) found that research on mentoring in community colleges focused more on the informal mentoring of college leadership and less on the formal mentoring of…

  10. Faculty Development for Ambulatory Care Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William A.; Carline, Jan D.; Ambrozy, Donna M.; Irby, David M.

    1997-01-01

    A study documented the practices of 14 peer-nominated medical educators who conduct faculty development programs in ambulatory care settings. Results indicate the programs were delivered almost exclusively in workshop format, with great similarities in topics and strategies. Evaluation was generally limited to satisfaction ratings. Makes…

  11. Evaluating Faculty Perceptions of Student Learning Outcomes: A Rasch Measurement Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The importance of assessing student learning outcomes has demanded attention from most everyone involved in the higher education enterprise, as accreditation and funding implications are often linked to the results. Faculty, however, are often critical of the assessment process because outcomes assessment is costly with regard to time,…

  12. Latinos in Higher Education: An Evaluation of a University Faculty Mentoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Silvia J.; Reigadas, Elena T.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed Latino students participating in a university Faculty Mentoring Program (FMP). Found that: (1) students experienced an increase in college self-efficacy and academic goal definition; (2) students with same-ethnic mentors perceived them as more supportive and reported greater program satisfaction; and (3) frequency of contact was…

  13. Evaluation of Alcohol and Drug Use Attitudes and Behaviors in Pharmacy College Faculty: Part I. Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A national survey of pharmacy faculty (n=1,326) found widespread current alcohol use, 2 percent diagnosed or undiagnosed self-reported alcoholism, and "drinking problems" in 3 percent. Prior recreational drug use was reported by 32 percent, current use 4 percent. Some reported drug addiction or abuse problems. Alcohol use rates are similar to…

  14. Commentary: Minimizing Evaluation Misuse as Principled Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, J. Bradley

    2004-01-01

    "Ethical Challenges," in my experience, is invariably interesting, often instructive and sometimes amusing. Some of the most engaging stimulus scenarios raise thorny evaluation practice issues that ultimately lead to disparate points of view about the nature of the issue and how to handle it (Datta, 2002; Smith, 2002). Despite my poor performance…

  15. Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M., Ed.; Schafer, William D., Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document consists of papers published in the electronic journal "Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation" during 2000-2001: (1) "Advantages of Hierarchical Linear Modeling" (Jason W. Osborne); (2) "Prediction in Multiple Regression" (Jason W. Osborne); (3) Scoring Rubrics: What, When, and How?" (Barbara M. Moskal); (4) "Organizational…

  16. Teaching "Out" in the University: An Investigation into the Effects of Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Faculty Self-Disclosure upon Student Evaluations of Faculty Teaching Effectiveness in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) university faculty worry about the effects of self-disclosure in their professional lives. One concern is that self-disclosure as LGBT could result in negative evaluations of one's teaching by students due to student bias against LGBT people. In order to investigate this concern, this study…

  17. Bridging the gap: creating faculty development opportunities at a large medical center.

    PubMed

    James, Kia M G

    2004-01-01

    Faculty development often focuses on developing practicing professionals into teaching experts within a classroom setting. As such, the topic of nursing faculty development is often written about from the standpoint of an employing traditional academic institution. Nursing faculty also have development needs related to practice within a clinical education institution. How do faculty members maintain a current perspective on endless changes in the clinical setting? This becomes particularly challenging if faculty are not actively engaged in nursing practice at the bedside and utilize a clinical facility for education sporadically throughout an academic year. This article describes the method one large academic medical center used to partner collaboratively with schools of nursing to create opportunities for faculty development. A need for clinical faculty development was recognized and a clinical facility faculty day was created and implemented. Information shared during this faculty development day included institutional practice changes, the implementation of a computerized medical record documentation system, general orientation policies, and procedures related to the conducting of business within the institution. A networking opportunity was also provided for faculty and the institutional healthcare leadership staff. Anecdotal evaluation information is also shared.

  18. Faculty Meetings: Hidden Conversational Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    In the everydayness of faculty meetings, collegial conversations mirror distinctive dynamics and practices, which either enhance or undercut organizational effectiveness. A cluster of conversational practices affect how colleagues connect, engage, interact, and influence others during faculty meetings in diverse educational settings. The…

  19. Faculty application of the American Psychological Association style.

    PubMed

    Morse, Gwen Goetz

    2009-10-01

    This article explores current faculty methods with the application and evaluation of the American Psychological Association (APA) style. Specific aims were to determine concerns related to APA style, review faculty grading practices, identify institutional resources, and report potential solutions for improving application of APA style. A survey with an exploratory descriptive research design was developed and distributed online to academic chairs and deans, requesting their support in distributing the survey to their faculty. Responses (N = 704) were grouped into five categories: departmental and personal concerns; faculty grading practices; institutional resources; format, writing style, and grammar; and suggestions and potential solutions. Sixty percent reported that application and evaluation of APA style is a concern in their department. Content analysis identified four categories as proposed solutions: consistency, education, resources, and dialogue. On the basis of the feedback of the participants, the CRED program is proposed for the issues that were identified. PMID:19645365

  20. Faculty application of the American Psychological Association style.

    PubMed

    Morse, Gwen Goetz

    2009-10-01

    This article explores current faculty methods with the application and evaluation of the American Psychological Association (APA) style. Specific aims were to determine concerns related to APA style, review faculty grading practices, identify institutional resources, and report potential solutions for improving application of APA style. A survey with an exploratory descriptive research design was developed and distributed online to academic chairs and deans, requesting their support in distributing the survey to their faculty. Responses (N = 704) were grouped into five categories: departmental and personal concerns; faculty grading practices; institutional resources; format, writing style, and grammar; and suggestions and potential solutions. Sixty percent reported that application and evaluation of APA style is a concern in their department. Content analysis identified four categories as proposed solutions: consistency, education, resources, and dialogue. On the basis of the feedback of the participants, the CRED program is proposed for the issues that were identified.

  1. Toward Principled Practice in Evaluation: Learning from Instructors' Dilemmas in Evaluating Graduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabar, Naama

    2002-01-01

    Explored issues related to student evaluation in higher education through responses of 40 faculty members to a scenario involving the evaluation of a graduate student whose thesis did not meet the teacher's expectations. Findings illuminate the clash between instructors' concerns for their students and the need to evaluate them according to…

  2. Hemodialysis safety: Evaluation of clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Fadili, Wafaa; Adnouni, Adil; Laouad, Inass

    2016-05-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) safety has become a clinical priority; therefore, the use of checklists for making the dialysis session safe is now widely adopted. The aim of our study was to assess different shortcomings in the clinical practice of nurses working in different Moroccan dialysis centers and to discuss the interest of using such checklists. This cross-sectional study was performed in 13 chronic HD centers. Clinical practice of nurses was evaluated through checklists used in European outpatient dialysis units. We noted several deficiencies mainly related to the clinical evaluation of dialysis patients and to aspects related to hygiene and protection measures against contamination. Optimal safety of dialysis sessions requires the use of simple and reproducible means that improve clinical skills of the health staff. PMID:27215249

  3. Infusing Theory into Practice, Practice into Theory: Small Wins and Big Gains for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rog, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    This article illustrates the synergistic role between practice and theory in evaluation. Using reflective practice, the author reviews her own work as well as the work of other evaluators to illustrate how theory can influence practice and, in turn, how evaluation practice can inform and grow theory, especially evaluation theory. The following…

  4. Preparing student nurses, faculty and clinicians for 21st century informatics practice: findings from a national survey of nursing education programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Barbara J; Elfrink, Victoria L; Pierce, Susan T

    2004-01-01

    Because healthcare delivery increasingly mandates data-driven decision-making, it is imperative that informatics knowledge and skills are integrated into nursing education curricula for all future nurse clinicians and educators. A national online survey of deans/directors of 266 baccalaureate and higher nursing education programs in the U.S. identified perceived informatics competencies and knowledge of under-graduate and graduate nursing students; determined the preparedness of nurse faculty to teach and use informatics tools; and elicited perceptions of informatics requirements of local practicing nurses. Frequency data and qualitative responses were analyzed. Approximately half of the programs reported requiring word processing and email skills upon entry into the nursing major. The use of standardized languages and the nurse's role in the life cycle of an information system were the least visible informatics content at all levels. Half of program faculty, rated as "novice" or "advanced beginners", are teaching information literacy skills. Findings have major implications for nurse educators, staff developers, and program administrators who are planning faculty/staff development opportunities and designing nursing education curricula that prepare nurses for professional practice. PMID:15360943

  5. Clarifying the Merits of Argument in Evaluation Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Deborah; Smith, Nick L.

    1993-01-01

    After a brief review of previous studies of justifying claims in evaluation practice, an analysis is provided using the jurisprudence metaphor of S. Toulmin (1958) in the assessment of evaluative arguments. Applications and implications for evaluation practice are discussed. (SLD)

  6. Faculty Development Units at Mexican Higher Education Institutions: A Descriptive Study of Characteristics, Common Practices and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavela Guerra, Rocio del Carmen

    2011-01-01

    The rapid expansion in higher education in the 1960s and early 1970s brought a reexamination of university teaching and learning, placing significant attention on the role of faculty development. The steady growth of this field has been reflected in the establishment of centers, offices, and divisions at many colleges and universities that are in…

  7. So Much Depends upon a Red Chili Pepper: A Faculty Perspective on the Bringing Theory to Practice Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzig, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    The author had a conversation one late afternoon with an untenured colleague from another department regarding chili pepper ratings. Her colleague explained that the popular RateMyProfessor.com Web site allows students to rate faculty members not only according to standards of "clarity," "helpfulness," and something called "easiness," but also in…

  8. Preliminary Examination of Safety Issues on a University Campus: Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs & Attitudes of Female Faculty & Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Paula C.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2007-01-01

    University and college campuses are not immune to acts of violence. Unfortunately there is limited information regarding violence in the academic setting among women employees. As such, the purpose of this exploratory research was to examine issues that female faculty and staff members have about safety on and around campus, including concerns…

  9. A New "Class" of Undergraduate Professors: Examining Teaching Beliefs and Practices of Science Faculty with Education Specialties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addy, Tracie M.; Simmons, Patricia; Gardner, Grant E.; Albert, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Within higher education, science departments have been making efforts to place more emphasis on improving discipline-specific teaching and learning. One such shift is the increased hiring of science faculty with educational specialties (SFES). Although SFES have begun to multiply in number, there is little published on their teaching ideologies…

  10. Creating and Implementing a Faculty Interest Group for Historically Underrepresented Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follins, Lourdes D.; Paler, Lisa K.; Nanin, Jose E.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the creation and implementation of a faculty interest group for historically underrepresented faculty at a large, urban community college in the Northeast. Faculty interest groups provide opportunities for faculty across disciplines to meet to explore common interests and share concerns and best practices. The faculty…

  11. Faculty Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Martin

    Patterns that emerged from reviewing syllabi for courses on faculty issues are discussed, and four sample syllabi are presented. Few doctoral programs in higher education administration were identified that devote an entire course to the subject of American college and university faculty. For four courses that did devote an entire course to the…

  12. Faculty Inbreeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eells, Walter Crosby; Cleveland, Austin Carl

    1999-01-01

    A study of 16,837 faculty members at 219 colleges and universities in 42 states found great variation in the extent to which faculties were hiring their own institution's graduates as teachers. Six institutions showed no such "inbreeding," whereas seven had over 60% inbreeding. (Originally published in 1935) (MSE)

  13. Faculty Remarks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marvin

    A discussion is provided of the Fashion Institute of Technology's (FIT's) new faculty contract and its implications for the college. First, the paper traces the history of union-management negotiations. After looking at the bitter relationship that restricted faculty growth, development, and morale in the 1970s, the paper describes the "contract…

  14. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of the Implementation of a Mentorship Plan in the Faculty of Education at the University of Lleida (UdL), Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filella, Gemma; Lara, Isabel; Soldevila, Anna; Nadal, Jesus; Ribes, Ramona; Agullo, Maria Jesus; Carrillo, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of a preliminary study on the possible implementation of a Mentorship Plan in the Faculty of Teacher Education at the University of Lleida (UdL) is described. A total of sixty-seven first-year Special- and Nursery School-education teacher students participated in this survey. Results were evaluated in both qualitative and…

  16. An Exploratory Investigation of the Periodic Performance Evaluation Processes for Marketing Faculty: A Comparison of Doctoral-Granting and Non-Doctoral-Granting Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, C. David; Carley, Susan S.; Stuart, Randy S.

    2009-01-01

    Whether a first entrant into the academic job market or a seasoned professional, career outcomes for marketing educators depend heavily on the evaluation process used at their institutions. This research explores the periodic performance evaluation process for marketing faculty members using data collected from a national sample of marketing…

  17. For Those of Us at the Borders: Recognition and Evaluation of Faculty Work in the Academic Field of Film and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, E. Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Artistic, scholarly, and professional works by individual faculty members in the field of film and digital media are not being adequately recognized or rewarded as scholarship activity during performance evaluation in institutions of higher learning. Conventional systems for the recognition and evaluation of work prioritize scientism and compel…

  18. Faculty Development and Support Needs of Nurse Practitioner Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Teddy; Norton, Darlene

    1999-01-01

    A nationwide sample of 128 nurse practitioner faculty expressed a significant disparity between ideal and actual faculty support and development structures and processes in their current employment. The greatest hindrance was administrators' lack of knowledge of their clinical practice responsibilities. (JOW)

  19. Practical Diagnostics for Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Siegel, Jeff; Sherman, Max

    2002-06-11

    In this report, we identify and describe 24 practical diagnostics that are ready now to evaluate residential commissioning metrics, and that we expect to include in the commissioning guide. Our discussion in the main body of this report is limited to existing diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. Appendix C describes the 83 other diagnostics that we have examined in the course of this project, but that are not ready or are inappropriate for residential commissioning. Combined with Appendix B, Table 1 in the main body of the report summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of all 107 diagnostics. We first describe what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Our intent in this discussion is to formulate and clarify these issues, but is largely preliminary because such a practice does not yet exist. Subsequent sections of the report describe metrics one can use in residential commissioning, along with the consolidated set of 24 practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now to evaluate them. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies by LBNL staff and others in more than 100 houses. These studies concentrate on evaluating diagnostics in the following four areas: the DeltaQ duct leakage test, air-handler airflow tests, supply and return grille airflow tests, and refrigerant charge tests. Appendix A describes those efforts in detail. In addition, where possible, we identify the costs to purchase diagnostic equipment and the amount of time required to conduct the diagnostics. Table 1 summarizes these data. Individual equipment costs for the 24

  20. Evaluation of a Transition to Practice Program for Neurosurgery Residents: Creating a Safe Transition From Resident to Independent Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Lister, J. Richard; Friedman, William A.; Murad, Gregory J.; Dow, Jamie; Lombard, Gwen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In 2004, the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Florida implemented a major curriculum innovation called the Transition to Practice program. This program was established to prepare residents to more safely transition to the role of independent practitioner. Methods A qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the program was conducted after its fifth year using online surveys and interviews. Study participants included Transition to Practice graduates, faculty, and current residents. Results Of the 26 respondents, 89% of faculty and all graduates were very satisfied with the program. Strengths identified included an independent yet mentored broad operative experience, the development of self-confidence, and a real sense of responsibility for patients. Medical billing and coding instruction and career mentoring were areas of the program that required additional attention. Conclusion Overall, this program is meeting the stated objectives and is well received by the graduates and faculty. Based on the results of this evaluation, curricular changes such as instructions in practice management and implementation of a career-mentoring program have occurred. The Transition to Practice program is a unique curricular response to change that other surgical specialties may find useful in addressing the current-day stresses on graduate medical education. PMID:21976085

  1. Challenges and Issues in the Evaluation of Teaching Quality: How Does it Affect Teachers' Professional Practice? A UK Perspective.

