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Sample records for practice guideline hoarseness

  1. Hoarseness evaluation: a transatlantic survey of laryngeal experts.

    PubMed

    Sadoughi, Babak; Fried, Marvin P; Sulica, Lucian; Blitzer, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Hoarseness is a symptom of laryngeal dysfunction, without an existing consensus regarding its appropriate evaluation. A survey of laryngeal specialists is proposed to establish expert opinion on the methodology for evaluation of hoarseness, and to identify divergence of opinion regarding appropriate management. Cross-sectional survey. A 13-item questionnaire was submitted electronically to the membership of the American Laryngological Association, the American Broncho-Esophagological Association, and the European Laryngological Society. Responses were collated anonymously and subjected to cross-tabulated data analysis. A total of 195 responses were included for review. The majority of respondents identified themselves as laryngologists/phoniatricians (54.9%). Two-thirds (64.1%) of the providers dedicated more than 25% of their practice to voice management, and 48.8% managed more than 10 dysphonic patients weekly. Most respondents defined hoarseness and dysphonia as symptoms and not diseases. The panel recommended a mandated time to laryngoscopy of 1 week to 1 month from the onset of symptoms for most acutely dysphonic patients, regardless of risk factors for malignancy, while it was not advised to defer laryngoscopy beyond 2 months of symptom persistence in any situation. A majority (96.2%) felt that an otolaryngologist ought to perform the initial laryngoscopy of a newly hoarse patient. This survey demonstrates an agreement to expedite specialized laryngeal visualization for cases of hoarseness not subsiding within 1 month, and exemplifies controversies stemming from a recently published clinical practice guideline. Ongoing research and practice evaluation will contribute to set forth improved standards of care and to appropriately counsel dysphonic patients. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. [Guidelines for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Vleugels, A M

    1997-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements that are intended to support medical decision making in well-defined clinical situations. Essentially, their object is to reduce the variability in medical practice, to improve quality, and to make appropriated control of the financial resources possible. Internationally, ever more organisations, associations, and institutions are concerned with the development of guidelines in many different areas of care. Making implicit knowledge explicit is one of the associated advantages of guidelines: they have a potential utility in training, in process evaluation, and in the reevaluation of outcome studies. In liability issues, their existence has a double effect: they can be used to justify medical behaviour, and they constitute a generally accepted reference point. A derivative problem is the legal liability of the compilers of the guidelines. The principle of the guideline approach can be challenged academically: science cannot give a definition of optimal care with absolute certainty. What is called objectivity often rests on methodologically disputable analyses; also the opinion of opinion leaders is not always a guarantee for scientific soundness. Moreover, patients are not all identical: biological variability, situational factors, patient expectations, and other elements play a role in this differentiation. Clinicians are often hesitant with respect to clinical guidelines: they are afraid of cookbook medicine and curtailment of their professional autonomy. Patients fear reduction of individualization of care and the use of guidelines as a rationing instrument. The effects of the introduction of clinical practice guidelines on medical practice, on the results and on the cost of care vary but are generally considered to be favourable. The choice of appropriate strategies in development, dissemination, and implementation turns out to be of critical importance. The article ends with concrete

  3. Commentary: Hoarseness in pellagra.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy

    2011-06-01

    Pellagra is the clinical manifestation of niacin deficiency. The classical manifestations of pellagra include diarrhea, dementia, and dermatitis, but not all patients with pellagra present with all three manifestations. In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience Hiraga et al. present an interesting patient with pellagra who has laryngitis and hoarseness. Clinicians should remain alert for both the common and uncommon clinical manifestations of pellagra.

  4. Hoarseness in pellagra.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Akiyuki; Kamitsukasa, Ikuo; Araki, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Heizaburo

    2011-06-01

    A 67-year-old woman with chronic alcoholism was referred to our hospital with a 3-month history of progressive weakness in all four extremities and a 5-day history of hoarseness. On admission, she presented with glossitis and laryngitis. Neurological examination revealed weakness in all extremities and nerve conduction studies showed polyneuropathy. She was diagnosed with thiamine deficiency and administered intravenous multivitamins, including thiamine, pyridoxine and mecobalamin. Although the weakness in her extremities was ameliorated after treatment, her glossitis and laryngitis did not improve and psychosis subsequently occurred. After administration of nicotinamide, her psychosis and laryngitis dramatically improved. She was diagnosed with pellagra after detection of decreased serum levels of niacin and thiamine. Weakness may have been due to thiamine-deficient neuropathy or multiple vitamin deficiencies, as it improved with thiamine, pyridoxine and mecobalamin therapy. Because of lack of response to thiamine therapy, we concluded that the psychosis and laryngitis were caused by pellagra. Although stomatitis and glossitis in pellagra has been well documented, laryngitis and hoarseness appear to be very uncommon conditions. Differences in the turnover rates or energy requirements between the gastrointestinal tract and larynges may be a reason for the rarity of laryngeal involvement in pellagra. We should be vigilant to hoarseness, caused by laryngitis, which can be the predominant symptom in pellagra.

  5. Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Tunkel, David E; Bauer, Carol A; Sun, Gordon H; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Cunningham, Eugene R; Archer, Sanford M; Blakley, Brian W; Carter, John M; Granieri, Evelyn C; Henry, James A; Hollingsworth, Deena; Khan, Fawad A; Mitchell, Scott; Monfared, Ashkan; Newman, Craig W; Omole, Folashade S; Phillips, C Douglas; Robinson, Shannon K; Taw, Malcolm B; Tyler, Richard S; Waguespack, Richard; Whamond, Elizabeth J

    2014-10-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of sound without an external source. More than 50 million people in the United States have reported experiencing tinnitus, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 10% to 15% in adults. Despite the high prevalence of tinnitus and its potential significant effect on quality of life, there are no evidence-based, multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines to assist clinicians with management. The focus of this guideline is on tinnitus that is both bothersome and persistent (lasting 6 months or longer), which often negatively affects the patient's quality of life. The target audience for the guideline is any clinician, including nonphysicians, involved in managing patients with tinnitus. The target patient population is limited to adults (18 years and older) with primary tinnitus that is persistent and bothersome. The purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians managing patients with tinnitus. This guideline provides clinicians with a logical framework to improve patient care and mitigate the personal and social effects of persistent, bothersome tinnitus. It will discuss the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the effect of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers. The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians distinguish patients with bothersome tinnitus from patients with nonbothersome tinnitus. The development group made a strong recommendation against obtaining imaging studies of the head and neck in patients with tinnitus, specifically to evaluate tinnitus that does not localize to 1 ear, is nonpulsatile

  6. Improving clinical practice guidelines for practicing cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Dwyer, Edward M; Eberly, Shirley; Francis, Charles; Gillespie, John A; Goldstein, Robert E; Greenberg, Henry; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald J; Klein, Helmut; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Marcus, Frank I; Moss, Arthur J; Oakes, David; Ryan, Daniel H; Bloch Thomsen, Poul E; Zareba, Wojciech

    2015-06-15

    Cardiac-related clinical practice guidelines have become an integral part of the practice of cardiology. Unfortunately, these guidelines are often long, complex, and difficult for practicing cardiologists to use. Guidelines should be condensed and their format upgraded, so that the key messages are easier to comprehend and can be applied more readily by those involved in patient care. After presenting the historical background and describing the guideline structure, we make several recommendations to make clinical practice guidelines more user-friendly for clinical cardiologists. Our most important recommendations are that the clinical cardiology guidelines should focus exclusively on (1) class I recommendations with established benefits that are supported by randomized clinical trials and (2) class III recommendations for diagnostic or therapeutic approaches in which quality studies show no benefit or possible harm. Class II recommendations are not evidence based but reflect expert opinions related to published clinical studies, with potential for personal bias by members of the guideline committee. Class II recommendations should be published separately as "Expert Consensus Statements" or "Task Force Committee Opinions," so that both majority and minority expert opinions can be presented in a less dogmatic form than the way these recommendations currently appear in clinical practice guidelines.

  7. Development of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent current best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary guideline development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality guidelines can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge.

  8. [Multidisciplinary practice guideline 'Marfan syndrome'].

    PubMed

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multi-system disorder of dominant inheritance in which the cardiovasculature, in particular the aorta, the eyes and the skeleton are affected. Diagnostic assessment and treatment of patients who are suspected of or have Marfan syndrome should preferably be done by multidisciplinary teams such as those found in specialised Marfan syndrome centres. The practice guideline is intended for all care givers involved with the recognition, diagnosis, consultations and the medicinal and surgical treatment of Marfan patients; it includes referral criteria and information on the referral process. A diagnosis of Marfan syndrome is based on international criteria in which aortic root dilatation and dissection, ectopia lentis, an affected first-degree family member and a pathogenic FBN1 mutation are the cardinal features. Alternative diagnoses are also included in the practice guideline. Recommendations are given for the monitoring and treatment of Marfan patients during pregnancy and delivery. Advice on lifestyle is mainly focussed on sports activities.

  9. Hoarseness

    MedlinePlus

    ... The sound of our voice is produced by vibration of the vocal folds, which are two bands ... the lungs blows past, making them vibrate. The vibrations produce sound waves that travel through the throat, ...

  10. Hoarseness

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more of the following tests: Laryngoscopy Throat culture Throat examination with a small mirror X-rays of the neck or CT scan Blood tests such as a complete blood count ( CBC ) or blood differential

  11. Hoarseness

    MedlinePlus

    ... absolute voice rest and examination by an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat doctor). Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD): A possible cause of ... then evaluate the voice and do a complete ear, nose, and throat exam. This includes examination of the vocal folds ...

  12. 42 CFR 438.236 - Practice guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... guidelines that meet the following requirements: (1) Are based on valid and reliable clinical evidence or a... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Practice guidelines. 438.236 Section 438.236 Public... Improvement Standards § 438.236 Practice guidelines. (a) Basic rule: The State must ensure, through...

  13. Librarian contributions to clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Peggy; Protzko, Shandra

    2014-01-01

    Librarians have become more involved in developing high quality systematic reviews. Evidence-based practice guidelines are an extension of systematic reviews and offer another significant area for librarian involvement. This column highlights opportunities and challenges for the librarian working on guideline panels and provides practical considerations for meaningful contributions to the guideline creation process.

  14. Clinical practice guidelines in hypertension: a review.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita Lizbeth; Galvez-Olortegui, José Kelvin; Galvez-Olortegui, Tomas Vladimir; Sosa-Rosado, José Manuel; Camacho-Saavedra, Luis Arturo

    2015-10-23

    The aim of this study is the methodological evaluation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) in hypertension. This is the first in a series of review articles, analysis, assessment in methodology and content of clinical practice guidelines in Cardiology. Of all clinical practice guidelines, three were selected and the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument was used to assess each guide. The guidelines obtained the lowest score in the domain of applicability (mean 43.8%); while the highest score was for clarity of presentation (mean 81.5%). The lowest percentage was found in the applicability domain (European guideline) and the highest of all scores was found in two domains: scope and purpose, and clarity of presentation (Canadian guideline). Assessing the quality of the clinical practice guidelines analyzed, the Canadian is one with the best scores obtained by applying the AGREE II instrument, and it is advised to be used without modifications.

  15. Bullous pemphigoid: clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Fuertes de Vega, I; Iranzo-Fernández, P; Mascaró-Galy, J M

    2014-05-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease in which autoantibodies are directed against components of the basement membrane. Most of these antibodies belong to the immunoglobulin G class and bind principally to 2 hemidesmosomal proteins: the 180-kD antigen (BP180) and the 230-kD antigen (BP230). It is the most common blistering disease in the adult population in developed countries, with an estimated incidence in Spain of 0.2 to 3 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The disease primarily affects older people, although it can also occur in young people and even in children. In recent years, advances in clinical practice have led to a better understanding and improved management of this disorder. These advances include new diagnostic techniques, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for BP180 and new drugs for the treatment of BP, with diverse therapeutic targets. There is, however, still no international consensus on guidelines for the management of BP. This article is an updated review of the scientific literature on the treatment of BP. It focuses primarily on evidence-based recommendations and is written from a practical standpoint based on experience in the routine management of this disease.

  16. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Lipids.

    PubMed

    Tai, E Shyong; Chia, Boon Lock; Bastian, Amber Carla; Chua, Terrance; Ho, Sally Chih Wei; Koh, Teck Siew; Low, Lip Ping; Tey, Jeannie S; Poh, Kian Keong; Tan, Chee Eng; Ting, Peter; Tham, Tat Yean; Toh, Sue-Anne; van Dam, Rob M

    2017-03-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) has updated the Clinical Practice Guidelines on Lipids to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for lipids. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH Clinical Practice Guidelines on Lipids, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html.

  17. Clinical practice guideline: Allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Michael D; Gurgel, Richard K; Lin, Sandra Y; Schwartz, Seth R; Baroody, Fuad M; Bonner, James R; Dawson, Douglas E; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hackell, Jesse M; Han, Joseph K; Ishman, Stacey L; Krouse, Helene J; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Mims, James Whit W; Omole, Folashade S; Reddy, William D; Wallace, Dana V; Walsh, Sandra A; Warren, Barbara E; Wilson, Meghan N; Nnacheta, Lorraine C

    2015-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is one of the most common diseases affecting adults. It is the most common chronic disease in children in the United States today and the fifth most common chronic disease in the United States overall. AR is estimated to affect nearly 1 in every 6 Americans and generates $2 to $5 billion in direct health expenditures annually. It can impair quality of life and, through loss of work and school attendance, is responsible for as much as $2 to $4 billion in lost productivity annually. Not surprisingly, myriad diagnostic tests and treatments are used in managing this disorder, yet there is considerable variation in their use. This clinical practice guideline was undertaken to optimize the care of patients with AR by addressing quality improvement opportunities through an evaluation of the available evidence and an assessment of the harm-benefit balance of various diagnostic and management options. The primary purpose of this guideline is to address quality improvement opportunities for all clinicians, in any setting, who are likely to manage patients with AR as well as to optimize patient care, promote effective diagnosis and therapy, and reduce harmful or unnecessary variations in care. The guideline is intended to be applicable for both pediatric and adult patients with AR. Children under the age of 2 years were excluded from the clinical practice guideline because rhinitis in this population may be different than in older patients and is not informed by the same evidence base. The guideline is intended to focus on a limited number of quality improvement opportunities deemed most important by the working group and is not intended to be a comprehensive reference for diagnosing and managing AR. The recommendations outlined in the guideline are not intended to represent the standard of care for patient management, nor are the recommendations intended to limit treatment or care provided to individual patients. The development group made a strong

  18. Hoarseness and Risk Factors in University Teachers.

    PubMed

    Korn, Gustavo Polacow; Augusto de Lima Pontes, Antonio; Abranches, Denise; Augusto de Lima Pontes, Paulo

    2015-07-01

    To characterize the presence of hoarseness and the risk factors in male and female university teachers in private institutions in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Cross-sectional survey. Voice self-evaluation forms prepared by the Brazilian Ministry of Labor were administered to 846 university teachers in a private institution in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Prevalence of hoarseness in the sample is 39.6%. Percentage of hoarseness is higher in females (51.8%) than in males (32.6%). Comparing hoarseness and time of teaching, it was observed that the percentage of hoarseness is lower in a time shorter or equal to 1 year, and it is higher in a time between 10 and 20 years. Percentage of hoarseness is lower in the maximum workload of one to three class hours per day compared with the other workloads. Percentage of hoarseness is lower when the maximum number of students per classroom is less than 30 than when it is between 101 and 150 students. Other factors like in terms of noise and sound competition, air pollution, and in terms of causing stress and anxiety, besides habits and style/quality of life are related to the presence of hoarseness. University teachers show high percentage of hoarseness. Factors, such as time of teaching, females, work organization, workplace, in terms of noise and sound competition, air pollution, and in terms of causing stress and anxiety, besides habits and style/quality of life, are related to the presence of hoarseness in this group. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Distress management. Clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    2003-07-01

    The evaluation and treatment model expressed in the NCCN Distress Management Guidelines recommends that each new patient be rapidly assessed in the office or clinic waiting room for evidence of distress using a brief screening tool (the Distress Thermometer and Problem List) presented in Figure 1 (see page 369). A score of 5 or greater on the thermometer should trigger further evaluation and referral to a psychosocial service. The choice of which service should be determined by the problem areas specified on the Problem List. Patients with practical and psychosocial problems are referred to social work, emotional or psychological (excessive sadness, worry, nervousness) problems to mental health, and spiritual concerns to pastoral counselors. The primary oncology team members--doctor, nurse, and social worker--are central to making this model work. Team members collect information from the brief screening and problem list and expand it with the clinical evaluation. It is critical for at least one team member to be familiar with the mental health, psychosocial, and pastoral counseling resources available in the institution and the community. A list of the names and phone numbers for these resources should be kept in all oncology clinics and updated frequently. The first step in implementing this model is to establish a multidisciplinary committee in each institution or office responsible for 1) revising and modifying the standards of care to fit the particular clinical care setting and 2) implementing and monitoring the use of these standards. Because each institution has its own culture, standards must be implemented in ways that are compatible with each institution. The second step is to institute professional educational programs to ensure that staff is 1) aware that distress is under-recognized, 2) knowledgeable about the management of distress, and 3) aware of the resources available to treat it. It is important to have access to mental health professionals and

  20. Do guidelines create uniformity in medical practice?

    PubMed

    de Jong, Judith D; Groenewegen, Peter P; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Schellevis, François; Westert, Gert P

    2010-01-01

    This article aimed to test the general hypothesis that guidelines create uniformity, or reduce variation, in medical practice. Medical practice variation has policy interest and is one of the reasons for developing guidelines. The development and implementation of guidelines was considered in the broader context of processes of rationalization. We focused on the influence of voluntary guidelines developed by the professional organization for family physicians in the Netherlands on variation in drug prescription. Data were used from the First and Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (DNSGP1 and DNSGP2), collected in 1987 and 2001 respectively. DNSGP1 consisted of 103 practices and 161 GPs serving 335.000 patients. DNSGP2 consisted of 104 practices and 195 GPs serving 390.000 patients. Two groups of diagnoses were created, one containing all diagnoses for which guidelines were introduced and one containing all other diagnoses. For both groups a measure of concentration, Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI), was used to represent variation. This measure of concentration was compared between both groups using multilevel analysis. Results showed that although there was an overall increase in variation (a significantly lower HHI) in prescription, the increase was less in the cases of diagnoses for which guidelines were introduced. Guidelines, primarily, had an effect on variations in single-handed practices. The overall conclusion is that the introduction of guidelines, although it probably tempered the increase in variation, did not reduce variation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The shortcomings of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Leier, Carl V; Geleris, Paraschos; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of medical knowledge related to diagnosis and management over the last 5-6 decades has altered the course of diseases, improved clinical outcomes and increased survival. Thus, it has become difficult for the practicing physician to evaluate the long-term effects of a particular therapy on survival of an individual patient. Further, the approach by each physician to an individual patient with the same disease is not always uniform. In an attempt to assist physicians in applying newly acquired knowledge to patients, clinical practice guidelines were introduced by various scientific societies. Guidelines assist in facilitating the translation of new research discoveries into clinical practice; however, despite the improvements over the years, there are still several issues related to guidelines that often appear ‘lost in translation'. Guidelines are based on the results of randomized clinical trials, other nonrandomized studies, and expert opinion (i.e. the opinion of most members of the guideline committees). The merits and limitations of randomized clinical trials, guideline committees, and presentation of guidelines will be discussed. In addition, proposals to improve guidelines will be presented.

  2. Practice Guidelines for Operative Performance Assessments.

    PubMed

    Williams, Reed G; Kim, Michael J; Dunnington, Gary L

    2016-12-01

    To provide recommended practice guidelines for assessing single operative performances and for combining results of operative performance assessments into estimates of overall operative performance ability. Operative performance is one defining characteristic of surgeons. Assessment of operative performance is needed to provide feedback with learning benefits to surgical residents in training and to assist in making progress decisions for residents. Operative performance assessment has been a focus of investigation over the past 20 years. This review is designed to integrate findings of this research into a set of recommended operative performance practices. Literature from surgery and from other pertinent research areas (psychology, education, business) was reviewed looking for evidence to inform practice guideline development. Guidelines were created along with a conceptual and scientific foundation for each guideline. Ten guidelines are provided for assessing individual operative performances and 10 are provided for combing data from individual operative performances into overall judgments of operative performance ability. The practice guidelines organize available information to be immediately useful to program directors, to support surgical training, and to provide a conceptual framework upon which to build as the base of pertinent knowledge expands through future research and development efforts.

  3. Procedures for Using Clinical Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargrove, Patricia; Griffer, Mona; Lund, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article provides information about clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) to facilitate their application to the practice of speech-language pathology. CPGs are sets of recommendations based on evidence, including expert clinical opinion, that have been developed by a panel of reviewers. In this article, CPGs are defined and their…

  4. Guidelines for computer security in general practice.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Peter; Pleteshner, Catherine; Bhend, Heinz; Brouns, Johan

    2007-01-01

    As general practice becomes increasingly computerised, data security becomes increasingly important for both patient health and the efficient operation of the practice. To develop guidelines for computer security in general practice based on a literature review, an analysis of available information on current practice and a series of key stakeholder interviews. While the guideline was produced in the context of Australian general practice, we have developed a template that is also relevant for other countries. Current data on computer security measures was sought from Australian divisions of general practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with general practitioners (GPs), the medical software industry, senior managers within government responsible for health IT (information technology) initiatives, technical IT experts, divisions of general practice and a member of a health information consumer group. The respondents were asked to assess both the likelihood and the consequences of potential risks in computer security being breached. The study suggested that the most important computer security issues in general practice were: the need for a nominated IT security coordinator; having written IT policies, including a practice disaster recovery plan; controlling access to different levels of electronic data; doing and testing backups; protecting against viruses and other malicious codes; installing firewalls; undertaking routine maintenance of hardware and software; and securing electronic communication, for example via encryption. This information led to the production of computer security guidelines, including a one-page summary checklist, which were subsequently distributed to all GPs in Australia. This paper maps out a process for developing computer security guidelines for general practice. The specific content will vary in different countries according to their levels of adoption of IT, and cultural, technical and other health service factors. Making

  5. Targeting Quality Improvement in Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mims, James W

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines provide key action statements targeted at quality improvements. Areas of potential quality improvement can be identified by exploring known contributors to cognitive errors. Three common contributors to medical error and reduced quality care are (1) the complexity of modern medicine, (2) the tendency to apply cause and effect to random associations, and (3) our bias to our first intuition. Future authors of clinical practice guidelines should consider these 3 influences when deciding how to best provide guidance to improve patient care. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  6. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    Bell's palsy, named after the Scottish anatomist, Sir Charles Bell, is the most common acute mono-neuropathy, or disorder affecting a single nerve, and is the most common diagnosis associated with facial nerve weakness/paralysis. Bell's palsy is a rapid unilateral facial nerve paresis (weakness) or paralysis (complete loss of movement) of unknown cause. The condition leads to the partial or complete inability to voluntarily move facial muscles on the affected side of the face. Although typically self-limited, the facial paresis/paralysis that occurs in Bell's palsy may cause significant temporary oral incompetence and an inability to close the eyelid, leading to potential eye injury. Additional long-term poor outcomes do occur and can be devastating to the patient. Treatments are generally designed to improve facial function and facilitate recovery. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy, and some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, numerous diagnostic tests available are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy. The primary purpose of this guideline is to improve the accuracy of diagnosis for Bell's palsy, to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients with Bell's palsy, and to decrease harmful variations in the evaluation and management of Bell's palsy. This guideline addresses these needs by encouraging

  7. Practical guidelines for workload assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tattersall, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    The practical problems that might be encountered in carrying out workload evaluations in work settings have been outlined. Different approaches have been distinguished that may determine the type of research design used and provide assistance in the difficult choice between workload assessment techniques. One approach to workload assessment is to examine the short-term consequences of combining various tasks. Theoretical models of attention allocation will underpin specific studies of interference and the consequences of task demand and task conflict for performance. A further approach with a different temporal orientation may lead us to a better understanding of the relationships between work demands and strain through the analysis of individual differences in cognitive control processes. The application of these processes may depend on individual differences in long term styles and short term strategies, but may be used to prevent decrements in work performance under difficult conditions. However, control may attract costs as well as benefits in terms of changes in effective state and physiological activity. Thus, strain associated with work demands may only be measurable in the form of tradeoffs between performance and other domains of individual activity. The methodological implications are to identify patterns of adjustment to workload variations using repeated measures and longitudinal sampling of performance as well as subjective and physiological measures. Possible enhancements to workplace design must take into account these human factors considerations of workload in order to avoid potential decrements in individual performance and associated organizational problems.

  8. Guidelines for psychological practice with older adults.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Older Adults" are intended to assist psychologists in evaluating their own readiness for working with older adults and in seeking and using appropriate education and training to increase their knowledge, skills, and experience relevant to this area of practice. The specific goals of these professional practice guidelines are to provide practitioners with (a) a frame of reference for engaging in clinical work with older adults and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of attitudes, general aspects of aging, clinical issues, assessment, intervention, consultation, professional issues, and continuing education and training relative to work with this group. The guidelines recognize and appreciate that there are numerous methods and pathways whereby psychologists may gain expertise and/or seek training in working with older adults. This document is designed to offer recommendations on those areas of awareness, knowledge, and clinical skills considered as applicable to this work, rather than prescribing specific training methods to be followed. The guidelines also recognize that some psychologists will specialize in the provision of services to older adults and may therefore seek more extensive training consistent with practicing within the formally recognized specialty of Professional Geropsychology (APA, 2010c).

  9. 42 CFR 438.236 - Practice guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Practice guidelines. 438.236 Section 438.236 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement Measurement and...

  10. Mental Health Practice Guidelines for Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The guidelines and supporting rationale presented in this paper were developed from the October 2007 "Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference" sponsored by Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the REACH Institute (REsource for Advancing Children's Health). The purpose of the conference was to…

  11. Guidelines for the Practice of Parenting Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Parenting coordination is a nonadversarial dispute resolution process that is court ordered or agreed on by divorced and separated parents who have an ongoing pattern of high conflict and/or litigation about their children. These guidelines are designed to address the developing area of practice known as parenting coordination. In response to the…

  12. Guidelines for the Practice of Parenting Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Parenting coordination is a nonadversarial dispute resolution process that is court ordered or agreed on by divorced and separated parents who have an ongoing pattern of high conflict and/or litigation about their children. These guidelines are designed to address the developing area of practice known as parenting coordination. In response to the…

  13. Practice guidelines in the management of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Altman, R D; Lozada, C J

    1998-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common articular rheumatic disease. Practice guidelines have been developed to assist the practitioner in the care of patients with hip and knee OA. The guidelines divide the treatment strategy into nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic modalities. The nonpharmacologic or nonmedicinal approaches include patient education, psychosocial interventions, physical and surgical measures. Each of these are as important as the pharmacologic or medicinal measures. Medicinal measures can be subdivided into symptomatic therapy and disease modifying therapy. Even though all present therapies are aimed at symptoms, experimental therapies are being developed to alter the disease process.

  14. Clinical practice guideline: allergic rhinitis executive summary.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Michael D; Gurgel, Richard K; Lin, Sandra Y; Schwartz, Seth R; Baroody, Fuad M; Bonner, James R; Dawson, Douglas E; Dykewicz, Mark S; Hackell, Jesse M; Han, Joseph K; Ishman, Stacey L; Krouse, Helene J; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Mims, James Whit W; Omole, Folashade S; Reddy, William D; Wallace, Dana V; Walsh, Sandra A; Warren, Barbara E; Wilson, Meghan N; Nnacheta, Lorraine C

    2015-02-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Allergic Rhinitis. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 14 recommendations developed address the evaluation of patients with allergic rhinitis, including performing and interpretation of diagnostic testing and assessment and documentation of chronic conditions and comorbidities. It will then focus on the recommendations to guide the evaluation and treatment of patients with allergic rhinitis, to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for patients with allergic rhinitis.

  15. How Useful are Laboratory Practice Guidelines?

    PubMed Central

    Misra, S.; Moberg-Aakre, K.; Langlois, M.; Watine, J.; Twomey, P.J.; Oosterhuis, W.P.; Barth, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) relating to laboratory diagnostic testing are increasingly produced with the aim of standardizing practice and improving patient care based on the best available evidence. However, the production of a CPG is merely the first step in the process of getting evidence into practice, to be undertaken by laboratories and other stakeholders. This process should evaluate the information provided in the guidelines on laboratory tests, devise a strategy for implementing the CPG or the laboratory aspects of the CPG and finally, once implemented, assess the impact of the CPG on clinical practice, patient outcomes and costs of care. The purpose of CPG evaluation by the laboratory is to determine whether sufficient information is provided on the particular test recommended. CPGs may not always be written with the involvement of a laboratory specialist and this underlies the paucity of relevant information in some national guidelines. When laboratory specialists are involved, CPGs can provide practical information which supports local laboratories as well as clinicians in the implementation and appropriate use of recommendations. Implementation of CPGs is an often neglected area that needs attention and thought. There are many barriers to successful implementation, which may vary at local level. These need to be identified early if CPGs are to be successfully adhered to. The effectiveness of CPGs also needs to be audited using process and health outcome indicators. Clinical audit is an effective tool for assessing adherence to recommendations and for measuring the impact and success of the CPG. PMID:27683494

  16. Developing clinical practice guidelines: reviewing, reporting, and publishing guidelines; updating guidelines; and the emerging issues of enhancing guideline implementability and accounting for comorbid conditions in guideline development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this third paper we discuss the issues of: reviewing, reporting, and publishing guidelines; updating guidelines; and the two emerging issues of enhancing guideline implementability and how guideline developers should approach dealing with the issue of patients who will be the subject of guidelines having co-morbid conditions. PMID:22762242

  17. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so.

  18. Clinical practice guideline: acute otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Schwartz, Seth R; Cannon, C Ron; Roland, Peter S; Simon, Geoffrey R; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Huang, William W; Haskell, Helen W; Robertson, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    This clinical practice guideline is an update and replacement for an earlier guideline published in 2006 by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. This update provides evidence-based recommendations to manage acute otitis externa (AOE), defined as diffuse inflammation of the external ear canal, which may also involve the pinna or tympanic membrane. The variations in management of AOE and the importance of accurate diagnosis suggest a need for updating the clinical practice guideline. The primary outcome considered in this guideline is clinical resolution of AOE. The primary purpose of the original guideline was to promote appropriate use of oral and topical antimicrobials for AOE and to highlight the need for adequate pain relief. An updated guideline is needed because of new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group. The target patient is aged 2 years or older with diffuse AOE. Differential diagnosis will be discussed, but recommendations for management will be limited to diffuse AOE, which is almost exclusively a bacterial infection. This guideline is intended for primary care and specialist clinicians, including otolaryngologists-head and neck surgeons, pediatricians, family physicians, emergency physicians, internists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants. This guideline is applicable in any setting in which patients with diffuse AOE would be identified, monitored, or managed. The development group made strong recommendations that (1) clinicians should assess patients with AOE for pain and recommend analgesic treatment based on the severity of pain and (2) clinicians should not prescribe systemic antimicrobials as initial therapy for diffuse, uncomplicated AOE unless there is extension outside the ear canal or the presence of specific host factors that would indicate a need for systemic therapy. The development group made recommendations

  19. Integrating practice guidelines with financial incentives.

    PubMed

    White, L J; Ball, J R

    1990-02-01

    Practice guidelines, in whatever form, hold significant implications for the delivery and the financing of health care. Hence, great care must be taken in developing them. They must be scientifically sound and thus defensible. They must incorporate clinical perspectives and consider patients' preferences. They must cover appropriate as well as inappropriate services. They must foster creation and adoption of a rational payment system. What guidelines, in their best form, can do is enable physicians, faced with an overwhelming array of often conflicting information, to reduce some of the uncertainty they must cope with and to practice the most clinically effective medicine. For physicians to do so requires valid information from a credible source, most often in conjunction with appropriate financial incentives.

  20. [Clinical practice guideline. Drug prescription in elderly].

    PubMed

    Peralta-Pedrero, María Luisa; Valdivia-Ibarra, Francisco Javier; Hernández-Manzano, Mario; Medina-Beltrán, Gustavo Rodrigo; Cordero-Guillén, Miguel Angel; Baca-Zúñiga, José; Cruz-Avelar, Agles; Aguilar-Salas, Ismael; Avalos-Mejía, Annia Marisol

    2013-01-01

    The process of prescribing a medication is complex and includes: deciding whether it is indicated, choosing the best option, determining the dose and the appropriate management scheme to the physiological condition of the patient, and monitoring effectiveness and toxicity. We have to inform patients about the expected side effects and indications for requesting a consultation. Specific clinical questions were designed based on the acronym PICOST. The search was made in the specific websites of clinical practice guidelines, was limited to the population of older adults, in English or Spanish. We used 10 related clinical practice guidelines, eight systematic reviews and five meta-analyses. Finally, we made a search of original articles or clinical reviews for specific topics. The development and validation of clinical practice guidelines for "rational drug prescriptions in the elderly" is intended to promote an improvement in the quality of prescription through the prevention and detection of inappropriate prescribing in the elderly and, as a result of this, a decrease in the adverse events by drugs, deterioration of health of patients and expenditure of resources.

  1. [Progress in methodological characteristics of clinical practice guideline for osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Xing, D; Wang, B; Lin, J H

    2017-06-01

    At present, several clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of osteoarthritis have been developed by institutes or societies. The ultimate purpose of developing clinical practice guidelines is to formulate the process in the treatment of osteoarthritis effectively. However, the methodologies used in developing clinical practice guidelines may place an influence on the transformation and application of that in treating osteoarthritis. The present study summarized the methodological features of individual clinical practice guideline and presented the tools for quality evaluation of clinical practice guideline. The limitations of current osteoarthritis guidelines of China are also indicated. The review article might help relevant institutions improve the quality in developing guide and clinical transformation.

  2. [Guidelines for good practice of sports activities].

    PubMed

    Scheen, A J; Crielaard, J M

    2001-05-01

    The present closing article summarizes some guidelines for the good practice of physical activities in order to develop and maintain cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, and flexibility. Advice is given regarding the recommended quantity and quality of exercise in term of intensity, duration and frequency of training with the aim to optimize the risk/benefit ratio for health, in both aerobic endurance and resistance exercises. The crucial role of an appropriate warm-up and cool-down period, which would include flexibility exercises, is also emphasized. Finally, some practical examples illustrate this vademecum of physical activities.

  3. Osteoporosis: therapeutic guidelines. Guidelines for practice management of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sana N; Craig, Latasha; Wild, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Therapeutic guidelines of osteoporosis are reviewed from North American Menopause Society, American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the National Osteoporosis Foundation. The various guidelines are compared and discussed.

  4. [Asthma clinical practice guidelines: advantages and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Plaza, Vicente; Bellido-Casado, Jesús; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Rodrigo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines on asthma have contributed towards unifying concepts and reaching a consensus on performances between different professional groups. However, they have failed in the overall improvement in the management of asthma, the final objective that they are meant to achieve. Today, almost 20 years after they appeared, the majority of asthmatic patients are still inadequately controlled, partly due to lack of follow up by doctors and the rest of health care staff who have to look after them. This lack of follow up of these recommendations is probably associated with a lack of well structured planning in their circulation and implementation. Also, although the recommendations of these guidelines agree in what is essential, they differ in other aspects, which in turn could be determining factors in clinical practice. The purpose of this article has been to establish the main differences in the recommendations that the principal clinical practice guidelines on the disease propose on the diagnosis, classification and treatment of asthma. To do this we have compared, The British Guideline on the Management of Asthma 2007, The Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention/Global Initiative for Asthma 2006 (GINA), the National Prevention program for Education on Asthma (Programa Nacional de Prevención para la Educación del Asma) (NAEPP), the Spanish Guide for the Management of Asthma (Guía Española para el Manejo del Asma 2003) (GEMA) and the ALAT y SEPAR guides, Latin-America and Spain. Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Asthma Exacerbation (América Latina y España. Recomendaciones para la Prevención y el Tratamiento de la Exacerbación Asmática 2008) (ALERTA).

  5. Guidelines International Network: toward international standards for clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Qaseem, Amir; Forland, Frode; Macbeth, Fergus; Ollenschläger, Günter; Phillips, Sue; van der Wees, Philip

    2012-04-03

    Guideline development processes vary substantially, and many guidelines do not meet basic quality criteria. Standards for guideline development can help organizations ensure that recommendations are evidence-based and can help users identify high-quality guidelines. Such organizations as the U.S. Institute of Medicine and the United Kingdom's National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence have developed recommendations to define trustworthy guidelines within their locales. Many groups charged with guideline development find the lengthy list of standards developed by such organizations to be aspirational but infeasible to follow in entirety. Founded in 2002, the Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) is a network of guideline developers that includes 93 organizations and 89 individual members representing 46 countries. The G-I-N board of trustees recognized the importance of guideline development processes that are both rigorous and feasible even for modestly funded groups to implement and initiated an effort toward consensus about minimum standards for high-quality guidelines. In contrast to other existing standards for guideline development at national or local levels, the key components proposed by G-I-N will represent the consensus of an international, multidisciplinary group of active guideline developers. This article presents G-I-N's proposed set of key components for guideline development. These key components address panel composition, decision-making process, conflicts of interest, guideline objective, development methods, evidence review, basis of recommendations, ratings of evidence and recommendations, guideline review, updating processes, and funding. It is hoped that this article promotes discussion and eventual agreement on a set of international standards for guideline development.

  6. Utilization of clinical practice guidelines: barriers and facilitators.

    PubMed

    Keiffer, Melanie R

    2015-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines augment clinician decision making. Researchers cite a lack of knowledge of guideline existence, complexity of guidelines, staff attitude, lack of training, time and resource constraints as reasons for nonadherence. This project sought to understand factors that promote or prevent guideline implementation at the point of care. Respondents' viewed clinical practice guidelines as valid tools necessary to standardize patient care and exhibited proficiency in synthesis and integration of guidelines into clinical decisions and treatment plans. Efficient and effective guidelines impact patient safety and quality by increasing the consistency of behavior and replacing idiosyncratic behaviors with best practices.

  7. Development and pilot testing of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) on hoarseness.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C Matthew; Masood, Hamid; Pandian, Vinciya; Laeeq, Kulsoom; Akst, Lee; Francis, Howard W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2010-11-01

    To develop a valid and reliable tool for an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) on hoarseness. To pilot-test the feasibility by assessing residents' clinical skills in various core competencies while assessing hoarseness on a standardized patient (SP). Educational tool development. The OSCE checklists were developed using modified Delphi technique after obtaining feedback from faculty involved in providing care to hoarseness patients. SP-based and rest stations were created to assess clinical skills. Twelve Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residents participated in the study. Video recordings of residents' performance and their written documentation were rated by faculty members. The OSCE that we developed is a valid method of assessing residents' clinical skills for evaluating hoarseness. Senior residents performed better in all of the tasks such as obtaining history and performing a physical exam on an SP, ability to perform flexible laryngoscopy on a mannequin, and interpretation of radiologic findings. Internal consistency assessed by Cronbach's alpha as measure of inter-item reliability was 0.92 for laryngoscopic station and 0.95 for radiology station. This OSCE can be effectively used for the objective assessment of clinical competency in hoarseness. Our pilot study evaluated multiple competencies on a single occasion, including medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, and communication and interpersonal skills. Clinical competence in history taking, physical examination, flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy, and ability to interpret radiologic findings improved with increasing year of training. This OSCE provides targeted assessment of practice-based learning and feedback for improvement of clinical performance.

  8. Developing clinical practice guidelines: target audiences, identifying topics for guidelines, guideline group composition and functioning and conflicts of interest

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this first paper we discuss: the target audience(s) for guidelines and their use of guidelines; identifying topics for guidelines; guideline group composition (including consumer involvement) and the processes by which guideline groups function and the important procedural issue of managing conflicts of interest in guideline development. PMID:22762776

  9. Clinical practice guideline: tinnitus executive summary.

    PubMed

    Tunkel, David E; Bauer, Carol A; Sun, Gordon H; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Cunningham, Eugene R; Archer, Sanford M; Blakley, Brian W; Carter, John M; Granieri, Evelyn C; Henry, James A; Hollingsworth, Deena; Khan, Fawad A; Mitchell, Scott; Monfared, Ashkan; Newman, Craig W; Omole, Folashade S; Phillips, C Douglas; Robinson, Shannon K; Taw, Malcolm B; Tyler, Richard S; Waguespack, Richard; Whamond, Elizabeth J

    2014-10-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Tinnitus. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 13 recommendations developed address the evaluation of patients with tinnitus, including selection and timing of diagnostic testing and specialty referral to identify potential underlying treatable pathology. It will then focus on the evaluation and treatment of patients with persistent primary tinnitus, with recommendations to guide the evaluation and measurement of the impact of tinnitus and to determine the most appropriate interventions to improve symptoms and quality of life for tinnitus sufferers.

  10. Current clinical practice guidelines in atrial fibrillation: a review.

    PubMed

    Galvez-Olortegui, José Kelvin; Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita Lizbeth; Galvez-Olortegui, Tomas Vladimir; Godoy-Palomino, Armando; Camacho-Saavedra, Luis

    2016-01-14

    The aim of this study is the methodological evaluation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) in atrial fibrillation. This is the second in a series of articles of review, analysis, assessment in methodology and content of clinical practice guidelines in Cardiology. Among all clinical practice guidelines, we selected the American, Canadian and NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) guidelines. We used the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) II instrument for the assessment. In general, the guidelines obtained the lowest score in the applicability domain (mean 36.1%); while the highest score was for clarity of presentation (mean 93.5%). The lowest percentage was found in the editorial independence domain (Canadian guideline) and the highest of all scores in the applicability domain (NICE guideline). Regarding global quality, the NICE guideline obtained the AGREE II instrument best scores, followed by the American guideline, both recommended for use without modifications.

  11. [Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines in oral care 3. Support for the development of clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    van Dam, B A F M; Oosterkamp, B C M; den Boer, J C L; Bruers, J J M

    2015-02-01

    Support is an important factor in the implementation of clinical practice guidelines. Data from 5 studies from 1998 through 2013 offer insight into the support for clinical practice guidelines among dentists, orthodontists, dental hygienists and denturists in the Netherlands. In these, attitudes, opinions, knowledge and behaviour were seen as indicators of support. Dentists have an increasingly positive attitude towards clinical practice guidelines. The majority is aware of and uses at least 1 of the guidelines available to them and are in favour of the development of clinical practice guidelines. Orthodontists and dental hygienists have available few such guidelines, but the majority of both groups favour their development. Among denturists, who also have little experience with clinical practice guidelines, there are fewer supporters for their development. All in all, among caregivers in oral healthcare in the Netherlands, support for the use and development of clinical practice guidelines is growing.

  12. A review of clinical practice guidelines for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ball, David; Silvestri, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are important evidence-based resources to guide complex clinical decision making. However, it is challenging for health professionals to keep abreast available guidelines and to know how and where to access relevant guidelines. This review examines currently available guidelines for lung cancer published in the English language. Important key features are listed for each identified guideline. The methodology, approaches to dissemination and implementation, and associated resources are summarised. General challenges in the area of guideline development are highlighted. The potential to collaborate more widely across lung cancer guideline developers by sharing literature searches and assessments is discussed. PMID:24163752

  13. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    PubMed

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  14. SAGEDesktop: an environment for testing clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Berg, David; Ram, Prabhu; Glasgow, Julie; Castro, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines have begun to appear in electronic form with the expectation that they will be used to provide automated clinical decision support. Systems capable of executing these clinical practice guidelines are emerging concurrently. A few research projects have developed guideline authoring tools that allow encoding electronic clinical practice guidelines. However, we are not aware of tools that allow testing of electronic clinical practice guidelines by their authors. We have developed a tool called SAGEDesktop for the testing of electronic clinical practice guidelines. SAGEDesktop does not require external infrastructure to carry out this testing. It includes: 1) an embedded guideline engine which can execute electronic clinical practice guidelines 2) functionality that emulates the capabilities of a clinical information system necessary for the execution of the guideline, and 3) terminology server functionality that encapsulates standard clinical terms. Coupled with an authoring tool, SAGEDesktop provides a complete development environment in which precise and robust electronic clinical practice guidelines can be encoded and tested. We describe the features of SAGEDesktop, narrate our vision of the tool's use, and discuss SAGEDesktop's strengths and weaknesses.

  15. Sore throat and hoarseness after total intravenous anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, K; Sakai, H; Miyazawa, H; Toda, N; Iinuma, Y; Mochizuki, N; Hara, K; Otagiri, T

    2004-04-01

    Sore throat and hoarseness are common complications, but these have not been studied after total i.v. anaesthesia. We prospectively studied 418 surgical patients, aged 15-92 yr, after total i.v. anaesthesia with propofol, fentanyl and ketamine to assess possible factors associated with sore throat and hoarseness. We found sore throat in 50% and hoarseness in 55% of patients immediately after surgery. This decreased to 25% for sore throat and 24% for hoarseness on the day after surgery. Both sore throat and hoarseness were more common in females and when lidocaine spray had been used. Cricoid pressure during laryngoscopy was inversely associated with the risk of sore throat. Knowledge of these factors may reduce postoperative throat complications, and improve patient satisfaction.

  16. [A new generation of reliable clinical practice guidelines through MAGIC].

    PubMed

    Olav Vandvik, Per; Fog Heen, Anja; Brandt, Linn

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective disease diagnosis and treatment requires that health personnel can access the best evidence, preferably through reliable clinical practice guidelines. Most guidelines have methodological weaknesses, suboptimal reporting formats, and frequently fail to update content. New standards developed by the US Institute of Medicine and the Guidelines International Network and Systems for Trustworthy Guidelines offer better opportunities for success in the development of guidelines, but also increase the demand for methodological competence, clinical experience and time. It is important to provide clinical practice guidelines with reliable content, and achieve their dissemination and update as needed. In this article we describe how to apply new standards, methods and tools for the creation, dissemination and updating of reliable clinical practice guidelines. Key steps were set for the elaboration of guidelines by using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. It will be explained how an innovative research program, Making GRADE the Irresistible Choice (MAGIC) (www.magicproject.org), through its authorship and publication platform (MAGICapp), offers new solutions to facilitate the production, dissemination and dynamic update of reliable clinical practice guidelines. An example will be described about a recently published Norwegian guideline on the new oral anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation, showing how a guideline published in MAGICapp can be used in medical practice.

  17. Canadian guidelines for rhinosinusitis: practical tools for the busy clinician

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) frequently present in clinical practice. Guidelines for management of these conditions have been published extensively in the past. However, a set of guidelines that addressed issues specific to the Canadian environment while offering clear guidance for first-line clinicians was needed, and resulted in the recent publication of Canadian clinical practice guidelines for ABRS and CRS. In addition to addressing issues specific to Canadian physicians, the presented guidelines are applicable internationally, and offer single algorithms for the diagnosis and management of ABRS and CRS, as well as expert opinion in areas that do not have an extensive evidence base. This commentary presents major points from the guidelines, as well as the intended impact of the guidelines on clinical practice. See guidelines at: http://www.aacijournal.com/content/7/1/2 PMID:22296845

  18. Clinical Practice Guideline (Update): Earwax (Cerumen Impaction)

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Seth R; Magit, Anthony E; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Ballachanda, Bopanna B; Hackell, Jesse M; Krouse, Helene J; Lawlor, Claire M; Lin, Kenneth; Parham, Kourosh; Stutz, David R; Walsh, Sandy; Woodson, Erika A; Yanagisawa, Ken; Cunningham, Eugene R

    2017-01-01

    Objective This update of the 2008 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation cerumen impaction clinical practice guideline provides evidence-based recommendations on managing cerumen impaction. Cerumen impaction is defined as an accumulation of cerumen that causes symptoms, prevents assessment of the ear, or both. Changes from the prior guideline include a consumer added to the development group; new evidence (3 guidelines, 5 systematic reviews, and 6 randomized controlled trials); enhanced information on patient education and counseling; a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships; expanded action statement profiles to explicitly state quality improvement opportunities, confidence in the evidence, intentional vagueness, and differences of opinion; an enhanced external review process to include public comment and journal peer review; and 3 new key action statements on managing cerumen impaction that focus on primary prevention, contraindicated intervention, and referral and coordination of care. Purpose The primary purpose of this guideline is to help clinicians identify patients with cerumen impaction who may benefit from intervention and to promote evidence-based management. Another purpose of the guideline is to highlight needs and management options in special populations or in patients who have modifying factors. The guideline is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and manage patients with cerumen impaction, and it applies to any setting in which cerumen impaction would be identified, monitored, or managed. The guideline does not apply to patients with cerumen impaction associated with the following conditions: dermatologic diseases of the ear canal; recurrent otitis externa; keratosis obturans; prior radiation therapy affecting the ear; previous tympanoplasty/myringoplasty, canal wall down mastoidectomy, or other surgery affecting the ear canal. Key Action Statements The panel made a strong

  19. Guidelines to the practice of anesthesia revised edition 2013.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Richard; Chartrand, Daniel; Dain, Steven; Dobson, Gregory; Kurrek, Matthias; Lagacé, Annie; Stacey, Shean; Thiessen, Barton

    2013-01-01

    The Guidelines to the Practice of Anesthesia Revised Edition 2013 (the guidelines) were prepared by the Canadian Anesthesiologists' Society (CAS), which reserves the right to determine their publication and distribution. Because the guidelines are subject to revision, updated versions are published annually. The Guidelines to the Practice of Anesthesia Revised Edition 2013 supersedes all previously published versions of this document. Although the CAS encourages Canadian anesthesiologists to adhere to its practice guidelines to ensure high-quality patient care, the society cannot guarantee any specific patient outcome. Each anesthesiologist should exercise his or her own professional judgement in determining the proper course of action for any patient's circumstances. The CAS assumes no responsibility or liability for any error or omission arising from the use of any information contained in its Guidelines to the Practice of Anesthesia.

  20. Adherence to EBM guidelines in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Khafizianova, R Kh; Burykin, I M

    2015-01-01

    Adequate and rational pharmacotherapy is an important element of rehabilitation of patients with myocardial infarction. Orders of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, domestic and international guidelines, and scientific publications - all contain a complete algorithm for rational pharmacotherapy [1, 2]. These documents are based on the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and help practicing physicians to carry out individualized and rational pharmacotherapy. However, clinical studies have shown low adherence of physicians to clinical guidelines. In the Russian Federation the death rate from cardiovascular diseases is higher than in developed countries. Thus, studies of the causes of high cardiovascular mortality are needed. To assess adherence of practicing physicians to principles of evidence-based medicine in treating patients after myocardial infarction at the stage of rehabilitation. A retrospective analysis of 157 cases of patients in rehabilitation after myocardial infarction for the years 2006 and 2009 was undertaken.We analyzed the list of drugs, prescribed to patients during the period of rehabilitation, drug combinations, regimens and pharmacoepidemiological parameters. We used the following rehabilitation criteria: blood pressure control, smoking cessation, and weight control. Recommendations of controlled physical activities have also been studied. Patient care was compared with the guideline recommendations. Statistical analysis was performed using the OLAP system. 65 patients with myocardial infarction received rehabilitation therapy in 2006, and 92 - in 2009. It was found, that in 2006 physicians prescribed an average of 4.5 drugs per patient, and in 2009 - 4.6 drugs per patient. The average number of cardiovascular drugs (category C of ATC classification) per patient was 2.9 in 2006, and 2.6 - in 2009. Polypharmacy was found in half of the patients.In terms of evidence-based medicine, an important element in the rehabilitation

  1. Clinical practice guidelines to inform evidence-based clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J Stuart; Hubbard, Heddy; Faraday, Martha M; Forrest, John B

    2011-06-01

    With the volume of medical research currently published, any one practitioner cannot independently review the literature to determine best evidence-based medical care. Additionally, non-specialists usually do not have the experience to know best practice for all of the frequent clinical circumstances for which there is no good evidence. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) help clinicians to address these problems because they are systematically created documents that summarize knowledge and provide guidance to assist in delivering high-quality medicine. They aim to improve health care by identifying evidence that supports the best clinical care and making clear which practices appear to be ineffective. Non-structured literature review. CPGs combine evidence-based medicine (on topics for which evidence exists) with expert opinion (on topics for which there is no evidence). The optimal CPG applies structured and transparent judgments, from an unbiased and diverse panel which includes both clinical experts and non-physicians, to a systematic evidence review. It includes decisions in areas in which clinical data are both available and unavailable. The resulting guideline statements should be clearly linked to the quality of the available evidence and the target patient(s) should be clearly defined, so that the reader can assess strength and applicability of the statements to an individual patient. The application of high-quality CPGs improves patient care, but all too often CPGs are not used to the greatest advantage because of inadequate dissemination and incorporation into practice. This article provides an overview of CPGs, focusing on their justification, creation, improvement, and use.

  2. Clinical practice guideline: Tympanostomy tubes in children.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Schwartz, Seth R; Pynnonen, Melissa A; Tunkel, David E; Hussey, Heather M; Fichera, Jeffrey S; Grimes, Alison M; Hackell, Jesse M; Harrison, Melody F; Haskell, Helen; Haynes, David S; Kim, Tae W; Lafreniere, Denis C; LeBlanc, Katie; Mackey, Wendy L; Netterville, James L; Pipan, Mary E; Raol, Nikhila P; Schellhase, Kenneth G

    2013-07-01

    Insertion of tympanostomy tubes is the most common ambulatory surgery performed on children in the United States. Tympanostomy tubes are most often inserted because of persistent middle ear fluid, frequent ear infections, or ear infections that persist after antibiotic therapy. Despite the frequency of tympanostomy tube insertion, there are currently no clinical practice guidelines in the United States that address specific indications for surgery. This guideline is intended for any clinician involved in managing children, aged 6 months to 12 years, with tympanostomy tubes or being considered for tympanostomy tubes in any care setting, as an intervention for otitis media of any type. The primary purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide clinicians with evidence-based recommendations on patient selection and surgical indications for and management of tympanostomy tubes in children. The development group broadly discussed indications for tube placement, perioperative management, care of children with indwelling tubes, and outcomes of tympanostomy tube surgery. Given the lack of current published guidance on surgical indications, the group focused on situations in which tube insertion would be optional, recommended, or not recommended. Additional emphasis was placed on opportunities for quality improvement, particularly regarding shared decision making and care of children with existing tubes. ACTION STATEMENTS: The development group made a strong recommendation that clinicians should prescribe topical antibiotic eardrops only, without oral antibiotics, for children with uncomplicated acute tympanostomy tube otorrhea. The panel made recommendations that (1) clinicians should not perform tympanostomy tube insertion in children with a single episode of otitis media with effusion (OME) of less than 3 months' duration; (2) clinicians should obtain an age-appropriate hearing test if OME persists for 3 months or longer (chronic OME) or prior to surgery when

  3. Radiation protection guidelines for the practicing orthodontist.

    PubMed

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar

    2005-08-01

    This article summarizes the most recent (December 2003) dental x-ray guidelines from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements report #145. The guidelines are intended for all dental health-care providers. They address radiation dose limits for occupational and nonoccupational exposure and radiation protection for operators, patients, and the public. Equipment design can play an important role in radiation protection, and recommendations from the guidelines are discussed.

  4. [The local adaptation of clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Cavada, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The ADAPTE process is a systematic approach to adapting guidelines produced in one setting for use in a different cultural and organizational context. It ensures that the guideline addresses specific health questions relevant to the context, accounting for the needs, priorities, legislation, policies, and resources in the targeted setting. The ADAPTE process was developed to meet the needs of different user groups, including guideline developers, health care providers, and policy makers at the local, national, and international level. The process is flexible; the transparent and explicit reporting enhances the quality and validity of the adapted guideline. The ADAPTE process is briefly described.

  5. Clinical practice guideline: management of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Joshua A.; Hsu, Jonathan; Bawazeer, Mohammad; Marshall, John; Friedrich, Jan O.; Nathens, Avery; Coburn, Natalie; May, Gary R.; Pearsall, Emily; McLeod, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    There has been an increase in the incidence of acute pancreatitis reported worldwide. Despite improvements in access to care, imaging and interventional techniques, acute pancreatitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis, recent studies auditing the clinical management of the condition have shown important areas of noncompliance with evidence-based recommendations. This underscores the importance of creating understandable and implementable recommendations for the diagnosis and management of acute pancreatitis. The purpose of the present guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for the management of both mild and severe acute pancreatitis as well as the management of complications of acute pancreatitis and of gall stone–induced pancreatitis. Une hausse de l’incidence de pancréatite aiguë a été constatée à l’échelle mondiale. Malgré l’amélioration de l’accès aux soins et aux techniques d’imagerie et d’intervention, la pancréatite aiguë est toujours associée à une morbidité et une mortalité importantes. Bien qu’il existe des guides de pratique clinique pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, des études récentes sur la vérification de la prise en charge clinique de cette affection révèlent des lacunes importantes dans la conformité aux recommandations fondées sur des données probantes. Ces résultats mettent en relief l’importance de formuler des recommandations compréhensibles et applicables pour le diagnostic et la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë. La présente ligne directrice vise à fournir des recommandations fondées sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge de la pancréatite aiguë, qu’elle soit bénigne ou grave, ainsi que de ses complications et de celles de la pancréatite causée par un calcul biliaire. PMID:27007094

  6. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Su Yen; Ang, Seng Bin; Bee, Yong Mong; Chen, Richard YT; Gardner, Daphne; Ho, Emily; Adaikan, Kala; Lee, Alvin; Lee, Chung Horn; Lim, Fong Seng; Lim, Hwee Boon; Lim, Su Chi; Seow, Julie; Soh, Abel Wah Ek; Sum, Chee Fang; Tai, E Shyong; Thai, Ah Chuan; Wong, Tien Yin; Yap, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) have updated the clinical practice guidelines on Diabetes Mellitus to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for diabetes mellitus. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on Diabetes Mellitus, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:25017409

  7. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Goh, S Y; Ang, S B; Bee, Y M; Chen, Y T; Gardner, D S; Ho, E T; Adaikan, K; Lee, Y C; Lee, C H; Lim, F S; Lim, H B; Lim, S C; Seow, J; Soh, A W; Sum, C F; Tai, E S; Thai, A C; Wong, T Y; Yap, F

    2014-06-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) have updated the clinical practice guidelines on Diabetes Mellitus to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for diabetes mellitus. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on Diabetes Mellitus, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  8. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lim, Leslie; Chan, Hong Ngee; Chew, Peng Hoe; Chua, Sze Ming; Ho, Carolyn; Kwek, Seow Khee Daniel; Lee, Tih Shih; Loh, Patricia; Lum, Alvin; Tan, Yong Hui Colin; Wan, Yi Min; Woo, Matthew; Yap, Hwa Ling

    2015-06-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) has developed the clinical practice guidelines on Anxiety Disorders to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on anxiety disorders, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  9. Innovations in American Society of Clinical Oncology Practice Guideline Development.

