Science.gov

Sample records for practice oriented results

  1. Orientations to Reflective Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Bud; Austin, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Delineates five orientations to reflective practice: immediate, technical, deliberative, dialectic, and transpersonal, each reflecting different social science bases and beliefs and values about education. Views them as interactive, interdependent, noncompeting, aspects of reflective practice. (SK)

  2. Transitions in First-Year Students' Initial Practice Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Roni; Segal-Engelchin, Dorit; Huss, Efrat

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of the first-year program on the initial practice orientations of 2 distinct, equal-sized clusters of entering BSW students: micro-oriented and macro-oriented students. Results indicate that the proportion of students reporting a micro-practice orientation increased from 53.2% to 62.4% between the beginning and…

  3. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 2. Results: Primary care management and community orientation.

    PubMed

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-03-01

    At the WONCA Europe conference 2009 the recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' was presented. It is a background paper and reference manual, providing advocacy of general practice/family medicine (GP/FM) in Europe. The Research Agenda summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the WONCA Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In this second article, the results for the core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' are presented. Though there is a large body of research on various aspects of 'primary care management', it represents a very scattered rather than a meta view. Many studies focus on care for specific diseases, the primary/secondary care interface, or the implications of electronic patient records. Cost efficiency or process indicators of quality are current outcomes. Current literature on community orientation is mainly descriptive, and focuses on either care for specific diseases, or specific patient populations, or on the uptake of preventive services. Most papers correspond poorly to the WONCA concept. For both core competencies, there is a lack of research with a longitudinal perspective and/or relevant health or quality of life outcomes as well as research on patients' preferences and education for organizational aspects of GP/FM.

  4. Practical Vocational Orientation in the Comprehensive School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orne, Ingegard

    1973-01-01

    This description of practical vocational orientation in the Swedish comprehensive schools has been excerpted from Pryo i Samverkan (1971), a publication of the Arbetsmarknadens Yrkesrad (Vocational Council of the Labor Market). (Editor)

  5. Practice Oriented Master's in Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmock, John O.

    1996-01-01

    This award provides support for the development and initial implementation of an interdisciplinary Master's Program with a concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology. This program is a collaboration between the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Alabama A and M University, Northwest Shoals Community College, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the U.S. Army Missile Command, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Institute for Standards and Technology, Advanced Optical Systems Inc., Dynetics, Inc., Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Inc., Nichols Research Corp., SCI Inc., and Speedring Inc. These organizations have been participating fully in the design, development and implementation of the program. This program is directed at both traditional students as well as government and defense workers who desire specialty education in practical optics and optical systems design and manufacturing. It is intended to produce highly trained graduates who can solve practical problems, and includes an on-site practicum at a manufacturing location. The broad curriculum of this program emphasizes the fundamentals of optics, optical systems manufacturing and testing, and the principles of design and manufacturing-to-cost for commercial optical products. The degrees offered are the MS in Physics and the MSE in Electrical Engineering with concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology through the Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering departments of UAH with support from and in consultation with the Steering Committee composed of representatives from each of the participating organizations plus a student representative.

  6. Practice Oriented Master's in Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmock, John O.

    1997-01-01

    This award provides support for the development and initial implementation of an interdisciplinary Master's Program with a concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology. This program is a collaboration between the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Alabama A&M University, Northwest Shoals Community College, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the U. S. Army Missile Command, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Institute for Standards and Technology, Advanced Optical Systems Inc., Dynetics, Inc., Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Inc., Nichols Research Corp., SCI Inc., and Speedring Inc. These organizations have been participating fully in the design, development and implementation of the program. This program is directed at both traditional students as well as government and defense workers who desire specialty education in practical optics and optical systems design and manufacturing. It is intended to produce highly trained graduates who can solve practical problems, and includes an on-site practicum at a manufacturing location. The broad curriculum of this program emphasizes the fundamentals of optics, optical systems manufacturing and testing, and the principles of design and manufacturing-to-cost for commercial optical products. The degrees offered are the MS in Physics and the MSE in Electrical Engineering with concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology through the Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering departments of UAH with support from and in consultation with the Steering Committee composed of representatives from each of the participating organizations plus a student representative.

  7. Practice Oriented Master's in Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmock, John O.

    1998-01-01

    The development of an interdisciplinary Masters Program with a concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology has been is described. This program was developed under the U.S. Manufacturing Education and Training Activity of the Technology Reinvestment Project. This development was a collaboration between the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Alabama A&M University, Northwest Shoals Community College, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the U.S. Army Missile Command, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Advanced Optical Systems Inc., Dynetics, Inc., Hughes Danbury Optical Systems, Inc., Nichols Research and Speedring Inc. These organizations as well as the National Institute for Standards and Technology and SCI, Inc. have been participating fully in the design, development and implementation of this program. This goal of the program is to produce highly trained graduates who can also solve practical problems. To this end, the program includes an on-site practicum at a manufacturing location. The broad curriculum of this program emphasizes the fundamentals of optics, optical systems manufacturing and testing, and the principles of design and manufacturing to cost for commercial products. The Master's of Science (MS) in Physics and Master's of Science in Engineering (MSE) in Electrical Engineering Degrees with concentration in Optics and Photonics Technology are offered by the respective UAH academic departments with support from and in consultation with a Steering Committee composed of representatives from each of the participating organizations, and a student representative from UAH. The origins of the programs are described. The curricula of the programs is described. The course outlines of the new courses which were developed for the new curriculum are included. Also included are samples of on-site practicums which the students have been involved in. Also included as attachments are samples of the advertisements, which includes flyers, and

  8. OJPOT: online judge & practice oriented teaching idea in programming courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gui Ping; Chen, Shu Yu; Yang, Xin; Feng, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Practical abilities are important for students from majors including Computer Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering. Along with the popularity of ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ACM/ICPC) and other programming contests, online judge (OJ) websites achieve rapid development, thus providing a new kind of programming practice, i.e. online practice. Due to fair and timely feedback results from OJ websites, online practice outperforms traditional programming practice. In order to promote students' practical abilities in programming and algorithm designing, this article presents a novel teaching idea, online judge & practice oriented teaching (OJPOT). OJPOT is applied to Programming Foundation course. OJPOT cultivates students' practical abilities through various kinds of programming practice, such as programming contests, online practice and course project. To verify the effectiveness of this novel teaching idea, this study conducts empirical research. The experimental results show that OJPOT works effectively in enhancing students' practical abilities compared with the traditional teaching idea.

  9. Orientating Nonpharmacist Faculty Members to Pharmacy Practice

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Bianca; Sheridan, Leah; Sucher, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To design, implement, and evaluate a faculty development program intended to orient nonpharmacist faculty members to pharmacy practice. Design. A multifaceted program was implemented in 2012 that included 4 shadowing experiences in which faculty members visited acute care, ambulatory care, hospital, and community pharmacy settings under the guidance of licensed preceptors. Itineraries for each visit were based on objective lists of anticipated practice experiences that define the role of the pharmacist in each setting. Assessment. The 4 shadowing experiences culminated with reflection and completion of a survey to assess the impact of the program. All of the faculty participants agreed that the experience improved their conceptual understanding of contemporary pharmacy practice and the role of the pharmacist in the healthcare setting. The experience also improved faculty comfort with creating practice-relevant classroom activities. Conclusions. A shadowing experience is an effective way of orienting nonpharmacist faculty members to the practice of pharmacy. This program inspired the creation of an experience to introduce pharmacy practice faculty to pharmaceutical science faculty research initiatives. PMID:24954946

  10. Results-Oriented Supervision (for Teachers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Stanley S.

    Results-Oriented Supervision (R.O.S.) is a system for teacher supervision that focuses more on instructional improvement than on teacher evaluation. The supervisor and the teacher join together to formulate teaching objectives. After a period of implementation, a postconference is held to assess and restate or renew objectives. In the school…

  11. Social Workers’ Orientation Toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    PubMed Central

    Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with 13 background/demographic questions. Results: The overall level of orientation toward the EBP process is relatively low. Although respondents are slightly familiar with it and have slightly positive attitudes about it, their intentions to engage in it and their actual engagement are relatively low. Respondents who followed a course on the EBP process as a student are more oriented toward it than those who did not. Social workers under 29 are more familiar with the EBP process than those over 29. Conclusions: We recommend educators to take a more active role in teaching the EBP process to students and social workers.

  12. Social Workers’ Orientation Toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    PubMed Central

    Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers’ orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with 13 background/demographic questions. Results: The overall level of orientation toward the EBP process is relatively low. Although respondents are slightly familiar with it and have slightly positive attitudes about it, their intentions to engage in it and their actual engagement are relatively low. Respondents who followed a course on the EBP process as a student are more oriented toward it than those who did not. Social workers under 29 are more familiar with the EBP process than those over 29. Conclusions: We recommend educators to take a more active role in teaching the EBP process to students and social workers. PMID:27630517

  13. Covert Orienting to Central Vision Cues and Sport Practice Relations in the Development of Visual Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nougier, Vincent; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The development of visual orienting to a cued target on the part of practicing and nonpracticing tennis players aged 13, 16, and 25 years was examined. Results indicated that practicers were not faster than nonpracticers in processing visual information and that subjects of all ages oriented attention voluntarily to cued locations. (LB)

  14. Psychologists' Religious and Spiritual Orientations and Their Practice of Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafranske, Edward P.; Malony, H. Newton

    The nature of clinical psychologists' religiosity, belief orientation, and practices in psychotherapy, including an assessment of ideology, non-doctrinal beliefs, attitudes toward clinical interventions, and a measure of dimensions of religiosity needs to be examined. To assess psychologists' religious and spiritual orientation in relation to…

  15. Analysing Lecturer Practice: The Role of Orientations and Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, John; Stewart, Sepideh; Thomas, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This article continues a fairly recent trend of research examining the teaching practice of university mathematics lecturers. A lecturer's pedagogical practices in a course in linear algebra were discussed via a supportive community of inquiry. We use Schoenfeld's framework describing the relationship of resources, orientations and goals to…

  16. Practices of Compassionate, Critical, Justice-Oriented Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Hilary G.; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    In this cross-institutional, qualitative case study, two teacher educators in urban teacher education programs identify and analyze the components of our teacher education practice in relation to a vision of compassionate, critical, justice-oriented teacher education. Using Grossman et al.'s concepts of preparation for professional practice as an…

  17. Is the Presence of a Results-Oriented Professional Learning Community Predictive of Student Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between teacher collaboration practices known as working as a professional learning community (PLC) and student performance. Through a review of the current literature, an operational framework of PLCs was developed that distinguished results-oriented from inquiry-oriented PLCs. The study considered the…

  18. How an Organization's Environmental Orientation Impacts Environmental Performance and Its Resultant Financial Performance through Green Computing Hiring Practices: An Empirical Investigation of the Natural Resource-Based View of the Firm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aken, Andrew Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation uses the logic embodied in Strategic Fit Theory, the Natural Resource- Based View of the Firm (NRBV), strategic human resource management, and other relevant literature streams to empirically demonstrate how the environmental orientation of a firm's strategy impacts their environmental performance and resultant financial…

  19. [Vocational orientation in medical rehabilitation: development of a practice handbook and a homepage as user-oriented media for rehabilitative practice].

    PubMed

    Lukasczik, M; Löffler, S; Gerlich, C; Wolf, H-D; Neuderth, S

    2011-06-01

    Vocational orientation in medical rehabilitation has become an important issue in rehabilitation science and practice in Germany. Although a variety of vocationally oriented interventions has been developed in recent years, there is still a lack of consensus with regard to the definition of specific types of interventions as well as relevant criteria (e. g., methods; instruments; duration/frequency; patient groups). Building on preliminary definitions, basic types of vocationally oriented measures/interventions were conceptually modified and refined in the context of a consensual process. 39 experts of various professions were contacted during a 2-stage Delphi survey to evaluate existing definitions of vocationally oriented interventions using key questions. Standardized descriptions of 5 vocationally oriented basic interventions were specified in cooperation with an interdisciplinary panel of experts. Descriptions were published in a workbook and a homepage for researchers and clinicians, which also contain information on the implementation of measures into rehabilitative care as well as good practice examples. The media developed in this project may contribute to the transfer of research results on vocationally oriented rehabilitation into health care practice.

  20. [Vocational orientation in medical rehabilitation: development of a practice handbook and a homepage as user-oriented media for rehabilitative practice].

    PubMed

    Lukasczik, M; Löffler, S; Gerlich, C; Wolf, H-D; Neuderth, S

    2011-06-01

    Vocational orientation in medical rehabilitation has become an important issue in rehabilitation science and practice in Germany. Although a variety of vocationally oriented interventions has been developed in recent years, there is still a lack of consensus with regard to the definition of specific types of interventions as well as relevant criteria (e. g., methods; instruments; duration/frequency; patient groups). Building on preliminary definitions, basic types of vocationally oriented measures/interventions were conceptually modified and refined in the context of a consensual process. 39 experts of various professions were contacted during a 2-stage Delphi survey to evaluate existing definitions of vocationally oriented interventions using key questions. Standardized descriptions of 5 vocationally oriented basic interventions were specified in cooperation with an interdisciplinary panel of experts. Descriptions were published in a workbook and a homepage for researchers and clinicians, which also contain information on the implementation of measures into rehabilitative care as well as good practice examples. The media developed in this project may contribute to the transfer of research results on vocationally oriented rehabilitation into health care practice. PMID:21626462

  1. Analysing lecturer practice: the role of orientations and goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, John; Stewart, Sepideh; Thomas, Mike

    2011-10-01

    This article continues a fairly recent trend of research examining the teaching practice of university mathematics lecturers. A lecturer's pedagogical practices in a course in linear algebra were discussed via a supportive community of inquiry. We use Schoenfeld's framework describing the relationship of resources, orientations and goals to decision-making to analyse this practice. The lecturer's overarching goal of assisting students to see the 'big picture' and the methods he employed to do so, arising from his beliefs, values and preferences are described. An example of this approach in action is presented along with possible pedagogical implications.

  2. Community mental health nurses' perspectives of recovery-oriented practice.

    PubMed

    Gale, J; Marshall-Lucette, S

    2012-05-01

    Recovery-oriented practice, an approach aligned towards the service user perspective, has dominated the mental health care arena. Numerous studies have explored service users' accounts of the purpose, meaning and importance of 'recovery'; however, far less is known about healthcare staff confidence in its application to care delivery. A self-efficacy questionnaire and content analysis of nursing course documents were used to investigate a cohort of community mental health nurses' recovery-oriented practice and to determine the extent to which the current continuing professional development curriculum met their educational needs in this regard. Twenty-three community mental health nurses completed a self-efficacy questionnaire and 28 course documents were analysed. The findings revealed high levels of nurses' confidence in their understanding and ability to apply the recovery model and low levels of confidence were found in areas of social inclusion. The content analysis found only one course document that used the whole term 'recovery model'. The findings suggest a gap in the nurses' perceived ability and confidence in recovery-oriented practice with what is taught academically. Hence, nursing education needs to be more explicitly focused on the recovery model and its application to care delivery. PMID:22070737

  3. The orginization of medical practice and practice orientations among physicians in prepaid and nonprepaid primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, D

    1975-03-01

    Data are presented on office-based general practitioners and pediatricians working in varying practice settings. Fee-for-service physicians spend more time in direct patient care activities than those in prepaid practice, and devote more time to each patient. The data suggest that the patient load characteristic of general practice in prepaid groups encourages a more assembly line practice which is less responsive to patients than the pattern characteristic of fee-for-service practice. Prepaid physicians work during scheduled hours and may deal with increased load by processing patients more rapidly. Fee-for-service physicians tend to respond to increased demand by working longer hours. The responsiveness of primary care physicians to patient problems seems to reflect primarily their social orientations to medical practice and the time pressures they face. Varying practice settings result in different techniques of coping with the pressures of practice. Data are also presented on sociodemographic and professional characteristics of primary care physicians in varying settings, workload, use of diagnostic and laboratory procedures, social orientations to medical practice, satisfactions and dissatisfactions, and attitudes toward sociopolitical aspects of medical care. Suggestions are offered for improving the responsiveness of prepaid practice. PMID:1113557

  4. West meets East: psychophysics studies for understanding mysterious Oriental health promoting practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wen

    2008-04-01

    Based on his early graduated studies in psychophysics, the author has, in recent years, applied psychophysics for studying organic and motor senses (the two sensory systems deeply embedded inside of human body), and tried to understand the scientific foundation of the oriental health promoting practices. The preliminary results are promising and are discussed in detail in this paper. Psychophysics studies of organic and motor senses may be the tool to provide the connection between Western and Eastern medicines to form a balanced holistic medicine approach, and may help us to understand the scientific foundation of mysterious oriental health Promoting practices that serve as alternative medicines for promoting human wellness against illness.

  5. Effects of Textual and Animated Orienting Activities and Practice on Learning from Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieber, Lloyd P.; Hannafin, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes study designed to examine the effects of textual and/or computer animated orienting strategies and practice on rule-using and problem-solving skills of elementary school students using computer-assisted instruction. Four different versions of a lesson based on Isaac Newton's Law of Motion are described, and results are analyzed. (28…

  6. Managing the Teaching-Research Nexus: Ideals and Practice in Research-Oriented Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geschwind, Lars; Broström, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that while ideals of close linkages between research and teaching are widely embraced in research-oriented universities, a practice of division of labour between teaching-oriented and research-oriented staff persists. In an investigation of how the research-teaching nexus is managed at three Swedish universities, we…

  7. Practicing the practice: Learning to guide elementary science discussions in a practice-oriented science methods course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ashima Mathur

    University methods courses are often criticized for telling pre-service teachers, or interns, about the theories behind teaching instead of preparing them to actually enact teaching. Shifting teacher education to be more "practice-oriented," or to focus more explicitly on the work of teaching, is a current trend for re-designing the way we prepare teachers. This dissertation addresses the current need for research that unpacks the shift to more practice-oriented approaches by studying the content and pedagogical approaches in a practice-oriented, masters-level elementary science methods course (n=42 interns). The course focused on preparing interns to guide science classroom discussions. Qualitative data, such as video records of course activities and interns' written reflections, were collected across eight course sessions. Codes were applied at the sentence and paragraph level and then grouped into themes. Five content themes were identified: foregrounding student ideas and questions, steering discussion toward intended learning goals, supporting students to do the cognitive work, enacting teacher role of facilitator, and creating a classroom culture for science discussions. Three pedagogical approach themes were identified. First, the teacher educators created images of science discussions by modeling and showing videos of this practice. They also provided focused teaching experiences by helping interns practice the interactive aspects of teaching both in the methods classroom and with smaller groups of elementary students in schools. Finally, they structured the planning and debriefing phases of teaching so interns could learn from their teaching experiences and prepare well for future experiences. The findings were analyzed through the lens of Grossman and colleagues' framework for teaching practice (2009) to reveal how the pedagogical approaches decomposed, represented, and approximated practice throughout course activities. Also, the teacher educators

  8. Practice-oriented research: what it takes to do collaborative research in private practice.

    PubMed

    Koerner, Kelly; Castonguay, Louis G

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the authors' experience conducting research in and for private practice. Based on two distinct research programs (one guided by a scientist practitioner leading various groups of clinicians and another from a network of practitioners and researchers), a number of practice-oriented studies are presented. Lessons learned from these collaborative projects are discussed in terms of challenges and strategies to deal with them, as well as benefits that can be earned from conducting empirical studies within clinical routine. General recommendations are then offered to foster the engagement of clinicians in their own working environment and to facilitate partnerships between researchers and practitioners in developing and implementing valid, feasible, and informative clinical studies.

  9. Cultural orientations, parental beliefs and practices, and latino adolescents' autonomy and independence.

    PubMed

    Roche, Kathleen M; Caughy, Margaret O; Schuster, Mark A; Bogart, Laura M; Dittus, Patricia J; Franzini, Luisa

    2014-08-01

    Despite the salience of behavioral autonomy and independence to parent-child interactions during middle adolescence, little is known about parenting processes pertinent to youth autonomy development for Latino families. Among a diverse sample of 684 Latino-origin parent-adolescent dyads in Houston, Texas, this study examines how parents' cultural orientations are associated directly and indirectly, through parental beliefs, with parenting practices giving youth behavioral autonomy and independence. Informed by social domain theory, the study's parenting constructs pertain to youth behaviors in an "ambiguously personal" domain-activities that adolescents believe are up to youth to decide, but which parents might argue require parents' supervision, knowledge, and/or decision-making. Results for latent profile analyses of parents' cultural identity across various facets of acculturation indicate considerable cultural heterogeneity among Latino parents. Although 43% of parents have a Latino cultural orientation, others represent Spanish-speaking/bicultural (21%), bilingual/bicultural (15%), English-speaking/bicultural (15%), or US (6%) cultural orientations. Structural equation modeling results indicate that bilingual/bicultural, English-speaking/bicultural, and US-oriented parents report less emphasis on the legitimacy of parental authority and younger age expectations for youth to engage in independent behaviors than do Latino-oriented parents. Parental beliefs endorsing youth's behavioral independence and autonomy, in turn, are associated with less stringent parental rules (parental report), less parental supervision (parental and youth report), and more youth autonomy in decision-making (parental and youth report). Evidence thus supports the idea that the diverse cultural orientations of Latino parents in the US may result in considerable variations in parenting processes pertinent to Latino adolescents' development.

  10. Missing data in substance abuse research? Researchers’ reporting practices of sexual orientation and gender identity

    PubMed Central

    Bacca, Cristina L.; Cochran, Bryan N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals are at higher risk for substance use and substance use disorders than heterosexual individuals and are more likely to seek substance use treatment, yet sexual orientation and gender identity are frequently not reported in the research literature. The purpose of this study was to identify if sexual orientation and gender identity are being reported in the recent substance use literature, and if this has changed over time. Method The PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched for articles released in 2007 and 2012 using the term “substance abuse” and 200 articles were randomly selected from each time period and database. Articles were coded for the presence or absence of sexual orientation and gender identity information. Results Participants’ sexual orientation was reported in 3.0% and 4.9% of the 2007 and 2.3% and 6.5% of the 2012 sample, in PsycINFO and PubMed sample articles, respectively, while non-binary gender identity was reported in 0% and 1.0% of the 2007 sample and 2.3% and 1.9% of the 2012 PsycINFO and PubMed sample articles. There were no differences in rates of reporting over time. Conclusions Sexual orientation and gender identity are rarely reported in the substance abuse literature, and there has not been a change in reporting practices between 2007 and 2012. Recommendations for future investigators in reporting sexual orientation and gender identity are included. PMID:25496705

  11. Preferred Negative Geotactic Orientation in Mobile Cells: Tetrahymena Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond; Matsos, Helen C.

    1994-01-01

    For the protozoan species Tetrahymena a series of airplane experiments are reported, which varied gravity as an active laboratory parameter and tested for corresponding changes in geotaxic orientation of single cells. The airplane achieved altemating periods of low (0.01 g) and high (1.8 g, g = 980 cm/s) gravity by flying repeated Keplerian parabolas. The experimental design was undertaken to clearly distinguish gravity from competing aerodynamic and chemical gradients. In this way, each culture served as its own control, with gravity level alone determining the orientational changes. On average, 6.3% of the Tetrahymena oriented vertically in low gravity, while 27% oriented vertically in high-gravity phases. Simplified physical models are explored for describing these cell trajectores as a function of gravity, aerodynamic drag, and lift. The notable effect of gravity on turning behavior is emphasized as the biophysical cause of the observed negative geotaxis in Tetrahymena. A fundamental investigation of the biological gravity receptor (it it exists) and improved modeling for vertical migration in important types of ocean plankton motivate the present research.

  12. Preferred negative geotactic orientation in mobile cells: Tetrahymena results.

    PubMed Central

    Noever, D A; Cronise, R; Matsos, H C

    1994-01-01

    For the protozoan species Tetrahymena a series of airplane experiments are reported, which varied gravity as an active laboratory parameter and tested for corresponding changes in geotaxic orientation of single cells. The airplane achieved alternating periods of low (0.01 g) and high (1.8 g; g = 980 cm/s) gravity by flying repeated Keplerian parabolas. The experimental design was undertaken to clearly distinguish gravity from competing aerodynamic and chemical gradients. In this way, each culture served as its own control, with gravity level alone determining the orientational changes. On average, 6.3% of the Tetrahymena oriented vertically in low gravity, while 27% oriented vertically in high-gravity phases. Simplified physical models are explored for describing these cell trajectories as a function of gravity, aerodynamic drag, and lift. The notable effect of gravity on turning behavior is emphasized as the biophysical cause of the observed negative geotaxis in Tetrahymena. A fundamental investigation of the biological gravity receptor (if it exists) and improved modeling for vertical migration in important types of ocean plankton motivate the present research. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7858146

  13. Does a Social Work Degree Predict Practice Orientation? Measuring Strengths-Based Practice among Child Welfare Workers with the Strengths-Based Practices Inventory-Provider Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Emily M.; McCarthy, Sean C.; Serino, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Strengths-based practice (SBP) is one of the primary modalities of social work practice. The literature on SBP does not address a standardized tool for measuring SBP or whether receipt of a social work degree is related to practice orientation. We measure SBP with a provider-based Strengths-Based Practices Inventory (SBPI-P) and examine whether a…

  14. The Relationship between Early Elementary Teachers' Instructional Practices and Theoretical Orientations and Students' Growth in Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchey, Kristen D.; Coker, David L., Jr.; Jackson, Allison F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between 28 teachers' theoretical orientations to writing instruction and self-reported instructional practices and student writing performance. First-, second-, and third-grade teachers completed the Teacher Writing Orientation Scale developed by Graham, Harris, MacArthur, and Fink (2002) and reported the frequency…

  15. Science Meets Practice in Determining Effectiveness of Sexual Orientation Change Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kristin A.; Gock, Terry S.; Haldeman, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Guidelines for psychological practice with lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients," by the American Psychological Association. Guideline 3 of the acknowledges the diversity of human sexual orientation and that "efforts to change sexual orientation have not been shown to be effective or safe" (p. 14). As noted in the…

  16. The use of social environment in a psychosocial clubhouse to facilitate recovery-oriented practice

    PubMed Central

    Schmied, Virginia; Hungerford, Catherine; Cleary, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Recovery-oriented language has been widely adopted in mental health policy; however, little is known about how recovery practices are implemented within individual services, such as psychosocial clubhouses. Aims To explore how recovery practices are implemented in a psychosocial clubhouse. Method Qualitative case study design informed by self-determination theory was utilised. This included 120 h of participant observation, interviews with 12 clubhouse members and 6 staff members. Field notes and interview transcripts were subject to theoretical thematic analysis. Results Two overarching themes were identified, each comprising three sub-themes. In this paper, the overarching theme of ‘social environment’ is discussed. It was characterised by the sub-themes, ‘community and consistency’, ‘participation and opportunity’ and ‘respect and autonomy’. Conclusions Social environment was used to facilitate recovery-oriented practice within the clubhouse. Whether recovery is experienced by clubhouse members in wider society, may well depend on supports and opportunities outside the clubhouse. Declaration of interests None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703771

  17. NODDI: practical in vivo neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Schneider, Torben; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A; Alexander, Daniel C

    2012-07-16

    This paper introduces neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI), a practical diffusion MRI technique for estimating the microstructural complexity of dendrites and axons in vivo on clinical MRI scanners. Such indices of neurites relate more directly to and provide more specific markers of brain tissue microstructure than standard indices from diffusion tensor imaging, such as fractional anisotropy (FA). Mapping these indices over the whole brain on clinical scanners presents new opportunities for understanding brain development and disorders. The proposed technique enables such mapping by combining a three-compartment tissue model with a two-shell high-angular-resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) protocol optimized for clinical feasibility. An index of orientation dispersion is defined to characterize angular variation of neurites. We evaluate the method both in simulation and on a live human brain using a clinical 3T scanner. Results demonstrate that NODDI provides sensible neurite density and orientation dispersion estimates, thereby disentangling two key contributing factors to FA and enabling the analysis of each factor individually. We additionally show that while orientation dispersion can be estimated with just a single HARDI shell, neurite density requires at least two shells and can be estimated more accurately with the optimized two-shell protocol than with alternative two-shell protocols. The optimized protocol takes about 30 min to acquire, making it feasible for inclusion in a typical clinical setting. We further show that sampling fewer orientations in each shell can reduce the acquisition time to just 10 min with minimal impact on the accuracy of the estimates. This demonstrates the feasibility of NODDI even for the most time-sensitive clinical applications, such as neonatal and dementia imaging.

  18. Does learning in clinical context in anatomical sciences improve examination results, learning motivation, or learning orientation?

    PubMed

    Böckers, Anja; Mayer, Christian; Böckers, Tobias Maria

    2014-01-01

    The preclinical compulsory elective course "Ready for the Operating Room (OR)!?" [in German]: "Fit für den OP (FOP)"] was implemented for students in their second year, who were simultaneously enrolled in the gross anatomy course. The objective of the study was to determine whether the direct practical application of anatomical knowledge within the surgical context of the course led to any improvement in learning motivation, learning orientation, and ultimately examination results in the gross anatomy course, as compared with a control group. Within the scope of five teaching sessions, the students learned surgical hand disinfection, suturing techniques, and the identification of commonly used surgical instruments. In addition, the students attended five surgical demonstrations performed by surgical colleagues on cadavers. Successful learning of these basic skills was then assessed based on an Objectively Structured Practical Examination. Learning motivation and learning orientation in both subgroups was determined using the SELLMO-ST motivation test and the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory test. While a significant increase in work avoidance was identified in the control group, this was not the case for FOP participants. Similarly, an increase in the "deep approach" to learning, as well as a decrease in the "surface approach," was able to be documented among the FOP participants following completion of the course. The results suggest that students enrolled in the gross anatomy course, who were simultaneously provided with the opportunity to learn in clinical context, were more likely to be successful at maintaining learning motivation and learning orientation required for the learning process, than students who attended the gross anatomy course alone.

  19. Social Workers' Orientations toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Comparison with Psychologists and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Danielle E.; Rubin, Allen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results from a large, cross-sectional survey of social workers, psychologists, and licensed marriage and family therapists (LMFTs) in Texas (N = 865) regarding their orientation toward and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). All social workers were recruited by e-mail using the state NASW Listserv (analysis…

  20. Medical Simulation Practices 2010 Survey Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCrindle, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    Medical Simulation Centers are an essential component of our learning infrastructure to prepare doctors and nurses for their careers. Unlike the military and aerospace simulation industry, very little has been published regarding the best practices currently in use within medical simulation centers. This survey attempts to provide insight into the current simulation practices at medical schools, hospitals, university nursing programs and community college nursing programs. Students within the MBA program at Saint Joseph's University conducted a survey of medical simulation practices during the summer 2010 semester. A total of 115 institutions responded to the survey. The survey resus discuss overall effectiveness of current simulation centers as well as the tools and techniques used to conduct the simulation activity

  1. Women's Literacy and Numeracy Practices Oriented toward Small-Scale Social Action in Northern Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mein, Erika

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at literacy from social and critical perspectives in order to understand the literacy and numeracy practices of women in small savings groups in northern Mexico. In this case, women's literacy and numeracy practices were not only situated in a rural desert context but also oriented toward concrete action to address their…

  2. Human Resource Development Practices as Determinant of HRD Climate and Quality Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Arif; Hashim, Junaidah; Ismail, Ahmad Zaki Hj

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to measure employees' perception of human resource development (HRD) practices, to explore whether ISO certification leads to any improvements in HRD system, and to examine the role of HRD practices on employees' development climate and quality orientation in the organization. Design/methodology/approach: A total…

  3. Images as Orienting Activity: Using Theory to Inform Classroom Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feryok, Anne; Pryde, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Conceptualizations of teacher knowledge have shifted to focusing on the role of experiential rather than theoretical knowledge. There are different approaches to this, but the idea of an image that guides practice is widespread. One approach to images that has not been frequently investigated in studies of second language teachers is through…

  4. OJPOT: Online Judge & Practice Oriented Teaching Idea in Programming Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Gui Ping; Chen, Shu Yu; Yang, Xin; Feng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Practical abilities are important for students from majors including Computer Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering. Along with the popularity of ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ACM/ICPC) and other programming contests, online judge (OJ) websites achieve rapid development, thus providing a new kind of programming…

  5. Learning Partnerships in Practice: Orientation, Leadership, and Residence Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardone, Taran; Turton, Elizabeth Stoll; Olson, Gerald; Magolda, Marcia Baxter

    2013-01-01

    Committed to improving how their various programs serve student learning, Taran Cardone, Elizabeth Stoll Turton, Gerald Olson, and Marcia Baxter Magolda describe how their participation in Miami University's Community of Practice on Engaged Learning (COPEL) helped them create developmentally appropriate, learning-centered approaches that…

  6. Action versus result-oriented schemes in a grassland agroecosystem: a dynamic modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, Rodolphe; Doyen, Luc; Tichit, Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Effects of agri-environment schemes (AES) on biodiversity remain controversial. While most AES are action-oriented, result-oriented and habitat-oriented schemes have recently been proposed as a solution to improve AES efficiency. The objective of this study was to compare action-oriented, habitat-oriented and result-oriented schemes in terms of ecological and productive performance as well as in terms of management flexibility. We developed a dynamic modelling approach based on the viable control framework to carry out a long term assessment of the three schemes in a grassland agroecosystem. The model explicitly links grazed grassland dynamics to bird population dynamics. It is applied to lapwing conservation in wet grasslands in France. We ran the model to assess the three AES scenarios. The model revealed the grazing strategies respecting ecological and productive constraints specific to each scheme. Grazing strategies were assessed by both their ecological and productive performance. The viable control approach made it possible to obtain the whole set of viable grazing strategies and therefore to quantify the management flexibility of the grassland agroecosystem. Our results showed that habitat and result-oriented scenarios led to much higher ecological performance than the action-oriented one. Differences in both ecological and productive performance between the habitat and result-oriented scenarios were limited. Flexibility of the grassland agroecosystem in the result-oriented scenario was much higher than in that of habitat-oriented scenario. Our model confirms the higher flexibility as well as the better ecological and productive performance of result-oriented schemes. A larger use of result-oriented schemes in conservation may also allow farmers to adapt their management to local conditions and to climatic variations.

  7. Relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder, resilience, and religious orientation and practices among university student earthquake survivors in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Harvey J; Helm, Herbert W

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of PTSD symptoms; the relationship between PTSD and resilience, religious orientation and religious practices; and how gender is associated with these variables among a volunteer sample of 140 students attending a Christian university in Haiti approximately four months after the January 2010 earthquake. Using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C), the Resilience Scale (RS), and the Religious Orientation Scale (ROS) found no significant relationship between PTSD, resilience, religious orientation and religious practices. Results did indicate that 34% of the sample had PCL-C scores indicative of PTSD; female participants had higher PTSD symptoms than males; higher levels of intrinsic religious orientation were associated with more religious practices than extrinsic religious orientation; and males with higher PTSD symptoms were associated with lower levels of attending church-sponsored social events, while females with higher levels of resilience were more associated with church attendance and attending church social events. Mental health providers should develop more comprehensive disaster mental health services that build trust and are culturally sensitive to the post-trauma needs of the Haitian people.

  8. Hospital process orientation from an operations management perspective: development of a measurement tool and practical testing in three ophthalmic practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although research interest in hospital process orientation (HPO) is growing, the development of a measurement tool to assess process orientation (PO) has not been very successful yet. To view a hospital as a series of processes organized around patients with a similar demand seems to be an attractive proposition, but it is hard to operationalize this idea in a measurement tool that can actually measure the level of PO. This research contributes to HPO from an operations management (OM) perspective by addressing the alignment, integration and coordination of activities within patient care processes. The objective of this study was to develop and practically test a new measurement tool for assessing the degree of PO within hospitals using existing tools. Methods Through a literature search we identified a number of constructs to measure PO in hospital settings. These constructs were further operationalized, using an OM perspective. Based on five dimensions of an existing questionnaire a new HPO-measurement tool was developed to measure the degree of PO within hospitals on the basis of respondents’ perception. The HPO-measurement tool was pre-tested in a non-participating hospital and discussed with experts in a focus group. The multicentre exploratory case study was conducted in the ophthalmic practices of three different types of Dutch hospitals. In total 26 employees from three disciplines participated. After filling in the questionnaire an interview was held with each participant to check the validity and the reliability of the measurement tool. Results The application of the HPO-measurement tool, analysis of the scores and interviews with the participants resulted in the possibility to identify differences of PO performance and the areas of improvement – from a PO point of view – within each hospital. The result of refinement of the items of the measurement tool after practical testing is a set of 41 items to assess the degree of PO from an OM

  9. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  10. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  11. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  12. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  13. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  14. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  15. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  16. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  17. 27 CFR 8.52 - Practices which result in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Practices which result in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.52 Practices which result in exclusion. The practices specified in this section result in exclusion under section 105(a) of the Act....

  18. 27 CFR 8.53 - Practice not resulting in exclusion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Practice not resulting in..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL EXCLUSIVE OUTLETS Exclusion § 8.53 Practice not resulting in exclusion. The practice specified in this section is deemed not to result in exclusion under section 105(a)...

  19. Rasch Validation of a Measure of Reform-Oriented Science Teaching Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Hye Sun

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence from recent curriculum documents and previous research suggests that reform-oriented science teaching practices promote students' conceptual understanding, levels of achievement, and motivation to learn, especially when students are actively engaged in constructing their ideas through scientific inquiries. However, it is difficult to identify to what extent science teachers engage students in reform-oriented teaching practices (RTPs) in their science classrooms. In order to exactly diagnose the current status of science teachers' implementation of the RTPs, a valid and reliable instrument tool is needed. The principles of validity and reliability are fundamental cornerstones in developing a robust measurement tool. As such, this study was motivated by the desire to point out the limitations of the existing statistical and psychometric analyses and to further examine the validation of the RTP survey instrument. This paper thus aims at calibrating the items of the RTPs for science teachers using the Rasch model. The survey instrument scale was adapted from the 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education (NSSME) data. A total of 3701 science teachers from 1403 schools from across the USA participated in the NSSME survey. After calibrating the RTP items and persons on the same scale, the RTP instrument well represented the population of US science teachers. Model-data fit determined by Infit and Outfit statistics was within an appropriate range (0.5-1.5), supporting the unidimensional structure of the RTPs. The ordered category thresholds and the probability of the thresholds showed that the five-point rating scale functioned well. The results of this study support the use of the RTP measure from the 2012 NSSME in assessing usage of RTPs.

  20. Rasch Validation of a Measure of Reform-Oriented Science Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence from recent curriculum documents and previous research suggests that reform-oriented science teaching practices promote students' conceptual understanding, levels of achievement, and motivation to learn, especially when students are actively engaged in constructing their ideas through scientific inquiries. However, it is difficult…

  1. Social Workers' Orientation toward the Evidence-Based Practice Process: A Dutch Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zwet, Renske J. M.; Kolmer, Deirdre M. Beneken genaamd; Schalk, René

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study assesses social workers' orientation toward the evidence-based practice (EBP) process and explores which specific variables (e.g. age) are associated. Methods: Data were collected from 341 Dutch social workers through an online survey which included a Dutch translation of the EBP Process Assessment Scale (EBPPAS), along with…

  2. Assessing the Extent That the Gender and STEM Practice-Oriented Literature Is Evidence-Based

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamer, Elizabeth G.; Mutcheson, Ryan B.; Sutherland, Michelle; Meszaros, Peggy S.