    PubMed

    Warman, Sheena M

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of higher education is undertaken for the purposes of ensuring accountability, accreditation, and improvement, all of which are highly relevant to veterinary teaching institutions in the current economic climate. If evaluation is to drive change, it needs to be able to influence teaching practice. This article reviews the literature relating to evaluation of teaching quality in higher education with a particular focus on teachers' professional practice. Student evaluation and peer observation of teaching are discussed as examples of widely used evaluation processes. These approaches clearly have the potential to influence teachers' practice. Institutions should strive to ensure the development of a supportive culture that prioritizes teaching quality while being aware of any potential consequences related to cost, faculty time, or negative emotional responses that might result from the use of different evaluation methods.

  2. Critical Evaluation of Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Reames, Bradley N.; Krell, Robert W.; Ponto, Sarah N.; Wong, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Significant concerns exist regarding the content and reliability of oncology clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). The Institute of Medicine (IOM) report “Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust” established standards for developing trustworthy CPGs. By using these standards as a benchmark, we sought to evaluate recent oncology guidelines. Methods CPGs and consensus statements addressing the screening, evaluation, or management of the four leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the United States (lung, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers) published between January 2005 and December 2010 were identified. A standardized scoring system based on the eight IOM standards was used to critically evaluate the methodology, content, and disclosure policies of CPGs. All CPGs were given two scores; points were awarded for eight standards and 20 subcriteria. Results No CPG fully met all the IOM standards. The average overall scores were 2.75 of 8 possible standards and 8.24 of 20 possible subcriteria. Less than half the CPGs were based on a systematic review. Only half the CPG panels addressed conflicts of interest. Most did not comply with standards for inclusion of patient and public involvement in the development or review process, nor did they specify their process for updating. CPGs were most consistent with IOM standards for transparency, articulation of recommendations, and use of external review. Conclusion The vast majority of oncology CPGs fail to meet the IOM standards for trustworthy guidelines. On the basis of these results, there is still much to be done to make guidelines as methodologically sound and evidence-based as possible. PMID:23752105

  3. Supporting Women and Minority Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, JoAnn

    2004-01-01

    Good departmental practices can help women and minority faculty thrive and make the greatest possible contribution to the academic enterprise. Several recent books have explored what is wrong with the current way of doing business. In this article, the author outlines steps to bring U.S. minority and European American women faculty--at both the…

  4. Faculty Development. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, Bob, Ed.; McFerrin, Karen, Ed.

    This document contains the papers on faculty development from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference. Topics covered include: integration for ESL (English as a Second Language) success; changing roles of college faculty; inducing reflection on educational practice; a joint instructional technology and…

  5. Teaching and evaluating multitasking ability in emergency medicine residents - what is the best practice?

    PubMed

    Heng, Kenneth Wj

    2014-01-01

    Multitasking is an essential skill to develop during Emergency Medicine (EM) residency. Residents who struggle to cope in a multitasking environment risk fatigue, stress, and burnout. Improper management of interruption has been causally linked with medical errors. Formal teaching and evaluation of multitasking is often lacking in EM residency programs. This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents. With the advancement in understanding of what multitasking is, deliberate attempts should be made to teach residents pitfalls and coping strategies. This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training. The best way to evaluate multitasking ability in residents is by direct observation. The EM Milestone Project provides a framework by which multitasking can be evaluated. EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated.

  6. Teaching and evaluating multitasking ability in emergency medicine residents - what is the best practice?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Multitasking is an essential skill to develop during Emergency Medicine (EM) residency. Residents who struggle to cope in a multitasking environment risk fatigue, stress, and burnout. Improper management of interruption has been causally linked with medical errors. Formal teaching and evaluation of multitasking is often lacking in EM residency programs. This article reviewed the literature on multitasking in EM to identify best practices for teaching and evaluating multitasking amongst EM residents. With the advancement in understanding of what multitasking is, deliberate attempts should be made to teach residents pitfalls and coping strategies. This can be taught through a formal curriculum, role modeling by faculty, and simulation training. The best way to evaluate multitasking ability in residents is by direct observation. The EM Milestone Project provides a framework by which multitasking can be evaluated. EM residents should be deployed in work environments commiserate with their multitasking ability and their progress should be graduated after identified deficiencies are remediated. PMID:25635201

  7. Advising By Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Howard C.; Gardner, Robert E.

    The goal of the report is to identify, describe, and discuss some aspects of faculty advising that are little discussed between advisors and colleagues: source of confusion; roles; how to proceed with advising; keeping the relationship alive; special problems; informational advising; and models for advising. The concept and practice of an advising…

  8. Ethical evaluation of "retainer fee" medical practice.

    PubMed

    Needell, Mervin H; Kenyon, John S

    2005-01-01

    this innovative style of practice. Nevertheless, the weight of arguments presented here does not seem to justify unequivocal moral condemnation of RFMP. As neither pro nor con views seem to have settled the ethical question, definitive moral judgment on RFMP will probably depend on the outcome of future experience and ongoing evaluation. The implications of RFMP for any future healthcare system are not clear, at least to us.

  9. Evaluation of the admission procedure and academic performance on the Medical Faculty in Ljubljana, Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Susec-Michieli, M; Kalisnik, M

    1983-07-01

    The data about the applicants and medical students who matriculated at the Medical Faculty of Ljubljana during the period from 1962-63 to 1969-70 by admission procedure were reviewed. A higher proportion of women than men was accepted, but men went on from year to year more regularly (P less than 0.05). Women graduated significantly later (P less than 0.05). More than half the students came from Ljubljana and its surrounding area. Academic success was correlated with general success in secondary school and with the raw scores at the admission examinations. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated and their values varied greatly between men and women, as well as among single cohorts. The multiple regression analysis showed that the best predictor for academic performance was the average success in secondary school (gymnasium) and in addition, the raw scores in biology and foreign language obtained at the admission examination. The results also showed the standardized regression coefficients beta and these variables should therefore be retained in the admission procedure in future. The cumulated coefficient of determination could explain about 11% to 15% of the variability of dependent variables--i.e., average academic success (mean mark of all examinations) and average academic success standardized to the duration of study. The psychological test was of the least importance and could be omitted in future admission procedures. The mean mark in mathematics in secondary school and the mean mark in somatology (the study of the anatomy and physiology of the body) at the admission examination correlated highly with other admission criteria and could also be omitted in future. PMID:6877106

  10. Using Personnel Evaluation To Focus on the Development of Teaching Skills: Faculty Ideas and University Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Neil; Fenton, Ray

    The role of the personnel evaluation process in improving the performance of teachers as classroom communicators is explored by contrasting the personnel evaluation system of Alaska Pacific University (APU) with that of the Anchorage School District (Alaska). While the APU system offers little specification for formative evaluation activities, the…

  11. Selection of Course Evaluation Items by High and Low Rated Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ory, John C.; Brandenburg, Dale C.

    CAFETERIA-type rating systems, modeled after the one developed at Purdue University, allow the instructors being evaluated to select those items which their students will use in evaluating the instructors. Such computer-assisted systems allow the instructor to tailor the evaluation to the particular instructional strategies used. This study…

  12. ASHE Reader on Faculty and Faculty Issues in Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Martin J., Ed.

    The academic profession is discussed in 25 articles that cover: the current status of the professoriate, the faculty culture and nature of the career, teaching/research roles, women and minority faculty, part-time and two-year college faculty, and faculty development/evaluation. The book is intended as a reader for students in graduate programs in…

  13. Evaluators' Decision Making: The Relationship between Theory, Practice, and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourmen, Claire

    2009-01-01

    How do evaluation practitioners make choices when they evaluate a program? What function do evaluation theories play in practice? In this article, I report on an exploratory study that examined evaluation practices in France. The research began with observations of practitioners' activities, with a particular focus on the phases of evaluation…

  14. Faculty Recruitment in an Era of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Marilyn; Schimpf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Faculty recruitment is a challenge for administration and departments, especially in an era of change in the academy. This article builds on information from an interactive conference panel session that focused on faculty recruitment best practices. The article addresses faculty recruitment strategies that focus on the optimization of search…

  15. The Digital Learning Faculty Certificate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginzburg, Ekaterina; Chepya, Peter; Demers, David

    2010-01-01

    To assist in the training and professional development of faculty new to teaching online, Sacred Heart University established the Digital Learning Faculty Certificate Program. This 8-week online cohort program provides faculty with best practices for teaching online, including instructional design, effective online communication and appropriate…

  16. A User Centered Faculty Scheduled Development Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadian, Shohreh; Sly, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Colleges provide professional development opportunities to faculty to promote knowledge growth and improvement of skills. At the college, Scheduled Development (SD) time for faculty is based on the educational practice and recognition of the need for continuous professional development of faculty members. The paper presents a user-centered…

  17. Faculty Composition in Four-Year Institutions: The Role of Pressures, Values, and Organizational Processes in Academic Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Gehrke, Sean

    2016-01-01

    This study broadens our understanding of conditions that shape faculty composition in higher education. We surveyed academic deans to evaluate their views on the professoriate, values, pressures, and practices pertaining to the use of non-tenure-track faculty (NTTF). We utilized [ordinary-least-squares] OLS regression to test a model for…

  18. Faculty development.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Steven A

    2005-04-01

    As emergency medicine faculty, we are called upon to be skilled in a great number of different areas. Residency training prepares us to be knowledgeable clinicians, skillful at procedures, good communicators, and effective at multitasking. Rarely, however, does it prepare us as educators or in the nuances of career advancement in an academic environment. Faculty development is a term used to describe both our growth as clinician-educators and navigation of the tenure and promotion process. An important role of medical student educators is to assist in preparing themselves and the faculty to be good teachers. In addition, we all hope to have successful careers as clinician-educators. The goal of this report is 2-fold: to provide a guide for faculty to advance their skills as educators and to help teaching faculty to advance their academic career. The first section of this report presents an approach to becoming a skilled educator, and the second section focuses on career development as an educator in an academic setting.

  19. The (Mis)interpretation of Teaching Evaluations by College Faculty and Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boysen, Guy A.; Kelly, Timothy J.; Raesly, Holly N.; Casner, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching are ubiquitous and impactful on the careers of college teachers. However, there is limited empirical research documenting the accuracy of people's efforts in interpreting teaching evaluations. The current research consisted of three studies documenting the effect of small mean differences in teaching…

  20. An Evaluation of Communication among High School Faculty Using Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Susan; Teddlie, Charles

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an evaluation of a troubled high school that was conducted approximately fifteen years ago. Their original evaluation plan focused on the collection of academic achievement scores and attitudinal variables taken from the school effectiveness literature, but the serendipitous inclusion of what they called…

  1. College Students' Evaluations of Faculty Are Directly Related To Course Interest And Grade Expectation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocking, Joan M.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how changes in students' grade expectations affect their evaluations of instructors and courses. Changes in student interest and expected grade in the course emerged as the most important determinants in changing the students' evaluations of the instructors and the courses. (Author)

  2. Student Expectations of Course Content Affect Faculty Evaluations in an Abnormal Psychology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bock, Frances A.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a study measuring how student expectations of an abnormal psychology course affect their rating of professors. Findings showed a significant impact, especially in relation to popularized topics. Recommends evaluative instruments separating course-related factors from instructor ratings. (CK)

  3. Answering Student Questions During Examinations: A Descriptive Study of Faculty Beliefs.

    PubMed

    Stillwell, Susan B; Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2016-01-01

    Examinations are used to evaluate individual student learning. Therefore, fair and consistent administration practices are essential. One issue associated with testing administration practices includes whether or not students should be allowed to ask questions during exams and how faculty should respond. Findings from this descriptive study indicate that faculty believe answering questions disrupts the testing environment, inhibits effective monitoring of the testing environment, and could provide unfair hints to students who ask questions. Yet, faculty permit students to ask questions to clarify unclear wording, to provide definitions, and to appear receptive to student needs. Recommendations for nursing education and research are provided. PMID:27405200

  4. Evidence-Based Practice and Evaluation: From Insight to Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmuir, Sandra; Brown, Emma; Iyadurai, Suzi; Monsen, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    With the growing emphasis on accountability and evidence-based practice, evaluation has become increasingly important in the contexts in which educational psychologists (EPs) practice. This paper describes a Target Monitoring and Evaluation (TME) system, derived from Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) which was developed to evaluate outcomes of a wide…

  5. Improving Knowledge of General Dental Practitioners on Antibiotic Prescribing by Raising Awareness of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Zahabiyoun, Sana; Sahabi, Mahasti; Kharazi, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cases of antimicrobial resistance are increasing, partly due to inappropriate prescribing practices by dentists. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prescribing practices and knowledge of dentists with regards to antibiotics. Moreover, this study aimed to determine whether the prescriptions comply with the recommended guidelines and whether clinical audit can alter the prescribing practices of dentists leading to better use of antibiotics in the dental service. Materials and Methods: A clinical audit (before/after non-controlled trial) was carried out in two dental clinics in the northeast of England. Retrospective data were collected from 30 antibiotic prescriptions, analysed and compared with the recommended guidelines. Data collected included age and gender of patients, type of prescribed antibiotics and their dosage, frequency and duration, clinical condition and reason for prescribing. The principles of appropriate prescribing based on guidance by the Faculty of General Dental Practice in the United Kingdom (UK), FGDP, were discussed with the dental clinicians. Following this, prospective data were collected and similarly managed. Pre and post audit data were then compared. Changes were tested for significance using McNemar’s test and P value<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: After intervention, data revealed that antibiotic prescribing practices of dentists improved, as there was an increase in the percentage of prescriptions that were in accordance with the FGDP (UK) guidelines. Conclusion: In view of the limited data collected, this study concludes that there are inappropriate antibiotic prescribing practices amongst general dental practitioners and that clinical audit can address this situation, leading to a more rational use of antibiotics in dental practice. PMID:26622268