    PubMed

    Somerfield, Mark R; Bohlke, Kari; Browman, George P; Denduluri, Neelima; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hayes, Daniel F; Khorana, Alok A; Miller, Robert S; Mohile, Supriya G; Oliver, Thomas K; Ortiz, Eduardo; Lyman, Gary H

    2016-09-10

    Since the beginning of its guidelines program in 1993, ASCO has continually sought ways to produce a greater number of guidelines while maintaining its commitment to using the rigorous development methods that minimize the biases that threaten the validity of practice recommendations. ASCO is implementing a range of guideline development and implementation innovations. In this article, we describe innovations that are designed to (1) integrate consideration of multiple chronic conditions into practice guidelines; (2) keep more of its guidelines current by applying evolving signals or (more) rapid, for-cause updating approaches; (3) increase the number of high-quality guidelines available to its membership through endorsement and adaptation of other groups' products; (4) improve coverage of its members' guideline needs through a new topic nomination process; and (5) enhance dissemination and promote implementation of ASCO guidelines in the oncology practice community through a network of volunteer ambassadors. We close with a summary of ASCO's plans to facilitate the integration of data from its rapid learning system, CancerLinQ, into ASCO guidelines and to develop tactics through which guideline recommendations can be embedded in clinicians' workflow in digital form. We highlight the challenges inherent in reconciling the need to provide clinicians with more interactive, point-of-care guidance with ASCO's abiding commitment to methodologic rigor in guideline development.

  10. Guidelines for Guidelines: Are They Up to the Task? A Comparative Assessment of Clinical Practice Guideline Development Handbooks

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabnam; Rashidian, Arash

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We conducted a comparative review of clinical practice guideline development handbooks. We aimed to identify the main guideline development tasks, assign weights to the importance of each task using expert opinions and identify the handbooks that provided a comprehensive coverage of the tasks. Methods We systematically searched and included handbooks published (in English language) by national, international or professional bodies responsible for evidenced-based guideline development. We reviewed the handbooks to identify the main guideline development tasks and scored each handbook for each task from 0 (the handbook did not mention the task) to 2 (the task suitably addressed and explained), and calculated a weighted score for each handbook. The tasks included in over 75% of the handbooks were considered as ‘necessary’ tasks. Result Nineteen guideline development handbooks and twenty seven main tasks were identified. The guideline handbooks’ weighted scores ranged from 100 to 220. Four handbooks scored over 80% of the maximum possible score, developed by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Swiss Centre for International Health, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and World Health Organization. Necessary tasks were: selecting the guideline topic, determining the guideline scope, identifying relevant existing guidelines, involving the consumers, forming guideline development group,, developing clinical questions, systematic search for evidence, selecting relevant evidence, appraising identifies research evidence, making group decision, grading available evidence, creating recommendations, final stakeholder consultation, guideline implementation strategies, updating recommendations and correcting potential errors. Discussion Adequate details for evidence based development of guidelines were still lacking from many handbooks. The tasks relevant to ethical issues and piloting were missing in most handbooks. The findings

  11. Guidelines for guidelines: are they up to the task? A comparative assessment of clinical practice guideline development handbooks.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shabnam; Rashidian, Arash

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a comparative review of clinical practice guideline development handbooks. We aimed to identify the main guideline development tasks, assign weights to the importance of each task using expert opinions and identify the handbooks that provided a comprehensive coverage of the tasks. We systematically searched and included handbooks published (in English language) by national, international or professional bodies responsible for evidenced-based guideline development. We reviewed the handbooks to identify the main guideline development tasks and scored each handbook for each task from 0 (the handbook did not mention the task) to 2 (the task suitably addressed and explained), and calculated a weighted score for each handbook. The tasks included in over 75% of the handbooks were considered as 'necessary' tasks. Nineteen guideline development handbooks and twenty seven main tasks were identified. The guideline handbooks' weighted scores ranged from 100 to 220. Four handbooks scored over 80% of the maximum possible score, developed by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, Swiss Centre for International Health, Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and World Health Organization. Necessary tasks were: selecting the guideline topic, determining the guideline scope, identifying relevant existing guidelines, involving the consumers, forming guideline development group,, developing clinical questions, systematic search for evidence, selecting relevant evidence, appraising identifies research evidence, making group decision, grading available evidence, creating recommendations, final stakeholder consultation, guideline implementation strategies, updating recommendations and correcting potential errors. Adequate details for evidence based development of guidelines were still lacking from many handbooks. The tasks relevant to ethical issues and piloting were missing in most handbooks. The findings help decision makers in identifying the

  12. Standard Treatment Guidelines in Primary Healthcare Practice

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, S.; Udayshankar, P.M.; Rama, R.

    2014-01-01

    In India, healthcare delivery is implemented at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Of these, primary health care is the essential health care and is the first point of care for the public across the country. The primary health care system caters to nearly 70% of the population by treating about 90% of the common and locally prevailing problems. One of the integral elements of primary health care is provision of essential medicines, which should be available at all times in adequate amounts in appropriate dosage forms and at an affordable cost. It has an important bearing on the medical, economical and social outcomes of the healthcare delivery system. This situation mandates the need for rational use of medicines by standardizing the treatment of commonly occurring illness at the primary health care level. Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) have been in vogue in India only since recent times and is gaining popularity among practitioners. STGs have many advantages for the patients, healthcare providers, drug manufacturers and marketing agencies, and above all, the policy makers and the legislative system of the country. The drawback in STGs lies in the difficulties in implementation on a large scale. With due efforts to prioritize the health needs, comprehensive coverage of national health programs involving all the stakeholders including professional organizations, undergraduate medical curriculum planners and medical practitioners, STGs can be implemented effectively and thereby we can ensure a quality health care at the primary care level at an affordable cost as part of the now redefined Universal Health Coverage. This article is intended as a guide to understand the concept of STGs, prepared with the aim of capacity building for medical professionals in rationally treating patients in their day-to-day clinical practice. PMID:25657957

  13. Guidelines for psychological practice with transgender and gender nonconforming people.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    In 2015, the American Psychological Association adopted Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Clients in order to describe affirmative psychological practice with transgender and gender nonconforming (TGNC) clients. There are 16 guidelines in this document that guide TGNC-affirmative psychological practice across the lifespan, from TGNC children to older adults. The Guidelines are organized into five clusters: (a) foundational knowledge and awareness; (b) stigma, discrimination, and barriers to care; (c) lifespan development; (d) assessment, therapy, and intervention; and (e) research, education, and training. In addition, the guidelines provide attention to TGNC people across a range of gender and racial/ethnic identities. The psychological practice guidelines also attend to issues of research and how psychologists may address the many social inequities TGNC people experience.

  14. Treatment for Panic Disorder: Practical Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patricia M.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Belcastro, Amy L.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents current research information on the treatment of panic disorder. Specific guidelines are presented to guide the mental health counselor in the delivery of effective psychopharmacological and cognitive-behavioral treatment. (Contains 81 references.) (Author)

  15. Treatment for Panic Disorder: Practical Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patricia M.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Belcastro, Amy L.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents current research information on the treatment of panic disorder. Specific guidelines are presented to guide the mental health counselor in the delivery of effective psychopharmacological and cognitive-behavioral treatment. (Contains 81 references.) (Author)

  16. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endoscope Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is effective and safe for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disease. However, issues regarding endoscope-transmitted infections are emerging. Many countries have established and continuously revise guidelines for endoscope reprocessing in order to prevent infections. While there are common processes used in endoscope reprocessing, differences exist among these guidelines. It is important that the reprocessing of gastrointestinal endoscopes be carried out in accordance with the recommendations for each step of the process. PMID:26473117

  17. Clinical practice guideline: the diagnosis, management, and prevention of bronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Shawn L; Lieberthal, Allan S; Meissner, H Cody; Alverson, Brian K; Baley, Jill E; Gadomski, Anne M; Johnson, David W; Light, Michael J; Maraqa, Nizar F; Mendonca, Eneida A; Phelan, Kieran J; Zorc, Joseph J; Stanko-Lopp, Danette; Brown, Mark A; Nathanson, Ian; Rosenblum, Elizabeth; Sayles, Stephen; Hernandez-Cancio, Sinsi

    2014-11-01

    This guideline is a revision of the clinical practice guideline, "Diagnosis and Management of Bronchiolitis," published by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2006. The guideline applies to children from 1 through 23 months of age. Other exclusions are noted. Each key action statement indicates level of evidence, benefit-harm relationship, and level of recommendation. Key action statements are as follows: Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Quality appraisal of clinical practice guidelines on glioma.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hongliang; Gou, Yani; Pan, Yawen; Li, Qiao; Wei, Dang; Wang, Zhenwei; Niu, Xiaodong; Liang, Wentao; Zhang, Yinian

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) play an important role in healthcare. The guideline development process should be precise and rigorous to ensure that the results are reproducible and not vague. To determine the quality of guidelines, the Appraisal of Guidelines and Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument was developed and introduced. The aim of the present study was to assess the methodological quality of clinical practice guidelines on glioma. Eight databases (including MEDLINE and Embase) were searched till to August, 2013. The methodological quality of the guidelines was assessed by four authors independently using the AGREE II instrument. Fifteen relevant guidelines were included from 940 citations. The overall agreement among reviewers was moderate (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.92). The mean scores were moderate for the domains "scope and purpose" (59.54) and "clarity of presentation" (65.46); however, there were low scores for the domains "stakeholder involvement" (43.80), "rigor of development" (39.01), "applicability" (31.89), and "editorial independence" (30.83). Only one third of the guidelines described the systematic methods for searching, and nearly half of the (47%) guidelines did not give a specific recommendation. Only four of 15 described a procedure for updating the guideline; meanwhile, just six guidelines in this field can be considered to be evidence-based. The quality and transparency of the development process and the consistency in the reporting of glioma guidelines need to be improved. And the quality of reporting of guidelines was disappointing. Many other methodological disadvantages were identified. In the future, glioma CPGs should be based on the best available evidence and rigorously developed and reported. Greater efforts are needed to provide high-quality guidelines that serve as a useful and reliable tool for clinical decision-making in this field.

  19. Guidelines for clinical practice: applications for primary care.

    PubMed

    Lohr, K N

    1994-03-01

    Practice guidelines can make considerable contributions to several areas of health care delivery. Perhaps their greatest promise lies in the area of assessing and improving the quality of health care and health outcomes; secondarily, they may help to rationalize the overall use of health services and thus be a partial means to controlling the use of services and costs of care. Work at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States has (a) suggested eight characteristics of good guidelines; (b) building on those, pointed the way to methods for developing and assessing guidelines; and (c) shown how sound and realistic guidelines can contribute to better ways to measure and improve the quality of primary medical care. This paper discusses four questions: (1) what are guidelines, and how might they relate to or be of benefit to primary care and family medicine? (2) What criteria or principles should be used to create good practice guidelines? (3) What problems or pitfalls need to be anticipated in developing and disseminating guidelines? (4) In what ways can guidelines help improve the quality of health care, especially through quality assurance and improvement and utilization and cost management? Practice guidelines will not be a quick or painless strategy for improving the quality and value of health care, but unprecedented opportunities lie ahead for physicians in primary care.

  20. Actinic Keratosis Clinical Practice Guidelines: An Appraisal of Quality

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Joslyn S.; Scharnitz, Thomas; Seiverling, Elizabeth V.; Ahrns, Hadjh; Ferguson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a common precancerous skin lesion and many AK management guidelines exist, but there has been limited investigation into the quality of these documents. The objective of this study was to assess the strengths and weaknesses of guidelines that address AK management. A systematic search for guidelines with recommendations for AK was performed. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) was used to appraise the quality of guidelines. Multiple raters independently reviewed each of the guidelines and applied the AGREE II tool and scores were calculated. Overall, 2,307 citations were identified and 7 fulfilled the study criteria. The Cancer Council of Australia/Australian Cancer Network guideline had the highest mean scores and was the only guideline to include a systematic review, include an evidence rating for recommendations, and report conflicts of interest and funding sources. High-quality, effective guidelines are evidence-based with recommendations that are concise and organized, so practical application is facilitated. Features such as concise tables, pictorial diagrams, and explicit links to evidence are helpful. However, the rigor and validity of some guidelines were weak. So, it is important for providers to be aware of the features that contribute to a high-quality, practical document. PMID:26451140

  1. Implementation of study results in guidelines and adherence to guidelines in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Waldfahrer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines were introduced in hospital- and practice-based otorhinolaryngology in the 1990ies, and have been undergoing further development ever since. There are currently 20 guidelines on file at the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head & Neck Surgery. The society has cooperated in further 34 guidelines. The quality of the guidelines has been continuously improved by concrete specifications put forward by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V., AWMF). Since increasing digitalization has made access to scientific publications quicker and simpler, relevant study results can be incorporated in guidelines more easily today than in the analog world. S2e and S3 guidelines must be based on a formal literature search with subsequent evaluation of the evidence. The consensus procedure for S2k guidelines is also regulated. However, the implementation of guidelines in routine medical practice must still be considered inadequate, and there is still a considerable need for improvement in adherence to these guidelines. PMID:28025601

  2. [Implementation of Study Results in Guidelines and Adherence to Guidelines in Clinical Practice].

    PubMed

    Waldfahrer, F

    2016-04-01

    Guidelines were introduced in hospital and practice-based otorhinolaryngology in the 1990s, and have been undergoing further development ever since. There are currently 20 guidelines on file at the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. The Society has cooperated in a further 34 guidelines. The quality of the guidelines has been continually improved by concrete specifications put forward by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany [Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V.]. Since increasing digitalisation has made access to scientific publications quicker and more simple, relevant study results can be incorporated in guidelines more easily today than in the analogue world. S2e and S3 guidelines must be based on a formal literature search with subsequent evaluation of the evidence. The consensus procedure for S2k guidelines is also regulated. However, the implementation of guidelines in routine medical practice must still be considered inadequate, and there is still a considerable need for improvement in adherence to these guidelines. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Teleworking: Guidelines for Good Practice. IES Report 329.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huws, Ursula; And Others

    Because teleworking presents major new challenges to human resource managers, trade unions, and others involved in the development of good employment practices, this book provides practical guidelines for good practice in regard to teleworkers that recognize that teleworking is not a single category, but covers at least five distinct groups with…

  4. Automated Essay Scoring: Psychometric Guidelines and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramineni, Chaitanya; Williamson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of psychometric procedures and guidelines Educational Testing Service (ETS) uses to evaluate automated essay scoring for operational use. We briefly describe the e-rater system, the procedures and criteria used to evaluate e-rater, implications for a range of potential uses of e-rater, and directions for…

  5. Clinical practice guideline: acute otitis externa executive summary.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Schwartz, Seth R; Cannon, C Ron; Roland, Peter S; Simon, Geoffrey R; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Huang, William W; Haskell, Helen W; Robertson, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the updated Clinical Practice Guideline: Acute Otitis Externa, as a supplement to Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 8 recommendations developed address appropriate diagnosis of acute otitis externa (AOE) and the use of oral and topical antimicrobials and highlight the need for adequate pain relief. An updated guideline is needed due to new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group.

  6. Sandia software guidelines. Volume 3. Standards, practices, and conventions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies software standards, conventions, and practices. These guidelines are the result of a collective effort within Sandia National Laboratories to define recommended deliverables and to document standards, practices, and conventions which will help ensure quality software. 66 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Development of practice guidelines for hemodialysis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A M A; Allam, Mohd F; Habil, E S; Metwally, A M; Ibrahiem, N A; Radwan, M; El-Gaafary, M M; Afifi, A; Gadallah, M A

    2010-10-01

    Although hemodialysis is the main modaility of treatment of end-stage renal disease, no practice guidelines are available in Egypt. Applying international guidelines for hemodialysis would not be suitable or feasible, because of different health system and lack of resources. The aim of this project was the development of evidence- and consensus-based clinical practice guidelines for hemodialysis in Egypt. The Egyptian guidelines were adopted from the standards developed by The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta (Canada), The National Kidney Foundation (USA), The Clinical Standards Board for Scotland (Scotland), and The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (Canada). In addition, the guidelines published in Oxford Handbook of Dialysis were reviewed. Thereafter, a panel of Egyptian experts in the field of nephrology and hemodialysis was selected and invited to participate in this project. The Delphi technique was applied to build up the consensus among the experts on the formulated guidelines. The final version of the Egyptian Hemodialysis Practice Guidelines included five main sections; personnel, patient care practices, infection prevention and control, facility, and documentation/records. A consensus on practice guidelines for hemodialysis has been successfully produced and is supported by levels of evidence. The 12 Egyptian experts who participated in the Delphi technique and the reviewers assured the completeness and acceptability of the developed practice guidelines. Also, including experts from the university hospitals together with the Directorates of Cairo and Giza Health Affairs of the Egyptian Ministry of Health (MOH) avoided conflicts between clinical recommendations and feasible application in the MOH hemodialysis facilities.

  8. Development of practice guidelines for hemodialysis in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A. M. A.; Allam, Mohd. F.; Habil, E. S.; Metwally, A. M.; Ibrahiem, N. A.; Radwan, M.; El-Gaafary, M. M.; Afifi, A.; Gadallah, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Although hemodialysis is the main modaility of treatment of end-stage renal disease, no practice guidelines are available in Egypt. Applying international guidelines for hemodialysis would not be suitable or feasible, because of different health system and lack of resources. The aim of this project was the development of evidence- and consensus-based clinical practice guidelines for hemodialysis in Egypt. The Egyptian guidelines were adopted from the standards developed by The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Alberta (Canada), The National Kidney Foundation (USA), The Clinical Standards Board for Scotland (Scotland), and The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (Canada). In addition, the guidelines published in Oxford Handbook of Dialysis were reviewed. Thereafter, a panel of Egyptian experts in the field of nephrology and hemodialysis was selected and invited to participate in this project. The Delphi technique was applied to build up the consensus among the experts on the formulated guidelines. The final version of the Egyptian Hemodialysis Practice Guidelines included five main sections; personnel, patient care practices, infection prevention and control, facility, and documentation/records. A consensus on practice guidelines for hemodialysis has been successfully produced and is supported by levels of evidence. The 12 Egyptian experts who participated in the Delphi technique and the reviewers assured the completeness and acceptability of the developed practice guidelines. Also, including experts from the university hospitals together with the Directorates of Cairo and Giza Health Affairs of the Egyptian Ministry of Health (MOH) avoided conflicts between clinical recommendations and feasible application in the MOH hemodialysis facilities. PMID:21206681

  9. Quality of clinical practice guidelines in delirium: a systematic appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Marchington, Katie L; Agar, Meera; Davis, Daniel H J; Sikora, Lindsey; Tsang, Tammy W Y

    2017-01-01

    knowledge translation resources to guidelines may improve their practical application and effective monitoring. More delirium guideline evaluation studies are needed to determine their effect on clinical practice. PMID:28283488

  10. Practice guidelines for tumor marker use in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Catharine

    2002-08-01

    Increasing interest in implementing the practice of evidence-based medicine in oncology has encouraged the development of clinical guidelines, many of which include recommendations about the appropriate use of serum tumor markers. Recent national and international guidelines relating to the use of tumor markers in germ cell, colorectal, breast, ovarian, prostate, lung, neuroendocrine, and thyroid cancers were identified from the scientific literature and other sources and tabulated. Guideline recommendations developed by national and international groups and relating to the use of tumor markers for specific cancers are reviewed and compared, considering the recommendations made for their use in screening, diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of therapy. Potential advantages and disadvantages of clinical guidelines, how best to implement them, and means of auditing their effectiveness are also considered. Excellent clinical guidelines, including recommendations for the most appropriate use of tumor markers, are already available for many cancers. Many questions relating to optimal use of these important tests remain to be answered, but current guidelines already contain much valuable information and advice. Further dissemination and implementation of the guidelines should encourage better use of tumor markers in clinical practice. Careful audit studies are also required to establish the impact of these guidelines on the practice of evidence-based medicine.

  11. In the lymelight: law and clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ronn, Susan

    2009-06-01

    Almost from the beginning, the Ixodes scapularis and I pacificus, adult deer ticks, have been a breeding ground not only for Lyme disease, but also for political dissent. Most recently, the battleground moved into the arena of clinical practice guidelines. Both camps in the "Lyme Wars"-the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS)-have published Lyme disease practice guidelines. The guidelines conflict regarding diagnosis and treatment. The state of Connecticut's Attorney General's office conducted an investigation, under antitrust laws, into the development and promulgation of IDSA's 2006 guidelines. In an unprecedented move, IDSA and the AG have entered into a legal agreement that necessitates a rethinking of the guidelines, requiring a new review panel reflecting balanced, conflict-of-interest-free perspectives on Lyme disease.

  12. Defining ‘elderly’ in clinical practice guidelines for pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shamsher; Bajorek., Beata

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify how ‘elderly’ patients are defined and considered within Australian clinical guidelines for the use of pharmacotherapy. Method: Guidelines pertaining to the use of pharmacotherapy, focusing on conditions described in National Health Priority Areas, were identified using databases (Medline, Google Scholar) and organisation websites (Department of Health and Ageing, National Heart Foundation, National Health and Medical Research Council). Guidelines were reviewed and qualitatively analysed to identify any references or definitions of ‘elderly’ persons. Results: Among the 20 guidelines reviewed, 3 defined ‘elderly’ by chronological age (i.e., years since birth) while the remaining 17 guidelines did not define ‘elderly’ in any way. All 20 guidelines used the term ‘elderly’, whilst some guidelines provided age (chronological)-based dosage recommendations suggesting an ageist or generalist approach in their representation of ‘elderly’, for which rationale was seldom provided. Thematic analysis of the statements revealed five key themes regarding how ‘elderly’ was considered within the guidelines, broadly describing ‘elderly’ persons as being frail and with altered pharmacology. Some guidelines also highlighted the limited evidence base to direct clinical decision-making. A continuum of perceptions of ageing also emerged out of the identified themes. Conclusion: Clinical practice guidelines currently do not adequately define ‘elderly’ persons and provide limited guidance on how to apply treatment recommendations to older persons. The representation of ‘elderly’ in guidelines needs to be less based on chronological age or generic definitions focusing more on establishing a direct link between an individual patient’s characteristics and the pharmacology of their prescribed medication. Clinical guidelines that do not offer any practical descriptions of the features of ageing that are specifically related to the

  13. Practice implications of the Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Anne B

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common and complex cardiac arrhythmias. Using currently available evidence, leading medical societies have established recommendations for the optimal management of atrial fibrillation. These guidelines have recently been updated by 4 consensus groups: the European Society of Cardiology, the American College of Chest Physicians, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and a task force of 3 societies from the United States: the American College of Cardiology Foundation, the American Heart Association, and the Heart Rhythm Society. The present review focused on the similarities and differences among these recently updated guidelines. Key revisions included updated information on newer treatments for rhythm control, treatment options to reduce atrial fibrillation complications, and updated anticoagulant management for thromboprophylaxis.

  14. JSUM ultrasound elastography practice guidelines: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kuwahara, Takamichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Uchida, Hiroki; Sasahira, Naoki; Kawada, Natsuko; Itoh, Yuya; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a relatively new diagnostic technique for measuring the elasticity (hardness) of tissue. Eleven years have passed since the debut of elastography. Various elastography devices are currently being marketed by manufacturers under different names. Pancreatic elastography can be used not only with transabdominal ultrasonography but also with endoscopic ultrasonography, but some types of elastography are difficult to perform for the pancreas. These guidelines aim to classify the various types of elastography into two major categories depending on the differences in the physical quantity (strain, shear wave), and to present the evidence for pancreatic elastography and how to use pancreatic elastography in the present day. But the number of reports on ultrasound elastography for the pancreas is still small, and there are no reports on some elastography devices for the pancreas. Therefore, these guidelines do not recommend methods of imaging and analysis by elastography device.

  15. Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rosacea.

    PubMed

    Asai, Yuka; Tan, Jerry; Baibergenova, Akerke; Barankin, Benjamin; Cochrane, Chris L; Humphrey, Shannon; Lynde, Charles W; Marcoux, Danielle; Poulin, Yves; Rivers, Jason K; Sapijaszko, Mariusz; Sibbald, R Gary; Toole, John; Ulmer, Marcie; Zip, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic facial inflammatory dermatosis characterized by background facial erythema and flushing and may be accompanied by inflammatory papules and pustules, cutaneous fibrosis and hyperplasia known as phyma, and ocular involvement. These features can have adverse impact on quality of life, and ocular involvement can lead to visual dysfunction. The past decade has witnessed increased research into pathogenic pathways involved in rosacea and the introduction of novel treatment innovations. The objective of these guidelines is to offer evidence-based recommendations to assist Canadian health care providers in the diagnosis and management of rosacea. These guidelines were developed by an expert panel of Canadian dermatologists taking into consideration the balance of desirable and undesirable outcomes, the quality of supporting evidence, the values and preferences of patients, and the costs of treatment. The 2015 Cochrane review "Interventions in Rosacea" was used as a source of clinical trial evidence on which to base the recommendations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) Guideline development methodology: towards the best possible guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Evi V; Webster, Angela C; Bolignano, Davide; Haller, Maria C; Nistor, Ionut; van der Veer, Sabine N; Fouque, Denis; Van Biesen, Wim

    2014-04-01

    The prime mission of European Renal Best Practice (ERBP) is to improve the outcome of patients with kidney disease in a sustainable way through enhancing the availability of the knowledge on the management of these patients in a format that stimulates its use in clinical practice in Europe. A key activity is to produce clinical practice guidelines to help clinicians make the healthcare decisions they face. To further improve the quality and validity of its clinical practice guidelines, ERBP has revised its guideline development process. The present document outlines the principles of ERBP's 10-step approach. Important features include standard procedures for selecting topics, for assembling the guideline development group, for choosing and formulating questions, for finding, appraising and summarizing the evidence, for generating recommendations, for preparing reports and organizing peer review. ERBP has adopted the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system for rating the quality of the evidence and strength of recommendations and has addressed implementation in the development process by integrating the GuideLine Implementability Appraisal tool. Ultimately, it is anticipated that these changes will not only further improve the quality of the guideline development process, but also enhance the quality of care and improve outcomes of patients with kidney disease across Europe.

  17. Japanese clinical practice guidelines for congenital biliary dilatation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hiroki; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kamisawa, Terumi; Fujii, Hideki; Hamada, Yoshinori; Kubota, Masayuki; Urushihara, Naoto; Endo, Itaru; Nio, Masaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Ando, Hisami

    2017-01-01

    Until now, there have been no practical clinical guidelines for congenital biliary dilatation (CBD). In this review article, the Japanese Study Group on Congenital Biliary Dilatation (JSCBD) propose to establish clinical practice guidelines for CBD. Because the evidence-based literature is relatively small, we decided to create guidelines based on the consensus of experts, using the medical literature for reference. A total of 20 clinical questions (CQs) were considered by the members of the editorial committee responsible for the guidelines. The CQs included the distinct aspects of CBD: (1) Concepts and Pathology (three CQs); (2) Diagnosis (six CQs); (3) Pancreaticobiliary Complications (three CQs); Treatments and Prognosis (eight CQs). Each statements and comments for CQs were made by the guidelines committee members. CQs were finally approved after review by members of the editorial committee and the guidelines evaluation board of CBD. These guidelines were created to provide assistance in the clinical practice of CBD management; their contents focus on clinical utility, and they include general information on CBD to make this disease more widely recognized. © 2017 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  18. Using sperm posthumously: national guidelines versus practice.

    PubMed

    Raziel, Arieh; Friedler, Shevach; Strassburger, Deborah; Kaufman, Sarit; Umansky, Ana; Ron-El, Raphael

    2010-08-01

    Under pressure from involved families and time limitations, Israeli judges tend to authorize postmortem sperm retrieval and freezing, even in unmarried men and in contradiction to current, albeit non-legally binding, guidelines of the Attorney General. Postmortem sperm retrieval in our institution (2003 to June 2009) was successful in 17 cases, motile sperm was found in 16/17, and cryopreservation was performed in 15/16: no application for use of any of the postmortem frozen samples has been performed thus far.

  19. Management of Graves' disease: an overview and comparison of clinical practice guidelines with actual practice trends.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Becky T; Mai, Vinh Q; Burch, Henry B

    2014-06-01

    Over the last century, much has been learned about the pathogenesis, manifestations, and management of Graves' disease leading to the establishment of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. The joint clinical practice guidelines from the American Thyroid Association and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists give recommendations on both the diagnosis and treatment of hyperthyroidism. A survey of clinicians performed that same year, however, revealed that current practices diverge from these recently published guidelines in multiple areas. These differences will need to be assessed serially to determine the impact of the guidelines on future clinical practice and perhaps vice versa.

  20. Determination and Documentation of the Need for Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In August 2001, the American Psychological Association (APA) Council of Representatives approved as APA policy the "Criteria for Practice Guideline Development and Evaluation" (APA, 2002b), developed by the Board of Professional Affairs Committee on Professional Practice and Standards (COPPS). The present document was developed in response to a…

  1. Etiopathological study of 100 patients of hoarseness of voice: in a rural based hospital.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kamana Sindhu; Kaushal, Amit Kumar; Nagpure, P S; Agarwal, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    Hoarseness of voice is one of the commonest symptoms in otolaryngological practice and it indicates diseases ranging from totally benign condition to the most malignant condition. This is a study to know the etiology, predisposing factor, and clinical profile of patients having hoarseness of voice. The study was carried out in the department of ENT, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram. Patients coming to our OPD were selected. All the patients then underwent detailed history and routine investigations. Stroboscopic evaluation was done to reach to a diagnosis. A total of 100 patients having hoarseness of voice with male to female ratio 1.50:1 were analysed. Age group varied from 12 to 82 years. Largest group comprised of labourer (33 %) followed by house wives (30 %) and vocal paralysis was found in 33 % of the cases. Upper respiratory tract infection (24 %) and smoking (33 %) were found to be the common predisposing factors. Functional disorders were found in 14 % of the cases.

  2. Clinical practice guideline for the management of intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Woong; Seo, Jung Hwa; Kim, Sung Tae; Jung, Cheol Kyu; Suh, Sang-Il

    2014-09-01

    An intracranial aneurysm, with or without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), is a relevant health problem. The rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is a critical concern for individual health; even an unruptured intracranial aneurysm is an anxious condition for the individual. The aim of this guideline is to present current and comprehensive recommendations for the management of intracranial aneurysms, with or without rupture. We performed an extensive literature search, using Medline. We met in person to discuss recommendations. This document is reviewed by the Task Force Team of the Korean Society of Interventional Neuroradiology (KSIN). We divided the current guideline for ruptured intracranial aneurysms (RIAs) and unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). The guideline for RIAs focuses on diagnosis and treatment. And the guideline for UIAs focuses on the definition of a high-risk patient, screening, principle for treatment and selection of treatment method. This guideline provides practical, evidence-based advice for the management of patients with an intracranial aneurysm, with or without rupture.

  3. A practical approach to implementing new CDC GBS guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hill, Shawna M; Bridges, Margie A; Knudsen, Alexis L; Vezeau, Toni M

    2013-01-01

    Group beta streptococcus (GBS) is a well-documented pathogen causing serious maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The CDC guidelines for managing clients who test positive for GBS in pregnancy were revised and published in 2010. However, CDC and extant literature provide limited guidance on implementation strategies for these new recommendations. Although several algorithms are included in the CDC (2010) document, none combine the maternal risk factors for practical and consistent implementation from pregnancy to newborn. In response to confusion upon initial education of these guidelines, we developed an algorithm for maternal intrapartum management. In addition, we clarified the CDC (2010) newborn algorithm in response to provider request. Without altering the recommendations, both algorithms provide clarification of the CDC (2010) guidelines. The nursing process provides an organizational structure for the discussion of our efforts to translate the complex guidelines into practice. This article could provide other facilities with tools for dealing with specific aspects of the complex clinical management of perinatal GBS.

  4. Applying HIV testing guidelines in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Megan R; Fogler, Jess; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H

    2009-12-15

    An estimated one fourth of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are not aware they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV has the potential to ensure optimal outcomes for infected persons and to limit the spread of the virus. Important barriers to testing among physicians include insufficient time, reimbursement issues, and lack of patient acceptance. Current HIV testing guidelines address many of these barriers by making the testing process more streamlined and less stigmatizing. The opt-out consent process has been shown to improve test acceptance. Formal pretest counseling and written consent are no longer recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nevertheless, pretest discussions provide an opportunity to give information about HIV, address fears of discrimination, and identify ongoing high-risk activities. With increased HIV screening in the primary care setting, more persons with HIV could be identified earlier, receive timely and appropriate care, and get treatment to prevent clinical progression and transmission.

  5. Measuring Adherence to Practice Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Milchak, Jessica L.; Carter, Barry L.; Ardery, Gail; James, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Adherence to practice guidelines is frequently used as a measure of quality of care. Numerous studies have evaluated physician adherence to hypertension guidelines by prescription data, physician survey data, or medical record review. However, most have methodological limitations that might underestimate physician adherence. Accurate and meaningful characterization of adherence rests on evaluation of varied components of hypertension care, use of explicit validated performance measures, incorporation of implicit and explicit review, and linkage of process measures to blood pressure outcomes. PMID:15381676

  6. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis: development of a practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Hurkmans, E J; van der Giesen, F J; Bloo, H; Boonman, D C; van der Esch, M; Fluit, M; Hilberdink, W K; Peter, W F; van der Stegen, H P; Veerman, E A; Verhoef, J; Vermeulen, H M; Hendriks, H M; Schoones, J W; Vliet Vlieland, T P

    2011-01-01

    To improve the quality of the physiotherapy management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) a Dutch practice guideline, based on current scientific evidence and best practice, was developed. This guideline comprised all elements of a structured approach (assessment, treatment and evaluation) and was based on the Internatio-nal Classification of Functioning, disability and Health (ICF) and the ICF core sets for RA. A guideline steering committee, comprising 10 expert physiotherapists, selected topics concerning the guideline chapters initial assessment, treatment and evaluation. With respect to treatment a systematic literature search was performed using various databases, and the evidence was graded (1-4). For the initial assessment and evaluation mainly review papers and textbooks were used. Based on evidence and expert opinion, recommendations were formulated. A first draft of the guideline was reviewed by 10 experts from different professional backgrounds resulting in the final guideline. In total 7 topics were selected. For the initial assessment, three recommendations were made. Based on the ICF core sets for RA a list of health problems relevant for the physiotherapist was made and completed with red flags and points of attention. Concerning treatment, three recommendations were formulated; both exercise therapy and education on physiotherapy were recommended, whereas passive interventions (delivery of heat or cold, mechanical, electric and electromagnetic energy, massage, passive mobilization/manipulation and balneotherapy) were neither recommended nor discouraged. For treatment evaluation at the level of activities and participation, the Health Assessment Questionnaire was recommended. For evaluating specific body structures and functions the handheld dynamometer, 6-minute walk test or Ästrand bicycle test (including Borg-scale for rating the perceived exertion), Escola Paulista de Medicina Range of Motion Scale and a Visual Analog Scale for pain and

  7. Korean clinical practice guideline for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Choi, Hun; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Heon; Yang, Seong Ok; Oh, Chul Young; Cho, Young Sam; Kim, Kyoung Woo

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the Korean Urological Association organized the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Guideline Developing Committee composed of experts in the field of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the participation of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine and the Korean Continence Society to develop a Korean clinical practice guideline for BPH. The purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide current and comprehensive recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of BPH. The committee developed the guideline mainly by adapting existing guidelines and partially by using the de novo method. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2009 to 2013 by using medical search engines including data from Korea. Based on the published evidence, recommendations were synthesized, and the level of evidence of the recommendations was determined by using methods adapted from the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Meta-analysis was done for one key question and four recommendations. A draft guideline was reviewed by expert peer reviewers and discussed at an expert consensus meeting until final agreement was achieved. This evidence-based guideline for BPH provides recommendations to primary practitioners and urologists for the diagnosis and treatment of BPH in men older than 40 years. PMID:26966724

  8. Breast cancer practice guidelines: evaluation and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Edge, S B

    1997-11-01

    The utility of practice guidelines in breast cancer management remains unproved. This paper examines the scope and goals of published guidelines and their utility in the process of breast cancer treatment quality improvement. Although existing breast cancer guidelines vary widely in scope and intent, they provide a framework for meaningful quality-of-care evaluation. Among the few comprehensive breast cancer guideline programs are those developed by the Ontario Cancer Treatment Practice Guidelines Initiative, the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center, the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). Ultimately, guidelines will prove useful only if they are utilized as part of a comprehensive program to improve quality, cost-effectiveness, and outcomes. To accomplish this, they must include mechanisms for revision and evaluation. The evaluation of guideline utility in quality improvement, particularly in breast cancer care, is a complex long-term process, which should include input from practitioners, institutions, payors, and government.

  9. Involving Stakeholders in the Development of Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jennifer J

    2014-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines make recommendations that are relevant to large populations of practitioners, patients, and administrators. Although not all individuals with interest can physically sit on each development panel, there are numerous opportunities for stakeholder involvement in the guideline development process. Such involvement is encouraged, particularly at the time of topic selection, panel development, scope determination, and prerelease critique. Interface with the guidelines development process may occur either via representation through stakeholder organizations or at the individual level. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  10. Appraisal Tools for Clinical Practice Guidelines: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Siering, Ulrich; Eikermann, Michaela; Hausner, Elke; Hoffmann-Eßer, Wiebke; Neugebauer, Edmund A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Clinical practice guidelines can improve healthcare processes and patient outcomes, but are often of low quality. Guideline appraisal tools aim to help potential guideline users in assessing guideline quality. We conducted a systematic review of publications describing guideline appraisal tools in order to identify and compare existing tools. Methods Among others we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1995 to May 2011 for relevant primary and secondary publications. We also handsearched the reference lists of relevant publications. On the basis of the available literature we firstly generated 34 items to be used in the comparison of appraisal tools and grouped them into thirteen quality dimensions. We then extracted formal characteristics as well as questions and statements of the appraisal tools and assigned them to the items. Results We identified 40 different appraisal tools. They covered between three and thirteen of the thirteen possible quality dimensions and between three and 29 of the possible 34 items. The main focus of the appraisal tools were the quality dimensions “evaluation of evidence” (mentioned in 35 tools; 88%), “presentation of guideline content” (34 tools; 85%), “transferability” (33 tools; 83%), “independence” (32 tools; 80%), “scope” (30 tools; 75%), and “information retrieval” (29 tools; 73%). The quality dimensions “consideration of different perspectives” and “dissemination, implementation and evaluation of the guideline” were covered by only twenty (50%) and eighteen tools (45%) respectively. Conclusions Most guideline appraisal tools assess whether the literature search and the evaluation, synthesis and presentation of the evidence in guidelines follow the principles of evidence-based medicine. Although conflicts of interest and norms and values of guideline developers, as well as patient involvement, affect the trustworthiness of guidelines, they are

  11. Best Practice Guidelines on Publication Ethics: a Publisher's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Chris; Wager, Elizabeth; Bowman, Alyson; Fiack, Suzan; Scott-Lichter, Diane; Robinson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    These Best Practice Guidelines on Publication Ethics describe Blackwell Publishing's position on the major ethical principles of academic publishing and review factors that may foster ethical behavior or create problems. The aims are to encourage discussion, to initiate changes where they are needed, and to provide practical guidance, in the form of Best Practice statements, to inform these changes. Blackwell Publishing recommends that editors adapt and adopt the suggestions outlined to best fit the needs of their own particular publishing environment. PMID:17206953

  12. Best Practice Guidelines on Publication Ethics: a publisher's perspective.

    PubMed

    Graf, Chris; Wager, Elizabeth; Bowman, Alyson; Fiack, Suzan; Scott-Lichter, Diane; Robinson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    These Best Practice Guidelines on Publication Ethics describe Blackwell Publishing's position on the major ethical principles of academic publishing and review factors that may foster ethical behavior or create problems. The aims are to encourage discussion, to initiate changes where they are needed, and to provide practical guidance, in the form of Best Practice statements, to inform these changes. Blackwell Publishing recommends that editors adapt and adopt the suggestions outlined to best fit the needs of their own particular publishing environment.

  13. Utilization of the American Telemedicine Association's Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Antoniotti, Nina; Bernard, Jordana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) Standards and Guidelines Committee develops practice standards and guidelines. Key to the Committee's mission is dissemination so the standards can be used in the practice of telemedicine. Over a 2-year period, when a standards document was accessed from the ATA Web site, a short survey was completed, but it did not assess how the documents were used once downloaded. A more formal survey was conducted to determine the impact ATA standards and guidelines are having on healthcare delivery via telemedicine. Materials and Methods: A survey was developed and distributed via SurveyMonkey to 13,177 ATA members and nonmembers in November 2011. Results were compiled and analyzed after a 90-day open period for responses to be submitted. Results: The majority of respondents (96%) believe the practice of telemedicine/telehealth should have standards and guidelines and that the ATA and other professional societies/associations should be responsible for developing them. The top uses of guidelines include guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research. Respondents indicating a need for standards and guidelines said the ATA (78.7%) and other professional societies/associations (74.5%) should be responsible for development. When asked to list specific practice guidelines or standards they are using for telehealth, the majority (21.5%) are using in-house (e.g., hospital, company)-developed guidelines, followed by those from professional associations/societies (20.4%) and those developed by the ATA (18.2%). Conclusions: Overall, the survey results indicate guidelines documents developed by the ATA and other professional societies and those developed in-house are being regularly accessed and used in both public and private sectors. Practitioners of telemedicine believe that standards and guidelines are needed for guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research

  14. Persistent Lobar Atelectasis in a Patient With Chronic Hoarseness.

    PubMed

    Scelsi, Chris L; Khasnavis, Tanya; Patel, Nikhil G; Keshavamurthy, Jayanth H; Davis, William B

    2017-05-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented for outpatient evaluation of a 1-week history of fever and upper respiratory symptoms. She denied tobacco use, weight loss, hemoptysis, chronic cough, or recent travel and was in otherwise good health. Her medical history was insignificant except for her chronic hoarseness from a prior laryngeal disease. She denied any worsening hoarseness or any other vocal changes. She did report a positive family history of squamous cell lung cancer in her father. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Guidelines to Support Professional Copyright Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryden, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Copyright is extremely complex, and it is difficult to convey its complexities in a clear and concise form. Through decades of experience, archivists developed informal best practices for dealing with copyright in the analog world; however the application of copyright in the digital environment is evolving in response to rapidly changing…

  16. Sibling Family Practices: Guidelines for Healthy Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Toni Cavanagh; Huang, Bevan Emma; Simpson, Pippa M.

    2009-01-01

    A questionnaire was given to 500 mental health and child welfare professionals asking for maximum acceptable ages for siblings to engage jointly in certain family practices related to hygiene, affection, and privacy. A large proportion of respondents felt it was never acceptable for siblings to take showers together (40%), kiss on the mouth (37%),…

  17. Guidelines to Support Professional Copyright Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryden, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Copyright is extremely complex, and it is difficult to convey its complexities in a clear and concise form. Through decades of experience, archivists developed informal best practices for dealing with copyright in the analog world; however the application of copyright in the digital environment is evolving in response to rapidly changing…

  18. Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education Intervention Guideline Series: Guideline 2, Practice Facilitation.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Grant, Rachel E; Campbell, Craig; Colburn, Lois; Davis, David; Dorman, Todd; Fischer, Michael; Horsley, Tanya; Jacobs-Halsey, Virginia; Kane, Gabrielle; LeBlanc, Constance; Moore, Donald E; Morrow, Robert; Olson, Curtis A; Silver, Ivan; Thomas, David C; Turco, Mary; Kitto, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education commissioned a study to clarify and, if possible, standardize the terminology for a set of important educational interventions. In the form of a guideline, this article describes one such intervention, practice facilitation, which is a common strategy in primary care to help practices develop capacity and infrastructure to support their ability to improve patient care. Based on a review of recent evidence and a facilitated discussion with US and Canadian experts, we describe practice facilitation, its terminology, and other important information about the intervention. We encourage leaders and researchers to consider and build on this guideline as they plan, implement, evaluate, and report practice facilitation efforts. Clear and consistent use of terminology is imperative, along with complete and accurate descriptions of interventions, to improve the use and study of practice facilitation.

  19. Practical Guidelines for Qualitative Research Using Online Forums

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chee, Wonshik

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of Internet research in general, the number of qualitative Internet studies has recently increased. Online forums are one of the most frequently used qualitative Internet research methods. Despite an increasing number of online forum studies, very few articles have been written to provide practical guidelines to conduct an online forum as a qualitative research method. In this paper, practical guidelines in using an online forum as a qualitative research method are proposed based on three previous online forum studies. First, the three studies are concisely described. Practical guidelines are proposed based on nine idea categories related to issues in the three studies: (a) a fit with research purpose and questions; (b) logistics; (c) electronic versus conventional informed consent process; (d) structure and functionality of online forums; (e) interdisciplinary team; (f) screening methods; (g) languages; (h) data analysis methods; and (i) getting participants’ feedback. PMID:22918135

  20. South African hypertension practice guideline 2014

    PubMed Central

    Seedat, YK; Rayner, BL; Veriava, Yosuf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Outcomes Extensive data from many randomised, controlled trials have shown the benefit of treating hypertension (HTN). The target blood pressure (BP) for antihypertensive management is systolic < 140 mmHg and diastolic < 90 mmHg, with minimal or no drug side effects. Lower targets are no longer recommended. The reduction of BP in the elderly should be achieved gradually over one month. Co-existent cardiovascular (CV) risk factors should also be controlled. Benefits Reduction in risk of stroke, cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease and coronary artery disease. Recommendations Correct BP measurement procedure is described. Evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors and recommendations for antihypertensive therapy are stipulated. Lifestyle modification and patient education are cornerstones of management. The major indications, precautions and contra-indications are listed for each antihypertensive drug recommended. Drug therapy for the patient with uncomplicated HTN is either mono- or combination therapy with a low-dose diuretic, calcium channel blocker (CCB) and an ACE inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). Combination therapy should be considered ab initio if the BP is ≥ 160/100 mmHg. In black patients, either a diuretic and/or a CCB is recommended initially because the response rate is better compared to an ACEI. In resistant hypertension, add an alpha-blocker, spironolactone, vasodilator or β-blocker. Validity The guideline was developed by the Southern African Hypertension Society 2014©. PMID:25629715

  1. Practice guidelines for program evaluation in community-based rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Grandisson, Marie; Hébert, Michèle; Thibeault, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    This paper proposes practice guidelines to evaluate community-based rehabilitation (CBR) programs. These were developed through a rigorous three-phase research process including a literature review on good practices in CBR program evaluation, a field study during which a South Africa CBR program was evaluated, and a Delphi study to generate consensus among a highly credible panel of CBR experts from a wide range of backgrounds and geographical areas. The 10 guidelines developed are summarized into a practice model highlighting key features of sound CBR program evaluation. They strongly indicate that sound CBR evaluations are those that give a voice and as much control as possible to the most affected groups, embrace the challenge of diversity, and foster use of evaluation processes and findings through a rigorous, collaborative and empowering approach. The practice guidelines should facilitate CBR evaluation decisions in respect to facilitating an evaluation process, using frameworks and designing methods. Implications for rehabilitation Ten practice guidelines provide guidance to facilitate sound community-based rehabilitation (CBR) program evaluation decisions. Key indications of good practice include: • being as participatory and empowering as possible; • ensuring that all, including the most affected, have a real opportunity to share their thoughts; • highly considering mixed methods and participatory tools; • adapting to fit evaluation context, local culture and language(s); • defining evaluation questions and reporting findings using shared CBR language when possible, which the framework offered may facilitate.

  2. [Clinical practice guidelines and primary care. SESPAS report 2012].

    PubMed

    Atienza, Gerardo; Bañeres, Joaquim; Gracia, Francisco Javier

    2012-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are intended to serve as a bridge between the decision levels and the sources of knowledge, giving decision makers the best synthesis of scientific evidence and an analysis of context, to provide elements of judgement and to transfer scientific knowledge into clinical practice. However, the actual impact on health care is variable and effectiveness in changing medical practice, moderate. Qualitative and quantitative studies show that most primary care physicians consider that the guides are a valuable source of advice and training and a kind of improving the quality of healthcare. However, they underline its rigidity, the difficulty to apply to individual patients and that their main goal is to reduce healthcare costs. In Spain, there are several experiences as GuíaSalud in developing clinical practice guidelines aimed specifically at primary care. However, the proper implementation of a clinical practice guideline includes not only the quality and thoroughness of the evidence, but the credibility of professionals and organizations and other contextual factors such as characteristics of patients, providers and organizations or systems. An important step in future research is to develop a better theoretical understanding of organizational change that is required for management and professionals to give appropriate guidance to the implementation of the clinical practice guidelines.

  3. Clinical practice guidelines for cancer care: utilization and expectations of the practicing oncologist.

    PubMed

    Dillmon, Melissa; Goldberg, John M; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Mayer, Robert J; Loehrer, Patrick; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    ASCO produces guidelines for oncologists, utilizing a systematic review process. Although this resource-intense process results in authoritative and widely cited guidelines, they can cover only a few specific clinical issues. Hence, the ASCO guidelines presently do not fully address many clinical situations. Expanding the scope of ASCO guidelines will require major revisions to the guidelines development process. Changes likely to improve the process include establishing disease-specific committees composed of content experts, improving methods to resolve conflicts of interest, simplifying steps to engage members to suggest topics for new guidelines, and linking guidelines utilization with quality indices. In a time of rapid change in practice and research in cancer, ASCO can play a pivotal role in patient care through major revisions to guideline development, accessibility, and integration with quality metrics.

  4. [Clinical practice guidelines and knowledge management in healthcare].

    PubMed

    Ollenschläger, Günter

    2013-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are key tools for the translation of scientific evidence into everyday patient care. Therefore guidelines can act as cornerstones of evidence based knowledge management in healthcare, if they are trustworthy, and its recommendations are not biased by authors' conflict of interests. Good medical guidelines should be disseminated by means of virtual (digital/electronic) health libraries - together with implementation tools in context, such as guideline based algorithms, check lists, patient information, a.s.f. The article presents evidence based medical knowledge management using the German experiences as an example. It discusses future steps establishing evidence based health care by means of combining patient data, evidence from medical science and patient care routine, together with feedback systems for healthcare providers.

  5. Clinical practice guideline (update): Adult Sinusitis Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Piccirillo, Jay F; Chandrasekhar, Sujana S; Brook, Itzhak; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Kramper, Maggie; Orlandi, Richard R; Palmer, James N; Patel, Zara M; Peters, Anju; Walsh, Sandra A; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2015-04-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation has published a supplement to this issue featuring the updated "Clinical Practice Guideline: Adult Sinusitis" as a supplement to Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 14 developed recommendations address diagnostic accuracy for adult rhinosinusitis, the appropriate use of ancillary tests to confirm diagnosis and guide management (including radiography, nasal endoscopy, computed tomography, and testing for allergy and immune function), and the judicious use of systemic and topical therapy. Emphasis was also placed on identifying multiple chronic conditions that would modify management of rhinosinusitis, including asthma, cystic fibrosis, immunocompromised state, and ciliary dyskinesia. An updated guideline is needed as a result of new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group.

  6. Clinical Practice Guideline: Otitis Media with Effusion Executive Summary (Update).

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shin, Jennifer J; Schwartz, Seth R; Coggins, Robyn; Gagnon, Lisa; Hackell, Jesse M; Hoelting, David; Hunter, Lisa L; Kummer, Ann W; Payne, Spencer C; Poe, Dennis S; Veling, Maria; Vila, Peter M; Walsh, Sandra A; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2016-02-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation has published a supplement to this issue of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery featuring the updated "Clinical Practice Guideline: Otitis Media with Effusion." To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 18 recommendations developed emphasize diagnostic accuracy, identification of children who are most susceptible to developmental sequelae from otitis media with effusion, and education of clinicians and patients regarding the favorable natural history of most otitis media with effusion and the lack of efficacy for medical therapy (eg, steroids, antihistamines, decongestants). An updated guideline is needed due to new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group.

  7. Do perinatal guidelines have an impact on obstetric practices?

    PubMed

    Vendittelli, F; Rivière, O; Crenn-Hébert, C; Giraud-Roufast, A

    2012-10-01

    The publication of several sets of French guidelines was unfortunately not accompanied by planned assessment of their impact on practices. The goal of this study was to assess the impact of eight French perinatal guidelines on actual obstetric practices. Historical cohort setting in France: the Audipog database of 299,412 pregnancies from 1994 to 2006, from which we extracted a sub-sample by randomLy selecting from each participating maternity ward all births occurring during a single month of each year (n=107,450 pregnancies). The main outcome measure was the incidence of pertinent perinatal indicators related to these guidelines. These included site of delivery for low-birth-weight infants (1998), caesarean delivery (2000), preterm delivery (2002), breastfeeding (2002), smoking and pregnancy (2004), immediate postpartum hemorrhages (2004), early discharge after delivery (2004) and episiotomies (2005). Standardised rates, before and after the year of each guideline, were compared using a Chi(2) test. The percentage of children weighing less than 1500 g at birth born in Level III hospitals increased through 1999 but dropped subsequently, without ever returning to the 1994 level (P<0.0001). The overall caesarean rate climbed slowly but regularly from 1994 through 2006 (P<0.0001). Use of antenatal corticosteroids for women hospitalised for threatened preterm labour and in children born before 33 weeks has fluctuated since the release of the guideline (P>0.05). Exclusive breastfeeding at discharge from the maternity ward has increased slowly (P<0.0001). The percentage of deliveries with active management of the third stage of labour rose notably from 1999 to 2006 (P<0.0001), and smoking cessation during pregnancy rose slightly in 2006 (P<0.0001). Since 1994, early discharges have become slowly, slightly, but regularly more frequent for all women (P<0.0001). The guideline on episiotomies has had a slight positive effect in the short term (P<0.0001). Globally, the

  8. Guidelines on Good Clinical Laboratory Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ezzelle, J.; Rodriguez-Chavez, I. R.; Darden, J. M.; Stirewalt, M.; Kunwar, N.; Hitchcock, R.; Walter, T.; D’Souza, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    A set of Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) standards that embraces both the research and clinical aspects of GLP were developed utilizing a variety of collected regulatory and guidance material. We describe eleven core elements that constitute the GCLP standards with the objective of filling a gap for laboratory guidance, based on IND sponsor requirements, for conducting laboratory testing using specimens from human clinical trials. These GCLP standards provide guidance on implementing GLP requirements that are critical for laboratory operations, such as performance of protocol-mandated safety assays, peripheral blood mononuclear cell processing and immunological or endpoint assays from biological interventions on IND-registered clinical trials. The expectation is that compliance with the GCLP standards, monitored annually by external audits, will allow research and development laboratories to maintain data integrity and to provide immunogenicity, safety, and product efficacy data that is repeatable, reliable, auditable and that can be easily reconstructed in a research setting. PMID:18037599

  9. Electronic communities of practice: guidelines from a project.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kendall; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Norman, Cameron D; Li, Linda C; Olatunbosun, Tunde; Cressman, Céline; Nguyen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The timely incorporation of health research into the routine practice of individual health practitioners and interprofessional teams is a widely recognized and ongoing challenge. Health professional engagement and learning is an important cog in the wheel of knowledge translation; passive dissemination of evidence through journals and clinical practice guidelines is inadequate when used alone as an intervention to change the practices of the health professionals.An evolving body of research suggests that communities of practice can be effective in facilitating the uptake of best practices by individual health professionals and teams. Modern information technologies can extend the boundaries and reach of these communities, forming electronic communities of practice (eCoP) that can be used to promote intra- and interprofessional continuing professional development (CPD) and team-based, patient-centered care. However, examples of eCoPs and examination of their characteristics are lacking in the literature. In this paper, we discuss guidelines for developing eCoP. These guidelines will be helpful for others considering the use of the eCoP model in interprofessional learning and practice.

  10. A Descriptive Study of Children with Chronic Hoarseness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filter, Maynard D.; Poynor, R. Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-six chronically hoarse children (mean age nine) with nodules were found to be similar to those without nodules on various perceptual measures. Twenty of thirty of these children showed improvements after a year of rehabilitation in the public schools; improvement varied according to the abilities of individual clinicians. (Author/CL)

  11. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  12. Provider education to promote implementation of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ockene, J K; Zapka, J G

    2000-08-01

    Although the interest in and promulgation of clinical practice guidelines have significantly increased in the past 2 decades, concern exists about their actual implementation. This article focuses on one strategy to encourage guideline implementation at the clinician level: clinician education. The objectives of the article are to review educational strategies, to consider them within the context of complementary strategies carried out at the organizational and clinic setting levels, and to outline challenges and recommendations for clinicians' continuing education. Experience and data from relevant randomized clinical trials within an educational framework are reviewed. Implementation of clinical practice guidelines requires a variety of skills, including assessment, appropriate delineation of a treatment and monitoring plan, patient tracking, and patient counseling and education skills. Continuing education strategies must reflect the content and teaching methods that best match the learning objectives. The pressures of current-day practices place limits on the resources, particularly clinician time, that are available for continuing education. Organizational resources must be committed to build the complementary supportive systems necessary for improved clinician practice. In addition to physicians, education must be directed at nonphysician clinicians, office staff, and administrators who also are responsible for guideline implementation. To meet the challenges of developing clinician motivation, balancing competing demands, and treating patients with complex medical conditions, all within time constraints, clinical leaders need to design education activities that have leadership support, reflect compelling evidence, use multiple strategies and teaching techniques, and engage learners in skill building and problem solving.

  13. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  14. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  15. Practice Guidelines regarding Psychologists' Involvement in Pharmacological Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The guidelines presented in this document are intended to provide a resource to psychologists interested in the issue of what represents optimal practice in relation to pharmacotherapy. They are not intended to apply to those psychologists who choose not to become directly or indirectly involved in medication management regardless of their level…

  16. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  17. Can surveying practitioners about their practices help identify priority clinical practice guideline topics?