    2013-01-01

    One principal way to judge if the activity or program described in a practice-oriented publication is worth replicating is to consider the strength of its foundational component. A strong foundational component supports the credibility of an initiative by demonstrating that it was designed with an understanding of other similar initiatives and…

  3. Apprehensions and Expectations of the Adoption of Systematically Planned, Outcome-Oriented Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savaya, Riki; Altschuler, Dorit; Melamed, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The study examined social workers' apprehensions and expectations of the impending adoption of systematically planned, empirically based, outcome-oriented practice (SEOP). Method: Employing a mixed methods longitudinal design, the study used concept mapping to identify and map workers' apprehensions and expectations and a…

  4. Practice-Oriented Exercises as One of the Ways to Form the Competences of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanova, Marina Alexandrovna; Shashkina, Olga Vladimirovna; Starchenko, Elena Viktorovna

    2016-01-01

    The article describes the methods of teaching students majoring in languages with the use of practice-oriented exercises, the need for the development and implementation of which is defined by a new methodological basis of modern higher vocational education--a competence-based approach. The study hypothesis involves the assumption that…

  5. Exploring Students' Reflective Thinking Practice, Deep Processing Strategies, Effort, and Achievement Goal Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy Phuong

    2009-01-01

    Recent research indicates that study processing strategies, effort, reflective thinking practice, and achievement goals are important factors contributing to the prediction of students' academic success. Very few studies have combined these theoretical orientations within one conceptual model. This study tested a conceptual model that included, in…

  6. Enhancing Project-Oriented Learning by Joining Communities of Practice and Opening Spaces for Relatedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascual, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an extension to project-oriented learning to increase social construction of knowledge and learning. The focus is on: (a) maximising opportunities for students to share their knowledge with practitioners by joining communities of practice, and (b) increasing their intrinsic motivation by creating conditions for student's…

  7. Instructional Experiment of Practical Competencies-Oriented Teaching Materials in Technical Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Su-Chang

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to conduct experimental instruction on the human resource management unit of business management in practical competencies-oriented business program developed by Chen (2005). This study is based on the quasi-experiment method and the subjects are two classes of students in a four-year technical university who have completed the…

  8. Inequalities in family practitioner use by sexual orientation: evidence from the English General Practice Patient Survey

    PubMed Central

    Urwin, Sean; Whittaker, William

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test for differences in primary care family practitioner usage by sexual orientation. Design Multivariate logistic analysis of pooled cross-sectional postal questionnaire responses to family practitioner usage. Setting Patient-reported use and experience of primary care in England, UK. Data from several waves of a postal questionnaire (General Practice Patient Survey) 2012–2014. Population 2 807 320 survey responses of adults aged 18 years and over, registered with a family practitioner. Main outcome measures Probability of a visit to a family practitioner within the past 3 months. Results Lesbian women were 0.803 times (95% CI 0.755 to 0.854) less likely to have seen a family practitioner in the past 3 months relative to heterosexual women (bisexual women OR=0.887, 95% CI 0.817 to 0.963). Gay men were 1.218 times (95% CI 1.163 to 1.276) more likely to have seen a family practitioner relative to heterosexual men (bisexual men OR=1.084, 95% CI 0.989 to 1.188). Our results are robust to the timing of the family practitioner visit (0–3, 0–6, 0–12 months). Gay men were more likely to have seen a family practitioner than heterosexual men where the proportion of women practitioners in the practice was higher (OR=1.238, 95% CI 1.041 to 1.472). Conclusions Inequalities in the use of primary care across sexual orientation in England exist having conditioned on several measures of health status, demographic and family practitioner characteristics. The findings suggest these differences may be reduced by policies targeting a reduction of differences in patient acceptability of primary care. In particular, further research is needed to understand whether lower use among heterosexual men represents unmet need or overutilisation among gay men, and the barriers to practitioner use seemingly occurring due to the gender distribution of practices. PMID:27173816

  9. PCK in Action: Examining One Chemistry Teacher's Practice through the Lens of Her Orientation toward Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boesdorfer, Sarah; Lorsbach, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A teacher's orientation toward science teaching has been proposed as very influential to a teacher's pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and teaching practice. Experienced teachers' orientation toward science teaching and its connections to their practice has not been well explored. Focusing on a unit about the periodic table, this…

  10. Sleep-Dependent Learning and Practice-Dependent Deterioration in an Orientation Discrimination Task

    PubMed Central

    Mednick, Sara C.; Drummond, Sean P.A.; Boynton, Geoffrey M.; Awh, Ed; Serences, John

    2009-01-01

    Learning new information requires practice. The degree of learning can be influenced by the amount of practice and whether subjects sleep between sessions. Over-practice, however, can lead to performance deterioration. The interaction between practice-dependent deterioration and sleep-dependent learning needs more study. We examine whether the amount of practice before sleep alters learning, and whether prior sleep protects against deterioration. Two groups (N = 33) were tested three times across two days on an orientation discrimination task. The High practice group was tested twice before a night of sleep and once after, at 9 a.m., 7 p.m., and 9 a.m. The Low practice group was tested once before a night of sleep and twice after, at 7 p.m., 9 a.m., and 7 p.m. Overall, both groups showed (1) deterioration with repeated, within-day testing, (2) performance improvement only after a night of sleep, (3) similar amounts of sleep-dependent learning and practice-dependent deterioration. In summary, we found that sleep resets visual contrast thresholds to a lower baseline (i.e., produces learning), but does not prevent over-practice deterioration effects. Likewise, over-practice deterioration does not influence the magnitude of overnight learning on this task. PMID:18410166

  11. PCK in Action: Examining one Chemistry Teacher's Practice through the Lens of her Orientation Toward Science Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesdorfer, Sarah; Lorsbach, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    A teacher's orientation toward science teaching has been proposed as very influential to a teacher's pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and teaching practice. Experienced teachers' orientation toward science teaching and its connections to their practice has not been well explored. Focusing on a unit about the periodic table, this study provides a case study using a respected, experienced high-school chemistry teacher's orientation toward science teaching to make sense of her observed teaching practice. Aspects of her practice, which aligned and misaligned with current recommendations for science teaching, were explored. Using observations, interviews, and class documents, the study concluded that the teacher's orientation toward science teaching was an appropriate way of understanding her teaching practice. While also being shown to be a useful tool for researchers, this case provides an example how a teacher's orientation toward science teaching could help in the development of professional development, specifically professional development for the recently released Next Generation Science Standards.

  12. The Validity of the Personal Orientation Inventory for Measuring the Effects of Training for Therapeutic Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Joel; Knapp, Robert R.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of training counselors for the core therapeutic conditions of empathy, warmth, and genuineness were studied in terms of increased levels of actualizing as measured by the Personal Orientation Inventory. Results support the discriminant validity of the inventory. (JKS)

  13. Professional development for primary science teaching in Thailand: Knowledge, orientations, and practices of professional developers and professional development participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musikul, Kusalin

    The purpose of this study was to examine an entire PD project as a case to understand the dynamic nature of science PD in a holistic manner. I used a pedagogical content knowledge model by Magnusson, Krajcik, and Borko (1999) as my theoretical framework in examining the professional developers' and teacher participants' knowledge, orientation, and practice for professional development and elementary science teaching. The case study is my research tradition; I used grounded theory for data analysis. The primary data sources were interview, card sort activity, and observation field notes collected during the PD and subsequently in teacher participants' classrooms. Secondary data sources were documents and artifacts that I collected from the professional developers and teachers. An analysis of the data led me to interpret the following findings: (a) the professional developers displayed multiple orientations. These orientations included activity-driven, didactic, discovery, and pedagogy-driven orientations. The orientations that were found among the professional developers deviated from the reformed Thai Science Education Standards; (b) the professional developers had limited PCK for PD, which were knowledge of teachers' learning, knowledge of PD strategies, knowledge of PD curriculum, and knowledge of assessment.; (c) the professional developers' knowledge and orientations influenced their decisions in selecting PD activities and teaching approaches; (d) their orientations and PCK as well as the time factor influenced the design and implementation of the professional development; (e) the elementary teachers displayed didactic, activity-driven, and academic rigor orientations. The orientations that the teachers displayed deviated from the reformed Thai Science Education Standards; and (f) the elementary teachers exhibited limited PCK. It is evident that the limitation of one type of knowledge resulted in an ineffective use of other components of PCK. This study

  14. Enhancing project-oriented learning by joining communities of practice and opening spaces for relatedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, R.

    2010-03-01

    This article describes an extension to project-oriented learning to increase social construction of knowledge and learning. The focus is on: (a) maximising opportunities for students to share their knowledge with practitioners by joining communities of practice, and (b) increasing their intrinsic motivation by creating conditions for student's relatedness. The case study considers a last year capstone course in Mechanical Engineering. The work addresses innovative practices of active learning and beyond project-oriented learning through: (a) the development of a web-based decision support system, (b) meetings between the communities of students, maintenance engineers and academics, and (c) new off-campus group instances. The author hypothesises that this multi-modal approach increases deep learning and social impact of the educational process. Surveys to the actors support a successful achievement of the educational goals. The methodology can easily be extended to further improve the learning process.

  15. Head orientation affects the intracranial pressure response resulting from shock wave loading in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dal Cengio Leonardi, Alessandra; Keane, Nickolas J; Bir, Cynthia A; Ryan, Anne G; Xu, Liaosa; Vandevord, Pamela J

    2012-10-11

    Since an increasing number of returning military personnel are presenting with neurological manifestations of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there has been a great focus on the effects resulting from blast exposure. It is paramount to resolve the physical mechanism by which the critical stress is being inflicted on brain tissue from blast wave encounters with the head. This study quantitatively measured the effect of head orientation on intracranial pressure (ICP) of rats exposed to a shock wave. Furthermore, the study examined how skull maturity affects ICP response of animals exposed to shock waves at various orientations. Results showed a significant increase in ICP values in larger rats at any orientation. Furthermore, when side-ICP values were compared to the other orientations, the peak pressures were significantly lower suggesting a relation between ICP and orientation of the head due to geometry of the skull and location of sutures. This finding accentuates the importance of skull dynamics in explaining possible injury mechanisms during blast. Also, the rate of pressure change was measured and indicated that the rate was significantly higher when the top of the head was facing the shock front. The results confirm that the biomechanical response of the superior rat skull is distinctive compared to other areas of the skull, suggesting a skull flexure mechanism. These results not only present insights into the mechanism of brain injury, but also provide information which can be used for designing more effective protective head gear. PMID:22947434

  16. Determinants of Benin elementary school science teachers' orientation toward inquiry-based instructional practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gado, Issaou

    The Republic of Benin (West Africa) undertook a nationwide curriculum reform that put an emphasis on inquiry-based instructional practices. Little, if any, research has been conducted to explore factors that could be related to teachers' orientation toward inquiry instructional practices. The purpose of this research study was to investigate factors and concerns that determine Benin elementary school teachers' orientation toward the use of inquiry-based instruction in the teaching of science. The study followed a naturalistic inquiry methodology combining a correlational ex post facto design and an observational case-study design. The theory of Planned Behavior was the conceptual framework used to design the study. Two hundred (N = 200) elementary school teachers and three (n = 3) case study participants were purposively selected. Data was gathered via the Revised Science Attitude Scale (Thompson & Shrigley, 1986), the Science Teachers' Ideological Preference Scale (Jones & Harty, 1978), open-ended questions, interviews, and classroom observations using audiorecorders, videorecorders, and the researcher-contextualized version of the Observational System for the Analysis of Classroom Instruction (Hough, 1966). Qualitative and quantitative data provided a deeper understanding of participants' responses. Quantitative measures indicated that Benin elementary school teachers have positive attitudes toward school science, significant positive orientation toward both inquiry-based instruction and traditional non inquiry-based instruction, and higher orientation toward inquiry-based instruction than traditional non inquiry-based instruction. Attitude toward handling materials for investigations was found to significantly contribute to the prediction of participants' inquiry orientation. Qualitative analyses of participants' responses indicated that the expectations of educational leaders, individual motivation to comply with the program, a perceived control of the

  17. Circular economy practices among Chinese manufacturers varying in environmental-oriented supply chain cooperation and the performance implications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qinghua; Geng, Yong; Lai, Kee-hung

    2010-06-01

    The rapidly growing industrial activities in emerging economies such as China have been causing resource depletion and pollution problems. This reality requires China to adopt an integrated management approach to resolve the conflict between industrial development and environmental protection, and the concept of circular economy (CE) serves this purpose. In this paper, we examine if different types of manufacturing enterprises on environmental-oriented supply chain cooperation (ESCC) exist. We also determine if the Chinese manufacturer types varying in ESCC differ in their implementation of the CE practices towards achieving the CE-targeted goals on improving both environmental and economic performance. Our cluster analytic results with multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) among the four identified types of Chinese manufacturers varying in environmental-oriented supply chain cooperation highlight the importance to intensify the cooperation with upstream and downstream supply chain partners for a CE initiative to succeed.

  18. Enhancing Trifocal Leadership Practices Using Simulation in a Pediatric Charge Nurse Orientation Program.

    PubMed

    Clark, Teresa J; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S

    2015-07-01

    A well-established charge nurse orientation program was enhanced with the addition of a simulation, addressing three primary populations (the trifocus) with whom charge nurses interact: patients, patients' parents, and other staff members. In this pilot quality improvement project, 20 staff nurses enrolled in the orientation program and were assigned a mentor. Only one participant used the mentorship opportunity; therefore, it is not discussed here. Twelve nurses completed all charge nurse classes and a simulation scenario of caring for a deteriorating infant. The nurses were given an opportunity to reflect on leadership practices after the simulation. Thematic analysis from qualitative, reflective data supported the enhanced understanding of managing complex patients, a code situation, and teams; guiding a team's novice nurse; leading as a charge nurse; and using clinical and critical thinking skills. All nurses reported that the simulation as experiential learning helped them to meet their leadership goals. PMID:26154673

  19. Variations in Titan's dune orientations as a result of orbital forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, George D.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Ewing, Ryan C.; Lora, Juan M.; Newman, Claire E.; Tokano, Tetsuya; Lucas, Antoine; Soto, Alejandro; Chen, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Wind-blown dunes are a record of the climatic history in Titan's equatorial region. Through modeling of the climatic conditions associated with Titan's historical orbital configurations (arising from apsidal precessions of Saturn's orbit), we present evidence that the orientations of the dunes are influenced by orbital forcing. Analysis of 3 Titan general circulation models (GCMs) in conjunction with a sediment transport model provides the first direct intercomparison of results from different Titan GCMs. We report variability in the dune orientations predicted for different orbital epochs of up to 70°. Although the response of the GCMs to orbital forcing varies, the orbital influence on the dune orientations is found to be significant across all models. Furthermore, there is near agreement among the two models run with surface topography, with 3 out of the 5 dune fields matching observation for the most recent orbital cycle. Through comparison with observations by Cassini, we find situations in which the observed dune orientations are in best agreement with those modeled for previous orbital configurations or combinations thereof, representing a larger portion of the cycle. We conclude that orbital forcing could be an important factor in governing the present-day dune orientations observed on Titan and should be considered when modeling dune evolution.

  20. Task Results Processing for the Needs of Task-Oriented Design Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheliazkova, Irina; Kolev, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents learners' task results gathered by means of an example task-oriented environment for knowledge testing and processed by EXCEL. The processing is domain- and task-independent and includes automatic calculation of several important task and session's parameters, drawing specific graphics, generating tables, and analyzing the…

  1. Orientation patterns of stone pavements as a result of modern geomorphologic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael; Kleber, Arno

    2010-05-01

    Stone pavements are typical surface features of climate-sensitive, arid environments. They form a tightly interlocking mosaic of clasts, covering virtually stone-free aeolian material. However, this mosaic does not generally exhibit random orientation of its constituents. Rather, there are systematic unimodal to bimodal distributions of stone length axes present. These orientation patterns may be the result of active geomorphologic processes, implying the unstable and fragile nature of this landform as well as a dominant lateral geomorphologic component, not considered in existing models of stone pavement formation. Responsible processes should be controlled by relief properties and may thus be described by topographic attributes. From three study areas (Laguna Salada, Mexico, eastern Mojave Desert and southern Sevier Basin, USA) we present measurements of pavement stone orientations and their relationship to landscape parameters. From 1 by 1 m sized plots azimuthal digital images were taken, corrected, georeferenced and length as well as orientation angle of the a- and b-axes of at least 100 stones were digitised. Subsequently, statistical parameters of circular data were calculated. From a digital elevation model relief attributes were derived to test their influence on pavement patterns. Three general types of orientation patterns were identified from all study areas: unimodal, bimodal and unoriented. These types are clustered together and may change within small lateral distance. The type of pattern is not influenced by stone dimensions or the formation character of the site (i.e. basalt flow vs. alluvial fan). Relief properties (e.g. slope length, specific catchment, inclination), controlling lateral geomorphologic processes appear to play a major role in generating orientation patterns in stone pavement surfaces. Hence, from pattern analysis the dynamic nature of these features can be drawn.

  2. The Impact of Sexual Orientation on Sexuality and Sexual Practices in North American Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Benjamin N.; Smith, James F.; Eisenberg, Michael L.; Ando, Kathryn A.; Rowen, Tami S.; Shindel, Alan W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There has been limited investigation of the sexuality and sexual dysfunction in non-heterosexual subjects by the sexual medicine community. Additional research in these populations is needed. Aims To investigate and compare sexuality and sexual function in students of varying sexual orientations. Methods An internet-based survey on sexuality was administered to medical students in North American between the months of February and July of 2008. Main Outcome Measures All subjects provided information on their ethnodemographic characteristics, sexual orientation, and sexual history. Subjects also completed a series of widely-utilized instruments for the assessment of human sexuality (International Index of Erectile Function [IIEF], Female Sexual Function Index [FSFI], Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool [PEDT], Index of Sex Life [ISL]). Results There were 2,276 completed responses to the question on sexual orientation. 13.2% of male respondents and 4.7% of female respondents reported a homosexual orientation; 2.5% of male and 5.7% of female respondents reported a bisexual orientation. Many heterosexual males and females reported same-sex sexual experiences (4% and 10%, respectively). Opposite-sex experiences were very common in the male and female homosexual population (37% and 44%, respectively). The prevalence of premature ejaculation (PEDT > 8) was similar among heterosexual and homosexual men (16% and 17%, P = 0.7, respectively). Erectile dysfunction (IIEF-EF < 26) was more common in homosexual men relative to heterosexual men (24% vs. 12%, P = 0.02). High risk for female sexual dysfunction (FSFI < 26.55) was more common in heterosexual and bisexual women compared with lesbians (51%, 45%, and 29%, respectively, P = 0.005). Conclusion In this survey of highly educated young professionals, numerous similarities and some important differences in sexuality and sexual function were noted based on sexual orientation. It is unclear whether the

  3. Palaeomagnetic results from the southern Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico: evidence for Early Cretaceous or Laramide remagnetization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnel, H.; Gose, W. A.; Testarmata, M. M.; Bocanegra Noriega, G.

    1990-12-01

    A large suite of samples from the Latest Triassic Huizachal and Early Jurassic Huayacocotla Groups and the Latest Jurassic Taman and Earliest Cretaceous Pimienta Formations was collected in the southern Sierra Madre Oriental for a palaeomagnetic study. Only the samples from three sites belonging to the Huizachal Group and the Las Juntas Formation possibly have retained their primary magnetization. If so, their pole position does not reveal any palaeomagnetically discernable motion relative to cratonic North America. All remaining sites were remagnetized as evidenced by a negative fold test at four sites and the fact that the pole positions cluster better at the 95% significance level if no structural corrections are applied. The tightness of the cluster ( α95 = 4.6 °) and the same polarity, suggest that the samples were remagnetized at some common time. These results permit two interpretations. (1) If the sampling region has not suffered any significant tectonic rotation, then the remagnetization can be dated by comparison with the polar wander path for North America as Early Cretaceous (≈ 130 Ma). This Early Cretaceous phase of deformation is not recognized in the northern Sierra Madre Oriental and clearly pre-dates the Early Tertiary Laramide orogeny. (2) If the southern Sierra Madre Oriental did rotate counterclockwise by ≈ 20 °, then the remagnetization could have originated in any Cretaceous or Early Tertiary time, and may indeed be related to the Laramide deformation. In either case, the data imply that the southern Sierra Madre Oriental constitutes an independent tectonic domain.

  4. Effects of teachers' assessment practices on ninth grade students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations in Muscat science classrooms in the Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Kharusi, Hussain A.

    2007-12-01

    and achievement goal orientations. Results of the PCA/EFA revealed three dimensions of perceived classroom assessment environment: learning-, harsh-, and public-oriented assessment environments; and three dimensions of achievement goal orientations: mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. Results of the HLM showed that class contextual features and teacher's teaching experience and assessment practices interacted significantly with student characteristics in influencing students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. The findings were compared with findings from previous studies related to classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. Recommendations, implications, and suggestions for future research were discussed.

  5. Effects of teachers' assessment practices on ninth grade students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations in Muscat science classrooms in the Sultanate of Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Kharusi, Hussain A.

    2007-12-01

    and achievement goal orientations. Results of the PCA/EFA revealed three dimensions of perceived classroom assessment environment: learning-, harsh-, and public-oriented assessment environments; and three dimensions of achievement goal orientations: mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals. Results of the HLM showed that class contextual features and teacher's teaching experience and assessment practices interacted significantly with student characteristics in influencing students' perceptions of classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. The findings were compared with findings from previous studies related to classroom assessment environment and achievement goal orientations. Recommendations, implications, and suggestions for future research were discussed.

  6. Tennessee advanced practice nurse compensation survey results 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, representatives from Middle Tennessee Advanced Practice Nurses (MTAPN), Greater Memphis Area Advanced Practice Nurses (GMAAPN), and Northeast Tennessee Nurse Practitioners Association (NETNPA) decided to poll APNs in Tennessee to compare data with the most recent results from the Advance for Nurse Practitioners national NP survey. Every other year, Advance for Nurse Practitioners publishes salary survey results from their survey. Most recently, in January 2006, an average nationwide salary for all APNs was reported at $74,812, with Tennessee's average at $71,068.

  7. A Practical Method of Monitoring the Results of Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Daugharty, G. D.

    1979-01-01

    To meet our goal of improving health care through more productive use of the data we are collecting about the delivery of health care we need to define our concepts of health and quality. The WHO definition of health allows the design of useful functional outcome criteria which give us measurable standards for the outcome of the health care. By recording, retrieving, and reviewing pertinent information from the structure and the process of health care for a valid comparison with its outcome, the most effective and efficient health care is identified. A practical system is presented which identifies the better methods of management and produces the motivation for change that results in improved care. The successful use of this system in a private practice supports its universal adaptability for health care providers. The initial encouraging results suggest that future trials in other types of practices will be even more encouraging.

  8. Best Practices for Reduction of Uncertainty in CFD Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Childs, Robert E.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a proposed best-practices system that will present expert knowledge in the use of CFD. The best-practices system will include specific guidelines to assist the user in problem definition, input preparation, grid generation, code selection, parameter specification, and results interpretation. The goal of the system is to assist all CFD users in obtaining high quality CFD solutions with reduced uncertainty and at lower cost for a wide range of flow problems. The best-practices system will be implemented as a software product which includes an expert system made up of knowledge databases of expert information with specific guidelines for individual codes and algorithms. The process of acquiring expert knowledge is discussed, and help from the CFD community is solicited. Benefits and challenges associated with this project are examined.

  9. The relationship between suicide risk and sexual orientation: results of a population-based study.

    PubMed Central

    Remafedi, G; French, S; Story, M; Resnick, M D; Blum, R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the relationship between sexual orientation and suicide risk in a population-based sample of adolescents. METHODS: Participants were selected from a cross-sectional, statewide survey of junior and senior public high school students. All males (n = 212) and females (n = 182) who described themselves as bisexual/homosexual were compared with 336 gender-matched heterosexual respondents on three outcome measures: suicidal ideation, intent, and self-reported attempts. Logistic regression analyses were used to examine the association between sexual orientation and outcome measures with adjustment for demographic characteristics. RESULTS: Suicide attempts were reported by 28. 1 % of bisexual/homosexual males, 20.5% of bisexual/homosexual females, 14.5% of heterosexual females, and 4.2% of heterosexual males. For males, but not females, bisexual/homosexual orientation was associated with suicidal intent (odds ratio [OR] = 3.61 95% confidence interval [CI = 1.40, 9.36) and attempts (OR=7.10; 95% CI=3.05, 16.53). CONCLUSIONS: There is evidence of a strong association between suicide risk and bisexuality or homosexuality in males. PMID:9584034

  10. Pre-Service Teachers' Views on Practical Work with Inquiry Orientation in Textbook-Oriented Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mijung; Chin, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Despite inquiry-based teaching was introduced and encouraged as significant tool to develop students' scientific knowledge and habits of mind, its implementation has not been well established in science classrooms in Korea. To understand the challenges and difficulties of the practice of inquiry practical work, this study particularly aims to…

  11. Results of the 2002 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Kahn, Norman B

    2002-09-01

    The results of the 2002 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2001 Match, six fewer positions (103 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2002, as well as 48 fewer (30 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 1 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (8 more US seniors), and 45 fewer (45 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, 43 more positions (70 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology, but 11 fewer (16 fewer US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Eight fewer positions (60 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine while 99 fewer positions (142 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer opportunities for family physicians, family practice experienced a fifth year of decline through the 2002 NRMP. Many different forces, however, are impacting medical student career choices, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty, the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment, liability protection issues, and the impact of faculty and resident role models. The 2002 NRMP results may herald the leveling of recent trends away from family practice careers. PMID:12269534

  12. Results of the 2001 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, P A; McPherson, D S; Schmittling, G T; Kahn, N B

    2001-09-01

    The results of the 2001 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2000 Match, 240 fewer positions (317 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2001, as well as 76 fewer (47 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 5 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (7 fewer US seniors), and 7 fewer (1 fewer US senior) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, 40 more positions (64 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 11 more (10 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Ninety-one fewer positions (2 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 49 more positions (67 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a fourth year of decline though the 2001 NRMP. Current forces, including student perspectives of specialty prestige, the turbulence of the health care environment, media hype, market factors, lifestyle choices, and student debt, all appear to be influencing many students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:11573716

  13. Results of the 2003 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Perry A; McPherson, Deborah S; Schmittling, Gordon T; Kahn, Norman B

    2003-09-01

    The results of the 2003 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect a persistent decline of student interest in family practice residency training in the United States. Compared with the 2002 Match, 118 fewer positions (179 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2003, as well as 23 fewer (12 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 20 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (11 fewer US seniors), and 23 fewer (34 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In comparison, 40 more positions (14 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 8 more (8 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have shown increases over the past 3 years. Sixty-seven more positions (but 148 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 107 more positions (33 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for either practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer opportunities for family physicians, family practice experienced continued decline though the 2003 NRMP. Many different forces, including student perspectives of the demands, rewards, and prestige of the specialty; the turbulence and uncertainty of the health care environment; liability protection issues; and the impact of faculty and resident role models, are impacting medical student career choices. The 2003 NRMP again confirms the trend away from family practice and primary care careers. PMID:12947519

  14. Professionally Responsible Disclosure of Genomic Sequencing Results in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Kyle B.; Chung, Wendy K.; Joffe, Steven; Koenig, Barbara A.; Wilfond, Benjamin; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Genomic sequencing is being rapidly introduced into pediatric clinical practice. The results of sequencing are distinctive for their complexity and subsequent challenges of interpretation for generalist and specialist pediatricians, parents, and patients. Pediatricians therefore need to prepare for the professionally responsible disclosure of sequencing results to parents and patients and guidance of parents and patients in the interpretation and use of these results, including managing uncertain data. This article provides an ethical framework to guide and evaluate the professionally responsible disclosure of the results of genomic sequencing in pediatric practice. The ethical framework comprises 3 core concepts of pediatric ethics: the best interests of the child standard, parental surrogate decision-making, and pediatric assent. When recommending sequencing, pediatricians should explain the nature of the proposed test, its scope and complexity, the categories of results, and the concept of a secondary or incidental finding. Pediatricians should obtain the informed permission of parents and the assent of mature adolescents about the scope of sequencing to be performed and the return of results. PMID:26371191

  15. Results of the 1999 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Kahn, N B; Schmittling, G T; Graham, R

    1999-09-01

    The 1999 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) results reflect continued volatility in the perceptions and career choices of physicians entering graduate medical education in the United States. A total of 117 fewer positions (155 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs in 1999, as well as 23 fewer (29 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine and 38 fewer (27 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, nine more positions (19 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and one more (10 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have recently been market sensitive. Seventy-three more positions (but 67 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 30 more positions (40 more US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees are "pluripotential" with perceived options for practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the demands of managed care and the needs of rural and underserved populations continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a second year of "primary care backlash" through the 1999 NRMP. In addition, current forces appear to be influencing some students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:10489637

  16. Results of the 2000 National Resident Matching Program: family practice.

    PubMed

    Pugno, P A; McPherson, D S; Schmittling, G T; Kahn, N B

    2000-09-01

    The results of the 2000 National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) reflect substantial volatility in the perceptions and career choices of physicians entering graduate medical education in the United States. Ninety-four fewer positions (191 fewer US seniors) were filled in family practice residency programs through the NRMP in 2000, compared with 1999, as well as 60 fewer (66 fewer US seniors) in primary care internal medicine, 12 fewer in pediatrics-primary care (6 fewer US seniors), and 10 fewer (9 fewer US seniors) in internal medicine-pediatric programs. In contrast, 37 more positions (36 more US seniors) were filled in anesthesiology and 4 more (13 more US seniors) in diagnostic radiology, two "marker" disciplines that have recently been market sensitive. Twelve fewer positions (63 fewer US seniors) were also filled in categorical internal medicine, while 35 fewer positions (104 fewer US seniors) were filled in categorical pediatrics programs, where trainees perceive options for practicing as generalists or entering subspecialty fellowships, depending on the market. While the needs of the nation, especially rural and underserved populations, continue to offer a market for family physicians, family practice experienced a third year of decline through the 2000 NRMP. Current forces, including media hype, market factors, lifestyle choices, debt, and the turbulence of the health care environment, appear to be influencing many students to choose subspecialty rather than primary care careers. PMID:11002864

  17. A Review of Psychometric Assessment and Reporting Practices: An Examination of Measurement-Oriented versus Non-Measurement-Oriented Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaney, Kathleen L.; Tkatchouk, Masha; Gabriel, Stephanie M.; Ferguson, Leona P.; Knudsen, Jared R. S.; Legere, Julien C.

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study is to determine whether the psychometric evaluation practices and test-analytic rationales of researchers publishing in journals with a measurement focus differ from those of researchers publishing in journals with varying substantive research foci. Several components of two different samples of articles were…

  18. The State of Knowledge of Outdoor Orientation Programs: Current Practices, Research, and Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Brent J.; Gass, Michael A.; Nafziger, Christopher S.; Starbuck, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor orientation programs represent a prominent area of experiential education with over 25,000 participants annually. More than 191 outdoor orientation programs currently operate in the United States and Canada. The research examining outdoor orientation programs consists of 25 peer-reviewed published studies and 11 dissertations. A new theory…

  19. [Nurturing fair play in competitive sports. Results from a study on competitively oriented youth soccer].

    PubMed

    Pilz, G A

    2005-08-01

    Apologists of sports praise them as an ideal way to prevent addiction and violence. Sports critics see it rather as a socialization authority on the morals of the fair foul. This contradiction was investigated based on an examination of fairness behaviour and fairness education in youth soccer as well as the question of the connection between sports and violence and the preventive possibilities of sports. Our results point to differences in understanding fairness according to age, sex and primarily performance/success orientation. Teenagers learn al ready at the latest in the C youth that it is important and right in the interest of success to break rules. Thus it applies that the more distinctive the success orientation, the more in formal and formal fair play degenerate into fictitious action morals of competitive sport and make way for morals of the "fair foul". The coaches play an important, even quite obviously the central role as socialization agents. In stead of learning fairness, the opposite is often conveyed to many young people in the organizations. However, our examinations also show that coach es can positively influence both fairness understanding and fairness behaviour of young footballers. Coach es are thus challenged as role models to exemplify fair play by their own actions.

  20. ``Here the Scientists Explain What I Said.'' Coordination Practices Elicited During the Enactment of the Results and Discussion Sections of Adapted Primary Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Hedda; Yarden, Anat

    2009-05-01

    Adapted primary literature (APL) is a novel text genre that retains the authentic characteristics of primary literature. Learning through APL represents an educational intervention with an authentic scientific context. In this case study, we analyzed the 80-min discourse developed during the enactment of an article from an APL-based curriculum in biotechnology in one class, and examined epistemic practices used by students during their meaning-making of the Results and Discussion sections of the article. Specifically, we examined coordination practices, by which students connected elements belonging to different epistemic status or context (theory, data, experimental stages, biotechnological applications and text). The application of coordination practices was identified more than 70 times during the lesson. In the context of the Results section, the students displayed research-oriented coordination practices, which were frequently associated with claims of comprehension difficulty. In the context of the Discussion section, students displayed text-oriented coordination practices, associated with analysis of the text characteristics. We are suggesting that the research-oriented coordination practices and some of the text-oriented ones enabled the emergence of authentic scientific practices and learning by inquiry. Another type of text-oriented coordination practice enabled reflection on scientists’ experimental processes, enabling learning science as inquiry. The enactment model of APL used here allowed for both the emergence of the two dimensions of inquiry learning and the promotion of scientific literacy in the fundamental and derived senses.

  1. Evaluating a Practice-Oriented Service Model to Increase the Use of Respite Services among Minorities and Rural Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoro-Rodriguez, Julian; Kosloski, Karl; Montgomery, Rhonda J. V.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the practice-oriented model of service use (Yeatts, Crow, & Folts, 1992) relative to the more widely used behavioral model (Andersen, 1968) in its ability to explain the use of respite services by caregivers of Alzheimer's patients. Unlike the behavioral model, which focuses primarily on…

  2. Socio-Demographic and Practice-Oriented Factors Related to Proficiency in Problem Solving: A Lifelong Learning Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desjardins, Richard; Ederer, Peer

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relative importance of different socio-demographic and practice-oriented factors that are related to proficiency in problem solving in technology-rich environments (PSTREs) and by extension may be related to complex problem solving (CPS). The empirical analysis focuses on the proficiency measurements of PSTRE made…

  3. Children's Meaning-Making of Nature in an Outdoor-Oriented and Democratic Swedish Preschool Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaar, Susanne; Öhman, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the Swedish preschool educational tradition is characterised by outdoor-oriented and democratic approaches. The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate what consequences these approaches have for preschool children's meaning-making of nature, when studied in practice, in children's spontaneous…

  4. A Practice-Oriented Professional Development Programme to Support the Introduction of a New Mathematics Curriculum in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Ponte, Joao Pedro

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the extended workshop, a national professional development programme that was used in the preparatory stages of the introduction of a new mathematics curriculum for basic education (grades 1-9) in Portugal. These workshops are based on five major ideas-orientation towards practice, focus on students' learning, collaboration,…

  5. "What is the work of Recovery Oriented Practice? A systematic literature review".

    PubMed

    Chester, Polly; Ehrlich, Carolyn; Warburton, Loretta; Baker, David; Kendall, Elizabeth; Crompton, David

    2016-08-01

    Concepts of personal and social recovery in mental illness are constantly evolving because the journey is fluid and subject to change over time. Dynamic interactions between the complexities of human nature and mental illness create ever-altering landscapes of perplexity. The acknowledged ebb and flow of recovery in the presence of chronic and serious mental illness requires health professionals to provide a flexible suite of care, delivered through skills and methods that are responsive and meaningful to the recipient. We conducted a systematic search for qualitative literature that articulated the work of personally-supportive recovery-oriented practice (ROP) to determine the specific components of recovery-supportive work. Twenty-one articles were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria and were synthesized using a coding framework derived from Normalization Process Theory. We identified three kinds of recovery-supportive work required from health professionals: alleviating stigma, delivering effective recovery-supportive responses in the presence of complex health and social situations and managing challenges associated with the work of ROP. We discuss the resources needed for ROP and the barriers that inhibit health professionals' engagement in this work. By elucidating the work of ROP, we highlighted a disparity between health professionals' aspirations and achievements. These revelations could inform service delivery in order to better support consumer recovery in serious mental illness. PMID:27381002

  6. Practical approach in surface modification of biaxially oriented polypropylene films for gravure printability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuntapichedkul, Boonchai; Tantayanon, Supawan; Laohhasurayotin, Kritapas

    2014-09-01

    Biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film is one of the most popularly used materials for the gravure printing process in flexible packaging industry. The skin layers of BOPP film were associated with 3-6 weight % of propylene-ethylene copolymer. These films were completely biaxial-oriented by sequential stretching process after which the film surfaces were subjected to corona treatment integrated in the production line. The FT-IR results exhibited that polar functional groups as carbonyl molecules were established on the corona-treated BOPP film. The contact angles of these BOPP films were measured; the surface free energies (SFE) were then calculated. AFM topographical images also agreed well with the SFE which increased as the contents of propylene-ethylene copolymer increased. An approximated 20% increased SFE was obtained for the BOPP film that was associated with 6% propylene-ethylene copolymer. The printing quality on BOPP films was tested by light microscope which confirmed that the chromatic resolution of the printed images improved down to even more smaller groove sizes, 10 or 5 dot%. This improvement was also examined and found to correspond well with the interfacial tensions and work of adhesion between the inks and the modified BOPP films.

  7. A kernel-oriented model for coalition-formation in general environments: Implementation and results

    SciTech Connect

    Shehory, O.; Kraus, S.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we present a model for coalition formation and payoff distribution in general environments. We focus on a reduced complexity kernel-oriented coalition formation model, and provide a detailed algorithm for the activity of the single rational agent. The model is partitioned into a social level and a strategic level, to distinguish between regulations that must be agreed upon and are forced by agent-designers, and strategies by which each agent acts at will. In addition, we present an implementation of the model and simulation results. From these we conclude that implementing the model for coalition formation among agents increases the benefits of the agents with reasonable time consumption. It also shows that more coalition formations yield more benefits to the agents.

  8. Medical evaluation of children with chronic abdominal pain: impact of diagnosis, physician practice orientation, and maternal trait anxiety on mothers' responses to the evaluation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sara E; Smith, Craig A; Bruehl, Stephen P; Gigante, Joseph; Walker, Lynn S

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effects of diagnosis (functional versus organic), physician practice orientation (biomedical versus biopsychosocial), and maternal trait anxiety (high versus low) on mothers' responses to a child's medical evaluation for chronic abdominal pain. Mothers selected for high (n=80) and low (n=80) trait anxiety imagined that they were the mother of a child with chronic abdominal pain described in a vignette. They completed questionnaires assessing their negative affect and pain catastrophizing. Next, mothers were randomly assigned to view one of four video vignettes of a physician-actor reporting results of the child's medical evaluation. Vignettes varied by diagnosis (functional versus organic) and physician practice orientation (biomedical versus biopsychosocial). Following presentation of the vignettes, baseline questionnaires were re-administered and mothers rated their satisfaction with the physician. Results indicated that mothers in all conditions reported reduced distress pre- to post-vignette; however, the degree of the reduction differed as a function of diagnosis, presentation, and anxiety. Mothers reported more post-vignette negative affect, pain catastrophizing, and dissatisfaction with the physician when the physician presented a functional rather than an organic diagnosis. These effects were significantly greater for mothers with high trait anxiety who received a functional diagnosis presented by a physician with a biomedical orientation than for mothers in any other condition. Anxious mothers of children evaluated for chronic abdominal pain may be less distressed and more satisfied when a functional diagnosis is delivered by a physician with a biopsychosocial rather than a biomedical orientation.

  9. Interpretation of cytogenetic results in multiple myeloma for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, A M; Rajkumar, S V

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of cytogenetic abnormalities in multiple myeloma (MM) is often a challenging task. MM is characterized by several cytogenetic abnormalities that occur at various time points in the disease course. The interpretation of cytogenetic results in MM is complicated by the number and complexity of the abnormalities, the methods used to detect them and the disease stage at which they are detected. Specific cytogenetic abnormalities affect clinical presentation, progression of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) to MM, prognosis of MM and management strategies. The goal of this paper is to provide a review of how MM is classified into specific subtypes based on primary cytogenetic abnormalities and to provide a concise overview of how to interpret cytogenetic abnormalities based on the disease stage to aid clinical practice and patient management. PMID:26517360

  10. Earth and sky orientation results from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Himwich, W.; Caprette, D.

    1989-06-01

    Mark III VLBI data acquired since 1979 by the NASA Crustal Dynamics project and the NGS POLARIS/IRIS programs have been analyzed for Earth orientation parameters. The complete Earth orientation time series is designated ERP(GSFC)89 R 01.

  11. Earth and sky orientation results from the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project with site velocities adjusted.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Himwich, W.; Caprette, D.

    1989-06-01

    Mark III VLBI data acquired since 1979 by the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project and the NGS POLARIS/IRIS programs have been analyzed for Earth orientation parameters. The complete Earth orientation time series is designated ERP(GSFC)89 R 02.

  12. Non-coplanar automatic beam orientation selection in cranial IMRT: a practical methodology.

    PubMed

    Llacer, Jorge; Li, Sicong; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Promberger, Claus; Solberg, Timothy D

    2009-03-01

    This paper proposes a method for automatic selection of beam orientations in non-coplanar cranial IMRT. Methods of computer vision, beam's eye view techniques and neural networks are used to define a new geometry-based methodology that leads to treatment plans for cranial lesions that are comparable in quality to those generated by experienced radiation physicists. The automatic beam selection (ABS) process can be carried out in clinically useful computation times, in 1 min or less for most cases. In the process of describing the ABS process, it is shown that the cranial beam orientation optimization problem is mathematically ill posed, with the expectation that a large number of solutions will lead to similar results. Nevertheless, there are better and worse solutions and we show that the proposed ABS process, by its design, has to lead to one of the better ones. We have carried out extensive tests with 14 patients with beam selection tasks ranging from the rather simple to quite complex. The ABS process has always yielded optimizations with results that are considered good for clinic use. Seven-beam coplanar optimizations for some of the patients have also been investigated. Comparisons with non-coplanar optimizations indicate in which cases the simpler coplanar plans can be used to advantage. Parameters used in the comparisons are dose-volume histograms, minimum and maximum PTV doses, equivalent uniform doses for the PTV and OARs, and treatment volume, conformity and normal tissue indices. It is felt that the current ABS methodology is ready for extensive clinical tests. PMID:19204383

  13. Developing Practice Oriented Undergraduate Courses in a Quality Framework. A Case Study: Bachelor of Event Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitelaw, Paul A.; Wrathall, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon the stakeholder, scholarly, academic and jurisdictional influences on course development for a vocationally oriented bachelor's degree. Design/methodology/approach: This paper takes the form of a case study. Findings: Vocationally oriented bachelor's courses can be developed, especially when…

  14. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity/Expression (Sexual Minority Students): School Nurse Practice. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Establishment of…

  15. Physiotherapy after stroke: to what extent is task-oriented practice a part of conventional treatment after hospital discharge?