  6. Faculty Appointments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, H. Edward

    1977-01-01

    The conditions surrounding appointments of full-time, tenure-tract, teaching faculty and administration produce one area in collective bargaining contracts that affects equally every employee of an institution. Several of these conditions are discussed: initial appointments; appointment authority; conflict of appointment authority; appointment…

  7. Faculty Perceptions of Effective Practices for Utilizing a Framework to Develop a Concept-Based Curriculum in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magorian, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    All programs of healthcare education face increasing change and daunting challenges to prepare new graduates for the real world of practice as care providers in complex systems. The necessity for change in nursing education is at a critical level, called on from a variety of sources. New nurses must be able to enter practice as competent, safe,…

  8. A Collaboration of School Administrators and a University Faculty to Advance School Administrator Practices Using Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: An appreciative inquiry (AI) collaborative study with 11 school administrators in a highly diverse suburban school district sought to understand if observing and sharing successful school practices/events in a whole group setting led to change in their perceptions, attitudes, and administrative practice. The paper aims to discuss these…

  9. The Role of Academic Psychiatry Faculty in the Treatment and Subsequent Evaluation and Promotion of Medical Students: An Ethical Conundrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavan, Michael G.; Malin, Paula Jo; Wilson, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This article explores ethical and practical issues associated with the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) provision that states health professionals who provide psychiatric/psychological care to medical students must have no involvement in the academic evaluation or promotion of students receiving those services. Method: The…

  10. Faculty verbal evaluations reveal strategies used to promote medical student performance

    PubMed Central

    Hauer, Karen E.; Mazotti, Lindsay; O'Brien, Bridget; Hemmer, Paul A.; Tong, Lowell

    2011-01-01

    Background Preceptors rarely follow medical students' developing clinical performance over time and across disciplines. This study analyzes preceptors' descriptions of longitudinal integrated clerkship (LIC) students' clinical development and their identification of strategies to guide students' progress. Methods We used a common evaluation framework, reporter-interpreter-manager-educator, to guide multidisciplinary LIC preceptors' discussions of students' progress. We conducted thematic analysis of transcripts from preceptors' (seven longitudinal ambulatory preceptors per student) quarterly group discussions of 15 students' performance over one year. Results All students' clinical development progressed, although most experienced obstacles. Lack of structure in the history and physical exam commonly obstructed progression. Preceptors used templates for data gathering, and modeling or experiences in the inpatient setting to provide time and solidify structure. To advance students' knowledge acquisition, many preceptors identified focused learning topics with their students; to promote application of knowledge, preceptors used reasoning strategies to teach the steps involved in synthesizing clinical data. Preceptors shared accountability for helping students advance as the LIC allowed them to follow students' response to teaching strategies. Discussion These results depict preceptors' perceptions of LIC students' developmental continuum and illustrate how multidisciplinary preceptors can use a common evaluation framework to identify strategies to improve performance and follow students' performance longitudinally. PMID:21629669

  11. An Innovative Approach to Faculty Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dana, Heather; Havens, Brandy; Hochanadel, Cathy; Phillips, JoDee

    2010-01-01

    As online education has grown rapidly, colleges and universities have developed various approaches to effectively evaluating and coaching faculty. Faculty performance is central to student success and faculty need feedback that is consistent, constructive and illustrative. Through the use of screen recording technology, academic department chairs…

  12. Faculty Development: Not Just a Bandwagon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipps, Opal S.

    1978-01-01

    Considers problems in traditional faculty development programs, comments on the relation between faculty development and evaluation, and reviews the instructional development model, the organizational development approach, and the personal development model. Offers suggestions for nursing faculties and administrators in organizing a nursing…

  13. Preparing Engineering Faculty to Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Issues associated with the preparation of engineering faculty to teach online courses are examined. This includes: the nature of online teaching, engineering course materials, training faculty to teach online, use of online resources, course development, and evaluation of online courses. Selection of faculty and providing adequate support are…

  14. Faculty Advising Examined: Enhancing the Potential of College Faculty as Advisors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Gary L., Ed.

    This collection explores faculty advising as a potential contributor to student college success and provides information on how to organize, deliver, and improve overall faculty advising in the current higher education climate. The chapters are: (1) "Advising as Teaching" (Gary L. Kramer); (2) "Faculty Advising: Practice and Promise" (Wesley R.…

  15. Theory and Practice on Teacher Performance Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonghong, Cai; Chongde, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Teacher performance evaluation plays a key role in educational personnel reform, so it has been an important yet difficult issue in educational reform. Previous evaluations on teachers failed to make strict distinction among the three dominant types of evaluation, namely, capability, achievement, and effectiveness. Moreover, teacher performance…

  16. Assessing faculty professional development in STEM higher education: Sustainability of outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Derting, Terry L.; Ebert-May, Diane; Henkel, Timothy P.; Maher, Jessica Middlemis; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the effectiveness of Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching IV (FIRST), a professional development program for postdoctoral scholars, by conducting a study of program alumni. Faculty professional development programs are critical components of efforts to improve teaching and learning in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, but reliable evidence of the sustained impacts of these programs is lacking. We used a paired design in which we matched a FIRST alumnus employed in a tenure-track position with a non-FIRST faculty member at the same institution. The members of a pair taught courses that were of similar size and level. To determine whether teaching practices of FIRST participants were more learner-centered than those of non-FIRST faculty, we compared faculty perceptions of their teaching strategies, perceptions of environmental factors that influence teaching, and actual teaching practice. Non-FIRST and FIRST faculty reported similar perceptions of their teaching strategies and teaching environment. FIRST faculty reported using active learning and interactive engagement in lecture sessions more frequently compared with non-FIRST faculty. Ratings from external reviewers also documented that FIRST faculty taught class sessions that were learner-centered, contrasting with the teacher-centered class sessions of most non-FIRST faculty. Despite marked differences in teaching practice, FIRST and non-FIRST participants used assessments that targeted lower-level cognitive skills. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of the FIRST program and the empirical utility of comparison groups, where groups are well matched and controlled for contextual variables (for example, departments), for evaluating the effectiveness of professional development for subsequent teaching practices. PMID:27034985

  17. Assessing faculty professional development in STEM higher education: Sustainability of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Derting, Terry L; Ebert-May, Diane; Henkel, Timothy P; Maher, Jessica Middlemis; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A

    2016-03-01

    We tested the effectiveness of Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching IV (FIRST), a professional development program for postdoctoral scholars, by conducting a study of program alumni. Faculty professional development programs are critical components of efforts to improve teaching and learning in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, but reliable evidence of the sustained impacts of these programs is lacking. We used a paired design in which we matched a FIRST alumnus employed in a tenure-track position with a non-FIRST faculty member at the same institution. The members of a pair taught courses that were of similar size and level. To determine whether teaching practices of FIRST participants were more learner-centered than those of non-FIRST faculty, we compared faculty perceptions of their teaching strategies, perceptions of environmental factors that influence teaching, and actual teaching practice. Non-FIRST and FIRST faculty reported similar perceptions of their teaching strategies and teaching environment. FIRST faculty reported using active learning and interactive engagement in lecture sessions more frequently compared with non-FIRST faculty. Ratings from external reviewers also documented that FIRST faculty taught class sessions that were learner-centered, contrasting with the teacher-centered class sessions of most non-FIRST faculty. Despite marked differences in teaching practice, FIRST and non-FIRST participants used assessments that targeted lower-level cognitive skills. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of the FIRST program and the empirical utility of comparison groups, where groups are well matched and controlled for contextual variables (for example, departments), for evaluating the effectiveness of professional development for subsequent teaching practices.

  18. Using Developmental Evaluation Methods with Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Winkelen, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the use of developmental evaluation methods with community of practice programmes experiencing change or transition to better understand how to target support resources. Design/methodology/approach: The practical use of a number of developmental evaluation methods was explored in three organizations over a…

  19. Evaluating Teaching: A Guide to Current Thinking and Best Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James, Ed.

    This guide presents current research and thinking about teacher evaluation and combines that research with practice. Chapters contain illustrations and examples to make a research-practice connection and present a comprehensive approach to designing, implementing, and monitoring quality teacher-evaluation systems. Chapters include: (1) "Improving…

  20. Evaluating a Community-School Model of Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Daniel; Frey, Andy

    2008-01-01

    While research has shown that social workers can have positive impacts on students' school adjustment, evaluations of overall practice models continue to be limited. This article evaluates a model of community-school social work practice by examining its effect on problem behaviors and concerns identified by teachers and parents at referral. As…

  1. Building a Community of Evaluation Practice within a Multisite Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Leslie K.

    2011-01-01

    New and novel uses of evaluation processes and findings are possible when a community of practice develops as evaluation stakeholders participate in multisite evaluations in multiple ways. Developing such communities takes advantage of what makes multisite evaluations special. This chapter uses the example of the Innovative Technology Experiences…

  2. The Evaluation Attitudes and Practices of 4-H Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekies, Kristi S.; Bennett, Amanda M.

    2011-01-01

    Extension educators are expected to conduct program evaluation. An Internet survey was sent to county 4-H educators in Ohio to examine their evaluation attitudes and practices, as well as barriers to conducting evaluation. Respondents indicated a range of attitudes about evaluation and limited use of different designs and methods. Having enough…

  3. University Faculty's Perspectives on the Roles of E-Instructors and Their Online Instruction Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chiungsui; Shen, Hun-Yi; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Despite the rapid use of e-Learning in higher education, the beliefs of instructors about and their practices during online instruction have been seldom addressed. This study explores the role perceptions of e-instructors in higher education. In total, 106 instructors from 20 Taiwanese universities filled out a questionnaire. Analytical results…

  4. Supporting Future Faculty in Developing Their Teaching Practices: An Exploration of Communication Networks among Graduate Teaching Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Past research has shown that informal communications among Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are more influential in shaping their teaching practices than formal induction programs. Yet little is known about how these informal helping relationships evolve and how universities can help support their formation as part of the preparation of future…

  5. Evaluating Vocational Training Programs. A Practical Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunting, Gordon; And Others

    This guide is intended to serve as a systematic checklist for evaluators of vocational training institutions and for directors of schools or skills centers who want to identify areas in need of improvement. Discussed first are steps in defining the purpose of the evaluation (nature and objectives of the project, point of view, and the initial…

  6. Teacher Evaluation: A Study of Effective Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Arthur E.; And Others

    A preliminary survey of 32 school districts identified as having highly developed teacher evaluation systems was followed by the selection of 4 case study districts (Salt Lake City, Utah; Lake Washington, Washington; Greenwich, Connecticut; and Toledo, Ohio) representing diverse teacher evaluation processes and organizational environments. Common…

  7. Using Open Badges to Certify Practicing Evaluators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Randall; Randall, Dan; West, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    For several decades members of the American Evaluation Association have discussed and disputed the issue of evaluator certification. Our past inability to agree on a certification solution may have been partially caused by the weaknesses of traditional certification systems, which rely on candidates obtaining a degree and completing a…

  8. Teaching Practical Public Health Evaluation Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Mary V.

    2006-01-01

    Human service fields, and more specifically public health, are increasingly requiring evaluations to prove the worth of funded programs. Many public health practitioners, however, lack the required background and skills to conduct useful, appropriate evaluations. In the late 1990s, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) created the…

  9. Needs assessment and evaluation of a short course to improve faculties teaching skills at a former World Health Organization regional teacher training center

    PubMed Central

    KOJURI, JAVAD; AMINI, MITRA; KARIMIAN, ZAHRA; DEHGHANI, MOHAMMAD REZA; SABER, MAHBOOBEH; BAZRAFCAN, LEILA; EBRAHIMI, SEDIGHEH; REZAEE, RITA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the design of educational programs, much attention has been paid to teaching methods, needs assessment, an important part of the development of educational programs, generally is neglected. Another important aspect in educational program design is assessing effectiveness. The aims of this study were to design a formal needs assessment program to define the core contents of a faculty development program, and to determine whether participation in the faculty development program reinforced new teaching skills. Methods: A teacher-training program was designed at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences to help medical instructors boost their teaching skills. Needs assessment was done with nominal group technique followed by a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire. The program, imparted in workshop format, covered effective teaching methods, feedback, assessing knowledge and time management. Instruction was in the form of lectures, group discussions, case simulations, video presentations and role-plays. The program was evaluated in several phases using data triangulation and multi-item assessments of overall program quality in three major dimensions: Kirkpatrick program evaluation model, evaluation of the educational environment and qualitative analysis with open-ended questions. All participants in the study belonged to the academic staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (n=396). Results: Seven main categories were derived from nominal group techniques and questionnaires. After the program, participants rated the quality of the program highly. They felt that the educational intervention was appropriate and had a positive impact on their knowledge of effective teaching methods, feedback, knowledge assessment and time management. Assessment of the effectiveness of the program showed that participants reported significant improvements in their teaching abilities. Conclusions: Our faculty development program  have a significant positive effect on

  10. Evaluation Concepts and Practices in Selected Distance Education Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuemer, Rudolf, Ed.

    This report contains, in addition to the introduction and preface, 13 papers written by individuals working in the field of evaluation who present the concepts and practices of evaluation at their own particular distance education institutions. The introduction (Schuemer) gives a short outline of the evaluation nomenclature and an overview of the…

  11. Implementing and evaluating reflective practice group sessions.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Deidre; Higgins, Agnes

    2006-05-01

    The rapidly changing and developing arenas of biological and medical technology, coupled with a myriad of social concerns and issues affecting individual, family and societal health, necessitates that nursing practitioners engage themselves fully with patients in the pursuit of health and healing. The above factors have not only served as catalysts in the development of educational curricula in general but also nursing curricula. Reflection in these curricula is often considered an appropriate vehicle for the analysis of nursing practice, fostering not only an understanding of nurse's work but also the development of critically thoughtful approaches essential for providing nursing care in complex environments [Duke, S., Appleton, J., 2000. The use of reflection in a palliative care programme: a qualitative study of the development of reflective skills over an academic year. J. Adv. Nurs. 32 (6), 1557-1568]. Consequently, nurse educators are being called upon to develop nurses who are reflective practitioners. The focus of this paper is on an exploration of issues that arose from the implementation of reflective sessions with a group of qualified nurses undertaking a diploma in nursing. This paper addresses the challenges experienced in the introduction of reflection as a teaching method. Recommendations for other lecturers when using this approach are also provided. It is anticipated this paper will provide practical advice and guidance for educators who wish to use reflective sessions to enhance the educational experience of their nursing students. PMID:19040874

  12. Mediation Works: An Action Research Study Evaluating the Peer Mediation Program from the Eyes of Mediators and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jacqueline Yvonne; Boes, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to understand how mediators and faculty view a Peer Mediation Program (PMP). The review identified four subgroups: mediators, teachers, administrators, and school counselors as well as their views on the success or lack of success of PMPs. The research also reflects how to best engage stakeholders in the mediation…

  13. What's the Use of Faculty Development? Program Evaluation Using Retrospective Self-Assessments and Independent Performance Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewson, Mariana G.; Copeland, H. Liesel; Fishleder, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the usefulness of retrospective self-assessments by participants in a faculty development program in combination with independent ratings of their teaching performance by their trainees. Found that both the retrospective self-assessments and the independent ratings by trainees showed post-program improvements and were positively…

  14. Reflections on the Implementation of a Course Website Maintained by Multiple Faculty Members: Analysis, Development, Sustainability, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fried, Aaron P.