    PubMed Central

    Brouwers, Melissa C; Chambers, Alexandra; Perry, James

    2003-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to assist in patient and physician clinical decision making for specific clinical circumstances. In order to establish which guideline topics are priorities, practitioners were surveyed regarding their current practice. Methods One hundred ninety-seven practitioners in Ontario, Canada were mailed a survey exploring their current practice or opinion regarding the prophylactic use of anticonvulsant drugs in patients with malignant glioma who had never had a seizure. The survey consisted of seven questions regarding the relevance of a guideline on the subject to the practitioner's practice, the proportion of clinical cases involving anticonvulsant use, knowledge of existing guidelines on this topic, interest in reviewing a completed practice guideline and three clinical scenarios. Results There were 122 respondents who returned the survey (62% rate of return). Eighty percent of the practitioners who responded indicated that less than 25% of their clinical cases involved the use of anticonvulsants; however, only 16% of respondents indicated that a practice guideline would be irrelevant to their practice. Eighty percent of respondents volunteered to review a draft version of a practice guideline on the use of anticonvulsants. The survey presented the practitioners with three scenarios where anticonvulsants in patients with brain tumours may be appropriate: peri-operatively in patients without seizures, postoperatively in patients currently using anticonvulsants, and thirdly in patients not currently using anticonvulsants or undergoing surgery. In contrast to the third situation, the first two situations yielded considerable variation in practitioner response. Conclusion The survey established that there is some variation present in the current practice of anticonvulsant use in the patients with brain tumours. Whether there is an optimal treatment practice has yet to be determined

  18. Nutrition practices of nurseries in England. Comparison with national guidelines.

    PubMed

    Neelon, Sara E Benjamin; Burgoine, Thomas; Hesketh, Kathryn R; Monsivais, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    Recent national guidelines call for improved nutrition within early years settings. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe foods and beverages served in nurseries, assess provider behaviors related to feeding, and compare these practices to national guidelines. We administered a mailed survey to a random sample of nurseries across England, stratifying by tertile of deprivation. A total of 851 nurseries returned the survey (54.3% response rate). We fitted separate multivariate logistic regression models to estimate the association of deprivation with each of the 13 food and beverage guidelines and the seven provider behavior guidelines. We also conducted a joint F-test for any deprivation effect, to evaluate the effect of the guidelines combined. After adjusting for confounders, we observed differences in the frequency of nurseries that reported serving healthier foods across the tertiles of deprivation (p = 0.02 for joint F test). These adjusted results were driven mainly by nurseries in more deprived areas serving more whole grains (OR 1.57 (95% CI 1.00, 2.46)) and legumes, pulses, and lentils (1.40 (1.01, 2.14)). We also observed differences in the frequency of nurseries reporting more provider behaviors consistent with national guidelines across the tertiles of deprivation (p = 0.01 for joint F test). Nurseries in more deprived areas were more likely to dilute juice with water (2.35 (1.48, 3.73)), allow children to select their own portions (1.09 (1.06, 1.58)), and sit with children during meals (1.84 (1.07, 3.15)). While nurseries in the most deprived areas reported serving more healthy foods, a large percentage were still not meeting national guidelines. Policy and intervention efforts may increase compliance with national guidelines in nurseries in more deprived areas, and across England. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Peter; Quinn, Karen; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Aranda, Sanchia

    2008-01-01

    Background Support for family carers is a core function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based on available evidence and consensus based expert opinion. Methods The guidelines were developed via the following methods: (1) A literature review; (2) Conceptual framework; (3) Refinement of the guidelines based on feedback from an expert panel and focus groups with multidisciplinary specialists from three palliative care units and three major teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Results The literature review revealed that no comprehensive exploration of the conduct and utility of family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting has occurred. Preliminary clinical guidelines were developed by the research team, based on relevant literature and a conceptual framework informed by: single session therapy, principles of therapeutic communication and models of coping and family consultation. A multidisciplinary expert panel refined the content of the guidelines and the applicability of the guidelines was then assessed via two focus groups of multidisciplinary palliative care specialists. The complete version of the guidelines is presented. Conclusion Family meetings provide an opportunity to enhance the quality of care provided to palliative care patients and their family carers. The clinical guidelines developed from this study offer a framework for preparing, conducting and evaluating family meetings. Future research and clinical implications are outlined. PMID:18710576

  20. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for cholelithiasis 2016.

    PubMed

    Tazuma, Susumu; Unno, Michiaki; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Inui, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Kai, Masahiro; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Koji; Ryozawa, Shomei; Nimura, Yuji; Fujita, Naotaka; Kubota, Keiichi; Shoda, Junichi; Tabata, Masami; Mine, Tetsuya; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-03-01

    Cholelithiasis is one of the commonest diseases in gastroenterology. Remarkable improvements in therapeutic modalities for cholelithiasis and its complications are evident. The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology has revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for cholelithiasis. Forty-three clinical questions, for four categories-epidemiology and pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatments, and prognosis and complications-were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases for the period between 1983 and June 2012. The guidelines were developed with use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This article preferentially describes the clinical management of cholelithiasis and its complications. Following description of the diagnosis performed stepwise through imaging modalities, treatments of cholecystolithiasis, choledocholithiasis, and hepatolithiasis are introduced along with a flowchart. Since there have been remarkable improvements in endoscopic treatments and surgical techniques, the guidelines ensure flexibility in choices according to the actual clinical environment. The revised clinical practice guidelines are appropriate for use by clinicians in their daily practice.

  1. [Agreements and disagreements among the main clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Calderón Montero, A

    2014-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus has an enormous health and social impact and its incidence is rising exponentially in the industrialized world as a result of unhealthy lifestyles. In the last few years, research in this field has increased, leading to the development of new drugs and new indications. Consequently, numerous updates of clinical practice guidelines for diabetes have been published in the last 12 months, which provide health professionals with an up-to-date view of therapeutic possibilities. The present article reviews the guidelines with the greatest scientific impact and discusses areas of agreement and disagreement among these documents.

  2. Rethinking the Role of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) play a major role in pharmacy education. Students learn to locate, retrieve, and apply CPGs in didactic coursework and practice experiences. However, they often memorize and quote recommendations without critical analysis, which tends to undermine their clinical growth. Students should become genuine drug experts, based on strong critical-thinking skills and the ability to assimilate extensive clinical and scientific knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines improve health care, and students should be familiar with them, but there are legitimate criticisms of CPGs, stemming largely from potential conflicts of interest and limitations in the quality and scope of available evidence. Despite such flaws, CPGs can be used to facilitate the clinical growth of students if the emphasis is placed on critically analyzing and evaluating CPG recommendations, as opposed to blindly accepting them. From that perspective, the role that CPGs have come to play in education may need to be reconsidered. PMID:26889060

  3. Neonatal abstinence syndrome clinical practice guidelines for Ontario.

    PubMed

    Dow, Kimberly; Ordean, Alice; Murphy-Oikonen, Jodie; Pereira, Jodie; Koren, Gideon; Roukema, Henry; Selby, Peter; Turner, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Ontario's clinical practice guidelines for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) provide evidence-informed recommendations that address the needs of substance using pregnant women and newborns at risk of NAS. NAS is a complex and multifaceted issue that is escalating along with rapidly rising opioid use in Ontario. Reducing the incidence and impact of NAS requires immediate action in order to improve the care of affected women and infants. This includes optimizing and standardizing treatment strategies, assessing and managing social risk, better monitoring of prescribing practices and facilitating the implementation of better treatment and prevention strategies as they become available. These clinical practice guidelines provide the framework to inform and support the development of a coordinated strategy to address this important issue and to promote safe and effective care.

  4. Conflict of interest reporting in otolaryngology clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gordon H

    2013-08-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have become increasingly important in recent years due to an increasing emphasis on evidence-based practice, as well as serious discussions in academic, medical, and legal circles about their possible role in measuring physician performance, setting provider reimbursement strategy, and establishing protection from litigation in the future. At the same time, CPGs are costly to develop. Thus, as CPGs gain influence in medical practice, it will become essential that CPGs are developed using trustworthy standards and that the authors of CPGs are not being unduly influenced by financial pressures from external stakeholders. Since 2004, the 9 CPGs sponsored by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation have been developed with full disclosure and appropriate management of potential financial conflicts of interest. This commentary discusses the potential for conflict of interest in otolaryngology CPGs and how the otolaryngology guideline development process can serve as a model for other professional medical organizations.

  5. Translating psoriasis guidelines into practice: Important gaps revealed.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Reva; Lebwohl, Mark G; Gottlieb, Alice B; Boyer, Kevin; Hamarstrom, Elaine; Korman, Neil J; Kirsner, Robert S; Sober, Arthur J; Menter, Alan

    2016-03-01

    There is a well-established lack of adherence to evidence-based clinical guidelines. The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) developed educational sessions entitled Translating Evidence into Practice based on the published guidelines for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. We sought to determine the effectiveness of Translating Evidence into Practice sessions in improving patient care. Pre- and post-session surveys were administered at Translating Evidence into Practice sessions. A follow-up was administered 6 months after completion of the most recent session, which was 2.5 years after the first session. At both post-session and follow-up, more than 92% of participants believed the sessions had improved their knowledge. The proportion of participants that self-reported assessing disease severity, comorbidities, and quality of life increased at follow-up. Participants' self-reported counseling of patients and confidence in treating psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis also increased at post-session and follow-up. Greater than 97% of participants thought the sessions would have a positive impact on their practice whereas 50% reported making a change in practice. Lack of a control group, the self-reported nature of the data, and potential participant bias are limitations. The AAD's Translating Evidence into Practice sessions are effective and well received for improving knowledge and practice and can be useful to determine self-reported practice gaps. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners practice guideline 'Eczema'].

    PubMed

    de Vries, Corlien J H; de Witt-de Jong, Anne W F; Dirven-Meijer, Pauline C; Burgers, Jako S; Opstelten, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners practice guideline 'Eczema' provides recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of common types of eczema: atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, acro-vesicular eczema, nummular eczema, hypostatic eczema, and asteatotic eczema. Age is an important factor when determining the type of eczema. According to the guideline, patient history and physical examination are sufficient in the diagnosis of eczema; additional investigations are rarely indicated. Moisturizing the skin with neutral emollients is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with eczema. If treatment with glucocorticoids is indicated, it is recommended that patients should start with short-term twice daily application, decreasing to once daily application. The guideline advises not to treat eczema patients with tar preparations. General practitioners are also advised not to prescribe calcineurin inhibitors. How work may affect eczema, or how eczema may affect work, should be considered in adult patients.

  7. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for chronic pancreatitis 2015.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Ohara, Hirotaka; Kamisawa, Terumi; Sakagami, Junichi; Sata, Naohiro; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Hirota, Morihisa; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Hisato; Lee, Lingaku; Fujiyama, Takashi; Hijioka, Masayuki; Ueda, Keijiro; Tachibana, Yuichi; Sogame, Yoshio; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Kato, Ryusuke; Kataoka, Keisho; Shiratori, Keiko; Sugiyama, Masanori; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Tando, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-02-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is considered to be an irreversible progressive chronic inflammatory disease. The etiology and pathology of chronic pancreatitis are complex; therefore, it is important to correctly understand the stage and pathology and provide appropriate treatment accordingly. The newly revised Clinical Practice Guidelines of Chronic Pancreatitis 2015 consist of four chapters, i.e., diagnosis, staging, treatment, and prognosis, and includes a total of 65 clinical questions. These guidelines have aimed at providing certain directions and clinically practical contents for the management of chronic pancreatitis, preferentially adopting clinically useful articles. These revised guidelines also refer to early chronic pancreatitis based on the Criteria for the Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis 2009. They include such items as health insurance coverage of high-titer lipase preparations and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, new antidiabetic drugs, and the definition of and treatment approach to pancreatic pseudocyst. The accuracy of these guidelines has been improved by examining and adopting new evidence obtained after the publication of the first edition.

  8. [General Strategies for Implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Torres-Arreola, Laura Laura

    2015-01-01

    The need to use clinical practice guidelines (CPG) arises from the health conditions and problems that public health institutions in the country face. CPG are informative documents that help improve the quality of care processes and patient safety; having among its objectives, to reduce the variability of medical practice. The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social designed a strategic plan for the dissemination, implementation, monitoring and control of CPG to establish an applicable model in the medical units in the three levels of care at the Instituto. This paper summarizes some of the strategies of the plan that were made with the knowledge and experience of clinicians and managers, with which they intend to promote the adoption of the key recommendations of the guidelines, to promote a sense of belonging for health personnel, and to encourage changes in organizational culture.

  9. Developing clinical practice guidelines for epilepsy: A report from the ILAE Epilepsy Guidelines Working Group.

    PubMed

    Sauro, Khara M; Wiebe, Samuel; Perucca, Emilio; French, Jacqueline; Dunkley, Colin; de Marinis, Alejandro; Kirkpatrick, Martin; Jetté, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) contain evidence-based recommendations to guide clinical care, policy development, and quality of care improvement. A recent systematic review of epilepsy guidelines identified considerable variability in the quality of available guidelines. Although excellent frameworks for CPG development exist, processes are not followed uniformly internationally, and resources to develop CPGs may be limited in certain settings. An International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) working group was charged with proposing methodology to guide the development of future epilepsy-specific CPGs. A comprehensive literature search (1985-2014) identified articles related to CPG development and handbooks. Guideline handbooks were included if they were publicly available, and if their methodology had been used to develop CPGs. The working group's expertise also informed the creation of methodologies and processes to develop future CPGs for the ILAE. Five handbooks from North America (American Academy of Neurology), Europe (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network & National Institute for Health and Care Excellence), Australia (National Health and Medical Research Council), World Health Organization (WHO), and additional references were identified to produce evidence-based, consensus-driven methodology for development of epilepsy-specific CPGs. Key components of CPG development include the following: identifying the topic and defining the scope; establishing a working group; identifying and evaluating the evidence; formulating recommendations and determining strength of recommendations; obtaining peer reviews; dissemination, implementation, and auditing; and updating and retiring the CPG. A practical handbook and toolkit was developed. The resulting CPG development toolkit should facilitate the development of high-quality ILAE CPGs to improve the care of persons with epilepsy.

  10. Indian Psychiatric Society Survey on Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Avasthi, Ajit

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This survey aimed to assess the utility of the earlier published clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) by IPS and to understand the expectations of members of Indian Psychiatric Society from the proposed revised CPGs. In addition, the survey also evaluated the current level of practice of psychiatry in terms of availability of different investigation facilities, prescription patterns in terms of use of polypharmacy, and competence in carrying out certain nonpharmacological treatments. Methodology: An online survey was received by 3475 psychiatrist, of whom 608 (17.5%) participants completed the survey. Results: Almost all (93.8%) of the psychiatrists agreed that there should be separate CPGs for Indian setting. In terms of problems with the previous version of the CPGs, this survey shows that the previous version of guidelines was used in making clinical decisions by only one-third (31.25%) of the participating psychiatrists. The major limitations of the previous version of CPGs which were pointed out included the lack of consideration of socio-cultural issues (33.2%), lack of recommendations for many clinical situations that are encountered in clinical practice (43.15) and poor dissemination (35.2%). In terms of expectations, the membership expects the society to come up with guidelines, which are shorter in length (82.2%), has significant proportion of information in the form of tables and flow diagrams (58.7%), besides the evidence base must also take expert opinions into account (84.7%), must be circulated before adopting (88.7%), must be disseminated by displaying the same on the website (72%), and also by sending the same by E-mails (62%). Further, the membership expects the IPS to design online continuing medical education program on CPGs (54.3%). The survey also suggests that it is feasible on the part of more than two-third of the psychiatrists to monitor the metabolic parameters in routine clinical practice and carryout various nonpharmacological

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for the foot and ankle in rheumatoid arthritis: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Kym; Woodburn, James; Steultjens, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are recommendations systematically developed to assist clinical decision-making and inform healthcare. In current rheumatoid arthritis (RA) guidelines, management of the foot and ankle is under-represented and the quality of recommendation is uncertain. This study aimed to identify and critically appraise clinical practice guidelines for foot and ankle management in RA. Guidelines were identified electronically and through hand searching. Search terms 'rheumatoid arthritis', 'clinical practice guidelines' and related synonyms were used. Critical appraisal and quality rating were conducted using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. Twenty-four guidelines were included. Five guidelines were high quality and recommended for use. Five high quality and seven low quality guidelines were recommended for use with modifications. Seven guidelines were low quality and not recommended for use. Five early and twelve established RA guidelines were recommended for use. Only two guidelines were foot and ankle specific. Five recommendation domains were identified in both early and established RA guidelines. These were multidisciplinary team care, foot healthcare access, foot health assessment/review, orthoses/insoles/splints, and therapeutic footwear. Established RA guidelines also had an 'other foot care treatments' domain. Foot and ankle management for RA features in many clinical practice guidelines recommended for use. Unfortunately, supporting evidence in the guidelines is low quality. Agreement levels are predominantly 'expert opinion' or 'good clinical practice'. More research investigating foot and ankle management for RA is needed prior to inclusion in clinical practice guidelines.

  12. Evaluation of Pulmonary Nodules: Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines for Asia.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunxue; Choi, Chang-Min; Chu, Chung Ming; Anantham, Devanand; Chung-Man Ho, James; Khan, Ali Zamir; Lee, Jang-Ming; Li, Shi Yue; Saenghirunvattana, Sawang; Yim, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) clinical practice guidelines on the evaluation of pulmonary nodules may have low adoption among clinicians in Asian countries. Unique patient characteristics of Asian patients affect the diagnostic evaluation of pulmonary nodules. The objective of these clinical practice guidelines was to adapt those of CHEST to provide consensus-based recommendations relevant to practitioners in Asia. A modified ADAPTE process was used by a multidisciplinary group of pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons in Asia. An initial panel meeting analyzed all CHEST recommendations to achieve consensus on recommendations and identify areas that required further investigation before consensus could be achieved. Revised recommendations were circulated to panel members for iterative review and redrafting to develop the final guidelines. Evaluation of pulmonary nodules in Asia broadly follows those of the CHEST guidelines with important caveats. Practitioners should be aware of the risk of lung cancer caused by high levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, as well as the high incidence of adenocarcinoma in female nonsmokers. Furthermore, the high prevalence of granulomatous disease and other infectious causes of pulmonary nodules need to be considered. Therefore, diagnostic risk calculators developed in non-Asian patients may not be applicable. Overall, longer surveillance of nodules than those recommended by CHEST should be considered. TB in Asia favors lesser reliance on PET scanning and greater use of nonsurgical biopsy over surgical diagnosis or surveillance. Practitioners in Asia are encouraged to use these adapted consensus guidelines to facilitate consistent evaluation of pulmonary nodules. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Korean clinical practice guidelines: otitis media in children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Su-Kyoung; Choi, Kyu Young; Park, Su Eun; Chun, Young Myung; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Park, Shi-Nae; Cho, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Korean Otologic Society

    2012-08-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) are common infections in children, and their diagnosis and treatment have significant impacts on the health of children and the costs of providing national medical care. In 2009, the Korean Otologic Society organized a committee composed of experts in the field of otolaryngology, pediatrics, and family medicine to develop Korean clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for otitis media in children with the goal of meeting regional medical and social needs in Korea. For this purpose, the committee adapted existing guidelines. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2004 to 2009 using medical search engines including data from Korea. A draft was written after a national questionnaire survey and several public audits, and it was editorially supervised by senior advisors before publication of the final report. These evidence-based guidelines for the management of otitis media in children provide recommendations to primary practitioners for the diagnosis and treatment of children younger than 15 yr old with uncomplicated AOM and OME. The guidelines include recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment options, prevention and parent education, medical records, referral, and complementary/alternative medicine for treating pediatric otitis media.

  14. Korean Clinical Practice Guidelines: Otitis Media in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Su-Kyoung; Choi, Kyu Young; Park, Su Eun; Chun, Young Myung; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Park, Shi-Nae; Cho, Yang-Sun; Kim, Young-Jae

    2012-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) and otitis media with effusion (OME) are common infections in children, and their diagnosis and treatment have significant impacts on the health of children and the costs of providing national medical care. In 2009, the Korean Otologic Society organized a committee composed of experts in the field of otolaryngology, pediatrics, and family medicine to develop Korean clinical practice guidelines (CPG) for otitis media in children with the goal of meeting regional medical and social needs in Korea. For this purpose, the committee adapted existing guidelines. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2004 to 2009 using medical search engines including data from Korea. A draft was written after a national questionnaire survey and several public audits, and it was editorially supervised by senior advisors before publication of the final report. These evidence-based guidelines for the management of otitis media in children provide recommendations to primary practitioners for the diagnosis and treatment of children younger than 15 yr old with uncomplicated AOM and OME. The guidelines include recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment options, prevention and parent education, medical records, referral, and complementary/alternative medicine for treating pediatric otitis media. PMID:22876048

  15. Guidelines for safe practice of stereotactic body (ablative) radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Foote, Matthew; Bailey, Michael; Smith, Leigh; Siva, Shankar; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Seeley, Anna; Barry, Tamara; Booth, Jeremy; Ball, David; Thwaites, David

    2015-10-01

    The uptake of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR)/stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) worldwide has been rapid. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology (FRO) assembled an expert panel of radiation oncologists, radiation oncology medical physicists and radiation therapists to establish guidelines for safe practice of SABR. Draft guidelines were reviewed by a number of international experts in the field and then distributed through the membership of the FRO. Members of the Australian Institute of Radiography and the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine were also asked to comment on the draft. Evidence-based recommendations (where applicable) address aspects of departmental staffing, procedures and equipment, quality assurance measures, as well as organisational considerations for delivery of SABR treatments. Central to the guidelines is a set of key recommendations for departments undertaking SABR. These guidelines were developed collaboratively to provide an educational guide and reference for radiation therapy service providers to ensure appropriate care of patients receiving SABR. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  16. Implication of global nephrology guidelines in Asia and 'Asian CKD Best Practice Guidelines'.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yusuke

    2010-06-01

    By establishing Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO), nephrology has taken an important step towards developing global clinical practice guidelines (CPG). KDIGO published its first CPG on 'Hepatitis C in CKD' in 2008 and has since published two new CPG ('CKD-MBD' and 'Kidney Transplant Recipient') in 2009. A major obstacle to implement CPG is the lack of both high-quality evidence for regionally-specific areas of medicine and a lack of resources in many countries in our region. However, an endeavor by the Asian Forum of CKD Initiative (AFCKDI) may make it possible to overcome these obstacles. By developing regionally-specific CKD guidelines, the AFCKDI might identify relevant evidence gaps and by using specific expertise develop a standard of patient care appropriate to the Asia-Pacific region. This can be accomplished only by engaging a group of international experts who fully represent the Asia-Pacific area.

  17. Pressure Ulcers in Adults: Prediction and Prevention. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This package includes a clinical practice guideline, quick reference guide for clinicians, and patient's guide to predicting and preventing pressure ulcers in adults. The clinical practice guideline includes the following: overview of the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers; clinical practice guideline (introduction, risk assessment tools…

  18. The impact of stroke practice guidelines on knowledge and practice patterns of acute care health professionals.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Allen W; Roth, Elliot J; Rychlik, Karen; Pe, Klaren; King, Caroline; Clumpner, Jennifer

    2003-05-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Post-Stroke Rehabilitation Guidelines were developed to improve the quality, appropriateness and effectiveness of rehabilitation practices. An important goal of the guidelines process is to disseminate information to practitioners in order to encourage adoption of effective practices. To date, no systematic evaluation of these guidelines has been completed, nor has a programme been designed to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational programme about the guidelines. The objective was to evaluate changes in knowledge and practice following presentation of a lecture-based, educational programme about post-stroke rehabilitation guidelines. The research design was a single group, pre-test-post-test design without a comparison group. A knowledge and referral practices questionnaire was developed specifically for this study. Lecture attendance was not associated with an increase in knowledge or referrals. However, we found that respondents who made more referrals at follow-up had a higher knowledge level at pre-test. Also, those who completed a follow-up assessment knew more about the guidelines at the initial assessment than did those who did not complete the follow-up assessment. In addition, doctors knew more about stroke rehabilitation than the non-doctors, both at the pre-test and follow-up. Encouraging behaviour change among doctors and allied health professionals in referrals and clinical practice is a complicated process. Providing individual follow-up and lengthier contacts, assuring that care providers receive high-quality evidence that guidelines improve care, and consulting with key decision-makers about guideline implementation might enhance behaviour change.

  19. Ontario doctors' attitudes toward and use of clinical practice guidelines in oncology.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ian D; Brouwers, Melissa; Davies, Christine; Tetroe, Jacqueline

    2007-08-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are intended to improve patient care and outcomes. Controversy exists about the utility of guidelines and doctors' attitudes toward them. The purpose of the survey was to determine Ontario doctors' attitudes toward practice guidelines in general, awareness of, and attitudes about, Cancer Care Ontario's Practice Guideline Initiative and the evidence-based guidelines it produces, self-reported use of guidelines and, factors related to guideline use. We conducted a cross-sectional, self-administered postal survey of 1034 Ontario doctors who treat cancer. Main outcome measures were attitudes toward practice guidelines in general, attitudes towards those developed by Cancer Care Ontario's Practice Guideline Initiative, and self-reported use of practice guidelines. A total of 520 doctors responded producing a 57% survey response rate. Ontario doctors are quite positive about practice guidelines in general and those developed by Cancer Care Ontario. Forty-four per cent reported using guidelines routinely or most of the time. Positive attitudes towards guidelines in general and the Ontario cancer guidelines specifically were related to more frequent reported use of guidelines. Other factors related to frequent reported use of guidelines included being a medical oncologist, treating gynaecological cancers and not other types of cancers. Ontario doctors have positive attitudes toward practice guidelines and report frequent use of them. By understanding the relationship between doctors' perceptions of specific guidelines and their subsequent adherence to them, guideline developers will be better positioned to produce quality evidence-based guidelines that doctors will find acceptable, and therefore, be more predisposed to use.

  20. Evaluation of primary open-angle glaucoma clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wu, Annie M; Wu, Connie M; Young, Benjamin K; Wu, Dominic J; Chen, Allison; Margo, Curtis E; Greenberg, Paul B

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the methodologic quality of 3 primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). The CPGs were assessed with the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. Four authors (A.M.W., C.M.W., B.K.Y., D.J.W.) performed independent assessments of POAG CPGs. POAG CPGs published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), Canadian Ophthalmological Society (COS), and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) were appraised using the AGREE II instrument's 6 domains (Scope and Purpose, Stakeholder Involvement, Rigor of Development, Clarity of Presentation, Applicability, and Editorial Independence) and Overall Assessment score summarizing guideline quality across all domains. Scores ranged from 28% to 85% for the AAO CPG, 51% to 96% for the COS CPG, and 55% to 97% for the NICE CPG. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the reliability of mean scores for the AAO, COS, and NICE CPGs were 0.89, 0.86, and 0.74; 95% CIs were 0.80 to 0.95, 0.74 to 0.93, and 0.51 to 0.87, respectively. The strongest domains were Scope and Purpose (AAO, COS, NICE) and Clarity of Presentation (COS, NICE). The weakest domains were Stakeholder Involvement (AAO, COS) and Editorial Independence (AAO, COS, NICE). Future POAG CPGs can be improved by addressing potential conflicts of interest within the development group, ensuring transparency of guideline development methodology, and involving all relevant stakeholders in guideline development and review. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Clinical practice guideline adherence during Operation Inherent Resolve.

    PubMed

    Plackett, Timothy P; Cherry, Darren C; Delk, Gerald; Satterly, Steven; Theler, Jared; McVay, Derek; Moore, Jacqueline; Shackelford, Stacy A

    2017-07-01

    The Joint Trauma System (JTS) clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) contributed to the decrease in battlefield mortality over the past 15 years. However, it is unknown to what degree the guidelines are being followed in current military operations. A retrospective review was performed of all patients treated at three separate US Army Role II facilities during the first 10 months of Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq. Charts were reviewed for patient demographics, clinical care, and outcomes. Charts were also reviewed for compliance with JTS CPGs and Tactical Combat Casualty Care recommendations. A total of 114 trauma patients were treated during the time period. The mean age was 26.9 ± 10.1 years, 90% were males, and 96% were host nation patients. The most common mechanisms of injury were blast (49%) and gunshot (42%). Records were compliant with documenting a complete set of vitals in 58% and a pain score in 50% of patients. Recommendations for treatment of hypothermia were followed for 97% of patients. Tranexamic acid was given outside guidelines for 6% of patients, and for 40%, it was not determined if the guidelines were followed. Recommendations for initial resuscitative fluid were followed for 41% of patients. Recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis were followed for 40% of intra-abdominal and 73% of soft tissue injuries. Recommendations for tetanus prophylaxis were followed for 90% of patients. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis was given to 32% of patients and contraindicated in 27%. The recommended transfusion ratio was followed for 56% of massive transfusion patients. Recommendations for calcium administration were followed for 40% of patients. When composite scores were created for individual surgeons, there was significant variability between surgeons with regard to adherence to guidelines. There is significant deviation in the adherence to the CPGs. Epidemiologic study, level IV.

  2. Rhetoric and argumentation: how clinical practice guidelines think.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jonathan

    2013-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are an important source of justification for clinical decisions in modern evidence-based practice. Yet, we have given little attention to how they argue their evidence. In particular, how do CPGs argue for treatment with long-term medications that are increasingly prescribed to older patients? APPROACH AND RATIONALE: I selected six disease-specific guidelines recommending treatment with five of the medication classes most commonly prescribed for seniors in Ontario, Canada. I considered the stated aims of these CPGs and the techniques employed towards those aims. Finally, I reconstructed and logically analysed the arguments supporting recommendations for pharmacotherapy. The primary function of CPGs is rhetorical, or persuasive, and their means of persuasion include both a display of their credibility and their argumentation. Arguments supporting pharmacotherapy recommendations for the target population follow a common inductive pattern: statistical generalization from randomized controlled trial (RCT) and meta-analysis evidence. Two of the CPGs also argue their treatment recommendations for older patients in this style, while three fail to justify pharmacotherapy specifically for the older population. The arguments analysed lack the auxiliary assumptions that would warrant making a generalization about the clinical effectiveness of medications for the older population. Guidelines reason using simple induction, while ignoring important inferential gaps. Future guidelines should aspire to be well-reasoned rather than simply evidence-based; argue from a plurality of evidence; be wary of hasty inductions; appropriately limit the scope of their recommendations; and avoid making law-like, prescriptive generalizations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. Conclusions The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further

  4. Clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce; Vanholder, Raymond; Allolio, Bruno; Annane, Djillali; Ball, Steve; Bichet, Daniel; Decaux, Guy; Fenske, Wiebke; Hoorn, Ewout J; Hoorn, Ewout; Ichai, Carole; Joannidis, Michael; Soupart, Alain; Zietse, Robert; Haller, Maria; van der Veer, Sabine; Van Biesen, Wim; Nagler, Evi

    2014-03-01

    Hyponatraemia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mmol/L, is the most common disorder of body fluid and electrolyte balance encountered in clinical practice. Hyponatraemia is present in 15-20% of emergency admissions to hospital and occurs in up to 20% of critically ill patients. Symptomatology may vary from subtle to severe or even life threatening. Despite this, the management of patients remains problematic. Against this background, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the European Society of Endocrinology and the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association, represented by European Renal Best Practice have developed a Clinical Practice Guideline on the diagnostic approach and treatment of hyponatraemia as a joint venture of three societies representing specialists with a natural interest in hyponatraemia.

  5. Proposed practice guidelines for continuous contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Noel A; Coles, Chantal; Jaworski, Andrew; Rosario, Dean

    2001-03-01

    The introduction of silicone-containing hydrogel contact lenses (SCHCLs) for continuous wear (CW) presents practitioners with a unique challenge. To facilitate the transition, we propose a set of guidelines for the conduct of CW practice. The general concepts for the guide are derived from a range of similar codes of practice that have been produced for a range of aspects of eye care. The more general competencies required of eye care practice are assumed and are not discussed in detail. The document is based on the precept that the prescription of SCHCLs is an appropriate practice for suitably screened patients. Practitioners should acquire general and specific knowledge of information applicable to CW with SCHCLs. Support staff should be educated to handle a range of requirements specific to CW. There are no consulting room facilities required beyond those necessary for general optometric practice but we highly recommend that the CW practitioner use grading scales for anterior eye complications and a guide to corneal infiltrative conditions. More stringent examination protocols are required than for general contact lens practice, particularly in the selection of the patient. Patient management should be conducted to a medical standard of care. Documentation is critical and will involve general information about the product, an agreement, disclosure of risk factors, instructions for wear and care, recording of patient questions and answers provided, an informed consent form and detailed, accurate record keeping. A guideline such as this document cannot be positioned as a legal standard of care, but may be used in the formulation of such a standard.

  6. Guidelines for medical practice: 1. The reasons why.

    PubMed Central

    Linton, A L; Peachey, D K

    1990-01-01

    Various external special interest groups are promoting attempts to better measure and control the performance of the medical profession, primarily to restrain costs. We can neither afford to ignore the rising costs nor reject efforts by provincial licensing authorities to improve supervision of the quality of care. Furthermore, there is increasing public interest in the outcome of medical treatment and a suspicion that some care may be unnecessary or inappropriate. Much of what physicians do is not based on impeccable or complete scientific evidence, and we have not established a method whereby science can consistently be translated into practice. Optimal practice patterns must be defined to improve the quality of care and to maximize the efficiency with which scarce resources are used. Careful scientific evaluation of data is particularly necessary with the arrival of new drugs and technology. Sensible, flexible guidelines produced by appropriate panels will help promote improved practice. Rigid standards must be avoided to allow for individual consideration and scientific innovation. The recognized difficulties of influencing clinical practice by precept or education and the problems imposed by rapidly changing scientific knowledge are two hurdles to be overcome. Licensing bodies must identify and enforce minimal standards, but optimal practice patterns are better devised by a broader segment of the profession. Intervention by third-party payers, as is prevalent in the United States, intrudes upon physician autonomy and reduces access to care. Physicians must support the development of guidelines for optimal medical practice based on the best existing data and focused on improving the quality of care. PMID:2119873

  7. Participatory risk management: promoting physician compliance with practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, G O

    1994-06-01

    Claims that result from at-risk medical practices, especially those involving medical records and systems failure-related problems, cost significantly more than the average claim to resolve, primarily due to additional defense costs required for expert witnesses. An analysis of these claims areas has pinpointed specific problems that can be addressed and corrected. A participatory risk management program requires all physicians applying for insurance to comply with established general and specialty-specific practice guidelines. Additionally, physicians and their staff receive premium-credit points by attending regularly scheduled continuing education programs on reducing liability risk. If a claim arises in which there is some question about whether the physician followed the guidelines, the circumstances are thoroughly reviewed with the physician after defense of the claim has been completed. Additionally, a medical records consultation program helps individual practices audit their records and identify and correct any at-risk problems. Based on the success of the program, a new premium program has been instituted in which all physicians are placed in the lowest premium group, but they must participate regularly in risk management activities and avoid adverse actions to maintain the low premium rate.

  8. [Good Practice of Secondary Data Analysis (GPS): guidelines and recommendations].

    PubMed

    Swart, E; Gothe, H; Geyer, S; Jaunzeme, J; Maier, B; Grobe, T G; Ihle, P

    2015-02-01

    In 2005, the Working Group for the Survey and Utilisation of Secondary Data (AGENS) of the German Society for Social Medicine and Prevention (DGSMP) and the German Society for Epidemiology (DGEpi) first published "Good Practice in Secondary Data Analysis (GPS)" formulating a standard for conducting secondary data analyses. GPS is intended as a guide for planning and conducting analyses and can provide a basis for contracts between data owners. The domain of these guidelines does not only include data routinely gathered by statutory health insurance funds and further statutory social insurance funds, but all forms of secondary data. The 11 guidelines range from ethical principles and study planning through quality assurance measures and data preparation to data privacy, contractual conditions and responsible communication of analytical results. They are complemented by explanations and practical assistance in the form of recommendations. GPS targets all persons directing their attention to secondary data, their analysis and interpretation from a scientific point of view and by employing scientific methods. This includes data owners. Furthermore, GPS is suitable to assess scientific publications regarding their quality by authors, referees and readers. In 2008, the first version of GPS was evaluated and revised by members of AGENS and the Epidemiological Methods Working Group of DGEpi, DGSMP and GMDS including other epidemiological experts and had then been accredited as implementation regulations of Good Epidemiological Practice (GEP). Since 2012, this third version of GPS is on hand and available for downloading from the DGEpi website at no charge. Especially linguistic specifications have been integrated into the current revision; its internal consistency was increased. With regards to contents, further recommendations concerning the guideline on data privacy have been added. On the basis of future developments in science and data privacy, further revisions will

  9. Treatment of Cushing's Syndrome: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Lynnette K.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Findling, James W.; Murad, M. Hassan; Newell-Price, John; Savage, Martin O.; Tabarin, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective is to formulate clinical practice guidelines for treating Cushing's syndrome. Participants: Participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The European Society for Endocrinology co-sponsored the guideline. Evidence: The Task Force used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned three systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process: The Task Force achieved consensus through one group meeting, several conference calls, and numerous e-mail communications. Committees and members of The Endocrine Society and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Conclusions: Treatment of Cushing's syndrome is essential to reduce mortality and associated comorbidities. Effective treatment includes the normalization of cortisol levels or action. It also includes the normalization of comorbidities via directly treating the cause of Cushing's syndrome and by adjunctive treatments (eg, antihypertensives). Surgical resection of the causal lesion(s) is generally the first-line approach. The choice of second-line treatments, including medication, bilateral adrenalectomy, and radiation therapy (for corticotrope tumors), must be individualized to each patient. PMID:26222757

  10. Clinical Practice Guideline: Improving Nasal Form and Function after Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Lisa E; Tollefson, Travis T; Basura, Gregory J; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Abramson, Peter J; Chaiet, Scott R; Davis, Kara S; Doghramji, Karl; Farrior, Edward H; Finestone, Sandra A; Ishman, Stacey L; Murphy, Robert X; Park, John G; Setzen, Michael; Strike, Deborah J; Walsh, Sandra A; Warner, Jeremy P; Nnacheta, Lorraine C

    2017-02-01

    Objective Rhinoplasty, a surgical procedure that alters the shape or appearance of the nose while preserving or enhancing the nasal airway, ranks among the most commonly performed cosmetic procedures in the United States, with >200,000 procedures reported in 2014. While it is difficult to calculate the exact economic burden incurred by rhinoplasty patients following surgery with or without complications, the average rhinoplasty procedure typically exceeds $4000. The costs incurred due to complications, infections, or revision surgery may include the cost of long-term antibiotics, hospitalization, or lost revenue from hours/days of missed work. The resultant psychological impact of rhinoplasty can also be significant. Furthermore, the health care burden from psychological pressures of nasal deformities/aesthetic shortcomings, surgical infections, surgical pain, side effects from antibiotics, and nasal packing materials must also be considered for these patients. Prior to this guideline, limited literature existed on standard care considerations for pre- and postsurgical management and for standard surgical practice to ensure optimal outcomes for patients undergoing rhinoplasty. The impetus for this guideline is to utilize current evidence-based medicine practices and data to build unanimity regarding the peri- and postoperative strategies to maximize patient safety and to optimize surgical results for patients. Purpose The primary purpose of this guideline is to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians who either perform rhinoplasty or are involved in the care of a rhinoplasty candidate, as well as to optimize patient care, promote effective diagnosis and therapy, and reduce harmful or unnecessary variations in care. The target audience is any clinician or individual, in any setting, involved in the management of these patients. The target patient population is all patients aged ≥15 years. The guideline is intended to focus on knowledge gaps, practice

  11. Prioritization strategies in clinical practice guidelines development: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective Few methodological studies address the prioritization of clinical topics for the development of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs). The aim of this study was to validate a methodology for Priority Determination of Topics (PDT) of CPGs. Methods and results Firstly, we developed an instrument for PDT with 41 criteria that were grouped under 10 domains, based on a comprehensive systematic search. Secondly, we performed a survey of stakeholders involved in CPGs development, and end users of guidelines, using the instrument. Thirdly, a pilot testing of the PDT procedure was performed in order to choose 10 guideline topics among 34 proposed projects; using a multi-criteria analysis approach, we validated a mechanism that followed five stages: determination of the composition of groups, item/domain scoring, weights determination, quality of the information used to support judgments, and finally, topic selection. Participants first scored the importance of each domain, after which four different weighting procedures were calculated (including the survey results). The process of weighting was determined by correlating the data between them. We also reported the quality of evidence used for PDT. Finally, we provided a qualitative analysis of the process. The main domains used to support judgement, having higher quality scores and weightings, were feasibility, disease burden, implementation and information needs. Other important domains such as user preferences, adverse events, potential for health promotion, social effects, and economic impact had lower relevance for clinicians. Criteria for prioritization were mainly judged through professional experience, while good quality information was only used in 15% of cases. Conclusion The main advantages of the proposed methodology are supported by the use of a systematic approach to identify, score and weight guideline topics selection, limiting or exposing the influence of personal biases. However, the methodology was

  12. Practice guidelines for music interventions with hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Janice W; Shirk, Beverly J; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2007-12-01

    Music therapy is an effective complementary approach that can achieve specific therapeutic outcomes in the clinical management of pediatric patients. Growing research on music interventions has generated scientific knowledge about how this modality benefits patients and has formed the basis for effective protocols that can be used in practice. Although it can be challenging to translate research-based protocols into routine clinical care at the bedside, it is essential that music therapy interventions be aligned with evidence-based information and that accepted standards be established by the music therapy discipline to achieve the greatest benefit. The importance of partnerships between nurses and music therapists is emphasized to enhance the success of music-based treatments. This discussion synthesizes research findings that can be used to design pediatric practice guidelines in the application of music therapy.

  13. Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines Related to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Cheng, Chuang; Yan, Weiping; Xu, Guanghui; Feng, Jinzhou; Wang, Tianzhu; Chen, Cindy Si; Qin, Xinyue

    2014-01-01

    Background High quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) can provide clinicians with explicit recommendations on how to manage health conditions and bridge the gap between research and clinical practice. Unfortunately, the quality of CPGs for multiple sclerosis (MS) has not been evaluated. Objective To evaluate the methodological quality of CPGs on MS using the AGREE II instrument. Methods According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, we searched four databases and two websites related to CPGs, including the Cochrane library, PubMed, EMBASE, DynaMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC), and Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM). The searches were performed on September 20th 2013. All CPGs on MS were evaluated by the AGREE II instrument. The software used for analysis was SPSS 17.0. Results A total of 27 CPGs on MS met inclusion criteria. The overall agreement among reviews was good or substantial (ICC was above 0.70). The mean scores for each of all six domains were presented as follows: scope and purpose (mean ± SD: 59.05±16.13), stakeholder involvement (mean ± SD: 29.53±17.67), rigor of development (mean ± SD: 31.52±21.50), clarity of presentation (mean ± SD: 60.39±13.73), applicability (mean ± SD: 27.08±17.66), editorial independence (mean ± SD: 28.70±22.03). Conclusions The methodological quality of CPGs for MS was acceptable for scope, purpose and clarity of presentation. The developers of CPGs need to pay more attention to editorial independence, applicability, rigor of development and stakeholder involvement during the development process. The AGREE II instrument should be adopted by guideline developers. PMID:25302678

  14. Evidence-based practice guidelines--one way to enhance clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Barbara K

    2002-06-01

    Abdominoplasty and liposuction guidelines are just two of the guidelines that can be accessed and used to enhance patient care. Guidelines also can be used to increase your knowledge about many other health care topics. The NGC has approved guidelines for managing chronic pain, as well as guidelines on chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Many patients have chronic diseases, and you or your family members also may be affected by chronic disorders. These guidelines provide you with a quick overview of evidence-based treatment protocols. These guidelines are not a panacea for evidence-based practice, but using them is one way that perioperative nurses can enhance their clinical skills. Though not everyone has personal Internet access, most health care facilities do or can make access a reality. Other options include medical or public libraries. Then one simply has to access the NGC web site and join other professionals in improving the quality and timeliness of patient care.

  15. American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guidelines: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Somerfield, Mark R; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hagerty, Karen L; Brouwers, Melissa C; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Lyman, Gary H

    2008-08-20

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) published its first clinical practice guideline, which focused on the use of hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors, in 1994. Since then, ASCO has published 24 additional guidelines or technology assessments on a range of topics and is developing 11 additional guidelines. Guidelines are among ASCO's most valued products, according to membership surveys and data from the JCO.org Web site. However, the same data from ASCO members have highlighted a number of limitations to the guideline program. These relate to the timelines of guideline updates, difficulties locating guidelines and related products, and challenges to implementing ASCO guidelines in everyday clinical practice. This article outlines the concrete steps that the ASCO Health Services Committee (HSC) is taking to address these limitations, including the institution of a more aggressive guideline updating schedule, a transition from narrative to systematic literature reviews to support the practice recommendations, a new Board of Directors-approved policy to permit endorsement of other groups' guidelines, and a robust Clinical Tools and Resources program that offers a range of guideline dissemination and implementation aids. Additional work is underway to establish stronger and deeper collaborations with practicing oncologists to expand their role in the review, field testing, and implementation of guideline clinical tools and resources. Finally, the HSC is discussing evaluation of the guidelines program to maximize the impact of ASCO clinical practice guidelines on clinical decision making and, ultimately, the quality of cancer care.

  16. RELAP5-3D Developer Guidelines and Programming Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. George L Mesina

    2014-03-01

    Our ultimate goal is to create and maintain RELAP5-3D as the best software tool available to analyze nuclear power plants. This begins with writing excellent programming and requires thorough testing. This document covers development of RELAP5-3D software, the behavior of the RELAP5-3D program that must be maintained, and code testing. RELAP5-3D must perform in a manner consistent with previous code versions with backward compatibility for the sake of the users. Thus file operations, code termination, input and output must remain consistent in form and content while adding appropriate new files, input and output as new features are developed. As computer hardware, operating systems, and other software change, RELAP5-3D must adapt and maintain performance. The code must be thoroughly tested to ensure that it continues to perform robustly on the supported platforms. The coding must be written in a consistent manner that makes the program easy to read to reduce the time and cost of development, maintenance and error resolution. The programming guidelines presented her are intended to institutionalize a consistent way of writing FORTRAN code for the RELAP5-3D computer program that will minimize errors and rework. A common format and organization of program units creates a unifying look and feel to the code. This in turn increases readability and reduces time required for maintenance, development and debugging. It also aids new programmers in reading and understanding the program. Therefore, when undertaking development of the RELAP5-3D computer program, the programmer must write computer code that follows these guidelines. This set of programming guidelines creates a framework of good programming practices, such as initialization, structured programming, and vector-friendly coding. It sets out formatting rules for lines of code, such as indentation, capitalization, spacing, etc. It creates limits on program units, such as subprograms, functions, and modules. It

  17. Changing Current Practice in Urology: Improving Guideline Development and Implementation Through Stakeholder Engagement.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Sara J; MacLennan, Steven; Bex, Axel; Catto, James W F; De Santis, Maria; Glaser, Adam W; Ljungberg, Borje; N'Dow, James; Plass, Karin; Trapero-Bertran, Marta; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Wright, Penny; Giles, Rachel H

    2017-08-01

    Effective stakeholder integration for guideline development should improve outcomes and adherence to clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce; Vanholder, Raymond; Allolio, Bruno; Annane, Djillali; Ball, Steve; Bichet, Daniel; Decaux, Guy; Fenske, Wiebke; Hoorn, Ewout J; Ichai, Carole; Joannidis, Michael; Soupart, Alain; Zietse, Robert; Haller, Maria; van der Veer, Sabine; Van Biesen, Wim; Nagler, Evi

    2014-03-01

    Hyponatraemia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mmol/l, is the most common disorder of body fluid and electrolyte balance encountered in clinical practice. It can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms, from subtle to severe or even life threatening, and is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and length of hospital stay in patients presenting with a range of conditions. Despite this, the management of patients remains problematic. The prevalence of hyponatraemia in widely different conditions and the fact that hyponatraemia is managed by clinicians with a broad variety of backgrounds have fostered diverse institution- and speciality-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. To obtain a common and holistic view, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) and the European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA), represented by European Renal Best Practice (ERBP), have developed the Clinical Practice Guideline on the diagnostic approach and treatment of hyponatraemia as a joint venture of three societies representing specialists with a natural interest in hyponatraemia. In addition to a rigorous approach to methodology and evaluation, we were keen to ensure that the document focused on patient-important outcomes and included utility for clinicians involved in everyday practice.

  19. Clinical practice guideline on diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce; Vanholder, Raymond; Allolio, Bruno; Annane, Djillali; Ball, Steve; Bichet, Daniel; Decaux, Guy; Fenske, Wiebke; Hoorn, Ewout J; Ichai, Carole; Joannidis, Michael; Soupart, Alain; Zietse, Robert; Haller, Maria; van der Veer, Sabine; Van Biesen, Wim; Nagler, Evi

    2014-04-01

    Hyponatraemia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mmol/l, is the most common disorder of body fluid and electrolyte balance encountered in clinical practice. It can lead to a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms, from subtle to severe or even life threatening, and is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and length of hospital stay in patients presenting with a range of conditions. Despite this, the management of patients remains problematic. The prevalence of hyponatraemia in widely different conditions and the fact that hyponatraemia is managed by clinicians with a broad variety of backgrounds have fostered diverse institution- and speciality-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. To obtain a common and holistic view, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM), the European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) and the European Renal Association - European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA), represented by European Renal Best Practice (ERBP), have developed the Clinical Practice Guideline on the diagnostic approach and treatment of hyponatraemia as a joint venture of three societies representing specialists with a natural interest in hyponatraemia. In addition to a rigorous approach to methodology and evaluation, we were keen to ensure that the document focused on patient-important outcomes and included utility for clinicians involved in everyday practice.

  20. [The Process of Developing Clinical Practice Guidelines: Example of the "2015 Taiwan Chronic Kidney Disease Clinical Guidelines"].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh; Lee, Hsiu-Fang; Kuo, Yi-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), representing the current best-practice guidelines and recommendations for care, are supported by systematic review and evidence-based research. CPGs provide an effective and efficient approach to caring for patients and improving quality of care. Recently, the National Health Insurance Administration and National Institutes of Health developed CPGs for major diseases in Taiwan. This paper introduces the process that was used to develop one of these CPGs, the Taiwan Chronic Kidney Disease Clinical Guidelines, which was published in 2015. Further, we introduce the general development of published nursing guidelines in Taiwan. These CPGs are expected to initiate various renal-care guidelines and to promote the quality of renal care in the country.

  1. [Hysterectomy for benign pathology: Guidelines for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Deffieux, X; de Rochambeau, B; Chêne, G; Gauthier, T; Huet, S; Lamblin, G; Agostini, A; Marcelli, M; Golfier, F

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to provide guidelines for clinical practice from the French college of obstetrics and gynecology (CNGOF), based on the best evidence available, concerning hysterectomy for benign pathology. Each recommendation for practice was allocated a grade which depends on the level of evidence (guidelines for clinical practice method). Hysterectomy should be performed by a high volume surgeon (>10 procedures of hysterectomy per year) (grade C). Rectal enema stimulant laxatives are not recommended prior to hysterectomy (grade C). It is recommended to carry out vaginal disinfection using povidone iodine solution prior to an hysterectomy (grade B). Antibioprophylaxis is recommended during a hysterectomy, regardless of the surgical route (grade B). The vaginal or the laparoscopic routes are recommended for hysterectomy for benign pathology (grade B), even if the uterus is large and/or the patient is obese (grade C). The choice between these two surgical approaches depends on others parameters, such as the surgeon's experience, the mode of anesthesia and organizational constraints (operative duration and medico economic factors). Hysterectomy by vaginal route is not contraindicated in nulliparous women (grade C) or in women with previous c-section (grade C). No specific technique to achieve hemostasis is recommended with a view to avoid urinary tract injuries (grade C). In the absence of ovarian pathology and personal or family history of breast/ovarian carcinoma, it is recommended to conserve ovaries in pre-menopausal women (grade B). Subtotal hysterectomy is not recommended in order to diminish the risk of per- or postoperative complications (grade B). The application of these recommendations should minimize risks associated with hysterectomy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality assessment of acute viral bronchiolitis clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Sossa-Briceño, Monica P; Acuña-Cordero, Ranniery

    2017-02-01

    Recently, in an attempt to reduce variability in clinical practice and produce better results for patients, several clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for the appropriate diagnosis and management of bronchiolitis in infants have been developed. However, the quality of available CPGs for bronchiolitis management has not yet been systematically evaluated. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of acute viral bronchiolitis CPGs. We performed a systematic and exhaustive search of CPGs on bronchiolitis published from 2000 to 2014. Three independent appraisers assessed the quality of the CPGs using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. A standardized score was calculated for each of the six domains, and the CPGS were rated as recommended, recommended with modifications, or not recommended. Six CPGs published between the years 2000 and 2014 were selected from a total of 111 citations. There was substantial agreement among reviewers (ICC: 0.75; 95% CI, 0.61-0.89). The domains that scored the highest were 'scope and purpose', with a mean value of 92.1% (range: 77.8-100%), and 'clarity of presentation' [83.3% (69.4-91.7%)]. Those that scored the lowest were 'applicability' [44.3% (8.3-77.1%)], and 'stakeholder involvement' [66.7% (47.2-94.4%)]. Three CPGS were evaluated as being recommended with modifications, and only two were recommended for use in clinical practice. Available bronchiolitis CPGs vary in quality, and the findings of the present study are useful for identifying aspects or domains where there is room for improvement in future CPGs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Breast cancer treatment in clinical practice compared to best evidence and practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bloom, B S; de Pouvourville, N; Chhatre, S; Jayadevappa, R; Weinberg, D

    2004-01-12

    There is sparse evidence on community practice patterns in treating women with breast cancer. This study compared care of women with breast cancer with evidence from meta-analyses and US National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) clinical guidelines. Records of 4395 women with breast cancer were abstracted from practices of 19 surgeon oncologists in six specialty practices in the Philadelphia region during 1995-1999. Patients were followed through December 2001. Low-frequency data were obtained on all patients. All other data were from a random sample of 464 women, minimum of 50 patients per practice. Actual care provided was compared to NCCN guidelines and results of meta-analyses. Fewer than half the women received treatments reflecting meta-analysis results or NCCN guidelines, by disease stage/TNM status. Adherence to either standard varied from 0% for LCIS to 87% for stages IIA or IIB node positive. There are multiple interactive reasons for low adherence to guidelines or meta-analyses results, including insufficient health system supports to clinicians, inadequate organisation and delivery systems and ineffective continuing medical education. The paucity of written information from patient records on physician/patient interactions limits the understanding of treatment decisions.

  4. Clinical Practice Guideline for Diagnostic Testing for Adult Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, Vishesh K.; Auckley, Dennis H.; Chowdhuri, Susmita; Kuhlmann, David C.; Mehra, Reena; Ramar, Kannan; Harrod, Christopher G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This guideline establishes clinical practice recommendations for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults and is intended for use in conjunction with other American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) guidelines on the evaluation and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing in adults. Methods: The AASM commissioned a task force of experts in sleep medicine. A systematic review was conducted to identify studies, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) process was used to assess the evidence. The task force developed recommendations and assigned strengths based on the quality of evidence, the balance of benefits and harms, patient values and preferences, and resource use. In addition, the task force adopted foundational recommendations from prior guidelines as “good practice statements”, that establish the basis for appropriate and effective diagnosis of OSA. The AASM Board of Directors approved the final recommendations. Recommendations: The following recommendations are intended as a guide for clinicians diagnosing OSA in adults. Under GRADE, a STRONG recommendation is one that clinicians should follow under most circumstances. A WEAK recommendation reflects a lower degree of certainty regarding the outcome and appropriateness of the patient-care strategy for all patients. The ultimate judgment regarding propriety of any specific care must be made by the clinician in light of the individual circumstances presented by the patient, available diagnostic tools, accessible treatment options, and resources. Good Practice Statements: Diagnostic testing for OSA should be performed in conjunction with a comprehensive sleep evaluation and adequate follow-up. Polysomnography is the standard diagnostic test for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients in whom there is a concern for OSA based on a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Recommendations: We recommend that clinical tools, questionnaires and prediction

  5. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fukudo, Shin; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Akiho, Hirotada; Inamori, Masahiko; Endo, Yuka; Okumura, Toshikatsu; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Kamiya, Takeshi; Sato, Ken; Chiba, Toshimi; Furuta, Kenji; Yamato, Shigeru; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Azuma, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Mine, Tetsuya; Miura, Soichiro; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    New strategies for the care of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are developing and several novel treatments have been globally produced. New methods of care should be customized geographically because each country has a specific medical system, life style, eating habit, gut microbiota, genes and so on. Several clinical guidelines for IBS have been proposed and the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) subsequently developed evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for IBS. Sixty-two clinical questions (CQs) comprising 1 definition, 6 epidemiology, 6 pathophysiology, 10 diagnosis, 30 treatment, 4 prognosis, and 5 complications were proposed and statements were made to answer to CQs. A diagnosis algorithm and a three-step treatment was provided for patients with chronic abdominal pain or abdominal discomfort and/or abnormal bowel movement. If more than one alarm symptom/sign, risk factor and/or routine examination is positive, colonoscopy is indicated. If all of them, or the subsequent colonoscopy, are/is negative, Rome III or compatible criteria is applied. After IBS diagnosis, step 1 therapy consisting of diet therapy, behavioral modification and gut-targeted pharmacotherapy is indicated for four weeks. Non-responders to step 1 therapy proceed to the second step that includes psychopharmacological agents and simple psychotherapy for four weeks. In the third step, for patients non-responsive to step 2 therapy, a combination of gut-targeted pharmacotherapy, psychopharmacological treatments and/or specific psychotherapy is/are indicated. Clinical guidelines and consensus for IBS treatment in Japan are well suited for Japanese IBS patients; as such, they may provide useful insight for IBS treatment in other countries around the world.

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Brenta, Gabriela; Vaisman, Mario; Sgarbi, José Augusto; Bergoglio, Liliana Maria; Andrada, Nathalia Carvalho de; Bravo, Pedro Pineda; Orlandi, Ana Maria; Graf, Hans

    2013-06-01

    Hypothyroidism has long been known for its effects on different organ systems, leading to hypometabolism. However, subclinical hypothyroidism, its most prevalent form, has been recently related to cardiovascular risk and also to maternal-fetal complications in pregnant women. In these clinical practice guidelines, several aspects of this field have been discussed with the clear objectives of helping physicians treat patients with hypothyroidism, and of sharing some of our Latin American-based clinical experience. The Latin American Thyroid Society commissioned a Task Force on Hypothyroidism to develop evidence-based clinical guidelines on hypothyroidism. A systematic review of the available literature, focused on the primary databases of MedLine/PubMed and Lilacs/SciELO was performed. Filters to assess methodological quality were applied to select the best quality studies. The strength of recommendation on a scale from A-D was based on the Oxford Centre for Evidence--based Medicine, Levels of Evidence 2009, allowing an unbiased opinion devoid of subjective viewpoints. The areas of interest for the studies comprised diagnosis, screening, treatment and a special section for hypothyroidism in pregnancy. Several questions based on diagnosis, screening, treatment of hypothyroidism in adult population and specifically in pregnant women were posed. Twenty six recommendations were created based on the answers to these questions. Despite the fact that evidence in some areas of hypothyroidism, such as therapy, is lacking, out of 279 references, 73% were Grade A and B, 8% Grade C and 19% Grade D. These evidence-based clinical guidelines on hypothyroidism will provide unified criteria for management of hypothyroidism throughout Latin America. Although most of the studies referred to are from all over the world, the point of view of thyroidologists from Latin America is also given.