    PubMed

    Askim, Torunn; Indredavik, Bent; Engen, Astrid; Roos, Kerstin; Aas, Tone; Mørkved, Siv

    2013-07-01

    Research has shown that motor training after stroke should be task-oriented. It is still unknown whether the task-oriented approach is implemented into clinical practice. The purpose of the present study was to survey to which extent task-specific training was a part of conventional physiotherapy practice given to stroke patients after discharge from hospital. This cross-sectional survey was a sub-study of a randomized controlled trial. Physiotherapists treating patients included in the trial were asked to register their choice of treatment according to 11 predefined activity categories during the second week after discharge from hospital. Nineteen physiotherapists treating 46 patients suffering from mild-to-moderate stroke were included. The activities chosen in most patients were sit-to-stand (60.9%), balance in standing position (65.2%), walking on even ground (78.3%), and stair climbing (56.5%). Only two patients (4.3%) practiced transfers or balance related to activities of daily living (ADL), such as washing, dressing, and toileting. This study shows that conventional physiotherapy practice for a selected group of Norwegian stroke patients was mainly based on a task-oriented approach, although with very little emphasis on training in relation to ADL. Future research is needed to ensure that evidence-based treatment is given to all stroke patients.

  16. ';Best' Practices for Aggregating Subset Results from Archived Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, W. E.; Perez, J.

    2013-12-01

    In response to the exponential growth in science data analysis and visualization capabilities Data Centers have been developing new delivery mechanisms to package and deliver large volumes of aggregated subsets of archived data. New standards are evolving to help data providers and application programmers deal with growing needs of the science community. These standards evolve from the best practices gleaned from new products and capabilities. The NASA Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) has developed and deployed production provider-specific search and subset web applications for the CALIPSO, CERES, TES, and MOPITT missions. This presentation explores several use cases that leverage aggregated subset results and examines the standards and formats ASDC developers applied to the delivered files as well as the implementation strategies for subsetting and processing the aggregated products. The following topics will be addressed: - Applications of NetCDF CF conventions to aggregated level 2 satellite subsets - Data-Provider-Specific format requirements vs. generalized standards - Organization of the file structure of aggregated NetCDF subset output - Global Attributes of individual subsetted files vs. aggregated results - Specific applications and framework used for subsetting and delivering derivative data files

  17. Skinner Meets Piaget on the Reggio Playground: Practical Synthesis of Applied Behavior Analysis and Developmentally Appropriate Practice Orientations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warash, Bobbie; Curtis, Reagan; Hursh, Dan; Tucci, Vicci

    2008-01-01

    We focus on integrating developmentally appropriate practices, the project approach of Reggio Emilia, and a behavior analytic model to support a quality preschool environment. While the above practices often are considered incompatible, we have found substantial overlap and room for integration of these perspectives in practical application. With…

  18. Orientation effect on cone calorimeter test results to assess fire hazard of materials.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuang-Chung

    2009-12-30

    A cone calorimeter can provide material "reaction to fire" information for use in evaluating the fire hazard of materials. Two orientations can be selected, vertical or horizontal, depending on the geometry of materials in their final use. However, most fire models and material evaluation reports fail to consider the effects of the orientation and applied the horizontal case data. To assess the validity of using data with "horizontal" samples for further applications, a systematic experimental was performed using materials including PMMA, wooden products and polystyrene foams. Besides critical heat flux for ignition, other "reaction to fire" material properties were measured, including ignition time, ignition temperature, heat release rate history and mass loss rate when exposed to three heating irradiances, namely 15, 30 and 50 kW/m(2). For the horizontal orientation in comparison to the vertical orientation, the study data reveal relatively constant temperature distribution before ignition, lower critical heat flux for pilot ignition, shorter time to ignition, lower peak heat release rate, identical total heat release, longer burning time and almost identical combustion completeness for all the tested materials except polystyrene foams. Ignition temperature displaced no clear trend. Vertical orientation tests are consequently recommended for evaluating material fire performance. PMID:19665837

  19. Practical Bench Comparison of BBL CHROMagar Orientation and Standard Two-Plate Media for Urine Cultures

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Holly A.; Campbell, Mary; Baron, Ellen Jo

    2004-01-01

    A total of 1,023 urine samples sent for routine culture were plated onto sheep blood and MacConkey agars and a BBL CHROMagar Orientation (CO; Becton Dickinson, Cockeysville, Md.) plate, and the results were compared. Of these, 250 urine samples (24%) grew >10,000 CFU of one or two putative pathogens/ml and 773 showed no growth (NG), mixed growth of <10,000 CFU/ml, or three or more strains (mixed). The CO and conventional medium results agreed completely for 595 cultures with NG or <10,000 CFU/ml. An additional 178 urine samples yielded clinically insignificant differences. Both medium sets essentially agreed on quantities and identification for 400 single-pathogen cultures and 9 mixed cultures. With the caveat that CO cannot differentiate Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Serratia spp., enteric pathogens were identified only by morphology and color on CO. Direct visual differentiation of group B streptococci from lactobacilli is not possible, but lactobacillus cells always exhibited easily recognizable morphology on Gram stain. Of 108 paired organism susceptibility results encompassing 2,268 drug-pathogen combinations, there were 3% errors and only 1% very major errors. Use of CO allowed a >50% reduction in inoculation time and a >20% reduction in work-up time. For our laboratory, with 50% “no growth” and ca. 25% significant results (50% Escherichia coli), CO allowed time and workup cost savings for a majority of cultures. A cost analysis (time and supplies for our laboratory) showed that if CO is used alone, the break-even level for CO pricing is $1.78; if CO and blood agar are both used, the break-even pricing for CO is $1.53. PMID:14715732

  20. Classification of wounds at risk and their antimicrobial treatment with polihexanide: a practice-oriented expert recommendation.

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Assadian, O; Gerber, V; Kingsley, A; Kramer, A; Leaper, D J; Mosti, G; Piatkowski de Grzymala, A; Riepe, G; Risse, A; Romanelli, M; Strohal, R; Traber, J; Vasel-Biergans, A; Wild, T; Eberlein, T

    2011-01-01

    Currently, there are no generally accepted definitions for wounds at risk of infection. In clinical practice, too many chronic wounds are regarded as being at risk of infection, and therefore many topical antimicrobials - in terms of frequency and duration of use - are applied to wounds. Based on expert discussion and current knowledge, a clinical assessment score was developed. The objective of this wounds at risk (W.A.R.) score is to allow decision-making on the indication for the use of antiseptics on the basis of polihexanide. The proposed clinical classification of W.A.R. shall facilitate the decision for wound antisepsis and allow an appropriate general treatment regimen with the focus on the prevention of wound infection. The W.A.R. score is based on a clinically oriented risk assessment using concrete patient circumstances. The indication for the use of antiseptics results from the addition of differently weighted risk causes, for which points are assigned. Antimicrobial treatment is justified in the case of 3 or more points.

  1. Trip Staff Training Practices: Survey and Discussion Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwaagstra, Lynn

    A discussion group and survey examined trip-staff training practices among outdoor and adventure recreation/education programs. Of the 40 participants, 80 percent worked with university noncredit programs, with the remaining participants representing university for-credit, military recreation, nonprofit, and for-profit programs. Although the…

  2. Leadership Orientation as a Function of Interpersonal Need Structure: A Replication with Negative Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Jeffrey H.

    1983-01-01

    To replicate the Kuehl et al. (1975) study, 151 graduate students completed the Leadership Opinion Questionnaire, Least Preferred Co-Worker (LPC) Questionnaire, FIRO-B (Functional Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behavior), and F-Scale. Data failed to replicate earlier significant correlations between interpersonal needs as measured by the LPC…

  3. NASN position statement: Sexual orientation and gender identity/expression (sexual minority students): school nurse practice.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Beverly; Kelts, Susan; Robarge, Deb; Davis, Catherine; Delger, Suzey; Compton, Linda

    2013-03-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Sexual minority persons are those who identify themselves as gay, lesbian, or bisexual (LGB) or are unsure of their sexual orientation, or those who have had sexual contact with persons of the same sex or both sexes (Kann et al., 2011). Sexual minority is thought to be a more inclusive and neutral term. For the purposes of this statement, the term sexual minority will be used in lieu of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning).

  4. Practicalities and challenges in re-orienting the health system in Zambia for treating chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid evolution in disease burdens in low- and middle income countries is forcing policy makers to re-orient their health system towards a system which has the capability to simultaneously address infectious and non-communicable diseases. This paper draws on two different but overlapping studies which examined how actors in the Zambian health system are re-directing their policies, strategies and service structures to include the provision of health care for people with chronic conditions. Methods Study methods in both studies included semi-structured interviews with government health officials at national level, and governmental and non-governmental health practitioners operating from community-, primary health care to hospital facility level. Focus group discussions were conducted with staff, stakeholders and caregivers of programmes providing care and support at community- and household levels. Study settings included urban and rural sites. Results A series of adaptations transformed the HIV programme from an emergency response into the first large chronic care programme in the country. There are clear indications that the Zambian government is intending to expand this reach to patients with non-communicable diseases. Challenges to do this effectively include a lack of proper NCD prevalence data for planning, a concentration of technology and skills to detect and treat NCDs at secondary and tertiary levels in the health system and limited interest by donor agencies to support this transition. Conclusion The reorientation of Zambia’s health system is in full swing and uses the foundation of a decentralised health system and presence of local models for HIV chronic care which actively involve community partners, patients and their families. There are early warning signs which could cause this transition to stall, one of which is the financial capability to resource this process. PMID:25005125

  5. Large-Scale Implementation of Formative Assessment Practices in an Examination-Oriented Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratnam-Lim, Christina Tong Li; Tan, Kelvin Heng Kiat

    2015-01-01

    Singapore's education system has often been characterised as exam-oriented. This paper describes efforts ("windmills") made by the Government to constructively respond to the "winds of change" in the education system. A committee called the Primary Education Review and Implementation (PERI) Committee was appointed to study…

  6. Connecting Research on Retinitis Pigmentosa to the Practice of Orientation and Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geruschat, Duane R.; Turano, Kathleen A.

    2002-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) causes restriction of the visual field, progressive vision loss, and night blindness. This article presents an overview of the most common problems in orientation and mobility (O&M) for individuals with RP, appropriate interventions, vision science discoveries related to RP, and the impact of RP on functional visual…

  7. Microworlds for Learning Object-Oriented Programming: Considerations from Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djelil, Fahima; Albouy-Kissi, Adelaide; Albouy-Kissi, Benjamin; Sanchez, Eric; Lavest, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Object-Oriented paradigm is a common paradigm for introductory programming courses. However, many teachers find that transitioning to teaching this paradigm is a difficult task. To overcome this complexity, many experienced teachers use microworlds to give beginner students an intuitive and rapid understanding of fundamental abstract concepts of…

  8. Exploring Indian Secondary Teachers' Orientations and Practice for Teaching Science in an Era of Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nargund-Joshi, Vanashri; Park Rogers, Meredith A.; Akerson, Valarie L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005 India introduced a new National Curriculum Framework aimed at providing a more constructivist approach to learning for all subjects. Previous research on the impact of curriculum reform in other countries (e.g., United States) concluded that for reform to be successful teachers' orientations toward teaching and learning must be considered…

  9. On Practical Results of the Differential Power Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breier, Jakub; Kleja, Marcel

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes practical differential power analysis attacks. There are presented successful and unsuccessful attack attempts with the description of the attack methodology. It provides relevant information about oscilloscope settings, optimization possibilities and fundamental attack principles, which are important when realizing this type of attack. The attack was conducted on the PIC18F2420 microcontroller, using the AES cryptographic algorithm in the ECB mode with the 128-bit key length. We used two implementations of this algorithm - in the C programming language and in the assembler.

  10. What results when firms implement practices: the differential relationship between specific practices, firm financial performance, customer service, and quality.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Cristina B; Porath, Christine L; Benson, George S; Lawler, Edward E

    2007-11-01

    Previous research on organizational practices is replete with contradictory evidence regarding their effects. Here, the authors argue that these contradictory findings may have occurred because researchers have often examined complex practice combinations and have failed to investigate a broad variety of firm-level outcomes. Thus, past research may obscure important differential effects of specific practices on specific firm-level outcomes. Extending this research, the authors develop hypotheses about the effects of practices that (a) enable information sharing, (b) set boundaries, and (c) enable teams on 3 different firm-level outcomes: financial performance, customer service, and quality. Relationships are tested in a sample of observations from over 200 Fortune 1000 firms. Results indicate that information-sharing practices were positively related to financial performance 1 year following implementation of the practices, boundary-setting practices were positively related to firm-level customer service, and team-enabling practices were related to firm-level quality. No single set of practices predicted all 3 firm-level outcomes, indicating practice-specific effects. These findings help resolve the theoretical tension in the literature regarding the effects of organizational practices and offer guidance as to how to best target practices to increase specific work-related outcomes. Implications for theory, research, and practice are discussed. PMID:18020790

  11. Cognitive-Behaviorally-Oriented Group Rehabilitation of Adults with ADHD: Results of a 6-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salakari, Anita; Virta, Maarit; Gronroos, Nina; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Vataja, Risto; Kaski, Markus; Iivanainen, Matti

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Recently, novel psychological treatments for adult ADHD have been reported with promising results. However, studies about long-term treatment effects are scanty. The authors study effects of cognitive-behaviorally-oriented group rehabilitation during a 6-month follow-up. Method: Participating in the rehabilitation were 29 adults, of…

  12. Practical Life from the Second Plane to Third Plane: Orientation to History and Social Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, James

    2015-01-01

    In lyrical prose, Jim Webster lays out his view on the universal human use of tools and how "humans meet the practical demands of life." Webster lauds physical work and the work of the hand as they both support engagement, social cooperation, a deepening of relationships, and sustainability. Practical work is valuable and is plentiful as…

  13. Orienting head movements resulting from electrical microstimulation of the brainstem tegmentum in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Masino, T; Knudsen, E I

    1993-01-01

    The size and direction of orienting movements are represented systematically as a motor map in the optic tectum of the barn owl (du Lac and Knudsen, 1990). The optic tectum projects to several distinct regions in the medial brainstem tegmentum, which in turn project to the spinal cord (Masino and Knudsen, 1992). This study explores the hypothesis that a fundamental transformation in the neural representation of orienting movements takes place in the brainstem tegmentum. Head movements evoked by electrical microstimulation in the brainstem tegmentum of the alert barn owl were cataloged and the sites of stimulation were reconstructed histologically. Movements elicited from the brainstem tegmentum were categorized into one of six different classes: saccadic head rotations, head translations, facial movements, vocalizations, limb movements, and twitches. Saccadic head rotations could be further subdivided into two general categories: fixed-direction saccades and goal-directed saccades. Fixed-direction saccades, those whose direction was independent of initial head position, were elicited from the midbrain tegmentum. Goal-directed saccades, those whose direction changed with initial head position, were elicited from the central rhombencephalic reticular formation and from the efferent pathway of the cerebellum. Particular attention was paid to sites from which fixed-direction saccadic movements were elicited, as these movements appeared to represent components of orienting movements. Microstimulation in the medial midbrain tegmentum elicited fixed-direction saccades in one of six directions: rightward, leftward, upward, downward, clockwise roll, and counterclockwise roll. Stimulation in and around the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (InC; a complete list of anatomical abbreviations is given in the Appendix) produced ipsiversive horizontal saccades. Stimulation in the ventral InC and near the dorsal and medial edges of the red nucleus produced upward saccades. Stimulation

  14. Developing a typology of African Americans with limited literacy based on preventive health practice orientation: implications for colorectal cancer screening strategies.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Thomas F; Bass, Sarah Bauerle; Ruzek, Sheryl B; Wolak, Caitlin; Rovito, Michael J; Ruggieri, Dominique G; Ward, Stephanie; Paranjape, Anuradha; Greener, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Preventive health messages are often tailored to reach broad sociodemographic groups. However, within groups, there may be considerable variation in perceptions of preventive health practices, such as colorectal cancer screening. Segmentation analysis provides a tool for crafting messages that are tailored more closely to the mental models of targeted individuals or subgroups. This study used cluster analysis, a psychosocial marketing segmentation technique, to develop a typology of colorectal cancer screening orientation among 102 African American clinic patients between the ages of 50 and 74 years with limited literacy. Patients were from a general internal medicine clinic in a large urban teaching hospital, a subpopulation known to have high rates of colorectal cancer and low rates of screening. Preventive screening orientation variables included the patients' responses to questions involving personal attitudes and preferences toward preventive screening and general prevention practices. A k-means cluster analysis yielded three clusters of patients on the basis of their screening orientation: ready screeners (50.0%), cautious screeners (30.4%), and fearful avoiders (19.6%). The resulting typology clearly defines important subgroups on the basis of their preventive health practice perceptions. The authors propose that the development of a validated typology of patients on the basis of their preventive health perceptions could be applicable to a variety of health concerns. Such a typology would serve to standardize how populations are characterized and would provide a more accurate view of their preventive health-related attitudes, values, concerns, preferences, and behaviors. Used with standardized assessment tools, it would provide an empirical basis for tailoring health messages and improving medical communication.

  15. Does Learning in Clinical Context in Anatomical Sciences Improve Examination Results, Learning Motivation, or Learning Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Böckers, Anja; Mayer, Christian; Böckers, Tobias Maria

    2014-01-01

    The preclinical compulsory elective course "Ready for the Operating Room (OR)!?" [in German]: "Fit für den OP (FOP)"] was implemented for students in their second year, who were simultaneously enrolled in the gross anatomy course. The objective of the study was to determine whether the direct practical application of anatomical…

  16. Subjective and Objective Measures of Literacy: Implications for Current Results-Oriented Development Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Data from Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in Ethiopia and Nicaragua shed light on two practical questions that arise when turning ''Education for All'' goals of high literacy and universal primary school completion into more specific targets. First, how should we measure literacy? Second, how many years of schooling should be…

  17. Brahms An Agent-Oriented Language for Work Practice Simulation and Multi-Agent Systems Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierhuis, Maarten; Clancey, William J.; van Hoof, Ron J. J.

    Brahms is a multi-agent modeling language for simulating human work practice that emerges from work processes in organizations. The same Brahms language can be used to implement and execute distributed multi-agent systems, based on models of work practice that were first simulated. Brahms demonstrates how a multi-agent belief-desire-intention language, symbolic cognitive modeling, traditional business process modeling, activity-and situated cognition theories are brought together in a coherent approach for analysis and design of organizations and human-centered systems.

  18. The effect of quality management practices on operational and business results in the petroleum industry in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellat Parast, Mahour

    The trend toward globalization has challenged management thinking, organizational practices, and the ways companies interact with their customers and suppliers as well as with other segments of society. One such practice, Total Quality Management (TQM), has emerged as a management paradigm for enhancing organizational performance and profitability, to the extent that it has been regarded as "the second industrial revolution" (Kanji, 1990). Despite extensive research in quality management, little empirical research has been done on this in an international context, especially in the Middle East. This study attempts to investigate: (1) the relationship among quality management constructs based on the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award; and (2) the effect of quality management practices on operational and business results in the petroleum industry. A validated and reliable survey instrument was used for the study to collect data from 31 project managers/consultants in the petroleum industry in Iran. The results of the correlation analysis show that top management support is the major driver of quality management, which significantly correlates with other quality management practices. It was also found that customer orientation is not significantly correlated with external quality results (profitability). A regression analysis indicated top management support, employee training, and employee involvement as the three statistically significant variables in explaining the variability in internal quality results. Furthermore, it was found that internal quality results was statistically significant in explaining the variability of external quality results.

  19. [Quality management and practice-oriented research in a clinic-network of mother-/father-child rehabilitation centres].

    PubMed

    Otto, F; Arnhold-Kerri, S

    2010-04-01

    The Research Network Prevention and Rehabilitation for Mothers and Children is an association of currently 24 rehabilitation centres for mothers, fathers and their children, and a scientific team at the Hannover Medical School. The Research Network combines practice-oriented research on mother and child health with the further development of treatment programmes and the implementation of internal quality management in mother-/father-child rehabilitation centres in accordance with DIN EN ISO 9001. The present paper describes the concept of the Research Network and the work contents addressed over the last three years. The advantages and disadvantages of this association and the changes initiated in practice were evaluated from the point of view of 19 quality managers of the participating clinics. The data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, and a qualitative content analysis was performed in order to quantify the responses. The concept of the Research Network has proven successful. In the view of the quality managers of the clinics, implementation of DIN EN ISO 9001 has lead to structuring of the processes, improved internal communication, and increased motivation in the team. The major obstacles were the lack of time and human resources. In all clinics, the participation in practice-related research projects und scientifically monitored concept development has contributed to optimizing everyday practice. The exchange between the quality managers in external quality circle meetings was of central importance. The conjunction of internal quality management, practice-related research and concept development in a network can be recommended also for other associations of clinics, health centres or medical practices. PMID:20446193

  20. GRADE the evidence before using the results in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tharyan, Prathap

    2011-01-01

    Reports of clinical trials that do not describe the methods used to minimise the risk of bias, and reports that do not present results in a comprehensible and accurate manner, are unethical as they could lead to misleading conclusions, adverse health outcomes, and the inappropriate use of healthcare resources. The Grading of Recommendations: Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to framing healthcare recommendations provides a pragmatic approach to making summary evidence profiles of outcome-specific evaluations regarding the magnitude and precision of estimates of benefit and harms, and the overall quality of evidence from comparisons of healthcare interventions. In addition, contextual factors such as the balance between benefits, harms, and resource costs; baseline risks in different groups; inconveniences; varying values and preferences; and competing priorities and options, should ideally be extrapolated from these evidence profiles and other sources of evidence to determine the strength of recommendations regarding the use of an intervention.

  1. Association of Active Play-Related Parenting Behaviors, Orientations, and Practices with Preschool Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loprinzi, Paul D.; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Kane, Christy; Lee, Hyo; Beets, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parents' behaviors, practices, beliefs, and attitudes greatly influence children's active play behavior; however, little research has examined these parental influences on preschool children's sedentary behavior (SB). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between parental influences on…

  2. Orientation Practices for Effective Distributed Learning Coursework: Students Speak Their Minds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brescia, William; Miller, Michael; Ibrahima, Poda; Murry, John

    2004-01-01

    As an increasing number of graduate education courses are moved either online or into hybrid formats, instructors and administrators need to consider strategies for how to transition students into these new learning environments. This exploratory, qualitative study looked at one case study course and provides practical recommendations for stronger…

  3. A Practice-Oriented Definition of Post-Process Second Language Writing Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalan, Amir

    2014-01-01

    This article is a synthesis of the scholarly literature on the post-process approach to teaching second language (L2) writing, particularly college and university composition in English as an additional language. This synthesis aims to offer a definition of post-process L2 writing that can readily lend itself to practice and be more accessible to…

  4. Advanced practice in neurocritical care: an innovative orientation and competency model.

    PubMed

    Vicari-Christensen, Michele

    2014-02-01

    The advanced registered nurse practitioner (ARNP) began in the 1960s as an alternative provider to meet the demands of an escalating healthcare resource deficit. As the role evolved and ARNPs demonstrated safe and effective care, these providers began to appear in critical care settings. It is believed that in the specialty of Neurocritical Care, about half the providers are ARNPs. Hiring and training practitioners for this complex environment is daunting. At the University of Florida & Shands Jacksonville, an innovative orientation and competency model for ARNPs hired for the newly opened Neurocritical Care unit was developed and implemented. The program contains a roadmap for knowledge base and skill acquisition as well as competency training and maintenance. Experience with appropriate hiring and screening standards, internally developed training tools, and identification of necessary advanced classes are discussed. This model may be used as a guideline for Neurocritical Care ARNP training as well as adapted for all other critical care settings. PMID:24399169

  5. Astrometric exoplanet surveys in practice: challenges, opportunities, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahlmann, Johannes

    2015-08-01

    Conversely to the transit photometry and radial velocity methods, the astrometric discovery of exoplanets is still limited by the sensitivity of available instruments. Furthermore, the signature of a planet (described by 7 free parameters) is orders of magnitude smaller than the standard motion of a star (5 free parameters), which has to be solved for first. This has important implications in the design and implementation of astrometric planet search surveys and the large parameter space to be explored calls for efficient fitting algorithms. I will present results of the so-far most precise astrometric planet search from the ground, targeting 20 very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs with an accuracy of 100 micro-arcseconds, which include the discovery of binaries with components in the planetary mass regime and several planet candidates with Neptune-to-Jupiter masses. The employed genetic and MCMC algorithms were shown to be efficient in constraining all astrometric parameters, which makes them important tools for the exploitation of the data currently collected by the Gaia satellite. Gaia is expected to astrometrically discover thousands of giant exoplanets and I will report on several ongoing projects in preparation of this unique harvest, including the expected yield of circumbinary planets.

  6. Design for Usability; practice-oriented research for user-centered product design.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Daan; van Kuijk, Jasper; Hoolhorst, Frederik; Kim, Chajoong; Harkema, Christelle; Dorrestijn, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Design for Usability project aims at improving the usability of electronic professional and consumer products by creating new methodology and methods for user-centred product development, which are feasible to apply in practice. The project was focused on 5 key areas: (i) design methodology, expanding the existing approach of scenario-based design to incorporate the interaction between product design, user characteristics, and user behaviour; (ii) company processes, barriers and enablers for usability in practice; (iii) user characteristics in relation to types of products and use-situations; (iv) usability decision-making; and (v) product impact on user behaviour. The project team developed methods and techniques in each of these areas to support the design of products with a high level of usability. This paper brings together and summarizes the findings.

  7. Design for Usability; practice-oriented research for user-centered product design.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Daan; van Kuijk, Jasper; Hoolhorst, Frederik; Kim, Chajoong; Harkema, Christelle; Dorrestijn, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Design for Usability project aims at improving the usability of electronic professional and consumer products by creating new methodology and methods for user-centred product development, which are feasible to apply in practice. The project was focused on 5 key areas: (i) design methodology, expanding the existing approach of scenario-based design to incorporate the interaction between product design, user characteristics, and user behaviour; (ii) company processes, barriers and enablers for usability in practice; (iii) user characteristics in relation to types of products and use-situations; (iv) usability decision-making; and (v) product impact on user behaviour. The project team developed methods and techniques in each of these areas to support the design of products with a high level of usability. This paper brings together and summarizes the findings. PMID:22316853

  8. The Ethical Orientations of Education as a Practice in Its Own Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Padraig

    2011-01-01

    This article is the second of a two-part investigation, the first part of which was published in "Ethics and Education," vol. 5, issue 2, 2010, under the title "Preface to an ethics of education as a practice in its own right". Although it builds on the arguments of that "preface", this second part of the investigation can be read as a stand-alone…

  9. Perioperative management of patients receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy: a clinician-oriented and practical approach.

    PubMed

    Douketis, James D

    2011-10-01

    The management of patients who are receiving warfarin, aspirin, clopidogrel, or combinations of these drugs and require their interruption because of an elective surgical or other invasive procedure is a common and sometimes challenging clinical problem. For the practicing clinician, there are 2 key issues for perioperative anticoagulant management: 1) having an approach to stratify patients according to their risk for thromboembolism when warfarin or antiplatelet drug therapy is interrupted, and also having an approach to stratify patients according to the risk of bleeding associated with the surgery or procedure; and 2) determining which patients may require bridging anticoagulation and, if required, how to administer bridging, typically with a low-molecular-weight heparin, before and after surgery in a manner that minimizes the risk for bleeding. The overall goal is to minimize patients' risk for thromboembolism and bleeding throughout the perioperative period. The objective of this article is to provide an evidence-based but practical approach relating to these 2 key issues in a manner than can be applied to everyday clinical practice.

  10. Design of an Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Performance prediction of turbomachines is a significant part of aircraft propulsion design. In the conceptual design stage, there is an important need to quantify compressor and turbine aerodynamic performance and develop initial geometry parameters at the 2-D level prior to more extensive Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses. The Object-oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code (OTAC) is being developed to perform 2-D meridional flowthrough analysis of turbomachines using an implicit formulation of the governing equations to solve for the conditions at the exit of each blade row. OTAC is designed to perform meanline or streamline calculations; for streamline analyses simple radial equilibrium is used as a governing equation to solve for spanwise property variations. While the goal for OTAC is to allow simulation of physical effects and architectural features unavailable in other existing codes, it must first prove capable of performing calculations for conventional turbomachines. OTAC is being developed using the interpreted language features available in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code described by Claus et al (1991). Using the NPSS framework came with several distinct advantages, including access to the pre-existing NPSS thermodynamic property packages and the NPSS Newton-Raphson solver. The remaining objects necessary for OTAC were written in the NPSS framework interpreted language. These new objects form the core of OTAC and are the BladeRow, BladeSegment, TransitionSection, Expander, Reducer, and OTACstart Elements. The BladeRow and BladeSegment consumed the initial bulk of the development effort and required determining the equations applicable to flow through turbomachinery blade rows given specific assumptions about the nature of that flow. Once these objects were completed, OTAC was tested and found to agree with existing solutions from other codes; these tests included various meanline and streamline comparisons of axial

  11. Design of an Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Performance prediction of turbomachines is a significant part of aircraft propulsion design. In the conceptual design stage, there is an important need to quantify compressor and turbine aerodynamic performance and develop initial geometry parameters at the 2-D level prior to more extensive Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses. The Object-oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code (OTAC) is being developed to perform 2-D meridional flowthrough analysis of turbomachines using an implicit formulation of the governing equations to solve for the conditions at the exit of each blade row. OTAC is designed to perform meanline or streamline calculations; for streamline analyses simple radial equilibrium is used as a governing equation to solve for spanwise property variations. While the goal for OTAC is to allow simulation of physical effects and architectural features unavailable in other existing codes, it must first prove capable of performing calculations for conventional turbomachines.OTAC is being developed using the interpreted language features available in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code described by Claus et al (1991). Using the NPSS framework came with several distinct advantages, including access to the pre-existing NPSS thermodynamic property packages and the NPSS Newton-Raphson solver. The remaining objects necessary for OTAC were written in the NPSS framework interpreted language. These new objects form the core of OTAC and are the BladeRow, BladeSegment, TransitionSection, Expander, Reducer, and OTACstart Elements. The BladeRow and BladeSegment consumed the initial bulk of the development effort and required determining the equations applicable to flow through turbomachinery blade rows given specific assumptions about the nature of that flow. Once these objects were completed, OTAC was tested and found to agree with existing solutions from other codes; these tests included various meanline and streamline comparisons of axial

  12. The University of Washington's Community-Oriented Public Health Practice program and Public Health-Seattle & King County partnership.

    PubMed

    House, Peter J; Hartfield, Karen; Nicola, Bud; Bogan, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    The Community-Oriented Public Health Practice (COPHP) program, a 2-year in-residence MPH degree program in the University of Washington School of Public Health, has partnered with Public Health-Seattle & King County (PHSKC) since 2002 to create a mutually beneficial set of programs to improve teaching and address community-based public health problems in a practice setting. The COPHP program uses a problem-based learning approach that puts students in small groups to work on public health problems. Both University of Washington-based and PHSKC-based faculty facilitate the classroom work. In the first year for students, COPHP, in concert with PHSKC, places students in practicum assignments at PHSKC; in the second year, students undertake a master's project (capstone) in a community or public health agency. The capstone project entails taking on a problem in a community-based agency to improve either the health of a population or the capacity of the agency to improve population health. Both the practicum and the capstone projects emphasize applying classroom learning in actual public health practice work for community-based organizations. This partnership brings PHSKC and COPHP together in every aspect of teaching. In essence, PHSKC acts as the "academic health department" for COPHP. There are detailed agreements and contracts that guide all aspects of the partnership. Both the practicum and capstone projects require written contracts. The arrangements for getting non-University of Washington faculty paid for teaching and advising also include formal contracts.

  13. Uses and abuses of recovery: implementing recovery-oriented practices in mental health systems

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Mike; Amering, Michaela; Farkas, Marianne; Hamilton, Bridget; O'Hagan, Mary; Panther, Graham; Perkins, Rachel; Shepherd, Geoff; Tse, Samson; Whitley, Rob

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of recovery as a personal and subjective experience has emerged within mental health systems. This meaning of recovery now underpins mental health policy in many countries. Developing a focus on this type of recovery will involve transformation within mental health systems. Human systems do not easily transform. In this paper, we identify seven mis-uses (“abuses”) of the concept of recovery: recovery is the latest model; recovery does not apply to “my” patients; services can make people recover through effective treatment; compulsory detention and treatment aid recovery; a recovery orientation means closing services; recovery is about making people independent and normal; and contributing to society happens only after the person is recovered. We then identify ten empirically-validated interventions which support recovery, by targeting key recovery processes of connectedness, hope, identity, meaning and empowerment (the CHIME framework). The ten interventions are peer support workers, advance directives, wellness recovery action planning, illness management and recovery, REFOCUS, strengths model, recovery colleges or recovery education programs, individual placement and support, supported housing, and mental health trialogues. Finally, three scientific challenges are identified: broadening cultural understandings of recovery, implementing organizational transformation, and promoting citizenship. PMID:24497237

  14. [The influence of the concept of oriental sanitation in nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Zapico Yánez, Florentina

    2008-03-01

    The word "sanitation", similar to the concept care for has become popularized in such a way that it is difficult to determine its meanings. This article hopes to follow the Hernández Madrid model and guidelines since this is the clearest one available when one tries to understand the reason why, at present times, certain nursing theories communicate their new research tied to their introspection projects but, as we shall see shortly, prove to be of little practical use with real patients, at least in the Spanish sanitary world.

  15. US Urban Elementary Teachers' Knowledge and Practices in Teaching Science to English Language Learners: Results from the first year of a professional development intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santau, Alexandra O.; Secada, Walter; Maerten-Rivera, Jaime; Cone, Neporcha; Lee, Okhee

    2010-10-01

    The study examined US elementary teachers' knowledge and practices in four key domains of science instruction with English language learning (ELL) students. The four domains included: (1) teachers' knowledge of science content, (2) teaching practices to promote scientific understanding, (3) teaching practices to promote scientific inquiry, and (4) teaching practices to support English language development during science instruction. The study was part of a larger five-year research and development intervention aimed at promoting science and literacy achievement of ELL students in urban elementary schools. It involved 32 third grade, 21 fourth grade, and 17 fifth grade teachers participating in the first-year implementation of the intervention. Based on teachers' questionnaire responses and classroom observation ratings, results indicated that (1) teachers' knowledge and practices were within the bounds of acceptability but short of reform-oriented practices and (2) grade-level differences existed, especially between Grades 3 and 5.

  16. Patient-oriented presentation of results of radiological procedures using DICOM-compliant DVD media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Aberle, Denise R.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Lu, David S.; Dahlbom, Magdalena; McGill, D. Ric; McCoy, J. Michael

    2003-05-01

    Some institutions have adopted digital media such as CD ROMs to provide patients and referring physicians with results of radiological procedures. These systems require a computer to review the images and lack the supporting explanations and guidance for patients to properly understand the results. We developed a hybrid DVD encoding format that combines DICOM-compliant image storage format with video streams viewable on any consumer DVD players. The addition of the video material allows radiologists to provide explanations, disclaimers and guidance to the patients regarding the results of the study. The diagnostic report is also included on the DVD as a PDF file and as a set of video frames that can be viewed on a DVD player. The native high-resolution images are also included in DICOM format on the DVD and can be accessed by any workstation equipped with a DICOM viewer. The DVD that can be reviewed on any consumer DVD player overcomes the limitation of CD ROMS that require the use of a personal computer. The results of the radiological procedures become more accessible patients that could be reluctant or unable to use a computer. Also, live video clips add a more personalized note and allow radiologists to convey important messages to the patients. This is particularly useful for self-referred screening procedures where results should always be accompanied with education material and explanations of the findings.

  17. Growth of Sr(0.61)Ba(0.39)Nb2O6 fibers - New results regarding orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilde, Jeffrey P.; Jundt, Dieter H.; Galambos, Ludwig; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes stable growth of Sr(0.61)Ba(0.39)Nb2O6 (SBN) single-crystal optical fibers (grown by the laser-heated pedestal growth method) along the 100-line and 110-line crystallographic axes. The orientation of SBN fibers was investigated using transmission holograms recorded by focusing two separate, but mutually coherent, optical wavefronts into one end of the fiber. Results showed that the crystal quality of 100-line and 110-line SBN fibers grown at a given pull velocity strongly depended on the fiber diameter; generally, the quality improves with decreasing diameter.

  18. Social aspects of classroom learning: Results of a discourse analysis in an inquiry-oriented physical chemistry class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nicole M.

    Engaging students in classroom discourse offers opportunities for students to participate in the construction of joint understandings, to negotiate relationships between different types of evidence, and to practice making evidence-based claims about science content. However, close attention to social aspects of learning is critical to creating inquiry-oriented classroom environments in which students learn with understanding. This study examined the social influences that contribute to classroom learning in an inquiry-oriented undergraduate physical chemistry class using the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) approach. A qualitative approach to analyzing classroom discourse derived from Toulmin's (1968) model of argumentation was used to document patterns in classroom reasoning that reflect normative aspects of social interaction. Adapting the constructs of social and sociomathematical norms from the work of Yackel and Cobb (1996), I describe social aspects of the classroom environment by discussing normative aspects of social interaction (social norms) and discipline-specific criteria related to reasoning and justification in chemistry contexts, referred to here as sociochemical norms. This work discusses four social norms and two sociochemical norms that were documented over a five-week period of observation in Dr. Black's POGIL physical chemistry class. In small group activities, the socially established expectations that students explain reasoning, negotiate understandings of terminology and symbolic representations, and arrive at a consensus on critical thinking questions shaped small group interactions and reasoning. In whole class discussion, there was an expectation that students share reasoning with the class, and that the instructor provide feedback on student reasoning in ways that extended student contributions and elaborated relationships between macroscopic, particulate, and symbolic-level ideas. The ways in which the class constructed

  19. Anomalous diffraction theory for arbitrarily oriented finite circular cylinders and comparison with exact T-matrix results.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Arnott, W P; Hallett, J

    1998-07-20

    A general method is developed to formulate extinction and absorption efficiency for nonspherical particles at arbitrary and random orientations by use of anomalous diffraction theory (ADT). An ADT for finite circular cylinders is evaluated as an example. Existing ADT's for infinite cylinders at arbitrary orientations and for finite cylinders at the normal incidence are shown to be special cases of the new formulation. ADT solutions for finite cylinders are shown to approach the rigorous T-matrix results when the refractive indices approach unity. The importance of some physical processes that are neglected in the ADT approximation are evaluated by comparisons between ADT and rigorous calculations for different particle geometries. For spheres, van de Hulst's ADT and Mie theory are used, whereas the ADT that we present and T-matrix calculations are used for cylinders of different diameter-to-length ratios. The results show that the differences in extinction between ADT and exact solutions generally decrease with nonsphericity. A similar decrease occurs for absorption at wavelengths of relatively strong absorption. The influence of complex refractive index is evaluated. Our results suggest that ADT may provide a useful approximation in parameterization and remote sensing of cirrus clouds in the Christiansen bands where the real part of the refractive index approaches unity and/or where relative absorption is strong.

  20. A developing country's university oriented toward strengthening health systems: challenges and results.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, J H; Marsh, D R; Khan, K S; D'Souza, R; Husein, K; Aslam, A; Qureshi, A F; deWit, V; Harnar, R M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The Aga Khan University in Karachi has a mission to educate leaders and to contribute to the development of health systems for Pakistan amid challenges of scarcity and complexity. METHODS. Its key activities are (1) to design and test urban and rural health system prototypes, (2) to develop faculty in medical and nursing postgraduate community health sciences programs, and (3) to design and implement community-based undergraduate medical and nursing curricula. RESULTS. The university has developed equity-based, cost-effective primary health care prototypes in Karachi slums. With government counterparts it has tested village-, facility-, and district-level interventions in a poor rural district. Federal policymakers have taken models from each for widespread replication. The university is training 49 medical and 19 nursing faculty for postgraduate programs in community health sciences. Most faculty retain institutional leadership positions, including teaching community-based, problem-solving, community health sciences as 20% of the medical and nursing undergraduate curriculum. CONCLUSIONS. The mission and experience of the Aga Khan University in population-based health systems design and health sciences education can guide universities in both developing and developed countries. PMID:8238674

  1. Evaluating Behaviorally Oriented Aviation Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) Training and Programs: Methods, Results, and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, James C.; Thomas, Robert L., III

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of Aviation Resource Management Programs on aviation culture and performance has compelled a considerable body of research (Taylor & Robertson, 1995; Taylor, 1998; Taylor & Patankar, 2001). In recent years new methods have been applied to the problem of maintenance error precipitated by factors such as the need for self-assessment of communication and trust. The present study - 2002 -- is an extension of that past work. This research project was designed as the conclusion of a larger effort to help understand, evaluate and validate the impact of Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) training programs, and other MRM interventions on participant attitudes, opinions, behaviors, and ultimately on enhanced safety performance. It includes research and development of evaluation methodology as well as examination of psychological constructs and correlates of maintainer performance. In particular, during 2002, three issues were addressed. First, the evaluation of two (independent & different) MRM programs for changing behaviors was undertaken. In one case we were able to further apply the approach to measuring written communication developed during 2001 (Taylor, 2002; Taylor & Thomas, 2003). Second, the MRM/TOQ surveys were made available for completion on the internet. The responses from these on-line surveys were automatically linked to a results calculator (like the one developed and described in Taylor, 2002) to aid industry users in analyzing and evaluating their local survey data on the internet. Third, the main trends and themes from our research about MRM programs over the past dozen years were reviewed.