    2007-01-01

    Sustainability is a major issue when creating Websites that students use with courses. How will content change over time, how can faculty inexperienced with Web development add to and maintain content? This article will examine an implemented sustainable Website that can be managed by everyone associated with the course. (Contains 4 tables and 1…

  15. Appraisal and Evaluation: Chimera, Fantasy, or Practicality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marland, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Looks beyond the threatening and remunerative aspects of teacher appraisal in the United Kingdom to the contribution that evaluation can make to professional and school development. Considers five sound reasons for appraisal, the roles and behaviors to be appraised, and some workable approaches and techniques. Effective leadership is the key.…

  16. Some Principles and Practices of Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berty, Ernest

    Evaluation is the process of determining the extent to which specified objectives have been reached. As a professional tool, it is used to (1) appraise the achievements of individual students; (2) diagnose the learning problems of an individual student or class in order to devise future teaching strategies; and (3) appraise the effectiveness of…

  17. Stakeholder Involvement in Evaluation: Suggestions for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reineke, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Based on experiences in working with school district staff, suggestions for enhancing evaluation use through stakeholder involvement are discussed in terms of who should be involved, when involvement should occur, and how stakeholders should be involved via a dialogue-dependent process. (SLD)

  18. Structural Dimensions and Functions of Student Centers in the Open Education Faculty Practices: Three Metropolis Samplings--Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunckan, Ergun

    2007-01-01

    The Open Education Faculty Students Centers have been offering many services to students in Turkey since 1982. Building up bridges between students and faculties, student centers have had technological improvements since 1998 and thereafter quality of services have been increased and services given to students at the student center have been…

  19. The Changing Faculty and Student Success: Conceptual Diagrams--Interactions of Non-Tenure-Track Policies and Practices on Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Maxey, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the American academic workforce has fundamentally shifted over the past several decades. Whereas full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty were once the norm, more than two-thirds of the professoriate in non-profit postsecondary education is now comprised of non-tenure-track faculty. New hires across all institutional types are now…

  20. Exploring Faculty Decision-Making Processes for Using Instructional Technology in the Classroom: Implications for Policy and Practice. WISCAPE Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hora, Matthew Tadashi; Holden, Jeremiah Isaac

    2012-01-01

    Given the primacy of instructional technology in today's college classroom, it is important to understand how faculty use these tools, especially how they adapt specific tools to meet the unique needs of particular faculty or instructional situations. Instructional designers and policymakers face the challenge of introducing innovations into…

  1. Pedagogies, Perspectives, and Practices: Mobile Learning through the Experiences of Faculty Developers and Instructional Designers in Centers for Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosler, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the experiences, perceptions, and pedagogy of nine self-identified faculty developers and instructional designers who work in centers for teaching and learning supporting faculty members requesting assistance with mobile learning. With the ever-increasing use of mobile devices across…

  2. Practice to Pedagogy: A Study of the Lived Experiences of Part-Time Nursing Faculty Transitioning from Expert Nurse to Novice Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testut, Tammy A.

    2013-01-01

    Part-time faculty in nursing programs are increasingly being hired as a supplement to the deteriorating pool of full-time nursing faculty. There is a growing need to fill the many vacant slots in nursing academe at the same time that there is substantial growth in prospective students inspiring to become nurses. While these "expert"…

  3. Gender Differences in Business Faculty's Research Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yining; Zhao, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The authors use expectancy theory to evaluate gender differences in key factors that motivate faculty to conduct research. Using faculty survey data collected from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, they found that faculty members, both men and women, who displayed higher motivation were more productive in research. Among them, pretenured…

  4. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student.

  5. Plastics processing: statistics, current practices, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cooke, F

    1993-11-01

    The health care industry uses a huge quantity of plastic materials each year. Much of the machinery currently used, or supplied, for plastics processing is unsuitable for use in a clean environment. In this article, the author outlines the reasons for the current situation and urges companies to re-examine their plastic-processing methods, whether performed in-house or subcontracted out. Some of the factors that should be considered when evaluating plastics-processing equipment are outlined to assist companies in remaining competitive and complying with impending EC regulations on clean room standards for manufacturing areas.

  6. Creating a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement: one DNP program's experience.

    PubMed

    Meek, Julie A; Runshe, Debra; Young, Judith; Embree, Jennifer; Riner, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Developing faculty ownership of ongoing curricular improvement presents educational and management challenges for schools of nursing, yet little has been published about which components help build a faculty community that values curricular assessment and improvement. The purpose of this case study was to describe key features of and faculty satisfaction with one school of nursing's doctor of nursing practice curricular assessment process, with a description of key considerations for developing an ePortfolio-supported curricular assessment process. ePortfolio matrices were used as a curricular organizing structure for mapping and scoring each completed student assignment to an American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essential descriptor using a rubric that measured evidence of student learning. Faculty satisfaction with the process was also evaluated. First-year results indicated high levels of faculty satisfaction with the assessment process. The initial findings led to four actions for curricular improvement and agreement to continue the assessment process biannually. The curricular assessment was successful in generating faculty satisfaction, identifying needed areas to improve the curriculum, and obtaining faculty agreement to continue the process. A faculty community supportive of curricular assessment is essential to a transformational learning environment that prepares future nursing leaders. PMID:25601241

  7. Practical Guidelines for Evaluating Sampling Designs in Survey Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao; Wang, Lin

    The popularity of sample surveys in evaluation and research makes it necessary for consumers to tell a good survey from a poor one. Several sources were identified that gave advice on how to evaluate a sample design used in a survey study. The sources are either too limited or too extensive to be useful practically. The purpose of this paper is to…

  8. Evaluation: Emergence, Mode of Inquiry, Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Aidan

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the reader with an accessible and practical account of evaluation as a mode of inquiry within the broad domain of social science. The starting point is the presentation of a general outline of the main milestones relating to the emergence of evaluation as a mode of inquiry and some of the prominent advocates…

  9. An Introduction to Research and Evaluation in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flor, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Research and evaluation are tools that can help validate experiential education practice and provide a better understanding of it. Defines types of research and evaluation and discusses the benefits of these activities. Reasons for conducting research include (1) gaining support and credibility; (2) program improvement; and (3) marketing. (KS)

  10. Case Studies for Teacher Evaluation: A Study of Effective Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Arthur E.; And Others

    This document presents the four case studies that constituted the major sources for "Teacher Evaluation: A Study of Effective Practices" by the same authors. The study was undertaken to find teacher evaluation processes that produce information useful to school districts in helping teachers improve or in making personnel decisions. The four school…

  11. Balancing Evaluation Theory and Practice in the Real World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chelimsky, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the author argues that evaluation theory and practice interact insufficiently today, even though early evaluation theorists expected them to be closely intertwined. She views this limited connection as the result of differing interests on the part of theorists and practitioners, differing frequencies of dissemination, and differing…

  12. An Assessment of the Theoretical Underpinnings of Practical Participatory Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Pernelle A.; Champagne, Francois

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with the underpinnings of practical participatory evaluation (PPE). Evaluation approaches have long been criticized because their results are often not used. It is believed that PPE addresses this drawback. The article focuses on the mechanisms underlying the links between activities and consequences in PPE. A PPE theory…

  13. Evaluation of Continuous Assessment Practice by University Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osadebe, Patrick U.

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the extent to which Continuous Assessment (CA) was practiced by university lecturers in Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria. The evaluation of continuous assessment focused on the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains of students' behaviour. That is teaching and learning should focus on these areas. Two research…

  14. Advancing Empirical Scholarship to Further Develop Evaluation Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Good theory development is grounded in empirical inquiry. In the context of educational evaluation, the development of empirically grounded theory has important benefits for the field and the practitioner. In particular, a shift to empirically derived theory will assist in advancing more systematic and contextually relevant evaluation practice, as…

  15. Part-time faculty and gerontology programs:dilemmas and solutions.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Tonya M; Grabinski, C Joanne; Silverstein, Nina M; Spencer, Marian; Takayanagi, Paul W; Yee-Melichar, Darlene

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the use of adjunct faculty generally and within gerontology programs and discusses the benefits, drawbacks and possible solutions for both adjunct faculty and gerontology programs to utilize part-time teaching staff. The benefits reported for being a part-time faculty member include wanting to be in academia and supplementing an income. The reasons gerontology programs hire adjunct faculty members include their being less costly and bringing new skills to the programs. There are also practical and substantive drawbacks faced by part-time faculty. Practical issues include confusion with the pay schedule and last-minute class cancellations. Substantive issues include a lack of both respect and opportunities for professional development. The solutions to these issues include assigned space and support to part-time faculty members, maintaining peer and student evaluations, and affirming diversity in gerontology by recruiting adjunct faculty with knowledge and research capabilities for tenure-track positions as a strategy for successful gerontology program development.

  16. Does faculty development enhance teaching effectiveness?

    PubMed

    Hendricson, William D; Anderson, Eugene; Andrieu, Sandra C; Chadwick, D Gregory; Cole, James R; George, Mary C; Glickman, Gerald N; Glover, Joel F; Goldberg, Jerold S; Haden, N Karl; Kalkwarf, Kenneth L; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Neumann, Laura M; Pyle, Marsha; Tedesco, Lisa A; Valachovic, Richard W; Weaver, Richard G; Winder, Ronald L; Young, Stephen K

    2007-12-01

    Academic dentists and members of the practice community have been hearing, for more than a decade, that our educational system is in trouble and that the profession has lost its vision and may be wavering in the achievement of its goals. A core of consistently recommended reforms has framed the discussion of future directions for dental education, but as yet, most schools report little movement toward implementation of these reforms in spite of persistent advocacy. Provision of faculty development related to teaching and assessment strategies is widely perceived to be the essential ingredient in efforts to introduce new curricular approaches and modify the educational environment in academic dentistry. Analyses of the outcomes of efforts to revise health professions curricula have identified the availability and effectiveness of faculty development as a predictor of the success or failure of reform initiatives. This article will address faculty development for purposes of enhancing teaching effectiveness and preparing instructors for potential new roles associated with curriculum changes. Its overall purpose is to provide information and insights about faculty development that may be useful to dental schools in designing professional growth opportunities for their faculty. Seven questions are addressed: 1) What is faculty development? 2) How is faculty development accomplished? 3) Why is faculty development particularly important in dental education? 4) What happens when faculty development does not accompany educational reform? 5) Why are teaching attitudes and behaviors so difficult to change? 6) What outcomes can be expected from faculty development? and 7) What does the available evidence tell us about the design of faculty development programs? Evidence from systematic reviews pertaining to the teaching of evidence-based dentistry, strategies for continuing professional education, and the Best Evidence in Medical Education review of faculty development

  17. Leveraging a faculty fellowship programme to develop leaders in interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Robins, Lynne; Murphy, Nanci; Zierler, Brenda

    2016-07-01

    This article reports findings from an interprofessional education (IPE) study of a longitudinal faculty fellowship that aimed to develop IPE leaders at an academic institution based in the United States. Eight applicants were competitively selected to participate in an IPE track of the fellowship, alongside 14 faculty members who entered through a separate selection process. One year after graduation, a survey of the IPE fellows was undertaken to evaluate programme outcomes using open-ended questions based on an adaptation of Kirkpatrick's four-level training evaluation model. Results indicated that respondents valued participating in a longitudinal programme where they could learn about and practice teaching and leadership skills and conduct education scholarship. While learning on an interprofessional basis, the fellows reported establishing relationships that endured after graduation. This report suggests that adding IPE activities to existing faculty fellowship programmes can be an effective means of building faculty capacity to advance institutional IPE initiatives. PMID:27191191

  18. A Helping Hand for Young Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    With the academic year just under way, many junior faculty members in search of much-needed advice and guidance have begun to make critical connections with senior colleagues. Departmental pairings are the most standard form of faculty mentoring, as is the practice of newly minted professors' tapping colleagues on their own to answer questions…

  19. Harvard Law School's War over Faculty Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Matthew S.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the controversy over the lack of faculty diversity at Harvard Law School and highlights the school's past practices regarding hiring and promotion of minority teaching staff. The pool problem issue is discussed, and the current status of faculty diversity is presented. (GLR)

  20. Faculty Leadership and Instructional Technologies: Who Decides?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Discussion of leadership functions and practices in the realm of instructional technology in community colleges cannot be limited to the administrative side. Faculty members and faculties as collective bodies have influenced or attempted to influence the use of instructional technology and can claim professionally to have the right to participate…

  1. Teacher Education Faculty and Computer Competency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Robert N.; Armel, Donald

    A project was introduced in the College of Education at Eastern Illinois University to assist faculty, through inservice training, to become more knowledgeable about computer applications and limitations. Practical needs of faculty included word processing, statistical analysis, database manipulation, electronic mail, file transfers, file…

  2. Social Work Faculty and Undergraduate Research Mentorships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Pilar S.; Hughes, Anne K.; Vélez Ortiz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Social work faculty scholars lead the field as generators of knowledge that integrates investigative studies with practical social welfare outcomes. As such, the faculty potentially offers undergraduate researchers a different way of envisioning research that extends beyond traditional undergraduate research models. To date, however, no research…

  3. [Learning-enhancing evaluation practice in post-graduate medicine].

    PubMed

    Madsen, Bjørn Stæhr; Klitmøller, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The article addresses the issue of evaluation in clinical supervisor interviews, and how learning outcomes can be increased in this setting. Based on a literature review the article demonstrates that a learning-enhancing evaluation is a context bound process that needs to take emotional, social and operational aspects in account, in order to be successful. The article contributes to an understanding of how to promote a learning-enhancing evaluation practice in post-graduate medicine in the Danish medical training.