  7. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rare Diseases: The Orphanet Database

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Sonia; Rommel, Kathrin; Mateo Marquina, María Elena; Höhn, Sophie; Lanneau, Valérie; Rath, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for rare diseases (RDs) are scarce, may be difficult to identify through Internet searches and may vary in quality depending on the source and methodology used. In order to contribute to the improvement of the diagnosis, treatment and care of patients, Orphanet (www.orpha.net) has set up a procedure for the selection, quality evaluation and dissemination of CPGs, with the aim to provide easy access to relevant, accurate and specific recommendations for the management of RDs. This article provides an analysis of selected CPGs by medical domain coverage, prevalence of diseases, languages and type of producer, and addresses the variability in CPG quality and availability. CPGs are identified via bibliographic databases, websites of research networks, expert centres or medical societies. They are assessed according to quality criteria derived from the Appraisal of Guidelines, REsearch and Evaluation (AGREE II) Instrument. Only open access CPGs and documents for which permission from the copyright holders has been obtained are disseminated on the Orphanet website. From January 2012 to July 2015, 277 CPGs were disseminated, representing coverage of 1,122 groups of diseases, diseases or subtypes in the Orphanet database. No language restriction is applied, and so far 10 languages are represented, with a predominance of CPGs in English, French and German (92% of all CPGs). A large proportion of diseases with identified CPGs belong to rare oncologic, neurologic, hematologic diseases or developmental anomalies. The Orphanet project on CPG collection, evaluation and dissemination is a continuous process, with regular addition of new guidelines, and updates. CPGs meeting the quality criteria are integrated to the Orphanet database of rare diseases, together with other types of textual information and the appropriate services for patients, researchers and healthcare professionals in 40 countries. PMID:28099516

  8. Practical guidelines for B-cell receptor repertoire sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Yaari, Gur; Kleinstein, Steven H

    2015-11-20

    High-throughput sequencing of B-cell immunoglobulin repertoires is increasingly being applied to gain insights into the adaptive immune response in healthy individuals and in those with a wide range of diseases. Recent applications include the study of autoimmunity, infection, allergy, cancer and aging. As sequencing technologies continue to improve, these repertoire sequencing experiments are producing ever larger datasets, with tens- to hundreds-of-millions of sequences. These data require specialized bioinformatics pipelines to be analyzed effectively. Numerous methods and tools have been developed to handle different steps of the analysis, and integrated software suites have recently been made available. However, the field has yet to converge on a standard pipeline for data processing and analysis. Common file formats for data sharing are also lacking. Here we provide a set of practical guidelines for B-cell receptor repertoire sequencing analysis, starting from raw sequencing reads and proceeding through pre-processing, determination of population structure, and analysis of repertoire properties. These include methods for unique molecular identifiers and sequencing error correction, V(D)J assignment and detection of novel alleles, clonal assignment, lineage tree construction, somatic hypermutation modeling, selection analysis, and analysis of stereotyped or convergent responses. The guidelines presented here highlight the major steps involved in the analysis of B-cell repertoire sequencing data, along with recommendations on how to avoid common pitfalls.

  9. [Interpretation of Guidelines on Good Pharmacovigilance Practices for European Union].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-Ming; Tian, Feng

    2013-09-01

    Due to the limitations of pre-authorization clinical trials, the safety information obtained from them is relatively limited. Therefore, it is very necessary to carry out pharmacovigilance activities on drugs post-marketing. In order to promote the specific implementation of the new pharmacovigilance regulations, the European medicines agency (EMA) developed the Guideline on Good Pharmacovigilance Practices (GVP), as the new criteria for pharmacovigilance in the European Union (EU). Compared with the previously published, Guidelines on Pharmacovigilance for Medicinal Products for Human Use (2007), the GVP proposed more comprehensive and systematic provisions of pharmacovigilance systems, quality control systems, judgements, pharmacovigilance inspections and audits. In addition, it set more specific and comprehensive requirements on risk management systems, the management and reporting of adverse reactions to medicinal products, periodic safety update reports, post-authorization safety studies, signal management, and so on. Interpreting the basic principles, working mechanisms, key technologies and methods of the GVP provides a useful reference for us to carry out pharmacovigilance (especially regarding safety monitoring of parenterally administered Chinese medicine).

  10. [Practice guideline 'Perinatal management of extremely preterm delivery'].

    PubMed

    de Laat, Monique W M; Wiegerinck, Melanie M; Walther, Frans J; Boluyt, Nicole; Mol, Ben Willem J; van der Post, Joris A M; van Lith, Jan M M; Offringa, Martin

    2010-01-01

    At the request of the State Secretary of the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport a national multidisciplinary workgroup developed an evidence-based practice guideline for the management of pregnant women with an imminent preterm delivery after a pregnancy of less than 26 weeks duration and for extremely preterm neonates. Active care measures are advised for neonates from a gestational age of 24 0/7 weeks onwards, unless there are serious arguments that justify a conservative management. In cases of imminent preterm delivery, intrauterine transport to a perinatological care centre is advised from a gestational age of 23 4/7 weeks onwards. In cases of imminent preterm delivery, glucocorticoids to enhance fetal lung maturity should be administered from a gestational age of 23 5/7 weeks onwards. From a gestational age of 24 0/7 weeks onwards a caesarean section may be considered if the fetal condition during spontaneous labour justifies this.

  11. [Practical guidelines for diagnosis and therapy of restless legs syndrome].

    PubMed

    Krenzer, M; Oertel, W; Trenkwalder, C

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is the most common neurological sleep disorder affecting 10 % of the Caucasian population. The disorder is characterized by painful sensations in the lower limbs, especially during the evening, at night and during rest, resulting in an urge to move the legs and insomnia. As a result the quality of life is significantly reduced. Dopaminergic agents, opioids and anticonvulsants have proven to be effective for RLS with only the former being currently licensed; however, affected patients have to be identified, which is not always the case, especially in outpatient settings. Possible impediments to the adequate management of patients with RLS may include a lack of awareness, comorbidities and other medical conditions mimicking RLS. To overcome some of these difficulties practical guidelines for the diagnosis and therapy of RLS are provided.

  12. Best practice in forensic entomology--standards and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Amendt, Jens; Campobasso, Carlo P; Gaudry, Emmanuel; Reiter, Christian; LeBlanc, Hélène N; Hall, Martin J R

    2007-03-01

    Forensic entomology, the use of insects and other arthropods in forensic investigations, is becoming increasingly more important in such investigations. To ensure its optimal use by a diverse group of professionals including pathologists, entomologists and police officers, a common frame of guidelines and standards is essential. Therefore, the European Association for Forensic Entomology has developed a protocol document for best practice in forensic entomology, which includes an overview of equipment used for collection of entomological evidence and a detailed description of the methods applied. Together with the definitions of key terms and a short introduction to the most important methods for the estimation of the minimum postmortem interval, the present paper aims to encourage a high level of competency in the field of forensic entomology.

  13. Management of scars: updated practical guidelines and use of silicones.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Le Pillouer-Prost, Anne; Richert, Bertrand; Roseeuw, Diane; Vadoud, Javid

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids resulting from surgery, burns, trauma and infection can be associated with substantial physical and psychological distress. Various non-invasive and invasive options are currently available for the prevention and treatment of these scars. Recently, an international multidisciplinary group of 24 experts on scar management (dermatologists; plastic and reconstructive surgeons; general surgeons; physical medicine, rehabilitation and burns specialists; psychosocial and behavioural researchers; epidemiologists; beauticians) convened to update a set of practical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scars on the basis of the latest published clinical evidence on existing scar management options. Silicone-based products such as sheets and gels are recommended as the gold standard, first-line, non-invasive option for both the prevention and treatment of scars. Other general scar preventative measures include avoiding sun exposure, compression therapy, taping and the use of moisturisers. Invasive treatment options include intralesional injections of corticosteroids and/or 5-fluorouracil, cryotherapy, radiotherapy, laser therapy and surgical excision. All of these options may be used alone or as part of combination therapy. Of utmost importance is the regular re-evaluation of patients every four to eight weeks to evaluate whether additional treatment is warranted. The amount of scar management measures that are applied to each wound depends on the patient's risk of developing a scar and their level of concern about the scar's appearance. The practical advice presented in the current guidelines should be combined with clinical judgement when deciding on the most appropriate scar management measures for an individual patient.

  14. Application of The APA Practice Guidelines on Suicide to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Douglas G; Brewer, Margaret L

    2006-06-01

    This article presents charts from The American Psychiatric Association Practice Guideline for the Assessment and Treatment of Patients with Suicidal Behaviors, part of the Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders Compendium, and a summary of the assessment information in a format that can be used in routine clinical practice. Four steps in the assessment process are presented: the use of a thorough psychiatric examination to obtain information about the patient's current presentation, history, diagnosis, and to recognize suicide risk factors therein; the necessity of asking very specific questions about suicidal ideation, intent, plans, and attempts; the process of making an estimation of the patient's level of suicide risk is explained; and the use of modifiable risk and protective factors as the basis for treatment planning is demonstrated. Case reports are used to clarify use of each step in this process.

  15. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future. PMID:20529367

  16. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lorraine; Stricker, Raphael B

    2010-06-09

    Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future.

  17. Rigour of development of clinical practice guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Arianna; Girlanda, Francesca; Barbui, Corrado

    2015-03-15

    There is an increasing concern about the quality of clinical practice guidelines. Because no information is available on the rigour of development of clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder, we carried out a systematic review of those focusing on its pharmacological treatment. We searched the National Guideline Clearinghouse, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and CINHAL for guidelines published from 2003 to 2014. The quality of each guideline was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II). Fourteen guidelines were appraised. The overall quality of included guidelines varied considerably, both within and across AGREE II domains. Overall, six guidelines were rated as "recommended", two "recommended with modifications", and six were not recommended according to AGREE II ratings. The mean score for rigour of development was 46.8% of the maximum possible score, with no guidelines scoring the maximum score in this domain. Guidelines with lower editorial independence scores also had lower rigour of development scores, whereas those with higher-quality domain scores scored high in both domains. As current appraisal focused on guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder, it will be important to critically assess the rigour of development of other guidelines for bipolar and other psychiatric disorders. Health care providers, policy makers, physicians and patients alike need to be aware of the variability in guideline quality and identify the high-quality guidelines that meet their needs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Using spiritual interventions in practice: developing some guidelines from evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Hodge, David R

    2011-04-01

    Research indicates that many social work practitioners are interested in using spiritual interventions in clinical settings. Unfortunately, studies also indicate that practitioners have frequently received minimal training on the topic during their graduate education. Drawing from the evidence-based practice movement, this article develops some guidelines to assist practitioners in using spiritual interventions in an ethical, professional manner that fosters client well-being. These guidelines can be summarized under the following four rubrics: (1) client preference, (2) evaluation of relevant research, (3) clinical expertise, and (4) cultural competency. The article concludes by emphasizing that these overlapping guidelines should be considered concurrently, in a manner that privileges clients' needs and desires in the decision-making process.

  19. 2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Dyslipidemia in the Philippines - Executive Summary: Dyslipidemia Guidelines 2015.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Adriel E

    2016-10-01

    The Philippine Heart Association, the Philippine Lipid and Atherosclerosis Society, and the Philippine Society of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, collaborated to develop the 2015 Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Dyslipidemia in the Philippines (2015 CPG). These guidelines are meant to update the 2005 Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Management of Dyslipidemia in the Philippines (2005 CPG). A panel of experts in the fields of dyslipidemia, cardiology, endocrinology and epidemiology were assembled to comprise the technical research committee (TRC) tasked to review available clinical evidence on dyslipidemia management. The main objective for this document is to develop clinical guidelines in the management of Filipino patients who are diagnosed with elevated cholesterol. This may infl uence standards and national policies for optimal patient care and cardiovascular health.

  20. Advance Notice for Transition-Related Problem Behavior: Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Adam T; Strickland-Cohen, Kathleen; Dotson, Wesley; Williams, D Courtney

    2014-10-01

    Transitions between daily activities can occasion or elicit problem behavior in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Providing advance notice to signal an upcoming transition is a common practice in early and special education settings (e.g., Riffel 2010; Sandall et al. 2005). While the literature contains many demonstrations of the efficacy of various advance notice procedures, other studies have shown negative results. Practitioners are faced with the challenge of deciding whether advance notice is a viable treatment option for transition-related problem behavior in light of these contradictory findings. To assist the practitioner in this decision-making process, we provide a brief review of the advance notice literature, concentrating on the studies reporting that advance notice is ineffective at reducing transition-related problems. The goal is to provide practitioners with a better understanding of the environmental conditions under which advance notice is likely to be ineffective at decreasing problem behavior as well as the conditions under which it can be effective at reducing transition-related problem behavior. Discriminating these conditions may yield a useful set of practice guidelines for deciding when advance notice is a viable treatment option for decreasing transition-related problem behavior.

  1. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Best Practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Alan R; Bell, Scott C; Bojcin, Snezana; Bryon, Mandy; Duff, Alistair; Flume, Patrick; Kashirskaya, Nataliya; Munck, Anne; Ratjen, Felix; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Southern, Kevin W; Taccetti, Giovanni; Ullrich, Gerald; Wolfe, Sue

    2014-05-01

    Specialised CF care has led to a dramatic improvement in survival in CF: in the last four decades, well above what was seen in the general population over the same period. With the implementation of newborn screening in many European countries, centres are increasingly caring for a cohort of patients who have minimal lung disease at diagnosis and therefore have the potential to enjoy an excellent quality of life and an even greater life expectancy than was seen previously. To allow high quality care to be delivered throughout Europe, a landmark document was published in 2005 that sets standards of care. Our current document builds on this work, setting standards for best practice in key aspects of CF care. The objective of our document is to give a broad overview of the standards expected for screening, diagnosis, pre-emptive treatment of lung disease, nutrition, complications, transplant/end of life care and psychological support. For comprehensive details of clinical care of CF, references to the most up to date European Consensus Statements, Guidelines or Position Papers are provided in Table 1. We hope that this best practice document will be useful to clinical teams both in countries where CF care is developing and those with established CF centres.

  2. Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Practice Guidelines: Customized for Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Safi, Sare; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Azarmina, Mohsen; Moradian, Siamak; Entezari, Morteza; Nourinia, Ramin; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Shirvani, Armin; Shahraz, Saeid; Ramezani, Alireza; Dehghan, Mohammad Hossein; Shahsavari, Mohsen; Soheilian, Masoud; Nikkhah, Homayoun; Ziaei, Hossein; Behboudi, Hasan; Farrahi, Fereydoun; Falavarjani, Khalil Ghasemi; Parvaresh, Mohammad Mehdi; Fesharaki, Hamid; Abrishami, Majid; Shoeibi, Nasser; Rahimi, Mansour; Javadzadeh, Alireza; Karkhaneh, Reza; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Manaviat, Masoud Reza; Maleki, Alireza; Kheiri, Bahareh; Golbafian, Faegheh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To customize clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for management of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the Iranian population. Methods: Three DR CPGs (The Royal College of Ophthalmologists 2013, American Academy of Ophthalmology [Preferred Practice Pattern 2012], and Australian Diabetes Society 2008) were selected from the literature using the AGREE tool. Clinical questions were designed and summarized into four tables by the customization team. The components of the clinical questions along with pertinent recommendations extracted from the above-mentioned CPGs; details of the supporting articles and their levels of evidence; clinical recommendations considering clinical benefits, cost and side effects; and revised recommendations based on customization capability (applicability, acceptability, external validity) were recorded in 4 tables, respectively. Customized recommendations were sent to the faculty members of all universities across the country to score the recommendations from 1 to 9. Results: Agreed recommendations were accepted as the final recommendations while the non-agreed ones were approved after revision. Eventually, 29 customized recommendations under three major categories consisting of screening, diagnosis and treatment of DR were developed along with their sources and levels of evidence. Conclusion: This customized CPGs for management of DR can be used to standardize the referral pathway, diagnosis and treatment of patients with diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27994809

  3. [Factors influencing the quality of clinical practice guidelines in ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Londoño, J S; Medina-Torres, Y A; Sandoval-Salinas, C; Buitrago-Gutierrez, G; Torres-Ibargüen, M Z; Gonzalez-Rangel, A L

    To identify the characteristics of the published clinical practice guidelines for the management of epithelial ovarian cancer that suggest a good methodological quality. A literature review was performed on 25 clinical practice guidelines for epithelial ovarian cancer that were identified in different databases (MEDLINE, Guidelines International Network, National Guidelines Clearing house) published between 2007 and 2014. The quality of the guidelines was evaluated using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation II tool. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed to assess the association between the quality of the guidelines and of some of their features and their developers. Just under half (48%) of the guidelines were rated as low quality. Scientific societies or independent centres and private funding, or under-reporting the source of funding, were statistically associated with lower quality of clinical practice guidelines (P<.01). The guidelines developed by National Program Guidelines had a median of consistently higher scores in all domains of the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation II, with significant differences in the definition of scope and objectives, the participation of stakeholders, the methodological rigour of development, and applicability to the context. Features such as the nature of the developer and funding of the guidelines are predictors of quality that should be taken into account prior to the use of the recommendations of a document. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis 2015.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Hiroshi; Saito, Hidetsugu; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Uto, Hirofumi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Sakaida, Isao; Shibuya, Akitaka; Seike, Masataka; Nagoshi, Sumiko; Segawa, Makoto; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Kato, Akinobu; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Michitaka, Kojiro; Murawaki, Toshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Watanabe, Mamoru; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-07-01

    The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for liver cirrhosis in 2015. Eighty-three clinical questions were selected, and a literature search was performed for the clinical questions with use of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases for the period between 1983 and June 2012. Manual searching of the latest important literature was added until August 2015. The guidelines were developed with use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. This digest version in English introduces selected clinical questions and statements related to the management of liver cirrhosis and its complications. Branched-chain amino acids relieve hypoalbuminemia and hepatic encephalopathy and improve quality of life. Nucleoside analogues and peginterferon plus ribavirin combination therapy improve the prognosis of patients with hepatitis B virus related liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C related compensated liver cirrhosis, respectively, although the latter therapy may be replaced by direct-acting antivirals. For liver cirrhosis caused by primary biliary cirrhosis and active autoimmune hepatitis, urosodeoxycholic acid and steroid are recommended, respectively. The most adequate modalities for the management of variceal bleeding are the endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices and the balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration following endoscopic obturation with cyanoacrylate for gastric varices. Beta-blockers are useful for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. The V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan is a useful add-on therapy in careful diuretic therapy for ascites. Albumin infusion is useful for the prevention of paracentesis-induced circulatory disturbance and renal failure. In addition to disaccharides, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin is useful for the management of encephalopathy. Anticoagulation therapy is proposed for

  5. Comparing American, European and Asian practice guidelines for aortic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Maria; Pascual, Isaac; Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Moris, Cesar

    2017-01-01

    The aortic disease comprises a group of different pathologies of high prevalence, seriousness and ever changing by the medical and surgical investigations. Therefore cardiovascular scientific societies in USA, Europe and Asia have created Task Force on practice guidelines (PG) to develop, update and revise PG for aortic diseases. These documents issue recommendations on the diagnosis and management of different aortic diseases. The three societies agree on the recommendations about diagnostic tests and on the value of computed tomography and magnetic resonance as the main tools for the diagnosis and follow-up of aortic disease. Concerning to acute aortic syndromes (AAS), American and European GPs recognize intramural hematoma (IMH) as a type of AAS with surgery indication; however Asian guidelines consider IMH a pathological process different from AAS and indicate medical treatment. In thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA), all express the need for an adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, emphasizing strict control of blood pressure, smoking cessation and recommend the use of beta-blockers and statins. The threshold for asymptomatic repair is 5.5 cm in European and American and 6 cm for Asian PG, with lower thresholds in Marfan and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). As regards the abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), the PGs recognize the adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors, but there are differences in class of recommendation on statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or beta-blockers to prevent progression of AAA. For intervention, the threshold diameter in asymptomatic is 5.5 cm but can be reduced to 5 cm in women as recommended by Asian PG. Moreover the specific diseases such as Marfan, BAV, pregnancy or atherosclerosis aortic present specific recommendations with small differences between PGs. In conclusion, PGs are interesting and appropriate documents at present. They issue recommendations based on evidence that help the clinician and

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for resuscitation in acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Barnes, T A

    1995-04-01

    The development of the AHA Guidelines for CPR and ECC and the AARC RACH Clinical Practice Guideline should both be instrumental in improving the performance of RCPs on in-hospital resuscitation teams. The AARC and AHA are assuming important leadership roles in this movement by publishing CPGs for CPR and ECC. RCPs with ACLS training are in a prime position to assume more responsibility on resuscitation teams within acute care facilities. They should be prominent members of the resuscitation team--committed to the entire team's performance--and be actively involved in ACLS training. The first step in that process is to study the current levels of RCP competence in ACLS. Further, RCPs and health-care providers should define the goals of resuscitation in terms of long-term survival, quality of life, and years of useful life after CPR. The cost of inadequate attention to which patients should have DNR orders is a drain on the entire health-care system. Research on the impact of disease categories on CPR outcome should be used to educate physicians, nurses, and RCPs so they can help patients better understand their chances of regaining their pre-CPR quality of life. Successful CPR outcome should be carefully defined using the patient's disease category. Each patient should be individually evaluated for DNR orders. As suggested by Schwenzer, "Patients' perception of their quality of life before and after CPR should guide their and our decisions." However, we must all accept the responsibility for defining the limitations of medical technology and try to determine when CPR is futile.

  7. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hiroto; Kusano, Motoyasu; Arisawa, Tomiyasu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Kato, Mototsugu; Joh, Takashi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Nakada, Koji; Nagahara, Akihito; Futagami, Seiji; Manabe, Noriaki; Inui, Akio; Haruma, Ken; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Yakabi, Koji; Hongo, Michio; Uemura, Naomi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Sugano, Kentaro; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-02-01

    General interest in functional gastrointestinal disorders is increasing among Japanese doctors as well as patients. This increase can be attributed to a number of factors, including recent increased interest in quality of life and advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease. Japan recently became the world's first country to list "functional dyspepsia" as a disease name for national insurance billing purposes. However, recognition and understanding of functional dyspepsia (FD) remain poor, and no standard treatment strategy has yet been established. Accordingly, the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) developed an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for FD, consisting of five sections: concept, definition, and epidemiology; pathophysiology; diagnosis; treatment; and prognosis and complications. This article summarizes the Japanese guideline, with particular focus on the treatment section. Once a patient is diagnosed with FD, the doctor should carefully explain the pathophysiology and benign nature of this condition, establish a good doctor-patient relationship, and then provide advice for daily living (diet and lifestyle modifications, explanations, and reassurance). The proposed pharmacological treatment is divided into two steps: initial treatment including an acid inhibitory drug (H2RA or PPI) or prokinetics, (strong recommendation); second-line treatment including anxiolytics, antidepressants, and Japanese traditional medicine (weak recommendation). H. pylori eradication, strongly recommended with a high evidence level, is positioned separately from other treatment flows. Conditions that do not respond to these treatment regimens are regarded as refractory FD. Patients will be further examined for other organic disorders or will be referred to specialists using other approaches such as psychosomatic treatment.

  8. Clinical Practice Guideline: Otitis Media with Effusion (Update).

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shin, Jennifer J; Schwartz, Seth R; Coggins, Robyn; Gagnon, Lisa; Hackell, Jesse M; Hoelting, David; Hunter, Lisa L; Kummer, Ann W; Payne, Spencer C; Poe, Dennis S; Veling, Maria; Vila, Peter M; Walsh, Sandra A; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2016-02-01

    This update of a 2004 guideline codeveloped by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians, provides evidence-based recommendations to manage otitis media with effusion (OME), defined as the presence of fluid in the middle ear without signs or symptoms of acute ear infection. Changes from the prior guideline include consumer advocates added to the update group, evidence from 4 new clinical practice guidelines, 20 new systematic reviews, and 49 randomized control trials, enhanced emphasis on patient education and shared decision making, a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships, and new and expanded recommendations for the diagnosis and management of OME. The purpose of this multidisciplinary guideline is to identify quality improvement opportunities in managing OME and to create explicit and actionable recommendations to implement these opportunities in clinical practice. Specifically, the goals are to improve diagnostic accuracy, identify children who are most susceptible to developmental sequelae from OME, and educate clinicians and patients regarding the favorable natural history of most OME and the clinical benefits for medical therapy (eg, steroids, antihistamines, decongestants). Additional goals relate to OME surveillance, hearing and language evaluation, and management of OME detected by newborn screening. The target patient for the guideline is a child aged 2 months through 12 years with OME, with or without developmental disabilities or underlying conditions that predispose to OME and its sequelae. The guideline is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and manage children with OME, and it applies to any setting in which OME would be identified, monitored, or managed. This guideline, however, does not apply to patients <2 months or >12 years old. The update group made strong recommendations that clinicians (1

  9. Clinical Practice Guideline: Evaluation of the Neck Mass in Adults.

    PubMed

    Pynnonen, Melissa A; Gillespie, M Boyd; Roman, Benjamin; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Tunkel, David E; Bontempo, Laura; Brook, Itzhak; Chick, Davoren Ann; Colandrea, Maria; Finestone, Sandra A; Fowler, Jason C; Griffith, Christopher C; Henson, Zeb; Levine, Corinna; Mehta, Vikas; Salama, Andrew; Scharpf, Joseph; Shatzkes, Deborah R; Stern, Wendy B; Youngerman, Jay S; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2017-09-01

    Objective Neck masses are common in adults, but often the underlying etiology is not easily identifiable. While infections cause most of the neck masses in children, most persistent neck masses in adults are neoplasms. Malignant neoplasms far exceed any other etiology of adult neck mass. Importantly, an asymptomatic neck mass may be the initial or only clinically apparent manifestation of head and neck cancer, such as squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), lymphoma, thyroid, or salivary gland cancer. Evidence suggests that a neck mass in the adult patient should be considered malignant until proven otherwise. Timely diagnosis of a neck mass due to metastatic HNSCC is paramount because delayed diagnosis directly affects tumor stage and worsens prognosis. Unfortunately, despite substantial advances in testing modalities over the last few decades, diagnostic delays are common. Currently, there is only 1 evidence-based clinical practice guideline to assist clinicians in evaluating an adult with a neck mass. Additionally, much of the available information is fragmented, disorganized, or focused on specific etiologies. In addition, although there is literature related to the diagnostic accuracy of individual tests, there is little guidance about rational sequencing of tests in the course of clinical care. This guideline strives to bring a coherent, evidence-based, multidisciplinary perspective to the evaluation of the neck mass with the intention to facilitate prompt diagnosis and enhance patient outcomes. Purpose The primary purpose of this guideline is to promote the efficient, effective, and accurate diagnostic workup of neck masses to ensure that adults with potentially malignant disease receive prompt diagnosis and intervention to optimize outcomes. Specific goals include reducing delays in diagnosis of HNSCC; promoting appropriate testing, including imaging, pathologic evaluation, and empiric medical therapies; reducing inappropriate testing; and promoting appropriate

  10. Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update).

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Gubbels, Samuel P; Schwartz, Seth R; Edlow, Jonathan A; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Fife, Terry; Holmberg, Janene M; Mahoney, Kathryn; Hollingsworth, Deena B; Roberts, Richard; Seidman, Michael D; Steiner, Robert W Prasaad; Do, Betty Tsai; Voelker, Courtney C J; Waguespack, Richard W; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2017-03-01

    Objective This update of a 2008 guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by repeated episodes of positional vertigo. Changes from the prior guideline include a consumer advocate added to the update group; new evidence from 2 clinical practice guidelines, 20 systematic reviews, and 27 randomized controlled trials; enhanced emphasis on patient education and shared decision making; a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships; and new and expanded recommendations for the diagnosis and management of BPPV. Purpose The primary purposes of this guideline are to improve the quality of care and outcomes for BPPV by improving the accurate and efficient diagnosis of BPPV, reducing the inappropriate use of vestibular suppressant medications, decreasing the inappropriate use of ancillary testing such as radiographic imaging, and increasing the use of appropriate therapeutic repositioning maneuvers. The guideline is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and manage patients with BPPV, and it applies to any setting in which BPPV would be identified, monitored, or managed. The target patient for the guideline is aged ≥18 years with a suspected or potential diagnosis of BPPV. The primary outcome considered in this guideline is the resolution of the symptoms associated with BPPV. Secondary outcomes considered include an increased rate of accurate diagnoses of BPPV, a more efficient return to regular activities and work, decreased use of inappropriate medications and unnecessary diagnostic tests, reduction in recurrence of BPPV, and reduction in adverse events associated with undiagnosed or untreated BPPV. Other outcomes considered include minimizing costs in the diagnosis and treatment of BPPV, minimizing potentially unnecessary return physician visits, and maximizing

  11. The Spanish Neurological Society official clinical practice guidelines in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mercadé Cerdá, J M; Toledo Argani, M; Mauri Llerda, J A; López Gonzalez, F J; Salas Puig, X; Sancho Rieger, J

    2016-03-01

    Previous Official Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) in Epilepsy were based on expert opinions and developed by the Epilepsy Study Group of the Spanish Neurological Society (GE-SEN). The current CPG in epilepsy is based on the scientific method, which extracts recommendations from published scientific evidence. A reduction in the variability in clinical practice through standardization of medical practice has become its main function. This CPG is focused on comprehensive care for individuals affected by epilepsy as a primary and predominant symptom, regardless of the age of onset and medical policy. 1. Creation of GE-SEN neurologists working group, in collaboration with Neuropediatricians, Neurophysiologists and Neuroradiologists. 2. Identification of clinical areas to be covered: diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. 3. Search and selection of the relevant scientific evidence. 4. Formulation of recommendations based on the classification of the available scientific evidence. It contains 161 recommendations of which 57% are consensus between authors and publishers, due to an important lack of awareness in many fields of this pathology. This Epilepsy CPG formulates recommendations based on explicit scientific evidence as a result of a formal and rigorous methodology, according to the current knowledge in the pre-selected areas. This paper includes the CPG chapter dedicated to emergency situations in seizures and epilepsy, which may present as a first seizure, an unfavorable outcome in a patient with known epilepsy, or status epilepticus as the most severe manifestation. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Are biosafety practices in anatomical laboratories sufficient? A survey of practices and review of current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ehdaivand, Shahrzad; Chapin, Kimberle C; Andrea, Sarah; Gnepp, Douglas R

    2013-06-01

    Biosafety practices in anatomical pathology laboratories are crucial to prevent unnecessary exposures to both chemical and biological agents. Regulatory and guidance agencies have general regulations and recommendations regarding anatomical pathology laboratory biosafety practices. This study aimed to determine if professionals' perceptions and actual practice mirror these guidelines. Current available regulations and recommendations for biosafety practices in anatomical pathology laboratories were reviewed and used to construct a brief, validated online survey distributed to anatomical pathology professionals. The survey was completed by 39 survey participants in pathology departments from diverse institutions. An average of 44% of respondents reported receiving inadequate biosafety training. At survey initiation, 61.5% of respondents felt that the risks of chemical and infectious disease exposures had been clearly explained to them; however, by completion of the survey, only 21% believed risks to be clearly explained. Respondents use a variety of personal protective equipment, yet only 60% would have been classified as meeting recommendations. Most respondents reported having a needle stick or cut (56.3%) or formalin exposure by splash or prolonged direct skin contact (62.5%). The survey indicated that there is a dire need for improved training in anatomical pathology biosafety as daily practices do not reflect current guidelines. In addition, improved training on exposure risks, including needle-stick injuries, personal protective equipment, and chemical hazards, is needed. Finally, the success of this training should be monitored locally as regulatory agency requirements do not seem to alter daily practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 From the Japan Pancreas Society: A Synopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Kyoko; Furuse, Junji; Ito, Yoshinori; Hanada, Keiji; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on Evidence-Based Medicine 2006 were first published by the Japan Pancreas Society, and they were revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2009 in July 2009 and were further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2013 in October 2013. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. In October 2016, the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer were newly revised in Japanese. In the revised version, we introduced the concepts of GRADE - grading recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation approach for better understanding of the current guidelines. The guidelines show algorithms for the diagnosis, treatment, and chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer and address 7 subjects: diagnosis, surgical therapy, adjuvant therapy, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, stent therapy, and palliative medicine. They include 51 clinical questions and 76 statements. There are statements corresponding to clinical questions, evidence levels, recommended strengths, and agreement rates. These guidelines represent the most standard clinical and practical management at this time in Japan. This is the English synopsis of the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 in Japanese, which aims to disseminate the Japanese guidelines worldwide for the introduction of Japanese clinical management of these diseases.

  14. Management of single brain metastasis: a practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, A.; Perry, J.; Spithoff, K.; Chambers, A.; Laperriere, N.

    2007-01-01

    Questions Should patients with confirmed single brain metastasis undergo surgical resection? Should patients with single brain metastasis undergoing surgical resection receive adjuvant whole-brain radiation therapy (wbrt)? What is the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (srs) in the management of patients with single brain metastasis? Perspectives Approximately 15%–30% of patients with cancer will develop cerebral metastases over the course of their disease. Patients identified as having single brain metastasis generally undergo more aggressive treatment than do those with multiple metastases; however, in the province of Ontario, management of patients with single brain metastasis varies. Given that conflicting evidence has been reported, the Neuro-oncology Disease Site Group (dsg) of the Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-based Care felt that a systematic review of the evidence and a practice guideline were warranted. Outcomes Outcomes of interest were survival, local control of disease, quality of life, and adverse effects. Methodology The medline, cancerlit, embase, and Cochrane Library databases and abstracts published in the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (1997–2005) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (1998–2004) were systematically searched for relevant evidence. The review included fully published reports or abstracts of randomized controlled trials (rcts), nonrandomized prospective studies, and retrospective studies. The present systematic review and practice guideline has been reviewed and approved by the Neuro-oncology dsg, which comprises medical and radiation oncologists, surgeons, neurologists, a nurse, and a patient representative. External review by Ontario practitioners was obtained through an electronic survey. Final approval of the guideline report was obtained from the Report Approval Panel and the Neuro-oncology dsg. Results Quality of Evidence The literature

  15. South African Guidelines Excellence (SAGE): Efficient, effective and unbiased clinical practice guideline teams.

    PubMed

    Grimmer, Karen; Dizon, Janine Margarita; Louw, Quinette; Kredo, Tamara; Young, Taryn; Machingaidze, Shingai

    2016-03-29

    A range of different evidence-based methods for clinical practice guideline activities have been established, and there is common agreement in these that poorly conceived CPG team composition and management can jeopardise CPG integrity.  Recognised CPG initiatives therefore provide guidance on CPG team construction and management. In this editorial, we outline steps for effective, efficient and outcome-focused CPG team membership, roles and management: (i) determine responsibilities and tasks; (ii) identify 'experts' and their 'voices'; (iii) identify a CPG team leader; (iv) determine and declare conflicts of interest; (v) determine CPG team terms of reference; (vi) establish CPG timeframes and tailored capacity development; and (vii) establish consensus. Writing CPGs can be time-consuming and expensive.Efforts therefore need to be underpinned by efficient, respectful and agreed processes. Justifying CPG team membership, declaring conflicts of interest, identifying efficient ways of hearing constituent 'voices', defining and time-lining team tasks and roles, providing necessary training, and respecting individuals' efforts and time should ensure that CPG team members enjoy their experiences. This will contribute to growing CPG expertise in South Africa and beyond.

  16. 78 FR 38735 - Autopsy Performance Criteria: Standards, Guidelines and Best Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Office of Justice Programs Autopsy Performance Criteria: Standards, Guidelines and Best Practices AGENCY... and Best Practices''. The opportunity to provide comments on this document is open to...

  17. Development and utilization of best practice operational guidelines for immunization information systems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Warren; Lowery, N Elaine; Lyalin, David; Lambrecht, Nichole; Riddick, Sherry; Sutliff, Cynthia; Papadouka, Vikki

    2011-01-01

    To describe collaborative efforts to develop best practice operational guidelines for immunization information systems (IIS) and discuss awareness, acceptance, and utilization of the guidelines by the IIS community. Business analysis and facilitation techniques were used to support collaboration among IIS stakeholders who analyzed existing practices, brainstormed new approaches, and developed consensus-based recommendations. The guideline development process and its impact on IIS were evaluated using a postworkshop questionnaire, the IIS Annual Report, and an online survey for one of the guidelines. Immunization information systems domain in the United States. Staff from IIS; federal agencies; state, regional, and county health departments; privately run registries; and vendors/consultants. These included (1) completion of best practice guidelines; (2) degree of satisfaction among the participating IIS stakeholders with the work process and outcomes, interest, and willingness to implement best practice guidelines in their own IIS; (3) awareness and use of, as well as satisfaction with, the guidelines for patient active/inactive immunization status among IIS; and (4) acceptance and implementation of best practice guidelines across the US IIS. Since 2005, operational guidelines (that contain best practice recommendations) have been developed for 5 IIS functional areas: reminder/recall notifications, data quality assurance, vaccination level deduplication, management of patient active/inactive status, and adverse events reporting. Immunization information systems stakeholders who participated in the development of the recommendations expressed a high level of satisfaction with the process and the recommendations. Based on IIS Annual Report data, from 2007 to 2009 use of the guidelines increased from 46% to 80% of IIS. Best practice recommendations offer practical guidelines on the most challenging operational areas for IIS. Initial evidence indicates adoption of the

  18. Evidence-Based Practice Guideline: Changing the Practice of Physical Restraint Use in Acute Care.

    PubMed

    Lach, Helen W; Leach, Kathy M; Butcher, Howard K

    2016-02-01

    Physical restraints continue to be used in acute care settings, despite the challenges and calls to reduce this practice. The current guideline on restraint use is updated with evidence that includes critical care settings and issues related to restraint use in acute care units. Nurses play a significant role in the use of restraints. Factors such as nurse's knowledge and patient characteristics combined with the culture and resources in health care facilities influence the practice of physical restraint use. Nurses can identify patients at high risk for restraint use; assess the potential causes of unsafe behaviors; and target interventions in the areas of physiological, psychological, and environmental approaches to address those unsafe behaviors. Members of the interdisciplinary team can provide additional consultation, and institutions can provide resources and education and implement monitoring processes and quality improvement practices to help reduce the practice of physical restraint use. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(2), 17-26.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. [Acute otitis media: do not change the Dutch practice guideline].

    PubMed

    Damoiseaux, Roger A M J

    2012-01-01

    Two recent clinical trials have again shown that antibiotics are effective in the management of young children with acute otitis media (AOM). Should this change our reserved attitude towards the use of antibiotics? According to the rules for evidence-based medicine, we cannot ignore the vast body of evidence already existing unless new trials are methodologically better and their results differ from previous trials. This does not seem to be the case. The patient characteristics of these trials are similar to those of a previously published individual patient data meta-analysis. The primary outcome 'symptom scores' reported by Hoberman et al. is also comparable, but Tähtinen et al. may have overestimated the effect of antibiotics. Their primary outcome 'time to treatment failure' does not take later improvement or recovery into account. In both trials, the greatest benefit is related to otoscopic recovery of AOM, which is clinically not the most relevant outcome. For now, there is no reason to adapt the current AOM practice guideline of the Dutch College of General Practitioners.

  20. AARC clinical practice guideline: blood gas analysis and hemoximetry: 2013.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael D; Walsh, Brian K; Sittig, Steve E; Restrepo, Ruben D

    2013-10-01

    We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library database for articles published between January 1990 and December 2012. The update of this clinical practice guideline is based on 237 clinical trials, 54 reviews, and 23 meta-analyses on blood gas analysis (BGA) and hemoximetry. The following recommendations are made following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation scoring system. BGA and hemoximetry are recommended for evaluating a patient's ventilatory, acid-base, and/or oxygenation status. BGA and hemoximetry are suggested for evaluating a patient's response to therapeutic interventions. BGA and hemoximetry are recommended for monitoring severity and progression of documented cardiopulmonary disease processes. Hemoximetry is recommended to determine the impact of dyshemoglobins on oxygenation. Capillary BGA is not recommended to determine oxygenation status. Central venous BGA and hemoximetry are suggested to determine oxygen consumption in the setting of early goal-directed therapies. For the assessment of oxygenation, a peripheral venous P(O2) is not recommended as a substitute for an arterial blood measurement (P(aO2)). It is not recommended to use venous P(CO2) and pH as a substitute for arterial blood measurement of P(aCO2) and pH. It is suggested that hemoximetry is used in the detection and evaluation of shunts during diagnostic cardiac catheterization.

  1. [Alternative therapies for smoking cessation: clinical practice guidelines review].

    PubMed

    Astrid Becerra, Nelci; Alba, Luz Helena; Castillo, Juan Sebastián; Murillo, Raúl; Cañas, Alejandra; García-Herreros, Plutarco

    2012-01-01

    smoking is a chronic disease in the group of addictions and its treatment includes two components:psychosocial and pharmacological intervention. Other types of therapeutic approaches have been used as treatment options for tobacco addiction. Acupuncture, hypnosis and homeopathy are the most used nonconventional interventions. review the available evidence in regards to the use of alternative therapies for smoking cessation in the adult population from the published clinical practice guidelines (CPG). we performed an adaptation process of clinical recommendations from a systematic review of the literature specifically related to the use of alternative therapies for smoking cessation. we found 925 references, 9 were pre-screened and selected 5 CPG for adaptation.Acupuncture and related techniques do not improve abstinence rates compared to the placebo effect. There is insufficient evidence to recommend the use of hypnosis as a therapy for smoking cessation. There is no evidence that justifies the use of homeopathic medicines for the treatment of smoking. alternative therapies have not demonstrated efficacy in cessation. It is recommended to use other treatment options with proven efficacy for smoking cessation.

  2. [Good practice guidelines for the treatment of autistic spectrum disorders].

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Biggi, J; Ferrari-Arroyo, M J; Boada-Muñoz, L; Touriño-Aguilera, E; Artigas-Pallarés, J; Belinchón-Carmona, M; Muñoz-Yunta, J A; Hervás-Zúñiga, A; Canal-Bedia, R; Hernández, J M; Díez-Cuervo, A; Idiazábal-Aletxa, M A; Mulas, F; Palacios, S; Tamarit, J; Martos-Pérez, J; Posada-De la Paz, M

    Due to the inexistence of an aetiology-based intervention for autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) families and professionals are exposed to diverse and sometimes conflictive recommendations when they have to decide the most adequate alternative for treatment. To elaborate treatment guidelines agreed by consensus at the ASD Study Group of the (National) Institute of Health Carlos III. Information about treatment of ASD was searched and gathered through available evidence based medical (EBM) databases. The data generated was complemented with practice parameters published elsewhere, reports from prestigious international institutions, focus oriented searches in PubMed and, finally, the opinion and experience of a multidisciplinary Study Group with extensive experience in treating ASD in Spain. Most popular treatment methods were reviewed as well as the common elements to be considered in successful support programs. No simple treatment algorithm can be produced at this time, and the level of available evidence based recommendations are in the weaker degrees of EBM classifications. Nevertheless, there is widespread agreement to stress that education, with special incidence in the development of communication and social competence, with the addition of community support are the main means of treatment. They can be complemented, depending on individual needs, with medication, behavioural approaches and cognitive-behavioural therapy for associated psychological problems in persons with higher cognitive level. Support to families and community empowerment are essential elements for the quality of life of persons with ASD.

  3. [Best practice guidelines for research in autistic spectrum disorders].

    PubMed

    Belinchón-Carmona, M; Posada-De la Paz, M; Artigas-Pallarés, J; Canal-Bedia, R; Díez-Cuervo, A; Ferrari-Arroyo, M J; Fuentes-Biggi, J; Hernández, J M; Hervás-Zúñiga, A; Idiazábal-Aletxa, M A; Martos-Pérez, J; Mulas, F; Muñoz-Yunta, J A; Palacios, S; Tamarit, J; Valdizán, J R

    Achieving a better knowledge of autism and other pervasive developmental disorders known as autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), poses a major scientific challenge. These disorders are some of the earliest and most severe psychopathological disorders in infancy; they include an heterogeneous group of conditions; its prevalence rate seems to be continually increasing and they generate a significant social impact. Nowadays, there is a current international agreement on the general requirements to be fulfilled by research projects and the priority areas to be considered when developing ASD high quality research. In Spain, although there are some established research groups with broad experience and expertise in these disorders, public funding opportunities and research development are still scarce. For this reason, the Study Group of the Instituto de Salud Carlos III has generated by consensus some Good Practice Guidelines for Research in ASD. After comparing priorities and recommendations from international reference documents with the results obtained after having carried out an exhaustive bibliographic revision of articles published in autism in the last 30 years by Spanish authors, methodological and ethical recommendations are established. Finally, structural deficiencies to be corrected and emerging research initiatives to be supported are identified.

  4. Adherence to the AAOS upper-extremity clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Matzon, Jonas L; Lutsky, Kevin F; Maloney, Michael; Beredjiklian, Pedro K

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recently developed several clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) involving upper-extremity conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adherence to these CPGs by members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH). An e-mail containing a brief study description and access to the survey was sent to ASSH current and candidate members. The survey contained questions involving the existing upper-extremity AAOS CPGs: diagnosis and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome, treatment of distal radius fractures, and treatment of glenohumeral arthritis. Overall, 469 responses were obtained, for a response rate of 32%. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the responses. Members of ASSH do not universally adhere to the AAOS CPGs. For patients with carpal tunnel syndrome, 53% of respondents wait the recommended time to change nonoperative treatment after failure of a given modality, and 32% of respondents always order electrodiagnostic testing when considering surgery. Furthermore, 30% of respondents immobilize the wrist postoperatively. In regard to distal radius fractures, 11% of respondents always prescribe vitamin C after treatment, and 49% respondents never do so. However, ASSH members follow some of the recommendations. These include nighttime splinting (98%) and corticosteroid injections (85%) in the nonoperative treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. For distal radius fractures, almost 85% of respondents consider the suggested postreduction criteria when determining operative versus cast treatment. Further study is warranted to understand the reasons for and possible solutions to the inconsistent adherence to the AAOS CPGs.

  5. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Jae; Moon, Jae Young; Shin, Ein-Soon; Kim, Je Hyeong; Jung, Hoon; Park, So Young; Kim, Ho Cheol; Sim, Yun Su; Rhee, Chin Kook; Lim, Jaemin; Lee, Seok Jeong; Lee, Won-Yeon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Kwak, Sang Hyun; Kang, Eun Kyeong; Chung, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We generate strong (1) and weak (2) grade of recommendations based on high (A), moderate (B) and low (C) grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A) and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B) to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B) and inhaled nitric oxide (1A) as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C), and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B). The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B), however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B). In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B) and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B) and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B). Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A). In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:27790273

  6. Pituitary Incidentaloma: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Freda, Pamela U.; Beckers, Albert M.; Katznelson, Laurence; Molitch, Mark E.; Montori, Victor M.; Post, Kalmon D.; Vance, Mary Lee

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to formulate practice guidelines for endocrine evaluation and treatment of pituitary incidentalomas. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence and discussions through a series of conference calls and e-mails and one in-person meeting. Conclusions: We recommend that patients with a pituitary incidentaloma undergo a complete history and physical examination, laboratory evaluations screening for hormone hypersecretion and for hypopituitarism, and a visual field examination if the lesion abuts the optic nerves or chiasm. We recommend that patients with incidentalomas not meeting criteria for surgical removal be followed with clinical assessments, neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months for macroincidentalomas, 1 yr for a microincidentaloma, and thereafter progressively less frequently if unchanged in size), visual field examinations for incidentalomas that abut or compress the optic nerve and chiasm (6 months and yearly), and endocrine testing for macroincidentalomas (6 months and yearly) after the initial evaluations. We recommend that patients with a pituitary incidentaloma be referred for surgery if they have a visual field deficit; signs of compression by the tumor leading to other visual abnormalities, such as ophthalmoplegia, or neurological compromise due to compression by the lesion; a lesion abutting the optic nerves or chiasm; pituitary apoplexy with visual disturbance; or if the incidentaloma is a hypersecreting tumor other than a prolactinoma. PMID:21474686

  7. Clinical Practice Guideline: Safe Medication Use in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Dasta, Joseph F; Buckley, Mitchell S; Devabhakthuni, Sandeep; Liu, Michael; Cohen, Henry; George, Elisabeth L; Pohlman, Anne S; Agarwal, Swati; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Bejian, Sharon M; Berenholtz, Sean M; Pepin, Jodie L; Scanlon, Mathew C; Smith, Brian S

    2017-09-01

    To provide ICU clinicians with evidence-based guidance on safe medication use practices for the critically ill. PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science for relevant material to December 2015. Based on three key components: 1) environment and patients, 2) the medication use process, and 3) the patient safety surveillance system. The committee collectively developed Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions and quality of evidence statements pertaining to medication errors and adverse drug events addressing the key components. A total of 34 Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions, five quality of evidence statements, and one commentary on disclosure was developed. Subcommittee members were assigned selected Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions or quality of evidence statements. Subcommittee members completed their Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation of the question with his/her quality of evidence assessment and proposed strength of recommendation, then the draft was reviewed by the relevant subcommittee. The subcommittee collectively reviewed the evidence profiles for each question they developed. After the draft was discussed and approved by the entire committee, then the document was circulated among all members for voting on the quality of evidence and strength of recommendation. The committee followed the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to determine quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. This guideline evaluates the ICU environment as a risk for medication-related events and the environmental changes that are possible to improve safe medication use. Prevention strategies for medication-related events are reviewed by medication use process node (prescribing, distribution, administration, monitoring). Detailed

  8. Agreement among ASES members on the AAOS Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Paxton, E Scott; Matzon, Jonas L; Narzikul, Alexa C; Beredjiklian, Pedro K; Abboud, Joseph A

    2015-03-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) has recently developed several clinical practice guidelines (CPG) involving upper extremity conditions. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the practice patterns of members of the American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) with regard to the CPGs. An e-mail survey was sent to the 340 members of the ASES. The survey contained 40 questions involving the subject matter of the 2 existing AAOS CPGs pertaining specifically to the shoulder: Optimizing the Management of Rotator Cuff Problems and the Treatment of Glenohumeral Joint Arthritis. Overall, 98 responses were obtained, for a response rate of 29%. Only 19 of 47 CPGs were not "inconclusive" and a recommendation was actually made. A majority (more than 50%) of surgeons agreed with 17 (90%) of 19 of these AAOS recommendations. A strong majority (more than 80%) adhered to 13 (68%) of 19 recommendations. There were 4 consensus recommendations, and more than 50% agreed with all of them. Of the 5 moderate recommendations, more than 50% agreed with 4 of them. There were 10 weak recommendations, and more than 50% of surgeons agreed with 9 of them. There was more than 80% agreement on 18 of 28 inconclusive recommendations. Although the AAOS CPGs are not meant to be fixed protocols, they are intended to unify treatment and/or diagnosis of common problems based on the best evidence available. Despite the majority of the AAOS CPG recommendations for rotator cuff problems and glenohumeral arthritis being inconclusive, most surgeons agree with most of the CPG recommendations.

  9. 77 FR 64834 - Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... COMMISSION Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications AGENCY: Nuclear... Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines for Dry Cask Applications.'' The draft NUREG-2152 report provides best... can be controlled and quantified by the user are then discussed in detail, and best...

  10. Clinical Practice Guidelines and Consensus Statements in Oncology – An Assessment of Their Methodological Quality

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Carmel; Graham, Ian D.; Makarski, Julie; Chassé, Michaël; Fergusson, Dean; Hutton, Brian; Clemons, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines are widely available for enhancing the care of cancer patients. Despite subtle differences in their definition and purpose, these terms are often used interchangeably. We systematically assessed the methodological quality of consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published in three commonly read, geographically diverse, cancer-specific journals. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine’s standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. Findings Thirty-four consensus statements and 67 clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. The rigour of development score for consensus statements over the three journals was 32% lower than that of clinical practice guidelines. The editorial independence score was 15% lower for consensus statements than clinical practice guidelines. One journal

  11. AAPM Medical Physics Practice Guideline 3.a: Levels of supervision for medical physicists in clinical training.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony; Clements, Jessica B; Halvorsen, Per H; Herman, Michael G; Martin, Melissa C; Palta, Jatinder; Pfeiffer, Douglas E; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Schueler, Beth A; Shepard, S Jeff; Fairobrent, Lynne A

    2015-05-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  12. Medical Physics Practice Guideline 4.a: Development, implementation, use and maintenance of safety checklists.

    PubMed

    Fong de Los Santos, Luis E; Evans, Suzanne; Ford, Eric C; Gaiser, James E; Hayden, Sandra E; Huffman, Kristina E; Johnson, Jennifer L; Mechalakos, James G; Stern, Robin L; Terezakis, Stephanie; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Pronovost, Peter J; Fairobent, Lynne A

    2015-05-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a nonprofit professional society whose primary purposes are to advance the science, education and professional practice of medical physics. The AAPM has more than 8,000 members and is the principal organization of medical physicists in the United States.The AAPM will periodically define new practice guidelines for medical physics practice to help advance the science of medical physics and to improve the quality of service to patients throughout the United States. Existing medical physics practice guidelines will be reviewed for the purpose of revision or renewal, as appropriate, on their fifth anniversary or sooner.Each medical physics practice guideline represents a policy statement by the AAPM, has undergone a thorough consensus process in which it has been subjected to extensive review, and requires the approval of the Professional Council. The medical physics practice guidelines recognize that the safe and effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiology requires specific training, skills, and techniques, as described in each document. Reproduction or modification of the published practice guidelines and technical standards by those entities not providing these services is not authorized.The following terms are used in the AAPM practice guidelines:Must and Must Not: Used to indicate that adherence to the recommendation is considered necessary to conform to this practice guideline.Should and Should Not: Used to indicate a prudent practice to which exceptions may occasionally be made in appropriate circumstances.

  13. Identifying an appropriate Content Management System to develop Clinical Practice Guidelines: A perspective.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sandeep; Herring, Sally; Gray, Allison

    2017-03-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines are widely used to inform and improve the quality and consistency of clinical practice. Developing and publishing Clinical Practice Guidelines is a complex task involving multiple components. Electronic Content Management Systems are increasingly employed to make this task more manageable. The Content Management System market offers a variety of options for publishing content on the Internet. However, there are limited products that comprehensively address the requirements of publishing Clinical Practice Guidelines. The authors are involved in publishing guidelines for remote clinical practitioners in Australia and present their perspective about identifying an appropriate Content Management System. Several elements essential to addressing their unique editing needs are defined in this article. Unfortunately, customisation is very expensive and laborious: few Content Management System providers can comprehensively meet the needs of Clinical Practice Guidelines publishing. Being pragmatic about the level of functionality a product can offer to support publication is essential.

  14. [Cancer pain management: Systematic review and critical appraisal of clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Nicolás, I; Ángel-García, D; Saturno, P J; López-Soriano, F

    2016-01-01

    Although several clinical practice guidelines have been developed in the last decades, cancer pain management is still deficient. The purpose of this work was to carry out a comprehensive and systematic literature review of current clinical practice guidelines on cancer pain management, and critically appraise their methodology and content in order to evaluate their quality and validity to cope with this public health issue. A systematic review was performed in the main databases, using English, French and Spanish as languages, from 2008 to 2013. Reporting and methodological quality was rated with the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II (AGREE-II) tool, including an inter-rater reliability analysis. Guideline recommendations were extracted and classified into several categories and levels of evidence, aiming to analyse guidelines variability and evidence-based content comprehensiveness. Six guidelines were included. A wide variability was found in both reporting and methodological quality of guidelines, as well as in the content and the level of evidence of their recommendations. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guideline was the best rated using AGREE-II, while the Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica guideline was the worst rated. The Ministry of Health Malaysia guideline was the most comprehensive, and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guideline was the second one. The current guidelines on cancer pain management have limited quality and content. We recommend Ministry of Health Malaysia and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines, whilst Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica guideline still needs to improve. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. The 2014 Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines Companion: A Practical Approach to the Use of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Macle, Laurent; Cairns, John A; Andrade, Jason G; Mitchell, L Brent; Nattel, Stanley; Verma, Atul

    2015-10-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines Program has generated a comprehensive series of documents regarding the management of atrial fibrillation (AF) between 2010 and 2014. The guidelines provide evidence-based consensus management recommendations in a broad range of areas. These guidelines have proven useful in informing clinical practice, but often lack detail in specifications related to practical application, particularly for areas in which the evidence base is limited or conflicting. Based on feedback from the community, the CCS Atrial Fibrillation Guidelines Committee has identified a number of areas that require clarification to address commonly asked practical questions related to guidelines application. In the present article a number of such questions are presented and suggestions about how they can be answered are suggested. Among the issues considered are: (1) What duration of AF is clinically significant? (2) How are the risk factors in the CCS Algorithm for selecting anticoagulation therapy derived and defined? (3) How is valvular heart disease defined and how do different forms of valve disease affect the choice of anticoagulant therapy for AF patients? (4) How should we quantify renal dysfunction and how does it affect therapeutic choices? The response to these questions and the underlying logic are provided, along with an indication of future research needed where no specific approach can presently be recommended based on the literature.