  2. Do side-effects/injuries from yoga practice result in discontinued use? Results of a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Holton, M Kim; Barry, Adam E

    2014-01-01

    Context: Yoga-related injuries are of increasing concern as the use of yoga continues to rise. Aims: The aim of the following study is to examine whether a national sample of yoga practitioners would report discontinued use of yoga due to injury from the practice, assess what injuries resulted in discontinued use, determine what injuries were most common and identify injuries requiring medical attention. Methods: Secondary data analysis of a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States (n = 23,393). Results: Less than 1% of individuals who had ever practiced yoga (n = 2230) reported an injury from yoga that led to discontinued use. Of those reporting injury, less than one-third (n = 4) reported seeking medical attention. The most common side-effect was back pain. Approximately, half of those reporting back pain sought medical attention. Conclusions: Injury due to yoga is an infrequent barrier to continued practice and severe injury due to yoga is rare. PMID:25035627

  3. Problem-Solving Inquiry-Oriented Biology Tasks Integrating Practical Laboratory and Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedler, Yael; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents results of a study that examines the development and use of computer simulations for high school science instruction and for integrated laboratory and computerized tests that are part of the biology matriculation examination in Israel. Eleven implications for teaching are presented. (MDH)

  4. Teacher Well-Being: Exploring Its Components and a Practice-Oriented Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collie, Rebecca J.; Shapka, Jennifer D.; Perry, Nancy E.; Martin, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Teacher Well-Being Scale, which assesses three factors of teachers' work-related well-being: workload, organizational, and student interaction well-being. With a sample of Canadian teachers, results confirmed the reliability, approximate normality, and factor structure of the scale; provided…

  5. Peer Mentoring Communities of Practice for Early and Mid-Career Faculty: Broad Benefits from a Research-Oriented Female Peer Mentoring Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Amanda; Shaw, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    In light of recent interest in the limitations of early and mid-career mentoring (Driscoll et al 2009; Trowers 2011), this case study of a women's scholarly activity and goal setting Community of Practice (CoP) indicates that such groups can offer extensive peer mentoring at one teaching-oriented state university in the United States. Using a…

  6. Inter-Generational Differences in Individualism/Collectivism Orientations: Implications for Outlook towards HRD/HRM Practices in India and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Rajashi; Chaudhuri, Sanghamitra

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a conceptual model to explore the effects of intergenerational transition in individualism/collectivism orientations on the outlook towards different human resource development (HRD) and management practices. It contributes to the existing cross-cultural research in HRD by defining three prominent generations in India and by…

  7. Teaching cardiovascular physiology with equivalent electronic circuits in a practically oriented teaching module.

    PubMed

    Ribaric, Samo; Kordas, Marjan

    2011-06-01

    Here, we report on a new tool for teaching cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology that promotes qualitative as well as quantitative thinking about time-dependent physiological phenomena. Quantification of steady and presteady-state (transient) cardiovascular phenomena is traditionally done by differential equations, but this is time consuming and unsuitable for most undergraduate medical students. As a result, quantitative thinking about time-dependent physiological phenomena is often not extensively dealt with in an undergraduate physiological course. However, basic concepts of steady and presteady state can be explained with relative simplicity, without the introduction of differential equation, with equivalent electronic circuits (EECs). We introduced undergraduate medical students to the concept of simulating cardiovascular phenomena with EECs. EEC simulations facilitate the understanding of simple or complex time-dependent cardiovascular physiological phenomena by stressing the analogies between EECs and physiological processes. Student perceptions on using EEC to simulate, study, and understand cardiovascular phenomena were documented over a 9-yr period, and the impact of the course on the students' knowledge of selected basic facts and concepts in cardiovascular physiology was evaluated over a 3-yr period. We conclude that EECs are a valuable tool for teaching cardiovascular physiology concepts and that EECs promote active learning.

  8. 27 CFR 10.53 - Practices not resulting in exclusion. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Practices not resulting in exclusion. 10.53 Section 10.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS COMMERCIAL BRIBERY Exclusion § 10.53 Practices not...

  9. 27 CFR 10.53 - Practices not resulting in exclusion. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Practices not resulting in exclusion. 10.53 Section 10.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL COMMERCIAL BRIBERY Exclusion § 10.53 Practices not...

  10. 27 CFR 10.53 - Practices not resulting in exclusion. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Practices not resulting in exclusion. 10.53 Section 10.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS COMMERCIAL BRIBERY Exclusion § 10.53 Practices not...

  11. Resident-Care Practices in the County of Somerset, England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, H. H.; May, A. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of surveys of resident care practices for mentally retarded persons in Somerset indicated that hostel units were resident-oriented in their care practices, whereas hospital units for severely and profoundly mentally retarded people were institution-oriented. (Author)

  12. Planck intermediate results. XXXII. The relative orientation between the magnetic field and structures traced by interstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    first statistical study of the relative orientation between the matter structures and the magnetic field in the ISM points out that, at the angular scales probed by Planck, the field geometry projected on the plane of the sky is correlated with the distribution of matter. In the diffuse ISM, the structures of matter are usually aligned with the magnetic field, while perpendicular structures appear in molecular clouds. We discuss our results in the context of models and MHD simulations, which attempt to describe the respective roles of turbulence, magnetic field, and self-gravity in the formation of structures in the magnetized ISM.

  13. Control of gravitropic orientation. I. Non-vertical orientation by primary roots of maize results from decay of competence for orthogravitropic induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMotte, Clifford E.; Pickard, Barbara G.

    2004-01-01

    Plant organs may respond to gravity by vertical (orthogravitropic), oblique (plagiogravitropic) or horizontal (diagravitropic) growth. Primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) provide a good system for studying such behaviours because they are reportedly capable of displaying all three responses. In current work using maize seedlings of the Silver Queen cultivar, stabilisation of growth at an oblique orientation was commonplace. Hypothetically, plagiogravitropism may be accomplished either by a process we call graded orthogravitropism or by hunting about a sensed non-vertical setpoint. In graded orthotropism primary bending is unidirectional and depends on facilitative stimuli that determine its extent. The hallmark of the setpoint mechanism is restorative curvature of either sign following a displacement; both diagravitropism and orthogravitropism are based on setpoints. Roots settled in a plagiogravitropic orientation were tested with various illumination and displacement protocols designed to distinguish between these two hypotheses. The tests refuted the setpoint hypothesis and supported that of graded orthotropism. No evidence of diagravitropism could be found, thus, earlier claims were likely based on inadequately controlled observations of graded orthotropism. We propose that orthotropism is graded by the sequential action of dual gravity receptors: induction of a vectorial gravitropic response requires gravitational induction of a separate facilitative response, whose decay in the absence of fresh stimuli can brake gravitropism at plagiotropic angles.

  14. Control of gravitropic orientation. I. Non-vertical orientation by primary roots of maize results from decay of competence for orthogravitropic induction.

    PubMed

    LaMotte, Clifford E; Pickard, Barbara G

    2004-01-01

    Plant organs may respond to gravity by vertical (orthogravitropic), oblique (plagiogravitropic) or horizontal (diagravitropic) growth. Primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) provide a good system for studying such behaviours because they are reportedly capable of displaying all three responses. In current work using maize seedlings of the Silver Queen cultivar, stabilisation of growth at an oblique orientation was commonplace. Hypothetically, plagiogravitropism may be accomplished either by a process we call graded orthogravitropism or by hunting about a sensed non-vertical setpoint. In graded orthotropism primary bending is unidirectional and depends on facilitative stimuli that determine its extent. The hallmark of the setpoint mechanism is restorative curvature of either sign following a displacement; both diagravitropism and orthogravitropism are based on setpoints. Roots settled in a plagiogravitropic orientation were tested with various illumination and displacement protocols designed to distinguish between these two hypotheses. The tests refuted the setpoint hypothesis and supported that of graded orthotropism. No evidence of diagravitropism could be found, thus, earlier claims were likely based on inadequately controlled observations of graded orthotropism. We propose that orthotropism is graded by the sequential action of dual gravity receptors: induction of a vectorial gravitropic response requires gravitational induction of a separate facilitative response, whose decay in the absence of fresh stimuli can brake gravitropism at plagiotropic angles. PMID:15895502

  15. Test result communication in primary care: a survey of current practice

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Lilford, Richard; McManus, Richard J; Hill, Ann; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of blood tests ordered in primary care continues to increase and the timely and appropriate communication of results remains essential. However, the testing and result communication process includes a number of participants in a variety of settings and is both complicated to manage and vulnerable to human error. In the UK, guidelines for the process are absent and research in this area is surprisingly scarce; so before we can begin to address potential areas of weakness there is a need to more precisely understand the strengths and weaknesses of current systems used by general practices and testing facilities. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of practices across England to determine the methods of managing the testing and result communication process. In order to gain insight into the perspectives from staff at a large hospital laboratory we conducted paired interviews with senior managers, which we used to inform a service blueprint demonstrating the interaction between practices and laboratories and identifying potential sources of delay and failure. Results Staff at 80% of practices reported that the default method for communicating normal results required patients to telephone the practice and 40% of practices required that patients also call for abnormal results. Over 80% had no fail-safe system for ensuring that results had been returned to the practice from laboratories; practices would otherwise only be aware that results were missing or delayed when patients requested results. Persistent sources of missing results were identified by laboratory staff and included sample handling, misidentification of samples and the inefficient system for collating and resending misdirected results. Conclusions The success of the current system relies on patients both to retrieve results and in so doing alert staff to missing and delayed results. Practices appear slow to adopt available technological solutions despite their potential for

  16. Transfer Paths of Research Results to the Practice: Observations From the Receiving End

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findikakis, A. N.

    2005-12-01

    A non-scientific poll of fellow practicing professionals suggests that there is a range of opinions regarding the effectiveness of different ways of becoming acquainted with and using the results of academic research in their practice. Journal articles remain the dominant path for transferring research results to the profession, even though accessing them is becoming more difficult with time. Driven primarily by cost considerations personal and corporate subscriptions seem to be on the decline. Libraries are one of the first victims of cost cutting measures in the industry. Even though the availability of journal articles in electronic form facilitates their availability, their prices are prohibitive. This is especially true during when a professional is searching for a solution to a problem and may have to review several papers on the subject. One colleague suggested that the professional organizations and other publishers of research articles could learn from the experience of the music industry, by lowering the cost of downloading individual papers to something like a dollar per article, recovering thus their production costs through the increase in the volume of purchased articles. The posting on the internet of special reports and dissertations by research institutions is viewed as very useful by those working in practice. The distribution through the internet of reports by federal organizations conducting or sponsoring research, such as the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is greatly appreciated by the practicing professionals. The use of leading researchers as consultants provides a direct path for bringing research results to the practice, but it is limited to a small number of cases where bringing in a consultant can be justified. Short courses are viewed as an effective way of familiarizing professionals with the latest research findings on specific subjects. The notes distributed in such courses are considered

  17. The addition of functional task-oriented mental practice to conventional physical therapy improves motor skills in daily functions after stroke*

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Couto-Paz, Clarissa C.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.; Tierra-Criollo, Carlos J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental practice (MP) is a cognitive strategy which may improve the acquisition of motor skills and functional performance of athletes and individuals with neurological injuries. Objective To determine whether an individualized, specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional physical therapy (PT), promoted better learning of motor skills in daily functions in individuals with chronic stroke (13±6.5 months post-stroke). Method Nine individuals with stable mild and moderate upper limb impairments participated, by employing an A1-B-A2 single-case design. Phases A1 and A2 included one month of conventional PT, and phase B the addition of MP training to PT. The motor activity log (MAL-Brazil) was used to assess the amount of use (AOU) and quality of movement (QOM) of the paretic upper limb; the revised motor imagery questionnaire (MIQ-RS) to assess the abilities in kinesthetic and visual motor imagery; the Minnesota manual dexterity test to assess manual dexterity; and gait speed to assess mobility. Results After phase A1, no significant changes were observed for any of the outcome measures. However, after phase B, significant improvements were observed for the MAL, AOU and QOM scores (p<0.0001), and MIQ-RS kinesthetic and visual scores (p=0.003; p=0.007, respectively). The significant gains in manual dexterity (p=0.002) and gait speed (p=0.019) were maintained after phase A2. Conclusions Specific functional task-oriented MP, when added to conventional PT, led to improvements in motor imagery abilities combined with increases in the AOU and QOM in daily functions, manual dexterity, and gait speed. PMID:24271094

  18. Lattice-Preferred Orientation in Deformed Novaculite - Comparison of in-situ Results Using BEARTEX and Post-Mortem EBSD Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenweber, A.; Thomas, S.; Burnley, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Berkeley Texture Package BEARTEX is a Windows-based computer software that combines various algorithms to analyze lattice-preferred orientation in polycrystalline materials. BEARTEX was initially designed to interpret diffraction intensity data from pole figure goniometers. Recently it has been successfully used to process synthetic forsterite powder diffraction data from in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction taken during deformation (Bollinger et al. 2012). Our study aims to test the practicability of using BEARTEX to analyze the evolution of lattice-preferred orientation in natural polycrystalline quartz (novaculite) during deformation. In-situ X-ray diffraction data was collected during the deformation of novaculite at 2.5 GPa and up to 1000 °C in a D-DIA apparatus using the ten-element energy-dispersive detector at the NSLS beamline X17B2. Diffraction intensities are a function of crystal orientation, expressed in azimuth angle η and pole distance ψ. The latter is the angle between the normal of a given diffraction plane and the vertical direction of the D-DIA apparatus - our principal stress direction during compression. Orientation-dependent diffraction intensities were corrected for different responses of the single detectors and x-ray absorption effects of the anvils. Orientation distributions (ODs) and inverse pole figures were calculated using BEARTEX. In addition, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses were carried out on the deformed novaculite samples. Generated pole figures were compared with those derived from BEARTEX. Textural properties of our novaculite starting material complicated the BEARTEX analyses. The relatively strong variation of grain sizes in our natural specimens caused non-random diffraction intensity distributions. Those lead to non-random distributions of crystal orientations when analyzed with BEARTEX, although pole figures from EBSD data clearly show random crystal orientations. In an attempt to solve this problem

  19. OCAM - A CELSS modeling tool: Description and results. [Object-oriented Controlled Ecological Life Support System Analysis and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drysdale, Alan; Thomas, Mark; Fresa, Mark; Wheeler, Ray

    1992-01-01

    Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) technology is critical to the Space Exploration Initiative. NASA's Kennedy Space Center has been performing CELSS research for several years, developing data related to CELSS design. We have developed OCAM (Object-oriented CELSS Analysis and Modeling), a CELSS modeling tool, and have used this tool to evaluate CELSS concepts, using this data. In using OCAM, a CELSS is broken down into components, and each component is modeled as a combination of containers, converters, and gates which store, process, and exchange carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen on a daily basis. Multiple crops and plant types can be simulated. Resource recovery options modeled include combustion, leaching, enzyme treatment, aerobic or anaerobic digestion, and mushroom and fish growth. Results include printouts and time-history graphs of total system mass, biomass, carbon dioxide, and oxygen quantities; energy consumption; and manpower requirements. The contributions of mass, energy, and manpower to system cost have been analyzed to compare configurations and determine appropriate research directions.

  20. Is the quality of care in general medical practice improving? Results of a longitudinal observational study.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stephen; Steiner, Andrea; Robison, Judy; Webb, Dale; Raven, Ann; Roland, Martin

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for increased accountability within health care has led to a myriad of government initiatives in the United Kingdom, with the aim of improving care, setting minimum standards, and addressing poor performance. AIM: To assess the quality of care in English general practice in the year 2001 compared with 1998, in terms of access, interpersonal care, and clinical care (chronic disease management, elderly care, and mental health care). DESIGN OF STUDY: Observational study in a purposive sample of general practices in England. SETTING: Twenty-three general practices in England--eight in North Thames, seven in the North West, and eight in the South West. RESULTS: Outcome measures were: quality of chronic disease management (angina, adult asthma and type 2 diabetes from practice questionnaires and medical record review), elderly care and mental health care (from practice questionnaires), access to care, continuity of care and interpersonal care (from practice and patient questionnaires) and costs (mean change in practice budget between 1998 and 2001). There were significant improvements in quality of care in terms of organisational access to services (P = 0.016), practice organisation of chronic disease management (P = 0.039), and the quality of angina care (P = 0.003). There were no significant changes in quality scores for mental health care, elderly care, access and interpersonal care. The mean practice budget rose by 3.4% between 1998 and 2001 (adjusted for inflation). CONCLUSION: These findings provide evidence of improvements in some aspects of the quality of care, achieved at modest cost. This was achieved during a time when the National Health Service was undergoing a series of reforms. However, primary care in England is characterised by variation in care, with significant improvements still possible. PMID:12879830

  1. Use of inertial properties to orient tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent theoretical and experimental results have demonstrated that it is possible to orient quasi-round objects such as apples by taking advantage of inertial-effects during rotation. In practice, an apple rolled down a track consisting of two parallel rails tends to move to an orientation where the...

  2. Frequency of yoga practice predicts health: results of a national survey of yoga practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alyson; Friedmann, Erika; Bevans, Margaret; Thomas, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Background. Yoga shows promise as a therapeutic intervention, but relationships between yoga practice and health are underexplored. Purpose. To examine the relationship between yoga practice and health (subjective well-being, diet, BMI, smoking, alcohol/caffeine consumption, sleep, fatigue, social support, mindfulness, and physical activity). Methods. Cross-sectional, anonymous internet surveys distributed to 4307 randomly selected from 18,160 individuals at 15 US Iyengar yoga studios; 1045 (24.3%) surveys completed. Results. Mean age 51.7 (± 11.7) years; 84.2% female. Frequency of home practice favorably predicted (P < .001): mindfulness, subjective well-being, BMI, fruit and vegetable consumption, vegetarian status, sleep, and fatigue. Each component of yoga practice (different categories of physical poses, breath work, meditation, philosophy study) predicted at least 1 health outcome (P < .05). Conclusions. Home practice of yoga predicted health better than years of practice or class frequency. Different physical poses and yoga techniques may have unique health benefits. PMID:22927885

  3. Clarifying Definitions for the Massage Therapy Profession: the Results of the Best Practices Symposium†

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann B.; Cambron, Jerrilyn A.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Travillian, Ravensara S.; Saunders, Ruth P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Massage therapists are at times unclear about the definition of massage therapy, which creates challenges for the profession. It is important to investigate the current definitions and to consider the field as a whole in order to move toward clarity on what constitutes the constructs within the profession. Purpose To determine how a sample of experts understand and describe the field of massage therapy as a step toward clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, and framing the process of massage therapy practice. Setting A two-day symposium held in 2010 with the purpose of gathering knowledge to inform and aid in the creation of massage therapy best practice guidelines for stress and low back pain. Participants Thirty-two experts in the field of massage therapy from the United States, Europe, and Canada. Design Qualitative analysis of secondary cross-sectional data using a grounded theory approach. Results Three over-arching themes were identified: 1) What is massage?; 2) The multidimensional nature of massage therapy; and 3) The influencing factors on massage therapy practice. Discussion The data offered clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, as well as a framework for the context for massage therapy practice. These clarifications can serve as initial steps toward the ultimate goal of creating new theory for the field of massage therapy, which can then be applied in practice, education, research, and policy. Conclusions Foundational research into how experts in the profession understand and describe the field of massage therapy is limited. Understanding the potential differences between the terms massage and massage therapy could contribute to a transformation in the profession in the areas of education, practice, research, policy and/or regulation. Additionally, framing the context for massage therapy practice invites future discussions to further clarify practice issues.

  4. Clarifying Definitions for the Massage Therapy Profession: the Results of the Best Practices Symposium†

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ann B.; Cambron, Jerrilyn A.; Sharpe, Patricia A.; Travillian, Ravensara S.; Saunders, Ruth P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Massage therapists are at times unclear about the definition of massage therapy, which creates challenges for the profession. It is important to investigate the current definitions and to consider the field as a whole in order to move toward clarity on what constitutes the constructs within the profession. Purpose To determine how a sample of experts understand and describe the field of massage therapy as a step toward clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, and framing the process of massage therapy practice. Setting A two-day symposium held in 2010 with the purpose of gathering knowledge to inform and aid in the creation of massage therapy best practice guidelines for stress and low back pain. Participants Thirty-two experts in the field of massage therapy from the United States, Europe, and Canada. Design Qualitative analysis of secondary cross-sectional data using a grounded theory approach. Results Three over-arching themes were identified: 1) What is massage?; 2) The multidimensional nature of massage therapy; and 3) The influencing factors on massage therapy practice. Discussion The data offered clarifying definitions for massage and massage therapy, as well as a framework for the context for massage therapy practice. These clarifications can serve as initial steps toward the ultimate goal of creating new theory for the field of massage therapy, which can then be applied in practice, education, research, and policy. Conclusions Foundational research into how experts in the profession understand and describe the field of massage therapy is limited. Understanding the potential differences between the terms massage and massage therapy could contribute to a transformation in the profession in the areas of education, practice, research, policy and/or regulation. Additionally, framing the context for massage therapy practice invites future discussions to further clarify practice issues. PMID:27648109

  5. Are Business-Oriented Social Networking Web Sites Useful Resources for Locating Passive Jobseekers? Results of a Recent Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKay, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The assumption that members of business-oriented social networking Web sites are passive jobseekers has never been validated. The purpose of this study is to examine the accuracy of this assumption. The study concludes that this claim is questionable and that the majority of members registered at one major site, and possibly others, are currently…

  6. Bringing a Network-Oriented Approach to Domestic Violence Services: A Focus Group Exploration of Promising Practices.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Lisa A; Banyard, Victoria; Woulfe, Julie; Ash, Sarah; Mattern, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Despite powerful evidence that informal social support contributes to survivors' safety and well-being, mainstream domestic violence (DV) programs have not developed comprehensive models for helping isolated survivors re-engage with these networks. Although many advocates use network-oriented strategies informally, they often do so without resources, funding, or training. This qualitative focus group study explored advocates' use and perceptions of network-oriented strategies. Advocates working in a range of DV programs across one state described the importance of network-oriented work and articulated its five dimensions, including helping survivors build their capacity to form healthy relationships, identify helpful and harmful network members, re-engage with existing networks, develop new relationships, and respond more effectively to network members. PMID:26270387

  7. Bringing a Network-Oriented Approach to Domestic Violence Services: A Focus Group Exploration of Promising Practices.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Lisa A; Banyard, Victoria; Woulfe, Julie; Ash, Sarah; Mattern, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Despite powerful evidence that informal social support contributes to survivors' safety and well-being, mainstream domestic violence (DV) programs have not developed comprehensive models for helping isolated survivors re-engage with these networks. Although many advocates use network-oriented strategies informally, they often do so without resources, funding, or training. This qualitative focus group study explored advocates' use and perceptions of network-oriented strategies. Advocates working in a range of DV programs across one state described the importance of network-oriented work and articulated its five dimensions, including helping survivors build their capacity to form healthy relationships, identify helpful and harmful network members, re-engage with existing networks, develop new relationships, and respond more effectively to network members.

  8. Practice of Educating Engineer from the Global Viewpoint and the Educational Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Tadayosi

    Learning and education aims of the Fukui National College of Technology are “Ability rearing of the manufacturing, the environment coordinating and the system design with the engineer ethics of the global viewpoint”, and they practice educating engineer. What becomes the key subject are “Engineer ethics” and “Global environment”. We report the practiced content and the educational result in the inside which is of two subjects in charge. On using the self-made textbook, all students achieved the learning and educational goal aim A.

  9. The Role of Intrinsic Goal Orientation, Self-Efficacy, and E-Learning Practice in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chyung, Seung Youn; Moll, Amy J.; Berg, Shelley A.

    2010-01-01

    Research on academic self-regulation suggests that students who are successful in academic settings tend to possess and use effective self-regulative learning characteristics such as intrinsic goal orientation and self-efficacy. Social-cognitive theories also emphasize that learning occurs through interactions between learners and the learning…

  10. Valuing Practice over Theory: How Beginning Teachers Re-Orient their Practice in the Transition from the University to the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jeanne M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is about the experiences of beginning teachers in turning theory learned in universities into practice in the workplace. The research is situated in the context of a pre-service teacher education programme that explicitly and deliberately seeks to bridge the theory-practice gap in teacher education. The paper argues that, despite…

  11. Good practices and health policy analysis in European sports stadia: results from the 'Healthy Stadia' project.

    PubMed

    Drygas, Wojciech; Ruszkowska, Joanna; Philpott, Matthew; Björkström, Olav; Parker, Mike; Ireland, Robin; Roncarolo, Federico; Tenconi, Maria

    2013-06-01

    Sport plays an important role within society and sports stadia provide significant settings for public health strategies. In addition to being places of mass gathering, stadia are often located in less affluent areas and are traditionally attended by 'harder to reach' communities. Unfortunately sports stadia and the clubs they host are rarely perceived as places that promote healthy lifestyles. Fast food, alcohol and tobacco are commonly advertized, served and consumed during sports games giving the spectators and TV fans contradictory messages concerning healthy choices. As part of a wider programme of work part-funded by the European Union, a study was therefore designed to explore current 'good practice' relating to positive health interventions in sports stadia across a number of European countries. Using a specially designed questionnaire, information about health policies and good practices relating to food offerings in stadia, physical activity promotion among local communities, tobacco policy, positive mental health initiatives, environmental sustainability practices and social responsibility policies were collected in 10 European countries (England and Northern Ireland, Finland, Georgia, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Spain and Sweden) involving 88 stadia. The audit results show that stadia health policies differ considerably between specific countries and sports. Based on the literature analysed, the examples of good practices collected through the study, and the subsequent instigation of a European Healthy Stadia Network, it shows that there is considerable potential for stadia to become health promoting settings.

  12. Evidence that Gender Differences in Social Dominance Orientation Result from Gendered Self-Stereotyping and Group-Interested Responses to Patriarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Michael T.; Wirth, James H.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have found that, compared to women, men express higher levels of social dominance orientation (SDO), an individual difference variable reflecting support for unequal, hierarchical relationships between groups. Recent research suggests that the often-observed gender difference in SDO results from processes related to gender group…

  13. Which Children Can Find a Way through a Strange Town Using a Streetmap?--Results of an Empirical Study on Children's Orientation Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmer, Ingrid; Hemmer, Michael; Kruschel, Katja; Neidhardt, Eva; Obermaier, Gabriele; Uphues, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    This article relates about some results of an interdisciplinary research project analyzing influencing factors of children's spatial orientation competence in real space carried out by geography educators and psychologists. The focus is on the concept of representation as a theoretical foundation. The research design for collecting data of…

  14. [Inhuman practices in gynecology in national socialism and its victims. Study of concrete results].

    PubMed

    Stauber, M; Kindermann, G

    1994-08-01

    In our opinion German gynaecology has failed to adequately face what came to pass during the Nazi period. This can be proved objectively, for there is no evidence that, after 1945, gynaecology had in any way cared to take notice--either thermatically or medically--of the thousands of victims of inhuman practices such as forced termination of pregnancy, compulsory sterilisation and the like. During the past 50 years recollections of enforced sterilisations, compulsory abortions, deliberate and hence criminal negligence and problematic approaches in research and teaching were almost completely banished from the area of conscious awareness and largely suppressed or silently ignored. Most of the medical directors of Departments of Gynaecology of German universities shared this view whenever they were questioned on the connections between gynaecology and Nazism. Now that two generations have passed it seems possible to examine and explore with less guilt feelings and shame the immensely fateful rôle of gynaecology in that context. Accent should be on the fate of the victims of that period. To bring back these events to memory, however, does not permit to conceal the part played by the physicians committing of these inhuman Nazi crimes. Data collected from a psychosomatically oriented examination of victims exemplify that to concretely recall gynaecology during Nazism a1-so offers a chance in several respects. One of the possibilities in this context is to signal "late apology" and regret to patients who had been victims, in one's own area of work, after one has psychically worked over their fate. Besides, a gynaecological-psychosomatic expertise will help e.g. that compulsorily sterilised women are granted financial aid that has at long last become a legal possibility and can be applied for since 1980. However, the relevant patient records do show very clearly that the inhuman practice of gynaecology during the so-called "Third Reich" was not only a collective problem

  15. The Recovery-Oriented Care Collaborative: A Practice-Based Research Network to Improve Care for People With Serious Mental Illnesses.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin L; Kiger, Holly; Gaba, Rebecca; Pancake, Laura; Pilon, David; Murch, Lezlie; Knox, Lyndee; Meyer, Mathew; Brekke, John S

    2015-11-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) create continuous collaborations among academic researchers and practitioners. Most PBRNs have operated in primary care, and less than 5% of federally registered PBRNs include mental health practitioners. In 2012 the first PBRN in the nation focused on individuals with serious mental illnesses-the Recovery-Oriented Care Collaborative-was established in Los Angeles. This column describes the development of this innovative PBRN through four phases: building an infrastructure, developing a research study, executing the study, and consolidating the PBRN. Key lessons learned are also described, such as the importance of actively engaging direct service providers and clients.

  16. [Social and cultural determinants of dental health practices in Morocco: results of a qualitative study].

    PubMed

    Msefer, Souad; Taleb, Wafae; Naji, Jamaleddine

    2004-01-01

    The objective of any health education program is to inculcate healthy life habits to improve the health status of the target population. The evaluation of an oral hygiene health education program for Moroccan schoolchildren implemented a decade ago by oral surgeons does not reveal any improvement of their dental health. To understand the obstacles to the acquisition of good oral hygiene habits, we conducted a qualitative survey of knowledge, attitude, and practices, based on semi-directive interviews with focus groups of children who had participated in the program. The results show that social and cultural determinants play an important role in the lack of impact of these programs and that Bourdieu's theory of action should be applied to understand the processes by which living conditions affect individuals'practices. Thus to inculcate healthy lifestyle habits, an ecological approach that takes into consideration the social, cultural, and economic environment is most likely to induce the emergence of favourable social conditions.

  17. Surprising results: HIV testing and changes in contraceptive practices among young women in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Sennott, Christie; Yeatman, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This study uses eight waves of data from the population-based Tsogolo la Thanzi study (2009–2011) in rural Malawi to examine changes in young women’s contraceptive practices, including the use of condoms, non-barrier contraceptive methods, and abstinence, following positive and negative HIV tests. The analysis factors in women’s prior perceptions of their HIV status that may already be shaping their behaviour and separates surprise HIV test results from those that merely confirm what was already believed. Fixed effects logistic regression models show that HIV testing frequently affects the contraceptive practices of young Malawian women, particularly when the test yields an unexpected result. Specifically, women who are surprised to test HIV positive increase their condom use and are more likely to use condoms consistently. Following an HIV negative test (whether a surprise or expected), women increase their use of condoms and decrease their use of non-barrier contraceptives; the latter may be due to an increase in abstinence following a surprise negative result. Changes in condom use following HIV testing are robust to the inclusion of potential explanatory mechanisms including fertility preferences, relationship status, and the perception that a partner is HIV positive. The results demonstrate that both positive and negative tests can influence women’s sexual and reproductive behaviours, and emphasise the importance of conceptualizing of HIV testing as offering new information only insofar as results deviate from prior perceptions of HIV status. PMID:26160156

  18. Healthcare-associated pathogens and nursing home policies and practices: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhiqiu; Mukamel, Dana B; Huang, Susan S; Li, Yue; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the prevalence of healthcare-associated pathogens and the infection control policies and practices in a national sample of nursing homes (NHs). METHODS In 2012, we conducted a national survey about the extent to which NHs follow suggested infection control practices with regard to 3 common healthcare-associated pathogens: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers, and their prevalence in NHs. We adapted a previously used and validated NH infection control survey, including questions on prevalence, admission and screening policies, contact precautions, decolonization, and cleaning practices. RESULTS A total of 1,002 surveys were returned. Of the responding NHs, 14.2% were less likely to accept residents with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, with the principal reason being lack of single or cohort rooms. NHs do not routinely perform admission screening (96.4%) because it is not required by regulation (56.2%) and would not change care provision (30.7%). Isolation strategies vary substantially, with gloves being most commonly used. Most NHs (75.1%) do not decolonize carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but some (10.6%) decolonize more than 90% of residents. Despite no guidance on how resident rooms on contact precautions should be cleaned, 59.3% of NHs report enhanced cleaning for such rooms. CONCLUSION Overall, NHs tend to follow voluntary infection control guidelines only if doing so does not require substantial financial investment in new or dedicated staff or infrastructure. PMID:25797334

  19. Healthcare-Associated Pathogens and Nursing Home Policies and Practices: Results from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhiqiu; Mukamel, Dana B.; Huang, Susan S.; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Objectives State and federal recommendations for infection control/prevention (IC) in nursing homes (NHs) have become more frequent, but little is known about actual NH policies/practices. Design and setting In 2012, we conducted a national survey about the extent to which NHs follow suggested IC practices with regard to three common healthcare-associated pathogens: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Clostridium difficile (C.diff), and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers, and their prevalence in NHs. We adapted a previously used and validated NH infection control survey, including questions on prevalence, admission and screening policies, contact precaution, decolonization, and cleaning practices. Results 1,002 surveys were returned. 14.2% of NHs are less likely to accept residents with MRSA, with principal reason being lack of single/cohort rooms. NHs do not routinely perform admission screening (96.4%) because it is not required by regulation (56.2%) and would not change care provision (30.7%). Isolation strategies vary substantially, with gloves being most commonly used. Most NHs (75.1%) do not decolonize MRSA carriers, but some (10.6%) decolonize over 90% of residents. Despite no guidance on how resident rooms on contact precautions should be cleaned, 59.3% of NHs report enhanced cleaning for such rooms. Conclusions Overall, NHs tend to follow voluntary infection control guidelines only if doing so does not require substantial financial investment in new/dedicated staff or infrastructure. PMID:25797334

  20. Translating research into practice: criteria for applying literature search results to your work.

    PubMed

    Foster, Margaret; Shurtz, Suzanne; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2014-03-01

    Evidence-based practices in the fields of health education and health promotion require evaluating the validity and reliability of relevant and timely research. Skills associated with effectively assessing and applying research findings are essential when researchers and practitioners are developing a new program, writing a grant, or completing a research project. This Tool outlines steps and resources with which health educators and health promotion specialists can critically appraise the literature before deciding to apply a concept or practice. It also includes descriptions of "levels of evidence" for determining level of academic rigor, and questions to guide critical appraisals of published literature and other resources for determining their relevance to the work at hand. Assessing the evidence involves two steps: synthesizing selected articles and then applying their content to a certain situation, population, or need. This Tool is intended to advance the profession by offering tips for assessing and applying the results of literature searches, which involves evaluating the quality of the articles and determining how to best put the research into practice. PMID:24344120

  1. Healthcare-associated pathogens and nursing home policies and practices: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhiqiu; Mukamel, Dana B; Huang, Susan S; Li, Yue; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the prevalence of healthcare-associated pathogens and the infection control policies and practices in a national sample of nursing homes (NHs). METHODS In 2012, we conducted a national survey about the extent to which NHs follow suggested infection control practices with regard to 3 common healthcare-associated pathogens: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, and extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers, and their prevalence in NHs. We adapted a previously used and validated NH infection control survey, including questions on prevalence, admission and screening policies, contact precautions, decolonization, and cleaning practices. RESULTS A total of 1,002 surveys were returned. Of the responding NHs, 14.2% were less likely to accept residents with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, with the principal reason being lack of single or cohort rooms. NHs do not routinely perform admission screening (96.4%) because it is not required by regulation (56.2%) and would not change care provision (30.7%). Isolation strategies vary substantially, with gloves being most commonly used. Most NHs (75.1%) do not decolonize carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but some (10.6%) decolonize more than 90% of residents. Despite no guidance on how resident rooms on contact precautions should be cleaned, 59.3% of NHs report enhanced cleaning for such rooms. CONCLUSION Overall, NHs tend to follow voluntary infection control guidelines only if doing so does not require substantial financial investment in new or dedicated staff or infrastructure.

  2. Substance use and dietary practices among students attending alternative high schools: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Substance use and poor dietary practices are prevalent among adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine frequency of substance use and associations between cigarette, alcohol and marijuana use and selected dietary practices, such as sugar-sweetened beverages, high-fat foods, fruits and vegetables, and frequency of fast food restaurant use among alternative high school students. Associations between multi-substance use and the same dietary practices were also examined. Methods A convenience sample of adolescents (n = 145; 61% minority, 52% male) attending six alternative high schools in the St Paul/Minneapolis metropolitan area completed baseline surveys. Students were participants in the Team COOL (Controlling Overweight and Obesity for Life) pilot study, a group randomized obesity prevention pilot trial. Mixed model multivariate analyses procedures were used to assess associations of interest. Results Daily cigarette smoking was reported by 36% of students. Cigarette smoking was positively associated with consumption of regular soda (p = 0.019), high-fat foods (p = 0.037), and fast food restaurant use (p = 0.002). Alcohol (p = 0.005) and marijuana use (p = 0.035) were positively associated with high-fat food intake. With increasing numbers of substances, a positive trend was observed in high-fat food intake (p = 0.0003). There were no significant associations between substance use and fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusions Alternative high school students who use individual substances as well as multiple substances may be at high risk of unhealthful dietary practices. Comprehensive health interventions in alternative high schools have the potential of reducing health-compromising behaviors that are prevalent among this group of students. This study adds to the limited research examining substance use and diet among at-risk youth. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01315743 PMID:21518437

  3. Abnormal ovarian cancer screening test result: women's informational, psychological and practical needs.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Patricia Y; Graves, Kristi D; Pavlik, Edward J; Andrykowski, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Considerable effort has been devoted to the identification of cost-effective approaches to screening for ovarian cancer (OC). Transvaginal ultrasound (TVS) is one such screening approach. Approximately 5-7% of routine TVS screening tests yield abnormal results. Some women experience significant distress after receipt of an abnormal TVS screening test. Four focus groups provided in-depth, qualitative data regarding the informational, psychological, and practical needs of women after the receipt of an abnormal TVS result. Through question and content analytic procedures, we identified four themes: anticipation, emotional response, role of the screening technician, and impact of prior cancer experiences. Results provide initial guidance toward development of interventions to promote adaptive responses after receipt of an abnormal cancer screening test result.

  4. Social Aspects of Classroom Learning: Results of a Discourse Analysis in an Inquiry-Oriented Physical Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Nicole M.

    2012-01-01

    Engaging students in classroom discourse offers opportunities for students to participate in the construction of joint understandings, to negotiate relationships between different types of evidence, and to practice making evidence-based claims about science content. However, close attention to social aspects of learning is critical to creating…

  5. Using a service oriented architecture approach to clinical decision support: performance results from two CDS Consortium demonstrations.

    PubMed

    Paterno, Marilyn D; Goldberg, Howard S; Simonaitis, Linas; Dixon, Brian E; Wright, Adam; Rocha, Beatriz H; Ramelson, Harley Z; Middleton, Blackford

    2012-01-01

    The Clinical Decision Support Consortium has completed two demonstration trials involving a web service for the execution of clinical decision support (CDS) rules in one or more electronic health record (EHR) systems. The initial trial ran in a local EHR at Partners HealthCare. A second EHR site, associated with Wishard Memorial Hospital, Indianapolis, IN, was added in the second trial. Data were gathered during each 6 month period and analyzed to assess performance, reliability, and response time in the form of means and standard deviations for all technical components of the service, including assembling and preparation of input data. The mean service call time for each period was just over 2 seconds. In this paper we report on the findings and analysis to date while describing the areas for further analysis and optimization as we continue to expand our use of a Services Oriented Architecture approach for CDS across multiple institutions.