  4. Evaluation of best practices in the design of online evidence-based practice instructional modules*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Margaret J.; Shurtz, Suzanne; Pepper, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The research determined to what extent best practices are being followed by freely available online modules aimed at teaching critical thinking and evidence-based practices (EBPs) in health sciences fields. Methods: In phase I, an evaluation rubric was created after reviewing the literature. Individual rubric questions were assigned point values and grouped into sections, and the sections weighted. Phase II involved searching Internet platforms to locate online EBP modules, which were screened to determine if they met predetermined criteria for inclusion. Phase III comprised a first evaluation, in which two authors assessed each module, followed by a second evaluation of the top-scoring modules by five representatives from different health sciences units. Results: The rubric's 28 questions were categorized into 4 sections: content, design, interactivity, and usability. After retrieving 170 online modules and closely screening 91, 42 were in the first evaluation and 8 modules were in the second evaluation. Modules in the first evaluation earned, on average, 59% of available points; modules in the second earned an average of 68%. Both evaluations had a moderate level of inter-rater reliability. Conclusions: The rubric was effective and reliable in evaluating the modules. Most modules followed best practices for content and usability but not for design and interactivity. Implications: By systematically collecting and evaluating instructional modules, the authors found many potentially useful elements for module creation. Also, by reviewing the limitations of the evaluated modules, the authors were able to anticipate and plan ways to overcome potential issues in module design. PMID:24415917

  5. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  6. Faculty Retention Study, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Texas Community Coll., McAllen. Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness.

    This survey attempted to study factors important to making faculty decide to continue or terminate employment at South Texas Community College (STCC). Surveys were e-mailed to 276 full time, regular faculty and 170 adjunct faculty with valid STCC e-mail addresses. Although 54% (150) of the full time faculty responded to the survey, it remains a…

  7. What Do Faculty Want?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chizmar, John F.; Williams, David B.

    2001-01-01

    Uses classroom experience and data from a faculty survey to explore what faculty want from instructional technology. Presents several assertions, such as "faculty want instructional technology driven by pedagogical goals" and "faculty desire Web-based tools designed for a specific pedagogical task as opposed to a Swiss-Army-knife Web tool designed…

  8. Scholarly productivity for nursing clinical track faculty.

    PubMed

    Tschannen, Dana; Anderson, Christine; Strobbe, Stephen; Bay, Esther; Bigelow, April; Dahlem, Chin Hwa Gina Y; Gosselin, Ann K; Pollard, Jennifer; Seng, Julia S

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have yielded substantial advancement by clinical track faculty in cohort expansion and collective contributions to the discipline of nursing. As a result, standards for progression and promotion for clinical faculty need to be more fully developed, articulated, and disseminated. Our school formed a task force to examine benchmarks for the progression and promotion of clinical faculty across schools of nursing, with the goal of guiding faculty, reviewers, and decision makers about what constitutes excellence in scholarly productivity. Results from analyses of curriculum vitae of clinical professors or associate professors at six universities with high research activity revealed a variety of productivity among clinical track members, which included notable diversity in the types of scholarly products. Findings from this project help quantify types of scholarship for clinical faculty at the time of promotion. This work provides a springboard for greater understanding of the contributions of clinical track faculty to nursing practice.

  9. Preventing and managing unprofessionalism in medical school faculties.

    PubMed

    Binder, Renee; Friedli, Amy; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Professionalism is a required competency for medical students, residents, practicing physicians, and academic faculty. Faculty members must adhere to codes of conduct or risk discipline. The authors describe issues of unprofessionalism that culminate in allegations of faculty misconduct or filing of grievances in academic medicine and outline strategies for early intervention and prevention. The authors, vice and associate deans and executive director of the office of faculty affairs at a large U.S. medical school, have handled many allegations of unprofessional conduct over the past decade. They present case examples based on behaviors such as lack of respect, inappropriate language and behavior, failure to cooperate with members of the health care team, and sexual harassment/discrimination. They discuss factors complicating evaluation of these behaviors, including variable definitions of respect, different cultural norms, and false allegations. The authors make recommendations for prevention and intervention, including early identification, performance management, education about sexual harassment, and referrals to professional coaches, anger management classes, and faculty-staff assistance programs.

  10. Faculty Handbook for Sabbaticals Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitz, Sally Innis

    Practical guidelines to help faculty members plan sabbaticals abroad are presented. It is recommended that plans be begun two years prior to the departure time in order to prepare a proposal if necessary, secure funding, and make housing and schooling arrangements for the family. Specific funding sources are identified, including U.S. federal…

  11. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  12. Contingent Faculty across the Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobe, Monica F.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a 1999 survey conducted by the Coalition on the Academic Workforce (CAW), a group of higher education and disciplinary associations concerned about the dramatic rise in contingent faculty, to examine the staffing practices across eleven humanities and social science disciplines. The comprehensive report showed…

  13. [Practical chemistry education provided by team-based learning (TBL) and peer evaluation].

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Konishi, Motomi; Nishida, Takahiro; Kushihata, Taro; Sone, Tomomichi; Kurio, Wasako; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Yanada, Kazuo; Nakamura, Mitsutaka

    2014-01-01

    Learning chemistry is cumulative: basic knowledge and chemical calculation skills are required to gain understanding of higher content. However, we often suffer from students' lack of learning skills to acquire these concepts. One of the reasons is the lack of adequate training in the knowledge and skills of chemistry, and one of the reasons for this lack is the lack of adequate evaluation of training procedures and content. Team-based learning (TBL) is a strong method for providing training in the knowledge and skills of chemistry and reaffirms the knowledge and skills of students of various levels. In our faculty, TBL exercises are provided for first-year students concurrently with lectures in physical chemistry and analytical chemistry. In this study, we researched the adoption of a peer evaluation process for this participatory learning model. Questionnaires taken after TBL exercises in the previous year showed a positive response to TBL. Further, a questionnaire taken after TBL exercises in the spring semester of the current year also yielded a positive response not only to TBL but also to peer evaluation. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between the improvement of students' grades in chemistry classes and the feeling the percentage (20%) of peer evaluation in overall evaluation low (logistic regression analysis, p=0.022). On the basis of the findings, we argue that TBL provides a generic, practical learning environment including an effective focus on learning strategy and evaluation of knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and studies on the educational effects of TBL and peer evaluation.

  14. e-Support4U: An evaluation of academic writing skills support in practice.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Lauren; Nicolls, Barbara

    2010-11-01

    The Faculty of Society and Health at Buckinghamshire New University is committed to the widening participation agenda and to providing support that enables our students to achieve the requirements of the programme and registration. Literacy and numeracy skill development is an integral part of the academic modules of our current pre-registration curriculum. E-Support4U was launched in semester two of 2008 with the aim of extending academic writing support beyond the confines of the University and into the practice arena. Evaluation of the project tentatively suggests that the scaffold approach to academic writing, based on Salmon's 5-stage framework, may have contributed to a 100% pass rate for the reflective practice-based assignment for this cohort of students. However, participants experienced issues around access; differing levels of IT skills, dispersed placements that contributed to a lack of active collaboration within the group. Recommendations include early introduction of blended learning and incorporation of web 2.0 technology into the curriculum.

  15. Sources of Tension and Conflict between Librarians and Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Mary

    1981-01-01

    A variety of issues are considered in a discussion of faculty-librarian relationships: traditional training and characteristics of college librarians, faculty involvement in policymaking and library practice, the library needs of scholars, stereotypes and individual personality differences, and faculty status for librarians. (MSE)

  16. Academic Faculty Wives and Systemic Discrimination--Antinepotism and "Inbreeding."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagg, Anne Innis

    1993-01-01

    A study at the University of Waterloo (Canada) investigated existence of formal or informal policies of (1) antinepotism affecting spouses of current faculty and (2) hiring of the department's own doctoral recipients. Although some departments do hire faculty spouses and own doctorates, many faculty oppose these practices. The questionnaire is…

  17. Assess and Invest: Faculty Feedback on Library Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelt, Kristina M.; Pendell, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Communication and collaboration with faculty are increasingly important in the development of both curriculum-integrated and stand-alone "just in time" library tutorials. In the final developmental stages of the Evidence-Based Practice online tutorials, faculty members were asked to provide input during structured faculty feedback…

  18. Family Medicine Educators' Perceptions of the Future of Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quirk, Mark; Lasser, Daniel; Domino, Frank; Chuman, Alan; Devaney-O'Neil, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Family medicine faculty participated in focus groups to gather their perceptions about faculty development. They emphasized that faculty development methods must be proven effective, woven into the fabric of clinical practice, and deal with increasing time and financial pressures. Much discussion was related to the need for national and regional…

  19. Faculty Employment at 4-Year Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiangmin

    2010-01-01

    We examine the variation in employment levels of part-time faculty, full-time teaching faculty, and full-time professorial faculty across 4-year colleges and universities in the United States. Employment structures and practices in higher education institutions are determined by a variety of economic and institutional factors. For example, a 1%…

  20. On the Status of Medical School Faculty and Clinical Research Manpower, 1968-1990. National Institutes of Health Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, C. R.; And Others

    The results of six studies concerning medical school faculty and clinical research personnel are presented. The studies concern: (1) career research productivity of physician faculty; (2) accession and attrition of medical school faculty who are recent physician graduates; (3) comparison of training programs for physician scientists; (4) the…

  1. Evaluation of health information outreach: theory, practice, and future direction*

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Wanda; Dutcher, Gale A.; Keselman, Alla

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Convincing evidence of the effectiveness of health information outreach projects is essential to ensure their continuity. This paper reviews the current state of health information outreach evaluation, characterizes strengths and weaknesses in projects' ability to measure their impact, and assesses enablers of and barriers to projects' success. It also relates the projects' characteristics to evaluation practices. The paper then makes recommendations for strengthening evaluation. Methods: Upon conducting a literature search, the authors identified thirty-three articles describing consumer health information outreach programs, published between 2000 and 2010. We then analyzed the outreach projects with respect to their goals and characteristics, evaluation methods and measures, and reported outcomes. Results: The results uncovered great variation in the quality of evaluation methods, outcome measures, and reporting. Outcome measures did not always match project objectives; few quantitative measures employed pretests or reported statistical significance; and institutional change was not measured in a structured way. While papers reported successful outcomes, greater rigor in measuring and documenting outcomes would be helpful. Conclusion: Planning outcome evaluation carefully and conducting research into mediators between health information and behavior will strengthen the ability to identify best practices and develop a theoretical framework and practical guidance for health information outreach. PMID:23646029

  2. Relationships Among Perceived Wellness Culture, Healthy Lifestyle Beliefs, and Healthy Behaviors in University Faculty and Staff: Implications for Practice and Future Research.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Amaya, Megan; Szalacha, Laura A; Hoying, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    Identifying key factors influencing healthy lifestyle behaviors in university faculty and staff is critical in designing interventions to improve health outcomes and reduce health care costs. A descriptive study was conducted with 3,959 faculty and staff at a Midwestern, U.S. University. Key measures included perceived worksite culture, healthy lifestyle beliefs, and healthy lifestyle behaviors. Healthy lifestyle beliefs were strongly positively associated with healthy lifestyle behaviors. Regression analyses demonstrated positive healthy lifestyle behaviors based upon sex (female, Std. β = .068, p < .001) and role (faculty, Std. β = .059, p < .001) and a negative effect of race (African Americans, Std. β = -.059, p < .001). The positive effect of perceived wellness culture on healthy lifestyle behaviors was completely mediated by healthy lifestyle beliefs. Interventions to enhance perceived wellness culture and healthy lifestyle beliefs should result in healthier behaviors and improved health outcomes.

  3. Effective Practices for Evaluating Education and Public Outreach Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, S.

    2013-12-01

    Stephanie Baird Wilkerson, PhD Carol Haden EdD Magnolia Consulting,LLC Education and public outreach (EPO) program developers and providers seeking insights regarding effective practices for evaluating EPO activities programs benefit from understanding why evaluation is critical to the success of EPO activities and programs, what data collection methods are appropriate, and how to effectively communicate and report findings. Based on our extensive experience evaluating EPO programs, we will share lessons learned and examples of how these practices play out in actual evaluation studies. EPO program developers, providers, and evaluators must consider several factors that influence which evaluation designs and data collection methods will be most appropriate, given the nature of EPO programs. Effective evaluation practices of EPO programs take into account a program's phase of development, duration, and budget as well as a program's intended outcomes. EPO programs that are just beginning development will have different evaluation needs and priorities than will well-established programs. Effective evaluation practices consider the 'life' of a program with an evaluation design that supports a program's growth through various phases including development, revision and refinement, and completion. It would be premature and inappropriate to expect the attainment of longer-term outcomes of activities during program development phases or early stages of implementation. During program development, EPO providers should clearly define program outcomes that are feasible and appropriate given a program's scope and expected reach. In many respects, this directly relates to the amount of time, or duration, intended audiences participate in EPO programs. As program duration increases so does the likelihood that the program can achieve longer-term outcomes. When choosing which outcomes are reasonable to impact and measure, program duration should be considered. Effective evaluation

  4. Firm Size, Ownership, Training Duration and Training Evaluation Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asadullah, Muhammad Ali; Peretti, Jean Marie; Ali, Arain Ghulam; Bourgain, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to test the mediating role of training duration in relationship between firm characteristics and training evaluation practices. In this paper, the authors also investigated if this mediating effect differs with respect to the size of the firm. Design/methodology/approach: The authors collected data from 260…

  5. Developing, implementing, and evaluating a professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Basol, Roberta; Hilleren-Listerud, Amy; Chmielewski, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how The Compass, a professional practice model (PPM), was developed through clinical nurse involvement, review of literature, expert opinion, and an innovative schematic. Implementation was supported through a dynamic video account of a patient story, interwoven with The Compass. Postproject evaluation of PPM integration demonstrates opportunities for professional nursing development and future planning. PMID:25479174

  6. Grounded Practice: Putting the "Self" Back into Self-Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, David

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by Whitehead and McNiff's "living theory" approach and the "Thinking Schools International" programme, this paper focuses on issues surrounding self-evaluation practices in schools and research aimed at school improvement, with specific consideration given to grounded theory and action research. Specifically, the…

  7. Expanding Conceptions of Inquiry and Practice in Supervision and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sergiovanni, Thomas T.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical and practical perspectives, absolute and bounded rationality, the nature of reality, and the subject-object problem are discussed to point out the blind spots in the scientific-technical view of teacher supervision and evaluation. Multiple perspectives of knowledge development and use are needed to build an expansive science of…

  8. An Evaluation of Best Practices in Online Continuing Theological Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raybon, Stephen Paul

    2012-01-01

    The principle purpose of this mixed methods case study was to evaluate the extent to which a wholly online continuing theological education program operated by an Association of Theological Schools accredited seminary modeled best practices of online education, as exemplified by the findings of the "Quality On the Line" study and the…

  9. A Model for Evaluating eXtension Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelsey, Kathleen D.; Stafne, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    As Americans shift their work and leisure activities online, Extension seeks to remain viable by delivering programs through a website known as eXtension. eXtension is predicated on the voluntary labor of Extension specialists and educators who form Communities of Practice to create and deliver content through the website. Evaluation of eXtension…

  10. Sampling and Measurement Error in Faculty Activity and Effort Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Edgar; Kutina, Kenneth L.