  16. Health promotion board-ministry of health clinical practice guidelines: treating tobacco use and dependence.

    PubMed

    Chan, K; Chandler, J; Cheong, K; Giam, P E; Kanagalingam, D; Lee, L L; Leong, L L; Ng, Y; Oh, C; Shi, M; Tan, A S L; Tan, C M; Tan, T L; Utravathy, V

    2013-07-01

    The Health Promotion Board (HPB) has updated the clinical practice guidelines on Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence to provide health professionals in Singapore with evidence-based interventions for smoking cessation. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary of key guideline recommendations (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the HPB-MOH Clinical Practice Guidelines on Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Health Promotion Board website: http://www.hpb.gov.sg/cpg-smoking-cessation. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  17. Academy of Medicine-Ministry of Health clinical practice guidelines: attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Fung, Daniel S S; Lim, Choon Guan; Wong, John Chee Meng; Ng, Koon Hock; Cheok, Christopher Cheng Soon; Kiing, Jennifer Sie Hee; Chong, Shang Chee; Lou, June; Daniel, Mary Lourdes; Ong, Desmond; Low, Charity; Aljunied, Sharifah Mariam; Choi, Pui Meng; Mehrotra, Kala; Kee, Carolyn; Leung, Ivy; Yen, Lee Chen; Wong, Geraldine; Lee, Poh Yin; Chin, Bella; Ng, Hwee Chien

    2014-08-01

    The Academy of Medicine (AMS) and the Ministry of Health (MOH) have developed the clinical practice guidelines on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for ADHD. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on ADHD, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html.The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  18. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yee Tang Sonny; Chee, Cynthia Bin Eng; Hsu, Li Yang; Jagadesan, Raghuram; Kaw, Gregory Jon Leng; Kong, Po Marn; Lew, Yii Jen; Lim, Choon Seng; Lim, Ting Ting Jayne; Lu, Kuo Fan Mark; Ooi, Peng Lim; Sng, Li-Hwei; Thoon, Koh Cheng

    2016-03-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) has developed the clinical practice guidelines on Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Tuberculosis to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for tuberculosis. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Tuberculosis, for the information of SMJ readers. The chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  19. Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yee Tang Sonny; Chee, Cynthia Bin Eng; Hsu, Li Yang; Jagadesan, Raghuram; Kaw, Gregory Jon Leng; Kong, Po Marn; Lew, Yii Jen; Lim, Choon Seng; Lim, Ting Ting Jayne; Lu, Kuo Fan Mark; Ooi, Peng Lim; Sng, Li-Hwei; Thoon, Koh Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The Ministry of Health (MOH) has developed the clinical practice guidelines on Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Tuberculosis to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for tuberculosis. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Tuberculosis, for the information of SMJ readers. The chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:26996216

  20. Academy of Medicine-Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Daniel SS; Lim, Choon Guan; Wong, John Chee Meng; Ng, Koon Hock; Cheok, Christopher Cheng Soon; Kiing, Jennifer Sie Hee; Chong, Shang Chee; Lou, June; Daniel, Mary Lourdes; Ong, Desmond; Low, Charity; Aljunied, Sharifah Mariam; Choi, Pui Meng; Mehrotra, Kala; Kee, Carolyn; Leung, Ivy; Yen, Lee Chen; Wong, Geraldine; Lee, Poh Yin; Chin, Bella; Ng, Hwee Chien

    2014-01-01

    The Academy of Medicine (AMS) and the Ministry of Health (MOH) have developed the clinical practice guidelines on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for ADHD. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the MOH clinical practice guidelines on ADHD, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_medical.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:25189301

  1. Medical Physics Practice Guidelines - the AAPM's minimum practice recommendations for medical physicists.

    PubMed

    Mills, Michael D; Chan, Maria F; Prisciandaro, Joann I; Shepard, Jeff; Halvorsen, Per H

    2013-11-04

    The AAPM has long advocated a consistent level of medical physics practice, and has published many recommendations and position statements toward that goal, such as Science Council Task Group reports related to calibration and quality assurance, Education Council and Professional Council Task Group reports related to education, training, and peer review, and Board-approved Position Statements related to the Scope of Practice, physicist qualifications, and other aspects of medical physics practice. Despite these concerted and enduring efforts, the profession does not have clear and concise statements of the acceptable practice guidelines for routine clinical medical physics. As accreditation of clinical practices becomes more common, Medical Physics Practice Guidelines (MPPGs) will be crucial to ensuring a consistent benchmark for accreditation programs. To this end, the AAPM has recently endorsed the development of MPPGs, which may be generated in collaboration with other professional societies. The MPPGs are intended to be freely available to the general public. Accrediting organizations, regulatory agencies, and legislators will be encouraged to reference these MPPGs when defining their respective requirements. MPPGs are intended to provide the medical community with a clear description of the minimum level of medical physics support that the AAPM would consider prudent in clinical practice settings. Support includes, but is not limited to, staffing, equipment, machine access, and training. These MPPGs are not designed to replace extensive Task Group reports or review articles, but rather to describe the recommended minimum level of medical physics support for specific clinical services. This article has described the purpose, scope, and process for the development of MPPGs.

  2. Guidelines in cardiac clinical practice: evaluation of their methodological quality using the AGREE II instrument

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Patel, Vanash; Nijjer, Sukhjinder S; Kirresh, Ali; Darzi, Ara; Chambers, John C; Malik, Iqbal; Kooner, Jaspal S; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2013-01-01

    Although clinical guidelines have an influential role in healthcare practice, their development process and the evidence they cite has been subject to criticism. This study evaluates the quality of guidelines in cardiac clinical practice by examining how they adhere to validated methodological standards in guideline development. A structured review of cardiac clinical practice guidelines published in seven cardiovascular journals between January 2001 and May 2011 was performed. The AGREE II assessment tool was used by two researchers to evaluate guideline quality. A total of 101 guidelines were identified. Assessment of guidelines using AGREE II found methodological quality to be highly variable (median score, 58.70%; range, 45.34–76.40%). ‘Scope and purpose’ (median score, 86.1%) and ‘clarity of development’ (median score, 83.3 %) were the two domains within AGREE II that received the highest scores. Applicability (median score, 20.80%; range, 4.20–54.20%) and editorial independence (median score, 33.30%; range, 0–62.50%) had the lowest scores. There is considerable variability in the quality of cardiac clinical practice guidelines and this has not improved over the last 10 years. Incorporating validated guideline assessment tools, such as AGREE II, may improve the quality of guidelines. PMID:23759888

  3. [The role of atherogenic dyslipidaemia in clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Mantilla-Morató, Teresa; Díaz-Rodríguez, Ángel; Brea-Hernando, Ángel; González-Santos, Pedro; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Pintó, Xavier; Millán Núñez-Cortés, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidaemia is underdiagnosed, undertreated, and under-controlled. The aim of the present study was to assess the positioning of clinical guidelines as regards atherogenic dyslipidaemia. The major clinical guidelines of scientific societies or official agencies issued between January 1, 2012 and March 31, 2015 were collected from the MEDLINE database. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, non-HDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein (apo) B were gathered from the 10 selected guidelines, and it was assessed whether these parameters were considered a cardiovascular risk factor, a therapeutic target, or proposed a pharmacological strategy. American guidelines, except the National Lipid Association (NLA), do not consider HDL cholesterol and triglycerides in cardiovascular prevention. The NLA emphasises the relevance of atherogenic dyslipidaemia. The Canadian guidelines introduced non-HDL cholesterol and ApoB as alternative targets, and proposes non-statin treatment in the presence of low HDL cholesterol and hypertriglyceridaemia. The International Atherosclerosis Society (IAS) and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines promote the importance of non-HDL cholesterol. European, Brazilian and Japanese guidelines highlight HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, but with the limitation that the main evidence comes from sub-analysis of clinical studies. The clinical guidelines analysed do not consider, or unconvincingly address, the importance of atherogenic dyslipidaemia. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. A critical appraisal and comparison of the quality and recommendations of glaucoma clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yvonne; Goldberg, Ivan; Migdal, Clive; Lee, Paul P

    2011-06-01

    To appraise primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) practice guidelines critically and to compare these guidelines' major recommendations. Evaluation of clinical practice guidelines and their development process. Glaucoma fellowship-trained ophthalmologists. The POAG clinical practice guidelines published by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), European Glaucoma Society (EGS), and South East Asia Glaucoma Interest Group (SEAGIG) were evaluated by independent reviewers using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument. Domain scores using the AGREE instrument. Critical appraisal using the AGREE instrument demonstrated that the AAO guidelines scored favorably (>60%) in the domains of scope and purpose, rigor of development, and clarity and presentation, while scoring unfavorably (<60%) in the domains of stakeholder involvement, applicability, and editorial independence. The Terminology and Guidelines for Glaucoma and the Asia Pacific Glaucoma Guidelines respectively developed by EGS and SEAGIG scored favorably in the domains of scope and purpose and clarity and presentation, but scored unfavorably in the domains of stakeholder involvement, applicability, and editorial independence. The major recommendations regarding diagnosis and management of POAG were similar among the 3 guidelines, although the level of detail varied considerably. Although the clinical practice guidelines from the AAO, SEAGIG, and EGS have contributed to developing evidence-based guidelines for glaucoma management, there is variability in the quality of the guideline development process and how it is reported as evaluated by a standardized instrument. The adoption of common standards in developing clinical practice guidelines in ophthalmology should improve their consistency and quality. Proprietary or commercial disclosure may be found after the references. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Appraisal of the Quality of Neurosurgery Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ducis, Katrina; Florman, Jeffrey E; Rughani, Anand I

    2016-06-01

    The rate of neurosurgery guidelines publications was compared over time with all other specialties. Neurosurgical guidelines and quality of supporting evidence were then analyzed and compared by subspecialty. The authors first performed a PubMed search for "Neurosurgery" and "Guidelines." This was then compared against searches performed for each specialty of the American Board of Medical Specialties. The second analysis was an inventory of all neurosurgery guidelines published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Guidelines clearinghouse. All Class I evidence and Level 1 recommendations were compared for different subspecialty topics. When examined from 1970-2010, the rate of increase in publication of neurosurgery guidelines was about one third of all specialties combined (P < 0.0001). However, when only looking at the past 5 years the publication rate of neurosurgery guidelines has converged upon that for all specialties. The second analysis identified 49 published guidelines for assessment. There were 2733 studies cited as supporting evidence, with only 243 of these papers considered the highest class of evidence (8.9%). These papers were used to generate 697 recommendations, of which 170 (24.4%) were considered "Level 1" recommendations. Although initially lagging, the publication of neurosurgical guidelines has recently increased at a rate comparable with that of other specialties. However, the quality of the evidence cited consists of a relatively low number of high-quality studies from which guidelines are created. Wider implications of this must be considered when defining and measuring quality of clinical performance in neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Health care delivery for head-and-neck cancer patients in Alberta: a practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J.R.; Lau, H.; Surgeoner, B.V.; Chua, N.; Dobrovolsky, W.; Dort, J.C.; Kalaydjian, E.; Nesbitt, M.; Scrimger, R.A.; Seikaly, H.; Skarsgard, D.; Webster, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment of head-and-neck cancer is complex and requires the involvement of various health care professionals with a wide range of expertise. We describe the process of developing a practice guideline with recommendations about the organization and delivery of health care services for head-and-neck cancer patients in Alberta. Methods Outcomes of interest included composition of the health care team, qualification requirements for team members, cancer centre and team member volumes, infrastructure needs, and wait times. A search for existing practice guidelines and a systematic review of the literature addressing the organization and delivery of health care services for head-and-neck cancer patients were conducted. The search included the Standards and Guidelines Evidence (sage) directory of cancer guidelines and PubMed. Results One practice guideline was identified for adaptation. Three additional practice guidelines provided supplementary evidence to inform guideline recommendations. Members of the Alberta Provincial Head and Neck Tumour Team (consisting of various health professionals from across the province) provided expert feedback on the adapted recommendations through an online and in-person review process. Selected experts in head-and-neck cancer from outside the province participated in an external online review. SUMMARY The recommendations outlined in this practice guideline are based on existing guidelines that have been modified to fit the Alberta context. Although specific to Alberta, the recommendations lend credence to similar published guidelines and could be considered for use by groups lacking the resources of appointed guideline panels. The recommendations are meant to be a guide rather than a fixed protocol. The implementation of this practice guideline will depend on many factors, including but not limited to availability of trained personnel, adequate funding of infrastructure, and collaboration with other associations of

  7. Physician adherence to ACR gout treatment guidelines: perception versus practice.

    PubMed

    Oderda, Gary M; Shiozawa, Aki; Walsh, Michael; Hess, Kyle; Brixner, Diana I; Feehan, Michael; Akhras, Kasem

    2014-05-01

    In October 2012, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) published recommendations for chronic gout treatment goals and pharmacotherapy. Identify potential gaps between real-world chronic gout treatment, ACR guideline recommendations, and physicians' perceived guideline adherence by evaluating records of patients classified as having "higher" and "lower" guideline adherence as defined by the investigators. A comprehensive quantitative survey was administered between February 11 and February 22, 2013, to physicians treating patients with gout; the survey included a patient record chart review informed by prior qualitative interviews. Eight criteria from the ACR gout management guidelines were used to compose the survey. To assess ACR guideline adherence, information from records of patients with chronic gout treated by primary care physicians (PCPs) and rheumatologists was scored from 0 (no adherence) to 8 (total adherence), in accordance with ACR guideline recommendations. Physicians also indicated how closely they believed patient treatment followed current guidelines on a 10-point scale. Of the 350 records of patients with chronic gout, all but 3 PCP patients were adherent on ≥ 1 guideline recommendation, but nearly all patients could be considered nonadherent, considering all potential recommendations. Patients with chronic gout treated by rheumatologists tended to be managed more closely to ACR guidelines than patients treated by PCPs (mean scores: rheumatologists 5.8/8 ± 1.7 vs 4.3/8 ± 1.7 for PCPs). Among patients classified as having "higher adherence" based on adherence scores, there was low adherence on first-line urate lowering therapy dose, acute prophylaxis dosing, and length of prophylaxis treatment. Among PCPs and rheumatologists, there was a disparity between how closely physicians believed patient treatment followed guidelines and actual adherence with ACR guidelines based on adherence scores. For 16.4% of patients treated by PCPs and 18

  8. [Practice guideline on extremely premature birth: too little room for parents to decide].

    PubMed

    van Delden, J J M Hans

    2010-01-01

    The new practice guideline on the treatment of extremely premature infants is discussed. The guideline advises to actively treat all children born after 24 0/7 weeks of gestation. Although there is some evidence supporting this view, it is argued that the guideline is incomplete as decisions about the treatment of such newborn infants can only be made after discussion with the parents. The guideline should also have taken into account the ethical and legal aspects of the issue. It is therefore concluded that the guideline itself is immature and premature.

  9. Clinical practice guidelines: barriers to durability after effective early implementation.

    PubMed

    Brand, C; Landgren, F; Hutchinson, A; Jones, C; Macgregor, L; Campbell, D

    2005-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines in general (General-CPG) may reduce variation in clinician performance and improve patient outcomes. Short-term evaluation is now routine, but demonstration of early successful implementation does not necessarily ensure longer-term effectiveness. To assess adherence to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-CPG recommendations at the Royal Melbourne Hospital (RMH), 2 years after successful implementation. To identify barriers to sustained success of General-CPG. A multi-faceted evaluation was performed to document: (i) current adherence to COPD management recommendations (medical record audit); (ii) awareness of attitudes towards and barriers for the use of COPD-CPG and General-CPG (staff survey, focus groups and key informant interviews) and (iii) access to and quality of available General-CPG (internet review and random sample General-CPG evaluation. Adherence to COPD-CPG recommendations was highly variable. Adherence was higher in the Emergency Department than the general wards and for specific therapeutic recommendations. It was lower for non-pharmacological therapy and for recommendations relating to processes of care. Most health professionals were in favour of General-CPG. Barriers to use of General-CPG were in keeping with previous literature reports. Organizational issues including high levels of staff turnover and lack of integration of General-CPG into hospital quality frameworks were highlighted as major barriers. Hospital intranet access and presentation of General-CPG identified lack of consistency in terminology and presentation. Short-term effectiveness of COPD-CPG implementation did not ensure sustained success. Departmental organizational behaviours and organizational system barriers are major factors influencing durability.

  10. Sex and gender considerations in Canadian clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Clow, Barbara; Haworth-Brockman, Margaret; Voss, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Background: The importance of sex and gender in the diagnosis and management of health conditions is well established, but the extent to which this evidence is integrated into clinical practice guidelines remains unknown. We aimed to determine the proportion of Canadian clinical practice guidelines that integrate evidence on sex and gender considerations. Methods: We searched the Canadian Medical Association's CPG Infobase, PubMed, all provincial/territorial websites and websites of professional organizations for English- and French-language Canadian clinical practice guidelines published between January 2013 and June 2015 on selected conditions identified as priorities by policy-makers and practitioners. Citations and text were searched electronically using keyword terms related to sex and gender. Three investigators independently analyzed and categorized the content of text-positive clinical practice guidelines based on clinical relevance for practitioners. Results: Of the 118 clinical practice guidelines that met the inclusion criteria, 79 (66.9%) were text-positive for sex and/or gender keywords; 8 (10%) of the 79 used the keywords only in relation to pregnancy. Of the remaining 71 guidelines, 25 (35%) contained sex-related diagnostic or management recommendations. An additional 5 (7%) contained recommendations for sex-specific laboratory reference values, 29 (41%) referred to differences in epidemiologic features or risk factors only, and 12 (17%) contained nonrelevant mentions of search keywords. Twenty-five (35%) of the text-positive guidelines used the terms "sex" and/or "gender" correctly. Interpretation: Recommendations related to sex and gender are inconsistently reported in Canadian clinical practice guidelines. Guidelines such as the Sex and Gender Equity in Research guidelines may help inform the meaningful inclusion of sex and gender evidence in the development of clinical practice guidelines. PMID:28401121

  11. Acoustic and perceptual parameters relating to connected speech are more reliable measures of hoarseness than parameters relating to sustained vowels.

    PubMed

    Halberstam, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    This report investigates the correlations between acoustic parameters and the perception of hoarseness by trained listeners. Both sustained vowels and connected speech were examined. Fourteen acoustic parameters from samples of sustained vowels and 2 from connected speech were measured. The results show that jitter, shimmer and cepstral peak prominence (CPP) are correlated with the perception of hoarseness in sustained vowels. CPP is strongly correlated with the perception of hoarseness in connected speech. Some evidence is seen that perception of hoarseness in connected speech is more valid than the perception of hoarseness in sustained vowels. It is concluded that CPP for connected speech is a more valid objective measure of hoarseness than jitter, shimmer or CPP for sustained vowels and that perception of hoarseness may be most accurate in connected speech, rather than isolated vowels. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. Best practice guidelines for stroke in Cameroon: An innovative and participatory knowledge translation project.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Lynn; Fanfon, Timothy N; Bramall, Alexa; Ngole, Eta M; Kuwoh, Pius; Anjonga, Emmanuel; Difang, Brenda M E; Kiani, Shirin; Muso, Petra S; Trivedi, Navjyot; Sama, Julius; Teboh, Sylvian

    2014-01-01

    Although the adherence to stroke guidelines in high-income countries has been shown to be associated with improved patient outcomes, the research, development and implementation of rehabilitation related guidelines in African countries is lacking. The purpose of this article is to describe how a group of front-line practitioners collaborated with academics and students to develop best practice guidelines (BPG) for the management and rehabilitation of stroke in adult patients in Cameroon. A working group was established and adapted internationally recognised processes for the development of best practice guidelines. The group determined the scope of the guidelines, documented current practices, and critically appraised evidence to develop guidelines relevant to the Cameroon context. The primary result of this project is best practice guidelines which provided an overview of the provision of stroke rehabilitation services in the region, and made 83 practice recommendations to improve these services. We also report on the successes and challenges encountered during the process, and the working group's recommendations aimed at encouraging others to consider similar projects. This project demonstrated that there is interest and capacity for improving stroke rehabilitation practices and for stroke guideline development in Africa.

  13. Best practice guidelines on publishing ethics: a publisher's perspective, 2nd edition.

    PubMed

    Graf, Chris; Deakin, Lisa; Docking, Martine; Jones, Jackie; Joshua, Sue; McKerahan, Tiffany; Ottmar, Martin; Stevens, Allen; Wates, Edward; Wyatt, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Wiley has updated its publishing ethics guidelines, first published in 2006. The new guidelines provide guidance, resources, and practical advice on ethical concerns that arise in academic publishing for editors, authors, and researchers, among other audiences. New guidance is also included on whistle blowers, animal research, clinical research, and clinical trial registration, addressing cultural differences, human rights, and confidentiality. The guidelines are uniquely interdisciplinary and were reviewed by 24 editors and experts chosen from the wide range of communities that Wiley serves. The new guidelines are also published in Advanced Materials, Headache, International Journal of Clinical Practice, Social Science Quarterly, and on the website http://exchanges.wiley.com/ethicsguidelines.

  14. Methodology for lung cancer evidence review and guideline development: ACCP evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (2nd Edition).

    PubMed

    McCrory, Douglas C; Lewis, Sandra Zelman; Heitzer, Julia; Colice, Gene; Alberts, W Michael

    2007-09-01

    To assemble a geographically diverse panel of experts in the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer, representative of multiple clinical specialties, with the intention of developing clinically relevant practice guidelines for chest medicine and primary care physicians, including recommendations covering the full spectrum of care of the patient with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The Duke University Center for Clinical Health Policy Research was selected to review and summarize the current evidence in the treatment of NSCLC. The BlueCross BlueShield Association Technology Evaluation Center was chosen and funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to review and synthesize the current evidence on treatment of SCLC. Other chapters received existing guidelines, systematic reviews, and metaanalyses that were published since the first edition of these guidelines, as collected by the Duke University Evidence-based Practice Center. The writing committees for these chapters conducted searches for the primary articles and additional evidence in their topic area. The expert panel established clinical recommendations founded on the synthesis of this evidence. This section describes the approach used to develop the guidelines, including identifying, evaluating, and synthesizing the evidence, assessing the strength of evidence and grading the individual recommendations, and suggestions for implementation of the guidelines.

  15. Adherence To Diabetes Mellitus Treatment Guidelines From Theory To Practice: The Missing Link.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Noreen Rahat; Khan, Shahzad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex multisystem disease that requires high quality care. Clinical practice guidelines help physicians and patients make the best possible health care decisions and improve health care management of diabetic patients. These guidelines provide the norms for clinical management as well as monitoring of diabetes care. They are not simple algorithms but are based on structured evidence based diabetic management protocols developed from randomized controlled trials. Despite the widespread availability of this diabetic guideline, their use is suboptimal at best. There are several factors blamed for contributing to this missing link from available theoretical guideline recommendations to practical applications of these guidelines. We present a brief review based on available literature review for an ongoing interventional study being done by authors in two tertiary care hospital in Lahore Pakistan for improving adherence to diabetes guidelines. We will discuss guideline implementation cycle and also present a framework encompassing various factors involved in adherence to guidelines. Until recently the emphasis to improve the guideline adherence targeted the factors relating to individual health care professionals in reference to their knowledge, attitude practice of the guidelines. However, we will discuss that broader range of health care systems, organizational factors, and factors relating to patients which may also significantly impact the adherence to the guidelines. The framework emphasises that it is important to understand the factors that act as barriers and contribute to the missing link between theory and practice of diabetic guidelines. This will help plan appropriate strategies in the pre-implementation stage for effective and improved diabetes guidelines adherence and management.

  16. [Clinical Practice Guidelines for Management of Schizophrenia: Evaluation Using AGREE II].

    PubMed

    de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Ávila, Mauricio J; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; García Valencia, Jenny; Arenas Borrero, Álvaro Enrique; Vélez Traslaviña, Ángela; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Colombia is developing multiple national practice guidelines from a range of diseases. Clinical practice guidelines represent a very useful tool to be able to take decision over a patient care that is widely available for the clinician. In psychiatry there are a good number of international clinical guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia nevertheless there is no article that evaluate them scientifically In the settings of developing a Colombian schizophrenia practice guideline, a systematic search was performed in multiple databases and the results were then evaluated by two trained persons. We present the results globally and by domains. We found 164 matches for possible guidelines. After screening 7 guidelines were evaluated with the AGREE II instrument. Globally and by the different domains, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) was the guideline that got the best score. From the guidelines that were reviewed, 4 were from Europe and only 2 were from Latin America. None of the guidelines used GRADE methodology for the recommendations. The diversity of the schizophrenia treatment guidelines does not allow an easy adoption of the recommendation by a psychiatrist in Colombia. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. [Experience of the Mexican National Health System in the development of clinical practice guidelines].

    PubMed

    Sosa-García, Jesús Ojino; Nieves-Hernández, Pedro; Puentes-Rosas, Esteban; Pineda-Pérez, Dayana; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Torres-Arreola, Laura del Pilar; Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Barragán-Padilla, Sergio Baltazar; Díaz-González, Ruth; Chávez-Valdez, Lizbeth; Ramírez-López, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are tools that have been able to streamline decisions made in health issues and to decrease the gap between clinical action and scientific evidence. The objective of the study is to share the experience in the development and to update the guidelines by the National Health System of Mexico. The methodology in the development of the guidelines consists of 5 phases: prioritisation, establishment of work groups, development by adoption of international guidelines of de novo, validation and integration in the Master catalogue of clinical practice guidelines for its dissemination. The Master catalogue of clinical practice guidelines contains 664 guidelines, distributed in 42% Internal Medicine, 22% Surgery, 24% Pediatrics and 12% Gynecology. From the total of guidelines coverage is granted at an 85% of the Universal catalogue of health services, an 84% of the Catastrophic expenses protection fund and a 61% of the XXI Century Medical Insurance of the National Commission of Social Protection in Health. The result is the sum of a great effort of coordination and cooperation between the institutions of the National Health System, political wills and a commitment of 3,477 health professionals that participate in guidelines' development and update. Master catalogue guidelines' integration, diffusion and implantation improve quality of attention and security of the users of the National Health System. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Exercise for people with cancer: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Segal, R.; Zwaal, C.; Green, E.; Tomasone, J.R.; Loblaw, A.; Petrella, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background Development of this guideline was undertaken by the Exercise for People with Cancer Guideline Development Group, a group organized by Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care (pebc). The purpose of the guideline was to provide guidance for clinicians with respect to exercise for patients living with cancer, focusing on the benefits of specific types of exercise, recommendations about screening requirements for new referrals, and safety concerns. Methods Consistent with the pebc’s standardized approach, a systematic search was conducted for existing guidelines, and systematic literature searches were performed in medline and embase for both systematic reviews and primary literature. Content and methodology experts performed an internal review, which was followed by an external review by targeted experts and intended users. Results The search identified three guidelines, eighteen systematic reviews, and twenty-nine randomized controlled trials with relevance to the topic. The present guideline provides recommendations for the duration, frequency, and intensity of exercise appropriate for people living with cancer. It also provides recommendations for pre-exercise assessment, safety concerns, and delivery models. Conclusions There is sufficient evidence to show that exercise provides benefits in quality of life and muscular and aerobic fitness for people with cancer both during and after treatment, and that it does not cause harm. The present guideline is intended to support the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology’s Canadian physical activity guidelines. The recommendations are intended for clinicians and institutions treating cancer patients in Ontario, and for policymakers and program planners involved in the delivery of exercise programs for cancer patients. PMID:28270724

  19. GuideLine Interchange Format (GLIP): Extensions and Practical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    these guidelines is expected to reduce costs of medical care while improving patient outcomes . 2 - 3 The evidence-based medicine work-group published...Preliminary data on about 400 patients show that the guideline application improves outcomes and decreases costs . Acknowledgements: Our research on...systematically into the authoring process. Use of Electronic Patient Record and statistical analysis and data mining techniques will facilitate the discovery

  20. Building Chronic Kidney Disease Clinical Practice Guidelines Using the openEHR Guideline Definition Language.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Heng; Lo, Ying-Chih; Hung, Pei-Yuan; Liou, Der-Ming

    2016-12-07

    As a result of the disease's high prevalence, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. A clinical decision support system that integrates with computer-interpretable guidelines (CIGs) should improve clinical outcomes and help to ensure patient safety. The openEHR guideline definition language (GDL) is a formal language used to represent CIGs. This study explores the feasibility of using a GDL approach for CKD; it also attempts to identify any potential gaps between the ideal concept and reality. Using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) anemia guideline as material, we designed a development workflow in order to establish a series of GDL guidelines. Focus group discussions were conducted in order to identify important issues related to GDL implementation. Ten GDL guidelines and 37 archetypes were established using the KDIGO guideline document. For the focus group discussions, 16 clinicians and 22 IT experts were recruited and their perceptions, opinions and attitudes towards the GDL approach were explored. Both groups provided positive feedback regarding the GDL approach, but raised various concerns about GDL implementation. Based on the findings of this study, we identified some potential gaps that might exist during implementation between the GDL concept and reality. Three directions remain to be investigated in the future. Two of them are related to the openEHR GDL approach. Firstly, there is a need for the editing tool to be made more sophisticated. Secondly, there needs to be integration of the present approach into non openEHR-based hospital information systems. The last direction focuses on the applicability of guidelines and involves developing a method to resolve any conflicts that occur with insurance payment regulations.

  1. Do clinical practice guidelines define good medical care? The need for good science and the disclosure of uncertainty when defining 'best practices'.

    PubMed

    Woolf, S H

    1998-03-01

    Practice guidelines, although important in promoting quality, can also be harmful if they do not advocate the best options for patients. The latter can occur because of uncertainties in scientific evidence, biases in guideline development, and patient heterogeneity. Guidelines must therefore accurately describe the quality of the evidence and the degree of uncertainty that underlie recommendations. Proper methods for developing practice guidelines are reviewed.

  2. Singapore Armed Forces Medical Corps-Ministry of Health clinical practice guidelines: management of heat injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, L; Fock, K M; Lim, C L F; Ong, E H M; Poon, B H; Pwee, K H; O'Muircheartaigh, C R; Seet, B; Tan, C L B; Teoh, C S

    2010-10-01

    The Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) Medical Corps and the Ministry of Health (MOH) have published clinical practice guidelines on Management of Heat Injury to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based guidance on the prevention and clinical management of exertional heat injuries. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the SAF Medical Corps-MOH clinical practice guidelines on Management of Heat Injury, for the information of readers of the Singapore Medical Journal. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/mohcorp/publications.aspx?id=25178. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  3. Arytenoid Dislocation as a Cause of Prolonged Hoarseness after Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Goz, Vadim; Qureshi, Sheeraz; Hecht, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Case series of two arytenoid dislocations after anterior cervical discectomy. Objective To recognize arytenoid dislocation as a possible cause of prolonged hoarseness in patients after anterior cervical discectomies. Summary of Background Data Prolonged hoarseness is a common postoperative complication after anterior cervical spine surgery. The etiology of prolonged postoperative hoarseness is usually related to a paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. However, other causes of postoperative hoarseness may be overlooked in this clinical scenario. Other possible etiologies include pharyngeal and laryngeal trauma, hematoma and edema, injury of the superior laryngeal nerve, as well as arytenoid cartilage dislocation. Arytenoid dislocation is often misdiagnosed as vocal fold paresis due to recurrent or laryngeal nerve injury. Methods We report two cases of arytenoid dislocation and review the literature on this pathology. Results Two patients treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion experienced prolonged postoperative hoarseness. Arytenoid dislocation was confirmed by flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy in both cases. The dislocations experienced spontaneous reduction at 6 weeks and 3 months postsurgery. Conclusions Arytenoid dislocation must be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged postoperative hoarseness and evaluated for using direct laryngoscopy, computed tomography, or a laryngeal electromyography. Upon diagnosis, treatment must be considered immediately. Slight dislocations can reduce spontaneously without surgical intervention; however, operative intervention may be required at times. PMID:24436851

  4. Arytenoid dislocation as a cause of prolonged hoarseness after cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Goz, Vadim; Qureshi, Sheeraz; Hecht, Andrew C

    2013-03-01

    Study Design Case series of two arytenoid dislocations after anterior cervical discectomy. Objective To recognize arytenoid dislocation as a possible cause of prolonged hoarseness in patients after anterior cervical discectomies. Summary of Background Data Prolonged hoarseness is a common postoperative complication after anterior cervical spine surgery. The etiology of prolonged postoperative hoarseness is usually related to a paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. However, other causes of postoperative hoarseness may be overlooked in this clinical scenario. Other possible etiologies include pharyngeal and laryngeal trauma, hematoma and edema, injury of the superior laryngeal nerve, as well as arytenoid cartilage dislocation. Arytenoid dislocation is often misdiagnosed as vocal fold paresis due to recurrent or laryngeal nerve injury. Methods We report two cases of arytenoid dislocation and review the literature on this pathology. Results Two patients treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion experienced prolonged postoperative hoarseness. Arytenoid dislocation was confirmed by flexible fiber-optic laryngoscopy in both cases. The dislocations experienced spontaneous reduction at 6 weeks and 3 months postsurgery. Conclusions Arytenoid dislocation must be considered in the differential diagnosis of prolonged postoperative hoarseness and evaluated for using direct laryngoscopy, computed tomography, or a laryngeal electromyography. Upon diagnosis, treatment must be considered immediately. Slight dislocations can reduce spontaneously without surgical intervention; however, operative intervention may be required at times.

  5. [Clinical practice guidelines: juridical and medico legal issues in health care malpractice liability].

    PubMed

    Moreschi, Carlo; Broi, Ugo Da

    2014-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines are clinical tools addressed to medical and health professionals and are normally employed to improve quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutical procedures but may sometimes limit the autonomy of medical and other health care professionals. The adherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines should not be an exclusive step to evaluate the liability and respect of standards of care in case of medico-legal investigations being each clinical case very specific. Medical liability and respect of standards of care should be evaluated with the support of Clinical Practice Guidelines and the extensive examination of all specific features, professional background and experience requested to treat each single patient.

  6. Assembly and evaluation of an inventory of guidelines that are available to support clinical hematology laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; George, T I; Proytcheva, M

    2015-05-01

    Practice guidelines provide helpful support for clinical laboratories. Our goal was to assemble an inventory of publically listed guidelines on hematology laboratory topics, to create a resource for laboratories and for assessing gaps in practice-focused guidelines. PubMed and website searches were conducted to assemble an inventory of hematology laboratory-focused guidelines. Exclusions included annual, technical, or collaborative study reports, clinically focused guidelines, position papers, nomenclature, and calibration documents. Sixty-eight guidelines were identified on hematology laboratory practice topics from 12 organizations, some as joint guidelines. The median year of publication was 2010 and 15% were >10 years old. Coagulation topics had the largest numbers of guidelines, whereas some areas of practice had few guidelines. A minority of guidelines showed evidence of periodic updates, as some organizations did not remove or identify outdated guidelines. This inventory of current practice guidelines will encourage awareness and uptake of guideline recommendations by the worldwide hematology laboratory community, with the International Society for Laboratory Hematology facilitating ongoing updates. There is a need to encourage best guideline development practices, to ensure that hematology laboratory community has current, high-quality, and evidence-based practice guidelines that cover the full scope of hematology laboratory practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Best practices for mental health in child welfare: parent support and youth empowerment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Lisa Hunter; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Kaplan, Sandra J; Kemp, Susan P; Hartman, Robert L; Trupin, Casey; Soto, Wilfredo; Pecora, Peter J; LaBarrie, Theressa L; Jensen, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    This paper, the second in a series of two guideline papers emerging from the 2007 Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference, provides an overview of the key issues related to parent support and youth empowerment in child welfare and presents consensus guidelines in these important areas. The paper also discusses some of the implications these guidelines have for the child welfare field.

  8. Best practices for mental health in child welfare: screening, assessment, and treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Lisa Hunter; Landsverk, John; Levitt, Jessica Mass; Leslie, Laurel K; Hurley, Maia M; Bellonci, Christopher; Gries, Leonard T; Pecora, Peter J; Jensen, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    The Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference focused on developing guidelines in five key areas (screening and assessment, psychosocial interventions, psychopharmacologic treatment, parent engagement, and youth empowerment) related to children's mental health. This paper provides an overview of issues related to the first three areas, presents the guidelines developed in these areas, and discusses the implications these guidelines have for the field of child welfare.

  9. Applying Clinical Practice Guidelines to the Complex Patient: Insights for Practice and Policy from Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michelle L A; Grudniewicz, Agnes; Albadry, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In Canada, policy makers are working to align services with the Stroke Rehabilitation Best Practice Recommendations (SRBPR). Complicating the application of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is the fact that most strokes occur in the context of other diagnoses. We sought to understand clinicians' use of the CPGs and ascertain how much guidance regarding multimorbidity was available in the SRBPR. Study results indicated that using the recommendations was problematic due to a perceived lack of guidance regarding comorbidities and multimorbidity, and concerns regarding the applicability to "real-life patients." Comorbidities were mentioned in less than half of the recommendations, but no explicit guidance was provided regarding the management of comorbidities. Given the prevalence of multimorbidity in stroke rehabilitation, this clinical context is ideal for development and testing of CPGs that account for multimorbidity and other complexity factors. Results may also suggest limitations to using CPGs in the development of activity-based funding models.

  10. Management of venous leg ulcers in general practice - a practical guideline.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sankar; Sreedharan, Sadhishaan

    2014-09-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers are the most common wounds seen in general practice. Their management can be both challenging and time-consuming. To produce a short practical guideline incorporating the TIME concept and A2BC2D approach to help general practitioners and their practice nurses in delivering evidence-based initial care to patients with chronic venous leg ulcers. Most chronic venous leg ulcers can be managed effectively in the general practice setting by following the simple, evidence-based approach described in this article. Figure 1 provides a flow chart to aid in this process. Figure 2 illustrates the principles of management in general practice. Effective management of chronic ulcers involves the assessment of both the ulcer and the patient. The essential requirements of management are to debride the ulcer with appropriate precautions, choose dressings that maintain adequate moisture balance, apply graduated compression bandage after evaluation of the arterial circulation and address the patient's concerns, such as pain and offensive wound discharge.

  11. Influence of Institutional Guidelines on Oral Hygiene Practices in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Kiyoshi-Teo, Hiroko; Blegen, Mary

    2015-07-01

    Maintaining oral hygiene is a key component of preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia; however, practices are inconsistent. To explore how characteristics of institutional guidelines for oral hygiene influence nurses' oral hygiene practices and perceptions of that practice. Oral hygiene section of a larger survey study on prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Critical care nurses at 8 hospitals in Northern California that had more than 1000 ventilator days in 2009 were recruited to participate in the survey. Twenty-one questions addressed oral hygiene practices and practice perceptions. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and Spearman correlations were used for analyses. A total of 576 critical care nurses (45% response rate) responded to the survey. Three types of institutional oral hygiene guidelines existed: nursing policy, order set, and information bulletin. Nursing policy provided the most detail about the oral hygiene care; however, adherence, awareness, and priority level were higher with order sets (P < .05). The content and method of disseminating these guidelines varied, and nursing practices were affected by these differences. Nurses assessed the oral cavity and used oral swabs more often when those practices were included in institutional guidelines. The content and dissemination method of institutional guidelines on oral hygiene do influence the oral hygiene practices of critical care nurses. Future studies examining how institutional guidelines could best be incorporated into routine workflow are needed. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  12. Adherence to COPD management guidelines in general practice? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sehl, J; O'Doherty, J; O'Connor, R; O'Sullivan, B; O'Regan, A

    2017-07-22

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive illness that is mostly managed in the general practice setting. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines are the international gold standard, and it is important to understand how these are being applied in general practice. This review aimed to assess the current level of adherence to international best practice guidelines among general practitioners in relation to COPD. PubMed and EMBASE searches (from 2012 to 2016) were performed and used the search terms guidelines, COPD, general practitioners, and primary care. Papers were excluded if they were not primary sources, were published before 2012, or did not pertain to a general practice setting. After applying set inclusion and exclusion criteria, 11 studies were retrieved. These papers were grouped under three categories: diagnosis, pharmacological, and non-pharmacological management, based on the GOLD guidelines. Current studies show significant variability in adherence to the GOLD guidelines. Barriers identified include lack of clarity, unfamiliarity with recommendations, and lack of familiarity with the guidelines. If general practice is expected to manage COPD and other chronic diseases, health service investment is needed to provide appropriate focused guidelines, to support their dissemination and resources to implement them in practice.

  13. The updating of clinical practice guidelines: insights from an international survey.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Martínez García, Laura; Carrasco, José Miguel; Solà, Ivan; Qureshi, Safia; Burgers, Jako S

    2011-09-13

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have become increasingly popular, and the methodology to develop guidelines has evolved enormously. However, little attention has been given to the updating process, in contrast to the appraisal of the available literature. We conducted an international survey to identify current practices in CPG updating and explored the need to standardize and improve the methods. We developed a questionnaire (28 items) based on a review of the existing literature about guideline updating and expert comments. We carried out the survey between March and July 2009, and it was sent by email to 106 institutions: 69 members of the Guidelines International Network who declared that they developed CPGs; 30 institutions included in the U.S. National Guideline Clearinghouse database that published more than 20 CPGs; and 7 institutions selected by an expert committee. Forty-four institutions answered the questionnaire (42% response rate). In the final analysis, 39 completed questionnaires were included. Thirty-six institutions (92%) reported that they update their guidelines. Thirty-one institutions (86%) have a formal procedure for updating their guidelines, and 19 (53%) have a formal procedure for deciding when a guideline becomes out of date. Institutions describe the process as moderately rigorous (36%) or acknowledge that it could certainly be more rigorous (36%). Twenty-two institutions (61%) alert guideline users on their website when a guideline is older than three to five years or when there is a risk of being outdated. Twenty-five institutions (64%) support the concept of "living guidelines," which are continuously monitored and updated. Eighteen institutions (46%) have plans to design a protocol to improve their guideline-updating process, and 21 (54%) are willing to share resources with other organizations. Our study is the first to describe the process of updating CPGs among prominent guideline institutions across the world, providing a

  14. Syncope Best Practices: A Syncope Clinical Practice Guideline to Improve Quality.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Heather M; Sachdeva, Ritu; Mahle, William T; McCracken, Courtney E; Kelleman, Michael; McConnell, Michael; Fischbach, Peter S; Cardis, Brian M; Campbell, Robert M; Oster, Matthew E

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether implementation of a standardized clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the evaluation of syncope would decrease practice variability and resource utilization. A retrospective review of medical records of patients presenting to our practice for outpatient evaluation of syncope before and after implementation of the CPG. The guideline included elements of history, physical exam, electrocardiogram, and "red flags" for further testing. Outpatient pediatric cardiology offices of a large pediatric cardiology practice. All new patients between 3 and 21 years old, who presented to cardiology clinic with a chief complaint of syncope. The CPG for the evaluation of pediatric syncope was presented to the providers. Resource utilization was determined by the tests ordered by individual physicians before and after initiation of the CPG. Patient final diagnoses were recorded and the medical records were subsequently reviewed to determine if any patients, who presented again to the system, were ultimately diagnosed with cardiac disease. Of the 1496 patients with an initial visit for syncope, there was no significant difference in the diagnosis of cardiac disease before or after initiation of the CPG: (0.6% vs. 0.4%, P = .55). Electrocardiography provides the highest yield in the evaluation of pediatric syncope. Despite high compliance (86.9%), there were no overall changes in costs ($346.31 vs. $348.53, P = .85) or in resource utilization. There was, however, a decrease in the variability of ordering of echocardiograms among physicians, particularly among those at the extremes of utilization. Although the CPG did not decrease already low costs, it did decrease the wide variability in echo utilization. Evaluation beyond detailed history, physical exam, and electrocardiography provides no additional benefit in the evaluations of pediatric patients presenting with syncope. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Home mechanical ventilation: a Canadian Thoracic Society clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    McKim, Douglas A; Road, Jeremy; Avendano, Monica; Abdool, Steve; Cote, Fabien; Duguid, Nigel; Fraser, Janet; Maltais, Fracois; Morrison, Debra L; O'Connell, Colleen; Petrof, Basil J; Rimmer, Karen; Skomro, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are surviving episodes of prolonged mechanical ventilation or benefitting from the recent availability of userfriendly noninvasive ventilators. Although many publications pertaining to specific aspects of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) exist, very few comprehensive guidelines that bring together all of the current literature on patients at risk for or using mechanical ventilatory support are available. The Canadian Thoracic Society HMV Guideline Committee has reviewed the available English literature on topics related to HMV in adults, and completed a detailed guideline that will help standardize and improve the assessment and management of individuals requiring noninvasive or invasive HMV. The guideline provides a disease-specific review of illnesses including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord injury, muscular dystrophies, myotonic dystrophy, kyphoscoliosis, post-polio syndrome, central hypoventilation syndrome, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as important common themes such as airway clearance and the process of transition to home. The guidelines have been extensively reviewed by international experts, allied health professionals and target audiences. They will be updated on a regular basis to incorporate any new information.

  16. Advancing Clinical Practice and Policy through Guidelines. The Role of the American Thoracic Society

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    In the face of an overwhelmingly large and growing medical literature, providers often turn to clinical practice guidelines to inform the decisions they make with patients. By systematically appraising the evidence and providing transparent recommendations for practice, guidelines have the potential to improve both bedside decision-making and health policy. This potential has not been fully realized because most guidelines lack transparency, are tainted by conflicts of interest, or fail to employ rigorous methods to appraise the evidence. To address the shortcomings of past guidelines, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published recommendations for trustworthy guidelines, effectively setting the “gold standard” for what constitutes a high-quality guideline. Along with many other groups that develop guidelines, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) is rapidly evolving processes for development and implementation to meet many of the IOM standards. This Pulmonary Perspective describes the rapidly changing landscape of clinical practice guidelines, the role of the ATS in this landscape, and the activities the ATS is engaged in to ensure that the guidelines it produces are of the highest quality with the broadest impact. PMID:23392437

  17. Benchmarking of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis practice with ENT.UK guidelines.

    PubMed

    Al-Qahtani, Ali S

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to benchmark our guidelines of prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in ENT surgical population against ENT.UK guidelines, and also to encourage healthcare providers to utilize benchmarking as an effective method of improving performance. The study design is prospective descriptive analysis. The setting of this study is tertiary referral centre (Assir Central Hospital, Abha, Saudi Arabia). In this study, we are benchmarking our practice guidelines of the prevention of VTE in the ENT surgical population against that of ENT.UK guidelines to mitigate any gaps. ENT guidelines 2010 were downloaded from the ENT.UK Website. Our guidelines were compared with the possibilities that either our performance meets or fall short of ENT.UK guidelines. Immediate corrective actions will take place if there is quality chasm between the two guidelines. ENT.UK guidelines are evidence-based and updated which may serve as role-model for adoption and benchmarking. Our guidelines were accordingly amended to contain all factors required in providing a quality service to ENT surgical patients. While not given appropriate attention, benchmarking is a useful tool in improving quality of health care. It allows learning from others' practices and experiences, and works towards closing any quality gaps. In addition, benchmarking clinical outcomes is critical for quality improvement and informing decisions concerning service provision. It is recommended to be included on the list of quality improvement methods of healthcare services.

  18. [Interpretation of Clinical Practice Guideline for Low Back Pain Treated with Acupuncture and Moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong; Liu, Zhishun; Xie, Limin; Zhu, Yuan; Li, Sinuo

    2015-10-01

    Based on entire literature retrieval about low back pain treated with acupuncture and moxibustion, Clinical Practice Guideline for Low Back Pain Treated with Acupuncture and Moxibustion was drafted according to method of evidence quality and recommended intensity grading system(GRADE). This article specificly introduces the aim and available diseases of the guideline. The principle and recommended plans are also detailedly explained.

  19. The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines: Overview and Implications for Nursing Practice.

    PubMed

    Rouen, Patricia A; Wallace, Brenna R

    2017-02-01

    This article reviews the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans released in 2016. Key recommendations are summarized and significant changes in the guidelines are highlighted. Implications for nursing practice to promote nutrition health are identified and resources to support implementation are included.

  20. Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare: Parent Support and Youth Empowerment Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanelli, Lisa Hunter; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Kaplan, Sandra J.; Kemp, Susan P.; Hartman, Robert L.; Trupin, Casey; Soto, Wilfredo; Pecora, Peter J.; LaBarrie, Theresa L.; Jensen, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper, the second in a series of two guideline papers emerging from the 2007 Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference, provides an overview of the key issues related to parent support and youth empowerment in child welfare and presents consensus guidelines in these important areas. The paper also discusses some…

  1. Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare: Parent Support and Youth Empowerment Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanelli, Lisa Hunter; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Kaplan, Sandra J.; Kemp, Susan P.; Hartman, Robert L.; Trupin, Casey; Soto, Wilfredo; Pecora, Peter J.; LaBarrie, Theresa L.; Jensen, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper, the second in a series of two guideline papers emerging from the 2007 Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference, provides an overview of the key issues related to parent support and youth empowerment in child welfare and presents consensus guidelines in these important areas. The paper also discusses some…

  2. [Induced abortion: Guidelines for clinical practice - Text of the Guidelines (short text)].

    PubMed

    Vayssière, C; Gaudineau, A; Attali, L; Bettahar, K; Eyraud, S; Faucher, P; Fournet, P; Hassoun, D; Hatchuel, M; Jamin, C; Letombe, B; Linet, T; Msika Razon, M; Ohanessian, A; Segain, H; Vigoureux, S; Winer, N; Wylomanski, S; Agostini, A

    2016-12-01

    Develop recommendations for the practice of induced abortion. The Pubmed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the French and foreign Gyn-Obs societies or colleges have been consulted. The number of induced abortions (IA) has been stable for several decades. There are a lot of factors explaining the choice of abortion when there is an unplanned pregnancy (UPP). Early initiation and choice of contraception in connection to the woman's life are associated with lower NSP. Reversible contraceptives of long duration of action should be positioned fist in line for the teenager because of its efficiency (grade C). Ultrasound before induced abortion must be encouraged but should not be obligatory before performing IA (Professional consensus). As soon as the sonographic apparition of the embryo, the estimated date of pregnancy is done by measuring the crown-rump length (CRL) or by measuring the biparietal diameter (BIP) from 11 weeks on (grade B). Reliability of these parameters being±5 days, IA could be done if measurements are respectively less than 90mm for CRL and less than 30mm for BIP (Professional consensus). A medical IA performed with a dose of 200mg mifepristone combined with misoprostol is effective at any gestational age (EL1). Before 7 weeks, mifepristone followed between 24 and 48hours by taking misoprostol orally, buccally sublingually or eventually vaginally at a dose of 400 ug possibly renewed after 3hours (EL1, grade A). Beyond 7 weeks, misoprostol given vaginally, sublingually or buccally are better tolerated with fewer side effects than oral route (EL1). It is recommended to always use a cervical preparation during an instrumental abortion (Professional consensus). Misoprostol is a first-line agent for cervical preparation at a dose of 400 mcg (grade A). Aspiration evacuation is preferable to curettage (grade B). A perforated uterus during an instrumental suction should not be considered as a scarred uterus (Professional

  3. Principles and Guidelines for Equitable Mathematics Teaching Practices and Materials for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moschkovich, Judit

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes principles for equitable mathematics teaching practices for English Language Learners (ELLs) and outlines guidelines for materials to support such practices. Although research cannot provide a recipe for equitable teaching practices for ELLs, teachers, educators, and administrators can use this set of…

  4. Guideline to good practices for seasonal facility preservation at DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This guide is intended to assist facility maintenance organizations in the review of existing methods and in the development of new methods for establishing a maintenance Seasonal Facility Preservation program. It is expected that each DOE facility may use approaches or methods different from those defined in this guide. The specific guidelines that follow reflect generally accepted industry practices. Therefore, deviation from any particular guideline would not, in itself, indicate a problem. If substantive differences exist between the intent of this guideline and actual practice, management should evaluate current practice to determine the need to include/exclude proposed features. A change in maintenance practice would be appropriate if a performance weakness were determined to exist. The development, documentation, and implementation of other features that further enhance these guidelines for specific applications are encouraged.

  5. Offering prenatal diagnostic tests: European guidelines for clinical practice [corrected].

    PubMed

    Skirton, Heather; Goldsmith, Lesley; Jackson, Leigh; Lewis, Celine; Chitty, Lyn

    2014-05-01

    For over four decades, it has been possible to offer prenatal diagnostic testing for fetal abnormalities. Prenatal testing is now available for a wide range of monogenic disorders as well as chromosomal abnormalities and should be provided within the ethical framework of informed consent and autonomous choice. However, there are no published guidelines for health professionals from varied disciplines who offer prenatal diagnosis (PND) in a range of possible settings including departments of maternity, obstetrics and clinical genetics. We used an Expert Group technique to develop a set of guidelines for provision of prenatal diagnostic services. Thirteen European health professionals, all experts in PND, participated in a workshop to develop the guidelines, which were then subjected to a wide consultation process. The objective of PND was defined as providing prenatal diagnostic testing services (for genetic conditions) that enable families to make informed choices consistent with their individual needs and values and which support them in dealing with the outcome of such testing. General principles, logistical considerations, clinical care and counselling topics are all described and are equally applicable to invasive and non-invasive testing. These guidelines provide a framework for ethical clinical care; however, they are flexible enough to enable practitioners to adapt them to their particular setting. Ideally, an individualised approach to each family is required to ensure autonomous choice and informed consent regarding prenatal diagnostic testing within the local ethical and legal framework.

  6. Family Life Education in Multicultural Classrooms. Practical Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Nancy; And Others

    This guide presents approaches and guidelines for developing culturally appropriate and relevant family life education. It begins with a definition of culture and a look at different types of acculturation. A section on cultural relevance in family life education briefly explains the challenge of a multicultural approach in family life education…

  7. Critical Appraisal Tools and Reporting Guidelines for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    K Buccheri, Robin; Sharifi, Claire

    2017-09-12

    Nurses engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) have two important sets of tools: Critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines. Critical appraisal tools facilitate the appraisal process and guide a consumer of evidence through an objective, analytical, evaluation process. Reporting guidelines, checklists of items that should be included in a publication or report, ensure that the project or guidelines are reported on with clarity, completeness, and transparency. The primary purpose of this paper is to help nurses understand the difference between critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines. A secondary purpose is to help nurses locate the appropriate tool for the appraisal or reporting of evidence. A systematic search was conducted to find commonly used critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines for EBP in nursing. This article serves as a resource to help nurse navigate the often-overwhelming terrain of critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines, and will help both novice and experienced consumers of evidence more easily select the appropriate tool(s) to use for critical appraisal and reporting of evidence. Having the skills to select the appropriate tool or guideline is an essential part of meeting EBP competencies for both practicing registered nurses and advanced practice nurses (Melnyk & Gallagher-Ford, 2015; Melnyk, Gallagher-Ford, & Fineout-Overholt, 2017). Nine commonly used critical appraisal tools and eight reporting guidelines were found and are described in this manuscript. Specific steps for selecting an appropriate tool as well as examples of each tool's use in a publication are provided. Practicing registered nurses and advance practice nurses must be able to critically appraise and disseminate evidence in order to meet EBP competencies. This article is a resource for understanding the difference between critical appraisal tools and reporting guidelines, and identifying and accessing appropriate tools or guidelines. © 2017

  8. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    PubMed

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-02-27

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www

  9. Best Practice No 177: Best practice guideline: writing a business case for service development in pathology.

    PubMed

    Galloway, M J

    2004-04-01

    This guideline reviews the introduction and development of business planning in the National Health Service. A guideline for writing a business case for service development that would form part of a pathology business plan has been developed. This guideline outlines six steps that are required in the preparation of a business case. The format of the guideline has been developed largely from other national guidelines that have been published for the development of capital projects. In view of the publication of these guidelines, the scope of this guideline excludes business cases for information, management, and technology projects and large capital projects.

  10. A UML approach to process modelling of clinical practice guidelines for enactment.

    PubMed

    Knape, T; Hederman, L; Wade, V P; Gargan, M; Harris, C; Rahman, Y

    2003-01-01

    Although clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been suggested as a means of encapsulating best practice in evidence-based medical treatment, their usage in clinical environments has been disappointing. Criticisms of guideline representations have been that they are predominantly narrative and are difficult to incorporate into clinical information systems. This paper analyses the use of UML process modelling techniques for guideline representation and proposes the automated generation of executable guidelines using XMI. This hybrid UML-XMI approach provides flexible authoring of guideline decision and control structures whilst integrating appropriate data flow. It also uses an open XMI standard interface to allow the use of authoring tools and process control systems from multiple vendors. The paper first surveys CPG modelling formalisms followed by a brief introduction to process modelling in UMI. Furthermore, the modelling of CPGs in UML is presented leading to a case study of encoding a diabetes mellitus CPG using UML.

  11. Translation of hypertension treatment guidelines into practice: a review of implementation.

    PubMed

    Handler, Joel; Lackland, Daniel T

    2011-01-01

    Compared with the history of national guideline development, the science attached to implementation of guidelines is relatively new. Effectiveness of a highly evidence-based guideline, such as the 8th Joint National Committee recommendations on the treatment of high blood pressure, depends on successful translation into clinical practice. Implementation relies on several steps: clear and executable guideline language, audit and feedback attached to education of practitioners charged with carrying out the guidelines, team-based care delivery, credibility of blood pressure measurement, and measures to address therapeutic inertia and medication adherence. An evolving role of the electronic health record and patient empowerment are developments that will further promote implementation of the hypertension guideline. Further research will be needed to assess the efficacy and cost effectiveness of various implementation tools and strategies. Copyright © 2011 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Guideline to good practices for facility condition inspections at DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This guide is intended to provide a means for owner/operators to have an awareness of the way business is actually being conducted on the shop floor. Also, this guide is intended to provide a means for maintenance managers to impart their expectations to crafts persons as to how maintenance should be conducted. It is expected that each DOE facility may use different approaches or methods than those defined in this guide. Explanation of the intent of this guide is provided in the Discussion section, and the specific guidelines that follow reflect generally accepted industry practices. In some cases, example situations accompany these guidelines. These examples have been provided only as an aid in clear understanding of the guidelines and should not be construed as the only method for meeting the intent of the guidelines. Therefore, deviation from any particular guideline would not, in itself, indicate a problem. If substantive differences exist between the intent of the Guideline and actual practice, management should evaluate current practice to determine the need to include/exclude proposed features. A change to maintenance practice would be appropriate if a performance weakness was determined to exist. Development, documentation, and implementation of other features which further enhance these guidelines for specific applications, is encouraged.

  13. ASPS clinical practice guideline summary on reduction mammaplasty.

    PubMed

    Kalliainen, Loree K

    2012-10-01

    In May of 2011, the Executive Committee of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons approved an evidence-based guideline on reduction mammaplasty developed by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Health Policy Committee. The guideline addresses six clinical questions: procedural efficacy as noted by relief of symptoms, resection weight, the impact of body mass index on surgical complications, use of prophylactic antibiotics, use of drains, and effect on quality of life. The evidence indicates that resection volume is not correlated directly to the degree of postoperative symptom relief. Increased breast resection weight may increase the risks of complication. The evidence is inconclusive on whether increased body mass index is associated with increased risk of complications. Perioperative antibiotics may reduce the risk of infection associated with reduction mammaplasty, and in standard reduction mammaplasty procedures without liposuction, the use of drains is not beneficial. Reduction mammaplasty has been shown to improve quality of life.

  14. Practical guidelines for radiographers to improve computed radiography image quality.

    PubMed

    Pongnapang, N

    2005-10-01

    Computed Radiography (CR) has become a major digital imaging modality in a modern radiological department. CR system changes workflow from the conventional way of using film/screen by employing photostimulable phosphor plate technology. This results in the changing perspectives of technical, artefacts and quality control issues in radiology departments. Guidelines for better image quality in digital medical enterprise include professional guidelines for users and the quality control programme specifically designed to serve the best quality of clinical images. Radiographers who understand technological shift of the CR from conventional method can employ optimization of CR images. Proper anatomic collimation and exposure techniques for each radiographic projection are crucial steps in producing quality digital images. Matching image processing with specific anatomy is also important factor that radiographers should realise. Successful shift from conventional to fully digitised radiology department requires skilful radiographers who utilise the technology and a successful quality control program from teamwork in the department.

  15. Which drugs are contraindicated during breastfeeding? Practice guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, M. E.; Lee, A.; Ito, S.