  6. Physical control oriented model of large scale refrigerators to synthesize advanced control schemes. Design, validation, and first control results

    SciTech Connect

    Bonne, François; Bonnay, Patrick

    2014-01-29

    In this paper, a physical method to obtain control-oriented dynamical models of large scale cryogenic refrigerators is proposed, in order to synthesize model-based advanced control schemes. These schemes aim to replace classical user experience designed approaches usually based on many independent PI controllers. This is particularly useful in the case where cryoplants are submitted to large pulsed thermal loads, expected to take place in the cryogenic cooling systems of future fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced Fusion Experiment (JT-60SA). Advanced control schemes lead to a better perturbation immunity and rejection, to offer a safer utilization of cryoplants. The paper gives details on how basic components used in the field of large scale helium refrigeration (especially those present on the 400W @1.8K helium test facility at CEA-Grenoble) are modeled and assembled to obtain the complete dynamic description of controllable subsystems of the refrigerator (controllable subsystems are namely the Joule-Thompson Cycle, the Brayton Cycle, the Liquid Nitrogen Precooling Unit and the Warm Compression Station). The complete 400W @1.8K (in the 400W @4.4K configuration) helium test facility model is then validated against experimental data and the optimal control of both the Joule-Thompson valve and the turbine valve is proposed, to stabilize the plant under highly variable thermals loads. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  7. Physical control oriented model of large scale refrigerators to synthesize advanced control schemes. Design, validation, and first control results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonne, François; Alamir, Mazen; Bonnay, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a physical method to obtain control-oriented dynamical models of large scale cryogenic refrigerators is proposed, in order to synthesize model-based advanced control schemes. These schemes aim to replace classical user experience designed approaches usually based on many independent PI controllers. This is particularly useful in the case where cryoplants are submitted to large pulsed thermal loads, expected to take place in the cryogenic cooling systems of future fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced Fusion Experiment (JT-60SA). Advanced control schemes lead to a better perturbation immunity and rejection, to offer a safer utilization of cryoplants. The paper gives details on how basic components used in the field of large scale helium refrigeration (especially those present on the 400W @1.8K helium test facility at CEA-Grenoble) are modeled and assembled to obtain the complete dynamic description of controllable subsystems of the refrigerator (controllable subsystems are namely the Joule-Thompson Cycle, the Brayton Cycle, the Liquid Nitrogen Precooling Unit and the Warm Compression Station). The complete 400W @1.8K (in the 400W @4.4K configuration) helium test facility model is then validated against experimental data and the optimal control of both the Joule-Thompson valve and the turbine valve is proposed, to stabilize the plant under highly variable thermals loads. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  8. Health practice correlates in three adult age groups: results from two community surveys.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, W; Lefebvre, R C; Assaf, A R; Lasater, T M; Carleton, R A

    1990-01-01

    Independently done surveys of a target population can make an important contribution to knowledge about the determinants of personal health behavior by highlighting variables that consistently emerge as significant predictors. This investigation examined the correlates of four health practice and knowledge indices related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in two baseline community surveys of the Pawtucket Heart Health Program (N = 2,413; N = 2,808). An additional dimension was the use of three adult age groups (18-29, 30-49, 50-64) in conducting the analyses. Results of both surveys showed that sex was the strongest correlate of the four indices--knowledge of CVD, encouraging health practice changes in others, dietary intake, and exercise. The four indices related to CVD were also associated with years of education, primary language, and whether or not a recent cholesterol measurement had been obtained, although these relationships were not as consistent as the results for sex. Overall, about half of each survey's significant associations were also found in the other survey (survey 1, 30 of 62; survey 2, 30 of 56). Consistency of significant results between surveys was best for the group ages 30-49. In either survey, it was rare for an association between a predictor and behavioral index to appear in each of the three age groups. This study supports the importance of the subjects' sex in research on personal health practices, suggests the potential for independence even among health-related indices pertinent to a single type of illness, and emphasizes the usefulness of utilizing independent samples to identify important correlates of health behavior. PMID:2120725

  9. Voltammetry and coulometry with immersed thin layer electrodes. Part 2: Practical considerations and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinman, A. S.; Pons, S.; Cassidy, J.

    1984-11-01

    We have shown that geometrical considerations in the design of immersed thin layer electrochemical cells are important in the satisfactory performance of voltammetric experiments in solutions of high specific resistivity. In this paper, practical cell design and experimental results for a variety of systems are considered. In summary, we feel that reasonable care in the design of thin layer cells leads to the quantitative use of voltammetry and coulometry in systems with high specific resistivities. In the end, the effort is not much more than that required for conventional cyclic voltammetry, whereas the advantages of analysis using thin layer techniques are greater than those in conventional voltammetry.

  10. Results Oriented Management in Education. Project R.O.M.E. The Verification and Validation of Principal Competencies and Performance Indicators: Assessment Design--Procedures--Instrumentation--Field Test Results. volume 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

    This document describes the processes and procedures used by the University of Georgia Project R.O.M.E. (Results Oriented Management in Education) assessment staff during 1974-75 to produce the following products: (1) performance indicators of public school principal competencies initially developed during the 1973-74 project year, (2) a report of…

  11. A method for obtaining practical flutter-suppression control laws using results of optimal control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newson, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of optimal control theory are used to synthesize a feedback filter. The feedback filter is used to force the output of the filtered frequency response to match that of a desired optimal frequency response over a finite frequency range. This matching is accomplished by employing a nonlinear programing algorithm to search for the coefficients of the feedback filter that minimize the error between the optimal frequency response and the filtered frequency response. The method is applied to the synthesis of an active flutter-suppression control law for an aeroelastic wind-tunnel model. It is shown that the resulting control law suppresses flutter over a wide range of subsonic Mach numbers. This is a promising method for synthesizing practical control laws using the results of optimal control theory.

  12. From Theory to Practice: A Path through Imperfection--Lessons from Evaluation of Policy Oriented Environmental Health Research in Belgium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keune, Hans; Morrens, Bert; Loots, Ilse; Springael, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dealing with complex issues per definition bears the burden of imperfection. Whatever comforting theoretical concepts may promise, real life complexity will take its messy toll once travelling from conceptual ambition to real life practice. We specifically reflect on the social scientific contribution to these inter- and…

  13. A Crafts-Oriented Approach to Computing in High School: Introducing Computational Concepts, Practices, and Perspectives with Electronic Textiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Lee, Eunkyoung; Searle, Kristin; Fields, Deborah; Kaplan, Eliot; Lui, Debora

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we examine the use of electronic textiles (e-textiles) for introducing key computational concepts and practices while broadening perceptions about computing. The starting point of our work was the design and implementation of a curriculum module using the LilyPad Arduino in a pre-AP high school computer science class. To…

  14. Taking Them into the Field: Mathematics Teacher Candidate Learning about Equity-Oriented Teaching Practices in a Mediated Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sara Sunshine

    2012-01-01

    Teacher education programs have been criticized as too theoretical with university courses disconnected from the practical realities of classrooms. This single case study investigates a model of teacher education that worked to bridge the coursework-fieldwork gap in teacher education. The Mediated Field Experience (MFE) is a field experience…

  15. Impact of agricultural management practices on DOC leaching - results of a long-term lysimeter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Ollesch, G.; Seeger, J.; Meißner, R.; Rode, M.

    2009-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes are recently increasing in surface waters of humid climate regions. Due to its substantial importance for leaching processes, aquatic foodwebs, and drinking water purification a better understanding of sources and pathways of DOC is needed. Therefore this study aims to analyse and simulate DOC fluxes in agricultural ecosystems with selected crop rotations. A data set of 24 lysimeters of the UFZ Lysimeter station at Falkenberg (Saxony-Anhalt) covering nine years of DOC investigation has been selected and examined. The data set covers a wide range of climatic conditions with deviating management practices for grasslands and agricultural crop rotations. The monthly DOC concentrations assessed in the leached water range from 2.4 to 34.1 mg /l. DOC concentrations depend on temperature, precipitation and discharge. The type of crop grown on the lysimeter is an important trigger for DOC leaching - especially lysimeters used as pasture, or planted with rape and carrots exhibit high DOC concentrations. Management practices and fertilizer application modify the leaching of DOC and offer potentials to reduce DOC losses. The results form the basis of further process simulation studies and upscaling of the results to the small catchment scale.

  16. Transport and reaction kinetics at the glass:solution interface region: Results of repository-oriented leaching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Bates, J.K.

    1986-12-31

    Repository-oriented leaching experiments involving Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) 165 type glass under a {gamma}-radiation field (1 = 0.2 x 10{sup 4} R/h) have been performed by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. In this communication, we discuss glass surface analyses obtained by SEM, nuclear resonance profiling, and SIMS together with leachate solution data in relation to a mechanism that couples diffusion, hydrolysis (etching and gelation), and precipitation to qualitatively describe the release of different glass components to the leachant solutions. The release of mobile (e.g., Li) and partly mobile (e.g., B) species is controlled primarily by interdiffusion with water species across the interdiffusion zone. Glass components that are immobile in the interdiffusion zone are released to the solution by etching. For prediction of long-term steady-state concentrations of glass components with low solubility, the relative rates of release from the glass and secondary mineral precipitation must be taken into account.

  17. Different roles and different results: how activity orientations correspond to relationship quality and student outcomes in school-based mentoring.

    PubMed

    Keller, Thomas E; Pryce, Julia M

    2012-02-01

    This prospective, mixed-methods study investigated how the nature of joint activities between volunteer mentors and student mentees corresponded to relationship quality and youth outcomes. Focusing on relationships in school-based mentoring programs in low-income urban elementary schools, data were obtained through pre-post assessments, naturalistic observations, and in-depth interviews with mentors and mentees. Adopting an exploratory approach, the study employed qualitative case study methods to inductively identify distinctive patterns reflecting the focus of mentoring activities. The activity orientations of relationships were categorized according to the primary functional role embodied by the mentor and the general theme of interactions: teaching assistant/tutoring, friend/engaging, sage/counseling, acquaintance/floundering. Next, these categories were corroborated by comparing the groups on quantitative assessments of relationship quality and change in child outcomes over time. Relationships characterized by sage mentoring, which balanced amicable engagement with adult guidance, were rated most favorably by mentees on multiple measures of relationship quality. Furthermore, students involved in sage mentoring relationships showed declines in depressive symptoms and aggressive behaviors. For disconnected pairs (acquaintances), students reported more negative relationship experiences. Findings suggest effective mentoring relationships represent a hybrid between the friendly mutuality of horizontal relationships and the differential influence of vertical relationships.

  18. Measuring the effects of Meniere's disease: results of the Patient-Oriented Severity Index (MD POSI) version 1.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M P; Gates, G A

    1999-04-01

    We describe the development and initial psychometric testing of a new self-report instrument for quantifying the impact of Meniere's disease (MD) on patients' lives: the Meniere's Disease Patient-Oriented Severity Index (MD POSI). Eighty-five volunteers with chronic MD took a self-administered MD POSI. The internal consistency form of reliability was determined by calculating Cronbach's alpha. The relationship between total MD POSI problem severity scores and responses to a global question concerning the degree to which his or her MD had changed the patient's life assessed construct-related validity. The total problem severity score yielded excellent reliability (Cronbach's alpha = .928). No significant age or gender effects were seen. A highly statistically significant association was noted between total problem severity scores and the degree to which the patient's life had been changed by his or her MD (Spearman rank correlation = .526, p < .0001), indicating excellent construct-related validity. The material included in the initial questionnaire provides important information that can be used clinically to quantify the impact of MD on patients' health status. A beta version of the instrument is in the process of validation and determination of its sensitivity to change in health status.

  19. Partnership for Healthier Asians: Disseminating Evidence-Based Practices in Asian-American Communities Using a Market-Oriented and Multilevel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Karen; Quinn, Michael; Chandrasekar, Edwin; Patel, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the greatest challenges facing health promotion and disease prevention is translating research findings into evidence-based practices (EBP). There is currently a limited research base to inform the design of dissemination action plans, especially within medically underserved communities. Objective The objective of this paper is to describe an innovative study protocol to disseminate colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines in seven Asian subgroups. Methods This study integrated a market-oriented Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model, Diffusion of Innovation Theory, and community-based participatory research approach to create a community-centered dissemination framework. Consumer research, through focus groups and community-wide surveys, was centered on the adopters to ensure a multilevel intervention was well designed and effective. Results Collaboration took place between an academic institution and eight community-based organizations. These groups worked together to conduct thorough consumer research. A sample of 72 Asian Americans participated in 8 focus groups, and differences were noted across ethnic groups. Furthermore, 464 community members participated in an Individual Client Survey. Most participants agreed that early detection of cancer was important (434/464, 93.5%), cancer could happen to anyone (403/464, 86.9%), CRC could be prevented (344/464, 74.1%), and everyone should screen for CRC (389/464, 83.8%). However, 35.8% (166/464) of participants also felt that people were better off not knowing it they had cancer, and 45.5% (211/464) would screen only when they had symptoms. Most participants indicated that they would screen upon their doctor’s recommendation, but half reported that they only saw a doctor when they were sick. Data collection currently is underway for a multilevel intervention (community health advisor and social marketing campaign) and will conclude March 2016. We expect that analysis and results will be available by

  20. Benchmarking the burden of 100 diseases: results of a nationwide representative survey within general practices

    PubMed Central

    Begaud, Bernard; Lert, France; Rouillon, Frederic; Massol, Jacques; Guillemot, Didier; Avouac, Bernard; Duru, Gerard; Magnier, Anne-Marie; Rossignol, Michel; Abenhaim, Lucien

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the burden of diseases and quality of life (QOL) of patients for a large variety of diseases within general practice. Design In a representative nationwide cross-sectional study, a total of 825 general practitioners (GPs) were randomly selected from across France. Independent investigators recruited 8559 patients attending the GPs' practices. Data on QOL (12-Item Short Form questionnaire) and other individual characteristics were documented by the independent investigators for all participants in the waiting room. Medical information was recorded by GPs. Sampling was calibrated to national standards using the CALMAR (CALage sur MARges) weighting procedure. Associations of lower scores (ie, below vs above the first quartile) of physical and mental component scores (physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS), respectively) with main diseases and patients characteristics were estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Weighted morbidity rates, PCS and MCS were computed for 100 diagnoses using the International Classification of Diseases (9th version). Results Overall mental impairment was observed among patients in primary care with an average MCS of 41.5 (SD 8.6), ranging from 33.0 for depressive disorders to 45.3 for patients exhibiting fractures or sprains. Musculoskeletal diseases were found to have the most pronounced effect on impaired physical health (OR=2.31; 95% CI 2.08 to 2.57) with the lowest PCS (45.6 (SD 8.8)) and ranked first (29.0%) among main diagnoses experienced by patients followed by cardiovascular diseases (26.7%) and psychological disorders (22.0%). When combining both prevalence and QOL, musculoskeletal diseases represented the heaviest burden in general practice. Conclusions Etude épidémiologique de l'Impact de santé public sur 3 groupes de pathologies (EPI3) is the first study to provide reference figures for burden of disease in general practice across a wide range of

  1. [Implementation of Study Results in Guidelines and Adherence to Guidelines in Clinical Practice].

    PubMed

    Waldfahrer, F

    2016-04-01

    Guidelines were introduced in hospital and practice-based otorhinolaryngology in the 1990s, and have been undergoing further development ever since. There are currently 20 guidelines on file at the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery. The Society has cooperated in a further 34 guidelines. The quality of the guidelines has been continually improved by concrete specifications put forward by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany [Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften e.V.]. Since increasing digitalisation has made access to scientific publications quicker and more simple, relevant study results can be incorporated in guidelines more easily today than in the analogue world. S2e and S3 guidelines must be based on a formal literature search with subsequent evaluation of the evidence. The consensus procedure for S2k guidelines is also regulated. However, the implementation of guidelines in routine medical practice must still be considered inadequate, and there is still a considerable need for improvement in adherence to these guidelines. PMID:27128403

  2. Getting clinical trial results into practice: design, implementation, and process evaluation of the ALLHAT Dissemination Project

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, L Kay; Cushman, William C; Cutler, Jeffrey A; Davis, Barry R; Dawson, Glenna; Einhorn, Paula T; Graumlich, James F; Piller, Linda B; Pressel, Sara; Roccella, Edward J; Simpson, Lara; Whelton, Paul K; Williard, Angela

    2009-01-01

    Background Conventional dissemination of clinical trial results has inconsistent impact on physician practices. A more comprehensive plan to influence determinants of prescribing practices is warranted. Purpose To report the response from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s requirement for dissemination and evaluation of trials with potential immediate public health applicability. Methods ALLHAT’s dissemination plan had two-components: 1) a traditional approach of media coverage, scientific presentation and publication; and 2) a theory-based approach targeting determinants of clinician behavior. Strategies included (1) academic detailing, in which physicians approach colleagues regarding blood pressure management, (2) direct patient messages to stimulate communication with physicians regarding blood pressure control, (3) approaches to formulary systems to use educational and economic incentives for evidence-based prescription, and (4) direct professional organization appeals to clinicians. Results One hundred and forty-seven Investigator Educators reported 1698 presentations to 18,524 clinicians in 41 states and the District of Columbia. The pre- and post-test responses of 1709 clinicians in the face-to-face meetings indicated significant changes in expectations for positive patient outcomes and intention to prescribe diuretics. Information was mailed to 55 individuals representing 20 professional organizations and to eight formulary systems. Direct-to-patient messages were provided to 14 sites that host patient newsletters and Web sites such as health plans and insurance companies, 62 print mass media outlets, and 12 broadcast media sites. Limitations It was not within the scope of the project to conduct a randomized trial of the impact of the dissemination. However, impact evaluation using quasi-experimental designs is ongoing. Conclusions A large multi

  3. Geriatric screening in first opinion practiceresults from 45 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate and report the results of screening geriatric dogs in a first opinion practice. Methods A prospective health screen of dogs over nine-years-old involving history taking, physical examination and urinalysis. Results At least one previously unrecognised problem was identified in 80% of 45 dogs and 353 findings (mean 7·8 per dog) were recorded. Owners often failed to recognise and report serious signs of age-related disease. However, they most often reported increased sleeping (31%), loss of hearing (29%) or sight (20%), stiffness or lameness (22%) and “slowing down” (20%). Increased lens opacity (64%), increased thirst (58%), pain (24%), increased frequency of urination (24%), signs of osteoarthritis (24%) and dental disease (22%) were most frequently identified at the time of consultation. Potentially, life-threatening findings included respiratory distress, palpable abdominal masses and metastatic lung disease. Screening resulted in 29 further diagnostic procedures, including 10 dental procedures, seven medical treatments, two surgical procedures and euthanasia of two dogs. Clinical Significance Screening elderly dogs identified unrecognised and unreported health risk factors resulting in lifestyle modification and ongoing monitoring, as well as signs of age-related diseases resulting in diagnostic investigations, early diagnoses and surgical and medical interventions to improve quality of life. PMID:22835038

  4. Practical considerations for the interpretation of microbial testing results based on small numbers of samples.

    PubMed

    Hoelzer, Karin; Pouillot, Régis

    2013-11-01

    While adequate, statistically designed sampling plans should be used whenever feasible, inference about the presence of pathogens in food occasionally has to be made based on smaller numbers of samples. To help the interpretation of such results, we reviewed the impact of small sample sizes on pathogen detection and prevalence estimation. In particular, we evaluated four situations commonly encountered in practice. The first two examples evaluate the combined impact of sample size and pathogen prevalence (i.e., fraction of contaminated food items in a given lot) on pathogen detection and prevalence estimation. The latter two examples extend the previous example to consider the impact of pathogen concentration and imperfect test sensitivity. The provided examples highlight the difficulties of making inference based on small numbers of samples, and emphasize the importance of using appropriate statistical sampling designs whenever possible.

  5. Practical guidelines for reporting results in single- and multi-component analytical calibration: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2015-04-01

    Practical guidelines for reporting analytical calibration results are provided. General topics, such as the number of reported significant figures and the optimization of analytical procedures, affect all calibration scenarios. In the specific case of single-component or univariate calibration, relevant issues discussed in the present Tutorial include: (1) how linearity can be assessed, (2) how to correctly estimate the limits of detection and quantitation, (2) when and how standard addition should be employed, (3) how to apply recovery studies for evaluating accuracy and precision, and (4) how average prediction errors can be compared for different analytical methodologies. For multi-component calibration procedures based on multivariate data, pertinent subjects here included are the choice of algorithms, the estimation of analytical figures of merit (detection capabilities, sensitivity, selectivity), the use of non-linear models, the consideration of the model regression coefficients for variable selection, and the application of certain mathematical pre-processing procedures such as smoothing.

  6. Homeopathic medical practice: Long-term results of a cohort study with 3981 patients

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Claudia M; Lüdtke, Rainer; Baur, Roland; Willich, Stefan N

    2005-01-01

    Background On the range of diagnoses, course of treatment, and long-term outcome in patients who chose to receive homeopathic medical treatment very little is known. We investigated homeopathic practice in an industrialized country under everyday conditions. Methods In a prospective, multicentre cohort study with 103 primary care practices with additional specialisation in homeopathy in Germany and Switzerland, data from all patients (age >1 year) consulting the physician for the first time were observed. The main outcome measures were: Patient and physician assessments (numeric rating scales from 0 to 10) and quality of life at baseline, and after 3, 12, and 24 months. Results A total of 3,981 patients were studied including 2,851 adults (29% men, mean age 42.5 ± 13.1 years; 71% women, 39.9 ± 12.4 years) and 1,130 children (52% boys, 6.5 ± 3.9 years; 48% girls, 7.0 ± 4.3 years). Ninety-seven percent of all diagnoses were chronic with an average duration of 8.8 ± 8 years. The most frequent diagnoses were allergic rhinitis in men, headache in women, and atopic dermatitis in children. Disease severity decreased significantly (p < 0.001) between baseline and 24 months (adults from 6.2 ± 1.7 to 3.0 ± 2.2; children from 6.1 ± 1.8 to 2.2 ± 1.9). Physicians' assessments yielded similar results. For adults and young children, major improvements were observed for quality of life, whereas no changes were seen in adolescents. Younger age and more severe disease at baseline were factors predictive of better therapeutic success. Conclusion Disease severity and quality of life demonstrated marked and sustained improvements following homeopathic treatment period. Our findings indicate that homeopathic medical therapy may play a beneficial role in the long-term care of patients with chronic diseases. PMID:16266440

  7. [Contact lens associated dry eye. Current study results and practical implementation].

    PubMed

    Khaireddin, R

    2013-06-01

    Contact lens-associated dry eye symptoms have mostly been therapeutically addressed using artificial tears containing hyaluronic acid to supplement tear film volume with often unsatisfactory results. However, the main reason for contact lens-associated dry eye is not the lack of tear fluid but the lack of tear film stability due to meibomian gland dysfunction leading to reduction of the lipid film of tears. This is associated with increased evaporation of the aqueous phase of tear fluid and a measurable hyperosmolarity of the residual "denatured" tear film. A subsequent inflammatory reaction of the ocular surface then leads to the vicious circle of dry eye. The aim of this review is to summarize current study results on this topic and to give practical advice on how to address dry eye symptoms in contact lens wearers more accurately. For most contact lens-associated dry eye symptoms a combined therapy with unpreserved artificial tears plus phospholipid-liposome eye spray yields the best results. In cases of additional signs of blepharitis the regular use of phospholipid-liposome solution for lid margin hygiene is beneficial.

  8. Perceived future career prospects in general practice: quantitative results from questionnaire surveys of UK doctors

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Trevor W; Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Background There are more studies of current job satisfaction among GPs than of their views about their future career prospects, although both are relevant to commitment to careers in general practice. Aim To report on the views of GPs compared with clinicians in other specialties about their future career prospects. Design and setting Questionnaire surveys were sent to UK medical doctors who graduated in selected years between 1974 and 2008. Method Questionnaires were sent to the doctors at different times after graduation, ranging from 3 to 24 years. Results Based on the latest survey of each graduation year of the 20 940 responders, 66.2% of GPs and 74.2% of hospital doctors were positive about their prospects and 9.7% and 8.3%, respectively, were negative. However, with increasing time since graduation and increasing levels of seniority, GPs became less positive about their prospects; by contrast, over time, surgeons became more positive. Three to 5 years after graduation, 86.3% of those training in general practice were positive about their prospects compared with 52.9% of surgical trainees: in surveys conducted 12–24 years after graduation, 60.2% of GPs and 76.6% of surgeons were positive about their prospects. Conclusion GPs held broadly positive views of their career prospects, as did other doctors. However, there was an increase in negativity with increasing time since graduation that was not seen in hospital doctors. Research into the causes of this negativity and policy measures to ameliorate it would contribute to the continued commitment of GPs and may help to reduce attrition. PMID:27578813

  9. Theories of Sexual Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storms, Michael D.

    1980-01-01

    Results indicated homosexuals, heterosexuals, and bisexuals did not differ within each sex on measures of masculinity and femininity. Strong support was obtained for the hypothesis that sexual orientation relates primarily to erotic fantasy orientation. (Author/DB)

  10. Daylighting practices of the architectural industry (baseline results of a national survey)

    SciTech Connect

    Hattrup, M.P.

    1990-05-01

    A national survey of over 300 commercial design architects was conducted to develop baseline information on their knowledge, perceptions, and use of daylighting in commercial building designs. Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted the survey for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Building and Community Systems (BCS). In the survey daylighting was defined as the intentional use of natural light as a partial substitute for artificially generated light. The results suggested that architects need to be educated about the true benefits of daylighting and the impacts it can have on a building's energy performance. Educational programs that will increase the architects' understanding and awareness of modern daylighting technologies and practices should be developed by utilities, stage agencies, and the federal government. If more architects can be made aware of the true effectiveness and positive attributes of daylighting systems and technologies, daylighting may be used in more commercial buildings. The results of the survey show that the more familiar architects feel they are with daylighting, the more they use daylighting. 3 refs., 19 tabs.

  11. Approaches of National 3d Mapping: Research Results and Standardisation in Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoter, J. E.; Streilein, A.; Pla, M.; Baella, B.; Capstick, D.; Home, R.; Roensdorf, C.; Lagrange, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    Over the past ten years technologies for generating, maintaining and using 3D geo-information have matured. For national mapping agencies one of the challenges is how to best extend 2D data into 3D data, making best use of research results and available technologies. Some mapping organisations are making serious progress. The question addressed in this paper is how research results achieved in the past ten years are applied in practice and what research problems remain. In addition, the paper explores the potentials of the OGC 3D standard (i.e. CityGML) for 3D national mapping and what developments are further required to make the standard better fit for this purpose. The main conclusions of the paper are that 3D data is more and more available but still suffers from a low level of usage (mainly visualisation) and standards and formats based on CityGML have been stabilised although software support is still in the early stage. Several recommendations are made to meet these problems, including the definition of European CityGML profiles (as the INSPIRE Building profile) to harmonise 3D needs and standardise 3D implementations at international level.

  12. Core Practices for Teaching History: The Results of a Delphi Panel Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogo, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Recent education literature and research has focused on identifying effective core teaching practices to inform and help shape teacher education and professional development. Although a rich literature on the teaching and learning of history has continued to develop over the past decade, core practice research has largely overlooked…

  13. Credit for Prior Learning Practices: Results of the AACRAO December 2014 60 Second Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2015

    2015-01-01

    The American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) initiated a series of surveys designed to capture member institutional practice snapshots in 60 seconds or less. The December 2014 "AACRAO 60 Second Survey" asked respondents to indicate their institutions' credit for prior learning practices (CPL). To…

  14. Implementation Integrity of Practice-Based Coaching: Preliminary Results from the BEST in CLASS Efficacy Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Kevin S.; Conroy, Maureen A.; Vo, Abigail; Ladwig, Crystal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the practice-based coaching model used in BEST in CLASS, a Tier-2 classroom-based intervention comprised of evidence-based instructional practices designed to prevent and ameliorate the chronic problem behaviors of young children at risk for the development of emotional/behavioral disorders. Following a…

  15. Embedding evidence-based practice among nursing undergraduates: Results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    André, Beate; Aune, Anne G; Brænd, Jorunn A

    2016-05-01

    Evidence-based practice is currently one of the most important developments in health care. Research in nursing science is rapidly growing; however, translating the knowledge based on this research into clinical practice is often hampered, and may be dependent on reflective skills. The aim of this study was to see how undergraduate nursing students in nursing should increase their skills and knowledge related to evidence-based practice through participation in clinical research projects. A qualitative approach was used in collecting and analyzing the data. Students participated in a pilot clinical research project and a received guidance related to their bachelor thesis. After the project was completed, all students filled in a questionnaire. The students' motivation to participate in this study was reported to be high, but they reported low knowledge related to evidence-based practice. All students reported that their attitude towards evidence-based practice changed in a positive direction during their participation in the project. Evidence-based practice influenced nursing practices by putting more focus on critical thinking, increasing pride and giving a sense of ownership in the clinical field. The curricula and the pedagogical perspectives in nursing education can influence the attitude towards evidence-based practice and skills among nursing bachelor students. PMID:27235563

  16. Design and Practice on Metadata Service System of Surveying and Mapping Results Based on Geonetwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Z.; Zhou, X.

    2011-08-01

    Based on the analysis and research on the current geographic information sharing and metadata service,we design, develop and deploy a distributed metadata service system based on GeoNetwork covering more than 30 nodes in provincial units of China.. By identifying the advantages of GeoNetwork, we design a distributed metadata service system of national surveying and mapping results. It consists of 31 network nodes, a central node and a portal. Network nodes are the direct system metadata source, and are distributed arround the country. Each network node maintains a metadata service system, responsible for metadata uploading and management. The central node harvests metadata from network nodes using OGC CSW 2.0.2 standard interface. The portal shows all metadata in the central node, provides users with a variety of methods and interface for metadata search or querying. It also provides management capabilities on connecting the central node and the network nodes together. There are defects with GeoNetwork too. Accordingly, we made improvement and optimization on big-amount metadata uploading, synchronization and concurrent access. For metadata uploading and synchronization, by carefully analysis the database and index operation logs, we successfully avoid the performance bottlenecks. And with a batch operation and dynamic memory management solution, data throughput and system performance are significantly improved; For concurrent access, , through a request coding and results cache solution, query performance is greatly improved. To smoothly respond to huge concurrent requests, a web cluster solution is deployed. This paper also gives an experiment analysis and compares the system performance before and after improvement and optimization. Design and practical results have been applied in national metadata service system of surveying and mapping results. It proved that the improved GeoNetwork service architecture can effectively adaptive for distributed deployment

  17. State Financial Control Practices and Public Universities: Results of a National Study. Revised. ASHE 1984 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    Results of a national study of budgetary control imposed upon 88 Ph.D. granting public universities by 49 state governments (excluding Alaska) are presented. A comparative analysis is provided of financial control practices in each state, along with an index that places these practices along a continuum. Information is included on the nature and…

  18. Summarising and validating test accuracy results across multiple studies for use in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Riley, Richard D; Ahmed, Ikhlaaq; Debray, Thomas P A; Willis, Brian H; Noordzij, J Pieter; Higgins, Julian P T; Deeks, Jonathan J

    2015-06-15

    Following a meta-analysis of test accuracy studies, the translation of summary results into clinical practice is potentially problematic. The sensitivity, specificity and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of a test may differ substantially from the average meta-analysis findings, because of heterogeneity. Clinicians thus need more guidance: given the meta-analysis, is a test likely to be useful in new populations, and if so, how should test results inform the probability of existing disease (for a diagnostic test) or future adverse outcome (for a prognostic test)? We propose ways to address this. Firstly, following a meta-analysis, we suggest deriving prediction intervals and probability statements about the potential accuracy of a test in a new population. Secondly, we suggest strategies on how clinicians should derive post-test probabilities (PPV and NPV) in a new population based on existing meta-analysis results and propose a cross-validation approach for examining and comparing their calibration performance. Application is made to two clinical examples. In the first example, the joint probability that both sensitivity and specificity will be >80% in a new population is just 0.19, because of a low sensitivity. However, the summary PPV of 0.97 is high and calibrates well in new populations, with a probability of 0.78 that the true PPV will be at least 0.95. In the second example, post-test probabilities calibrate better when tailored to the prevalence in the new population, with cross-validation revealing a probability of 0.97 that the observed NPV will be within 10% of the predicted NPV.

  19. Practical applicability and preliminary results of the Baltic Environmental Satellite Remote Sensing System (SatBaltic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, B.; Ostrowska, M.; Bradtke, K.; Darecki, M.; Dera, J.; Dudzinska-Nowak, J.; Dzierzbicka, L.; Ficek, D.; Furmanczyk, K.; Kowalewski, M.; Krezel, A.; Majchrowski, R.; Paszkuta, M.; Ston-Egiert, J.; Stramska, M.; Zapadka, T.

    2012-04-01

    SatBaltic (Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment) project is being realized in Poland by the SatBaltic Scientific Consortium, specifically appointed for this purpose, which associates four scientific institutions: the Institute of Oceanology PAN in Sopot - coordinator, the University of Gdańsk (Institute of Oceanography), the Pomeranian Academy in Słupsk (Institute of Physics) and the University of Szczecin (Institute of Marine Sciences). We present the first the results of the first year and a half of SatBaltic's implementation. The final result of the project is to be the creation and setting in motion of the SatBaltic Operational System (SBOS), the aim of which is to monitor effectively and comprehensively the state of the Baltic Sea environment using remote sensing techniques. Various aspects of the practical applicability of SBOS to the monitoring of the Baltic ecosystem are discussed. We present some examples of the maps of the various characteristics of the Baltic obtained using the current version of SBOS, including algorithms and models that are still in an unfinished state. At the current stage of research, these algorithms apply mainly to the characteristics of the solar energy influx and the distribution of this energy among the various processes taking place in the atmosphere-sea system, and also to the radiation balance of the sea surface, the irradiance conditions for photosynthesis and the condition of plant communities in the water, sea surface temperature distributions and some other marine phenomena correlated with this temperature. Also given are results of preliminary inspections of the accuracy of the magnitudes shown on the maps.

  20. Design considerations &practical results with long duration systems for manned flight: cryogenic helium and superpressure balloons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, J.

    The paper will describe two manned flights made in polyethylene zero pressure balloons with liquid helium carried to provide all in-flight buoyancy adjustment. These balloons were of 1,600 and 8,000 cubic meter volumes. Two flights have been made, both lasting 24 hours. The first flight cruised and flew through the sunset at 18,000 feet / 5,500 meters. The second flight using a pressurized cabin included flying through the night at about 32,000 feet / 10,000 meters. These flights highlight a wide range of theoretical and practical design concerns. For a craft carrying a crew, structural integrity and manageability &control in flight are naturally important. These flights demonstrated the complete feasibility of this system which will be described in detail. In addition the author constructed a 1,600 cubic meter pumpkin balloon used for a two day fight across Australia with a crew of two. Considerable problems were discovered during construction with distortion of the balloon. Although this work was done some time ago, the results have not been published in detail. The reason for publications at this time is that the work is very relevant to the problems recently encountered with the ULDB pumpkin design. The author, who is a physicist as well as a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, was the principal desig ner as well as pilot of these craft. Ends...

  1. Cold Chain and Consumers’ Practices: Exploratory Results of Focus Group Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fasolato, Luca; Cardazzo, Barbara; Berti, Giulia; Novelli, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative survey was to gain an insight into the ways consumers purchase, transport and storage fresh and frozen food. In particular, this paper considered consumers’ behaviour and the knowledge they have about cold chain. An explorative study was held using focus group interviews (n. 4) as the method for data collection. The sampling group was composed of 24 consumers (4 males and 20 females) and the age ranged from 33 to 78. Data revealed that food safety knowledge is at a fairly good level, however consumer practices in certain cases were inappropriate particularly with respect to transport from the store to home, storage and thaw. Consumers were particularly concerned about frozen food that should not be thawed during shopping or transportation. Knowledge about eggs storage seemed to be dodgy as well. Due to the restricted extent of the sample survey the results cannot be generalized to the whole Italian population; still, this method is particularly useful for discovering not only what people think but why they think that way. PMID:27800367

  2. Instructional Practices in Introductory Geoscience Courses: Results of a National Faculty Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    The NAGT professional development program "On the Cutting Edge" recently surveyed 7000 geoscience faculty in the United States to develop a snapshot of current instructional practices in undergraduate geoscience courses, faculty strategies for learning new content and new teaching approaches, and faculty involvement in the geoscience education community. Over 2200 faculty responded to the survey which was conducted by the American Institute of Physics. Results for introductory courses (814 responses) indicate that lecture is the most common teaching strategy used in courses of all sizes. Many faculty incorporate some interactive activities in their courses. Most commonly, they use questioning, demonstrations, discussions, and in-class exercises. Less common, but not rare, are small group discussion or think-pair-share and classroom debates or role-playing. Activities involving problem solving, using quantitative skills, working with data and primarily literature, and structured collaboration are incorporated by many faculty in introductory courses, suggesting efforts to teach the process of science. Activities in which students address a problem of national or local interest, analyze their own data, or address problems of their own design are less common but not rare. Field experiences are common but not ubiquitous for students in introductory courses. A wide variety of assessment strategies are used in introductory courses of all sizes, including exams, quizzes, problem sets, papers, oral presentations, and portfolios. While papers are used for assessment more extensively in small classes, a significant number of faculty use papers in large classes (greater than 81 students). A majority of faculty use rubrics in grading. Faculty report that in the past two years, approximately one-third have made changes in the content of their introductory courses while just under half have changed the teaching methods they use. While faculty learn about both new content and

  3. Implant removal of osteosynthesis: the Dutch practice. Results of a survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this survey study was to evaluate the current opinion and practice of trauma and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands in the removal of implants after fracture healing. Methods A web-based questionnaire consisting of 44 items was sent to all active members of the Dutch Trauma Society and Dutch Orthopaedic Trauma Society to determine their habits and opinions about implant removal. Results Though implant removal is not routinely done in the Netherlands, 89% of the Dutch surgeons agreed that implant removal is a good option in case of pain or functional deficits. Also infection of the implant or bone is one of the main reasons for removing the implant (> 90%), while making money was a motivation for only 1% of the respondents. In case of younger patients (< 40 years of age) only 34% of the surgeons agreed that metal implants should always be removed in this category. Orthopaedic surgeons are more conservative and differ in their opinion about this subject compared to general trauma surgeons (p = 0.002). Though the far majority removes elastic nails in children (95%). Most of the participants (56%) did not agree that leaving implants in is associated with an increased risk of fractures, infections, allergy or malignancy. Yet in case of the risk of fractures, residents all agreed to this statement (100%) whereas staff specialists disagreed for 71% (p < 0.001). According to 62% of the surgeons titanium plates are more difficult to remove than stainless steel, but 47% did not consider them safer to leave in situ compared to stainless steel. The most mentioned postoperative complications were wound infection (37%), unpleasant scarring (24%) and postoperative hemorraghe (19%). Conclusion This survey indicates that there is no general opinion about implant removal after fracture healing with a lack of policy guidelines in the Netherlands. In case of symptomatic patients a majority of the surgeons removes the implant, but this is not

  4. Pruritus in hemodialysis patients: Results from the Japanese Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (JDOPPS).

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Fuller, Douglas S; Saito, Akira; Akizawa, Tadao; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Pisoni, Ronald L; Robinson, Bruce M; Akiba, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Pruritus affects many patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In this study, pruritus and its relationship to morbidity, quality of life (QoL), sleep quality, and patient laboratory measures were analyzed in a large sample of Japanese patients undergoing HD. Severity of patient-reported pruritus symptoms experienced during a 4-week period was collected from 6480 Japanese patients undergoing HD in three phases of the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS; 1996-2008; 60-65 study facilities/phase). Adjusted linear and logistic regressions were used to identify associations of pruritus with treatment parameters and QoL outcomes. Adjusted Cox regressions examined the influence of pruritus severity on mortality. Moderate to extreme pruritus was experienced by 44% of prevalent patients undergoing HD in the Japanese Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study. Many patient characteristics were significantly associated with pruritus, but this did not explain the large differences in pruritus among facilities (20-70%). Pruritus was slightly less common in patients starting HD than in patients on dialysis >1 year. Patients with moderate to extreme pruritus were more likely to feel drained (adjusted odds ratio = 2.2-5.8, P < 0.0001), have poor sleep quality (adjusted odds ratio = 1.9-3.7, P < 0.0001), and have QoL mental and physical composite scores 2.3-6.7 points lower (P < 0.0001) than patients with no/mild pruritus. Pruritus in patients undergoing HD was associated with a 23% higher mortality risk (P = 0.09). The many poor outcomes associated with pruritus underscore the need for better therapeutic agents to provide relief for the 40-50% of prevalent patients undergoing HD substantially affected by pruritus. Pruritus in new patients with end-stage renal disease likely results from uremia or pre-existing conditions (not HD per se), indicating the need to understand development of pruritus before end-stage renal disease.

  5. Bioactive maca (Lepidium meyenii) alkamides are a result of traditional Andean postharvest drying practices.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Eliana; Hadzich, Antonella; Kofer, Waltraud; Mithöfer, Axel; Cosio, Eric G

    2015-08-01

    Maca, Lepidium meyenii Walpers (Brassicaceae), is an annual herbaceous plant native to the high plateaus of the Peruvian central Andes. Its underground storage hypocotyls have been a traditional medicinal agent and dietary staple since pre-Columbian times. Reported properties include energizing and fertility-enhancing effects. Published reports have focused on the benzylalkamides (macamides) present in dry hypocotyls as one of the main bioactive components. Macamides are secondary amides formed by benzylamine and a fatty acid moiety, with varying hydrocarbon chain lengths and degree of unsaturation. Although it has been assumed that they are usually present in fresh undamaged tissues, analyses show them to be essentially absent from them. However, hypocotyls dried by traditional Andean postharvest practices or industrial oven drying contain up to 800μgg(-1) dry wt (2.3μmolg(-1) dry wt) of macamides. In this study, the generation of macamides and their putative precursors were studied during nine-week traditional drying trials at 4200m altitude and in ovens under laboratory conditions. Freeze-thaw cycles in the open field during drying result in tissue maceration and release of free fatty acids from storage and membrane lipids up to levels of 1200μgg(-1) dry wt (4.3μmolg(-1) dry wt). Endogenous metabolism of the isothiocyanates generated from glucosinolate hydrolysis during drying results in maximal benzylamine values of 4300μgg(-1) dry wt (40.2μmolg(-1) dry wt). Pearson correlation coefficients of the accumulation profiles of benzylamine and free fatty acid to that of macamides showed good values of 0.898 and 0.934, respectively, suggesting that both provide sufficient substrate for amide synthesis during the drying process. PMID:25817836

  6. Early preventive attachment-oriented psychotherapeutic intervention program with parents of a very low birthweight premature infant: results of attachment and neurological development.