    1974-01-01

    Evaluates a stratified sampling method developed at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine to estimate mean faculty effort devoted to programs from randomly selected faculty samples over three consecutive years. (Author/PG)

  11. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes.

  12. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    PubMed

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes. PMID:18358441

  13. Solving the nurse faculty shortage: exploring retention issues.

    PubMed

    Berent, Georgine R; Anderko, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have explored reasons why nurse faculty leave academia, but few have focused on factors that encourage them to stay. Using Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory, an online cross-sectional survey was completed by 1,171 tenured nurse faculty nationwide. Factor analysis revealed that the most significant factor influencing retention was professional satisfaction with faculty identity, including the ability to shape nursing practice. Academia may benefit by considering these factors to promote nurse faculty retention.

  14. Solving the nurse faculty shortage: exploring retention issues.

    PubMed

    Berent, Georgine R; Anderko, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have explored reasons why nurse faculty leave academia, but few have focused on factors that encourage them to stay. Using Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene Theory, an online cross-sectional survey was completed by 1,171 tenured nurse faculty nationwide. Factor analysis revealed that the most significant factor influencing retention was professional satisfaction with faculty identity, including the ability to shape nursing practice. Academia may benefit by considering these factors to promote nurse faculty retention. PMID:21857339

  15. Faculty Hiring and Development at BYU: Perspectives of a Recent Hire and Department Chair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, R. Steven

    2002-04-01

    I will present a personal perspective on the transition from an industrial to an academic physicist. For those planning on a similar transition, I will mention several things that were helpful in preparing myself, marketing myself, and adapting to an academic setting. For instance, a significant difference between academic and industrial physics is the responsibility of classroom teaching. Several things that proved particularly useful in improving my own teaching were mentoring teaching partnerships, student evaluations, help in the tenure and promotion process, and programs available from our Faculty Center. From my current perspective as a department chair, I will further discuss mentoring practices I have found helpful with other new faculty. These include such things as inviting mentors to participate with new faculty in development workshops and providing financial and other recognition for participation as a mentor. In addition to developing professional skills, I have found that good mentoring is particularly critical in encouraging new faculty to adapt to departmental culture. Finally, I will discuss ideas I have found helpful in successfully recruiting new faculty. This involves researching, identifying, and actively recruiting faculty we think will build our department. For us, it has not been sufficient to passively rely on responses from applicants to advertisements and word-of-mouth inquiries. Through careful hiring and effective mentoring, we have developed an excellent record of having our faculty being successful in the tenure process.

  16. Evaluation, or Just Data Collection? An Exploration of the Evaluation Practice of Selected UK Environmental Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Sarah Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the evaluation practices of environmental educators. Questionnaires and discussion groups with a convenience sample of UK-based practitioners were used to uncover their evaluation methods. Although many report that they are evaluating regularly, this is mainly monitoring numbers of participants or an assessment of enjoyment.…

  17. An Orientation Program for Clinical Adjunct Faculty.

    PubMed

    Rice, Gwendolyn

    2016-01-01

    Having highly competent clinical faculty in an institution of higher learning is a prerequisite for graduating safe nurses in the future. The purpose of this project was to increase each clinical nurse's knowledge and skills for the new role of clinical adjunct nursing faculty. Successful implementation of this program will help promote consistency in effective job performance of clinical adjunct faculty and facilitate achievement of the projected goals and outcomes. This orientation program was presented in a one day face-to-face encounter with twelve (12) adjunct faculty members, tenured and others on the tenured track. These faculty members were hired by City Colleges of Chicago (CCC) School of Nursing Program at the Malcolm X College. Presentations were given by attendees with a lesson plan. Pre-test, post-test and evaluation forms were presented and it was agreed that an orientation program should be developed and presented to all newly hired clinical adjunct nursing faculty at CCC.

  18. An Orientation Program for Clinical Adjunct Faculty.

    PubMed

    Rice, Gwendolyn

    2016-01-01

    Having highly competent clinical faculty in an institution of higher learning is a prerequisite for graduating safe nurses in the future. The purpose of this project was to increase each clinical nurse's knowledge and skills for the new role of clinical adjunct nursing faculty. Successful implementation of this program will help promote consistency in effective job performance of clinical adjunct faculty and facilitate achievement of the projected goals and outcomes. This orientation program was presented in a one day face-to-face encounter with twelve (12) adjunct faculty members, tenured and others on the tenured track. These faculty members were hired by City Colleges of Chicago (CCC) School of Nursing Program at the Malcolm X College. Presentations were given by attendees with a lesson plan. Pre-test, post-test and evaluation forms were presented and it was agreed that an orientation program should be developed and presented to all newly hired clinical adjunct nursing faculty at CCC. PMID:26930766

  19. A realist evaluation of the role of communities of practice in changing healthcare practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Healthcare organisations seeking to manage knowledge and improve organisational performance are increasingly investing in communities of practice (CoPs). Such investments are being made in the absence of empirical evidence demonstrating the impact of CoPs in improving the delivery of healthcare. A realist evaluation is proposed to address this knowledge gap. Underpinned by the principle that outcomes are determined by the context in which an intervention is implemented, a realist evaluation is well suited to understand the role of CoPs in improving healthcare practice. By applying a realist approach, this study will explore the following questions: What outcomes do CoPs achieve in healthcare? Do these outcomes translate into improved practice in healthcare? What are the contexts and mechanisms by which CoPs improve healthcare? Methods The realist evaluation will be conducted by developing, testing, and refining theories on how, why, and when CoPs improve healthcare practice. When collecting data, context will be defined as the setting in which the CoP operates; mechanisms will be the factors and resources that the community offers to influence a change in behaviour or action; and outcomes will be defined as a change in behaviour or work practice that occurs as a result of accessing resources provided by the CoP. Discussion Realist evaluation is being used increasingly to study social interventions where context plays an important role in determining outcomes. This study further enhances the value of realist evaluations by incorporating a social network analysis component to quantify the structural context associated with CoPs. By identifying key mechanisms and contexts that optimise the effectiveness of CoPs, this study will contribute to creating a framework that will guide future establishment and evaluation of CoPs in healthcare. PMID:21600057

  20. Commentary: faculty development: the road less traveled.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Yvonne

    2011-04-01

    The 2020 Vision of Faculty Development Across the Medical Education Continuum conference, and the resulting articles in this issue, addressed a number of topics related to the future of faculty development. Focusing primarily on the development of faculty members as teachers, conference participants debated issues related to core teaching competencies, barriers to effective teaching, competency-based assessment, relationship-centered care, the hidden curriculum that faculty members encounter, instructional technologies, continuing medical education, and research on faculty development. However, a number of subjects were not addressed. If faculty development is meant to play a leading role in ensuring that academic medicine remains responsive to faculty members and societal needs, additional themes should be considered. Medical educators should broaden the focus of faculty development and target the various roles that clinicians and basic scientists play, including those of leader and scholar. They must also remember that faculty development can play a critical role in curricular and organizational change and thus enlarge the scope of faculty development by moving beyond formal, structured activities, incorporating notions of self-directed learning, peer mentoring, and work-based learning. In addition, medical educators should try to situate faculty development in a more global context and collaborate with international colleagues in the transformation of medical education and health care delivery. It has been said that faculty development can play a critical role in promoting culture change at a number of levels. A broader mandate, innovative programming that takes advantage of communities of practice, and new partnerships can help to achieve this objective.

  1. To Improve the Academy: Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education.

    This annual journal issue contains 21 papers, many of which were developed as background pieces for sessions of the annual conferences of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education (POD). Papers are grouped into four sections on: personal reflections, faculty development, evaluation of teaching practices, and…

  2. Moving a Mountain: Transforming the Role of Contingent Faculty in Composition Studies and Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schell, Eileen E., Ed.; Stock, Patricia Lambert, Ed.

    This book addresses the counterproductive conditions in which part-time and non-tenure-track composition faculty must teach, using case studies, local narratives, and models for ethical employment practices. It presents and evaluates a range of proactive strategies for change, both for local conditions and broader considerations. Section 1,…

  3. Faculty development for underrepresented minority dental faculty and residents.

    PubMed

    Gates, Paul; Ubu, Ngozi; Smithey, Leslie; Rogers, Jennifer; Haden, N Karl; Rodriguez, Tobias; Albino, Judith E N; Evans, Clyde; Zarkowski, Pamela; Weinstein, George; Hendricson, William D

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the implementation and evaluation of the Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center Dental Faculty Development Program (DFDP) for fifteen participants: five advanced dental education faculty members and ten residents. The 100-hour DFDP, designed in the longitudinal immersion model for faculty development, was conducted in four phases at the Bronx-Lebanon Department of Dentistry in the Bronx, New York, in 2010-11. The DFDP was implemented to help underrepresented minority (URM) dental residents and clinical faculty members develop skills necessary for academic careers and enhanced teaching effectiveness. The program's curriculum had four themes: teaching and learning, scholarship, academic leadership, and career planning. For each phase, the participants completed pre- and post-training assessments of their knowledge, attitudes, and confidence, as well as qualitative evaluation of DFDP organization, content, activities, and value. The participants' pre-instruction mean knowledge score for all phases combined was 48.3 percent, and the post-test score was 81.1 percent (p=0.01). The participants showed minimal change in their attitudes about educational issues, but they reported enhanced confidence for twenty-five skills addressed in the DFDP. The total confidence score was 77.5 (25 skills × 3.1 group mean) on all pre-tests combined and 100.2 (25 × 4.0 group mean) on the post-tests (p=0.01). The participant ratings for overall DFDP implementation and for twenty-four topical sessions were uniformly positive. The faculty and resident participants in this year-long faculty development initiative at an advanced dental education program with a high URM representation demonstrated enhanced knowledge and confidence and provided positive program evaluations. This report also describes curricular and assessment enhancements for subsequent years of the DFDP based on the first-year outcomes. PMID:23486892

  4. Blending Our Practice: Using Online and Face-to-Face Methods to Sustain Community among Faculty in an Extended Length Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paskevicius, Michael; Bortolin, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the design and implementation of a nine-month faculty development programme delivered using a combination of face-to-face and online methods. Participants from a range of disciplines met at regular intervals throughout the year. Between the face-to-face meetings, participants engaged in online activities such as discussions,…

  5. Dynamics of Faculty Engagement in the Movement for Democracy's Education at Northern Arizona University: Backgrounds, Practices, and Future Horizons. Kettering Foundation Working Paper: [2015:02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Romand; Scarnati, Blase

    2015-01-01

    As scholarship has become increasingly narrow and disconnected from public life, Kettering research has documented an intense sense of malaise in higher education, what Harry Boyte has called a loss of civic agency. Surprisingly, however, faculty at a few campuses have begun to self-organize to integrate civic work into their teaching and…

  6. Developing Professional Forums that Support Thoughtful Discussion, Reflection, and Social Action: One Faculty's Commitment to Social Justice and Culturally Responsive Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Ann; Schlichting, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    There are many challenges facing those educators who strive to ensure that their pre-service teachers understand the issues surrounding equity and social justice. In response to these challenges, and in response to the interests, questions, and concerns of the faculty in a School of Education, two professors worked collaboratively with…

  7. Teaching Faculty How To Use Technology: Best Practices from Leading Institutions. American Council on Education/Oryx Press Series on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epper, Rhonda M., Ed.; Bates, A. W., Ed.

    The case studies and analyses in this book address the ways in which higher education institutions are responding to the growing demand for faculty support in the use of technology. Cases were selected from more than 100 institutions that participated in a study by the State Higher Education Executive Officers and the American Productivity &…

  8. Faculty Policies for Granting Salary Increases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John D.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Profiles of thirty faculty members, including background information, student evaluations, publications, and service activities were constructed. Twelve faculty members served as judges regarding salary increases for the ensuing school year. Salary increases were found and analyzed through judgment analysis, a useful technique for identifying the…

  9. The Madness of Weighted Mean Faculty Salaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micceri, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Higher education frequently uses weighted mean faculty salaries to compare either across institutions, or to evaluate an institution's salary growth over time. Unfortunately, faculty salaries are an extraordinarily complex phenomenon that cannot be legitimately reduced to a single number any more than the academic construct of skills, knowledge,…

  10. Faculty Perceptions of Online Accounting Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Amanda M.; Johnson, Leigh R.

    2015-01-01

    The perceptions of faculty members, who design and evaluate online accounting coursework content, are an important consideration in determining the quality inherent in such content. This study reports the results of a survey which examines accounting faculty members' attitudes towards online education (measured as their willingness to accept…

  11. Faculty Attitudes and Behaviors Concerning Student Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpe, Rebecca; Davidson, Laura; Bell, Matthew C.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between university faculty attitudes concerning student cheating and syllabus statements on academic integrity were evaluated to determine the relationship between faculty attitudes and their actual attempts to deter cheating rates through their syllabi. No relationship was found between attitudes about student cheating and the…

  12. Introducing guidelines for good evaluation practice in health informatics.

    PubMed

    Nykänen, Pirkko; Brender, Jytte; Ammenwerth, Elske; Talmon, Jan; de Keizer, Nicolette; Rigby, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Good evaluation practice guidelines have been developed through a consensus making process by a core team and the health informatics community. A set of 60 issues has been identified that is relevant for planning, implementation and execution of an evaluation study in the health informatics domain. These issues cover all phases of an evaluation study: Study exploration, first study design, operationalization of methods, detailed study design, execution and finalization of an evaluation study. Issues of risk management and project control are also addressed in the guidelines. Through application of these guidelines the general validity and generalization of evaluation studies are likely to be increased, since these guidelines aim at avoiding a number of omissions, pitfalls and risks. PMID:19745455

  13. Faculty-Curriculum Development. Curriculum Design by Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yura, Helen; And Others

    Faculty curriculum development, and specific applications to nursing education, are addressed in 37 papers and 6 discussion summaries from 1973 and 1974 workshops sponsored by the National League for Nursing. Attention is directed to: the curriculum development process, curriculum evaluation, the conceptual framework as a part of curriculum…

  14. Finding an Analytic Frame for Faculty-Student Interaction within Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mara, Miriam; Mara, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a case study analyzing how a Faculty-in-Residence program fosters student engagement. Using Cox & Orehovec's typology to add granularity to the National Study on Student Engagement's criteria for student engagement, we suggest best practices for the implementation of these in-situ faculty engagement programs.