    2000-01-01

    QUESTION: Many breastfeeding mothers are concerned about taking medications that might affect their babies. Are there any guidelines on which drugs are safe? ANSWER: Only a few drugs pose a clinically significant risk to breastfed babies. In general, antineoplastics, drugs of abuse, some anticonvulsants, ergot alkaloids, and radiopharmaceuticals should not be taken, and levels of amiodarone, cyclosporine, and lithium should be monitored. Images p1757-a PMID:11013791

  16. Automating Performance Measures and Clinical Practice Guidelines: Differences and Complementarities

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Samson W.; Martins, Susana; Oshiro, Connie; Yuen, Kaeli; Wang, Dan; Robinson, Amy; Ashcraft, Michael; Heidenreich, Paul A.; Goldstein, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Through close analysis of two pairs of systems that implement the automated evaluation of performance measures (PMs) and guideline-based clinical decision support (CDS), we contrast differences in their knowledge encoding and necessary changes to a CDS system that provides management recommendations for patients failing performance measures. We trace the sources of differences to the implementation environments and goals of PMs and CDS. PMID:28269917

  17. Opioid prescribing: guidelines, laws, rules, regulations, policies, best practices.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James

    2013-11-01

    Prescription drug abuse, misuse and unintentional overdose deaths are major public health concerns and have captured the attention of regulators at every level. There is no shortage of guidelines, laws, rules, regulations, and policies regarding opioid prescribing. Physicians struggle with their duty to treat pain, and yet balance this against the risk to patients as well as the potential for diversion. There are gaps in policy and resources such as lack of interdisciplinary pain clinics, addiction treatment, and education for prescribers and patients.

  18. Clinical Pharmacogenetic Testing and Application: Laboratory Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sollip; Yun, Yeo Min; Chae, Hyo Jin; Cho, Hyun Jung; Ji, Misuk; Kim, In Suk; Wee, Kyung A; Lee, Woochang; Song, Sang Hoon; Woo, Hye In; Lee, Soo Youn; Chun, Sail

    2017-03-01

    Pharmacogenetic testing for clinical applications is steadily increasing. Correct and adequate use of pharmacogenetic tests is important to reduce unnecessary medical costs and adverse patient outcomes. This document contains recommended pharmacogenetic testing guidelines for clinical application, interpretation, and result reporting through a literature review and evidence-based expert opinions for the clinical pharmacogenetic testing covered by public medical insurance in Korea. This document aims to improve the utility of pharmacogenetic testing in routine clinical settings.

  19. Clinical Pharmacogenetic Testing and Application: Laboratory Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sollip; Yun, Yeo-Min; Chae, Hyo-Jin; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Ji, Misuk; Kim, In-Suk; Wee, Kyung-A; Lee, Woochang; Song, Sang Hoon; Woo, Hye In

    2017-01-01

    Pharmacogenetic testing for clinical applications is steadily increasing. Correct and adequate use of pharmacogenetic tests is important to reduce unnecessary medical costs and adverse patient outcomes. This document contains recommended pharmacogenetic testing guidelines for clinical application, interpretation, and result reporting through a literature review and evidence-based expert opinions for the clinical pharmacogenetic testing covered by public medical insurance in Korea. This document aims to improve the utility of pharmacogenetic testing in routine clinical settings. PMID:28029011

  20. Effective Practices in the Treatment of Trauma in Children and Adolescents: From Guidelines to Organizational Practices.

    PubMed

    Lucio, Robert; Nelson, Tiffany L

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to traumatic events happens at an alarming rate for children and adolescents in the United States. If left unaddressed, these youth have a high risk of growing up with additional health and mental health problems. In this article the authors review three key aspects of helping youth heal from the symptoms of experiencing a traumatic event; (1) recommended guidelines, (2) specific treatments, and (3) the Trauma-Informed Care Framework. Eleven recommendations from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry are discussed as they relate to effective practices in the treatment of trauma in children and adolescents. Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy and child-parent psychotherapy are also explored as the two specific interventions that have the most empirical support for treatment in children and adolescents. Finally, the tenets of a Trauma-Informed Care Framework are presented along with a review of how well these have been applied in youth serving organizations.

  1. Adherence to and uptake of clinical practice guidelines: lessons learned from a clinical practice guideline on chemotherapy concomitant with radiotherapy in head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hall, S.F.; Irish, J.C.; Gregg, R.W.; Groome, P.A.; Rohland, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (cpgs) are systematically developed statements designed to assist practitioners and patients in making decisions about appropriate heath care interventions. Clinical practice guidelines are expensive and time-consuming to create. A cpg on concurrent chemotherapy with radiation therapy (ccrt) was developed in Ontario at a time when treatment approaches for head-and-neck cancer were changing significantly. Methods An assessment of treatments and outcomes based on electronic and chart data obtained from a population-based study of 571 patients with oropharynx cancer treated in Ontario (2003–2004) was combined with a review of relevant knowledge transfer (publications and presentations at major meetings) to understand variation in adherence to a cpg. Results In 9 Ontario cancer treatment centres, ccrt was used for 55% of all patients with oropharyngeal cancer; however, at the centres individually, that proportion ranged from 82% to 39%. Furthermore, there was no agreement on the chemotherapy regimen: 2–4 years later (a period during which newer regimens were emerging), only 4 of 9 centres were following the guideline for most patients. When outcomes of treated patients were compared for centres with “higher” and “lower” use of ccrt, no difference in survival was observed (p = 0.64). Conclusions At a time of treatment evolution, the new guideline was controversial, and there are many reasons for the mixed adherence. An estimation of adherence should be included during both development and review of guidelines. PMID:25908922

  2. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  3. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This document provides healthcare practitioners with information regarding the management of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) to enable them to better meet the needs of this patient population. These guidelines describe controversies in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and include recommendations that take into account changes in the bacteriologic landscape. Recent guidelines in ABRS have been released by American and European groups as recently as 2007, but these are either limited in their coverage of the subject of CRS, do not follow an evidence-based strategy, or omit relevant stakeholders in guidelines development, and do not address the particulars of the Canadian healthcare environment. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of CRS, along with the development of appropriate therapeutic strategies, have improved outcomes for patients with CRS. CRS now affects large numbers of patients globally and primary care practitioners are confronted by this disease on a daily basis. Although initially considered a chronic bacterial infection, CRS is now recognized as having multiple distinct components (eg, infection, inflammation), which have led to changes in therapeutic approaches (eg, increased use of corticosteroids). The role of bacteria in the persistence of chronic infections, and the roles of surgical and medical management are evolving. Although evidence is limited, guidance for managing patients with CRS would help practitioners less experienced in this area offer rational care. It is no longer reasonable to manage CRS as a prolonged version of ARS, but rather, specific therapeutic strategies adapted to pathogenesis must be developed and diffused. Guidelines must take into account all available evidence and incorporate these in an unbiased fashion into management recommendations based on the quality of evidence, therapeutic benefit, and risks incurred. This document is focused on readability rather than

  4. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Martin; Evans, Gerald A; Keith, Paul K; Wright, Erin D; Kaplan, Alan; Bouchard, Jacques; Ciavarella, Anthony; Doyle, Patrick W; Javer, Amin R; Leith, Eric S; Mukherji, Atreyi; Robert Schellenberg, R; Small, Peter; Witterick, Ian J

    2011-05-01

    This document provides health care practitioners with information regarding the management of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) to enable them to better meet the needs of this patient population. These guidelines describe controversies in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and include recommendations that take into account changes in the bacteriologic landscape. Recent guidelines in ABRS have been released by American and European groups as recently as 2007, but these are either limited in their coverage of the subject of CRS, do not follow an evidence-based strategy, or omit relevant stakeholders in the development of guidelines and do not address the particulars of the Canadian health care environment.Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of CRS, along with the development of appropriate therapeutic strategies, have improved outcomes for patients with CRS. CRS now affects large numbers of patients globally, and primary care practitioners are confronted by this disease on a daily basis. Although initially considered a chronic bacterial infection, CRS is now recognized as having multiple distinct components (eg, infection, inflammation), which have led to changes in therapeutic approaches (eg, increased use of corticosteroids). The role of bacteria in the persistence of chronic infections and the roles of surgical and medical management are evolving. Although evidence is limited, guidance for managing patients with CRS would help practitioners less experienced in this area offer rational care. It is no longer reasonable to manage CRS as a prolonged version of ARS, but, rather, specific therapeutic strategies adapted to pathogenesis must be developed and diffused.Guidelines must take into account all available evidence and incorporate these in an unbiased fashion into management recommendations based on the quality of evidence, therapeutic benefit, and risks incurred. This document is focused on readability

  5. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Martin; Evans, Gerald A; Keith, Paul K; Wright, Erin D; Kaplan, Alan; Bouchard, Jacques; Ciavarella, Anthony; Doyle, Patrick W; Javer, Amin R; Leith, Eric S; Mukherji, Atreyi; Schellenberg, R Robert; Small, Peter; Witterick, Ian J

    2011-02-10

    This document provides healthcare practitioners with information regarding the management of acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) to enable them to better meet the needs of this patient population. These guidelines describe controversies in the management of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) and include recommendations that take into account changes in the bacteriologic landscape. Recent guidelines in ABRS have been released by American and European groups as recently as 2007, but these are either limited in their coverage of the subject of CRS, do not follow an evidence-based strategy, or omit relevant stakeholders in guidelines development, and do not address the particulars of the Canadian healthcare environment.Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of CRS, along with the development of appropriate therapeutic strategies, have improved outcomes for patients with CRS. CRS now affects large numbers of patients globally and primary care practitioners are confronted by this disease on a daily basis. Although initially considered a chronic bacterial infection, CRS is now recognized as having multiple distinct components (eg, infection, inflammation), which have led to changes in therapeutic approaches (eg, increased use of corticosteroids). The role of bacteria in the persistence of chronic infections, and the roles of surgical and medical management are evolving. Although evidence is limited, guidance for managing patients with CRS would help practitioners less experienced in this area offer rational care. It is no longer reasonable to manage CRS as a prolonged version of ARS, but rather, specific therapeutic strategies adapted to pathogenesis must be developed and diffused.Guidelines must take into account all available evidence and incorporate these in an unbiased fashion into management recommendations based on the quality of evidence, therapeutic benefit, and risks incurred. This document is focused on readability rather than

  6. Knowledge of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Screening Guidelines and Clinical Practices Among Gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Sameer D.; Kuhn, Latoya B.; Rubenstein, Joel H.; Pardi, Darrell S.; Marrero, Jorge A.; Schoenfeld, Philip S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Screening of high-risk patients for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may result in early diagnosis and improved outcomes. Our aim was to assess gastroenterologists’ knowledge of HCC management guidelines established by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) and usual clinical practice. Methods We surveyed gastroenterologists attending two gastroenterology board review courses regarding their knowledge of HCC screening guidelines and usual practice of screening for HCC. Practices were compared and adherence to the 2005 published HCC guidelines was assessed. Results The median age of gastroenterology attending physicians (n = 160) was 41 years, and 75% were men with a median of 11.5 years of practice. A total of 79% of respondents correctly identified the high-risk patients who qualify for HCC screening. Most gastroenterologists correctly identified the screening methods (88.5%) and screening interval (98%). Among those who knew guideline recommendations (i.e., correct identification and certainty of guideline recommendations), 100% reported that they followed the guideline recommendation in their own practices. Regarding the management of abnormal test, 31% of gastroenterologists did not identify that referral for liver transplantation is the recommended management strategy for small HCC in a Child B patient with cirrhosis. The number of years in clinical practice (p = 0.30) and involvement in a malpractice suit (p = 0.34) did not affect the practice patterns. Conclusions Most gastroenterologists correctly identified the common high-risk scenarios, methods, and interval of HCC screening as recommended by AASLD. Gastroenterologists who knew the HCC guidelines applied them in their own practice. However, approximately one-quarter do not know the appropriate management of a positive result, thereby likely hampering the overall effectiveness of screening. PMID:20978844

  7. Potential facilitators and barriers to adopting standard treatment guidelines in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sangeeta; Pandit, Ajay; Tabassum, Fauzia

    2017-04-18

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess medicines information sources accessed by clinicians, if sources differed in theory and practice and to find out the barriers and facilitators to effective guideline adoption. Design/methodology/approach In all, 183 doctors were surveyed. Barriers and facilitators were classified as: communication; potential adopters; innovation; organization characteristics and environmental/social/economic context. Findings Most of the clinicians accessed multiple information sources including standard treatment guidelines, but also consulted seniors/colleagues in practice. The top three factors influencing clinical practice guideline adoption were innovation characteristics, environmental context and individual characteristics. The respondents differed in the following areas: concerns about flexibility offered by the guideline; denying patients' individuality; professional autonomy; insights into gaps in current practice and evidence-based practice; changing practices with little or no benefit. Barriers included negative staff attitudes/beliefs, guideline integration into organizational structures/processes, time/resource constraints. Fearing third parties (government and insurance companies) restricting medicines reimbursement and poor liability protection offered by the guidelines emerged as the barriers. Facilitators include aligning organizational structures/processes with the innovation; providing leadership support to guide diffusion; increasing awareness and enabling early innovation during pre/in-service training, with regular feedback on outcomes and use. Practical implications Guideline adoption in clinical practice is partly within doctors' control. There are other key prevailing factors in the local context such as environmental, social context, professional and organizational culture affecting its adoption. Organizational policy and accreditation standards necessitating adherence can serve as a driver. Originality

  8. Improving access to clinical practice guidelines with an interactive graphical interface using an iconic language

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines are useful for physicians, and guidelines are available on the Internet from various websites such as Vidal Recos. However, these guidelines are long and difficult to read, especially during consultation. Similar difficulties have been encountered with drug summaries of product characteristics. In a previous work, we have proposed an iconic language (called VCM, for Visualization of Concepts in Medicine) for representing patient conditions, treatments and laboratory tests, and we have used these icons to design a user interface that graphically indexes summaries of product characteristics. In the current study, our objective was to design and evaluate an iconic user interface for the consultation of clinical practice guidelines by physicians. Methods Focus groups of physicians were set up to identify the difficulties encountered when reading guidelines. Icons were integrated into Vidal Recos, taking human factors into account. The resulting interface includes a graphical summary and an iconic indexation of the guideline. The new interface was evaluated. We compared the response times and the number of errors recorded when physicians answered questions about two clinical scenarios using the interactive iconic interface or a textual interface. Users’ perceived usability was evaluated with the System Usability Scale. Results The main difficulties encountered by physicians when reading guidelines were obtaining an overview and finding recommendations for patients corresponding to “particular cases”. We designed a graphical interface for guideline consultation, using icons to identify particular cases and providing a graphical summary of the icons organized by anatomy and etiology. The evaluation showed that physicians gave clinical responses more rapidly with the iconic interface than the textual interface (25.2 seconds versus 45.6, p < 0.05). The physicians appreciated the new interface, and the System Usability Scale

  9. Sunscreen compliance with regional clinical practice guidelines and product labeling standards in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Sporer, Matthias E; Mathy, Joanna E; Kenealy, John; Mathy, Jon A

    2016-03-01

    INTRODUCTION For general practitioners, practice nurses and community pharmacists in New Zealand, a core duty is to educate patients about sun protection. We aimed to evaluate compliance of locally available sunscreens with regional clinical practice guidelines and sunscreen labelling standards, to assist clinicians in advising consumers on sunscreen selection. METHODS We audited all sunscreens available at two Auckland stores for three New Zealand sunscreen retailers. We then assessed compliance with accepted regional clinical practice guidelines for sun protection from the New Zealand Guidelines Group. We further assessed compliance with regional Australia/New Zealand consumer standards for sunscreen labelling. RESULTS All sunscreens satisfied clinical guidelines for broad-spectrum protection, and 99% of sunscreens met or exceeded clinical guidelines for minimal Sun Protection Factor. Compliance with regional standardized labelling guidelines is voluntary in New Zealand and 27% of audited sunscreens were not fully compliant with SPF labelling standards. DISCUSSION Sunscreens were generally compliant with clinical guidelines for minimal sun protection. However there was substantial noncompliance with regional recommendations for standardized sunscreen labelling. Primary health care clinicians should be aware that this labelling noncompliance may mislead patients into thinking some sunscreens offer more sun protection than they do. Mandatory compliance with the latest regional labelling standards would simplify sunscreen selection by New Zealand consumers. KEYWORDS Sunscreen; Sun Protection Factor; SPF; Skin Neoplasms; Melanoma; Skin Cancer Prevention.

  10. The inclusion of cognition in vascular risk factor clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Kenneth; Middleton, Laura E; Moorhouse, Paige K; Skoog, Ingmar; Black, Sandra E

    2009-01-01

    Background: People with vascular risk factors are at increased risk for cognitive impairment as well as vascular disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether vascular risk factor clinical practice guidelines consider cognition as an outcome or in connection with treatment compliance. Methods: Articles from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were assessed by at least two reviewers and were included if: (1) Either hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, or atrial fibrillation was targeted; (2) The guideline was directed at physicians; (3) Adult patients (aged 19 years or older) were targeted; and (4) The guideline was published in English. Of 91 guidelines, most were excluded because they were duplicates, older versions, or focused on single outcomes. Results: Of the 20 clinical practice guidelines that met inclusion criteria, five mentioned cognition. Of these five, four described potential treatment benefits but only two mentioned that cognition may affect compliance. No guidelines adequately described how to screen for cognitive impairment. Conclusion: Despite evidence that links cognitive impairment to vascular risk factors, only a minority of clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of vascular risk factors consider cognition as either an adverse outcome or as a factor to consider in treatment. PMID:19966911

  11. Pilot testing of guidelines to support good practice in the development of professional portfolios.

    PubMed

    Clarke, David J; Cortis, Joseph D; Sowter, Julie

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the introduction of new evidence based portfolio guidelines helped students and assessors to understand the expectations for completion of a clinical practice portfolio, and whether this understanding resulted in the submission of evidence consistent with the guidelines. New evidence based portfolio guidelines were introduced to an undergraduate BSc (Hons) Radiography (Diagnostic) programme. A total of 134 students completed 12 item questionnaires relating to using the portfolio guidelines. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 12 students and 5 lecturer practitioners. Documentary analysis was undertaken on 26 portfolios. Survey data indicated that the new guidelines increased students' understanding of portfolio evidence requirements. Statistically significant increases in scores were evident for only two out of 12 questions; these related to understanding the need for critical reflection and which elements of the portfolio would be rewarded in assessment. Survey data also indicated some dissatisfaction with the role of lecturer practitioners and clinical assessors in relation to portfolio development. Interviews provided more mixed perceptions of the contribution of enhanced guidelines and identified some reasons for dissatisfaction with the lecturer practitioner and clinical assessor role. Documentary analysis indicated that whilst the guidelines improved students' and lecturers' understanding of evidence requirements, this did not translate into portfolio evidence which matched guideline expectations. Portfolio evidence was restricted to meeting the minimum profession specific task requirements and often indicated a mis-match between guideline expectations and assessor assessment judgements. New evidence based guidelines improved understanding of evidence and presentation requirements for clinical practice portfolios. Consistent interpretation of portfolio guidelines however requires structured

  12. Practice what you preach? An exploratory multilevel study on rheumatoid arthritis guideline adherence by rheumatologists

    PubMed Central

    Lesuis, N; den Broeder, A A; Hulscher, M E J L; van Vollenhoven, R F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess variation in and determinants of rheumatologist guideline adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in daily practice. Methods In this retrospective observational study, guideline adherence in the first year of treatment was assessed for 7 predefined parameters on diagnostics, treatment and follow-up in all adult patients with RA with a first outpatient clinic visit at the study centre, from September 2009 to March 2011. Variation in guideline adherence was assessed on parameter and rheumatologist level. Determinants for guideline adherence were assessed in patients (demographic characteristics, rheumatoid factor (RF) and/or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (aCCP) positivity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, erosive disease, comorbidity and the number of available disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment options) and rheumatologists (demographic and practice characteristics, guideline knowledge and agreement, outcome expectancy, cognitive bias, thinking style, numeracy and personality). Results A total of 994 visits in 137 patients with RA were reviewed. Variation in guideline adherence among parameters was present (adherence between 21% and 72%), with referral to the physician assistant as lowest scoring and referral to a specialised nurse as highest scoring parameter. Variation in guideline adherence among rheumatologists was also present (adherence between 22% and 100%). Patient sex, the number of DMARD options, presence of erosions, comorbidity, RF/aCCP positivity, type of patient and the rheumatologists' scientific education status were associated with adherence to 1 or more guideline parameters. Conclusions Guideline adherence varied considerably among the guideline parameters and rheumatologists, showing that there is room for improvement. Guideline adherence in our sample was related to several patient and rheumatologist determinants. PMID:27252892

  13. The Million Hearts initiative: Guidelines and best practices.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Orsolini, Liana; Gawlik, Kate; Braun, Lynne T; Chyun, Deborah A; Conn, Vicki S; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Lewis, Lisa M; Melkus, Gail D'Eramo; Millan, Angelica; Rice, Virginia Hill; Wilbur, JoEllen; Nowlin, Sarah; Olin, Abigail R

    2016-02-18

    Million Hearts is a national initiative to improve the nation's cardiovascular health through evidence-based practices and prevention. This article reviews the ABCS of Million Hearts with an emphasis on NP-led care models. Recommendations for clinical practice, education, research, and health policy are highlighted.

  14. [Acute pancreatitis. Evidence-based practice guidelines, prepared by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Hritz, István; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Szücs, Ákos; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Hegyi, Péter

    2015-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases of the gastrointestinal tract associated with significant morbidity and mortality that requires up-to-date and evidence based treatment guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare evidence based guideline for the medical and surgical management of acute pancreatitis based on the available international guidelines and evidence. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and, if it was necessary, complemented and/or modified the international guidelines. All together 42 relevant clinical questions were defined in 11 topics (Diagnosis and etiology, Prognosis, Imaging, Fluid therapy, Intensive care management, Prevention of infectious complications, Nutrition, Biliary interventions, Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography pancreatitis, Indication, timing and strategy for intervention in necrotizing pancreatitis, Timing of cholecystectomy [or endoscopic sphincterotomy]). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate® grading system. The draft of the guideline was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. 25 clinical questions with almost total (more than 95%) and 17 clinical questions with strong (more than 70%) agreement were accepted. The present guideline is the first evidence based acute pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide important help for tuition, everyday practice and for establishment of proper finance of acute pancreatitis. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become as basic reference in Hungary.

  15. [Clinical practice guideline 'Complex regional pain syndrome type I'].

    PubMed

    Perez, R S G M; Zollinger, P E; Dijkstra, P U; Thomassen-Hilgersom, I L; Zuurmond, W W A; Rosenbrand, C J G M; Geertzen, J H B

    2007-07-28

    The development and treatment ofthe complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) are a subject of much discussion. Using the method for the development ofevidence-based guidelines, a multidisciplinary guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome has been drawn up. The diagnosis of CRPS-I is based on the clinical observation of signs and symptoms. For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised up to step z. In case of pain ofa neuropathic nature, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For the treatment ofinflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine) are advised. In order to enhance peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used for a cold extremity ifvasodilatory medication produces insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, the use of vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operation time and limited use of bloodlessness are advised for the secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Use of regional anaesthetic techniques can also be considered in this connection.

  16. Canadian clinical practice guidelines for invasive candidiasis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bow, Eric J; Evans, Gerald; Fuller, Jeff; Laverdière, Michel; Rotstein, Coleman; Rennie, Robert; Shafran, Stephen D; Sheppard, Don; Carle, Sylvie; Phillips, Peter; Vinh, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Candidemia and invasive candidiasis (C/IC) are life-threatening opportunistic infections that add excess morbidity, mortality and cost to the management of patients with a range of potentially curable underlying conditions. The Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada developed evidence-based guidelines for the approach to the diagnosis and management of these infections in the ever-increasing population of at-risk adult patients in the health care system. Over the past few years, a new and broader understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of C/IC has emerged and has been coupled with the availability of new antifungal agents and defined strategies for targeting groups at risk including, but not limited to, acute leukemia patients, hematopoietic stem cell transplants and solid organ transplants, and critical care unit patients. Accordingly, these guidelines have focused on patients at risk for C/IC, and on approaches of prevention, early therapy for suspected but unproven infection, and targeted therapy for probable and proven infection. PMID:22132006

  17. Exit site care in the Netherlands: the use of guidelines in practice.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Bettie P; de Vries-Hoogsteen, Anneke; Winkels, Bieneke; Zevenbergen-Osinga, Helma; Thijssen-Broers, Ingrid; Bellemakers, Trian

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the quality of exit site care by evaluating the use of the Dutch exit site guideline over a period of 15 years. The special interest group (SIG) for peritoneal dialysis (PD) analysed results of three surveys concerning general exit site care among members of the Dutch Association for nurses and carers (V&VN), the dialysis and nephrology section. In 2002 (when no guidelines were available) the survey showed huge diversity in practice, with no definition of the post-operative period after catheter placement and no uniform monitoring of the exit site. There was a difference in use of dressings and exit site care. In 2009, the survey showed that most dialysis centres worked with the first guideline of the V&VN (2006) and exit site classification (2006). However, at this time, there was still diversity in the way exit site care was undertaken. In 2016, there was widespread use of guidelines and classification alongside a more individual approach to practice. Differences occured in use of disinfectant, antimicrobial ointment, swimming and going to the sauna. The exit site guideline has been widely used in the Netherlands, improving quality in care and utilising a more individual patient approach in care. However, there are still differences identified in practice for which the evidence-base and evaluation will be undertaken to supplement the guideline and attribute to exit site care practice. © 2017 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  18. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Delirium Management: Potential Application in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Shirley H.; Bruera, Eduardo; Lawlor, Peter G.; Kanji, Salmaan; Davis, Daniel H.J.; Agar, Meera; Wright, David; Hartwick, Michael; Currow, David C.; Gagnon, Bruno; Simon, Jessica; Pereira, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Context Delirium occurs in patients across a wide array of health care settings. The extent to which formal management guidelines exist or are adaptable to palliative care is unclear. Objectives This review aims to 1) source published delirium management guidelines with potential relevance to palliative care settings, 2) discuss the process of guideline development, 3) appraise their clinical utility, and 4) outline the processes of their implementation and evaluation and make recommendations for future guideline development. Methods We searched PubMed (1990–2013), Scopus, U.S. National Guideline Clearinghouse, Google, and relevant reference lists to identify published guidelines for the management of delirium. This was supplemented with multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and other relevant stakeholders at an international delirium study planning meeting. Results There is a paucity of high-level evidence for pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in the management of delirium in palliative care. However, multiple delirium guidelines for clinical practice have been developed, with recommendations derived from “expert opinion” for areas where research evidence is lacking. In addition to their potential benefits, limitations of clinical guidelines warrant consideration. Guidelines should be appraised and then adapted for use in a particular setting before implementation. Further research is needed on the evaluation of guidelines, as disseminated and implemented in a clinical setting, focusing on measurable outcomes in addition to their impact on quality of care. Conclusion Delirium clinical guidelines are available but the level of evidence is limited. More robust evidence is required for future guideline development. PMID:24766743

  19. Clinical practice guidelines for delirium management: potential application in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Bush, Shirley H; Bruera, Eduardo; Lawlor, Peter G; Kanji, Salmaan; Davis, Daniel H J; Agar, Meera; Wright, David Kenneth; Hartwick, Michael; Currow, David C; Gagnon, Bruno; Simon, Jessica; Pereira, José L

    2014-08-01

    Delirium occurs in patients across a wide array of health care settings. The extent to which formal management guidelines exist or are adaptable to palliative care is unclear. This review aims to 1) source published delirium management guidelines with potential relevance to palliative care settings, 2) discuss the process of guideline development, 3) appraise their clinical utility, and 4) outline the processes of their implementation and evaluation and make recommendations for future guideline development. We searched PubMed (1990-2013), Scopus, U.S. National Guideline Clearinghouse, Google, and relevant reference lists to identify published guidelines for the management of delirium. This was supplemented with multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and other relevant stakeholders at an international delirium study planning meeting. There is a paucity of high-level evidence for pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in the management of delirium in palliative care. However, multiple delirium guidelines for clinical practice have been developed, with recommendations derived from "expert opinion" for areas where research evidence is lacking. In addition to their potential benefits, limitations of clinical guidelines warrant consideration. Guidelines should be appraised and then adapted for use in a particular setting before implementation. Further research is needed on the evaluation of guidelines, as disseminated and implemented in a clinical setting, focusing on measurable outcomes in addition to their impact on quality of care. Delirium clinical guidelines are available but the level of evidence is limited. More robust evidence is required for future guideline development. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality appraisal of clinical practice guidelines on pancreatic cancer: a PRISMA-compliant article.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyun; Tian, Hongliang; Song, Ailin; Jin, Lan; Zhou, Xiaona; Liu, Xiaoye; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2015-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) play an important role in health care. The guideline development process should be precise and rigorous to ensure that the results are reproducible and not vague. To determine the quality of guidelines, the Appraisal of Guidelines and Research and Evaluation (AGREE) instrument was developed and introduced. The objective of this study is to assess the methodological quality of CPGs on pancreatic cancer. Five databases (included MEDLINE and EMBASE) and guideline websites were searched till April, 2014. The methodological quality of the guidelines was assessed by 4 authors independently using the AGREE II instrument. From 2526 citations, 21 relevant guidelines were included. The overall agreement among reviewers was moderate (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.64-0.96). The mean scores were moderate for the domains "scope and purpose" and "clarity of presentation"; however, they were low for the domains "stakeholder involvement" (31.22), "rigor of development", "applicability", and "editorial independence". These domain scores were lower when compared with international levels. There are 5 (23.81%) guidelines that described the systematic methods for searching. Moreover, only 5 (23.81%) guidelines reported that methodological expertise were included in the guideline developing teams. The quality and transparency of the development process and the consistency in the reporting of pancreatic cancer guidelines need to be improved. Many other methodological disadvantages were identified. In the future, pancreatic cancer CPGs should base on the best available evidence rigorously developed and reported. Greater efforts are needed to provide high-quality guidelines that serve as a useful and reliable tool for clinical decision making in this field.

  1. Patterns of care before and after the adult sinusitis clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Kepnes, Lynn J

    2013-07-01

    Determine if patterns of care for acute sinusitis have changed after the publication of the adult sinusitis clinical practice guideline. Cross-sectional study with historical controls. Cases of adult acute sinusitis occurring in 2005-2006 (before guideline publication) and 2009-2010 (>1 year after guideline publication) were extracted from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey. Changes in the rates of analgesic recommendations, oral antibiotic prescriptions, and choice of antibiotic therapy were determined and compared before and after guideline publication and relative to guideline recommendations. An estimated 18.1 ± 1.8 million cases of adult acute sinusitis were studied before (7.9 ± 0.9 million visits for 2005-2006) and after (10.2 ± 1.5 million visits for 2009-2010) guideline publication. Recommendation rates for analgesics did not change significantly (18.9% before vs. 23.0% after, P=.470). The proportion of patients receiving oral antibiotics increased after guideline publication (75.5% before vs. 85.7% after, P=.021). In keeping with guideline recommendations, the proportion of patients treated with amoxicillin as the agent of choice when antibiotics are prescribed increased from 8.1% to 29.4% after guideline publication (P=.001). Care patterns for the medical treatment of acute adult sinusitis have changed after guideline publication, with an increase in oral antibiotic prescription rates in cases of acute sinusitis and increase in the use of amoxicillin as the first-line antimicrobial agent. The latter is strongly in keeping with guideline recommendation. Clinicians' espousal of the analgesic recommendations likely needs improvement to better comply with guideline recommendations. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 352: Innovative practice: ethical guidelines.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    Innovations in medical practice are critical to the advancement of medicine. Good clinicians constantly adapt and modify their clinical approaches in ways they believe will benefit patients. Innovative practice frequently is approached very differently from formal research, which is governed by distinct ethical and regulatory frameworks. Although opinions differ on the distinction between research and innovative practice, the production of generalizable knowledge is one defining characteristic of research. Physicians considering innovative practice must disclose to patients the purpose, benefits, and risks of the proposed treatment, including risks not quantified but plausible. They should attempt an innovative procedure only when familiar with and skilled in its basic components. A clinician should share results, positive or negative, with colleagues and, when feasible, teach successful techniques and procedures to other physicians. Practitioners should be wary of adopting innovative procedures or diagnostic tests on the basis of promotions and marketing when the value of the procedures or tests has not been proved. A practitioner should move an innovative practice into formal research if the innovation represents a significant departure from standard practice, if the innovation carries unknown or potentially significant risks, or if the practitioner's goal is to use data from the innovation to produce generalizable knowledge. If there is any question whether innovative practices should be formalized as research, clinicians should seek advice from the relevant institutional review board.

  3. Comparing Drug-Disease Associations in Clinical Practice Guideline Recommendations and Drug Product Label Indications.

    PubMed

    Leung, Tiffany I; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and structured product labels (SPLs) are both intended to promote evidence-based medical practices and guide clinicians' prescribing decisions. However, it is unclear how well CPG recommendations about pharmacologic therapies for certain diseases match SPL indications for recommended drugs. In this study, we use publicly available data and text mining methods to examine drug-disease associations in CPG recommendations and SPL treatment indications for 15 common chronic conditions. Preliminary results suggest that there is a mismatch between guideline-recommended pharmacologic therapies and SPL indications. Conflicting or inconsistent recommendations and indications may complicate clinical decision making and implementation or measurement of best practices.

  4. Risk and Strategic Decision-Making in Developing Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczynski, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) represents an important approach to educating and treating individuals diagnosed with disabilities or disorders. Understanding research findings is the cornerstone of EBP. The methodology of systematic reviews, which involves carefully analyzing research findings, can result a practice guideline that recommends…

  5. [Practice guidelines for medical treatment from the perspective of health law].

    PubMed

    Roscam Abbing, H D

    1998-11-07

    Clinical practice guidelines are directions for medical doctors on the action to be taken in a given situation, thus standardising medical performance as regards content. The implementation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is stimulated by government and health care insurers. Court decisions frequently refer to these guidelines. From a medical and legal perspective, the implementation of CPGs in daily medical practice has advantages (e.g. they contribute to best medical practice as well as to the quality of information to be provided to the patients), but also disadvantages (they may replace professional responsibility and may put cost containment over professional autonomy). CPGs may contribute to quality of care provided they are applied flexibly and responsibly.

  6. Development of an evidence-based clinical practice guideline on linear growth measurement of children.

    PubMed

    Foote, Jan M; Brady, Linda H; Burke, Amber L; Cook, Jennifer S; Dutcher, Mary E; Gradoville, Kathleen M; Groos, Jennifer A; Kinkade, Kimberly M; Meeks, Reylon A; Mohr, Pamela J; Schultheis, Debra S; Walker, Brenda S; Phillips, Kirk T

    2011-08-01

    Growth is an important indicator of child health; however, measurements are frequently inaccurate and unreliable. This article reviews the literature on linear growth measurement error and describes methods used to develop and evaluate an evidence-based clinical practice guideline on the measurement of recumbent length and stature of infants, children, and adolescents. Systematic methods were used to identify evidence to answer clinical questions about growth measurement. A multidisciplinary team critically appraised and synthesized the evidence to develop clinical practice recommendations using an evidence-based practice rating scheme. The guideline was prospectively evaluated through internal and external reviews and a pilot study to ensure its validity and reliability. Adoption of the clinical practice guideline can improve the accuracy and reliability of growth measurement data.

  7. Developing strategies for on-call staffing: a working guideline for safe practices.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, John; Falcone, Deborah; Lopez, Jacy; Mislan, Linda; Murphy, Marialena; Acello, Toni

    2014-10-01

    Effective on-call clinical staffing is critical to providing perioperative services to patients requiring emergency surgical care. Without careful monitoring of continuous work hours and hours worked per week, staffing practices can adversely affect the ability of personnel to function and provide care. Managers and perioperative personnel must carefully evaluate their on-call schedule to ensure the provision of safe medical care for their patients. Perioperative leaders at two hospitals partnered to create a safety guideline for on-call staffing practices, which includes zone guides for determining workload intensity. This guideline has served to help managers evaluate the general safety of their staffing plan and identify on-call practices that may need improvement or support in their areas of responsibility. Key recommendations from the guideline can help perioperative managers at other facilities establish clinical staffing plans and on-call practices that are safe and effective.

  8. Incorporation of Pharmacogenomics into Routine Clinical Practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline Development Process

    PubMed Central

    Caudle, Kelly E.; Klein, Teri E.; Hoffman, James M.; Müller, Daniel J.; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M.; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F.; Schwab, Matthias; Agúndez, José A.G.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F.; Crews, Kristine R.; Scott, Stuart A.; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Stein, C. Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V.; Williams, Marc S.; Johnson, Samuel G.

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine’s Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines. PMID:24479687

  9. The dissemination of clinical practice guidelines over an intranet: an evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Stolte, J. J.; Ash, J.; Chin, H.

    1999-01-01

    This study compares two clinical practice guideline dissemination systems. It was hypothesized that placing guidelines on an intranet would make this information easier to retrieve. Retrieval time, retrieval accuracy, and ease of use were empirically evaluated. Sixteen clinicians from Kaiser Permanente volunteered to complete tasks that measured these variables. Time values were significantly longer for tasks completed with intranet guidelines (Intranet = 6.7 minutes, Paper = 5.7 minutes). Tasks completed with paper guidelines had a significantly higher percentage of perfect scores than those completed with the intranet (Paper = 85%, Intranet = 59%). There was no significant difference in reported ease of use. Simply placing clinical information on an electronic system does not guarantee that the information will be easier to retrieve. Such information needs to be fully integrated into the clinical decision making process. Computerizing guidelines may provide a necessary initial step toward this goal, but it does not represent the final solution. PMID:10566503

  10. Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guideline development process.

    PubMed

    Caudle, Kelly E; Klein, Teri E; Hoffman, James M; Muller, Daniel J; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F; Schwab, Matthias; Agundez, Jose A G; Freimuth, Robert R; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F; Crews, Kristine R; Scott, Stuart A; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J; Tyndale, Rachel F; Stein, C Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V; Williams, Marc S; Johnson, Samuel G

    2014-02-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines.

  11. Green Tea Gargling Effect on Cough & Hoarseness After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft

    PubMed Central

    Aryaeefar, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Hedayat; Yazdani-Charati, Jamshid; Soleimani, Aria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Endotracheal intubation is a method necessary for controlling and maintaining airway during general anesthesia. Cough and hoarseness are common complications after endotracheal intubation. Inflammation has an important role in postoperative cough and hoarseness outbreak. Also it has been stated that green tea has anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, the current study has been conducted to investigate green tea gargling solution effect on cough and hoarseness after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: In this single-blind, randomized, & controlled clinical trial, we enrolled 121 patients undergoing CABG admitted to the ICU. The intervention group participants were asked to gargle 30 cc of green tea solution. The control group patients gargled 30 cc of distilled water. An hour after extubation, the intervention group patients were asked to gargle 30 cc of green tea and the control group patients were required to gargle 30 cc of distilled water every 6 hour up to 24 hour (each patient for 4 times). Moreover, the cough and hoarseness questionnaire was also filled in 6, 12, and 24 hours after endotracheal extubation. Results: The results showed no significant differences among the patients in both groups regarding age, gender, body mass index, smoking history, and anesthesia duration. There was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of cough 12 hours after removing the endotracheal tube. At other times, there was no significant difference between the two groups considering cough and hoarseness. Conclusion: The present study results showed that green tea gargling does not decrease hoarseness. Though, cough occurrence was less in the intervention group than the other group. PMID:26156921

  12. Supporting the Uptake of Nursing Guidelines: what you really need to know to move nursing guidelines into practice.

    PubMed

    Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Ploeg, Jenny; Dobbins, Maureen; Jack, Susan

    2013-05-01

    There is a current push to use best practice guidelines (BPGs) in health care to enhance client care and outcomes. Even though intensive resources have been invested internationally to develop BPGs, a gap in knowledge exists about how to consistently and efficiently move them into practice. Constructivist grounded theory was used to explore the complex processes of a breastfeeding BPG implementation and uptake in three acute care hospitals. Interviews (n = 120) with 112 participants representing clients, nurses, lactation consultants, midwives, physicians, managers, administrators, and nurse educators as well as document and field note analysis informed this study. Data were analyzed using constant comparison and coding steps outlined by Charmaz: initial coding, selective (focused) coding, then theoretical coding. Triangulation of data types and sources were used as well as theoretical sampling. Data were collected from 2009 to 2010. Two sites showed BPG uptake while one did not. Factors present in the uptake sites included, ongoing passionate frontline leaders, the use of multifaceted strategies, and processes that occurred at organizational, leadership, individual and social levels. Particularly noteworthy was the transformation of individual nurses to believing in and using the BPG. Impacts occurred at client, nurse, unit, inter-professional, organizational and system levels. A conceptual framework: Supporting the Uptake of Nursing Guidelines, was developed that reveals essential processes used to facilitate BPG uptake into nursing practice and a process of nurse transformation to believing in and using the BPG. © Sigma Theta Tau International.

  13. Methodology for the MASCC/ISOO Mucositis Clinical Practice Guidelines Update.

    PubMed

    Bowen, J M; Elad, S; Hutchins, R D; Lalla, R V

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Mucositis Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) recently completed the process of updating the MASCC/ISOO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the prevention and treatment of mucositis. These guidelines, originally published in 2004, and last updated in 2007, provide clinicians with objective, evidence-based recommendations for the management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy. This brief paper describes the methodology used to conduct the most recent systematic review in 2011, and develop new guidelines, providing the basis for the update. The overriding aims of the process were to assess evidence of effectiveness of interventions for the prevention and treatment of mucositis and to produce clinical practice guidelines for the management of mucositis using best available evidence.

  14. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Williams, Jason; Bennett, Brad L; Stiller, Gregory; Islas, Arthur A; McCord, Seth

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to produce best practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of the injured or potentially injured spine in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made regarding several parameters related to spinal immobilization. These recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. A treatment algorithm based on the guidelines is presented. This is an updated version of original WMS Practice Guidelines for Spine Immobilization in the Austere Environment published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2013;24(3):241-252. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Best practice guidelines on publishing ethics: a publisher's perspective, 2nd edition.

    PubMed

    Graf, Chris; Deakin, Lisa; Docking, Martine; Jones, Jackie; Joshua, Sue; McKerahan, Tiffany; Ottmar, Martin; Stevens, Allen; Wates, Edward; Wyatt, Deborah

    2015-01-14

    Wiley has updated its publishing ethics guidelines, first published in 2006. These new guidelines provide guidance, resources, and practical advice on ethical concerns that arise in academic publishing for editors, authors, and researchers, among other audiences. New guidance is included about whistle blowers, animal research, clinical research, and clinical trial registration, addressing cultural differences, human rights, and confidentiality. The guidelines are uniquely interdisciplinary, and were reviewed by 24 editors and experts chosen from the wide range of communities that Wiley serves. These guidelines are also published in: Headache, International Journal of Clinical Practice, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Social Science Quarterly, and on the website http://exchanges.wiley.com/ethicsguidelines.

  16. Practicalizing piaget at the asep guidelines conference 1970

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawns, Rod

    1990-01-01

    ‘To understand is to invent’ (Piaget, 1968). This paper examines the attempt of Les Dale, the Assistant Director of the Australian Science Education Project, to apply Piagetian theory to describing a theory of instruction for the Project. The historiographical method consists in examining and comparing instances of curriculum invention in science education in Australia starting with contemporary and retrospective accounts of the key figures (Fawns 1988a). This paper is a case record (Stenhouse, 1978) which synthesises public and personal material in the files collected by the author. It has been subjected to review by Dale and others including those to whom it was presented at A.S.E.R.A. It accompanies an earlier paper (Fawns, 1989) which assessed the social context of the Debate at the Guidelines Conference 20 years on.

  17. Do published guidelines for evaluation of irritable bowel syndrome reflect practice?

    PubMed

    Yawn, B P; Lydick, E; Locke, G R; Wollan, P C; Bertram, S L; Kurland, M J

    2001-01-01

    The only US guidelines listed in the National Guideline Warehouse for the diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) are the expert opinion guidelines published by The American Gastroenterology Association. Although the listed target audience of these guidelines includes family physicians and general internists, the care recommended in the guidelines has not been compared to actual primary care practice. This study was designed to compare expert opinion guidelines with the actual primary care provided and to assess outcomes in the 3 years following the IBS diagnosis. This is a retrospective medical record review study using a random sample of incident IBS cases from all Olmsted County, Minnesota providers diagnosed between January 1, 1993 and December 31, 1995. Data was collected on all care and testing provided to the subjects as well as 3-year outcomes related to the IBS diagnosis. Of the 149 IBS patients, 99 were women and the mean age was 47.6 years. No patient had all of the diagnostic tests recommended in the guidelines. 42% had the basic blood tests of CBC and a chemistry panel. Sedimentation rate (2%) and serum thyroxine level (3%) were uncommon. Colon imaging studies were done in 41% including 74% of those over the age of 50. In the 3 years following the diagnosis, only one person had a change in diagnosis and no diagnoses of gastro-intestinal malignancies were made in the cohort. Primary care practice based diagnostic evaluations for IBS differ significantly from the specialty expert opinion-based guidelines. Implementation of the specialty guidelines in primary care practice would increase utilization with apparent limited improvement in diagnostic outcomes.

  18. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Paul J; Kris, Mark G; Basch, Ethan; Bohlke, Kari; Barbour, Sally Y; Clark-Snow, Rebecca Anne; Danso, Michael A; Dennis, Kristopher; Dupuis, L Lee; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Eng, Cathy; Feyer, Petra C; Jordan, Karin; Noonan, Kimberly; Sparacio, Dee; Somerfield, Mark R; Lyman, Gary H

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO guideline for antiemetics in oncology. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel and conducted a systematic review of the medical literature for the period of November 2009 to June 2016. Results Forty-one publications were included in this systematic review. A phase III randomized controlled trial demonstrated that adding olanzapine to antiemetic prophylaxis reduces the likelihood of nausea among adult patients who are treated with high emetic risk antineoplastic agents. Randomized controlled trials also support an expanded role for neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists in patients who are treated with chemotherapy. Recommendation Key updates include the addition of olanzapine to antiemetic regimens for adults who receive high-emetic-risk antineoplastic agents or who experience breakthrough nausea and vomiting; a recommendation to administer dexamethasone on day 1 only for adults who receive anthracycline and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy; and the addition of a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist for adults who receive carboplatin area under the curve ≥ 4 mg/mL per minute or high-dose chemotherapy, and for pediatric patients who receive high-emetic-risk antineoplastic agents. For radiation-induced nausea and vomiting, adjustments were made to anatomic regions, risk levels, and antiemetic administration schedules. Rescue therapy alone is now recommended for low-emetic-risk radiation therapy. The Expert Panel reiterated the importance of using the most effective antiemetic regimens that are appropriate for antineoplastic agents or radiotherapy being administered. Such regimens should be used with initial treatment, rather than first assessing the patient's emetic response with less-effective treatment. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/supportive-care-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  19. Clinical practice guideline for diagnosis and management of urticaria.

    PubMed

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Tuchinda, Papapit; Chularojanamontri, Leena; Chanyachailert, Pattriya; Korkij, Wiwat; Chunharas, Amornsri; Wananukul, Siriwan; Limpongsanurak, Wanida; Benjaponpitak, Suwat; Wisuthsarewong, Wanee; Aunhachoke, Kobkul; Wessagowit, Vesarat; Chatchatee, Pantipa; Wattanakrai, Penpun; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Noppakun, Nopadon; Vichyanond, Pakit; Suthipinittharm, Puan; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Singalavanija, Srisupalak; Ngamphaiboon, Jarungchit

    2016-09-01

    Urticaria is a common skin condition that can compromise quality of life and may affect individual performance at work or school. Remission is common in majority of patients with acute spontaneous urticaria (ASU); however, in chronic cases, less than 50% had remission. Angioedema either alone or with urticaria is associated with a much lower remission rate. Proper investigation and treatment is thus required. This guideline, a joint development of the Dermatological Society of Thailand, the Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Association of Thailand and the Pediatric Dermatological Society of Thailand, is graded and recommended based on published evidence and expert opinion. With simple algorithms, it is aimed to help guiding both adult and pediatric physicians to better managing patients who have urticaria with/without angioedema. Like other recent guideline, urticaria is classified into spontaneous versus inducible types. Patients present with angioedema or angioedema alone, drug association should be excluded, acetyl esterase inhibitors (ACEIs) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in particular. Routine laboratory investigation is not cost-effective in chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU), unless patients have clinical suggesting autoimmune diseases. Non-sedating H1-antihistamine is the first-line treatment for 2-4 weeks; if urticaria was not controlled, increasing the dose up to 4 times is recommended. Sedating first-generation antihistamines have not been proven more advantage than non-sedating antihistamines. The only strong evidence-based alternative regimen for CSU is an anti-IgE: omalizumab; due to very high cost it however might not be accessible in low-middle income countries. Non-pharmacotherapeutic means to minimize hyper-responsive skin are also important and recommended, such as prevention skin from drying, avoidance of hot shower, scrubbing, and excessive sun exposure.

  20. [Automatic application of clinical guidelines - from theory to practice].

    PubMed

    Shalom, Erez; Shahar, Yuval; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2013-05-01

    ClinicaL guidelines (GLs) have been shown to be a powerful tool for enhancing the uniformity and quality of care, reducing its costs. However, since they are typically represented in free text, this leads to low rates of compliance. Therefore, physicians might benefit from GL automated decision support. It should be noted that not many studies evaluate the effect of providing support for the application of GLs over significant stretches of time on the quality of medical decisions. In this paper, we will describe the general architecture of medical decision support systems, review several known GL application frameworks, and focus on the research performed in the medicaL informatics research center at Ben-Gurion University [BGU] of the Negev which developed the Digital ELectronic Guideline Library, called DeGeL. In particular, we will describe a new GL application framework called PICARD that is intended for GL application over time, while ensuring that the GLs recommendations were followed. We will briefly introduce a technical evaluation of PICARD in the cardiology domain to manage patients according to a Coumadin [Warfarin] protocoL, and a functional evaluation in a complex pre-eclampsia/ eclampsia GL in the OB/GYN domain, which we performed with 36 physicians. The results showed that the PICARD creates independence in the quality of the decisions from any particular physician, level of expertise, clinicaL scenario, or decision type within the scenarios. CurrentLy, PICARD is a core component in the EU Mobiguide project, which focuses on remote monitoring and care of chronic patients, using mobile devices to send alerts and recommendations.

  1. Invited Article: Conflicts of interest for authors of American Academy of Neurology clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Holloway, R G; Mooney, C J; Getchius, T S D; Edlund, W S; Miyasaki, J O

    2008-07-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) shape clinical care worldwide but are prone to potential error and bias due to conflicts of interest (COI). To explore the extent and scope of American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline author reported COI and implications for management; and to review process of AAN guideline COI management to highlight challenges, establish comparative benchmarks, and identify areas to be improved. Authors of AAN clinical practice guidelines with an active membership panel completed a COI reporting form. Authors were asked to report current interests including the 1 year prior to the date of completing the form. Interests include personal income relationships (consulting, speaker's bureaus, advisory boards), equity (stocks/stock options), patent/royalties, research, clinical practice, fiduciary interest in a company, and expert testimony. Comparisons were made between the two committees that oversee CPG development at the AAN: the Quality Standards Subcommittee (QSS) and the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment (TTA) Subcommittee. There were 50 CPG with an average of 8.5 authors per CPG. There were a total of 425 available authors, 351 of whom completed a COI reporting form (83% response rate). Forty-six of the 50 guidelines had at least one author with a COI. The most commonly reported COIs were research-related (45% of authors), clinical practice-related (42%), and personal income relationships (33%). Authors of QSS guidelines were more likely to have personal income COIs with pharmaceutical and medical device companies (39% vs 24%, p < 0.01), whereas authors of TTA guidelines were more likely to have clinical practice-related COIs (50% vs 38%, p < 0.05). A minority of authors had individual COIs exceeding >$25,000 or had multiple interests (>10) that overlapped with content of the guidelines. Conflicts of interest are common for authors of American Academy of Neurology clinical practice guidelines across many domains of personal and

  2. A Guideline for Parkinson's Disease Nurse Specialists, with Recommendations for Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Lennaerts, Herma; Groot, Marieke; Rood, Berna; Gilissen, Koen; Tulp, Hella; van Wensen, Erik; Munneke, Marten; van Laar, Teus; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2017-08-11

    Parkinson's Disease Nurse Specialists (PDNS) play an important role in the care for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their caregivers. Until now, there were no nursing guidelines in PD, and interventions were based solely on daily clinical practice because there is no evidence to support the merits of nursing interventions. Consequently, there is little uniformity in current care delivery. Developing a guideline for PDNS. We developed a guideline based on a questionnaire among PDNS and a literature review, supplemented with expert opinion plus the input of patients and caregivers. The questionnaire was filled in by 97 PDNS and 51 generic nurses with knowledge of PD to identify barriers in PD nursing care. Subsequently, we did a systematic literature search and transformed these sources of information into practice recommendations, which were developed according to international standards for guideline development. Based on the results of the questionnaire we identified seven specific core areas: defining the role of PDNS in terms of caseload, education, competences and care coordination; medication adherence; provision of information and education; coping; caregiver support; urogenital function; and orthostatic hypotension. The systematic literature search identified 186 studies, of which 33 studies were finally analyzed. Furthermore, we developed practice recommendations based on good clinical practice for the following areas: self-care, mental functioning, mobility, nutrition, sexuality, work, sleep, palliative care and complementary (integrative) care. These guidelines provide ground to harmonize care delivery by PDNS in clinical practice, and offer a foundation for future research.

  3. Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guidelines 2010 for antiemesis in oncology: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hideki; Saeki, Toshiaki; Aiba, Keisuke; Tamura, Kazuo; Aogi, Kenjiro; Eguchi, Kenji; Okita, Kenji; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryuhei; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Boku, Narikazu; Wada, Makoto; Akechi, Tatsuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Okawa, Yutaka; Onozawa, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hidenori; Shima, Yasuo; Shimoyama, Naohito; Takeda, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Akifumi; Ikeda, Tadashi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to disseminate the standard of antiemetic therapy for Japanese clinical oncologists. On the basis of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument, which reflects evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, a working group of the Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) reviewed clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis and performed a systematic review of evidence-based domestic practice guidelines for antiemetic therapy in Japan. In addition, because health-insurance systems in Japan are different from those in other countries, a consensus was reached regarding standard treatments for chemotherapy that induce nausea and vomiting. Current evidence was collected by use of MEDLINE, from materials from meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and from European Society of Medical Oncology/Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer guidelines for antiemesis. Initially, 21 clinical questions (CQ) were selected on the basis of CQs from other guidelines. Patients treated with highly emetic agents should receive a serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist. For patients with moderate emetic risk, 5HT3 receptor antagonists and dexamethasone were recommended, whereas for those receiving chemotherapy with low emetic risk dexamethasone only is recommended. Patients receiving high-emetic-risk radiation therapy should also receive a 5HT3 receptor antagonist. In this paper the 2010 JSCO clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis are presented in English; they reveal high concordance of Japanese medical circumstances with other antiemetic guidelines that are similarly based on evidence.

  4. Why we do what we do: implementation of practice guidelines by family nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Martin, Frances

    2008-10-01

    To examine who or what influenced family nurse practitioner (FNP) students' implementation of Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of Blood Pressure (JNC-7) guidelines for hypertension management. Eleven FNP students in their final semester completed a clinical course assignment in which they each provided care to five patients with hypertension (N = 55). Written responses to a 10-item tool eliciting patient management data as well as perceived barriers or facilitators to using JNC-7 clinical guidelines in precepted clinical settings were analyzed. The extent to which JNC-7 guidelines predicted clinical management of hypertension by student FNPs in primary care settings was congruent with the literature findings, reflecting a wide variation in implementation of guidelines from evidence-based practice (EBP) data. The literature supports utilization of clinical guidelines in patient care. Yet, implementation of guidelines in clinical practice is a complex phenomenon. Practitioners are looking for reliable evidence on which to base decision making. In the long term, EBP addresses some of the complexities of effective care delivery. The current trend is toward increasing utilization of evidence in caring for our patients. Implementation of EBP guidelines by preceptors in the workplace should increase as NP preceptors serve as role models of EBP implementation. Rewards may be important factors in implementation.

  5. Factors associated with nursing students' adherence to venous blood collection practice guidelines - A cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Karin; Brulin, Christine; Grankvist, Kjell; Juthberg, Christina

    2017-03-01

    Venous blood specimen collection is a common procedure that nursing students perform during pre-registration courses, and training for such collections takes place on campus as well as at clinical placements. However, levels of adherence to practice guidelines are still suboptimal among both nursing students and healthcare staff. We aimed to explore nursing students' adherence to the Swedish national venous blood specimen collection practice guidelines regarding patient identification and test request management and how this adherence is related to clinical experience, capability beliefs, research use, and the perceived social climate in clinical contexts. A survey with a cross-sectional design was conducted among 305 nursing students at a medium-sized university in Sweden. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used for data analysis. The survey showed that 82% of the students adhered to patient identification guideline practices and 80% to test request management practices. Factors associated with correct patient identification procedures were semester and frequency of research use. Factors associated with correct test request management were previous healthcare work experience, semester, and capability beliefs regarding academic abilities and evidence-based practice. We conclude that there is a need to develop educational tools to train students in research use and evidence-based practice in order to enhance guideline practice adherence and improve patient safety.

  6. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of constipation in adults. Part 2: Diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Serra, Jordi; Mascort-Roca, Juanjo; Marzo-Castillejo, Mercè; Aros, Silvia Delgado; Ferrándiz Santos, Juan; Rey Diaz Rubio, Enrique; Mearin Manrique, Fermín

    2017-04-01

    Constipation is a very common disorder that adversely affects well-being and quality of life. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are an essential element for proper patient management and safe, effective treatment. The aim of these guidelines is to provide health care professionals who care for patients with chronic constipation with a tool that allows them to make the best decisions about the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of constipation. The methodology used to draw up these guidelines is described in the Part 1. In this article we will discuss the recommendations for the diagnostic and therapeutic management of constipation.

  7. [Development and Quality Evaluation of Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines of Chinese Medicine].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yue-rong; Chen, Ke-ji

    2016-01-01

    More attentions have been paid to the development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (ECPGs) of Chinese medicine (CM). International guideline evaluation instruments such as Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE I) has been gradually applied in ECPGs quality evaluation of CM. Nowadays, there are some certain methodological defects in partial ECPGs of Chinese medicine, with relatively low applicability and slowly update. It is suggested to establish technical specifications of CM-ECPGs in accordance with the characteristics of CM and international general specification, strengthen the quality evaluation of CM-ECPGs, attach great importance to the regularly update as well as popularization and application of CM-ECPGs.