    PubMed

    Brisch, Karl Heinz; Bechinger, Doris; Betzler, Suzanne; Heinemann, Hilde

    2003-06-01

    The birth of a very small preterm infant (< or = 1500 grams) can be a traumatizing experience for many parents. A developmental risk model is presented that is the background to an early attachment-oriented preventive psychotherapeutic intervention. This comprehensive parent-centered intervention program is composed of supportive group psychotherapy, attachment-oriented focal individual psychotherapy, a home visit and video-based sensitivity training. The intervention aims at improving parental coping, the process of attachment and parent-infant interaction. In a prospective longitudinal design mothers were randomly assigned to a control (N = 44) and an intervention group (N = 43) after preterm delivery. Results show that the percentage of secure (control vs. intervention group: 77.8% vs. 59.4%) and insecure (control vs. intervention group: 8.3% vs. 31.3% avoidant, 13.9% vs. 9.4% ambivalent) attachment quality in high-risk preterm infants is comparable to results from studies with term infants. There was no significant statistical difference in terms of quality of attachment of the preterm infants between the control group and the intervention group. However, only in the control group, impaired neurological development corresponded significantly with an insecure quality of attachment, but not in the intervention group, although there were significantly more neurologically impaired infants in the intervention group. This result is discussed as an effect of the intervention program.

  7. Results Oriented Benchmarking: The Evolution of Benchmarking at NASA from Competitive Comparisons to World Class Space Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Informal benchmarking using personal or professional networks has taken place for many years at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recognized early on, the need to formalize the benchmarking process for better utilization of resources and improved benchmarking performance. The need to compete in a faster, better, cheaper environment has been the catalyst for formalizing these efforts. A pioneering benchmarking consortium was chartered at KSC in January 1994. The consortium known as the Kennedy Benchmarking Clearinghouse (KBC), is a collaborative effort of NASA and all major KSC contractors. The charter of this consortium is to facilitate effective benchmarking, and leverage the resulting quality improvements across KSC. The KBC acts as a resource with experienced facilitators and a proven process. One of the initial actions of the KBC was to develop a holistic methodology for Center-wide benchmarking. This approach to Benchmarking integrates the best features of proven benchmarking models (i.e., Camp, Spendolini, Watson, and Balm). This cost-effective alternative to conventional Benchmarking approaches has provided a foundation for consistent benchmarking at KSC through the development of common terminology, tools, and techniques. Through these efforts a foundation and infrastructure has been built which allows short duration benchmarking studies yielding results gleaned from world class partners that can be readily implemented. The KBC has been recognized with the Silver Medal Award (in the applied research category) from the International Benchmarking Clearinghouse.

  8. Engagement of patients in religious and spiritual practices: Confirmatory results with the SpREUK-P 1.1 questionnaire as a tool of quality of life research

    PubMed Central

    Büssing, Arndt; Matthiessen, Peter F; Ostermann, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background Quality of life is a multidimensional construct composed of functional, physical, emotional, social and spiritual well-being. In order to examine how patients with severe diseases view the impact of spirituality and religiosity on their health and how they cope with illness, we have developed the SpREUK questionnaire. We deliberately avoided the intermingling of attitudes, convictions and practices, and thus addressed the distinct forms and frequencies of spiritual/religious practices in an additional manual, the SpREUK-P questionnaire. Methods The SpREUK-P was designed to differentiate spiritual, religious, existentialistic and philosophical practices. It was tested in a sample of 354 German subjects (71% women; 49.0 ± 12.5 years). Half of them were healthy controls, while among the patients cancer was diagnosed in 54%, multiple sclerosis in 22%, and other chronic diseases in 23%. Reliability and factor analysis of the inventory were performed according to the standard procedures. Results We confirmed the structure and consistency of the previously described 18-item SpREUK-P manual and improved the quality of the current construct by adding several new items. The new 25-item SpREUK-P 1.1 (Cronbach's alpha = 0.8517) has the following scales: (1) conventional religious practice (CRP), (2) existentialistic practice (ExP), (3) unconventional spiritual practice (USP), (4) nature/environment-oriented practice (NoP), and (5) humanistic practice (HuP). Among the tested individuals, the highest engagement scores were found for HuP and NoP, while the lowest were found for the USP. Women had significantly higher scores for ExP than male patients. With respect to age, the engagement in CRP increases with increasing age, while the engagement in a HuP decreased. Individuals with a Christian orientation and with a religious and spiritual attitude had the highest engagement scores for CRP, while the engagement in an USP was high with respect to a spiritual attitude

  9. What clinical activities do advanced-practice registered dietitian nutritionists perform? Results of a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; Rothpletz Puglia, Pamela; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Activities performed by advanced-practice registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) have yet to be clearly elucidated. The study aimed to gain consensus on the practice activities of advanced-practice RDNs who provide direct clinical nutrition care. A three-round Delphi study was conducted. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDN experts working as clinicians and/or managers in direct care settings that met inclusion criteria for advanced-level practice. In Round 1, 85 experts provided open-ended advanced-level practice activities linked to the Nutrition Care Process sections. Using content analysis, the responses were coded into activity statements. In Round 2, experts rated the essentiality of these activities. In Round 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus while viewing their previous rating, the group median, and comments. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 were neither essential nor nonessential, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to each question was <2.0. Seventy-six (89.4%) experts completed all rounds. From 770 comments, 129 activity statements were generated. All statements reached consensus: 97.7% as essential; 0.8% as nonessential; and 1.5% as neither. Of essential activities, 67.5% were highly essential with limited variability (median=1.0; interquartile range≤2.0). Advanced-practice RDNs' tasks are patient-centered and reflect complex care; involve a comprehensive and discriminating approach; are grounded in advanced knowledge and expertise in clinical nutrition; include use of advanced interviewing, education, and counseling strategies; and require communication with patient, families, and the health care team. The high-level of consensus from experts suggest advanced-level clinical nutrition practice exists and can be defined.

  10. A Better IDEA: Best Practice and Outcomes-Oriented Remedies in Public Impact Litigation for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Kathleen G.; McCarthy, Megan A.; Shea, Lindsay; Marcus, Steven C.; Mandell, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Class action lawsuits filed in violation of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) raise questions for those concerned with improving the education system for students with disabilities. First, do the lawsuits result in changes that can be directly linked to improved student outcomes? Second, do these lawsuits and the "consent…

  11. Tyrosine monitoring in children with early and continuously treated phenylketonuria: results of an international practice survey.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Rachael; Sullivan, Karen A; Young, Ross McD; McGill, James J

    2010-12-01

    Investigations into the biochemical markers associated with executive function (EF) impairment in children with early and continuously treated phenylketonuria (ECT-PKU) remain largely phenylalanine-only focused, despite experimental data showing that a high phenylalanine:tyrosine (phe:tyr) ratio is more strongly associated with EF deficit than phe alone. A high phe:tyr ratio is hypothesized to lead to a reduction in dopamine synthesis within the brain, which in turn results in the development of EF impairment. This paper provides a snapshot of current practice in the monitoring and/or treatment of tyrosine levels in children with PKU, across 12 countries from Australasia, North America and Europe. Tyrosine monitoring in this population has increased over the last 5 years, with over 80% of clinics surveyed reporting routine monitoring of tyrosine levels in infancy alongside phe levels. Twenty-five percent of clinics surveyed reported actively treating/managing tyrosine levels (with supplemental tyrosine above that contained in PKU formulas) to ensure tyrosine levels remain within normal ranges. Anecdotally, supplemental tyrosine has been reported to ameliorate symptoms of both attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and depression in this population. EF assessment of children with ECT-PKU was likewise highly variable, with 50% of clinics surveyed reporting routine assessments of intellectual function. However when function was assessed, test instruments chosen tended towards global measures of IQ prior to school entry, rather than specific assessment of EF development. Further investigation of the role of tyrosine and its relationship with phe and EF development is needed to establish whether routine tyrosine monitoring and increased supplementation is recommended. PMID:20882350

  12. Renegotiating cultural practices as a result of HIV in the eastern region of Malawi.

    PubMed

    Banda, Felix; Kunkeyani, Thokozani E

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that HIV awareness is very high among Malawians and yet infection rates are rising. Local cultural practices have been identified as contributing to this contradictory situation. Using data from 12 focus-group discussions collected in Balaka, Zomba, Machinga and Mangochi, the paper explores the reformulation of nine cultural practices as a preventive measure against HIV. The study reveals that cultural practices that involve sexual acts for completion are mediated through condoms and HIV tests. The study also shows that traditional herbs known for healing ailments are repurposed to symbolise sexual acts. We conclude that the idea of repurposing offers an avenue in which initiation and cleansing rites that involve sexual acts are replaced by other semiotics such as a traditional medicine called mtela. We also conclude that the modifications to cultural practices do not indicate complete abandonment of associated traditions, rather, they constitute the renegotiation of cultural practices and meanings associated with particular rites of passage. Lastly, we propose that a comprehensive prevention programme needs to be part of a wider national HIV-prevention effort combining a women and child rights and empowerment agenda and, critically, lifestyle lessons in a process of cultural renegotiation. PMID:25138154

  13. [Frequency of congenital anomalies in cattle: results from the practice in comparison with literature].

    PubMed

    Bähr, C; Distl, O

    2005-04-01

    The study gives a short survey of the literature of frequently observed congenital anomalies in cattle and refers to data on cases of congenital anomalies registered in a veterinary practice over a period of 8 years and in an AI (artificial insemination) station of the Rinder-Union West (RUW) during 4 years. The frequency of congenital anomalies was estimated at 0.013% in the area of the RUW. In the veterinary practice a frequency of 0.51% was found. The most prevalent anomalies were seen in legs (39% in the veterinary practice and 21% in RUW) followed by congenital anomalies of the spine (9% in the veterinary practice and 17% in RUW). Arthrogryposes were most frequent among the anomalies of the legs with 65% (veterinary practice) and 39% (RUW), respectively, of all cases of registered leg anomalies in the respective area. Umbilical hernia and atresia of segments of the intestinum were seen in 8-30% of all registered cases. The frequency of congenital anomalies differed not significantly among paternal half sib groups. A questionnaire was proposed for the registration of congenital anomalies in progeny tests of AI bulls. A series of photographs showing the most prevalent congenital anomalies is supporting the registration form. PMID:15900680

  14. Renegotiating cultural practices as a result of HIV in the eastern region of Malawi.

    PubMed

    Banda, Felix; Kunkeyani, Thokozani E

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that HIV awareness is very high among Malawians and yet infection rates are rising. Local cultural practices have been identified as contributing to this contradictory situation. Using data from 12 focus-group discussions collected in Balaka, Zomba, Machinga and Mangochi, the paper explores the reformulation of nine cultural practices as a preventive measure against HIV. The study reveals that cultural practices that involve sexual acts for completion are mediated through condoms and HIV tests. The study also shows that traditional herbs known for healing ailments are repurposed to symbolise sexual acts. We conclude that the idea of repurposing offers an avenue in which initiation and cleansing rites that involve sexual acts are replaced by other semiotics such as a traditional medicine called mtela. We also conclude that the modifications to cultural practices do not indicate complete abandonment of associated traditions, rather, they constitute the renegotiation of cultural practices and meanings associated with particular rites of passage. Lastly, we propose that a comprehensive prevention programme needs to be part of a wider national HIV-prevention effort combining a women and child rights and empowerment agenda and, critically, lifestyle lessons in a process of cultural renegotiation.

  15. FERPA Training Practices: Results of the AACRAO January 2016 60 Second Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2016

    2016-01-01

    The January 2016 American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) "60 Second Survey" focused on institutional Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) training practices and measuring the level of interest in an AACRAO-developed online FERPA training module. The survey received 878 usable responses.…

  16. College and University Dining Services Administrators' Intention to Adopt Sustainable Practices: Results from US Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chao-Jung; Gregoire, Mary B.; Arendt, Susan; Shelley, Mack C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine college and university dining services administrators' (CUDSAs) intention to adopt sustainable practices. Design/methodology/approach: The theory of planned behavior (TPB) including constructs of subjective norm (SN), attitude, perceived behavior control, and personal norm (PN), formed the…

  17. Distance Education Practices: Summary Results of the AACRAO February 2015 60 Second Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2015

    2015-01-01

    The February 2015 American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) "60 Second Survey" asked respondents to identify whether or not their institution offers distance education, and if so, to answer additional questions about distance education course practices. The survey received 838 unique institutional…

  18. Results Orientated Workplace Literacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Virginia, Comp.

    Cuyahoga Community College's (CCC) Unified Technologies Center (UTC) collaborated with three Cleveland area manufacturing companies in a workplace literacy project. The project provided job-related mathematics and communications programs for 302 employees who needed basic skills upgrading to improve their job performance. The project…

  19. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a proactive, goal-oriented, integrated care model in general practice for older people. A cluster randomised controlled trial: Integrated Systematic Care for older People—the ISCOPE study

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jeanet; den Elzen, Wendy; van Houwelingen, Anne H.; Heijmans, Margot; Stijnen, Theo; Van den Hout, Wilbert; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2016-01-01

    Background: older people often experience complex problems. Because of multiple problems, care for older people in general practice needs to shift from a ‘problem-based, disease-oriented’ care aiming at improvement of outcomes per disease to a ‘goal-oriented care’, aiming at improvement of functioning and personal quality of life, integrating all healthcare providers. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of this proactive and integrated way of working are not yet established. Design: cluster randomised trial. Participants: all persons aged ≥75 in 59 general practices (30 intervention, 29 control), with a combination of problems, as identified with a structured postal questionnaire with 21 questions on four health domains. Intervention: for participants with problems on ≥3 domains, general practitioners (GPs) made an integrated care plan using a functional geriatric approach. Control practices: care as usual. Outcome measures: (i) quality of life (QoL), (ii) activities of daily living, (iii) satisfaction with delivered health care and (iv) cost-effectiveness of the intervention at 1-year follow-up. Trial registration: Netherlands trial register, NTR1946. Results: of the 11,476 registered eligible older persons, 7,285 (63%) participated in the screening. One thousand nine hundred and twenty-one (26%) had problems on ≥3 health domains. For 225 randomly chosen persons, a care plan was made. No beneficial effects were found on QoL, patients' functioning or healthcare use/costs. GPs experienced better overview of the care and stability, e.g. less unexpected demands, in the care. Conclusions: GPs prefer proactive integrated care. ‘Horizontal’ care using care plans for older people with complex problems can be a valuable tool in general practice. However, no direct beneficial effect was found for older persons. PMID:26764392

  20. A collaborative accountable care model in three practices showed promising early results on costs and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Richard B; Sanderson, Mark I; Walters, Barbara A; Kennedy, Karen; Flores, Robert C; Muney, Alan M

    2012-11-01

    Cigna's Collaborative Accountable Care initiative provides financial incentives to physician groups and integrated delivery systems to improve the quality and efficiency of care for patients in commercial open-access benefit plans. Registered nurses who serve as care coordinators employed by participating practices are a central feature of the initiative. They use patient-specific reports and practice performance reports provided by Cigna to improve care coordination, identify and close care gaps, and address other opportunities for quality improvement. We report interim quality and cost results for three geographically and structurally diverse provider practices in Arizona, New Hampshire, and Texas. Although not statistically significant, these early results revealed favorable trends in total medical costs and quality of care, suggesting that a shared-savings accountable care model and collaborative support from the payer can enable practices to take meaningful steps toward full accountability for care quality and efficiency.

  1. Acting in Light of the Future: How Do Future-Oriented Cultural Practices Evolve and How Can We Accelerate Their Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Biglan, Anthony; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive knowledge of how to prevent or ameliorate serious diseases, natural disasters, environmental degradation, and a wide range of other problems, we often fail to take action that that would prevent or mitigate these problematic outcomes. In short, although we may have sound scientific knowledge about threats to future wellbeing, we appear to have limited insight into how to benefit from this knowledge. With this paper, we argue that our current scientific understanding of how to act in light of the future is limited, but we offer a theoretical analysis of future-oriented behavior at both individual and organizational levels. Specifically, the paper draws on a functional contextualist account of human language and cognition, Relational Frame Theory (RFT), and its integrated therapeutic approach, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and extends this framework to analyzing the evolution of the practices of groups and organizations. This framework can provide an understanding of how human behavior may be modified in the present to serve improving human wellbeing in the future at individual, organizational, and even national levels. PMID:26693140

  2. Discourses of student orientation to medical education programs

    PubMed Central

    Ellaway, Rachel H.; Cooper, Gerry; Al-Idrissi, Tracy; Dubé, Tim; Graves, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Although medical students’ initial orientation is an important point of transition in medical education, there is a paucity of literature on the subject and major variations in the ways that different institutions orient incoming medical students to their programs. Methods We conducted a discourse analysis of medical education orientation in the literature and on data from a survey of peer institutions’ approaches to orientation. Results These two discourses of orientation had clear similarities, in particular, the critical role of ceremony and symbols, and the focus on developing professionalism and physician identities. There were also differences between them, in particular, in the way that the discourse in the literature focused on the symbolic and professional aspects of orientation; something we have called ‘cultural orientation’. Meanwhile, those who were responsible for orientation in their own institutions tended to focus on the practical and social dimensions. Conclusion By examining how orientation has been described and discussed, we identify three domains of orientation: cultural, social, and practical. These domains are relatively distinct in terms of the activities associated with them, and in terms of who is involved in organizing and running these activities. We also describe orientation as a liminal activity system on the threshold of medical school where incoming students initially cross into the profession. Interestingly, this state of ambiguity also extends to the scholarship of orientation with only some of its aspects attracting formal enquiry, even though there is a growing interest in transitions in medical education as a whole. We hope, therefore, that this study can help to legitimize enquiry into orientation in all its forms and that it can begin to situate the role of orientation more firmly within the firmament of medical education practice and research. PMID:24646440

  3. The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 3. Results: person centred care, comprehensive and holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Paul; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri E J H; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2010-06-01

    The recently published 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. In a first article, background, objectives, and methodology were discussed. In a second article, the results for the two core competencies 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' were presented. This article reflects on the three core competencies, which deal with person related aspects of GP/FM, i.e. 'person centred care', 'comprehensive approach' and 'holistic approach'. Though there is an important body of opinion papers and (non-systematic) reviews, all person related aspects remain poorly defined and researched. Validated instruments to measure these competencies are lacking. Concerning patient-centredness, most research examined patient and doctor preferences and experiences. Studies on comprehensiveness mostly focus on prevention/care of specific diseases. For all domains, there has been limited research conducted on its implications or outcomes.

  4. Integration of Complementary and Alternative Medicine into Family Practices in Germany: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Stefanie; Musselmann, Berthold; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    More than two-thirds of patients in Germany use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provided either by physicians or non-medical practitioners (“Heilpraktiker”). There is little information about the number of family physicians (FPs) providing CAM. Given the widespread public interest in the use of CAM, this study aimed to ascertain the use of and attitude toward CAM among FPs in Germany. A postal questionnaire developed based on qualitatively derived data was sent to 3000 randomly selected FPs in Germany. A reminder letter including a postcard (containing a single question about CAM use in practice and reasons for non-particpation in the survey) was sent to all FPs who had not returned the questionnaire. Of the 3000 FPs, 1027 (34%) returned the questionnaire and 444 (15%) returned the postcard. Altogether, 886 of the 1471 responding FPs (60%) reported using CAM in their practice. A positive attitude toward CAM was indicated by 503 FPs (55%), a rather negative attitude by 127 FPs (14%). Chirotherapy, relaxation and neural therapy were rated as most beneficial CAM therapies by FPs, whereas neural therapy, phytotherapy and acupuncture were the most commonly used therapies in German family practices. This survey clearly demonstrates that CAM is highly valued by many FPs and is already making a substantial contribution to first-contact primary care in Germany. Therefore, education and research about CAM should be increased. Furthermore, with the provision of CAM by FPs, the role of non-medical CAM practitioners within the German healthcare system is to be questioned. PMID:19293252

  5. Consumer Shell Egg Consumption and Handling Practices: Results from a National Survey.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Katherine M; Cates, Sheryl C; Bradley, Samantha; Godwin, Sandria; Chambers, Delores

    2015-07-01

    Numerous cases and outbreaks of Salmonella infection are attributable to shell eggs each year in the United States. Safe handling and consumption of shell eggs at home can help reduce foodborne illness attributable to shell eggs. A nationally representative Web survey of 1,504 U.S. adult grocery shoppers was conducted to describe consumer handling practices and consumption of shell eggs at home. Based on self-reported survey data, most respondents purchase shell eggs from a grocery store (89.5%), and these eggs were kept refrigerated (not at room temperature; 98.5%). As recommended, most consumers stored shell eggs in the refrigerator (99%) for no more than 3 to 5 weeks (97.6%). After cracking eggs, 48.1% of respondents washed their hands with soap and water. More than half of respondents who fry and/or poach eggs cooked them so that the whites and/or the yolks were still soft or runny, a potentially unsafe practice. Among respondents who owned a food thermometer (62.0%), only 5.2% used it to check the doneness of baked egg dishes when they prepared such a dish. Consumers generally followed two of the four core "Safe Food Families" food safety messages ("separate" and "chill") when handling shell eggs at home. To prevent Salmonella infection associated with shell eggs, consumers should improve their practices related to the messages "clean" (i.e., wash hands after cracking eggs) and "cook" (i.e., cook until yolks and whites are firm and use a food thermometer to check doneness of baked egg dishes) when preparing shell eggs at home. These findings will be used to inform the development of science-based consumer education materials that can help reduce foodborne illness from Salmonella infection.

  6. Consumer Shell Egg Consumption and Handling Practices: Results from a National Survey.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Katherine M; Cates, Sheryl C; Bradley, Samantha; Godwin, Sandria; Chambers, Delores

    2015-07-01

    Numerous cases and outbreaks of Salmonella infection are attributable to shell eggs each year in the United States. Safe handling and consumption of shell eggs at home can help reduce foodborne illness attributable to shell eggs. A nationally representative Web survey of 1,504 U.S. adult grocery shoppers was conducted to describe consumer handling practices and consumption of shell eggs at home. Based on self-reported survey data, most respondents purchase shell eggs from a grocery store (89.5%), and these eggs were kept refrigerated (not at room temperature; 98.5%). As recommended, most consumers stored shell eggs in the refrigerator (99%) for no more than 3 to 5 weeks (97.6%). After cracking eggs, 48.1% of respondents washed their hands with soap and water. More than half of respondents who fry and/or poach eggs cooked them so that the whites and/or the yolks were still soft or runny, a potentially unsafe practice. Among respondents who owned a food thermometer (62.0%), only 5.2% used it to check the doneness of baked egg dishes when they prepared such a dish. Consumers generally followed two of the four core "Safe Food Families" food safety messages ("separate" and "chill") when handling shell eggs at home. To prevent Salmonella infection associated with shell eggs, consumers should improve their practices related to the messages "clean" (i.e., wash hands after cracking eggs) and "cook" (i.e., cook until yolks and whites are firm and use a food thermometer to check doneness of baked egg dishes) when preparing shell eggs at home. These findings will be used to inform the development of science-based consumer education materials that can help reduce foodborne illness from Salmonella infection. PMID:26197282

  7. New circuit theory of multiconductor transmission lines resulting from a new practice of noise reduction

    PubMed Central

    TOKI, Hiroshi; SATO, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In modern life, we are surrounded by and filled with electromagnetic noise caused by the dominant use of energy in the form of electricity. This situation is brought about by the fact that the noise is not understood theoretically. A new practice of noise reduction was introduced for the construction of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). The key concept is a symmetric three-line circuit that arranges power supplies, noise filters and magnets around a third central ground line. A continuous theoretical effort forced us to find a new circuit theory involving a multiconductor transmission-line system starting from Maxwell’s equations without any approximation. We discuss the essence of all of these experimental and theoretical developments with the hope to remove unnecessary electromagnetic noise not only from power supplies, but also from all electric devices. The newly derived circuit theory of multiconductor transmission lines is universal, and establishes the validity of the practice of noise reduction. PMID:24522153

  8. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics.

  9. Physician, Practice, and Patient Characteristics Related to Primary Care Physician Physical and Mental Health: Results from the Physician Worklife Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Eric S; Konrad, Thomas R; Linzer, Mark; McMurray, Julia; Pathman, Donald E; Gerrity, Martha; Schwartz, Mark D; Scheckler, William E; Douglas, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the impact that physician, practice, and patient characteristics have on physician stress, satisfaction, mental, and physical health. Data Sources Based on a survey of over 5,000 physicians nationwide. Four waves of surveys resulted in 2,325 complete responses. Elimination of ineligibles yielded a 52 percent response rate; 1,411 responses from primary care physicians were used. Study Design A conceptual model was tested by structural equation modeling. Physician job satisfaction and stress mediated the relationship between physician, practice, and patient characteristics as independent variables and physician physical and mental health as dependent variables. Principle Findings The conceptual model was generally supported. Practice and, to a lesser extent, physician characteristics influenced job satisfaction, whereas only practice characteristics influenced job stress. Patient characteristics exerted little influence. Job stress powerfully influenced job satisfaction and physical and mental health among physicians. Conclusions These findings support the notion that workplace conditions are a major determinant of physician well-being. Poor practice conditions can result in poor outcomes, which can erode quality of care and prove costly to the physician and health care organization. Fortunately, these conditions are manageable. Organizational settings that are both “physician friendly” and “family friendly” seem to result in greater well-being. These findings are particularly important as physicians are more tightly integrated into the health care system that may be less clearly under their exclusive control.

  10. Is it possible and worth keeping track of deaths within general practice? Results of a 15 year observational study

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, B; Hurwitz, B

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To assess the value of maintaining a death register in a general practice with particular reference to monitoring quality of care. Design of study: Observational study. Setting: Inner London general practice. Method: The practice maintained a manual death register, retained medical records of all deceased patients, and requested information on cause of death from health authorities and coroners for 15 years. Main outcome measures: Number and causes of deaths; 3 yearly age standardised death rates; proportion of deaths formally notified to the practice; place of death; source of cause of death information. Results: During the study period 578 patients died. Practice age standardised death rates fell significantly from 35.59 to 27.12/1000. 498 (86.2%) deaths were formally notified to the practice, 392 within 7 days of death. Of 143 deaths reported to the coroner, only 45 coroners' reports were received. 360 (64.1%) died in hospital, 139 (24.8%) at home, and 38 (6.8%) in a hospice. Death certificate cause of death information was obtained from patients' records in 33.6% (n=194) of cases and from health authority sources for 50% (n=289). The pattern of ascertained causes of deaths was similar to the national pattern. Conclusion: A death register can examine trends in practice deaths by age and place of death and comparisons undertaken with nationally published mortality data. An accurate picture of cause of death cannot be generated from routine data flows alone. There is delay in informing GPs of patient deaths. Meaningful and timely monitoring of deaths cannot be undertaken by individual practices. National Statistics should provide routine analysis of GP death certificate information. PMID:14532364

  11. Chronic disease management in general practice: results from a national study.

    PubMed

    Darker, C; Martin, C; O'Dowd, T; O'Kelly, F; O'Shea, B

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to provide baseline data on chronic disease management (CDM) provision in Irish general practice (GP). The survey instrument was previously used in a study of primary care physicians in 11 countries, thus allowing international comparisons. The response rate was 72% (380/527).The majority of GPs (240/380; 63%) reported significant changes are needed in our health care system to make CDM work better. Small numbers of routine clinical audits are being performed (95/380; 25%). Irish GPs use evidence based guidelines for treatment of diabetes (267/380; 71%), asthma / COPD (279/380; 74%) and hypertension (297/380; 79%), to the same extent as international counterparts. Barriers to delivering chronic care include increased workload (379/380; 99%), lack of appropriate funding (286/380; 76%), with GPs interested in targeted payments (244/380; 68%). This study provides baseline data to assess future changes in CDM.

  12. Does Reform-Oriented Teaching Make a Difference? The Relationship Between Teaching Practices and Achievement in Mathematics and Science. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Vi-Nhuan; Stecher, Brian M.; Lockwood, J.R.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Robyn, Abby; Williams, Valerie L.; Ryan, Gery; Kerr, Kerri A.; Martinez, Jose Felipe; Klein, Stephen P.

    2006-01-01

    In a three-year study, RAND researchers examined the relationship between reform-oriented instruction and student performance in mathematics and science. At the end of the study, students who had been exposed to more reform-oriented teaching performed better in both math and science than those who had experienced less, but the differences in…

  13. The Sustainability of Change in Teacher Beliefs and Practices as a Result of an Overseas Professional Development Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This article examines whether there are changes in students' teaching practices as a result of their experiencing an overseas professional development course (PDC); the process of any such changes; and whether any changes found are sustainable in the long term. Three forms of data gathering are used, lesson observation, in-depth interviews,…

  14. School Policies and Practices to Improve Health and Prevent Obesity: National Secondary School Survey Results. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lloyd D.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Terry-McElrath, Yvonne; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    This report provides updated results from one of the most comprehensive studies of health-related policies and practices in U.S. public middle and high schools to date, which was released in August 2011. The major findings and trends presented in this report describe issues relevant to childhood obesity for four school years, from 2006-07 to…

  15. Four Years of Practical Arrangements between IAEA and Moscow SIA 'Radon': Preliminary Results - 13061

    SciTech Connect

    Batyukhnova, O.G.; Karlina, O.K.; Neveikin, P.P.

    2013-07-01

    The International Education Training Centre (IETC) at Moscow State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' (SIA 'Radon'), in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has developed expertise and provided training to waste management personnel for the last 15 years. Since 1997, the educational system of the enterprise with the support of the IAEA has acquired an international character: more than 470 experts from 35 countries- IAEA Member States completed the professional development. Training is conducted at various thematic courses or fellowships for individual programs and seminars on IAEA technical projects. In June 2008 a direct agreement (Practical Arrangements) was signed between SIA 'Radon' and the IAEA on cooperation in the field of development of new technologies, expert's advice to IAEA Member States, and, in particular, the training of personnel in the field of radioactive waste management (RWM), which opens up new perspectives for fruitful cooperation of industry professionals. The paper summarizes the current experience of the SIA 'Radon' in the organization and implementation of the IAEA sponsored training and others events and outlines some of strategic educational elements, which IETC will continue to pursue in the coming years. (authors)

  16. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  17. Metastatic colorectal cancer KRAS genotyping in routine practice: results and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Aude; Blanchard, France; Le Pessot, Florence; Sesboüé, Richard; Di Fiore, Frédéric; Bossut, Jessie; Fiant, Elodie; Frébourg, Thierry; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe

    2011-08-01

    KRAS genotyping is mandatory before anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States and in Europe. Thus, large-scale KRAS mutation screening is needed for efficient patient management and in the future metastatic colorectal cancer genotyping might also include the detection of the BRAF V600E mutation, which is a very strong negative prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. We report our experience of routine KRAS/BRAF mutation screening practice performed on 1130 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples from 992 colorectal cancer patients. DNA was extracted from macrodissected tumor areas highlighted by a pathologist, KRAS codons 12/13 and BRAF V600E mutations were assessed in a single SNaPshot® multiplex assay and each mutation was confirmed by an independent analysis. KRAS and BRAF mutations were, respectively, present in 41.8 and 6.5% of the tumor samples. If KRAS and BRAF mutations were mutually exclusive, four samples presented two concomitant KRAS mutations. Genotyping of paired primary tumors and metastases from 44 patients indicated that 5 patients (11.4%) presented discordant KRAS mutational status. KRAS genotype heterogeneity was also observed within primary tumor sites in seven cases. Non-reproducible KRAS artefactual mutations were detected in 53 samples (4.7%). We found that the prominent mechanism leading to these artefactual mutations was the fragmentation of DNA occurring during tissue processing. Routine KRAS genotyping performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues requires, therefore, the development of quality control scheme for molecular pathology, especially because of DNA damages induced by formalin fixation. The tumor heterogeneity observed in some patients indicates that it should be more appropriate to perform KRAS genotyping on metastases if sample is available.

  18. Personality and Medical Specialty Choice: Technique Orientation versus People Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Osmon, William R.

    2001-01-01

    Results of the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire completed by 161 physicians indicated that role consciousness, abstractedness, and tough mindedness differentiated medical specialties (surgeons, anesthesiologists, family practitioners). Results correlated with the use of differences between person orientation and technique orientation to…

  19. Shaking hands with a computer: an examination of two methods of organizational newcomer orientation.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Michael J; Gogus, Celile Itir

    2005-09-01

    The current study investigated the effects of using a computer-based orientation program on organizational socialization and attitudinal outcomes. In a quasi-experimental field study, 261 newcomers either participated in a group, social-based orientation session or an individual, computer-based orientation session. Consistent with hypotheses, results indicated that participation in the computer-based orientation session led to lower levels of socialization in the more socially rich content areas, whereas the more information-based content areas were not affected. Levels of socialization mediated the effects of computer-based orientation on the more distal attitudinal outcomes of affective organizational commitment and job satisfaction. Computer-based orientation participation also negatively affected supervisor ratings of socialization. The results demonstrate the importance of newcomer orientations and socialization outcomes during organizational entry and that training method can be an important moderator of orientation practices.

  20. US EPA's pollution prevention rd and d results: Practical tools for the trade

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to share a number of the results from several years of researching engineering solutions to multi-media problems, building a sound scientific foundation to support pollution prevention (P2) principles, and developing and demonstrating pollution prevention technologies, tools, and techniques. The 'tools of the trade' for pollution prevention are the research reports that provide results of technology development, the case studies and demonstrations of P2 technologies, and the technical guides and manuals for conducting P2 activities.

  1. Policy Impacts on Pedagogical Practice and ICT Use: An Exploration of the Results from Sites 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, N.; Lee, M. W.; Chan, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Second Information Technology in Education Study (SITES) 2006 results reveal that principals' perceived presence of lifelong learning-related pedagogical activities in their schools had changed markedly since the same data was collected in 1998 in SITES-M1. More intriguing was the fact that the directions of the changes were quite different…

  2. Analyzing data in aquaculture: practical significance, a new paradigm for determining the importance of results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyzing data and interpreting results is often the most difficult and yet important part of the scientific research process. Currently, aquaculture researchers almost exclusively employ null hypothesis significance testing (NHST), a synthesis of the Fisher test of significance and the Neyman-Pears...

  3. Practical Model and Protocol for Interpreting MCMI-III Results to Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, Joy D.; Brown, Nathan C.

    One ethical dilemma for psychologists is finding methods to share test results with their clients in such a way that the client is not deleteriously labeled, but is encouraged by the knowledge of assessed strength and growth areas. This paper offers one answer by presenting a structured protocol that draws on an iceberg metaphor for categorizing…

  4. Incentive Pay Programs Do Not Affect Teacher Motivation or Reported Practices: Results from Three Randomized Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Kun; Le, Vi-Nhuan; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Marsh, Julie A.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Stecher, Brian M.; Springer, Matthew G.

    2013-01-01

    This study drew on teacher survey responses from randomized experiments exploring three different pay-for-performance programs to examine the extent to which these programs motivated teachers to improve student achievement and the impact of such programs on teachers' instruction, number of hours worked, job stress, and collegiality. Results showed…

  5. Whose Orientations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutoff, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to Jon A. Levisohn's article entitled "A Menu of Orientations in the Teaching of Rabbinic Literature." While the "menu" Levisohn describes in his groundbreaking work on orientations to the teaching of rabbinic texts will almost certainly be refined over time, even as it stands this article should be of…

  6. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    radiation. The major results of the systematic work on optical orientation, both experimental and theoretical, at the Ioffe Institute and the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris are documented in the book Optical Orientation, edited by F Meier and B P Zakharchenya in the series Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences [4], in which the foundations of optical orientation are comprehensively presented by renowned authors. This book is still the unsurpassed standard work in the field. If one asks what has become new since that publication in 1984 it is obviously the arrival of low-dimensional structures, two-dimensional heterostructures and zero-dimensional quantum dots. It has turned out that the quantum confinement can significantly modify the spin lifetime and the spin relaxation. The experimental work on spin alignment was done by a relative small number of researchers. However, the situation has substantially changed during the last decade. Research on spin-related phenomena has become very popular and the word 'spintronics' was coined. Spin research is no longer considered to be somewhat esoteric, since the replacement of silicon microelectronics based on the electron charge by spin-based electronics is being discussed. Whether these proposals can be realized remains to be seen. But one consequence has been a worldwide increase of high level basic research in spin phenomena. Another line of current research which has contributed to the popularity of spin-related research is quantum computing, based on spin-qubits. To be useful, solid state systems require long spin relaxation times and weak interaction with the environment. This is indispensable for low error rates. The difficulties in achieving these goals have been extensively discussed in the literature. Nowadays, because of the volume and diversity of spin-related work worldwide, a book on optical orientation like that edited by Meyer and Zakharchenya does not seem possible, so in this special issue of

  7. Publication and non-publication of drug trial results: a 10-year cohort of trials in Norwegian general practice

    PubMed Central

    Brænd, Anja Maria; Straand, Jørund; Jakobsen, Rune Bruhn; Klovning, Atle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previously, we identified a 10-year cohort of protocols from applications to the Norwegian Medicines Agency 1998–2007, consisting of 196 drug trials in general practice. The aim of this study was to examine whether trial results were published and whether trial funding and conflicts of interest were reported. Design Cohort study of trials with systematic searches for published results. Setting Clinical drug trials in Norwegian general practice. Methods We performed systematic literature searches of MEDLINE, Embase and CENTRAL to identify publications originating from each trial using characteristics such as test drug, comparator and patient groups as search terms. When no publication was identified, we contacted trial sponsors for information regarding trial completion and reference to any publications. Main outcome measures We determined the frequency of publication of trial results and trial characteristics associated with publication of results. Results Of the 196 trials, 5 were never started. Of the remaining 191 trials, 71% had results published in a journal, 11% had results publicly available elsewhere and 18% of trials had no results available. Publication was more common among trials with an active comparator drug (χ2 test, p=0.040), with a larger number of patients (total sample size≥median, p=0.010) and with a longer trial period (duration≥median, p=0.025). Trial funding was reported in 85% of publications and increased over time, as did reporting of conflicts of interest among authors. Among the 134 main journal articles from the trials, 60% presented statistically significant results for the investigational drug, and the conclusion of the article was favourable towards the test drug in 78% of papers. Conclusions We did not identify any journal publication of results for 29% of the general practice drug trials. Trials with an active comparator, larger and longer trials were more likely to be published. PMID:27067893

  8. [Practical results and their importance for spreading chloride emissions through heat generation and fertilizer drying].

    PubMed

    Ponsold, B

    1990-04-01

    In steam generators fired with lignite which contains less than 0.1 per cent of chloride, the concentration of chlorine compounds emitted will range from 5 to 80 mg m-3, and of chlorohydrogen from 1-75 mg m-3. When rotary (drum) filters are used for phase splitting and rotary driers for drying the moist potash fertilizers the emission rate of chlorohydrogen lies between 300 and 1,000 mg m-3. Centrifugal precipitation results in a cleangas dust load of 700-2500 mg m-3. The propagation of chlorohydrogen aerosols emitted is determined by the equilibrium balance reaction.

  9. Components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit: results from The Dental Practice- Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Qvist, Vibeke; Patel, Sagar; Foy, Pat; Williams, O. Dale; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Identify components of patient satisfaction with a dental restorative visit; and test the hypothesis that certain dentist, patient, and procedural factors are associated with patient satisfaction. Methods 197 practices in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) recruited consecutive patients with defective restorations that were replaced or repaired in permanent teeth. At the end of the treatment visit, each subject was asked to complete a satisfaction survey and mail it directly to the DPBRN Regional Coordinators. Results Analysis of 5,879 satisfaction surveys revealed three satisfaction components which were interpersonal relationship-comfort attributes; material choice-value factors; and sensory-evaluative features. Satisfaction was highest among patients who received care in a private practice model; when the restoration was repaired rather than replaced; or when the restored tooth was not a molar. Conclusion These data suggest that a patient’s judgments of dentist’s skills and quality of care are based on personal interactions with the dentist, the level of comfort, and post-treatment sensitivity. These conclusions have direct implications for patient management before, during and after the procedure. Practice implications When taking a patient-centered approach, dentists should seek to understand how patients evaluate and rate the service provided, facilitating a focus on what each patient values most. PMID:22942147

  10. [Practice report: the process-based indicator dashboard. Visualising quality assurance results in standardised processes].