  15. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS): Differentiating Faculty Knowledge and Experience in Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanauer, David I.; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education reform efforts have called for widespread adoption of evidence-based teaching in which faculty members attend to student outcomes through assessment practice. Awareness about the importance of assessment has illuminated the need to understand what faculty members know and how they engage…

  16. Evaluating Masters of School Administration Internship Experiences: Practices and Competencies Quantified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringler, Marjorie; Rouse, William; St. Clair, Randy

    2012-01-01

    The Masters of School Administration (MSA) at East Carolina University culminates with a year-long internship that incorporates multiple assessments to evaluate administrative experiences. One of the assessments allows for faculty to determine how each student's experiences align with the North Carolina School Executive Standards (NCSES). Analysis…

  17. The Influence of Nursing Faculty Workloads on Faculty Retention: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing faculty workloads have come to the forefront of discussion in nursing education. The National League of Nursing (NLN) has made nursing faculty workloads a high priority in nursing education. Included in the priorities are areas of creating reform through innovations in nursing education, evaluating reform through evaluation research, and…

  18. Student vs Faculty Curriculum Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Coke R.; Myers, Rosemary

    1975-01-01

    Attitudes toward advisers and first-year academic progress were assessed for 223 freshman students at Idaho State University. Students advised by students had more positive attitudes toward their advisers and lower drop rates than those advised by faculty. No difference was observed for achieved GPA. Bases for evaluation are discussed. (Author)

  19. Evaluation and treatment of hypernatremia: a practical guide for physicians.

    PubMed

    Liamis, George; Filippatos, Theodosios D; Elisaf, Moses S

    2016-01-01

    Hypernatremia (serum sodium concentration >145 mEq/L) is a common electrolyte disorder with increased morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly and critically ill patients. The review presents the main pathogenetic mechanisms of hypernatremia, provides specific directions for the evaluation of patients with increased sodium levels and describes a detailed algorithm for the proper correction of hypernatremia. Furthermore, two representative cases of hypovolemic and hypervolemic hypernatremia are presented along with practical clues for their proper evaluation and treatment. Accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment is crucial since undercorrection or overcorrection of hypernatremia are both associated with poor patients' prognosis. PMID:26813151

  20. Exploring Vocational Evaluation Practices following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Dillahunt-Aspillaga, Christina; Jorgensen Smith, Tammy; Hanson, Ardis; Ehlke, Sarah; Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Dixon, Charlotte G.; Quichocho, Davina

    2015-01-01

    Background. Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) face many challenges when attempting to return to work (RTW). Vocational evaluation (VE) is a systematic process that involves assessment and appraisal of an individual's current work-related characteristics and abilities. Objective. The aims of this study are to (1) examine demographic and employment characteristics of vocational rehabilitation providers (VRPs), (2) identify the specific evaluation methods that are used in the VE of individuals with TBI, and (3) examine the differences in assessment method practices based upon evaluator assessment preferences. Methods. This exploratory case study used a forty-six-item online survey which was distributed to VRPs. Results. One hundred and nine VRPs accessed the survey. Of these, 74 completed the survey. A majority of respondents were female (79.7%), Caucasian (71.6%), and holding a master's degree (74.3%), and more than half (56.8%) were employed as state vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRCs). In addition, over two-thirds (67.6%) were certified rehabilitation counselors (CRCs). Respondents reported using several specific tools and assessments during the VE process. Conclusions. Study findings reveal differences in use of and rationales for specific assessments amongst VRPs. Understanding VRP assessment practices and use of an evidence-based framework for VE following TBI may inform and improve VE practice. PMID:26494945

  1. At the Tipping Point? Role of Formal Faculty Mentoring in Changing University Research Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.; Hutinger, Janice L.

    2008-01-01

    The present article focuses on how faculty can be guided in the mentoring process and how formal mentoring programs improve practice, as well as the impact of formal mentoring on new faculty and faculty mentors. The empirical case study described features a new faculty mentoring program in its second year of development in a university research…

  2. Evaluating Youth Sexual Health Peer Education Programs: "Challenges and Suggestions for Effective Evaluation Practices"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaworsky, Denise; Larkin, June; Sriranganathan, Gobika; Clout, Jerri; Janssen, Jesse; Campbell, Lisa; Flicker, Sarah; Stadnicki, Dan; Erlich, Leah; Flynn, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Although peer sexual health education is a common form of sexual health promotion for youth, systematic reviews of these programs are relatively rare. In this study we interviewed youth peer educators to inquire about their experience of program evaluation and their perception of what is needed to develop effective evaluation practices. Data were…

  3. Evaluating the Economic Viability of Universities by Using Price-Level-Adjusted Financial Data. Faculty Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, James L.; Snyder, Gerald E.

    Ways in which the external financial disclosures by universities may evaluate institutional economic viability are demonstrated. It is argued that the evaluation should take into account the effect of inflation and activity level. The evaluation model requires several years' information about revenues (general operating fund), the impact of…

  4. Colleges and Money. A Faculty Guide to Academic Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Change Magazine, New Rochelle, NY.

    The basics of academic economics are examined in this faculty guide. The modern management movement has reached American higher education and has created new expectations concerning the faculty's role. An earlier preoccupation with management methods has been replaced by concentration on evaluation. Faculty should share in the preparation of their…

  5. Extensive UOP Program Brings (and) Keeps Faculty UP to Speed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trippe, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Describes programs at the University of Phoenix to develop and enhance faculty effectiveness. Discusses training for first-time online courses; continuous online training (including: the Faculty Writing Workshop; Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum; Grading, Evaluation, and Feedback; Learning Teams; and other courses); faculty peer reviews;…

  6. Students' Perceptions and Faculty Measured Competencies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malechwanzi, J. Muthiani; Lei, Hongde; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether there is significant relationship between students' perceived faculty competencies and faculty evaluated competencies. The study identified four main dimensions for measuring faculty competencies namely: teaching, research, additional services and advising. This study adopted a mixed method design. The study…

  7. Evaluation of clinical teaching models for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Croxon, Lyn; Maginnis, Cathy

    2009-07-01

    Clinical placements provide opportunities for student nurses to learn experientially. To create a constructive learning environment staff need to be friendly, approachable, available and willing to teach. There must be adequate opportunities for students to develop confidence and competence in clinical skills with a focus on student learning needs rather than service needs of facilities. A popular model for clinical teaching of nursing students is the preceptor model. This model involves a student working under the supervision of individual registered nurses who are part of the clinical staff. This model was failing to meet students' needs in acute nursing practice areas, largely due to Registered Nurse staff shortages and demanding workloads. The students' evaluations led to the trial of a 'cluster' or group model of eight students, with a clinical facilitator who is paid by the university, in each acute nursing ward. Evaluation of twenty nursing students' perceptions of their acute nursing practice clinical placements was conducted using a mixed method approach to evaluate the two models of student supervision. Results indicate that the students prefer small groups with the clinical facilitator in one area. Thus evaluation and feedback from students and the perceptions of their clinical placement is essential. PMID:18722161

  8. Faculty beliefs on fundamental dimensions of scholarship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnegan, Brian

    Many noted academicians in recent years have called for a closer examination and redefinition of what is considered scholarly activity. This study explores two natural science departments where faculty roles have been refined to place an emphasis on teaching. How have these roles come about and how are they being accepted? What beliefs or attitudes are contributing to their success or failure? Do the relative disciplines have any effect? By interviewing the faculty of these departments, and surveying their colleagues in similar departments, with respect to their beliefs and practices, future programs for faculty development will be given important information and guidance. The importance of content specific knowledge related to many of the links faculty perceived between teaching and research. Chemists were more likely than biologists to report that research was required for faculty to maintain up-to-date content area knowledge. Both groups reported that research is the best way to remain current. Teaching., most reported helped to prevent faculty knowledge of their content area from becoming too narrowly focused. Teaching was also believed to improve faculty research through development of communication skills. Faculty accept, with reservations, the importance of wider views of scholarship, but in general are dubious of distinct career paths for teaching-oriented and research-oriented faculty. The chairs and the majority of the faculty felt that their departments were improved by the inclusion of some faculty who concentrated on studying teaching and worked to improve the experience of the department's undergraduate students. The field of faculty development in higher education is an expanding, evolving one. The faculty developer can serve as a liaison between the leadership of an institution and the professoriate. When this occurs it is possible to change the culture of an institution. In order to build a lasting culture based on teaching as a cornerstone of

  9. Scores on Standard Measures of Academic Achievement and Family Practice Clerkship Evaluations by Students Choosing Family Practice and Non-Family Practice Specialties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos-Outcalt, Doug; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study of 658 University of Arizona medical school graduates compared standardized test scores, grade point averages, and family practice clerkship evaluations for students selecting family practice and non-family practice specialties. Family practice graduates scored lower on the national licensing examination, but there was no difference in…

  10. A report on a national study of doctoral nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Dreher, H Michael; Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith; Cornelius, Frances H; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2012-12-01

    This article reports on a national study of doctoral nursing faculty, including both PhD and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) faculty. Using a national sample of 624 doctoral nursing faculty, we surveyed individuals on a variety of issues, including succession planning, retirement, quality of life as a doctoral faculty member, their views on the new DNP degree, and how they view the future of doctoral nursing education. Study implications for both DNP and PhD faculty are explored and the meaning of the findings of the study for the future are discussed, including new items that will be investigated in a repeat survey in 2012.

  11. WHERE Are the Faculty? Fulfilling the Traditional Faculty Role at a Distance.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G

    2016-01-01

    Innovative approaches are needed to retain seasoned nursing faculty. Technology provides opportunities for faculty to fulfill the traditional roles of teaching, research, and service from a site removed from the traditional campus. The purpose of this article is to encourage faculty and administrators in traditional, land-based colleges and universities to thoughtfully consider the advantages and challenges of the remote worksite for faculty based on the experience of one faculty. Some faculty are better suited to a remote work environment than others. Long-term established faculty may be better able to successfully transition to the tripartite faculty roles with greater ease than novice nurse educators as a result of their familiarity with the institutional resources and comfort in the teaching role. Preparation for the remote experience must be diligent and thoughtful, considering equipment needs, connectivity, and support personnel and strategies for ensuring continued engagement within the nursing education program. Institutional policies must also be considered related to fulfillment of the faculty role via distance technology. A pilot experience for one faculty, as described here, may be useful for evaluating the cost-benefit to the individual and the institution. PMID:27424925

  12. WHERE Are the Faculty? Fulfilling the Traditional Faculty Role at a Distance.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G

    2016-01-01

    Innovative approaches are needed to retain seasoned nursing faculty. Technology provides opportunities for faculty to fulfill the traditional roles of teaching, research, and service from a site removed from the traditional campus. The purpose of this article is to encourage faculty and administrators in traditional, land-based colleges and universities to thoughtfully consider the advantages and challenges of the remote worksite for faculty based on the experience of one faculty. Some faculty are better suited to a remote work environment than others. Long-term established faculty may be better able to successfully transition to the tripartite faculty roles with greater ease than novice nurse educators as a result of their familiarity with the institutional resources and comfort in the teaching role. Preparation for the remote experience must be diligent and thoughtful, considering equipment needs, connectivity, and support personnel and strategies for ensuring continued engagement within the nursing education program. Institutional policies must also be considered related to fulfillment of the faculty role via distance technology. A pilot experience for one faculty, as described here, may be useful for evaluating the cost-benefit to the individual and the institution.

  13. Inequalities in health: evaluation and effectiveness in practice.

    PubMed

    Lazenbatt, A; Orr, J; O'Neill, E

    2001-12-01

    This paper details the findings from a project that assessed the contribution made by nurses, midwives and health visitors to targeting health and social need. This is an important theme within the Northern Ireland Regional Strategy entitled 'Health and well-being into the next millennium: a regional strategy for health and social well-being 1997-2002', which is concerned with addressing inequalities in health status and social well-being. In response to this initial survey, the paper also highlights the second phase of the project that was the development of an evaluation manual specifically designed to assist health-care practitioners in establishing evaluation frameworks and in applying evaluation techniques and methods. The paper describes four research case studies that are intended to illustrate the kinds of evaluation methods necessary to cover the stages of evaluation, needs assessment, structure, process and outcome, and to reflect the experience of applied evaluation as it occurs in practice as opposed to how it appears in textbooks.

  14. Design, implementation and evaluation of a community health training program in an integrated problem-based medical curriculum: a fifteen-year experience at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chastonay, Philippe; Vu, Nu Viet; Humair, Jean-Paul; Mpinga, Emmanuel Kabengele; Bernheim, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Background In the literature the need for relevance in medical education and training has been stressed. In the last 40 years medical schools have been challenged to train doctors competent to respond to community health needs. In the mid-90s the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine introduced an integrated medical curriculum. In this initiative a particular emphasis was put in introducing a 6-year longitudinal and multidisciplinary Community Health Program (CHP). Objectives The aims of the present article are to describe the conception, elaboration and implementation of the CHP as well as its evolution over 15 years and the evaluation of its outcomes. Methods The CHP was at its origin elaborated by a small group of highly motivated teachers and later on developed by a multi-disciplinary group of primary care physicians, epidemiologists, public health and bio-ethics specialists, occupational health professionals, lawyers and historians. Evaluation of the program outcomes included educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Results The CHP learning objectives and teaching modalities were defined by the multi-disciplinary group in consensus meetings which triggered a collaborative spirit among teachers and facilitated further developments. The evaluation procedures allowed the monitoring of students’ satisfaction which remained high over the years, students’ active participation which decreased over time and success at certifying exams which was globally as good as in basic life sciences. The evaluation also assessed outcomes such as educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Conclusion As suggested in the literature, our experience shows that the students’ direct exposure and practice in the community health environment is an effective training approach to broaden students’ education by offering them a community

  15. Evaluating Online Tutorials for University Faculty, Staff, and Students: The Contribution of Just-in-Time Online Resources to Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Jennifer; Park, Yeonjeong

    2011-01-01

    The effective integration of current technologies in teaching and research is a high priority for today's universities. To support the technology skills of university faculty, staff, and students, the subject university's office for faculty training and support, provides free, 24/7 access to a collection of online technology tutorials leased from…

  16. Using Faculty Preference to Identify Disciplinary Pairs and Foster Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Mahauganee D.; Dumford, Amber D.; Cole, Eddie R.; Nelson Laird, Thomas F.; Haywood, Antwione M.