  8. Gastric Cancer, Version 3.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Ajani, Jaffer A; D'Amico, Thomas A; Almhanna, Khaldoun; Bentrem, David J; Chao, Joseph; Das, Prajnan; Denlinger, Crystal S; Fanta, Paul; Farjah, Farhood; Fuchs, Charles S; Gerdes, Hans; Gibson, Michael; Glasgow, Robert E; Hayman, James A; Hochwald, Steven; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Ilson, David H; Jaroszewski, Dawn; Johung, Kimberly L; Keswani, Rajesh N; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Korn, W Michael; Leong, Stephen; Linn, Catherine; Lockhart, A Craig; Ly, Quan P; Mulcahy, Mary F; Orringer, Mark B; Perry, Kyle A; Poultsides, George A; Scott, Walter J; Strong, Vivian E; Washington, Mary Kay; Weksler, Benny; Willett, Christopher G; Wright, Cameron D; Zelman, Debra; McMillian, Nicole; Sundar, Hema

    2016-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most frequently diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of death from cancer in the world. Several advances have been made in the staging procedures, imaging techniques, and treatment approaches. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Gastric Cancer provide an evidence- and consensus-based treatment approach for the management of patients with gastric cancer. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for staging, assessment of HER2 overexpression, systemic therapy for locally advanced or metastatic disease, and best supportive care for the prevention and management of symptoms due to advanced disease. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  9. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert; Williams, Jason; Bennett, Brad; Stiller, Gregory; Islas, Arthur; McCord, Seth

    2013-09-01

    In an effort to produce best-practice guidelines for spine immobilization in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for management of the injured or potentially injured spine in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made regarding several factors related to spinal immobilization. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each factor according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. A treatment algorithm based on the guidelines is presented.

  10. American Pancreatic Association Practice Guidelines in Chronic Pancreatitis: Evidence-Based Report on Diagnostic Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Conwell, Darwin L.; Lee, Linda S.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Longnecker, Daniel S.; Miller, Frank H.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Levy, Michael J.; Kwon, Richard; Lieb, John G.; Stevens, Tyler; Toskes, Philip P.; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Wu, Bechien U.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Vege, Santhi S.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains challenging in early stages of the disease. This report defines the diagnostic criteria useful in the assessment of patients with suspected and established chronic pancreatitis. All current diagnostic procedures are reviewed and evidence based statements are provided about their utility and limitations. Diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis are classified as definitive, probable or insufficient evidence. A diagnostic (STEP-wise; S-survey, T-tomography, E-endoscopy and P-pancreas function testing) algorithm is proposed that proceeds from a non-invasive to a more invasive approach. This algorithm maximizes specificity (low false positive rate) in subjects with chronic abdominal pain and equivocal imaging changes. Futhermore, a nomenclature is suggested to further characterize patients with established chronic pancreatitis based on TIGAR-O (T-toxic, I-idiopathic, G-genetic, A- autoimmune, R-recurrent and O-obstructive) etiology, gland morphology (Cambridge criteria) and physiologic state (exocrine, endocrine function) for uniformity across future multi-center research collaborations. This guideline will serve as a baseline manuscript that will be modified as new evidence becomes available and our knowledge of chronic pancreatitis improves. PMID:25333398

  11. The updating of clinical practice guidelines: insights from an international survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have become increasingly popular, and the methodology to develop guidelines has evolved enormously. However, little attention has been given to the updating process, in contrast to the appraisal of the available literature. We conducted an international survey to identify current practices in CPG updating and explored the need to standardize and improve the methods. Methods We developed a questionnaire (28 items) based on a review of the existing literature about guideline updating and expert comments. We carried out the survey between March and July 2009, and it was sent by email to 106 institutions: 69 members of the Guidelines International Network who declared that they developed CPGs; 30 institutions included in the U.S. National Guideline Clearinghouse database that published more than 20 CPGs; and 7 institutions selected by an expert committee. Results Forty-four institutions answered the questionnaire (42% response rate). In the final analysis, 39 completed questionnaires were included. Thirty-six institutions (92%) reported that they update their guidelines. Thirty-one institutions (86%) have a formal procedure for updating their guidelines, and 19 (53%) have a formal procedure for deciding when a guideline becomes out of date. Institutions describe the process as moderately rigorous (36%) or acknowledge that it could certainly be more rigorous (36%). Twenty-two institutions (61%) alert guideline users on their website when a guideline is older than three to five years or when there is a risk of being outdated. Twenty-five institutions (64%) support the concept of "living guidelines," which are continuously monitored and updated. Eighteen institutions (46%) have plans to design a protocol to improve their guideline-updating process, and 21 (54%) are willing to share resources with other organizations. Conclusions Our study is the first to describe the process of updating CPGs among prominent guideline

  12. Clinical practice guideline development manual: A quality-driven approach for translating evidence into action

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Richard M.; Shiffman, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Guidelines translate best evidence into best practice. A well-crafted guideline promotes quality by reducing healthcare variations, improving diagnostic accuracy, promoting effective therapy, and discouraging ineffective – or potentially harmful – interventions. Despite a plethora of published guidelines, methodology is often poorly defined and varies greatly within and among organizations. Purpose This manual describes the principles and practices used successfully by the American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery to produce quality-driven, evidence-based guidelines using efficient and transparent methodology for action-ready recommendations with multi-disciplinary applicability. The development process, which allows moving from conception to completion in twelve months, emphasizes a logical sequence of key action statements supported by amplifying text, evidence profiles, and recommendation grades that link action to evidence. Conclusions As clinical practice guidelines become more prominent as a key metric of quality healthcare, organizations must develop efficient production strategies that balance rigor and pragmatism. Equally important, clinicians must become savvy in understanding what guidelines are – and are not – and how they are best utilized to improve care. The information in this manual should help clinicians and organizations achieve these goals. PMID:19464525

  13. International experts' practice in the antibiotic therapy of infective endocarditis is not following the guidelines.

    PubMed

    Tissot-Dupont, H; Casalta, J P; Gouriet, F; Hubert, S; Salaun, E; Habib, G; Fernandez-Gerlinger, M P; Mainardi, J L; Tattevin, P; Revest, M; Lucht, F; Botelho-Nevers, E; Gagneux-Brunon, A; Snygg-Martin, U; Chan, K L; Bishara, J; Vilacosta, I; Olmos, C; San Román, J A; López, J; Tornos, P; Fernández-Hidalgo, N; Durante-Mangoni, E; Utili, R; Paul, M; Baddour, L M; DeSimone, D C; Sohail, M R; Steckelberg, J M; Wilson, W R; Raoult, D

    2017-10-01

    The management of infective endocarditis (IE) may differ from international guidelines, even in reference centres. This is probably because most recommendations are not based on hard evidence, so the consensus obtained for the guidelines does not represent actual practices. For this reason, we aimed to evaluate this question in the particular field of antibiotic therapy. Thirteen international centres specialized in the management of IE were selected, according to their reputation, clinical results, original research publications and quotations. They were asked to detail their actual practice in terms of IE antibiotic treatment in various bacteriological and clinical situations. They were also asked to declare their IE-related in-hospital mortality for the year 2015. The global compliance with guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy was 58%, revealing the differences between theoretical 'consensus', local recommendations and actual practice. Some conflicts of interest were also probably expressed. The adherence to guidelines was 100% when the protocol was simple, and decreased with the seriousness of the situation (Staphylococus spp. 54%-62%) or in blood-culture-negative endocarditis (0%-15%) that requires adaptation to clinical and epidemiological data. Worldwide experts in IE management, although the majority of them were involved and co-signed the guidelines, do not follow international consensus guidelines on the particular point of the use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evolution of clinical practice guidelines: evidence supporting expanded use of medicines.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Robert W; Dean, Bonnie B

    2006-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the primary factor underlying increased spending on pharmaceuticals has been the rising utilization of medications, rather than increases in unit drug price. This study examined the evolution of clinical practice guidelines to assess possible reasons for the rising drug volume. Clinical practice guidelines from 1970 to the present were reviewed for the six most prevalent treatable medical conditions/risk factors listed as priority areas by the Institute of Medicine. We searched the National Guidelines Clearinghouse, PubMed and Medline databases, and Web sites of relevant national organizations for US clinical practice guidelines published through January 2005. Information pertaining to the therapeutic regimen (eg, the frequency and duration of recommended treatment, when treatment should be initiated, the patient population for whom the guideline was intended) was abstracted and entered into evidence tables. Changes in guidelines were distributed across three themes that recommended evidence-based increases in medication use, including: (1) changes in the size of the treatable population; (2) changes in the number and type of recommended pharmaceutical therapeutic options, including movement from monotherapy to combination therapy, treatment of comorbidities, and use of newer types of medicines; and (3) changes in the therapeutic regimen, including a shift from episodic care to preventive and chronic care. Many of these changes point to an important, but not often noticed, addition of secondary prevention of disease effects to the objectives of medical care. These trends are likely to continue with important economic, clinical, and policy ramifications.

  15. Clinical practice guideline development manual: a quality-driven approach for translating evidence into action.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shiffman, Richard N

    2009-06-01

    Guidelines translate best evidence into best practice. A well-crafted guideline promotes quality by reducing health-care variations, improving diagnostic accuracy, promoting effective therapy, and discouraging ineffective-or potentially harmful-interventions. Despite a plethora of published guidelines, methodology is often poorly defined and varies greatly within and among organizations. This manual describes the principles and practices used successfully by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery to produce quality-driven, evidence-based guidelines using efficient and transparent methodology for action-ready recommendations with multidisciplinary applicability. The development process, which allows moving from conception to completion in 12 months, emphasizes a logical sequence of key action statements supported by amplifying text, evidence profiles, and recommendation grades that link action to evidence. As clinical practice guidelines become more prominent as a key metric of quality health care, organizations must develop efficient production strategies that balance rigor and pragmatism. Equally important, clinicians must become savvy in understanding what guidelines are-and are not-and how they are best utilized to improve care. The information in this manual should help clinicians and organizations achieve these goals.

  16. The relationship between organizational culture and implementation of clinical practice guidelines: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Dodek, Peter; Cahill, Naomi E; Heyland, Daren K

    2010-01-01

    The context in which critical care providers work has been shown to be associated with adherence to recommendations of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Consideration of contextual factors such as organizational culture may therefore be important when implementing guidelines. Organizational culture has been defined simply as "how things are around here" and encompasses leadership, communication, teamwork, conflict resolution, and other domains. This narrative review highlights the results of recent quantitative and qualitative studies, including studies on adherence to nutrition guidelines in the critical care setting, which demonstrate that elements of organizational culture, such as leadership support, interprofessional collaboration, and shared beliefs about the utility of guidelines, influence adherence to guideline recommendations. Outside nutrition therapy, there is emerging evidence that strategies focusing on organizational change (eg, revision of professional roles, interdisciplinary teams, integrated care delivery, computer systems, and continuous quality improvement) can favorably influence professional performance and patient outcomes. Consequently, future interventions aimed at implementing nutrition guidelines should aim to measure and take into account organizational culture, in addition to considering the characteristics of the patient, provider, and guideline. Further high quality, multimethod studies are required to improve our understanding of how culture influences guideline implementation, and which organizational change strategies might be most effective in optimizing nutrition therapy.

  17. Implementing Asthma Guidelines Using Practice Facilitation and Local Learning Collaboratives: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mold, James W.; Fox, Chester; Wisniewski, Angela; Lipman, Paula Darby; Krauss, Margot R.; Harris, D. Robert; Aspy, Cheryl; Cohen, Rachel A.; Elward, Kurt; Frame, Paul; Yawn, Barbara P.; Solberg, Leif I.; Gonin, René

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Guideline implementation in primary care has proven difficult. Although external assistance through performance feedback, academic detailing, practice facilitation (PF), and learning collaboratives seems to help, the best combination of interventions has not been determined. METHODS In a cluster randomized trial, we compared the independent and combined effectiveness of PF and local learning collaboratives (LLCs), combined with performance feedback and academic detailing, with performance feedback and academic detailing alone on implementation of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s Asthma Guidelines. The study was conducted in 3 primary care practice-based research networks. Medical records of patients with asthma seen during pre- and postintervention periods were abstracted to determine adherence to 6 guideline recommendations. McNemar’s test and multivariate modeling were used to evaluate the impact of the interventions. RESULTS Across 43 practices, 1,016 patients met inclusion criteria. Overall, adherence to all 6 recommendations increased (P ≤.002). Examination of improvement by study arm in unadjusted analyses showed that practices in the control arm significantly improved adherence to 2 of 6 recommendations, whereas practices in the PF arm improved in 3, practices in the LLCs improved in 4, and practices in the PF + LLC arm improved in 5 of 6 recommendations. In multivariate modeling, PF practices significantly improved assessment of asthma severity (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% CI, 1.7–3.8) and assessment of asthma level of control (OR = 2.3, 95% CI, 1.5–3.5) compared with control practices. Practices assigned to LLCs did not improve significantly more than control practices for any recommendation. CONCLUSIONS Addition of PF to performance feedback and academic detailing was helpful to practices attempting to improve adherence to asthma guidelines. PMID:24821894

  18. Clinical practice guideline: tonsillitis I. Diagnostics and nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Windfuhr, Jochen P; Toepfner, Nicole; Steffen, Gregor; Waldfahrer, Frank; Berner, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    More than 120,000 patients are treated annually in Germany to resolve repeated episodes of acute tonsillitis. Therapy is aiming at symptom regression, avoidance of complications, reduction in the number of disease-related absences in school or at work, increased cost-effectiveness and improved quality of life. The purpose of this part of the guideline is to provide clinicians in any setting with a clinically focused multi-disciplinary guidance through different conservative treatment options in order to reduce inappropriate variation in clinical care, improve clinical outcome and reduce harm. Surgical management in terms of intracapsular as well as extracapsular tonsillectomy (i.e. tonsillotomy) is the subject of part II of this guideline. To estimate the probability of tonsillitis caused by β-hemolytic streptococci, a diagnostic scoring system according to Centor or McIsaac is suggested. If therapy is considered, a positive score of ≥3 should lead to pharyngeal swab or rapid test or culture in order to identify β-hemolytic streptococci. Routinely performed blood tests for acute tonsillitis are not indicated. After acute streptococcal tonsillitis, there is no need to repeat a pharyngeal swab or any other routine blood tests, urine examinations or cardiological diagnostics such as ECG. The determination of the antistreptolysin O-titer (ASLO titer) and other antistreptococcal antibody titers do not have any value in relation to acute tonsillitis with or without pharyngitis and should not be performed. First-line therapy of β-hemolytic streptococci consists of oral penicillin. Instead of phenoxymethylpenicillin-potassium (penicillin V potassium), also phenoxymethlpenicillin-benzathine with a clearly longer half-life can be used. Oral intake for 7 days of one of both the drugs is recommended. Alternative treatment with oral cephalosporins (e.g. cefadroxil, cefalexin) is indicated only in cases of penicillin failure, frequent recurrences, and whenever a more

  19. Prenatal Depression: Best Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Laura H.; Gintner, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide counselors with an overview of best practices for the treatment of women who experience prenatal depression (PND). The authors first discuss issues in the screening and diagnosis of PND. Next, the 2 most common treatments, antidepressants and psychotherapy, are reviewed and discussed in relation to current…

  20. Electronic Communities of Practice: Guidelines from a Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kendall; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Norman, Cameron D.; Li, Linda C.; Olatunbosun, Tunde; Cressman, Celine; Nguyen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The timely incorporation of health research into the routine practice of individual health practitioners and interprofessional teams is a widely recognized and ongoing challenge. Health professional engagement and learning is an important cog in the wheel of knowledge translation; passive dissemination of evidence through journals and clinical…

  1. Examining Psychosocial Identity Development Theories: A Guideline for Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkouti, Ibrahim Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Erikson's psychosocial identity development theory, identifies prominent theorists who extended his work, examines the limitations of the theory and explains how this theory can be applied to student affairs practices. Furthermore, two different studies that clarify the relationship between psychosocial factors…

  2. Examining Psychosocial Identity Development Theories: A Guideline for Professional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkouti, Ibrahim Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Erikson's psychosocial identity development theory, identifies prominent theorists who extended his work, examines the limitations of the theory and explains how this theory can be applied to student affairs practices. Furthermore, two different studies that clarify the relationship between psychosocial factors…

  3. Ethical Guidelines and Practices for US Military Medical Professionals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-03

    through imitation and practice. It dates back to Aristotle , who argued that the purpose of mankind is to exercise virtue (or excellence... Aristotle claimed that virtues are a mean between two extremes. For example, courage is a means between cowardice (too little courage) and foolhardiness

  4. Practical Guidelines for Evaluating Sampling Designs in Survey Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao; Wang, Lin

    The popularity of sample surveys in evaluation and research makes it necessary for consumers to tell a good survey from a poor one. Several sources were identified that gave advice on how to evaluate a sample design used in a survey study. The sources are either too limited or too extensive to be useful practically. The purpose of this paper is to…

  5. Learning outside the Classroom: Theory and Guidelines for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beames, Simon; Higgins, Pete; Nicol, Robbie

    2011-01-01

    "Learning Outside the Classroom" outlines theory and practice that will enable and encourage teachers to systematically and progressively incorporate meaningful outdoor learning opportunities into their daily teaching activities in a wide variety of environments and with diverse populations of pupils. This is the first textbook based around the…

  6. Veterans in the College Classroom: Guidelines for Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Omar S.; Springer, Stephen B.; Nelson, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) remain central topics in institutions' efforts to address student veteran needs. From the authors' experiences with student veterans, they present the five principles of effective instructional practice identified by the National Research Council (NRC) within the context of…

  7. Guidelines for client selection in the home birth midwifery practice.

    PubMed

    Vedam, S; Kolodji, Y

    1995-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the safety of planned home birth; yet, few have identified specific criteria for selection of the home birth candidate. Home birth midwifery practice achieves successful outcomes by appropriate evaluation of medical and obstetric risk factors, as well as an ongoing evaluation and development of the client's psychosocial resources and the midwife-client relationship. Relevant medical and obstetric factors include significant medical illnesses, antenatal course, smoking history, commitment to breastfeeding, and the woman's nutritional profile. Social and environmental factors include the need for a stable birthing environment, practical means for hospital transfer, and the presence of loving support for the client during and after delivery. The client's psychological preparedness is a critical variable that may affect the ability to deliver in the home setting without analgesia or labor augmentation. Active participation in prenatal care, preparation of the home and family members, and a realistic attitude regarding the risks, benefits, and potential complications of planned home delivery are all components of this preparedness. Because midwifery practice promotes midwife-client rapport by careful attention to both medical and psychosocial issues during prenatal care, this relationship is itself an important predictor of the client's suitability for home birth. The quality of midwife-client interactions may influence not only the decision to plan a home birth but the indications for hospital transfer should problems arise. In this article, existing literature is reviewed and criteria are proposed for selecting home birth candidates within the American midwifery practice setting.

  8. Practical School Security: Basic Guidelines for Safe and Secure Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    This book is written primarily for elementary and secondary school administrators and teachers, but college faculty involved in providing teacher or administrator education would also benefit from the practical approach to issues of school security. Chapters 1 through 3 establish a framework for dealing with the myths and realities of school…

  9. Veterans in the College Classroom: Guidelines for Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Omar S.; Springer, Stephen B.; Nelson, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) remain central topics in institutions' efforts to address student veteran needs. From the authors' experiences with student veterans, they present the five principles of effective instructional practice identified by the National Research Council (NRC) within the context of…

  10. Learning outside the Classroom: Theory and Guidelines for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beames, Simon; Higgins, Pete; Nicol, Robbie

    2011-01-01

    "Learning Outside the Classroom" outlines theory and practice that will enable and encourage teachers to systematically and progressively incorporate meaningful outdoor learning opportunities into their daily teaching activities in a wide variety of environments and with diverse populations of pupils. This is the first textbook based around the…

  11. Electronic Communities of Practice: Guidelines from a Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Kendall; Jarvis-Selinger, Sandra; Norman, Cameron D.; Li, Linda C.; Olatunbosun, Tunde; Cressman, Celine; Nguyen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The timely incorporation of health research into the routine practice of individual health practitioners and interprofessional teams is a widely recognized and ongoing challenge. Health professional engagement and learning is an important cog in the wheel of knowledge translation; passive dissemination of evidence through journals and clinical…

  12. Practical School Security: Basic Guidelines for Safe and Secure Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    This book is written primarily for elementary and secondary school administrators and teachers, but college faculty involved in providing teacher or administrator education would also benefit from the practical approach to issues of school security. Chapters 1 through 3 establish a framework for dealing with the myths and realities of school…

  13. Prenatal Depression: Best Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Laura H.; Gintner, Gary G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide counselors with an overview of best practices for the treatment of women who experience prenatal depression (PND). The authors first discuss issues in the screening and diagnosis of PND. Next, the 2 most common treatments, antidepressants and psychotherapy, are reviewed and discussed in relation to current…

  14. Communication Intervention in Natural Learning Environments: Guidelines for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Nicole; Dunst, Carl J.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional framework for defining different aspects of natural learning environments is used to organize and describe natural communication intervention practices. Seven applicable communication intervention methods and strategies easily implemented in natural environments by speech therapists are described, as are reflective procedures.…

  15. Guide to good practices for developing learning objectives. DOE guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This guide to good practices provides information and guidance on the types of, and the development of learning objectives in performance-based training system at reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities. Contractors are encouraged to consider this guidance as a reference when developing new learning objectives or refining existing ones. Training managers, designers, developers, and instructors are the intended audiences.

  16. [Role of secondary care too small in Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) practice guideline 'Dementia'].

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M; Lemstra, Evelien W; Verhey, Frans R J

    2012-01-01

    The third revision of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Dementia' is a major improvement and stimulates the general practitioner by providing concrete advice on stepped care in dementia diagnostics and organizing care management in order to obtain improvement in the quality and realization of dementia care in the primary care setting. However, this practice guideline does not address more effective and efficient dementia care by collaboration between primary and secondary care as it discourages the prescription of cholinesterase inhibitors and recommends limiting further diagnostic procedures to patients in whom a treatable condition is likely. Although, this new practice guideline strengthens the central role of the general practitioner in Dutch dementia care, this role would be further reinforced if general practitioners were to adopt integrated diagnostics of dementia and relevant additional diseases burden as the starting point.

  17. Cost of Medications Recommended by Canadian Acne Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Czilli, Tiffany; Tan, Jerry; Knezevic, Sanja; Peters, Colin

    2016-11-01

    Acne affects a large proportion of the Canadian population and has psychosocial and financial consequences. We provide cost information for treatments recommended by the Canadian acne guidelines. Highest level recommendations were selected for 3-month usage cost. Three-month estimated treatment costs were as follows: topical retinoids ($14.40-$73.80), benzoyl peroxide (BPO; $6.75), fixed-dose BPO-clindamycin ($40.95-$44.10) and BPO-adapalene ($73.80), oral antibiotics ($25.20 for tetracycline 250 mg qid; $52.20 and $52.74 for doxycycline 50 mg bid and 100 mg od, respectively), and hormonal therapy ($26.46-$37.80 for ethinyl estradiol [EE] 0.030 mg/drospirenone 3mg and $75.60-108.99 for EE 0.035 mg/cyproterone acetate 2 mg). Oral isotretinoin 3-month costs ranged from $393.96 to $478.80. Awareness of costs of recommended treatments may facilitate improved outcomes by increasing procurement and adherence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. AAA (2010) CAPD clinical practice guidelines: need for an update.

    PubMed

    DeBonis, David A

    2017-09-01

    Review and critique of the clinical value of the AAA CAPD guidance document in light of criteria for credible and useful guidance documents, as discussed by Field and Lohr. A qualitative review of the of the AAA CAPD guidelines using a framework by Field and Lohr to assess their relative value in supporting the assessment and management of CAPD referrals. Relevant literature available through electronic search tools and published texts were used along with the AAA CAPD guidance document and the chapter by Field and Lohr. The AAA document does not meet many of the key requirements discussed by Field and Lohr. It does not reflect the current literature, fails to help clinicians understand for whom auditory processing testing and intervention would be most useful, includes contradictory suggestions which reduce clarity and appears to avoid conclusions that might cast the CAPD construct in a negative light. It also does not include input from diverse affected groups. All of these reduce the document's credibility. The AAA CAPD guidance document will need to be updated and re-conceptualised in order to provide meaningful guidance for clinicians.

  19. Borderline intellectual functioning: consensus and good practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; García-Gutiérrez, Juan Carlos; Ruiz Gutiérrez-Colosía, Mencía; Artigas-Pallarès, Josep; García Ibáñez, José; González Pérez, Joan; Nadal Pla, Margarida; Aguilera Inés, Francisco; Isus, Sofia; Cereza, Josep Maria; Poole, Miriam; Portero Lazcano, Guillermo; Monzón, Patricio; Leiva, Marta; Parellada, Mara; García Nonell, Katia; Martínez I Hernández, Andreu; Rigau, Eugenia; Martínez-Leal, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The Borderline Intellectual Functioning (BIF) is conceptualized as the frontier that delimits "normal" intellectual functioning from intellectual disability (IQ 71-85). In spite of its magnitude, its prevalence cannot be quantified and its diagnosis has not yet been defined. To elaborate a conceptual framework and to establish consensus guidelines. A mixed qualitative methodology, including frame analysis and nominal groups techniques, was used. The literature was extensively reviewed in evidence based medical databases, scientific publications, and the grey literature. This information was studied and a framing document was prepared. Scientific publications covering BIF are scarce. The term that yields a bigger number of results is "Borderline Intelligence". The Working Group detected a number of areas in which consensus was needed and wrote a consensus document covering the conclusions of the experts and the framing document. It is a priority to reach an international consensus about the BIF construct and its operative criteria, as well as to develop specific tools for screening and diagnosis. It is also necessary to define criteria that enable its incidence and prevalence. To know what interventions are the most efficient, and what are the needs of this population, is vital to implement an integral model of care centred on the individual. Copyright © 2011 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. [Clinical practice guideline. Traumatic urethral stenosis in males].

    PubMed

    Serrano-Brambila, Eduardo Alonso; Moreno-Alcázar, Othón Martino; Neri-Páez, Edgar; Sánchez-Martínez, Luis Carlos; Hernández-Ordóñez, Octavio Francisco; Morales-Morales, Arturo; Basavilvazo-Rodríguez, M Antonia; Torres-Arreola, Laura del Pilar; Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of urethral stenosis in Mexico had not been documented. At the Centro Médico Nacional La Raza, during the year 2010, 629 patients with urethral stenosis were attended as outpatient consultation: 85 % with previous urethral stenosis and 15 % with urethral treatment complication. Urethral stenosis is a chronic illness, with multiple etiological origins and the handling is controversial. It has a great negative impact for the patients and the recurrence reaches 85 %. The treatment consisted of an invasive approach (urethral dilations, endoscopy procedure) and open surgery (urethroplasty). The World Health Organization and World Alliance take the world challenge about the urinary tract infections associated with the attention of patients, focused on urethral stenosis. The objective of the following clinical guide is to offer to the health professional a clinical tool for making decisions in the handling of the hardship or masculine urethral stenosis, based on the best available evidence, carrying out in systematized form with bibliographical research using validated terms of the MeSH: urethral structures, in the databases Trip database, PubMed, Guideline Clearinghouse, Cochrane Library and Ovid.

  1. Practice Patterns and Opinions on Current Clinical Practice Guidelines Regarding the Management of Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yoonsun; Zimmermann, Anthony E; Thomas, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine current delirium practices in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting and evaluate awareness and adoption of the 2013 Pain, Agitation, and Delirium (PAD) guidelines with emphasis on delirium management. A large-scale, multidisciplinary, online survey was administered to physician, pharmacist, nurse, and mid-level practitioner members of the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) between September 2014 and October 2014. A total of 635 respondents completed the survey. Nonpharmacologic interventions such as early mobilization were used in most ICUs (83%) for prevention of delirium. A majority of respondents (97%) reported using pharmacologic agents to treat hyperactive delirium. Ninety percent of the respondents answered that they were aware of the 2013 PAD guidelines, and 75% of respondents felt that their delirium practices have been changed as a result of the new guidelines. In addition, logistic regression analysis of this study showed that respondents who use delirium screening tools were twice more likely to be fully aware of key components of the updated guidelines (odds ratio [OR] = 2.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.20-3.60). Most critical care practitioners are fully aware and knowledgeable of key recommendations in the new guidelines and have changed their delirium practices accordingly.

  2. Leading on the frontlines with passion and persistence: a necessary condition for Breastfeeding Best Practice Guideline uptake.

    PubMed

    Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Ploeg, Jenny; Jack, Susan; Dobbins, Maureen

    2013-06-01

    The research question explored was what are the processes and strategies used by frontline leaders to support the uptake of the Breastfeeding Best Practice Guideline by nurses in maternity care practice settings? Best Practice Guidelines have been shown to enhance client care and outcomes. Leadership is known to have a key role in moving Best Practice Guidelines into nursing practice yet how this happens is poorly understood. This insight is needed to consistently and efficiently facilitate Best Practice Guideline uptake into clinical practice. Constructivist grounded theory was used to explore the social processes and strategies involved in facilitating Best Practice Guideline uptake. Purposive, criterion-based, theoretical and negative case sampling were used recruiting 58 health professionals and 54 clients. Triangulation and constant comparison of data sources and types (interviews, documents and field notes) were used for analysis and rigour. Passionate, persistent, respected frontline leaders using tailored, multifaceted strategies aimed at three groups of nurse adopters effectively support the uptake of the Breastfeeding Best Practice Guideline in nursing practice. Successful uptake strategies used by frontline leaders that are new or underdeveloped in the previous literature are presented. The study findings illuminated multidimensional, tailored strategies that frontline leaders use to facilitate the uptake of Best Practice Guidelines. Attention to individual attitudes and beliefs, as well as organisational, interorganisational and interprofessional partnerships are vital to uptake. Organisations that aspire to foster Best Practice Guideline uptake must invest in frontline leaders to 'make it happen' and sustain Best Practice Guideline uptake in practice. Understanding how frontline leaders facilitate Best Practice Guideline uptake is essential to selecting, educating and supporting them to foster desired practice changes. Strategies are explicated that

  3. Prophylactic Antibiotic Guidelines in Modern Interventional Radiology Practice

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eunice; Tam, Matthew D.B.S.; Kikano, Raghid N.; Karuppasamy, Karunakaravel

    2010-01-01

    Modern interventional radiology practice is continuously evolving. Developments include increases in the number of central venous catheter placements and tumor treatments (uterine fibroid therapy, radio- and chemoembolization of liver tumor, percutaneous radiofrequency and cryoablation), and new procedures such as abdominal aortic aneurysm stent-graft repair, vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty, and varicose vein therapies. There have also been recent advancements in standard biliary and urinary drainage procedures, percutaneous gastrointestinal feeding tube placement, and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Prophylactic antibiotics have become the standard of care in many departments, with little clinical data to support its wide acceptance. The rise in antibiotic-resistant strains of organisms in all hospitals worldwide have forced every department to question the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The authors review the evidence behind use of prophylactic antibiotics in standard interventional radiology procedures, as well as in newer procedures that have only recently been incorporated into interventional radiology practice. PMID:22550374

  4. Video-assisted feedback in general practice internships using German general practitioner's guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bölter, Regine; Freund, Tobias; Ledig, Thomas; Boll, Bernhard; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Roos, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The planned modification of the Medical Licenses Act in Germany will strengthen the specialty of general practice. Therefore, medical students should get to know the daily routine of general practitioners during their academic studies. At least 10% of students should get the possibility to spend one quarter of the internship, in the last year of their academic studies, in a practice of family medicine. The demonstrated teaching method aims at giving feedback to the student based on video recordings of patient consultations (student-patient) with the help of a checklist. Video-feedback is already successful used in medical teaching in Germany and abroad. This feasibility study aims at assessing the practicability of video-assisted feedback as a teaching method during internship in general practice. First of all, the general practice chooses a guideline as the learning objective. Secondly, a subsequent patient - student - consultation is recorded on video. Afterwards, a video-assisted formative feedback is given by the physician. A checklist with learning objectives (communication, medical examination, a structured case report according to the guideline) is used to structure the feedback content. The feasibility was assessed by a semi structured interview in order to gain insight into barriers and challenges for future implementation. The teaching method was performed in one general practice. Afterwards the teaching physician and the trainee intern were interviewed. The Following four main categories were identified: feasibility, performance, implementation in daily routine, challenges of the teaching concept.The results of the feasibility study show general practicability of this approach. Installing a video camera in one examination room may solve technical problems. The trainee intern mentioned theoretical and practical benefits using the guideline. The teaching physician noted the challenge to reflect on his daily routines in the light of evidence

  5. Video-assisted feedback in general practice internships using German general practitioner's guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Bölter, Regine; Freund, Tobias; Ledig, Thomas; Boll, Bernhard; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Roos, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The planned modification of the Medical Licenses Act in Germany will strengthen the specialty of general practice. Therefore, medical students should get to know the daily routine of general practitioners during their academic studies. At least 10% of students should get the possibility to spend one quarter of the internship, in the last year of their academic studies, in a practice of family medicine. The demonstrated teaching method aims at giving feedback to the student based on video recordings of patient consultations (student-patient) with the help of a checklist. Video-feedback is already successful used in medical teaching in Germany and abroad. This feasibility study aims at assessing the practicability of video-assisted feedback as a teaching method during internship in general practice. Teaching method: First of all, the general practice chooses a guideline as the learning objective. Secondly, a subsequent patient – student – consultation is recorded on video. Afterwards, a video-assisted formative feedback is given by the physician. A checklist with learning objectives (communication, medical examination, a structured case report according to the guideline) is used to structure the feedback content. Feasibility: The feasibility was assessed by a semi structured interview in order to gain insight into barriers and challenges for future implementation. The teaching method was performed in one general practice. Afterwards the teaching physician and the trainee intern were interviewed. The following four main categories were identified: feasibility, performance, implementation in daily routine, challenges of the teaching concept. The results of the feasibility study show general practicability of this approach. Installing a video camera in one examination room may solve technical problems. The trainee intern mentioned theoretical and practical benefits using the guideline. The teaching physician noted the challenge to reflect on his daily

  6. Synthesising practice guidelines for the development of community-based exercise programmes after stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple guidelines are often available to inform practice in complex interventions. Guidance implementation may be facilitated if it is tailored to particular clinical issues and contexts. It should also aim to specify all elements of interventions that may mediate and modify effectiveness, including both their content and delivery. We conducted a focused synthesis of recommendations from stroke practice guidelines to produce a structured and comprehensive account to facilitate the development of community-based exercise programmes after stroke. Methods Published stroke clinical practice guidelines were searched for recommendations relevant to the content and delivery of community-based exercise interventions after stroke. These were synthesised using a framework based on target intervention outcomes, personal and programme proximal objectives, and recommended strategies. Results Nineteen guidelines were included in the synthesis (STRIDES; STroke Rehabilitation Intervention-Development Evidence Synthesis). Eight target outcomes, 14 proximal objectives, and 94 recommended strategies were identified. The synthesis was structured to present best practice recommendations in a format that could be used by intervention programme developers. It addresses both programme content and context, including personal factors, service standards and delivery issues. Some recommendations relating to content, and many relating to delivery and other contextual issues, were based on low level evidence or expert opinion. Where opinion varied, the synthesis indicates the range of best practice options suggested in guidelines. Conclusions The synthesis may assist implementation of best practice by providing a structured intervention description that focuses on a particular clinical application, addresses practical issues involved in programme development and provision, and illustrates the range of best-practice options available to users where robust evidence is lacking. The

  7. [Clinical Practice Guideline for the proper use and cessation of hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    "Clinical Practice Guideline for the proper use and cessation of hypnotics" has been developed by focusing on insomnia treatments with acceptable safety and effectiveness. In this guideline, forty clinical questions encountered in clinical practice starting from the initial treatment of insomnia, optimization of pharmacotherapy, sleep hygiene instruction and cognitive behavioral therapy, specific treatment for insomnia with various medical conditions, responding to chronic insomnia, goal setting of treatment and methods for cessation of hypnotics, have been set. Based on the existing evidence associated with the clinical questions, also on the basis of expert consensus if sufficient evidence does not exist, we set clinical recommendations for the physicians and accessible information for patients.

  8. [Practical guidelines for peer support programmes for mental health problems].

    PubMed

    Campos, Filipa; Sousa, Ana; Rodrigues, Vânia; Marques, António; Queirós, Cristina; Dores, Artemisa

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the guiding principles for the implementation of peer support programmes in Portugal. The study was divided in 2 phases. In the first phase a systematic review of 112 papers indexed in ISI and EBSCO databases (2001 to 2012) was conducted. In the second phase clinicians, researchers, and people with psychiatric disabilities were invited to take part in a two-round online survey based on the Delphi process to rate the importance of statements generated from the systematic review. Data were analysed with NVivo 9 and SPSS 19. During the Delphi round 72 experts were contacted, 44 participated in the second round. A consensus was achieved on major statements, with 84% of the sentences obtaining a consensus and 8 key recommendations covering goals of peer support, selection of peer supporters, training and accreditation, role of mental health professionals, role of peer supporters, access to peer supporters, looking after peer supporters, and programme evaluation were based on these statements. Use of peer support for mental health problems is still underexplored and surrounded by some controversy and ambiguity. However, its organization and proper monitoring appears to enhance the quality of life and social inclusion of people with mental illness. This highlights the importance of conducting studies that increase our knowledge of these programmes and determining guidelines for their implementation. This national consensus may be used as a starting point for the design and implementation of peer support programmes in mental health organizations. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Rituximab in Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia: A Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Prica, A; Baldassarre, F; Hicks, L K; Imrie, K; Kouroukis, T; Cheung, M

    2017-01-01

    Rituximab is the first monoclonal antibody to be approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration in cancer. Its role in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), has evolved significantly. We aimed to systematically review and update the literature on rituximab in lymphoma and CLL, and provide evidence-based consensus guidelines for its rational use. Validated methodology from the Cancer Care Ontario Program in Evidence-based Care was used. A comprehensive literature search was completed by a methodologist from the Hematology Disease Site Group of Cancer Care Ontario. Data were extracted from randomised controlled trials of rituximab-containing chemotherapy regimens for patients with lymphoma or CLL. Fifty-six primary randomised controlled trials were retrievable and met all inclusion criteria. Clinically important benefits in progression-free survival or overall survival were seen in the following settings: (i) addition of rituximab to combination chemotherapy for initial treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma and HIV-related lymphoma with CD4 count ≥50/mm(3); (ii) addition of rituximab to combination chemotherapy for initial and subsequent treatment of follicular lymphoma and other indolent B-cell lymphomas; (iii) use of rituximab maintenance in patients with indolent B-cell lymphomas who have responded to chemoimmunotherapy; (iv) addition of rituximab to fludarabine-based chemotherapy or chlorambucil for initial treatment of CLL. The consensus opinion of the Hematology Disease Site Group is that rituximab is recommended for these indications. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Management of Early-stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Herst, J; Crump, M; Baldassarre, F G; MacEachern, J; Sussman, J; Hodgson, D; Cheung, M C

    2017-01-01

    In the past, treatment for patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma consisted mainly of radiotherapy. Now, chemotherapy alone and chemoradiotherapy are treatment options. These guidelines aim to provide recommendations on the optimal management of early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma. We conducted a systematic review searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and other literature sources from 2003 to 2015, and applied the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). Two authors independently reviewed and selected studies, and appraised the evidence quality. The document underwent internal and external review by content, methodology experts, a patient representative and clinicians in Ontario. We have issued recommendations for patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma and with nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma; with favourable and unfavourable prognosis; and for the use of positron emission tomography to direct treatment. We have provided our interpretation of the evidence and considerations for implementation. Examples of recommendations are: 'Patients with early-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma should not be treated with radiotherapy alone'; 'chemotherapy plus radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone are recommended treatment options for patients with early-stage non-bulky Hodgkin lymphoma'; 'The Working Group does not recommend the use of a negative interim positron emission tomography scan alone to identify patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma for whom radiotherapy can be omitted without a reduction in progression-free survival'. Through the use of GRADE, recommendations were geared towards patient important outcomes and their strength reflected the available evidence and its interpretation from the patients' point of view. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Practice guideline update summary: Corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gloss, David; Moxley, Richard T.; Ashwal, Stephen; Oskoui, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To update the 2005 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline on corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: We systematically reviewed the literature from January 2004 to July 2014 using the AAN classification scheme for therapeutic articles and predicated recommendations on the strength of the evidence. Results: Thirty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Recommendations: In children with DMD, prednisone should be offered for improving strength (Level B) and pulmonary function (Level B). Prednisone may be offered for improving timed motor function (Level C), reducing the need for scoliosis surgery (Level C), and delaying cardiomyopathy onset by 18 years of age (Level C). Deflazacort may be offered for improving strength and timed motor function and delaying age at loss of ambulation by 1.4–2.5 years (Level C). Deflazacort may be offered for improving pulmonary function, reducing the need for scoliosis surgery, delaying cardiomyopathy onset, and increasing survival at 5–15 years of follow-up (Level C for each). Deflazacort and prednisone may be equivalent in improving motor function (Level C). Prednisone may be associated with greater weight gain in the first years of treatment than deflazacort (Level C). Deflazacort may be associated with a greater risk of cataracts than prednisone (Level C). The preferred dosing regimen of prednisone is 0.75 mg/kg/d (Level B). Over 12 months, prednisone 10 mg/kg/weekend is equally effective (Level B), with no long-term data available. Prednisone 0.75 mg/kg/d is associated with significant risk of weight gain, hirsutism, and cushingoid appearance (Level B). PMID:26833937

  12. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update.

    PubMed

    Basch, Ethan; Prestrud, Ann Alexis; Hesketh, Paul J; Kris, Mark G; Feyer, Petra C; Somerfield, Mark R; Chesney, Maurice; Clark-Snow, Rebecca Anne; Flaherty, Anne Marie; Freundlich, Barbara; Morrow, Gary; Rao, Kamakshi V; Schwartz, Rowena N; Lyman, Gary H

    2011-11-01

    To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline for antiemetics in oncology. A systematic review of the medical literature was completed to inform this update. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Collaboration Library, and meeting materials from ASCO and the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer were all searched. Primary outcomes of interest were complete response and rates of any vomiting or nausea. Thirty-seven trials met prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria for this systematic review. Two systematic reviews from the Cochrane Collaboration were identified; one surveyed the pediatric literature. The other compared the relative efficacy of the 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT(3)) receptor antagonists. Combined anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens were reclassified as highly emetic. Patients who receive this combination or any highly emetic agents should receive a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 (NK(1)) receptor antagonist. A large trial validated the equivalency of fosaprepitant, a single-day intravenous formulation, with aprepitant; either therapy is appropriate. Preferential use of palonosetron is recommended for moderate emetic risk regimens, combined with dexamethasone. For low-risk agents, patients can be offered dexamethasone before the first dose of chemotherapy. Patients undergoing high emetic risk radiation therapy should receive a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist before each fraction and for 24 hours after treatment and may receive a 5-day course of dexamethasone during fractions 1 to 5. The Update Committee noted the importance of continued symptom monitoring throughout therapy. Clinicians underestimate the incidence of nausea, which is not as well controlled as emesis.

  13. Treatment of demodicosis in dogs: 2011 clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Ralf S; Bensignor, Emmanuel; Ferrer, Lluís; Holm, Birgit; Lemarie, Stephen; Paradis, Manon; Shipstone, Michael A

    2012-04-01

    These guidelines were written by an international group of specialists with the aim to provide veterinarians with current recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of canine demodicosis. Published studies of the various treatment options were reviewed and summarized. Where evidence in form of published studies was not available, expert consensus formed the base of the recommendations. Demodicosis can usually be diagnosed by deep skin scrapings or trichograms; in rare cases a skin biopsy may be needed for diagnosis. Immune suppression due to endoparasitism or malnutrition in young dogs and endocrine diseases, neoplasia and chemotherapy in older dogs are considered predisposing factors and should be diagnosed and treated to optimize the therapeutic outcome. Dogs with disease severity requiring parasiticidal therapy should not be bred. Secondary bacterial skin infections frequently complicate the disease and require topical and/or systemic antimicrobial therapy. There is good evidence for the efficacy of weekly amitraz rinses and daily oral macrocyclic lactones such as milbemycin oxime, ivermectin and moxidectin for the treatment of canine demodicosis. Weekly application of topical moxidectin can be useful in dogs with milder forms of the disease. There is some evidence for the efficacy of weekly or twice weekly subcutaneous or oral doramectin. Systemic macrocyclic lactones may cause neurological adverse effects in sensitive dogs, thus a gradual increase to the final therapeutic dose may be prudent (particularly in herding breeds). Treatment should be monitored with monthly skin scrapings and extended beyond clinical and microscopic cure to minimize recurrences. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2012 ESVD and ACVD.

  14. Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Primary Aldosteronism: What is New in the 2016 Update?

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Damian G; Yanes Cardozo, Licy L

    2016-01-01

    Primary Aldosteronism is the single most common cause of secondary hypertension and is associated with increased target organ injury. The Endocrine Society has recently released the updated Clinical Practice Guideline for Primary Aldosteronism entitled “The Management of Primary Aldosteronism: Case Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline”. We review the updated Clinical Practice Guideline, highlighting the new recommendations and the implications that they may have in clinical practice. The recognition by the Endocrine Society’s Task Force that Primary Aldosteronism is a public health issue and that the population at risk for screening should be significantly expanded will surely have an impact in the clinical practice which hopefully will translate in better detection, diagnosis and treatment of patients with Primary Aldosteronism. PMID:28018978

  15. Initial impact of the acute otitis externa clinical practice guideline on clinical care.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Kepnes, Lynn J

    2011-09-01

    Objectives. Determine the influence of the acute otitis externa clinical practice guideline on clinical care. Study Design. Cross-sectional study with historical controls. Setting. Outpatient departments in the United States. Methods. Cases of acute otitis externa occurring in 2004-2005 (before guideline publication) and 2007-2008 (after guideline publication) were extracted from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Care Survey. Prescribing rates for ototopical medications, analgesic recommendations, and oral antibiotics were determined and compared before and after guideline publication and relative to guideline recommendations. Results. An estimated 5.50 (standard error of the estimated mean, 0.38) million visits (mean age, 27.7 [1.7] years; 49.8% male) with a primary and singular coded diagnosis of acute otitis externa were studied (2.64 [0.26] million visits for 2004-2005 and 2.86 [0.28] million visits for 2007-2008). Prescribing rates for ototopical preparations were 67.2% (5.3%) and 67.6% (5.0%) before and after guideline publication, respectively (P = .955). Recommendation rates for analgesics were 14.2% (3.3%) and 20.6% (3.9%), respectively (P = .248). Prescription rates for oral antibiotics were 21.7% (4.8%) and 30.5% (3.6%), before and after, respectively (P = .166). Conclusion. Clinician behavior in the medical treatment of acute otitis externa has not significantly changed after guideline publication, despite clear, evidence-based guideline recommendations. These data have important implications for performance measures based on the guideline. Further efforts toward guideline dissemination are likely needed.

  16. Developing a Clinician Friendly Tool to Identify Useful Clinical Practice Guidelines: G-TRUST.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Allen F; Vaswani, Akansha; Andrews, Bonnie K; Erlich, Deborah R; D'Amico, Frank; Lexchin, Joel; Cosgrove, Lisa

    2017-09-01

    Clinicians are faced with a plethora of guidelines. To rate guidelines, they can select from a number of evaluation tools, most of which are long and difficult to apply. The goal of this project was to develop a simple, easy-to-use checklist for clinicians to use to identify trustworthy, relevant, and useful practice guidelines, the Guideline Trustworthiness, Relevance, and Utility Scoring Tool (G-TRUST). A modified Delphi process was used to obtain consensus of experts and guideline developers regarding a checklist of items and their relative impact on guideline quality. We conducted 4 rounds of sampling to refine wording, add and subtract items, and develop a scoring system. Multiple attribute utility analysis was used to develop a weighted utility score for each item to determine scoring. Twenty-two experts in evidence-based medicine, 17 developers of high-quality guidelines, and 1 consumer representative participated. In rounds 1 and 2, items were rewritten or dropped, and 2 items were added. In round 3, weighted scores were calculated from rankings and relative weights assigned by the expert panel. In the last round, more than 75% of experts indicated 3 of the 8 checklist items to be major indicators of guideline usefulness and, using the AGREE tool as a reference standard, a scoring system was developed to identify guidelines as useful, may not be useful, and not useful. The 8-item G-TRUST is potentially helpful as a tool for clinicians to identify useful guidelines. Further research will focus on its reliability when used by clinicians. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  17. [Good medical practice for drugs. Definition, guidelines, references, field of action and applications].

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Proper use of drugs can be defined as the use of the right product, in a correct dosage, during an adequate length of time, for a given patient and provided he has no serious side effects.It is virtually impossible, with such a number of drugs, such a number of clinical situations to prescribe adequately without using references or guidelines. References may lead to a unique choice, when the diagnosis is certain and the drug to be given is unique. With a good initial and continuous medical education, doctors can take easily this type of decision. The Summary of Products Characteristics (SPC) helps them; by sticking to this fundamental reference, prescription might be more precise and safe. In a lot of clinical situations the choice between a large numbers of therapeutic strategies necessitates use of a guideline based on scientific knowledge. Finally, a given therapeutic strategy can be as effective as and considerably less expensive than another. In such cases, payers can drive doctors to the prescription of the less expensive strategy.Some difficulties are common to all references and guidelines: 1. A lot of clinical situations are not covered by guidelines. 2. Guidelines should be updated each time there is a modification of knowledge: it is extremely difficult to do. 3. A great number of guidelines exist, issued by scientific community, health authorities or the payers. Sometime you can find a proposition in a guideline and the reverse in another guideline. It could be confusing. 4. Guidelines should be evaluated rigorously to know if they fulfil their goals. 5. Some of those guidelines simply cannot help doctors. They are too complex or do not take into account practical situations.We have made an inventory of those various guidelines and their weaknesses and we propose some solutions to increase their utility. We propose an analysis of the situation and some solutions to improve the quality and the relevance of the guidelines: to create groups of coordination

  18. Do We Practice What We Preach? A Review of Actual Clinical Practice with Regards to Preconception Care Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Abelman, Steve; Schulkin, Jay; Williams, Jennifer L.; Fassett, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To review what past studies have found with regard to existing clinical practices and approaches to providing preconception care. Methods: A literature review between 1966 and September 2005 was performed using Medline. Key words included preconception care, preconception counseling, preconception surveys, practice patterns, pregnancy outcomes, prepregnancy planning, and prepregnancy surveys. Results: There are no current national recommendations that fully address preconception care; as a result, there is wide variability in what is provided clinically under the rubric of preconception care. Conclusions: In 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sponsored a national summit regarding preconception care and efforts are underway to develop a uniform set of national recommendations and guidelines for preconception care. Understanding how preconception care is presently incorporated and manifested in current medical practices should help in the development of these national guidelines. Knowing where, how, and why some specific preconception recommendations have been successfully adopted and translated into clinical practice, as well as barriers to implementation of other recommendations or guidelines, is vitally important in developing an overarching set of national guidelines. Ultimately, the success of these recommendations rests on their ability to influence and shape women's health policy. PMID:16897374

  19. Clinical practice guidelines on cancer-associated thrombosis: a review on scope and methodology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Agnes Y Y; Peterson, Erica A; Wu, Cynthia

    2016-04-01

    Cancer-associated thrombosis is a well-recognized complication in patients with cancer. It imposes significant patient morbidity and anxiety, increases personal and societal financial burden, and is the second-leading cause of death in this population. There have been increasing research efforts to reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and optimize its treatment but the quality of evidence is diverse. To assist clinicians in providing care based on best-available evidence, many international and national organizations have issued clinical practice guidelines. Among these, the most highly cited resources include those developed by the American College of Chest Physicians, the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Society of Medical Oncology. Nationally-based guidelines have also been published by various groups, including the Italian Association of Medical Oncology, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, the French National Federation of the League of Centers Against Cancer, and the British Committee for Standards in Haematology. This review will cover fundamental aspects of clinical practice guideline development and evaluation, summarize the scope and methodology of published guidelines on the management of cancer-associated thrombosis and assess the quality of selected, international guidelines using the validated Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) tool. Areas of consensus and uncertainties will be briefly highlighted.

  20. Compliance of psychotropic drug prescription with clinical practice guidelines in older inpatients.

    PubMed

    Etchepare, Fanny; Pambrun, Elodie; Bégaud, Bernard; Verdoux, Hélène; Tournier, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Several practice guidelines were published by French regulatory agencies between 2006 and 2009 to improve psychotropic drug use in older patients. The objectives of the study were to assess compliance with these guidelines in older patients hospitalized in psychiatric units and to identify characteristics associated with compliance. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 117 patients aged 65 years and older hospitalized in two psychiatric departments of a public hospital, at three dates randomly chosen between January and May 2014. Medical and sociodemographic characteristics were collected from electronic medical records. In all, 8% of psychotropic prescriptions were compliant with guidelines. A total of 98% of antidepressant prescriptions complied with guidelines for product selection (no tricyclics) and 72% for initial dosage (half of that recommended for younger adults). Regarding benzodiazepines, short half-life drugs were chosen in 73% of treatments, low maintenance dosage was found in 64% of treatments, and a discontinuous administration rhythm was noted in 33% of treatments. Regarding antipsychotics, initial dosage was a quarter of the allowed initial dosage for younger adults in 39% of prescriptions and metabolic blood testing was performed in 17% of prescriptions. Neurological and cognitive tolerance was monitored in 41% and 61% of prescriptions, respectively. Few clinical factors were found to be associated with compliance or noncompliance with guidelines in older psychiatric inpatients. Practice guidelines on psychotropic drug prescription were partially respected in older inpatients. Practitioners should take into account the risks associated with non-recommended patterns of psychotropic drug use in this vulnerable population.

  1. Asian-Pacific clinical practice guidelines on the management of hepatitis B: a 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Sarin, S K; Kumar, M; Lau, G K; Abbas, Z; Chan, H L Y; Chen, C J; Chen, D S; Chen, H L; Chen, P J; Chien, R N; Dokmeci, A K; Gane, Ed; Hou, J L; Jafri, W; Jia, J; Kim, J H; Lai, C L; Lee, H C; Lim, S G; Liu, C J; Locarnini, S; Al Mahtab, M; Mohamed, R; Omata, M; Park, J; Piratvisuth, T; Sharma, B C; Sollano, J; Wang, F S; Wei, L; Yuen, M F; Zheng, S S; Kao, J H

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, some 240 million people have chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV), with the highest rates of infection in Africa and Asia. Our understanding of the natural history of HBV infection and the potential for therapy of the resultant disease is continuously improving. New data have become available since the previous APASL guidelines for management of HBV infection were published in 2012. The objective of this manuscript is to update the recommendations for the optimal management of chronic HBV infection. The 2015 guidelines were developed by a panel of Asian experts chosen by the APASL. The clinical practice guidelines are based on evidence from existing publications or, if evidence was unavailable, on the experts' personal experience and opinion after deliberations. Manuscripts and abstracts of important meetings published through January 2015 have been evaluated. This guideline covers the full spectrum of care of patients infected with hepatitis B, including new terminology, natural history, screening, vaccination, counseling, diagnosis, assessment of the stage of liver disease, the indications, timing, choice and duration of single or combination of antiviral drugs, screening for HCC, management in special situations like childhood, pregnancy, coinfections, renal impairment and pre- and post-liver transplant, and policy guidelines. However, areas of uncertainty still exist, and clinicians, patients, and public health authorities must therefore continue to make choices on the basis of the evolving evidence. The final clinical practice guidelines and recommendations are presented here, along with the relevant background information.

  2. Laryngeal cryptococcus: a rare cause of hoarseness in renal allograft recipient

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Jashan; Sandhu, Jasvinder Singh; Kaur Puri, Harpreet; Munjal, Manish

    2017-01-01

    Cryptococcosis commonly involves central nervous system and lungs in organ transplant recipients. Isolated laryngeal infection is extremely rare. We report a rare case of cryptococcus in a renal allograft recipient that clinically presented with hoarseness of voice and mimicked laryngeal carcinoma on examination. PMID:28197527

  3. Effect of clonidine premedication on postoperative sore throat and hoarseness after total intravenous anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Koichi; Yamada, Takeshi; Hara, Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effect of oral clonidine premedication on postoperative sore throat and hoarseness, we evaluated the incidence and severity of each of these complications in patients who underwent elective surgery in the supine position. The subjects were 82 patients, American Society of Anesthiologists (ASA) status I-III, aged 15-82 years. They were premedicated with either 150 microg oral clonidine and 20 mg raftidine (clonidine group; n = 41) or with 20 mg raftidine only (control group; n = 41) 2 h before anesthesia induction. General anesthesia was maintained with propofol, ketamine, fentanyl, and vecuronium, with or without epidural anesthesia. Postoperative sore throat and hoarseness were evaluated immediately after surgery and on the day after surgery. The incidences of sore throat and hoarseness tended to be higher in the clonidine group than in the control group; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant differences in the severity of these symptoms between the two groups. In conclusion, oral premedication with 150 microg clonidine did not prevent postoperative sore throat or hoarseness, and may have exacerbated these symptoms.

  4. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure Companion: Bridging Guidelines to Your Practice.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Jonathan G; Chan, Michael; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Harkness, Karen; Heckman, George A; Kouz, Simon; Leblanc, Marie-Hélène; Moe, Gordon W; O'Meara, Eileen; Abrams, Howard; Ducharme, Anique; Grzeslo, Adam; Hamilton, Peter G; Koshman, Sheri L; Lepage, Serge; McDonald, Michael; McKelvie, Robert; Rajda, Miroslaw; Swiggum, Elizabeth; Virani, Sean; Zieroth, Shelley

    2016-03-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Program has generated annual HF updates, including formal recommendations and supporting Practical Tips since 2006. Many clinicians indicate they routinely use the Canadian Cardiovascular Society HF Guidelines in their daily practice. However, many questions surrounding the actual implementation of the Guidelines into their daily practice remain. A consensus-based approach was used, including feedback from the Primary and Secondary HF Panels. This companion is intended to answer several key questions brought forth by HF practitioners such as appropriate timelines for initial assessments and subsequent reassessments of patients, the order in which medications should be added, how newer medications should be included in treatment algorithms, and when left ventricular function should be reassessed. A new treatment algorithm for HF with reduced ejection fraction is included. Several other practical issues are addressed such as an approach to management of hyperkalemia/hypokalemia, treatment of gout, when medications can be stopped, and whether a target blood pressure or heart rate is suggested. Finally, elements and teaching of self-care are described. This tool will hopefully function to allow better integration of the HF Guidelines into clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. What Next? Translating AGI's 2015 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct into Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, M. A.; Keane, C.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) published a revised version of the 1999 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct, an aspirational document outlining ethical principles that should inform the professional behavior of all geoscientists. The revised Guidelines reflect a consensus of opinion among AGI's 51 member societies and show an evolution in thinking about geoscience ethics. The Guidelines also represent a foundational document to support the expansion of ethical guidelines by individual societies and organizations. Publishing the Guidelines was a significant milestone but aspirations need to be matched by action. We examine several developments that implement aspects of the Guidelines, including the development of a consensus statement regarding access and inclusion of individuals living with disabilities in the geosciences, a Joint AGI/Geological Society of America Societies meeting on professional conduct, geoethics training initiatives, and efforts to foster international cooperation in recognizing and implementing ethical practice in the geosciences. In addition, we examine the level of success in using these Guidelines as philosophical cornerstones for a number of international projects, such as Resourcing Future Generations and the International Raw Materials Observatory, that bring geoscience directly into contact with large societal issues.