    PubMed

    Petzold, Thomas; Hertzschuch, Diana; Elchlep, Frank; Eberlein-Gonska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Process management (PM) is a valuable method for the systematic analysis and structural optimisation of the quality and safety of clinical treatment. PM requires a high motivation and willingness to implement changes of both employees and management. Definition of quality indicators is required to systematically measure the quality of the specified processes. One way to represent comparable quality results is the use of quality indicators of the external quality assurance in accordance with Sect. 137 SGB V—a method which the Federal Joint Committee (GBA) and the institutions commissioned by the GBA have employed and consistently enhanced for more than ten years. Information on the quality of inpatient treatment is available for 30 defined subjects throughout Germany. The combination of specified processes with quality indicators is beneficial for the information of employees. A process-based indicator dashboard provides essential information about the treatment process. These can be used for process analysis. In a continuous consideration of these indicator results values can be determined and errors will be remedied quickly. If due consideration is given to these indicators, they can be used for benchmarking to identify potential process improvements.

  11. [Practice report: the process-based indicator dashboard. Visualising quality assurance results in standardised processes].

    PubMed

    Petzold, Thomas; Hertzschuch, Diana; Elchlep, Frank; Eberlein-Gonska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Process management (PM) is a valuable method for the systematic analysis and structural optimisation of the quality and safety of clinical treatment. PM requires a high motivation and willingness to implement changes of both employees and management. Definition of quality indicators is required to systematically measure the quality of the specified processes. One way to represent comparable quality results is the use of quality indicators of the external quality assurance in accordance with Sect. 137 SGB V—a method which the Federal Joint Committee (GBA) and the institutions commissioned by the GBA have employed and consistently enhanced for more than ten years. Information on the quality of inpatient treatment is available for 30 defined subjects throughout Germany. The combination of specified processes with quality indicators is beneficial for the information of employees. A process-based indicator dashboard provides essential information about the treatment process. These can be used for process analysis. In a continuous consideration of these indicator results values can be determined and errors will be remedied quickly. If due consideration is given to these indicators, they can be used for benchmarking to identify potential process improvements. PMID:25523849

  12. Automated antibody structure prediction using Accelrys tools: Results and best practices

    PubMed Central

    Fasnacht, Marc; Butenhof, Ken; Goupil-Lamy, Anne; Hernandez-Guzman, Francisco; Huang, Hongwei; Yan, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    We describe the methodology and results from our participation in the second Antibody Modeling Assessment experiment. During the experiment we predicted the structure of eleven unpublished antibody Fv fragments. Our prediction methods centered on template-based modeling; potential templates were selected from an antibody database based on their sequence similarity to the target in the framework regions. Depending on the quality of the templates, we constructed models of the antibody framework regions either using a single, chimeric or multiple template approach. The hypervariable loop regions in the initial models were rebuilt by grafting the corresponding regions from suitable templates onto the model. For the H3 loop region, we further refined models using ab initio methods. The final models were subjected to constrained energy minimization to resolve severe local structural problems. The analysis of the models submitted show that Accelrys tools allow for the construction of quite accurate models for the framework and the canonical CDR regions, with RMSDs to the X-ray structure on average below 1 Å for most of these regions. The results show that accurate prediction of the H3 hypervariable loops remains a challenge. Furthermore, model quality assessment of the submitted models show that the models are of quite high quality, with local geometry assessment scores similar to that of the target X-ray structures. Proteins 2014; 82:1583–1598. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24833271

  13. Therapist Ethnicity and Treatment Orientation Differences in Multicultural Counseling Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Lauren K.; Zane, Nolan; Hwang, Wei-Chin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between therapist characteristics, therapeutic orientations, person-level and agency-level practices with cultural competency among 221 Los Angeles County community mental health clinicians. Results from an online survey indicated that compared to White therapists, ethnic minority therapists were more personally involved in communities of color, more likely to use a cultural framework in clinical practice, and perceived their agencies to be more culturally sensitive. Ethnic minority therapists also reported greater multicultural (MC) awareness and better MC counseling relationships with their clients than White therapists. Personal involvement in communities of color accounted for ethnic differences in MC awareness and MC counseling relationships. Compared to therapists with a strictly non-behavioral (psychodynamic or humanistic) orientation, therapists with an eclectic (or integrative) therapy orientation reported having a higher level of community knowledge. Therapists with an eclectic orientation reported greater MC awareness than therapists with a non-behavioral orientation, while both eclectic and behavioral (cognitive behavioral or behavior modification) therapists recounted better MC counseling relationships with their clients than therapists with a non-behavioral orientation. Community knowledge mediated eclectic vs. non-behavioral therapeutic orientation differences in MC awareness. Agency resources/linkages and outreach both moderated the relationship between therapeutic orientation and MC skills. Results suggest that if therapists become more personally involved with diverse populations, they will feel more culturally aware and feel like they have a better relationship with ethnic minority clients. PMID:25580187

  14. How to ensure that national radon survey results are useful for public health practice.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sarah B; Kosatsky, Tom; Barn, Prabjit

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to radon gas increases the risk of lung cancer. Preliminary national survey data collected by Health Canada indicate that approximately 10% of households exceed the recommended federal long-term guideline of 200 Bq/m3. However, results to date have been reported for large geographic areas in broad measurement categories. Given that Health Canada recommends the most rapid remediation for buildings with the highest concentrations, such reporting makes it challenging for public health authorities to target interventions to communities at the highest risk. Here we use data from a survey in British Columbia to illustrate how improved spatial resolution and more refined concentration categories would be valuable for prioritizing the use of limited public health resources. We encourage Health Canada in future to provide more specific, community-level information that can be used to inform local policy and to engage building owners in radon testing and remediation.

  15. Adoption Potential of Conservation Agriculture Practices in Sub-Saharan Africa: Results from Five Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndah, Hycenth Tim; Schuler, Johannes; Uthes, Sandra; Zander, Peter; Traore, Karim; Gama, Mphatso-S.; Nyagumbo, Isaiah; Triomphe, Bernard; Sieber, Stefan; Corbeels, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Despite the reported benefits of conservation agriculture (CA), its wider up-scaling in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has remained fairly limited. This paper shows how a newly developed qualitative expert assessment approach for CA adoption (QAToCA) was applied to determine its adoption potential in SSA. CA adoption potential is not a predictor of observed adoption rates. Instead, our aim was to systematically check relevant factors that may be influencing its adoption. QAToCA delivers an assessment of how suitable conditions "and thus the likelihood for CA adoption" are. Results show that the high CA adoption potentials exhibited by the Malawi and Zambia case relate mostly to positive institutional factors. On the other hand, the low adoption potential of the Zimbabwe case, in spite of observed higher estimates, is attributed mainly to unstable and less secured market conditions for CA. In the case of Southern Burkina Faso, the potential for CA adoption is determined to be high, and this assessment deviates from lower observed figures. This is attributed mainly to strong competition of CA and livestock for residues in this region. Lastly, the high adoption potential found in Northern Burkina Faso is explained mainly by the fact that farmers here have no alternative other than to adopt the locally adapted CA system—Zaï farming. Results of this assessment should help promoters of CA in the given regions to reflect on their activities and to eventually adjust or redesign them based on a more explicit understanding of where problems and opportunities are found.

  16. Adoption potential of conservation agriculture practices in sub-Saharan Africa: results from five case studies.

    PubMed

    Ndah, Hycenth Tim; Schuler, Johannes; Uthes, Sandra; Zander, Peter; Traore, Karim; Gama, Mphatso-S; Nyagumbo, Isaiah; Triomphe, Bernard; Sieber, Stefan; Corbeels, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Despite the reported benefits of conservation agriculture (CA), its wider up-scaling in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has remained fairly limited. This paper shows how a newly developed qualitative expert assessment approach for CA adoption (QAToCA) was applied to determine its adoption potential in SSA. CA adoption potential is not a predictor of observed adoption rates. Instead, our aim was to systematically check relevant factors that may be influencing its adoption. QAToCA delivers an assessment of how suitable conditions "and thus the likelihood for CA adoption" are. Results show that the high CA adoption potentials exhibited by the Malawi and Zambia case relate mostly to positive institutional factors. On the other hand, the low adoption potential of the Zimbabwe case, in spite of observed higher estimates, is attributed mainly to unstable and less secured market conditions for CA. In the case of Southern Burkina Faso, the potential for CA adoption is determined to be high, and this assessment deviates from lower observed figures. This is attributed mainly to strong competition of CA and livestock for residues in this region. Lastly, the high adoption potential found in Northern Burkina Faso is explained mainly by the fact that farmers here have no alternative other than to adopt the locally adapted CA system-Zaï farming. Results of this assessment should help promoters of CA in the given regions to reflect on their activities and to eventually adjust or redesign them based on a more explicit understanding of where problems and opportunities are found.

  17. Consumer home refrigeration practices: results of a web-based survey.

    PubMed

    Kosa, Katherine M; Cates, Sheryl C; Karns, Shawn; Godwin, Sandria L; Chambers, Delores

    2007-07-01

    To reduce bacterial growth and to ensure the quality and safety of food products, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration advise consumers to clean their refrigerators regularly, use a refrigerator thermometer, and keep refrigerator temperatures at 40 degrees F (4.4 degrees C) or below. We conducted a nationally representative Web-enabled survey (n = 2,060) to collect data on refrigerator thermometer ownership, home refrigerator temperatures, and the frequency of home refrigerator cleaning. We stratified the sample to provide results for pregnant women, older adults (60 years or older), and the remaining population. About half of all respondents had cleaned their refrigerators at least 1 month before the survey. Only 11% of all respondents had a thermometer in their refrigerator before the survey. Older adults (77.5%) were more likely than the remaining population (70.4%) to have their refrigerators at the recommended temperature (P < 0.01). Older adults who were not married and who lived alone were less likely to have refrigerator thermometers and to have their refrigerators at a recommended temperature (P < 0.05). For all respondents, those who had previously owned a refrigerator thermometer were more likely to have their refrigerators at the recommended temperature than were respondents who did not previously own a thermometer (P < 0.01). Food safety educators can use the survey findings and results of previous research to target educational materials and help consumers, especially those at risk for listeriosis, to safely store refrigerated foods at home.

  18. Series: The research agenda for general practice/family medicine and primary health care in Europe. Part 4. Results: specific problem solving skills.

    PubMed

    Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Beyer, Martin; Chevallier, Patrick; Eilat-Tsanani, Sophia; Lionis, Christos; Peremans, Lieve; Petek, Davorina; Rurik, Imre; Soler, Jean Karl; Stoffers, Henri Ejh; Topsever, Pinar; Ungan, Mehmet; van Royen, Paul

    2010-09-01

    The 'Research Agenda for General Practice/Family Medicine and Primary Health Care in Europe' summarizes the evidence relating to the core competencies and characteristics of the Wonca Europe definition of GP/FM, and its implications for general practitioners/family doctors, researchers and policy makers. The European Journal of General Practice publishes a series of articles based on this document. The previous articles presented background, objectives, and methodology, as well results on 'primary care management' and 'community orientation' and the person-related core competencies of GP/FM. This article reflects on the general practitioner's 'specific problem solving skills'. These include decision making on diagnosis and therapy of specific diseases, accounting for the properties of primary care, but also research questions related to quality management and resource use, shared decision making, or professional education and development. Clinical research covers most specific diseases, but often lacks pragmatism and primary care relevance. Quality management is a stronghold of GP/FM research. Educational interventions can be effective when well designed for a specific setting and situation. However, their message that 'usual care' by general practitioners is insufficient may be problematic. GP and their patients need more research into diagnostic reasoning with a step-wise approach to increase predictive values in a setting characterized by uncertainty and low prevalence of specific diseases. Pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies of new and established drugs or non-pharmaceutical therapy are needed. Multi-morbidity and complexity should be addressed. Studies on therapy, communication strategies and educational interventions should consider impact on health and sustainability of effects.

  19. Nuclear quality assurance operating philosophy: A quality-oriented approach

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, W.R. ); Geiger, J.E. ); Heibel, R.E. ); Cotton, J.B. ); Sabol, A.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Quality assurance programs have been part of the nuclear utility management process since the publication of the draft of 10CFR50 Appendix B in the late 1960s. The unwritten operational philosophy of nuclear quality assurance organizations focused on compliance with federal regulations. Adverse experiences, including operational events and extended shutdowns, prompted the gradual adoption of isolated practices extending beyond compliance orientation. These practices have an orientation that accommodates a definition of quality, a perspective of the role of nuclear quality assurance organizations in the overall concept of defense-in-depth, a definition of the segments of the nuclear quality assurance mission, and recent advances in the understanding of self-assessment. Observation of these practices at various nuclear utilities resulted in a syntheses of practices and approaches into a coherent quality-oriented nuclear quality assurance operating philosophy that is not totally adopted at any one utility.

  20. Current practices in mycobacteriology: results of a survey of state public health laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Huebner, R E; Good, R C; Tokars, J I

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-six state and territorial public health laboratories were surveyed to determine whether currently available rapid methods for the identification and drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were being performed. Forty (71%) laboratories use fluorochrome rather than conventional basic fuchsin stains for screening clinical specimens for acid-fast bacilli. Of the 55 laboratories that routinely culture for mycobacteria, 16 (29%) use the more rapid radiometric methods. Species identification of isolates is done by biochemical tests in 13 (23%) laboratories; 40 (72%) use nucleic acid probes, high-performance liquid chromatography, or the BACTEC p-nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone (NAP) test (rapid tests); 3 laboratories do not perform species identification. Drug susceptibility testing is performed with solid media by 36 of 45 (80%) laboratories, while the more rapid radiometric methods are used by 9 (20%) laboratories. Compared with the laboratories that use conventional methods, laboratories that use rapid methods report results more quickly: for species identification, 43 days (conventional) versus 22 days (rapid); for drug susceptibility testing, 44 days (conventional) versus 31 days (rapid) from specimen processing. Rapid technologies for microscopy and species identification are being used by many, but not all, state and territorial public health laboratories; however, most laboratories do not use the more rapid radiometric methods for routine culture or drug susceptibility testing of mycobacteria. Implementation of such rapid technologies can shorten turnaround times for the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis and recognition of drug resistance. PMID:8463385

  1. Survey results of the training, nutrition, and mental preparation of triathletes: practical implications of findings.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Shawn H; Houston, Melinda; Martin, Scott B

    2011-07-01

    Although triathlon is growing in popularity at a remarkable rate, it has not been extensively studied. The aims of this research were to identify preparation strategies used by triathletes and to categorize these strategies according to gender and consultation with triathlon coaches. Survey data collected from 401 triathletes (207 males, 194 females) revealed training, nutritional, and mental preparation habits. Most participants engaged in strength training, consumed food and/or fluids during and after training, set training and competition goals, and applied mental preparation strategies during training and the hour before racing. Water was the most commonly consumed fluid; positive self-talk was the most used mental strategy. Participants were more likely to consult with a triathlon coach than a nutrition or sport psychology professional. Athletes with more years of experience in triathlon and those competing in longer distances were more likely to consult a triathlon coach. Female triathletes were more likely than male triathletes to train with others, use mental preparation strategies, and report feeling anxious before competitions. More male triathletes reported using nutritional supplements during training than their female counterparts. These findings add to the limited research base on triathletes' training habits, and hopefully will help guide practitioners who work with this group. The results provide guidance for collaborative efforts among training, nutrition, and mental health professionals to best support triathletes.

  2. Moving formal methods into practice. Verifying the FTPP Scoreboard: Results, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivas, Mandayam; Bickford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the Phase 1 results of an effort aimed at formally verifying a key hardware component, called Scoreboard, of a Fault-Tolerant Parallel Processor (FTPP) being built at Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (CSDL). The Scoreboard is part of the FTPP virtual bus that guarantees reliable communication between processors in the presence of Byzantine faults in the system. The Scoreboard implements a piece of control logic that approves and validates a message before it can be transmitted. The goal of Phase 1 was to lay the foundation of the Scoreboard verification. A formal specification of the functional requirements and a high-level hardware design for the Scoreboard were developed. The hardware design was based on a preliminary Scoreboard design developed at CSDL. A main correctness theorem, from which the functional requirements can be established as corollaries, was proved for the Scoreboard design. The goal of Phase 2 is to verify the final detailed design of Scoreboard. This task is being conducted as part of a NASA-sponsored effort to explore integration of formal methods in the development cycle of current fault-tolerant architectures being built in the aerospace industry.

  3. Decadal changes in aerosol absorption across Brazil resulting from changes in biomass burning practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, H.; Morgan, W.; Darbyshire, E.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Liu, D.; Langridge, J.; Johnson, B. T.; Haywood, J. M.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Highwood, E.; Mollard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Open biomass burning makes a substantial contribution to the global budget of black carbon, yet models significantly underestimate absorption aerosol optical depth compared to observations by approximately a factor of two over South America. These large differences need to be addressed. Recent work has shown that the number of deforestation fires has decreased across Amazonia over the last decade, giving rise to a decrease in the abundance of biomass burning aerosol across the region. At the same time there has been an increase in the frequency of agricultural burning across regions that have previously been deforested, as well as increased burning in the east of Brazil in the Cerrado regions. We sampled both of these types of open burning extensively during a recent aircraft experiment. Significant concentrations of organic carbon as well as black carbon were observed, with this ratio providing the main control on the single scattering albedo (SSA).Deforestation fires and wild forest fires are prevalent across the south west of the Amazon Basin, where smouldering burning dominates. In the east of Brazil, agricultural burning proceeds via a much more efficient form of combustion and as a result, black carbon is a much larger fraction of the aerosol mass and SSAs are much lower than in the west. We have analysed MISR data across the region to show that whilst aerosol optical depths have decreased during the dry season over the last decade, with greater rates of reduction occurring over the south western margins of Amazonia, absorption aerosol optical depths have significantly increased over the Cerrado and remained constant over south western Amazonia. This has led to a decline in SSA across the whole of the region with greater reductions occurring over the eastern states. This finding is consistent with our aircraft measurements. We will discuss the implications of these changes for air quality and climate across the region.

  4. Methadone and Buprenorphine Prescribing and Referral Practices in US Prison Systems: Results from a Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy; Zaller, Nickolas; Dickman, Samuel; Trimbur, Catherine; Nijhawan, Ank; Rich, Josiah D.

    2009-01-01

    Background More than 50% of incarcerated individuals have a history of substance use, and over 200,000 individuals with heroin addiction pass through American correctional facilities annually. Opiate replacement therapy (ORT) with methadone or buprenorphine is an effective treatment for opiate dependence and can reduce drug-related disease and recidivism for inmates. Provision of ORT is nevertheless a frequently neglected intervention in the correctional setting. Objective and Methods We surveyed the 50 state; Washington, District of Columbia (DC); and Federal Department of Corrections' medical directors or their equivalents about their facilities' ORT prescribing policies and referral programs for inmates leaving prison. Results We received responses from 51 of 52 prison systems nationwide. Twenty-eight prison systems (55%) offer methadone to inmates in some situations. Methadone use varies widely across states: over 50% of correctional facilities that offer methadone do so exclusively for pregnant women or for chronic pain management. Seven states' prison systems (14%) offer buprenorphine to some inmates. The most common reason cited for not offering ORT was that facilities “prefer drug-free detoxification over providing methadone or buprenorphine.” Twenty-three states' prison systems (45%) provide referrals for some inmates to methadone maintenance programs after release, which increased from 8% in 2003; 15 states' prison systems (29%) provide some referrals to community buprenorphine providers. Conclusion Despite demonstrated social, medical, and economic benefits of providing ORT to inmates during incarceration and linkage to ORT upon release, many prison systems nationwide still do not offer pharmacological treatment for opiate addiction or referrals for ORT upon release. PMID:19625142

  5. The Vocationally-Oriented Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Douglas H.

    The development of American vocational education has evolved to a well-defined program of a practical orientation that has led the vocationally oriented students to define his goal so narrowly that no room is left for reading skills needed in coping with the burgeoning changes and innovations of modern business and industry. The first goal of…

  6. Strong growth orientation dependence of strain relaxation in epitaxial (Ba,Sr)TiO{sub 3} films and the resulting dielectric properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomoaki; Kamo, Takafumi; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Su Dong; Iijima, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    The growth orientation dependence of strain relaxation and the dielectric properties were investigated for (001)- and (111)-epitaxial (Ba,Sr)TiO{sub 3} films. The films were deposited on SrRuO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates using rf magnetron sputtering. The residual strain was found to be remarkably different between the two orientations, although these lattice mismatches are identical; the strain relaxation of the (001)-epitaxial films is significantly slower than that of the (111)-epitaxial films and is promoted only when the growth rate is very low ({<=}5 nm/h). The observed orientation dependence is discussed with the surface energy for both growth orientations, which influences the growth mode of the films. Due to the large contrast of the strain in the (001)- and (111)-epitaxial films, the paraelectric to ferroelectric phase transition temperature of the (001)-epitaxial films is much higher than that of unstrained bulks, while the (111)-epitaxial films show a phase transition temperature corresponding to that of unstrained bulks regardless of the growth rates.

  7. Support of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Content in Social Work Education: Results from National Surveys of U.S. and Anglophone Canadian Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I.; Woodford, Michael R.; Luke, Katherine P.; Gutierrez, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    This article presents findings from the first national surveys of United States and English- speaking Canadian MSW social work faculty examining their support of curriculum content on sexual orientation and gender identity. Faculty in either country are generally supportive of including LGBT content but report significantly more support for…

  8. A review of the practices and results of the UTMB to South Pole teledermatology program over the past six years.

    PubMed

    Sun, Angel; Lanier, Russell; Diven, Dayna

    2010-01-01

    There is no place on earth more remote and inaccessible than Antarctica. In 2002, Raytheon Polar Services Co. (RPS) awarded The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston the contract to provide specialty medical services via telemedicine to the approximately 3,500 National Science Foundation (NSF) researchers and support personnel who rotate through Antarctica in a given year. We present the practices and results of the UTMB to the South Pole teledermatology program over the past six years, from 2003 to 2008. Issues encountered include logistics of sending out biopsies for pathologic diagnosis, limited bandwidth, and satellite availability for data transmission. The UTMB to the South Pole teledermatology program demonstrates the clinical practicality of telemedicine in providing dermatologic care to remote populations in extreme climate conditions. PMID:20137758

  9. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    radiation. The major results of the systematic work on optical orientation, both experimental and

  10. Competitive binding of mg(2+), ca(2+), na(+), and K(+) ions to DNA in oriented DNA fibers: experimental and monte carlo simulation results

    PubMed Central

    Korolev, N; Lyubartsev, AP; Rupprecht, A; Nordenskiold, L

    1999-01-01

    Competitive binding of the most common cations of the cytoplasm (K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) with DNA was studied by equilibrating oriented DNA fibers with ethanol/water solutions (65 and 52% v/v EtOH) containing different combinations and concentrations of the counterions. The affinity of DNA for the cations decreases in the order Ca > Mg >> Na approximately K. The degree of Ca(2+) and/or Mg(2+) binding to DNA displays maximum changes just at physiological concentrations of salts (60-200 mM) and does not depend significantly on the ethanol concentration or on the kind of univalent cation (Na(+) or K(+)). Ca(2+) is more tightly bound to DNA and is replaced by the monovalent cations to a lesser extent than is Mg(2+). Similarly, Ca(2+) is a better competitor for binding to DNA than Mg(2+): the ion exchange equilibrium constant for a 1:1 mixture of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions, K(c)(Ca)(Mg), changes from K(c)(Ca)(Mg) approximately 2 in 65% EtOH (in 3-30 mM NaCl and/or KCl) to K(c)(Ca)(Mg) approximately 1.2-1.4 in 52% EtOH (in 300 mM NaCl and/or KCl). DNA does not exhibit selectivity for Na(+) or K(+) in ethanol/water solutions either in the absence or in the presence of Ca(2+) and/or Mg(2+). The ion exchange experimental data are compared with results of grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of systems of parallel and hexagonally ordered, uniformly and discretely charged polyions with the density and spatial distribution of the charged groups modeling B DNA. A quantitative agreement with experimental data on divalent-monovalent competition has been obtained for discretely charged models of the DNA polyion (for the uniformly charged cylinder model, coincidence with experiment is qualitative). The GCMC method gives also a qualitative description of experimental results for DNA binding competitions of counterions of the same charge (Ca(2+) with Mg(2+) or K(+) with Na(+)). PMID:10545373

  11. Closing the Gap between Beliefs and Practice: Change of Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Orientations during a PCK-Based NOS Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirdögen, Betül; Uzuntiryaki-Kondakçi, Esen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to investigate how pre-service chemistry teachers' science teaching orientations change during a two-semester intervention designed to enhance their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) for teaching the nature of science (NOS). Moreover, the way that pre-service chemistry teachers translated their change in…

  12. Maximizing Student Potential versus Building Community: An Exploration of Right-Wing Authoritarianism, Social Dominance Orientation, and Preferred Practice among Supporters of Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Jennifer Riedl; Cross, Tracy L.; Finch, Holmes

    2010-01-01

    Social dominance orientation (SDO), right-wing authoritarianism (RWA), and socially desirable responding were examined among a sample of self-identified supporters of gifted education (N = 341), 70% of whom had an official role in gifted education as researchers, teachers, or gifted-talented (G/T) trainers. The sample was primarily female, White,…

  13. Equity-Oriented Reform amid Standards-Based Accountability: A Qualitative Comparative Analysis of an Intermediary's Instructional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Tina M.; Woulfin, Sarah L.

    2014-01-01

    Intermediary organizations increasingly provide support for schools serving marginalized students. Some attribute this trend to growing ideological support for market-based strategies to further the public good. This article investigates one intermediary that marketed equity-oriented instructional goals for schools serving high numbers of students…

  14. An Examination of Growing Trends in Land Tenure and Conservation Practice Adoption: Results from a Farmer Survey in Iowa.

    PubMed

    Varble, Sarah; Secchi, Silvia; Druschke, Caroline Gottschalk

    2016-02-01

    Tenants and part-owners are farming an increasing number of acres in the United States, while full-owners are farming fewer acres. This shift in ownership is a potential cause for concern because some previous research indicated that tenant and part-owner farmers were less likely to adopt conservation practices than farmers who owned the land they farmed. If that trend persists, ownership changes would signal a national drop in conservation adoption. Here we examine this issue using a survey of agricultural operators in the Clear Creek watershed in Iowa, a state with intensive agricultural production. We compare adoption of conservation practices, and preferences for conservation information sources and communication channels, between farmers who rent some portion of the land they farm (tenants and part-owners) and farmers who own all of the land they farm (full-owners). We find that renters are more likely to practice conservation tillage than full-owners, though they are less likely to rotate crops. In addition, renters report using federal government employees (specifically, Natural Resource Conservation Service and Farm Service Agency) as their primary sources of conservation information, while full-owners most frequently rely on neighbors, friends, and County Extension. These findings are significant for conservation policy because, unlike some past research, they indicate that renters are not resistant to all types of conservation practices, echoing recent studies finding an increase in conservation adoption among non-full-owners. Our results emphasize the importance of government conservation communication and can inform outreach efforts by helping tailor effective, targeted conservation strategies for owners and renters.

  15. Practice patterns of naturopathic physicians: results from a random survey of licensed practitioners in two US States

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Heather S; Cherkin, Daniel C; Erro, Janet; Sherman, Karen J; Milliman, Bruce; Booker, Jennifer; Cramer, Elaine H; Smith, Michael J; Deyo, Richard A; Eisenberg, David M

    2004-01-01

    Background Despite the growing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by consumers in the U.S., little is known about the practice of CAM providers. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the practice patterns of naturopathic physicians in Washington State and Connecticut. Methods Telephone interviews were conducted with state-wide random samples of licensed naturopathic physicians and data were collected on consecutive patient visits in 1998 and 1999. The main outcome measures were: Sociodemographic, training and practice characteristics of naturopathic physicians; and demographics, reasons for visit, types of treatments, payment source and visit duration for patients. Result One hundred and seventy practitioners were interviewed and 99 recorded data on a total of 1817 patient visits. Naturopathic physicians in Washington and Connecticut had similar demographic and practice characteristics. Both the practitioners and their patients were primarily White and female. Almost 75% of all naturopathic visits were for chronic complaints, most frequently fatigue, headache, and back symptoms. Complete blood counts, serum chemistries, lipids panels and stool analyses were ordered for 4% to 10% of visits. All other diagnostic tests were ordered less frequently. The most commonly prescribed naturopathic therapeutics were: botanical medicines (51% of visits in Connecticut, 43% in Washington), vitamins (41% and 43%), minerals (35% and 39%), homeopathy (29% and 19%) and allergy treatments (11% and 13%). The mean visit length was about 40 minutes. Approximately half the visits were paid directly by the patient. Conclusion This study provides information that will help other health care providers, patients and policy makers better understand the nature of naturopathic care. PMID:15496231

  16. Measuring the economic value of alternative clam fishing management practices in the Venice Lagoon: results from a conjoint valuation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Paulo A. L. D.; Rossetto, Luca; de Blaeij, Arianne

    2004-11-01

    This article focuses on the economic valuation of alternative clam management practices in the Venice Lagoon. The proposed valuation method is characterized by the design of a survey questionnaire applied to the fishermen population. In each questionnaire, two fishing alternatives are described. The respondent is asked to choose one of them. This valuation method, referred in the article as conjoint valuation, gives sufficient flexibility to set, alter, and combine the valuation of different clam management practices. Furthermore, this approach presents an important advantage to the well-known contingent valuation method since it makes the monetary valuation of each management attribute possible. Estimation results show that all three attributes used in the questionnaire to describe and value different clam management practices—price of the annual permit and fishing technological system—are statistically robust, indicating that fishermen bear a utility change whenever these attributes change. In particular, fishermen's willingness to pay for a larger clam fishing area ranges between 568 and 811 € per year. In addition, an individual's willingness to pay for a fishing practice exclusively based on the vibrant rake system ranges between 1005 and 2456 €. Finally, the adoption of a clam fish management practice in the Venice Lagoon that is exclusively based on the use of manual rakes, which is associated with the lowest damage to the lagoon ecosystem, will represent a welfare loss of 5904 € per fisherman per year. Combining such a value estimate with the total number of fishermen currently operating in the Lagoon of Venice, the welfare loss associated with the adoption of this type of clam management policy amounts to 11.8 € million per year. This figure can be regarded as an upper bound to the cost of implementation of a clam fishing system anchored in the use of manual, ecosystem friendly rakes.

  17. An Examination of Growing Trends in Land Tenure and Conservation Practice Adoption: Results from a Farmer Survey in Iowa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varble, Sarah; Secchi, Silvia; Druschke, Caroline Gottschalk

    2016-02-01

    Tenants and part-owners are farming an increasing number of acres in the United States, while full-owners are farming fewer acres. This shift in ownership is a potential cause for concern because some previous research indicated that tenant and part-owner farmers were less likely to adopt conservation practices than farmers who owned the land they farmed. If that trend persists, ownership changes would signal a national drop in conservation adoption. Here we examine this issue using a survey of agricultural operators in the Clear Creek watershed in Iowa, a state with intensive agricultural production. We compare adoption of conservation practices, and preferences for conservation information sources and communication channels, between farmers who rent some portion of the land they farm (tenants and part-owners) and farmers who own all of the land they farm (full-owners). We find that renters are more likely to practice conservation tillage than full-owners, though they are less likely to rotate crops. In addition, renters report using federal government employees (specifically, Natural Resource Conservation Service and Farm Service Agency) as their primary sources of conservation information, while full-owners most frequently rely on neighbors, friends, and County Extension. These findings are significant for conservation policy because, unlike some past research, they indicate that renters are not resistant to all types of conservation practices, echoing recent studies finding an increase in conservation adoption among non-full-owners. Our results emphasize the importance of government conservation communication and can inform outreach efforts by helping tailor effective, targeted conservation strategies for owners and renters.

  18. A multidimensional measure of sexual orientation, use of psychoactive substances, and depression: results of a national survey on sexual behavior in france.

    PubMed

    Lhomond, Brigitte; Saurel-Cubizolles, Marie-Josèphe; Michaels, Stuart

    2014-04-01

    Using data from a large national representative survey on sexual behavior in France (Contexte de la Sexualité en France), this study analyzed the relationship between a multidimensional measure of sexual orientation and psychoactive substance use and depression. The survey was conducted in 2006 by telephone with a random sample of the continental French speaking population between the ages of 18 and 69 years. The sample used for this analysis consisted of the 4,400 men and 5,472 women who were sexually active. A sexual orientation measure was constructed by combining information on three dimensions of sexual orientation: attraction, sexual behavior, and self-definition. Five mutually exclusive groups were defined for men and women: those with only heterosexual behavior were divided in two groups whether or not they declared any same-sex attraction; those with any same-sex partners were divided into three categories derived from their self-definition (heterosexual, bisexual or homosexual). The consumption of alcohol and cannabis, which was higher in the non-exclusively heterosexual groups, was more closely associated with homosexual self-identification for women than for men. Self-defined bisexuals (both male and female) followed by gay men and lesbians had the highest risk of chronic or recent depression. Self-defined heterosexuals who had same-sex partners or attraction had levels of risk between exclusive heterosexuals and self-identified homosexuals and bisexuals. The use of a multidimensional measure of sexual orientation demonstrated variation in substance use and mental health between non-heterosexual subgroups defined in terms of behavior, attraction, and identity.

  19. A multidimensional measure of sexual orientation, use of psychoactive substances, and depression: results of a national survey on sexual behavior in france.

    PubMed

    Lhomond, Brigitte; Saurel-Cubizolles, Marie-Josèphe; Michaels, Stuart

    2014-04-01

    Using data from a large national representative survey on sexual behavior in France (Contexte de la Sexualité en France), this study analyzed the relationship between a multidimensional measure of sexual orientation and psychoactive substance use and depression. The survey was conducted in 2006 by telephone with a random sample of the continental French speaking population between the ages of 18 and 69 years. The sample used for this analysis consisted of the 4,400 men and 5,472 women who were sexually active. A sexual orientation measure was constructed by combining information on three dimensions of sexual orientation: attraction, sexual behavior, and self-definition. Five mutually exclusive groups were defined for men and women: those with only heterosexual behavior were divided in two groups whether or not they declared any same-sex attraction; those with any same-sex partners were divided into three categories derived from their self-definition (heterosexual, bisexual or homosexual). The consumption of alcohol and cannabis, which was higher in the non-exclusively heterosexual groups, was more closely associated with homosexual self-identification for women than for men. Self-defined bisexuals (both male and female) followed by gay men and lesbians had the highest risk of chronic or recent depression. Self-defined heterosexuals who had same-sex partners or attraction had levels of risk between exclusive heterosexuals and self-identified homosexuals and bisexuals. The use of a multidimensional measure of sexual orientation demonstrated variation in substance use and mental health between non-heterosexual subgroups defined in terms of behavior, attraction, and identity. PMID:23743831

  20. Nonerotic dual relationships between therapists and clients: the effects of sex, theoretical orientation, and interpersonal boundaries.

    PubMed

    Baer, Barbara E; Murdock, Nancy L

    1995-01-01

    We surveyed 223 APA members to investigate the roles of therapists' sex, theoretical orientation, interpersonal boundaries, and clients' sex in predicting therapists' assessments of the ethicality of nonerotic dual relationships with their clients. Results indicated that therapists' sex, interpersonal boundaries, and theoretical orientation influenced ethical judgments of these relationships. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings are discussed. PMID:11654197

  1. A case study in technology utilization: Industrial products and practices. [summary of benefits to national economy resulting from space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    In pursuit of such missions as Apollo, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has called into being unique equipment that obviously has little direct application beyond the achievement of mission objectives. Yet, to assume that further direct application of space program hardware is somehow a measure of the industrial benefits accruing to the nation is to misunderstand how the creation of new technology affects modern industrial capability. This document presents a profile of the significant ways in which technological developments in response to aerospace mission requirements have been coupled into industrial practice, with the result being that improved products and processes are now being utilized to benefit the nation.

  2. What does standard rehabilitation practice after total hip replacement in the UK entail? results of a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is evidence of prolonged poor function in patients following total hip replacement (THR). Studies of progressive resistance training (PRT) interventions to improve function are often compared to ‘standard’ practice which is not well defined. This study aimed to investigate ‘standard’ rehabilitation care in the UK after total hip replacement (THR) as well as determine whether PRT was part of ‘standard’ care. Methods After ethical approval, questionnaire item development about rehabilitation practice was guided by a focus group interview (after informed consent) with physiotherapists (n = 4; >5 years post-qualification) who regularly treated THR patients. An online questionnaire investigating the exercises prescribed and rehabilitation practice following THR was developed and sent to physiotherapists working in hospitals in the UK. The survey was performed from January to May 2011. The survey results were analysed (frequency (%) of responses) focusing on the exercises the physiotherapists considered important, as well as their use of PRT in prescribed regimes. Results 106 responses were obtained from physiotherapists in the UK. The survey respondents considered that the most important muscles to target in all phases of rehabilitation were the hip abductors (62.2%), followed by the quadriceps (16.9%), and other muscles (21%). Exercise type prescribed revealed no consensus, with weight bearing (42%), functional (45%) and Bed-based/Bridging/Postural exercises (13%) favoured. 83.7% were able to define the basis of progressive resistance training (PRT), but only 33% prescribed it. Conclusions Standard physiotherapy rehabilitation in the UK after THR is variable, and appears to rarely include PRT. This may be a factor in prolonged poor function in some patients after this common operation. PMID:23496875

  3. Insight into error hiding: exploration of nursing students' achievement goal orientations.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Karee E

    2014-02-01

    An estimated 50% of medication errors go unreported, and error hiding is costly to hospitals and patients. This study explored one issue that may facilitate error hiding. Descriptive statistics were used to examine nursing students' achievement goal orientations in a high-fidelity simulation course. Results indicated that although this sample of nursing students held high mastery goal orientations, they also held moderate levels of performance-approach and performance-avoidance goal orientations. These goal orientations indicate that this sample is at high risk for error hiding, which places the benefits that are typically gleaned from a strong mastery orientation at risk. Understanding variables, such as goal orientation, that can be addressed in nursing education to reduce error hiding is an area of research that needs to be further explored. This article discusses the study results and evidence-based instructional practices for this sample's achievement goal orientation profile. PMID:24444007

  4. Archaeoastronomy and the orientation of old churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangui, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cultural astronomy is an interdisciplinary area of research that studies how perceptions and concepts related to the sky are part of the worldview of a culture. One of its branches, archaeoastronomy, focuses on the material remains of past peoples and tries to investigate their practices and astronomical knowledge. In this context, the orientation of Christian churches is now considered a distinctive feature of their architecture that repeats patterns from early Christian times. There is a general tendency to align their altars in the solar range, with preference for orientations towards the east. Here we present recent data from our measurements of astronomical orientations of old churches located in two --geographically and culturally-- very distant regions, and we discuss the results in the light of the historical and cultural knowledge surrounding these temples.

  5. Chiropractic care for patients with acute neck pain: results of a pragmatic practice-based feasibility study☆

    PubMed Central

    Haneline, Michael T.; Cooperstein, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of a chiropractic practice-based research network to investigate the treatment of acute neck pain (ANP) and to report resulting findings. Methods Participating chiropractors recruited sequentially presenting ANP patients on their initial visit to the office. Patients were treated by the chiropractors using their usual methods. Data were prospectively collected by having patients complete the Neck Disability Index, Characteristic Pain Intensity score, and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Questionnaires were completed during routine office visits at baseline and then at weeks 1, 2, 4, 8, and 26, either in the office or by mail. Results Ten chiropractors supplied data on 99 patients. The number of cases contributed by each of the participating chiropractors ranged from 1 to 54, with a mean (SD) of 9.2 (10.5). Mean (SD) Neck Disability Index scores were 36 (17.9) at baseline and 9.8 (12.2) at the final evaluation; the Characteristic Pain Intensity scores were initially 55.3 (20.4) and were 24.5 (21.5) at the final evaluation. Transient minimal adverse effects were reported by chiropractors for only 7 (7.8%) patients. No serious adverse reactions were reported. Conclusion The practice-based research methodology used in this study appears to be a feasible way to investigate chiropractic care for ANP, and its methodologies could be used to plan future research. PMID:19948305

  6. Sex and sexual orientation disparities in adverse childhood experiences and early age at sexual debut in the United States: results from a nationally representative sample.

    PubMed

    Brown, Monique J; Masho, Saba W; Perera, Robert A; Mezuk, Briana; Cohen, Steven A

    2015-08-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked to early sexual debut, which has been found to be associated with multiple adverse health outcomes. Sexual minorities and men tend to have earlier sexual debut compared to heterosexual populations and women, respectively. However, studies examining the association between ACEs and early sexual debut among men and sexual minorities are lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the sex and sexual orientation disparities in the association between ACEs and age at sexual debut. Data were obtained from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Logistic and linear regression models were used to obtain crude and adjusted estimates and 95% confidence intervals adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, income, education, insurance and marital status for the association between ACEs (neglect, physical/psychological abuse, sexual abuse, parental violence, and parental incarceration and psychopathology) and early sexual debut. Analyses were stratified by sex and sexual orientation. Larger effect estimates depicting the association between ACEs and sexual debut were seen for women compared to men, and among sexual minorities, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM) and women who have sex with women (WSW), compared to heterosexuals. Sexual health education programs with a focus on delaying sexual debut among children and adolescents should also consider addressing ACEs, such as neglect, physical, psychological and sexual abuse, witnessing parental violence, and parental incarceration and psychopathology. Public health practitioners, researchers and sexual health education curriculum coordinators should consider these differences by sex and sexual orientation when designing these programs.