    2015-01-01

    Data from the 2010 administration of the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement were used to identify pairs of disciplines in which faculty want to be compared based on research practices, teaching practices, and perceptions of student engagement in academic activities. The goal of this study was to group disciplines by a method with which faculty…

  17. POD evaluation using simulation: Progress, practice and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Nicolas; Reverdy, Frédéric

    2016-02-01

    NDT performances evaluation in the aeronautic industry is made by estimating Probability of Detection (POD). It is a statistical estimation of the capability of a given NDT procedure to detect defects as a function of their size. The accuracy of the statistical estimation is directly linked the quality and quantity of collected data. The more data and the more realistic they are, the better the POD estimation. This practical production of data may have very high cost, sometimes obliging to decrease either the quantity or the quality (realistic) of data, or even both. In the last decade MAPOD and simulation-based POD approaches have emerged and been used for concept demonstration as a solution to decrease the cost of evaluating POD. Today tools are available to support these studies and are used in industrial laboratories. This paper reviews some examples of POD evaluation using simulation, describes the actual practice of the tools in the European aeronautical context and also draws some limits and perspectives for a future wider application of the simulation helped POD approach.

  18. Determining if shared leadership is being practiced: evaluation methodology.

    PubMed

    Spooner, S H; Keenan, R; Card, M

    1997-01-01

    This article explores the use of a cognitive information-processing structure, mental models, to assess an organizational management change to shared leadership (SL). The purpose of this study was to describe the mental models of critical care nurses after the implementation of an SL management model. Scenarios based on daily clinical situations and measuring three SL concepts (empowerment, accountability, and partnership in decision making) were posed to critical care nurses in personal interviews. By using this evaluation methodology, nurse administrators can determine to what extent a new management change has been incorporated into daily nursing practice and in what areas to target further education and resources.

  19. Practice-centred evaluation and the privileging of care in health information technology evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic Patient Records (EPRs) and telemedicine are positioned by policymakers as health information technologies that are integral to achieving improved clinical outcomes and efficiency savings. However, evaluating the extent to which these aims are met poses distinct evaluation challenges, particularly where clinical and cost outcomes form the sole focus of evaluation design. We propose that a practice-centred approach to evaluation - in which those whose day-to-day care practice is altered (or not) by the introduction of new technologies are placed at the centre of evaluation efforts – can complement and in some instances offer advantages over, outcome-centric evaluation models. Methods We carried out a regional programme of innovation in renal services where a participative approach was taken to the introduction of new technologies, including: a regional EPR system and a system to support video clinics. An ‘action learning’ approach was taken to procurement, pre-implementation planning, implementation, ongoing development and evaluation. Participants included clinicians, technology specialists, patients and external academic researchers. Whilst undergoing these activities we asked: how can a practice-centred approach be embedded into evaluation of health information technologies? Discussion Organising EPR and telemedicine evaluation around predetermined outcome measures alone can be impractical given the complex and contingent nature of such projects. It also limits the extent to which unforeseen outcomes and new capabilities are recognised. Such evaluations often fail to improve understanding of ‘when’ and ‘under what conditions’ technology-enabled service improvements are realised, and crucially, how such innovation improves care. Summary Our contribution, drawn from our experience of the case study provided, is a protocol for practice-centred, participative evaluation of technology in the clinical setting that privileges care. In

  20. [Students awareness of health teaching: evaluation of "health education" course and the occupational health nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Junko; Majima, Yukie; Ishihara, Itsuko

    2003-09-01

    The "health education" course is an important part of the baccalaureate curriculum in nursing. It is essential to teach students effective health education in a client oriented way. In order to improve the quality and content of this course, we extracted students descriptions from records of 44 students who had carried out group health education during nursing practice for the occupational health nursing course. We then analyzed students written sentences on their views concerning health teaching. After sentence analysis, we categorized these concepts into groups and titled them. The results of clarification of categories showed that the most common student awareness was in regard to technical and instructional skills, such as precise and suitable language selection for laymen, and utilization of teaching devices or mediums, during implementation of health teaching(43.6%). Secondly, assessment of health needs for a certain working population(10.3%), and effective teaching types such as instructional participant volunteers and full participation(9.2%) were deemed important. Thirdly, identification of the role of the occupational nurse(7.7%), and lastly the necessity of evaluation(2.3%) were considered necessary. Over all, in this study we found that students were most concerned about the instructional skills during the presentation of health education. Also, these results suggest that development of contents in the "health education" course to reinforce students assessment and evaluative abilities should be incorporated into the course. Furthermore, faculties who teach a "health education" course should provide a large variety of teaching materials and creative instructional methods for the students.

  1. Practical approaches for evaluating adrenal toxicity in nonclinical safety assessment

    PubMed Central

    Inomata, Akira; Sasano, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal gland has characteristic morphological and biochemical features that render it particularly susceptible to the actions of xenobiotics. As is the case with other endocrine organs, the adrenal gland is under the control of upstream organs (hypothalamic-pituitary system) in vivo, often making it difficult to elucidate the mode of toxicity of a test article. It is very important, especially for pharmaceuticals, to determine whether a test article-related change is caused by a direct effect or other associated factors. In addition, antemortem data, including clinical signs, body weight, food consumption and clinical pathology, and postmortem data, including gross pathology, organ weight and histopathologic examination of the adrenal glands and other related organs, should be carefully monitored and evaluated. During evaluation, the following should also be taken into account: (1) species, sex and age of animals used, (2) metabolic activation by a cytochrome P450 enzyme(s) and (3) physicochemical properties and the metabolic pathway of the test article. In this review, we describe the following crucial points for toxicologic pathologists to consider when evaluating adrenal toxicity: functional anatomy, blood supply, hormone production in each compartment, steroid biosynthesis, potential medulla-cortex interaction, and species and gender differences in anatomical features and other features of the adrenal gland which could affect vulnerability to toxic effects. Finally practical approaches for evaluating adrenal toxicity in nonclinical safety studies are discussed. PMID:26441474

  2. A framework for the design, implementation, and evaluation of interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Pardue, Karen T

    2015-01-01

    The growing emphasis on teamwork and care coordination within health care delivery is sparking interest in interprofessional education (IPE) among nursing and health profession faculty. Faculty often lack firsthand IPE experience, which hinders pedagogical reform. This article proposes a theoretically grounded framework for the design, implementation, and evaluation of IPE. Supporting literature and practical advice are interwoven. The proposed framework guides faculty in the successful creation and evaluation of collaborative learning experiences. PMID:25330345

  3. Development of the Evaluative Method for Evaluating and Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichow, Brian; Volkmar, Fred R.; Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    2008-01-01

    Although research in autism has grown more sophisticated, the gap between research knowledge and applicability of research in real world settings has grown. There have been a number of different reviews of evidence-based practices of treatments for young children with autism. Reviews which have critically evaluated the empirical evidence have not…

  4. Cross-Continental Reflections on Evaluation Practice: Methods, Use, and Valuing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallemeyn, Leanne M.; Hall, Jori; Friche, Nanna; McReynolds, Clifton

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation theory tree typology reflects the following three components of evaluation practice: (a) methods, (b) use, and (c) valuing. The purpose of this study was to explore how evaluation practice is conceived as reflected in articles published in the "American Journal of Evaluation" ("AJE") and "Evaluation," a…

  5. Theory Building through Praxis Discourse: A Theory- and Practice-Informed Model of Transformative Participatory Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnar, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Stakeholder participation in evaluation, where the evaluator engages stakeholders in the process, is prevalent in evaluation practice and is an important focus of evaluation research. Cousins and Whitmore proposed a bifurcation of participatory evaluation into the two streams of transformative participatory and practical participatory evaluation…

  6. A Critical Appraisal of and Recommendations for Faculty Development

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmo, B. Joseph; Edwards, David J.; Franks, Andrea S.; Naughton, Cynthia A.; Schonder, Kristine S.; Stamm, Pamela L.; Thornton, Phillip; Popovich, Nicholas G.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009-2010 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Council of Faculties Faculty Affairs Committee reviewed published literature assessing the scope and outcomes of faculty development for tenure and promotion. Relevant articles were identified via a PubMed search, review of pharmacy education journals, and identification of position papers from major healthcare professions academic organizations. While programs intended to enhance faculty development were described by some healthcare professions, relatively little specific to pharmacy has been published and none of the healthcare professions have adequately evaluated the impact of various faculty-development programs on associated outcomes. The paucity of published information strongly suggests a lack of outcomes-oriented faculty-development programs in colleges and schools of pharmacy. Substantial steps are required toward the development and scholarly evaluation of faculty-development programs. As these programs are developed and assessed, evaluations must encompass all faculty subgroups, including tenure- and nontenure track faculty members, volunteer faculty members, women, and underrepresented minorities. This paper proposes AACP, college and school, and department-level recommendations intended to ensure faculty success in achieving tenure and promotion. PMID:21931460

  7. Generative Insights from the Eleanor Chelimsky Forum on Evaluation Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Laura C.

    2014-01-01

    Both speakers at the Eleanor Chelimsky Forum on Theory and Practice in Evaluation pointed out the complexity and messiness of evaluation practice, and thus potential limits on theory and generalizable knowledge. The concept of reflective practice offers one way forward to build evaluation theory. Building generalizable knowledge about practice…

  8. Enacted Practices Evaluation Model. Research Report No. 75-07-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcock, Eugene P.; Sipes, Dawn; Lehman, Kenneth; Miller, Susan

    The Enacted Practices Evaluation Model (EPEM) is an accountability system for "promised" program practices. Evaluating programs in terms of implemented treatment (i.e. enacted practices) in ways that yield valid and reliable results for accountability purposes is among the most vexing challenges in the field of program evaluation. Evaluations…

  9. Teaching Research and Practice Evaluation Skills to Graduate Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Stephen E.; Vakharia, Sheila P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined outcomes of a graduate course on evaluating social work practice that required students to use published research, quantitative measures, and single-system designs in a simulated practice evaluation project. Method: Practice evaluation projects from a typical class were analyzed for the number of research references…

  10. An orientation to wellness for new faculty of medicine members: meeting a need in faculty development

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Garielle E.; Bharwani, Aleem; Patel, Kamala D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the format, content, and effectiveness of a newly developed orientation to wellness workshop, and to explore participants’ overall perceptions. Methods This was a mixed methods study. Participants consisted of 47 new faculty of medicine members who attended one of the four workshops held between 2011 and 2013. Questionnaires were used to evaluate workshop characteristics (10 survey items; response scale 1=unacceptable to 7=outstanding), intention to change behavior (yes/no), and retrospective pre/post workshop self-efficacy (4 survey items; response scale 1=no confidence to 6=absolute confidence). Mean scores and standard deviations were calculated for the workshop characteristics. Pre/post workshop self-efficacy scores were compared using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Participants’ written qualitative feedback was coded using an inductive strategy to identify themes. Results There was strong support for the workshop characteristics with mean scores entirely above 6.00 (N=42). Thirty-one of 34 respondents (91%) expressed intention to change their behavior as a result of participating in the workshop. The post workshop self-efficacy scores (N=38 respondents) increased significantly for all four items (p<0.0001) compared to pre workshop ratings. Participants perceived the key workshop elements as the evidence-based content relevant to academic physicians, incorporation of practical tips and strategies, and an atmosphere conducive to discussion and experience sharing. Conclusions   Participants welcomed wellness as a focus of faculty development. Enhancing instruction around wellness has the potential to contribute positively to the professional competency and overall functioning of faculty of medicine members. PMID:27494833

  11. Evaluating a moving target: Using Practical Participatory Evaluation (P-PE) in hospital settings

    PubMed Central

    Wharton, Tracy; Alexander, Neil

    2014-01-01

    This article describes lessons learned about implementing evaluations in hospital settings. In order to overcome the methodological dilemmas inherent in this environment, we used a practical participatory evaluation strategy to engage as many stakeholders as possible in the process of evaluating a clinical demonstration project. Demonstration projects, in this context, push the envelope about what is known about effectiveness in novel settings, and turnover of staff and patient populations can present challenges to gathering optimal data. By using P-PE, we built capacity in the environment while expanding possibilities for data collection. Suggestions are made based on our experience. PMID:24860251

  12. Do Asian American Faculty Face a Glass Ceiling in Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sharon M.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the glass ceiling hypothesis in relation to Asian American faculty using data from the 1993 National Study of Post-Secondary Faculty for 1,019 Asian American faculty members. Data limitations prevent concluding that such faculty do or do not face a glass ceiling; however, baseline findings for future research are established. (SLD)

  13. Judicial Recognition of Academic Collective Interests: A New Approach to Faculty Title VII Litigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurko, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Faculty Title VII litigation, challenges to the faculty evaluation process, and possible jucidial responses to faculty claims are reviewed. A proposed model would temper judicial interference in faculty employment disputes by informed deferences while preserving the unique character of academic institutions. (Journal availbility: Boston Univ. Law…

  14. Evaluation of radiation safety in 29 central Ohio veterinary practices.

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, S A; Wilkins, J R; Hueston, W D

    1989-01-01

    A sample of 29 veterinary practices in Central Ohio were visited to assess radiation safety practices and observance of state regulations. Lead aprons and gloves were usually available, but gloves were not always worn. Protective thyroid collars and lead glasses were not available in any practice, lead shields in only five practices, and lead-lined walls and doors in only two practices. Eighteen practices had none of the required safety notices posted. PMID:2735484

  15. Can Faculty Afford Honors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2012-01-01

    In "Costs and Benefits in the Economy of Honors," Richard Badenhausen identifies several pressing issues regarding the economic status of honors in the current financial climate of higher education, including the role of faculty in addressing those issues. In her response to Badenhausen's essay, Annmarie Guzy, a faculty member at the…

  16. Engendering Faculty Professional Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Terosky, Aimee LaPointe

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, faculty have faced rising workloads, increasing amounts of top-down accountability and oversight, mounting publication demands, decreasing numbers of tenure-track positions, and an increasingly dismal job market. The current recession has exacerbated the pressure by requiring departmental budget cuts, faculty layoffs,…

  17. Vassar College Faculty Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassar Coll., Poughkeepsie, NY.

    This handbook, published in 1975, is designed to meet two needs: (1) to provide a general introduction to the college and its organization, procedures, and services for new members of the faculty; and (2) to serve as a reference book containing precise and detailed information of importance to all faculty members. On matters relating to college…

  18. Defining Faculty Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Peter J.; Diamond, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    A process of planned change is proposed for redefining college faculty work. Legitimate faculty work is defined in broad terms, and information sources and methods for collecting information to support redefinition are identified. The final step in the redefinition process is the development of new mission statements for the institution and its…

  19. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  20. Faculty Workload Report, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada System of Higher Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Board policy provides that in the fall of every even-numbered year, the Chancellor's Office shall compile a System report on faculty workloads at NSHE (Nevada System of Higher Education) institutions. Faculty workload is collected from the institutions in two parts: (1) in-class instructional data originating from workload databases and validated…