  6. What is the Asian Consensus Statement on NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology (NCCN-ACS)?

    PubMed

    Akaza, Hideyuki

    2016-04-01

    Cancer treatment guidelines are compiled on the basis of established evidence. Such evidence is obtained from epidemiological, pathological and pharmacological study and, most importantly of all, the information gained from clinical trials. However, very little of the kind of evidence that is required for the compilation of treatment guidelines is actually obtained from Asian countries. When one considers the ethnic differences and disparities in medical care, coupled with the tremendous cultural diversity that characterize the Asian region, it would be difficult to conclude that there is currently sufficient evidence that could form the basis for the formulation of guidelines that would be relevant and applicable to all Asian countries. An urgent issue that needs to be addressed in order to achieve a breakthrough in this difficult situation is to build up a body of evidence at an advanced level that is specific to the Asian region and Asian ethnicities. For the interim, however, it is also necessary to efficiently incorporate evidence that has been obtained in Western countries. Furthermore, an effective method of utilizing guidelines that have already been compiled in Western countries is considered to be not by simply translating them into local languages, but rather to engage in a process of adaptation, whereby the guidelines are adjusted or modified to match the circumstances of a particular country or region. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines-Asian Consensus Statement (NCCN-ACS) documents have been compiled with this intention in mind, utilizing the NCCN guidelines that are widely used internationally.

  7. Approach to fever assessment in ambulatory cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowska, M.K.; Walker-Dilks, C.; Atzema, C.; Morris, A.; Gupta, R.; Halligan, R.; Kouroukis, T.; McCann, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background This guideline was prepared by the Fever Assessment Guideline Development Group, a group organized by the Program in Evidence-Based Care at the request of the Cancer Care Ontario Systemic Treatment Program. The mandate was to develop a standardized approach (in terms of definitions, information, and education) for the assessment of fever in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods The guideline development methods included a search for existing guidelines, literature searches in medline and embase for systematic reviews and primary studies, internal review by content and methodology experts, and external review by targeted experts and intended users. Results The search identified eight guidelines that had partial relevance to the topic of the present guideline and thirty-eight primary studies. The studies were mostly noncomparative prospective or retrospective studies. Few studies directly addressed the topic of fever except as one among many symptoms or adverse effects associated with chemotherapy. The recommendations concerning fever definition are supported mainly by other existing guidelines. No evidence was found that directly pertained to the assessment of fever before a diagnosis of febrile neutropenia was made. However, some studies evaluated approaches to symptom management that included fever among the symptoms. Few studies directly addressed information needs and resources for managing fever in cancer patients. Conclusions Fever in patients with cancer who are receiving systemic therapy is a common and potentially serious symptom that requires prompt assessment, but currently, evidence to inform best practices concerning when, where, and by whom that assessment is done is very limited. PMID:27536179

  8. [Post-partum contraception: Guidelines for clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Raccah-Tebeka, B; Plu-Bureau, G

    2015-12-01

    Establishment of guidelines for post-partum contraception. Systematic review of publications between 1960 and 2015 from database Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and recommendations of international societies. The most recent French data show that approximately 2% of women with induced abortion have deliver within 6 months before this abortion and 4% had a child six to twelve months earlier (Evidence Level [EL] 3). A contraceptive counseling is ideally recommended after delivery to avoid unplanned pregnancies (grade C). Among non-breastfeeding women, the shorter median delay for recovery ovulation is 39 days after delivery (EL4). Starting effective contraception later 21 days after delivery in women who does not want closely spaced pregnancy is recommended (grade B), and to prescribe it at the maternity (Professional consensus). In breastfeeding women, the recovery of ovarian activity is dependent on breastfeeding characteristics. Only exclusive breastfeeding with very specific conditions can be used for contraception over a six months period (EL2). For all other breastfeeding conditions, contraceptive strategies are the same than without breastfeeding (grade B). According to the post-partum risk of venous thromboembolism, the combined hormonal contraceptive use before six post-partum weeks is not recommended (grade B). In women with vascular risk factors, the evaluation of benefit risk balance of this use between 6th and 12th post-partum weeks is recommended (Professional consensus). Progestin only contraceptives with low dose are allowed in earlier post-partum (grade B), except at the acute phase of severe thromboembolic event (Professional consensus). In women who want intra-uterine device (IUD) as contraception, it is recommended to prescribe IUD at the hospital and to insert the IUD during the postnatal consultation (grade B). In breastfeeding women, progestin contraception's (oral or subcutaneous) are permitted immediately after delivery (grade B). For women

  9. A critique of current practice: ten foundational guidelines for autoethnographers.

    PubMed

    Tolich, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Any research is potentially compromised when researchers address ethical issues retrospectively rather than by anticipating these issues. In this regard, creative analytical practices (CAP) autoethnography has endemic problems. In Part 1 of this article, I detail a case study of an autoethnography in which journal reviewers insisted that an author gain retrospective informed consent from the 23 persons documented in an autoethnography. Yet the journal reviewers' insistence failed to go one step further-acknowledging that a conflict of interest develops when gaining consent retrospectively. In Part 2, I contrast three leading autoethnographers' justifications for not gaining informed consent with the Position Statement on Qualitative Research developed by successive Congresses of Qualitative Inquiry. In Part 3, I identify resources available for autoethnographers, including ethical issues present when researchers use autoethnography to heal themselves, violating the internal confidentiality of relational others. In Part 4, I question if autoethnography is research and, like journalism, exempt from formal ethics review. Throughout the article, 10 foundational ethical considerations for autoethnographers are developed, taking autoethnographers beyond procedural ethics and providing tools for their ethics in practice.

  10. Health Promotion Board–Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung Seng; Biddle, Stuart; Chan, Mei Fen; Cheng, Anton; Cheong, Magdalin; Chong, Yap Seng; Foo, Ling Li; Lee, Chung Horn; Lim, Su Chi; Ong, Wee Sian; Pang, Jonathan; Pasupathy, Shanker; Sloan, Robert; Seow, Mollie; Soon, Grace; Tan, Benedict; Tan, Thiam Chye; Teo, Soo Lay; Tham, Kwang Wei; van Dam, Rob M; Wang, John

    2016-01-01

    The Health Promotion Board (HPB) has developed the Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) on Obesity to provide health professionals in Singapore with recommendations for evidence-based interventions for obesity. This article summarises the introduction, epidemiology and executive summary of the key recommendations from the HPB-MOH CPG on Obesity for the information of SMJ readers. The chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Health Promotion Board website: http://www.hpb.gov.sg/cpg-obesity. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:27353244

  11. Ethics and best practice guidelines for training experiences in global health.

    PubMed

    Crump, John A; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2010-12-01

    Academic global health programs are growing rapidly in scale and number. Students of many disciplines increasingly desire global health content in their curricula. Global health curricula often include field experiences that involve crossing international and socio-cultural borders. Although global health training experiences offer potential benefits to trainees and to sending institutions, these experiences are sometimes problematic and raise ethical challenges. The Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training (WEIGHT) developed a set of guidelines for institutions, trainees, and sponsors of field-based global health training on ethics and best practices in this setting. Because only limited data have been collected within the context of existing global health training, the guidelines were informed by the published literature and the experience of WEIGHT members. The Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training encourages efforts to develop and implement a means of assessing the potential benefits and harms of global health training programs.

  12. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of acute altitude illness: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M; McIntosh, Scott E; Grissom, Colin K; Auerbach, Paul S; Rodway, George W; Schoene, Robert B; Zafren, Ken; Hackett, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for prevention and treatment of acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, and high altitude pulmonary edema. These guidelines present the main prophylactic and therapeutic modalities for each disorder and provide recommendations about their role in disease management. Recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and balance between the benefits and risks/burdens according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. The guidelines also provide suggested approaches to prevention and management of each disorder that incorporate these recommendations. This is an updated version of the original WMS Consensus Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Acute Altitude Illness published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2010;21(2):146-155. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of single rooms on the children's ward, Part 2: Guideline for practice.

    PubMed

    Rose, Pat; Blythe, Sue

    2009-02-01

    Most general children's wards have a limited number of single rooms available. This article presents evidence-based guidelines for practice developed in collaboration between several NHS trusts and a higher education institution, to ensure the effective and equitable use of this limited resource. The evidence underpinning the guideline was presented in part one, published in the December 2008 issue (Rose and Blythe 2008). The guideline covers the use of single rooms for control of infection, meeting psychosocial needs and in response to family preferences. It also provides guidance on action to be taken when no single room is available. This guideline provides a tool for staff to make clear to parents why their child was, or was not allocated a single room and the reason why if a child was moved out of a single room. It is also a resource for teaching students about the purposes and effects of isolation nursing on a children's ward.

  14. [Summary of the practice guideline 'Miscarriage' (second revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners (NHG)].

    PubMed

    van Balen, J A M; Flikweert, S; Wieringa-de Waard, M; de jonge, A; Wiersma, Tj; Goudswaard, A N

    2005-02-05

    The NHG practice guideline 'Miscarriage' provides guidelines for the diagnosis and management of pregnant women with vaginal bleeding during the period up to and including the 16th week after the first day of the last menstruation. The guideline has been revised on the basis of the developments over the last few years. The most important modifications are: In case of an imminent miscarriage, more consideration than before is given to the patient's preference with regard to ultrasonography, expectant management and curettage. The GP should therefore discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these options with the patient. A midwife was involved in the formulation of the new guideline. Referral from a GP to a midwife for transvaginal ultrasonography is offered as one of the possibilities. The paragraph on 'information' has been expanded on the basis of the results of a patient focus group.

  15. Health Promotion Board-Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung Seng; Biddle, Stuart; Chan, Mei Fen; Cheng, Anton; Cheong, Magdalin; Chong, Yap Seng; Foo, Ling Li; Lee, Chung Horn; Lim, Su Chi; Ong, Wee Sian; Pang, Jonathan; Pasupathy, Shanker; Sloan, Robert; Seow, Mollie; Soon, Grace; Tan, Benedict; Tan, Thiam Chye; Teo, Soo Lay; Tham, Kwang Wei; van Dam, Rob M; Wang, John

    2016-06-01

    The Health Promotion Board (HPB) has developed the Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) on Obesity to provide health professionals in Singapore with recommendations for evidence-based interventions for obesity. This article summarises the introduction, epidemiology and executive summary of the key recommendations from the HPB-MOH CPG on Obesity for the information of SMJ readers. The chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Health Promotion Board website: http://www.hpb.gov.sg/cpg-obesity. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines.

  16. European edition of the NCCN clinical practice guidelines: relevance of the translation and adaptation into Spanish.

    PubMed

    Guillem, V; Camps, C; Carrato, A; Díaz-Rubio, E; Gascón, P

    2017-03-01

    The NCCN-evidence-based oncology guidelines are consensus-based management documents, to ensure that all patients receive the most appropriate diagnosis, treatment and support services to achieve the best results. However, the use of these guidelines for decision-making by physicians in Spain is sometimes controversial, as treatments or diagnostic procedures are recommended which might not be authorised in our country, or other management options may exist. In March 2015, the ECO Foundation reached an agreement to translate and adapt the NCCN's clinical practice guidelines in oncology for the Spanish sector. Consequently, ECO is the first European organization to reach an agreement of this type with the NCCN. This agreement will allow all agents involved in managing the cancer patients to have available guidelines that are adapted to the specific needs of Spain.

  17. Compliance with surgical smoke evacuation guidelines: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kay

    2010-08-01

    Surgical smoke presents a serious health hazard, but perioperative nurses' compliance with smoke evacuation recommendations is not consistent. I investigated key indicators for compliance with electrosurgical smoke evacuation recommendations based on nurses' individual innovativeness characteristics, perceptions of the attributes of smoke evacuation recommendations, and organizational innovativeness characteristics. The study findings provide implications for improving nurses' compliance with smoke evacuation recommendations. Individual innovativeness characteristics, including nurses' knowledge and training, were most strongly linked to smoke evacuation compliance. The key indicators that promote surgical smoke evacuation can provide direction to guide the content of education programs and help identify the personnel and settings that are most in need of this information. Barriers to compliance included lack of equipment, physician resistance, noise, and staff member complacency. Vendor demonstrations on the ease of smoke evacuation device use can show nurses that smoke evacuation is compatible with nursing practice. Facility leaders should provide smoke evacuation policies that are easy to understand and should enforce these policies.

  18. Compliance with surgical smoke evacuation guidelines: implications for practice.

    PubMed

    Ball, Kay

    2012-03-01

    Surgical smoke presents a serious health hazard, but perioperative nurses' compliance with smoke evacuation recommendations is not consistent. I investigated key indicators for compliance with electrosurgical smoke evacuation recommendations based on nurses' individual innovativeness characteristics, perceptions of the attributes of smoke evacuation recommendations, and organizational innovativeness characteristics. The study findings provide implications for improving nurses' compliance with smoke evacuation recommendations. Individual innovativeness characteristics, including nurses' knowledge and training, were most strongly linked to smoke evacuation compliance. The key indicators that promote surgical smoke evacuation can provide direction to guide the content of education programs and help identify the personnel and settings that are most in need of this information. Barriers to compliance included lack of equipment, physician resistance, noise, and staff member complacency. Vendor demonstrations on the ease of smoke evacuation device use can show nurses that smoke evacuation is compatible with nursing practice. Facility leaders should provide smoke evacuation policies that are easy to understand and should enforce these policies.

  19. Analysis of the Practice Guidelines of the Dutch College of General Practitioners with Respect to the Use of Blood Tests

    PubMed Central

    VAN Wijk, Marc A. M.; Bohnen, Arthur M.; VAN DER Lei, Johan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine the consistency among the practice guidelines of the Dutch College of General Practitioners with respect to the use of blood tests. Methods: The authors evaluated 64 practice guidelines of the Dutch College of General Practitioners. For each guideline, they analyzed each sentence that contained a reference to a blood test to determine the clinical situation in which the test should be performed (the indication) and to determine the tests that should be performed in that situation (the recommended test). An incomplete recommendation refers to a guideline that mentioned a blood test but did not identify the indication for that test. An inconsistency refers to the situation in which one guideline recommended a certain test for a given indication whereas another guideline mentioned the same indication but did not recommend the same test. Results: Twenty-seven practice guidelines mentioned blood tests. Of these, three explicitly recommended not to request blood tests. Five guidelines contained incomplete recommendations, and the authors encountered two inconsistencies among the guidelines. Twenty-three guidelines mentioned blood tests and allowed the authors to identify indications and recommended tests. Conclusion: The identification of indications and recommended tests allows evaluation of consistency among practice guidelines. Although some incomplete recommendations and inconsistencies were discovered, the majority of the guidelines provide clear and unambiguous recommendations for blood-test ordering in primary care. PMID:10428005

  20. Transparency ethics in practice: Revisiting financial conflicts of interest disclosure forms in clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Sharara, Nour; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Laine, Loren; McQuaid, Kenneth; Soetikno, Roy; Subramanian, Venkataraman

    2017-01-01

    Background Authors of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) disclose financial conflicts of interest (FCOIs) to promote transparency ethics. Typically, they do so on standard declaration forms containing generic open-ended questions on FCOIs. Yet, the literature is scant on the format and effect of alternative disclosure forms. Does supplementing a standard form with subsequent detailed disclosure forms tailored to the context of the CPG improve the yield or accuracy of FCOIs declarations? Methods For an international CPG in gastroenterology on the endoscopic surveillance for colorectal neoplasia in inflammatory bowel disease, we compared the use of a standard FCOIs disclosure form with a contextual FCOIs disclosure form that detailed commercial relations related to the CPG topic. This included manufacturers of endoscopes, endoscopy equipment and accessories. Participants completed the generic form early, and the supplementary contextual form six months later. We then compared the FCOI disclosures obtained. Findings 26 participants provided FCOIs disclosures using both disclosure forms. We found discrepancies regarding (1) the disclosure of FCOIs (presence/absence), and (2) the listing of financial entities. While the number of participants who disclosed a FCOI remained the same (30.8%) using the two forms, disclosures were not from the same individuals: two additional participants disclosed a FCOI, whereas two participants withdrew previous disclosures. Among those who reported a FCOI in either form, we noted inconsistencies in disclosures for 70% of the participants. This included changes in FCOIs disclosure status or modifications of "their commercial relations". Discussion Accurate reporting of FCOIs advances the transparency and ethical integrity of CPGs. Our experience suggests that a contextual FCOIs disclosure form tailored to content of the CPG with narrow, detailed questions provides supplementary, more complete FCOIs declarations than generic forms alone

  1. Transparency ethics in practice: Revisiting financial conflicts of interest disclosure forms in clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Jones, Derek J; Sharara, Nour; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Laine, Loren; McQuaid, Kenneth; Soetikno, Roy; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Barkun, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Authors of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) disclose financial conflicts of interest (FCOIs) to promote transparency ethics. Typically, they do so on standard declaration forms containing generic open-ended questions on FCOIs. Yet, the literature is scant on the format and effect of alternative disclosure forms. Does supplementing a standard form with subsequent detailed disclosure forms tailored to the context of the CPG improve the yield or accuracy of FCOIs declarations? For an international CPG in gastroenterology on the endoscopic surveillance for colorectal neoplasia in inflammatory bowel disease, we compared the use of a standard FCOIs disclosure form with a contextual FCOIs disclosure form that detailed commercial relations related to the CPG topic. This included manufacturers of endoscopes, endoscopy equipment and accessories. Participants completed the generic form early, and the supplementary contextual form six months later. We then compared the FCOI disclosures obtained. 26 participants provided FCOIs disclosures using both disclosure forms. We found discrepancies regarding (1) the disclosure of FCOIs (presence/absence), and (2) the listing of financial entities. While the number of participants who disclosed a FCOI remained the same (30.8%) using the two forms, disclosures were not from the same individuals: two additional participants disclosed a FCOI, whereas two participants withdrew previous disclosures. Among those who reported a FCOI in either form, we noted inconsistencies in disclosures for 70% of the participants. This included changes in FCOIs disclosure status or modifications of "their commercial relations". Accurate reporting of FCOIs advances the transparency and ethical integrity of CPGs. Our experience suggests that a contextual FCOIs disclosure form tailored to content of the CPG with narrow, detailed questions provides supplementary, more complete FCOIs declarations than generic forms alone. The finding raises challenges on how

  2. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of lightning injuries: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Davis, Chris; Engeln, Anna; Johnson, Eric L; McIntosh, Scott E; Zafren, Ken; Islas, Arthur A; McStay, Christopher; Smith, William R; Cushing, Tracy

    2014-12-01

    To provide guidance to clinicians about best practices, the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and prevention of lightning injuries. These guidelines include a review of the epidemiology of lightning and recommendations for the prevention of lightning strikes, along with treatment recommendations organized by organ system. Recommendations are graded on the basis of the quality of supporting evidence according to criteria put forth by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original WMS Practice Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Lightning Injuries published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2012;23(3):260-269. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Dutch College of General Practitioner's practice guideline on polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arteritis].

    PubMed

    Eizenga, Wietze H; Hakvoort, Louwe; Dubbeld, Peter; Geijer, Roeland M M; Goudswaard, A N Lex

    2010-01-01

    The practice guideline for general practitioners (GPs) on polymyalgia rheumatica and temporal arteritis was published in February 2010 by the Dutch College of General Practitioners. This guideline provides GPs with recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of polymyalgia rheumatica. After other disorders have been excluded, the diagnosis of 'polymyalgia rheumatica' is made in patients over the age of 50 who have bilateral pain in the neck and shoulder girdle and/or hip girdle that has lasted for longer than 4 weeks, morning stiffness that lasts longer than 60 minutes and an ESR > 40 mm in the first hour. After the diagnosis is made treatment with prednisone or prednisolone 15 mg per day is started. This dosage is diminished very gradually according to a uniform treatment schedule during a period of 3 months, thereafter depending on the clinical course. The practice guideline pays attention to the diagnosis and management of temporal arteritis only when it occurs concurrently with polymyalgia rheumatica.

  4. European Society of Hypertension practice guidelines for home blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Parati, G; Stergiou, G S; Asmar, R; Bilo, G; de Leeuw, P; Imai, Y; Kario, K; Lurbe, E; Manolis, A; Mengden, T; O'Brien, E; Ohkubo, T; Padfield, P; Palatini, P; Pickering, T G; Redon, J; Revera, M; Ruilope, L M; Shennan, A; Staessen, J A; Tisler, A; Waeber, B; Zanchetti, A; Mancia, G

    2010-12-01

    Self-monitoring of blood pressure by patients at home (home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM)) is being increasingly used in many countries and is well accepted by hypertensive patients. Current hypertension guidelines have endorsed the use of HBPM in clinical practice as a useful adjunct to conventional office measurements. Recently, a detailed consensus document on HBPM was published by the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on Blood Pressure Monitoring. However, in daily practice, briefer documents summarizing the essential recommendations are needed. It is also accepted that the successful implementation of clinical guidelines in routine patient care is dependent on their acceptance by involvement of practising physicians. The present document, which provides concise and updated guidelines on the use of HBPM for practising physicians, was therefore prepared by including the comments and feedback of general practitioners.

  5. A constraint satisfaction approach to data-driven implementation of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kuziemsky, Craig; O'Sullivan, Dympna; Michalowski, Wojtek; Wilk, Szymon; Farion, Ken

    2008-11-06

    Despite significant research efforts, the implementation of computerized clinical practice guidelines (CPG) in practice remains problematic for a number of reasons. In particular most guideline representation models do not deal adequately with incomplete or inconsistent clinical data. We present a constraint satisfaction approach to address such shortcomings by focusing on CPG data rather than CPG representation. We model a CPG as a set of data-driven constraints which are used to generate complete solutions for describing a patient state from incomplete clinical data, where the patient state is confirmed by the user. Inconsistent input data can be temporarily eliminated and final feasible solutions (permitted complete solutions from a CPG) can pinpoint inconsistencies in original input data alongside allowable guideline data. We demonstrate a sample implementation of the approach for a pediatric asthma CPG.

  6. Automated linkage of free-text descriptions of patients with a practice guideline.

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, L. A.; Tovar, M.

    1993-01-01

    The process of applying a practice guideline to a patient requires a great deal of clinical data. AAPT (Appropriateness-Assessment Processing from Text) is an experimental computer program that can assess the appropriateness of coronary-artery bypass grafting surgery (CABG) in patients with coronary-artery disease (CAD) and chronic stable angina from the admission summaries of those patients. The AAPT architecture combines natural-language processing (NLP) and probabilistic inference. The NLP module identifies single clinical concepts of interest in the free-text document. The probabilistic inference module, a Bayesian belief network, estimates values for variables not specifically mentioned. AAPT produces a patient's summary of CAD that is similar to a manually generated clinical summary. Work is ongoing to improve AAPT and evaluate it as a tool to assist in the dissemination of guidelines and as a tool to encourage adherence to practice guidelines. PMID:8130477

  7. Representation of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Conventional and Augmented Decision Tables

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Richard N.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To develop a knowledge representation model for clinical practice guidelines that is linguistically adequate, comprehensible, reusable, and maintainable. Design: Decision tables provide the basic framework for the proposed knowledge representation model. Guideline logic is represented as rules in conventional decision tables. These tables are augmented by layers where collateral information is recorded in slots beneath the logic. Results: Decision tables organize rules into cohesive rule sets wherein complex logic is clarified. Decision table rule sets may be verified to assure completeness and consistency. Optimization and display of rule sets as sequential decision trees may enhance the comprehensibility of the logic. The modularity of the rule formats may facilitate maintenance. The augmentation layers provide links to descriptive language, information sources, decision variable characteristics, costs and expected values of policies, and evidence sources and quality. Conclusion: Augmented decision tables can serve as a unifying knowledge representation for developers and implementers of clinical practice guidelines. PMID:9292844

  8. Best practice guidelines on publishing ethics: a publisher's perspective, 2nd edition.

    PubMed

    Graf, Chris; Deakin, Lisa; Docking, Martine; Jones, Jackie; Joshua, Sue; McKerahan, Tiffany; Ottmar, Martin; Stevens, Allen; Wates, Edward; Wyatt, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Wiley has updated its publishing ethics guidelines, first published in 2006. The new guidelines provide guidance, resources, and practical advice on ethical concerns that arise in academic publishing for editors, authors, and researchers, among other audiences. New guidance is also included on whistle blowers, animal research, clinical research, and clinical trial registration, addressing cultural differences, human rights, and confidentiality. The guidelines are uniquely interdisciplinary, and were reviewed by 24 editors and experts chosen from the wide range of communities that Wiley serves. They are also published in Advanced Materials, International Journal of Clinical Practice, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Social Science Quarterly, and on the website http://exchanges.wiley.com/ethicsguidelines.

  9. [Methodology for the development and update of practice guidelines: current state].

    PubMed

    Barrera-Cruz, Antonio; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Torres-Arreola, Laura Pilar; Dávila-Torres, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The current scenario of health services in Mexico reveals as a priority the implementation of strategies that allow us to better respond to the needs and expectations of individuals and society as a whole, through the provision of efficient and effective alternatives for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In this context, clinical practice guidelines constitute an element of management in the health care system, whose objective is to establish a national bechmark for encouraging clinical and management decision making, based on recommendations from the best available evidence, in order to contribute to the quality and effectiveness of health care. The purpose of this document is to show the methodology used for the development and updating of clinical practice guidelines that the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social has developed in line with the sectorial model in order to serve the user of these guidelines.

  10. Best practice guidelines on publishing ethics: a publisher's perspective, 2nd edition.

    PubMed

    Graf, C; Deakin, L; Docking, M; Jones, J; Joshua, S; McKerahan, T; Ottmar, M; Stevens, A; Wates, E; Wyatt, D

    2014-12-01

    Wiley has updated its publishing ethics guidelines, first published in 2006. The new guidelines provide guidance, resources and practical advice on ethical concerns that arise in academic publishing for editors, authors and researchers, among other audiences. New guidance is also included on whistle blowers, animal research, clinical research and clinical trial registration, addressing cultural differences, human rights and confidentiality. The guidelines are uniquely interdisciplinary, and were reviewed by 24 editors and experts chosen from the wide range of communities that Wiley serves. They are also published in Advanced Materials, Headache, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Social Science Quarterly, and on the website http://exchanges.wiley.com/ethicsguidelines. © 2014 John Wiley and Sons. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Screening and follow-up of living kidney donors: a systematic review of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Chapman, Jeremy R; Wong, Germaine; de Bruijn, Jeanine; Craig, Jonathan C

    2011-11-15

    To minimize the health risks faced by living kidney donors, multiple clinical practice guidelines have been developed on the assessment and care of potential donors. This study aims to compare the quality, scope, and consistency of these guidelines. We searched for guidelines on living kidney donation in electronic databases, guideline registries, and relevant Web sites to February 21, 2011. Methodological quality was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Education (AGREE) instrument. Textual synthesis was used to compare guideline recommendations. Ten guidelines, published from 1996 to 2010, were identified. Although generally comprehensive, scope varied considerably and mostly appeared to lack methodological rigor. Many recommendations were consistent, but important differences were evident, particularly for thresholds for comorbidities which precluded donation; obesity/overweight (body mass index, 30-35 kg/m), diabetes/prediabetes (fasting blood glucose level, 6.1-7.0 mmol/L and oral glucose tolerance test, 7.8-11.1 mmol/L), hypertension (130/85 to 140/90 mm Hg), cardiovascular disease, malignancy, and nephrolithiasis. The importance of informed voluntary consent, genuine motivation, support, and psychological health were recognized but difficult to implement as specific tools for conducting psychosocial assessments were not recommended. Multiple major guidelines for living kidney donation have been published recently, resulting in unnecessary duplicative efforts. Most do not meet standard processes for development, and important recommendations about thresholds for exclusion based on comorbidities are contradictory. There is an urgent need for international collaboration and coordination to ensure, where possible, that guidelines for living donation are consistent, evidence based, and comprehensive to promote best outcomes for a precious resource.

  12. KDOQI US commentary on the 2013 KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Lipid Management in CKD.

    PubMed

    Sarnak, Mark J; Bloom, Roy; Muntner, Paul; Rahman, Mahboob; Saland, Jeffrey M; Wilson, Peter W F; Fried, Linda

    2015-03-01

    The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) guideline for management of dyslipidemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) was published in 2003. Since then, considerable evidence, including randomized controlled trials of statin therapy in adults with CKD, has helped better define medical treatments for dyslipidemia. In light of the new evidence, KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) formed a work group for the management of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD. This work group developed a new guideline that contains substantial changes from the prior KDOQI guideline. KDIGO recommends treatment of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD primarily based on risk for coronary heart disease, which is driven in large part by age. The KDIGO guideline does not recommend using low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level as a guide for identifying individuals with CKD to be treated or as treatment targets. Initiation of statin treatment is no longer recommended in dialysis patients. To assist US practitioners in interpreting and applying the KDIGO guideline, NKF-KDOQI convened a work group to write a commentary on this guideline. For the most part, our work group agreed with the recommendations of the KDIGO guideline, although we describe several areas in which we believe the guideline statements are either too strong or need to be more nuanced, areas of uncertainty and inconsistency, as well as additional research recommendations. The target audience for the KDIGO guideline includes nephrologists, primary care practitioners, and non-nephrology specialists such as cardiologists and endocrinologists. As such, we also put the current recommendations into the context of other clinical practice recommendations for cholesterol treatment.

  13. The Evolution of the AASM Clinical Practice Guidelines: Another Step Forward

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Deriy, Ludmila; Heald, Jonathan L.; Thomas, Sherene M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the goals of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) is to provide clear, evidence-based recommendations in our clinical practice guidelines. Periodically, the AASM will assess and update the process by which these guidelines are developed so that it is in line with the standards currently being used for guideline development. The AASM is now taking the next step forward by fully adopting GRADE (Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation) as the methodology used for evaluating evidence and forming clinical practice guidelines recommendations. Starting this year, AASM recommendations will be based on the following four interdependent domains: 1. quality of evidence; 2. balance of desirable and undesirable consequences; 3. patients' values and preferences; and 4. resource use (when known). AASM strengths of recommendations will be dichotomized into two categories: “Strong” and “Weak,” either for or against a patient-care strategy. In an effort to provide clarity and transparency, all AASM recommendations will be actionable statements that include the specific patient population for which the patient-care strategy is recommended, and clearly define the comparator against which the patient-care strategy was evaluated. In some recommendations, the comparator will be an alternative patient-care strategy (e.g., a “gold standard” or previously available alternative), while in other recommendations the comparator will be a placebo or no treatment; this is determined by the availability of evidence, and analyses decisions made by the AASM task force. Implementation of the complete GRADE criteria by the AASM allows us the best path forward towards continuing to provide high quality clinical practice guidelines. Citation: Morgenthaler TI, Deriy L, Heald JL, Thomas SM. The evolution of the AASM clinical practice guidelines: another step forward. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):129–135. PMID:26518707

  14. Practical Guidelines: Lung Transplantation in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirche, T. O.; Knoop, C.; Hebestreit, H.; Shimmin, D.; Solé, A.; Elborn, J. S.; Ellemunter, H.; Aurora, P.; Hogardt, M.; Wagner, T. O. F.; ECORN-CF Study Group

    2014-01-01

    There are no European recommendations on issues specifically related to lung transplantation (LTX) in cystic fibrosis (CF). The main goal of this paper is to provide CF care team members with clinically relevant CF-specific information on all aspects of LTX, highlighting areas of consensus and controversy throughout Europe. Bilateral lung transplantation has been shown to be an important therapeutic option for end-stage CF pulmonary disease. Transplant function and patient survival after transplantation are better than in most other indications for this procedure. Attention though has to be paid to pretransplant morbidity, time for referral, evaluation, indication, and contraindication in children and in adults. This review makes extensive use of specific evidence in the field of lung transplantation in CF patients and addresses all issues of practical importance. The requirements of pre-, peri-, and postoperative management are discussed in detail including bridging to transplant and postoperative complications, immune suppression, chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, and malignancies being the most important. Among the contributors to this guiding information are 19 members of the ECORN-CF project and other experts. The document is endorsed by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society and sponsored by the Christiane Herzog Foundation. PMID:24800072

  15. Guidelines for good practice in PGD: programme requirements and laboratory quality assurance.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    The Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis International Society (PGDIS) was organized in October 2002, with the purpose of encouraging and co-ordinating research, education and training in this multidisciplinary field, requiring a close collaboration of obstetricians, fertility specialists, embryologists and human geneticists. One of the major tasks of PGDIS is to advance the safety and accuracy of PGD and to encourage its adoption into clinical practice for improvement of genetic practices and reproductive medicine. In this context, PGDIS published voluntary guidelines applicable for any centre offering PGD in 2004, and these guidelines are now being updated and extended based on the present extensive PGD experience. The application of these guidelines is intended to further benefit patients and provide guidance to the laboratory staff. As in previous guidelines, PGDIS presents this document being aware that differences in national regulations exist that can affect local PGD practice. The document contains recent consensus points of general application that promote quality biopsy procedures and laboratory practice, enabling PGD centres to offer an improved clinical outcome to their patients. A variety of aspects related to a safe working system have been taken into consideration, based on the assumption that a quality programme depends on the cooperation of the whole PGD team.

  16. Asthma Management at Evans Army Community Hospital: Using Clinical Practice Guidelines to Improve Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-26

    publish MTF best practices, guidelines, metrics, algorithms, provider materials , pharmacy materials , patient education materials , and tool kits for...management system that accumulates and reports expenses, manpower, and workload performed by the DoD fixed military medical and dental treatment facilities...described the results of using consistent comprehensive patient education materials , provider education, and other asthma management interventions to

  17. Good Law, Good Practice, Good Sense: Using Legal Guidelines for Drafting Educational Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogotch, Ira E.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests how to use legal guidelines for drafting educational policies. Analyzes the political context in which present policymaking and governance initiatives exist. Two assumptions frame this article. First, good law makes for good administrative practice. Second, administrator policymaking is more important than the content of the policy…

  18. New ACGME Work-Hour Guidelines and Their Impact on Current Residency Training Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattar, S. Pirzada; Basith, Fatima; Madison, James; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has introduced new work-hour guidelines for residents in ACGME accredited programs that were implemented in July 2003. The new ACGME policies impact several practices in various psychiatry residency programs across the U.S., even though psychiatry has not been at the forefront…

  19. Teacher Performance Pay: Synthesis of Plans, Research, and Guidelines for Practice. Policy Brief RB-46

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heneman III, Herbert G.; Milanowski, Anthony; Kimball, Steven

    2007-01-01

    This Policy Brief focuses on the nature and effectiveness of these plans. Generic descriptions of three types of plans are provided, followed by a synthesis of research results on their effectiveness. A set of guidelines for effective practice is then provided to help states and districts embarking on these forms of performance pay. The authors…

  20. Guidelines on Multicultural Education, Training, Research, Practice, and Organizational Change for Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Provides psychologists with the rationale and needs for addressing multiculturalism and diversity in education, training, research, practice, and organizational change, along with basic information and relevant terminology to support these guidelines. Provides references for additional information and discusses paradigms that broaden the purview…

  1. A Critical Analysis of the INQAAHE Guidelines of Good Practice for Higher Education Quality Assurance Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmur, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    The International Network of Quality Assurance Agencies in Higher Education's Guidelines of Good Practice by higher education quality assurance agencies need substantial revision before they can be considered adequate by stakeholders in any national higher education system. Various revisions are proposed in this article. But the International…

  2. Adopting Health Behavior Change Theory throughout the Clinical Practice Guideline Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceccato, Natalie E.; Ferris, Lorraine E.; Manuel, Douglas; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.

    2007-01-01

    Adopting a theoretical framework throughout the clinical practice guideline (CPG) process (development, dissemination, implementation, and evaluation) can be useful in systematically identifying, addressing, and explaining behavioral influences impacting CPG uptake and effectiveness. This article argues that using a theoretical framework should…

  3. Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare: Screening, Assessment, and Treatment Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanelli, Lisa Hunter; Landsverk, John; Levitt, Jessica Mass; Leslie, Laurel K.; Hurley, Maia M.; Bellonci, Christopher; Gries, Leonard T.; Pecora, Peter J.; Jensen, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    The Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference focused on developing guidelines in five key areas (screening and assessment, psychosocial interventions, psychopharmacologic treatment, parent engagement, and youth empowerment) related to children's mental health. This paper provides an overview of issues related to the…

  4. Mental Health In-Service Training; Some Practical Guidelines for the Psychiatric Consultant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Beulah

    Based on the author's personal observations and opinions as a former public health psychiatric consultant, this book offers a theoretical orientation and practical guidelines for psychiatrists, analysts, clinical psychologists, psychiatric social workers, and others who hope to participate in community psychiatry as mental health consultants to…

  5. Infective endocarditis prophylaxis: current practice trend among paediatric cardiologists: are we following the 2007 guidelines?

    PubMed

    Naik, Ronak J; Patel, Neil R; Wang, Ming; Shah, Nishant C

    2016-08-01

    In 2007, the American Heart Association modified the infective endocarditis prophylaxis guidelines by limiting the use of antibiotics in patients with cardiac conditions associated with the highest risk of adverse outcomes after infective endocarditis. Our objective was to evaluate current practice for infective endocarditis prophylaxis among paediatric cardiologists. A web-based survey focussing on current practice, describing the use of antibiotics for infective endocarditis prophylaxis in various congenital and acquired heart diseases, was distributed via e-mail to paediatric cardiologists. The survey was kept anonymous and was distributed twice. Data from 253 participants were analysed. Most paediatric cardiologists discontinued infective endocarditis prophylaxis in patients with simple lesions such as small ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, and bicuspid aortic valve without stenosis or regurgitation; however, significant disagreement persists in prescribing infective endocarditis prophylaxis in certain conditions such as rheumatic heart disease, Fontan palliation without fenestration, and the Ross procedure. Use of antibiotic prophylaxis in certain selected conditions for which infective endocarditis prophylaxis has been indicated as per the current guidelines varies from 44 to 83%. Only 44% follow the current guidelines exclusively, and 34% regularly discuss the importance of oral hygiene with their patients at risk for infective endocarditis. Significant heterogeneity still persists in recommending infective endocarditis prophylaxis for several cardiac lesions among paediatric cardiologists. More than half of the participants (56%) do not follow the current guidelines exclusively in their practice. Counselling for optimal oral health in patients at risk for infective endocarditis needs to be optimised in the current practice.

  6. Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare: Screening, Assessment, and Treatment Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanelli, Lisa Hunter; Landsverk, John; Levitt, Jessica Mass; Leslie, Laurel K.; Hurley, Maia M.; Bellonci, Christopher; Gries, Leonard T.; Pecora, Peter J.; Jensen, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    The Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference focused on developing guidelines in five key areas (screening and assessment, psychosocial interventions, psychopharmacologic treatment, parent engagement, and youth empowerment) related to children's mental health. This paper provides an overview of issues related to the…

  7. Adopting Health Behavior Change Theory throughout the Clinical Practice Guideline Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceccato, Natalie E.; Ferris, Lorraine E.; Manuel, Douglas; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.

    2007-01-01

    Adopting a theoretical framework throughout the clinical practice guideline (CPG) process (development, dissemination, implementation, and evaluation) can be useful in systematically identifying, addressing, and explaining behavioral influences impacting CPG uptake and effectiveness. This article argues that using a theoretical framework should…

  8. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N=150 was…

  9. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N =150 was…

  10. Feeding Students in School: Providing Guidelines and Information on Safe Feeding Practices for Special Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sandra; And Others

    This manual provides guidelines for safe feeding practices for students with disabilities in Oregon schools. Stressed is the importance of distinguishing between feeding for the maintenance of health and feeding for the acquisition of skills. Individual sections cover: definitions of feeding programs; the school district responsibility; risks;…

  11. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guidelines, "Examination of the neonate": response from the perspective of general practice medicine].

    PubMed

    Springer, M P

    2002-11-09

    With the publication of the Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Examination of the neonate', a discussion which has lasted several decades has been brought to an end. Up to now a second neonatal examination by the general practitioner on the third, fourth or fifth day after a midwife-assisted birth was recommended. The arguments in support of this recommendation were based on the following: (a) the limited expertise of midwives in the past, (b) the experience that general practitioners had in examining children, although this experience was not specifically related to the defects for which neonates should be checked, and (c) the government bodies' wish to restrict the number of hospital deliveries by giving greater structure to the organisation of midwife care, which in practice, did not lead to large changes. Based on three studies, the practice guideline recommends that a second examination is of no added value.

  12. Current management of gout: practical messages from 2016 EULAR guidelines.

    PubMed

    Nuki, George; Doherty, Michael; Richette, Pascal

    2017-04-28

    The European League Against Rheumatism published updated recommendations for the management of gout in 2016, comprising 3 overarching principles and 11 key recommendations for clinical practice. Patient education about the pathophysiology of gout and its comorbidities, as well as the existence of effective treatments are important, and understanding the principles of managing acute attacks and eliminating urate crystals by lifelong lowering of the serum urate (SU) below a target level are essential. Advice about lifestyle, diet, weight, and other risk factors, as well as the need to screen for, and manage, comorbidities is emphasized. For the treatment of flares, colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and oral or intraarticular steroids, or a combination thereof, are recommended. In patients with frequent flares and contraindications to colchicine, NSAIDs, and corticosteroids, an interleukin-1 blocker should be considered. Urate-lowering therapy (ULT) should be discussed from the first presentation of the disease, and SU levels should be maintained at less than 6 mg/dl (360 µmol/l), or less than 5 mg/dl (300 µmol/l) in patients with severe gout. Allopurinol is recommended as first-line ULT with dose adjustment according to renal function. If the SU target cannot be achieved with allopurinol, then febuxostat, a uricosuric, or combining a xanthine oxidase inhibitor with a uricosuric should be considered. All ULTs should be started at low dose and titrated upwards until the SU target is achieved. Unless contraindicated, flare prophylaxis with low-dose colchicine or with NSAIDs at low dosage is recommended during the first 6 months of ULT. In patients with refractory gout, pegloticase can be considered.

  13. Adherence to guidelines on cervical cancer screening in general practice: programme elements of successful implementation.

    PubMed Central

    Hermens, R P; Hak, E; Hulscher, M E; Braspenning, J C; Grol, R P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is still only limited understanding of whether and why interventions to facilitate the implementation of guidelines for improving primary care are successful. It is therefore important to look inside the 'black box' of the intervention, to ascertain which elements work well or less well. AIM: To assess the associations of key elements of a nationwide multifaceted prevention programme with the successful implementation of cervical screening guidelines in general practice. DESIGN OF STUDY: A nationwide prospective cohort study. SETTING: A random sample of one-third of all 4,758 general practices in The Netherlands (n = 1,586). METHOD: General practitioners (GPs) in The Netherlands were exposed to a two-and-a-half-year nationwide multifaceted prevention programme to improve the adherence to national guidelines for cervical cancer screening. Adherence to guidelines at baseline and after the intervention and actual exposure to programme elements were assessed in the sample using self-administered questionnaires. RESULTS: Both baseline and post-measurement questionnaires were returned by 988 practices (response rate = 62%). No major differences in baseline practice characteristics between study population, non-responders, and all Netherlands practices were observed. After the intervention all practices improved markedly (P<0.001) in their incorporation of nine out of 10 guideline indicators for effective cervical screening into practice. The most important elements for successful implementation were: specific software modules (odds ratios and 95% confidence intervalsfor all nine indicators ranged from OR = 1.85 [95% CI = 1.24-2.77] to OR = 10.2 [95% CI = 7.58-14.1]); two or more 'practice visits' by outreach visitors (ORs and 95% CIs for six indicators ranged from OR = 1.46 [95% CI= 1.01-2.12] to OR = 2.35 [95% CI = 1.63-3.38]); and an educational programme for practice assistants (ORs and 95% CIs for four indicators ranged from OR = 1.57 [95% CI = 1

  14. Laboratory Medicine Best Practice Guideline: Vitamins A, E and the Carotenoids in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Greaves, Ronda F; Woollard, Gerald A; Hoad, Kirsten E; Walmsley, Trevor A; Johnson, Lambro A; Briscoe, Scott; Koetsier, Sabrina; Harrower, Tamantha; Gill, Janice P

    2014-01-01

    Despite apparent method similarities between laboratories there appear to be confounding factors inhibiting uniform reporting and standardisation of vitamin assays. The Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) Vitamins Working Party, in conjunction with The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs, has formulated a guideline to improve performance, reproducibility and accuracy of fat-soluble vitamin results. The aim of the guideline is to identify critical pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical components of the analysis of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood to promote best practice and harmonisation. This best practice guideline has been developed with reference to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) “Laboratory Medicine Best Practices: Developing an Evidence-Based Review and Evaluation Process”. The CDC document cites an evaluation framework for generating best practice recommendations that are specific to laboratory medicine. These 50 recommendations proposed herein, were generated from a comprehensive literature search and the extensive combined experience of the AACB Vitamins Working Party members. They were formulated based on comparison between an impact assessment rating and strength of evidence and were classified as either: (1) strongly recommend, (2) recommend, (3) no recommendation for or against, or (4) recommend against. These best practice recommendations represent the consensus views, in association with peer reviewed evidence of the AACB Vitamins Working Party, towards best practice for the collection, analysis and interpretation of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood. PMID:25210208

  15. Considerations on the Improved Integration of Medical Guidelines into Routine Clinical Practice – a Review and Concept Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, M. W.; Schlieter, H.; Richter, P.; Wesselmann, S.

    2016-01-01

    Medical guidelines have become established as the standard for the comprehensive synopsis of all available information (scientific trials, expert opinion) on diagnosis and treatment recommendations. The transfer of guidelines to clinical practice and subsequent monitoring has however proven difficult. In particular the potential interaction between guideline developers and guideline users has not been fully utilised. This review article analyses the status quo and existing methodological and technical information solutions supporting the guideline life cycle. It is shown that there are numerous innovative developments that in isolation do not provide comprehensive support. The vision of the “Living Guidelines 2.0” is therefore presented. This outlines the merging of guideline development and implementation on the basis of clinical pathways and guideline-based quality control, and building on this, the generation of information for guideline development and research. PMID:27134291

  16. Report on activities and attitudes of organizations active in the clinical practice guidelines field.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, A O; Battista, R N; Hodge, M J; Lewis, S; Basinski, A; Davis, D

    1995-01-01

    The organizing committee of a workshop on clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) surveyed invited organizations on their attitudes and activities related to five topics to be covered during the workshop sessions: organizational roles, priority setting, guidelines implementation, guidelines evaluation and development of a network of those active in the CPG field. Organizational roles: The national specialty societies were felt to have the largest role to play; the smallest roles were assigned to consumers, who were seen to have a role mainly in priority setting, and to industry and government, both of which were seen to have primarily a funding role. Many barriers to collaboration were identified, the solutions to all of which appeared to be better communication, establishment of common principles and clear role definitions. Priority setting: There was considerable agreement on the criteria that should be used to set priorities for CPG activities: the burden of disease on population health, the state of scientific knowledge, the cost of treatment and the economic burden of disease on society were seen as important factors, whereas the costs of guidelines development and practitioner interest in guidelines development were seen as less important. Organizations were unable to give much information on how they set priorities. Guidelines implementation: Most of the organizations surveyed did not actively try to ensure the implementation of guidelines, although a considerable minority devoted resources to implementation. The 38% of organizations that implemented guidelines actively listed a wide variety of activities, including training, use of local opinion leaders, information technology, local consensus processes and counter detailing. Guidelines evaluation: Formal evaluation of guidelines was undertaken by fewer than 13% of the responding organizations. All the evaluations incorporated assessments before and after guideline implementation, and some used primary patient

  17. Symptom relief in patients with pneumonia and dementia: implementation of a practice guideline.

    PubMed

    van der Maaden, Tessa; van der Steen, Jenny T; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Doncker, Sarah M M M; Anema, Johannes R; Hertogh, Cees M P M; de Vet, Henrica C W

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the degree of implementation and barriers encountered in the use of a practice guideline for optimal symptom relief for patients with dementia and pneumonia in Dutch nursing homes. A process evaluation included assessment of reach, fidelity, and dose delivered using researcher's observations, and dose received was addressed in a question "use of the practice guideline," which the physicians completed for each patient included in the study. Perceived barriers were assessed with a structured questionnaire (response 69%) and semi-structured interviews (n = 14), which were subject to qualitative content analysis. Of the 55 physicians involved in the intervention phase, 87% attended an implementation meeting; 20 physicians joined the study later (reach). The intervention was implemented as planned, and all intervention components were delivered by the researchers (fidelity and dose delivered). Thirty-six physicians included 109 patients. For 81% of the patients, the treating physician stated to have used the guideline (dose received). The guideline was perceived as providing a good overview of current practice, but some physicians had expected a more directive protocol or algorithm. Further, recommended regular observations of symptoms were rarely performed. Physician's often felt that "this is not different from what we usually do," and with the acute illness, there was not always enough time to (re)familiarize with the contents. The physicians used the practice guideline frequently despite important barriers. Future implementation may involve strategies such as multiple interactive meetings. Further, the greatest potential to alter usual practice should be emphasized, such as using observational instruments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Updated clinical practice guidelines for concussion/mild traumatic brain injury and persistent symptoms.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Shawn; Bayley, Mark; McCullagh, Scott; Velikonja, Diana; Berrigan, Lindsay; Ouchterlony, Donna; Weegar, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    To introduce a set of revised guidelines for the management of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and persistent symptoms following concussive injuries. The Guidelines for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Persistent Symptoms were made available in March 2011 based on literature and information up to 2008. A search for new clinical practice guidelines addressing mTBI and a systematic review of the literature evaluating treatment of persistent symptoms was conducted. Healthcare professionals representing a range of disciplines from Canada and abroad attended a consensus conference to revise the original guidelines in light of new evidence. A modified Delphi process was used to create 96 recommendations addressing the diagnosis and management of mTBI and persistent symptoms, including post-traumatic headache, sleep disturbances, mental health disorders, cognitive difficulties, vestibular and vision dysfunction, fatigue and return to activity/work/school. Numerous resources, tools and treatment algorithms were also included to aid implementation of the recommendations. The revised clinical practice guideline reflects the most current evidence and is recommended for use by clinicians who provide care to people who experience PPCS following mTBI.

  19. Primary care guidelines: Senior executives’ views on changing health centre practices in hypertension treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ijäs, Jarja; Alanen, Seija; Kaila, Minna; Ketola, Eeva; Nyberg, Solja; Välimäki, Maritta A.; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the adoption of the national Hypertension Guideline in primary care and to evaluate the consistency of the views of the health centre senior executives on the guideline's impact on clinical practices in the treatment of hypertension in their health centres. Design A cross-sectional telephone survey. Setting All municipal health centres in Finland. Subjects Health centres where both the head physician and the senior nursing officer responded. Main outcome measures Agreement in views of the senior executives on the adoption of clinical practices as recommended in the Hypertension Guideline. Results Data were available from 143 health centres in Finland (49%). The views of head physicians and senior nursing officers on the adoption of the Hypertension Guideline were not consistent. Head physicians more often than senior nursing officers (44% vs. 29%, p < 0.001) reported that no agreements on recording target blood pressure in patient records existed. A similar discrepancy was seen in recording cardiovascular risk (64% vs. 44%, p < 0.001). Senior executives agreed best on the calibration of sphygmomanometers and the provision of weight-control group counselling. Conclusions Hypertension Guideline recommendations that require joint agreements between professionals are less often adopted than simple, precise recommendations. More emphasis on effective multidisciplinary collaboration is needed. PMID:19929184

  20. Practice guidelines for acupuncturists using acupuncture as an adjunctive treatment for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Sarah; Ramjan, Lucie Michelle

    2015-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a potentially life-threatening eating disorder where people intentionally refuse to eat sufficient amounts to maintain a healthy body-weight for fear of becoming fat. The intense preoccupation with restriction of food and control of body weight makes this one of the most complex and confusing conditions for practitioners to treat. While no single treatment has been found to be superior to another in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, general practice guidelines are available to guide mainstream treatment, however there are no guidelines for practitioners of complementary therapies. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture show promise as an adjunctive therapy in improving co-morbidities such as depression and anxiety levels among people with anorexia nervosa, by strengthening mind, body and overall well-being. The aim of this guideline is to assist and support acupuncture practitioners to deliver effective and safe adjunctive acupuncture treatments to people with anorexia nervosa, by providing a practice guideline that is underpinned by an ethical and evidence-based framework. The use of complementary therapies and specifically acupuncture in the treatment of anorexia nervosa may provide important adjunctive care to allow a comprehensive treatment approach that potentially improves quality of life, reduces anxiety and instils hope for recovery. It is hoped that acupuncture practitioners treating patients with anorexia nervosa will refer to these guidelines and apply the guidance (as deemed appropriate).

  1. Systematic review of hypertension clinical practice guidelines based on the burden of disease: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin; Hu, Shilian; Li, Youping; Yan, Boxi; Shen, Gan; Wang, Li

    2014-02-01

    To perform a systematic review for the development, geographical distribution, and subject classification of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for hypertension worldwide. CPGs for the management of hypertension were identified through the searching of Ovid, EMbase, and Chinese electronic databases. Major guidelines websites such as NGC (National Guideline Clearinghouse), GIN (Guidelines International Network), NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) and CPGN (Clinical Practice Guideline Network), as well as Google Scholar were also screened for additional information. EndNote X3 and Excel 2007 were used for extracting and analyzing the data of included CPGs. A total of 375 hypertension CPGs were included, involving 6 continents, 33 countries, 4 regions, and 3 international organizations. The publication date ranged from the year of 1971 to 2012, with the number of CPGs increased year by year. The CPGs were mainly developed by North America, Europe, and Asia. Their subjects covered 3 categories and 11 sub-classes, which mainly focused on the management of adult hypertension (44.53%). The number of CPGs varies in regions, countries, and academic organizations, with the development process differently. The regional disparity between the number CPGs and burden of hypertension were observed. The CPGs made a point of the management of adult hypertension. © 2014 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Report on the International Society for Laboratory Hematology Survey on guidelines to support clinical hematology laboratory practice.

    PubMed

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; George, T I; Proytcheva, M; Iorio, A

    2016-05-01

    Given the importance of evidence-based guidelines in health care, we surveyed the laboratory hematology community to determine their opinions on guideline development and their experience and interest in developing clinical hematology laboratory practice guidelines. The study was conducted using an online survey, distributed to members of the International Society for Laboratory Hematology (ISLH) in 2015, with analysis of collected, anonymized responses. A total of 245 individuals participated. Most worked in clinical and/or research laboratories (83%) or industry (11%). 42% felt there were gaps in current guidelines. The majority (58%) recommended that ISLH engages its membership in guideline development. Participants differed in their familiarity with, and use of, different organizations' guidelines. Participants felt it was important to follow best practice recommendations on guideline development, including engagement of experts, statement about conflict of interests and how they were managed, systematic review and grading evidence for recommendations, identifying recommendations lacking evidence or consensus, and public input and peer review of the guideline. Moreover, it was considered important to provide guidelines free of charge. Industry involvement in guidelines was considered less important. The clinical laboratory hematology community has high expectations of laboratory practice guidelines that are consistent with recent recommendations on evidence-based guideline development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. American Geriatrics Society abstracted clinical practice guideline for postoperative delirium in older adults.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The abstracted set of recommendations presented here provides essential guidance both on the prevention of postoperative delirium in older patients at risk of delirium and on the treatment of older surgical patients with delirium, and is based on the 2014 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Guideline. The full version of the guideline, American Geriatrics Society Clinical Practice Guideline for Postoperative Delirium in Older Adults is available at the website of the AGS. The overall aims of the study were twofold: first, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the prevention of postoperative delirium in older adults; and second, to present nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions that should be implemented perioperatively for the treatment of postoperative delirium in older adults. Prevention recommendations focused on primary prevention (i.e., preventing delirium before it occurs) in patients who are at risk for postoperative delirium (e.g., those identified as moderate-to-high risk based on previous risk stratification models such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines, Delirium: Diagnosis, Prevention and Management. Clinical Guideline 103; London (UK): 2010 July 29). For management of delirium, the goals of this guideline are to decrease delirium severity and duration, ensure patient safety and improve outcomes.

  4. Translating New Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines into Practice: The Experience of One Community Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Christy J W; Gawrys, Breanna L; Wall, Jessica L; Saas, Patrick D; Seehusen, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    In December 2013 the US Preventive Services Task Force issued a recommendation for lung cancer screening with annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT). As screening guidelines emerge and change, this creates an environment for studying the translation of these guidelines into practice. This study assessed how these guidelines were implemented in a community hospital setting and the resulting radiologic findings. This observational study examined the radiologic outcomes of LDCT lung cancer screening guidelines and the resulting notification. During the first year after publication of the guidelines, 94 screening LDCT scans were ordered. Of these, 21 (22.3%) did not meet the criteria outlined by the US Preventive Services Task Force. Among the 72 cases that did met published criteria, 65.3% of scans detected nodules, and among the remaining 35.6%, half had another clinically significant finding. This study shows that new lung cancer screening guidelines, as implemented at a community hospital, resulted in radiologic findings that required follow-up in more than half of patients. Clinicians must be aware of these potential incidental findings when talking to patients about the decision to order screenings. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  5. Clinical practice guidelines in dentistry: opinions of dental practitioners on their contribution to the quality of dental care

    PubMed Central

    van der Sanden, W J M; Mettes, D; Plasschaert, A; van't, H; Grol, R; Verdonschot, E

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the opinions of general dental practitioners regarding the development and importance of clinical practice guidelines and their contribution to the quality of dental care. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to a representative sample of 1656 dentists in the Netherlands. Factor analysis was conducted to identify scales of variables, and a reliability analysis was conducted to verify the reliability of the identified scales. The effect of the independent variables is expressed as odds ratio per scale part (standard deviation, SD). Regression analyses were conducted to study determinants of the opinions on clinical guidelines. Results: The response rate was 73%; 54% of the respondents supported the development of clinical practice guidelines for dentists. Most respondents indicated that clinical practice guidelines could be used as a checklist, as a support in daily clinical decision making, and as a basis for continuing dental education. The factor analyses yielded four scale factors—contribution of guidelines to effectiveness of care (OR 1.95/SD), contribution of guidelines to professional autonomy (OR 1.70/SD), contribution of guidelines to quality of care (OR 2.52/SD), and contribution of guidelines to collaboration (OR 1.49/SD)—which complied with the criterion of Cronbach's alpha >0.60. Multiple regression analysis with the four scale factors as dependent variables yielded only extremely low correlations for practice and dentist characteristics (R2=0.01–0.04). Conclusions: Only about 50% of dentists support the development and implementation of clinical guidelines. Guidelines are seen as helpful in the provision of continuing dental education and as a support in daily clinical decision making. The most important barrier to successful implementation of clinical practice guidelines is the fear of dental practitioners that guidelines will reduce their professional autonomy. Practice and dentist characteristics are unrelated to dentists

  6. [Shoulder dystocia: Guidelines for clinical practice--Short text].

    PubMed

    Sentilhes, L; Sénat, M-V; Boulogne, A-I; Deneux-Tharaux, C; Fuchs, F; Legendre, G; Le Ray, C; Lopez, E; Sc