  7. Sex and sexual orientation disparities in adverse childhood experiences and early age at sexual debut in the United States: Results from a nationally representative sample☆

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Monique J.; Masho, Saba W.; Perera, Robert A.; Mezuk, Briana; Cohen, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked to early sexual debut, which has been found to be associated with multiple adverse health outcomes. Sexual minorities and men tend to have earlier sexual debut compared to heterosexual populations and women, respectively. However, studies examining the association between ACEs and early sexual debut among men and sexual minorities are lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the sex and sexual orientation disparities in the association between ACEs and age at sexual debut. Data were obtained from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Logistic and linear regression model were used to obtain crude and adjusted estimates and 95% confidence intervals adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, income, education, insurance and marital status for the association between ACEs (neglect, physical/psychological abuse, sexual abuse, parental violence, and parental incarceration and psychopathology) and early sexual debut. Analyses were stratified by sex and sexual orientation. Larger effect estimates depicting the association between ACEs and sexual debut were seen for women compared to men, and among sexual minorities, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM) and women who have sex with women (WSW), compared to heterosexuals. Sexual health education programs with a focus on delaying sexual debut among children and adolescents should also consider addressing ACEs, such as neglect, physical, psychological and sexual abuse, witnessing parental violence, and parental incarceration and psychopathology. Public health practitioners, researchers and sexual health education curriculum coordinators should consider these differences by sex and sexual orientation when designing these programs. PMID:25804435

  8. Saving genetic resources of native pigs in Occidental and Oriental countries - practical examples of the characterization and utilization of native pigs in Hungary and Laos.

    PubMed

    Rátky, Jozsef; Egerszegi, Istvan; Toth, Peter; Keonuchan, Soukanh; Nagai, Takashi; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Manabe, Noboru; Brüssow, Klaus-Peter

    2013-10-01

    Worldwide, only a few "fatty" pig breeds exist with different and/or regional utilization. Using the Hungarian Mangalica, which almost went extinct in Europe and the Lao Moo Lat pig, which still has a large population in South-East Asia as exemples, we wanted to demonstrate that indigenous (fatty) pig breeds may represent both national value and tremendous economic potential. Since these less prolific and less productive breeds cannot contribute to mass production, new market roles and methods should be established for them in the premium segment of pork trading. Thus their preservation and propagation needs the comprehensive collaboration of commercial, governmental actors and researchers. Briefly summarizing the history, we report the current results of reproductive physiology research. The commercial renaissance of Mangalica pigs is indebted to the enthusiastic efforts of basic scientists, pig breeding experts and dedicated Mangalica producers. Scientific achievements were applied to practical breeding and production of delicious pork and processed products, which ultimately made the economic success in the Mangalica sector possible. Both, research on and utilization of endangered (pig) breeds maintain not only breed diversities, but also may improve the livelihood of farmers worldwide.

  9. Practices to "Avoid" in Out-of-School Time Programs. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2010-03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin Anderson; Collins, Ashleigh; Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps one of the fastest ways to improve the quality of out-of-school time programs would be to replace practices that individuals know do not work with practices that appear to be more effective. In this brief, the authors highlight lessons from an expanding body of knowledge about specific program practices that should be avoided or minimized…

  10. Knowledge, Beliefs and Practices Regarding Antiretroviral Medications for HIV Prevention: Results from a Survey of Healthcare Providers in New England

    PubMed Central

    Krakower, Douglas S.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Mitty, Jennifer A.; Wilson, Ira B.; Kurth, Ann E.; Maloney, Kevin M.; Gallagher, Donna; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral treatment for HIV-infection before immunologic decline (early ART) and pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) can prevent HIV transmission, but routine adoption of these practices by clinicians has been limited. Methods Between September and December 2013, healthcare practitioners affiliated with a regional AIDS Education and Training Center in New England were invited to complete online surveys assessing knowledge, beliefs and practices regarding early ART and PrEP. Multivariable models were utilized to determine characteristics associated with prescribing intentions and practices. Results Surveys were completed by 184 practitioners. Respondent median age was 44 years, 58% were female, and 82% were white. Among ART-prescribing clinicians (61% of the entire sample), 64% were aware that HIV treatment guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services recommended early ART, and 69% indicated they would prescribe ART to all HIV-infected patients irrespective of immunologic status. However, 77% of ART-prescribing clinicians would defer ART for patients not ready to initiate treatment. Three-fourths of all respondents were aware of guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommending PrEP provision, 19% had prescribed PrEP, and 58% of clinicians who had not prescribed PrEP anticipated future prescribing. Practitioners expressed theoretical concerns and perceived practical barriers to prescribing early ART and PrEP. Clinicians with higher percentages of HIV-infected patients (aOR 1.16 per 10% increase in proportion of patients with HIV-infection, 95% CI 1.01–1.34) and infectious diseases specialists (versus primary care physicians; aOR 3.32, 95% CI 0.98–11.2) were more likely to report intentions to prescribe early ART. Higher percentage of HIV-infected patients was also associated with having prescribed PrEP (aOR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.34), whereas female gender (aOR 0.26, 95% CI 0.10–0.71) was associated

  11. Industrial Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasor, Leslie; Brooks, Valerie

    These eight modules for an industrial orientation class were developed by a project to design an interdisciplinary program of basic skills training for disadvantaged students in a Construction Technology Program (see Note). The Drafting module overviews drafting career opportunities, job markets, salaries, educational requirements, and basic…

  12. Comprehensive Coach Education and Practice Contact Restriction Guidelines Result in Lower Injury Rates in Youth American Football

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Yeargin, Susan; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Nittoli, Vincent C.; Mensch, James; Dodge, Thomas; Hayden, Ross; Dompier, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research evaluating the effect of comprehensive coach education and practice contact restriction in youth football injury rates is sparse. In 2012, USA Football released their Heads Up Football coaching education program (HUF), and Pop Warner Football (PW) instituted guidelines to restrict contact during practice. Purpose: To compare injury rates among youth football players aged 5 to 15 years by whether their leagues implemented HUF and/or were PW-affiliated. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Athletic trainers (ATs) evaluated and tracked injuries at each practice and game during the 2014 youth football season. Players were drawn from 10 leagues across 4 states. The non–Heads Up Football (NHUF) group consisted of 704 players (none of whom were PW-affiliated) from 29 teams within 4 leagues. The HUF+PW group consisted of 741 players from 27 teams within 2 leagues. The HUF-only group consisted of 663 players from 44 teams within 4 leagues. Injury rates and injury rate ratios (IRRs) were reported with 95% CIs. Results: A total of 370 injuries were reported during 71,262 athlete-exposures (AEs) (rate, 5.19/1000 AEs). Compared with the NHUF group (7.32/1000 AEs), the practice injury rates were lower for the HUF+PW group (0.97/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.08-0.21) and the HUF-only group (2.73/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.26-0.53). Compared with the NHUF group (13.42/1000 AEs), the game injury rate was lower for the HUF+PW group (3.42/1000 AEs; IRR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.15-0.44) but not for the HUF-only group (13.76/1000 AEs; IRR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.73-1.43). Also, the HUF+PW game injury rate was lower than that of HUF-only (IRR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.12-0.36). Higher injury rates were typically found in those aged 11 to 15 years compared with those aged 5 to 10 years. However, stronger effects related to HUF implementation and PW affiliation were seen among 11- to 15-year-olds. When restricted to concussions only, the sole difference was found

  13. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Concerning Malaria in Pregnancy: Results from a Qualitative Study in Madang, Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Erin V. W.; Pell, Christopher; Angwin, Angeline; Auwun, Alma; Daniels, Job; Mueller, Ivo; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Pool, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria is the leading cause of illness and death in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Infection during pregnancy with falciparum or vivax malaria, as occurs in PNG, has health implications for mother and child, causing complications such as maternal anemia, low birth weight and miscarriage. This article explores knowledge, attitudes and practices concerning malaria during pregnancy and it’s prevention in Madang, PNG, a high prevalence area. Methods As part of a qualitative study in Madang, exploring MiP, participatory techniques (free-listing and sorting) were conducted along with focus group discussions, in-depth interviews (with pregnant women, health staff and other community members) and observations in the local community and health facilities. Results The main themes explored were attitudes towards and knowledge of MiP, its risks, and prevention. Although there was a general awareness of the term “malaria”, it was often conflated with general sickness or with pregnancy-related symptoms. Moreover, many preventive methods for MiP were related to practices of general healthy living. Indeed, varied messages from health staff about the risks of MiP were observed. In addition to ideas about the seriousness and risk of MiP, other factors influenced the uptake of interventions: availability and perceived comfort of sleeping under insecticide-treated mosquito nets were important determinants of usage, and women’s heavy workload influenced Chloroquine adherence. Conclusion The non-specific symptoms of MiP and its resultant conflation with symptoms of pregnancy that are perceived as normal have implications for MiP prevention and control. However, in Madang, PNG, this was compounded by the inadequacy of health staff’s message about MiP. PMID:25893405

  14. [Current approaches in vocationally oriented medical rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Röckelein, E; Lukasczik, M; Neuderth, S

    2011-04-01

    Stressors and demands related to changes in work environment may result in impairments of employees' health and ability to work. In the context of the German statutory pension insurance's inpatient medical rehabilitation, these aspects are increasingly taken into account within the concept of vocationally oriented medical rehabilitation (VOMR). Nonetheless, a comprehensive implementation of diagnostic and therapeutic concepts in rehabilitative practice has not yet been realized. In this article, a profile of requirements for VOMR which has been developed by the German pension insurance is introduced that shall contribute to aligning rehabilitative measures for patients with work-related problems with occupational demands. Moreover, approaches for implementing vocationally oriented measures in diagnostics (e.g., screenings) and therapy (e.g., job training) as well as good practice examples are presented. In addition, user-oriented media (handbook, homepage) which enable researchers and clinicians to learn about the current state of research in this area are highlighted. Starting points for further development of vocational orientation in rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:21465399

  15. Sexual orientation, drug use preference during sex, and HIV risk practices and preferences among men who specifically seek unprotected sex partners via the internet.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hugh

    2009-05-01

    The present study entailed conducting a content analysis of 1,434 ads/profiles posted on one of the most popular "Men who have Sex with Men" (MSM) websites that specifically fosters unprotected sex. Ads/profiles were selected randomly based on the American ZIP code of residence (n = 1,316), with a randomly-drawn oversampling of profiles of men who self-identified as heterosexual or "curious" rather than gay or bisexual (n = 118). Data were collected between September 2006 and September 2007. The purpose of the present paper is to examine the conjoint effects of self-identified sexual orientation and preference for having/not having sex while high, on men's sought-after sexual risk. Analytical comparisons of the four groups showed that, on most measures, the combination of sexual orientation and drug use preference during sex differentiated the men. Generally speaking, gay/bisexual men who advertised online for partners with whom they could have sex while high expressed the greatest interest in risky sexual behaviors (e.g., felching, unprotected oral sex, unprotected anal sex) and various risk-related preferences (e.g., multiple partner sex, anonymous sex, eroticizing ejaculatory fluids). This is especially true when they are compared to their heterosexual/"curious" counterparts whose online profiles were not as likely to indicate a desire for having sex while high.

  16. Sexual orientation, drug use preference during sex, and HIV risk practices and preferences among men who specifically seek unprotected sex partners via the internet.

    PubMed

    Klein, Hugh

    2009-05-01

    The present study entailed conducting a content analysis of 1,434 ads/profiles posted on one of the most popular "Men who have Sex with Men" (MSM) websites that specifically fosters unprotected sex. Ads/profiles were selected randomly based on the American ZIP code of residence (n = 1,316), with a randomly-drawn oversampling of profiles of men who self-identified as heterosexual or "curious" rather than gay or bisexual (n = 118). Data were collected between September 2006 and September 2007. The purpose of the present paper is to examine the conjoint effects of self-identified sexual orientation and preference for having/not having sex while high, on men's sought-after sexual risk. Analytical comparisons of the four groups showed that, on most measures, the combination of sexual orientation and drug use preference during sex differentiated the men. Generally speaking, gay/bisexual men who advertised online for partners with whom they could have sex while high expressed the greatest interest in risky sexual behaviors (e.g., felching, unprotected oral sex, unprotected anal sex) and various risk-related preferences (e.g., multiple partner sex, anonymous sex, eroticizing ejaculatory fluids). This is especially true when they are compared to their heterosexual/"curious" counterparts whose online profiles were not as likely to indicate a desire for having sex while high. PMID:19543410

  17. MAGE (M-file/Mif Automatic GEnerator): A graphical interface tool for automatic generation of Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework configuration files and Matlab scripts for results analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chęciński, Jakub; Frankowski, Marek

    2016-10-01

    We present a tool for fully-automated generation of both simulations configuration files (Mif) and Matlab scripts for automated data analysis, dedicated for Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework (OOMMF). We introduce extended graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for fast, error-proof and easy creation of Mifs, without any programming skills usually required for manual Mif writing necessary. With MAGE we provide OOMMF extensions for complementing it by mangetoresistance and spin-transfer-torque calculations, as well as local magnetization data selection for output. Our software allows for creation of advanced simulations conditions like simultaneous parameters sweeps and synchronic excitation application. Furthermore, since output of such simulation could be long and complicated we provide another GUI allowing for automated creation of Matlab scripts suitable for analysis of such data with Fourier and wavelet transforms as well as user-defined operations.

  18. A Standards-Based Professional Development Program and the Resulting Impact on Two Sixth Grade Teachers' Classroom Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereki, Debra Lynn

    In 2000, California introduced science content standards as part of an across the curriculum reform. This presented a special challenge for elementary teachers due to an increased emphasis on math and language arts, and limited science background and resources. This two year qualitative study looks at a professional development program that resulted from collaboration between a university and an elementary school district. The program brought sixth grade elementary teachers together with scientists (geologists) and a science educator to develop a quality sixth grade science curriculum aligned to the California content standards. This multiple-case embedded study included an analysis of how these standards were addressed during the program, and the impact of this professional development on two teachers' classroom practices. The results of this study indicate that the geologists and the science educator played different but complementary roles in the professional development program. Furthermore, the professional development disproportionately focused on the Earth science standards, and this correlated to a disproportionate focus on these standards in the classrooms of the two teachers studied. Finally, the results indicate that as these two teachers implemented their new science units, they progressed through the initial stages of teacher change as outlined by change models described in the literature. However, they did not reach the final stage of change that involves complete confidence in their knowledge and being satisfied with the implementation of their science units.

  19. Developing and evaluating communication strategies to support informed decisions and practice based on evidence (DECIDE): protocol and preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare decision makers face challenges when using guidelines, including understanding the quality of the evidence or the values and preferences upon which recommendations are made, which are often not clear. Methods GRADE is a systematic approach towards assessing the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations in healthcare. GRADE also gives advice on how to go from evidence to decisions. It has been developed to address the weaknesses of other grading systems and is now widely used internationally. The Developing and Evaluating Communication Strategies to Support Informed Decisions and Practice Based on Evidence (DECIDE) consortium (http://www.decide-collaboration.eu/), which includes members of the GRADE Working Group and other partners, will explore methods to ensure effective communication of evidence-based recommendations targeted at key stakeholders: healthcare professionals, policymakers, and managers, as well as patients and the general public. Surveys and interviews with guideline producers and other stakeholders will explore how presentation of the evidence could be improved to better meet their information needs. We will collect further stakeholder input from advisory groups, via consultations and user testing; this will be done across a wide range of healthcare systems in Europe, North America, and other countries. Targeted communication strategies will be developed, evaluated in randomized trials, refined, and assessed during the development of real guidelines. Discussion Results of the DECIDE project will improve the communication of evidence-based healthcare recommendations. Building on the work of the GRADE Working Group, DECIDE will develop and evaluate methods that address communication needs of guideline users. The project will produce strategies for communicating recommendations that have been rigorously evaluated in diverse settings, and it will support the transfer of research into practice in healthcare systems

  20. Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge, Use, and Factors that Influence Decisions: Results from an Evidence-Based Practice Survey of Providers in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Angela; Walrath-Greene, Christine; Fisher, Sylvia; Crossbear, Shannon; Walker, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Evidence-based Treatment Survey were used to compare providers serving families in American Indian and Alaska Native communities to their counterparts in non-American Indian/Alaska Native communities on provider characteristics and factors that influence their decision to use evidence-based practices (N = 467). The findings suggest…

  1. Changes in Storm Flow as a Result of Direct Seed Farming Practices on the Columbia Plateau Semiarid Croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    -time precipitation patterns for the Columbia Plateau. Four runoff events were recorded from October 2002 through September 2003; the stage recorder failed in the conventionally tilled drainage during two of the events. During the events in which the runoff was recorded, the conventionally tilled drainage yielded 19.39 m3 and 20.83 m3; for those same events the 10.0 ha direct seed drainage yielded 0 m3 and 7.24 m3. Total recorded runoff for the year from the conventionally tilled drainage was 40.21 m3, and 40.96 m3 from the 10.0 ha direct seeded drainage. Total annual erosion from the conventionally tilled drainage was 127.05 kg/ha and 8.18 kg/ha from the direct seeded drainage. No runoff or erosion were recorded from the direct seeded 25.0, 18.1 drainages, or the 1.6 ha hillslope. From October 2003 through September 2004, one runoff event was missed and eight events were recorded from the conventionally tilled drainage, yielding 149.89-m3 runoff, and 286.71-kg/ha soil loss. The direct seeded drainages and hillslope produced no runoff or erosion. Under the climatic conditions during these two winters, the direct seed practices used in this study effectively controlled, runoff and erosion compared to a conventionally farmed drainage, at scales both larger than and smaller than the conventionally drained area. These results demonstrate the immediate soil and water conservation effectiveness of the direct seed technology. They also portend changes in the downstream processes as channels adjust to reduced stormflow volume and energy, and a reduced sediment supply.

  2. Cuadernos de Autoformacion en Participacion Social: Orientaciones Practicas. Volumen 4. Primera Edicion (Self-Instructional Notebooks on Social Participation: Practical Orientations. Volume 4. First Edition).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instituto Nacional para la Educacion de los Adultos, Mexico City (Mexico).

    The series "Self-instructional Notes on Social Participation" is a six volume series intended as teaching aids for adult educators. The theoretical, methodological, informative and practical elements of this series will assist professionals in their work and help them achieve greater success. The specific purpose of each notebook is indicated in…

  3. Use of Hypnotic Techniques in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Pain: Do the Ages of Patients or Years of Practice and Theoretical Orientation of Clinicians Matter?

    PubMed

    Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Solé, Ester; Racine, Mélanie; de la Vega, Rocío; Castarlenas, Elena; Jensen, Mark P; Miró, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Hypnosis is known to be effective in the treatment of pediatric pain. To better understand which strategies might be most useful, more knowledge is needed regarding the strategies that are actually used by experienced clinicians and the factors that influence their use. To address this knowledge gap, 35 health care professionals completed an online survey on the use of hypnosis in the management of pediatric chronic pain. The findings indicate that clinicians vary their use of hypnotic strategies primarily as a function of a patient's age but not as a function of theoretical orientation or amount of experience. The findings may be useful for guiding clinicians in their selection of strategies and suggestions when working with children with pain. PMID:27585730

  4. Using a Class to Conduct a Carbon Inventory: A Case Study with Practical Results at Macalester College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Christopher W.; Savanick, Suzanne; Manning, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the practical realities of using a college seminar to fulfill the carbon audit requirement for signatories to the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) and presents evidence of this approach's advantages as an educational and practical tool.…

  5. Crossing New Uncharted Territory: Shifts in Academic Identity as a Result of Modifying Teaching Practice in Undergraduate Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Sneddon, Jamie; Stewart, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    The changes in academic identity a teacher may undergo, as they modify their teaching practice, will vary depending on their experiences and the support they receive. In this paper, we describe the shifts in academic identity of two lecturers, a mathematician and a mathematics educator, as they both made changes to their teaching practice by…

  6. Knowledge of asthma guidelines: results of a UK General Practice Airways Group (GPIAG) web-based 'Test your Knowledge' quiz.

    PubMed

    Pinnock, Hilary; Holmes, Steve; Levy, Mark L; McArthur, Ruth; Small, Iain

    2010-06-01

    A web-based questionnaire, comprising 11 multiple choice questions, tested the knowledge of visitors to the General Practice Airways Group (GPIAG) online summary of the British Asthma guideline. On average, the 413 respondents answered less than half the questions correctly. GP scores were significantly lower than practice nurses. Improving clinicians' knowledge of asthma is a prerequisite for improving management.

  7. A web-based survey of the relationship between buddhist religious practices, health, and psychological characteristics: research methods and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Wiist, W H; Sullivan, B M; Wayment, H A; Warren, M

    2010-03-01

    A Web-based survey was conducted to study the religious and health practices, medical history and psychological characteristics among Buddhist practitioners. This report describes the development, advertisement, administration and preliminary results of the survey. Over 1200 Buddhist practitioners responded. Electronic advertisements were the most effective means of recruiting participants. Survey participants were mostly well educated with high incomes and white. Participants engaged in Buddhist practices such as meditation, attending meetings and obtaining instruction from a monk or nun, and practiced healthful behaviors such as regular physical activity and not smoking. Buddhist meditative practice was related to psychological mindfulness and general health.

  8. [Grandchildren in family care giving for people with dementia: experiences and evaluations--results from a life-world-oriented study].

    PubMed

    Philipp-Metzen, H E

    2011-12-01

    Dementia often has a serious impact on family life in household care giving situations. The qualitative study in applied gerontology presented here focuses on the subjective experiences of grandchildren and the intergenerational relationships of the family members. It includes 15 in-depth retrospective interviews with young adults (11 female, 4 male). The theoretical background is a sociological life-world-oriented approach by Alfred Schütz. The grandchildren reported a wide range of experiences with positive and enriching incidents prevailing, e.g., individual and familial competence in care giving, increased contact between family members, i.e., so-called"family cohesion", improvements in the grandchildren's social responsibility, and their acquired knowledge of the needs of older people and of persons with dementia. Individual stress was experienced because of so-called "challenging behavior" by the grandparents (e.g., aggressive behavior) or family circumstances when the demands were too great.A third category includes those experiences which seem to be "taken for granted" and are regarded as insignificant by the grandchildren. Because this category encompasses many of the grandchildren's own care giving activities, the widespread assumption that dementia must always cause younger carers stress is not true in general. The data suggest that living in a family that has difficulties in coping with the situation might be more demanding than dealing with the behavior and psychological symptoms of dementia. The grandchildren should be given access to age-appropriate information about the disease and the ways to communicate effectively with their grandparent needing care. PMID:21909775

  9. REVERSE AUCTION RESULTS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF DECENTRALIZED RETROFIT BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN A SMALL URBAN WATERSHED (CINCINNATI OH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although urban stormwater is typically conveyed to centralized infrastructure, there is great potential for reducing stormwater runoff quantity through decentralization. In this case we hypothesize that smaller-scale retrofit best management practices (BMPs) such as rain gardens ...

  10. Results from a survey of national immunization programmes on home-based vaccination record practices in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Young, Stacy L.; Gacic-Dobo, Marta; Brown, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on home-based records (HBRs) practices within national immunization programmes are non-existent, making it difficult to determine whether current efforts of immunization programmes related to basic recording of immunization services are appropriately focused. Methods During January 2014, WHO and the United Nations Children's Fund sent a one-page questionnaire to 195 countries to obtain information on HBRs including type of record used, number of records printed, whether records were provided free-of-charge or required by schools, whether there was a stock-out and the duration of any stock-outs that occurred, as well as the total expenditure for printing HBRs during 2013. Results A total of 140 countries returned a completed HBR questionnaire. Two countries were excluded from analysis because they did not use a HBR during 2013. HBR types varied across countries (vaccination only cards, 32/138 [23.1%]; vaccination plus growth monitoring records, 31/138 [22.4%]; child health books, 48/138 [34.7%]; combination of these, 27/138 [19.5%] countries). HBRs were provided free-of-charge in 124/138 (89.8%) respondent countries. HBRs were required for school entry in 62/138 (44.9%) countries. Nearly a quarter of countries reported HBR stock-outs during 2013. Computed printing cost per record was results provide a basis for national immunization programmes to develop, implement and monitor corrective activities to improve the availability and utilization of HBRs. Much work remains to improve forecasting where appropriate, to prevent HBR stock-outs, to identify and improve sustainable financing options and to explore viable market shaping opportunities. PMID:25733540

  11. UNCW Summer Orientation 1987 Evaluation Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David F.

    Results of evaluating the June 1987 orientation program at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington are discussed and compared to findings of the 1986 orientation program evaluation. Items that were ranked as the four highest and four lowest aspects of orientation are identified. Orientation leader effectiveness is also assessed, along with…

  12. Issues in practice based learning in nursing in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland: Results from a multi professional scoping exercise.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Maggie; McGowan, Brian

    2007-01-01

    The first year (2003-2004) of a three year nationally funded project focused on completing a scoping exercise on the nature of practice education in five selected health care professions: Dietetics, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy and Radiography (). A survey questionnaire, focus groups and secondary sources were used to collect data. Profession specific contributors completed the analysis of results. Resulting case studies were combined to produce a cross-professional overview of current issues in practice-based learning. The nursing case study identified areas of good practice such as; the mentorship model; the development of new support roles; and joint responsibility between Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) and Health Service areas for practice assessment. However, there were variations in the application of these areas of good practice throughout the United Kingdom (UK). Issues included; an inadequate supply of qualified mentors; formal recognition of the mentor role; and lack of knowledge of the relative impact of the differing mentor preparation programmes. In comparing the five professions, all had statutory requirements regarding the nature of practice learning but each profession differed in how this was managed and organised. The need for formal preparation, recognition and reward for the mentor/practice educator role was recognised with collaborative working across the professions a recommendation in order to achieve national improvement in the quality of practice learning support for health care professions.

  13. Revealing Interactions between Human Resources, Quality of Life and Environmental Changes within Socially-oriented Observations : Results from the IPY PPS Arctic Project in the Russian North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, Tatiana

    2010-05-01

    Socially-oriented Observations (SOO) in the Russian North have been carried out within multidisciplinary IPY PPS Arctic project under the leadership of Norway and supported by the Research Council of Norway as well as Russian Academy of Sciences. The main objective of SOO is to increase knowledge and observation of changes in quality of life conditions (state of natural environment including climate and biota, safe drinking water and foods, well-being, employment, social relations, access to health care and high quality education, etc.) and - to reveal trends in human capital and capacities (health, demography, education, creativity, spiritual-cultural characteristics and diversity, participation in decision making, etc.). SOO have been carried out in industrial cities as well as sparsely populated rural and nature protection areas in observation sites situated in different bioms (from coastal tundra to southern taiga zone) of Murmansk, Arkhangelsk Oblast and Republic of Komi. SOO were conducted according to the international protocol included in PPS Arctic Manual. SOO approaches based both on local people's perceptions and statistics help to identify main issues and targets for life quality, human capital and environment improvement and thus to distinguish leading SOO indicators for further monitoring. SOO have revealed close interaction between human resources, quality of life and environmental changes. Negative changes in human capital (depopulation, increasing unemployment, aging, declining physical and mental health, quality of education, loss of traditional knowledge, marginalization etc.), despite peoples' high creativity and optimism are becoming the major driving force effecting both the quality of life and the state of environment and overall sustainability. Human induced disturbances such as uncontrolled forests cuttings and poaching are increasing. Observed rapid changes in climate and biota (ice and permafrost melting, tundra shrubs getting taller and

  14. Orientation, Evaluation, and Integration of Part-Time Nursing Faculty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joanne S

    2015-07-10

    This study helps to quantify and describe orientation, evaluation, and integration practices pertaining to part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing education programs. A researcher designed Web-based survey was used to collect information from a convenience sample of part-time clinical nursing faculty teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Survey questions focused on the amount and type of orientation, evaluation, and integration practices. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze results. Respondents reported on average four hours of orientation, with close to half reporting no more than two hours. Evaluative feedback was received much more often from students than from full-time faculty. Most respondents reported receiving some degree of mentoring and that it was easy to get help from full-time faculty. Respondents reported being most informed about student evaluation procedures, grading, and the steps to take when students are not meeting course objectives, and less informed about changes to ongoing curriculum and policy.

  15. Practice Guidance for Buprenorphine for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorders: Results of an Expert Panel Process

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Carrie M.; Lindsay, Dawn; Williams, Jessica; Ayers, Amanda; Schuster, James; Cilia, Alyssa; Flaherty, Michael T.; Mandell, Todd; Gordon, Adam J.; Stein, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although numbers of physicians credentialed to prescribe buprenorphine has increased over time, many credentialed physicians may be reluctant to treat individuals with opioid use disorders due to discomfort with prescribing buprenorphine. Though prescribing physicians are required to complete a training course, many have questions about buprenorphine and treatment guidelines have not been updated to reflect clinical experience in recent years. We report on an expert panel process to update and expand buprenorphine guidelines. Methods We identified candidate guidelines through expert opinion and a review of the literature and used a modified RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to assess the validity of the candidate guidelines. An expert panel completed two rounds of rating, with a meeting to discuss the guidelines between the first and second rating. Results Through the rating process, expert panel members rated 90 candidate guideline statements across eight domains, including candidacy for buprenorphine treatment, dosing of buprenorphine, psychosocial counseling, and treatment of co-occurring depression and anxiety. A total of 65 guideline statements (72%) were rated as valid. Expert panel members had agreement in some areas, such as the treatment of co-occurring mental health problems, but disagreement in others, including the appropriate dosing of buprenorphine given patient complexities. Conclusions Through an expert panel process, we developed an updated and expanded set of buprenorphine treatment guidelines; this additional guidance may increase credentialed physicians’ comfort with prescribing buprenorphine to patients with opioid use disorders. Future efforts should focus on appropriate dosing guidance and ensuring that guidelines can be adapted to a variety of practice settings. PMID:25844527

  16. Real-world treatment practice in patients with advanced melanoma in the era before ipilimumab: results from the IMAGE study.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Mark R; Dalle, Stéphane; Claveau, Joel; Mut, Pilar; Hallmeyer, Sigrun; Plantin, Patrice; Highley, Martin; Kotapati, Srividya; Le, Trong Kim; Brokaw, Jane; Abernethy, Amy P

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic landscape for advanced melanoma has recently been transformed by several novel agents (immune checkpoint inhibitors and molecular-targeted agents). The prospective, multi-site, observational study IMAGE (ipilimumab: management of advanced melanoma in real practice) included a retrospective cohort to describe real-world treatment prior to approval of the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab. This retrospective cohort of patients, who started second-line/subsequent treatment (index therapy) for advanced melanoma within 3 years before ipilimumab approval, was selected randomly by chart review. Collected data included treatment history, patient outcomes, and healthcare resource utilization. All patients had ≥1 year of follow-up data. This analysis included 177 patients from Europe (69%) and North America (31%). The most common index therapies (used alone or in combination) were fotemustine (23%), dacarbazine (21%), temozolomide (14%), and platinum-based chemotherapy (14%). Most patients (89%) discontinued index treatment during the study period; the most common reason was disease progression (59%). Among patients with tumor assessment (153/177; 86%), 2% had complete response, 5% had partial response, and 12% had stable disease on last tumor assessment. At 1-year study follow-up, median progression-free survival was 2.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-2.9) and median overall survival was 8.8 months (95% CI, 6.5-9.7). During follow-up, 95% of the patients had healthcare visits for advanced melanoma, 74% of whom were hospitalized or admitted to a hospice facility. These results provide insights into patient care with advanced melanoma in the era before ipilimumab and may serve as a benchmark for new agents in future real-world studies.

  17. Real-world treatment practice in patients with advanced melanoma in the era before ipilimumab: results from the IMAGE study.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Mark R; Dalle, Stéphane; Claveau, Joel; Mut, Pilar; Hallmeyer, Sigrun; Plantin, Patrice; Highley, Martin; Kotapati, Srividya; Le, Trong Kim; Brokaw, Jane; Abernethy, Amy P

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic landscape for advanced melanoma has recently been transformed by several novel agents (immune checkpoint inhibitors and molecular-targeted agents). The prospective, multi-site, observational study IMAGE (ipilimumab: management of advanced melanoma in real practice) included a retrospective cohort to describe real-world treatment prior to approval of the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab. This retrospective cohort of patients, who started second-line/subsequent treatment (index therapy) for advanced melanoma within 3 years before ipilimumab approval, was selected randomly by chart review. Collected data included treatment history, patient outcomes, and healthcare resource utilization. All patients had ≥1 year of follow-up data. This analysis included 177 patients from Europe (69%) and North America (31%). The most common index therapies (used alone or in combination) were fotemustine (23%), dacarbazine (21%), temozolomide (14%), and platinum-based chemotherapy (14%). Most patients (89%) discontinued index treatment during the study period; the most common reason was disease progression (59%). Among patients with tumor assessment (153/177; 86%), 2% had complete response, 5% had partial response, and 12% had stable disease on last tumor assessment. At 1-year study follow-up, median progression-free survival was 2.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-2.9) and median overall survival was 8.8 months (95% CI, 6.5-9.7). During follow-up, 95% of the patients had healthcare visits for advanced melanoma, 74% of whom were hospitalized or admitted to a hospice facility. These results provide insights into patient care with advanced melanoma in the era before ipilimumab and may serve as a benchmark for new agents in future real-world studies. PMID:27118102

  18. Orientation filtering for crystalline films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, H.I.; Atwater, H.A.; Thompson, C.V.; Geis, M.W.

    1986-12-30

    A substrate is coated with a film to be recrystallized. A pattern of crystallization barriers is created in the film, for example, by etching voids in the film. An encapsulation layer is generally applied to protect the film, fill the voids and otherwise enhance a recrystallization process. Recrystallization is carried out such that certain orientations pass preferentially through the barrier, generally as a result of growth-velocity anisotropy. The result is a film of a specific predetermined crystallographic orientation, a range of orientations or a set of discrete orientations. 7 figs.

  19. Orientation filtering for crystalline films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Henry I.; Atwater, Harry A.; Thompson, Carl V.; Geis, Michael W.

    1986-12-30

    A substrate is coated with a film to be recrystallized. A pattern of crystallization barriers is created in the film, for example, by etching voids in the film. An encapsulation layer is generally applied to protect the film, fill the voids and otherwise enhance a recrystallization process. Recrystallization is carried out such that certain orientations pass preferentially through the barrier, generally as a result of growth-velocity anisotropy. The result is a film of a specific predetermined crystallographic orientation, a range of orientations or a set of discrete orientations.

  20. Orienting hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Hope, Anna E; Sugarman, Laurence I

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new frame for understanding hypnosis and its clinical applications. Despite great potential to transform health and care, hypnosis research and clinical integration is impaired in part by centuries of misrepresentation and ignorance about its demonstrated efficacy. The authors contend that advances in the field are primarily encumbered by the lack of distinct boundaries and definitions. Here, hypnosis, trance, and mind are all redefined and grounded in biological, neurological, and psychological phenomena. Solutions are proposed for boundary and language problems associated with hypnosis. The biological role of novelty stimulating an orienting response that, in turn, potentiates systemic plasticity forms the basis for trance. Hypnosis is merely the skill set that perpetuates and influences trance. This formulation meshes with many aspects of Milton Erickson's legacy and Ernest Rossi's recent theory of mind and health. Implications of this hypothesis for clinical skills, professional training, and research are discussed.

  1. Freshman Orientation in the United States Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Raymond

    Current freshman orientation practices among U.S. colleges and universities are described and comments upon the degree of concurrence between these practices and an evolving philosophy of freshman orientation are made. Letters requesting copies of orientation programs were sent to a random sample of 160 colleges and universities, divided equally…

  2. [Achievement of therapeutic target in subjects on statin treatment in clinical practice. Results of the STAR (Statins Target Assessment in Real practice) study].

    PubMed

    Degli Esposti, Luca; Sangiorgi, Diego; Arca, Marcello; Vigna, Giovanni B; Budal, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Ezio

    2011-12-01

    The primary aim of the STAR Study (Statins Target Assessment in Real practice) was to determine the LDL-cholesterol reduction and to analyse patient's and therapeutic factors associated to LDL-cholesterol target attainment in newly treated subjects with statins in an unselected population in clinical practice setting. Administrative databases (including pharmaceutical prescriptions and hospital admissions) and laboratory test databases (including LDL-cholesterol values) of five local health units, distributed in Emilia Romagna, Toscana and Umbria, were linked. A retrospective cohort study was conducted and all subjects aged > or =18 years with a first prescription for statins (newly treated subjects) between January 1st, 2007 and June 30th, 2008 were included. All statin prescriptions over a 12 months follow-up period were considered and used to calculate adherence to treatment. Baseline and follow-up LDL-cholesterol, respectively, were defined according to the nearest determination to the first prescription for statins and to the end of the follow-up period. A total of 3.232 subjects was included, 1.516 males (47%) and 1.716 females (53%), with an average age equal to 65.9 +/- 11.3 years. Among included subjects, 22.,6% had a gap to LDL-cholesterol target <10%, 30.0% between 10 and 29%, 20.7% between 30 and 49%, and 26.7% . or =50%. Among those with a gap to target > or =50%, 30-49%, and 10-29%, respectively, LDL-cholesterol target was attained by 7.1%, 41.8%, and 62.% of subjects. LDL-cholesterol target attainment was associated to gap to target, adherence with treatment, and type of statin. PMID:22567731

  3. Forecasting the Effect of the Change in Timing of the ABR Diagnostic Radiology Examinations: Results of the ACR Survey of Practice Leaders.

    PubMed

    Bluth, Edward I; Muroff, Lawrence R; Cernigliaro, Joseph G; Moore, Arl V; Smith, Geoffrey G; Flug, Jonathan; DeStigter, Kristen K; Allen, Bibb; Thorwarth, William T; Roberts, Anne C

    2015-05-01

    The results of a survey sent to practice leaders in the ACR Practice of Radiology Environment Database show that the majority of responding groups will continue to hire recently trained residents and fellows even though they have been unable to take the final ABR diagnostic radiology certifying examination. However, a significant minority of private practice groups will not hire these individuals. The majority of private practices expect the timing change for the ABR certifying examinations to affect their groups' function. In contrast, the majority of academic medical school practices expect little or no impact. Residents and fellows should not expect work time off or protected time to study for the certifying examination or for their maintenance of certification examinations in the future.

  4. Relationships between Electronic Information Media and Records Management Practices: Results of a Survey of United Nations Organizations. A Rand Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bikson, T. K.; Schieber, L.

    A Technical Panel on Electronic Records Management (TP/REM), which was established by the Advisory Committee for the Co-ordination of Information Systems (ACCIS), conducted a survey of existing electronic records management practices and standards related to new information and communication technologies and their interrelationships within the…

  5. A prospective study of the survival of chemically activated anterior resin composite restorations in general dental practice: 5-year results.

    PubMed

    van Noort, R; Davis, L G

    1993-08-01

    The principals of 26 general dental practices agreed to use six chemically activated resin composite restorative materials to restore Class III and Class V lesions and record information concerning their performance over a period of 5 years. The information collected was analysed by actuarial methods to assess the clinical longevity and reasons for replacement as perceived by the dentists operating in the General Dental Service in England. At the end of 5 years, 14 dentists provided sufficient returns for their data to be considered suitable for analysis. The database consisted of 2399 Class III and 1093 Class V restorations. The overall probability of survival at 5 years of Class III and Class V restorations was 62.9% and 71.8% respectively. The difference in performance between the six restorative materials was small, with the probability of survival varying from 70.4 +/- 2.9% to 56.3 +/- 2.9% for the Class III restorations and 78.6 +/- 3.7% to 67.7 +/- 4.2% for the Class V restorations. The main reasons for replacement were general surface discoloration, secondary caries and fracture. The chemically activated composite restorative materials available at the time of initiating this study produced comparable performances in general dental practice when used without enamel and dentine bonding techniques. This suggests that more general practice-based clinical studies are needed to determine whether or not improvements in materials and techniques are effectively transferred to the general practice situation.

  6. Practices to "Foster" in Out-of-School Time Programs. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2010-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin Anderson; Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta; Collins, Ashleigh

    2010-01-01

    A lot has been learned about effective approaches to realizing intended out-of-school time program outcomes. As program practitioners consider fostering evidence-based practices, program administrators, staff, and stakeholders must keep in mind that it is difficult to change behavior overnight, even among children. Efforts to improve outcomes for…

  7. Results from an Exploratory Study of Sun Protection Practice: Implications for the Design of Health Promotion Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eadie, Douglas; MacAskill, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary aim of the research reported here is to provide strategic guidance for the development of a national communication strategy to improve sun protection practice amongst young people. Design/methodology/approach: The research adopted an exploratory approach, employing qualitative focus groups to represent three population groups,…

  8. Teaching Practice of Life Study Lesson of Classroom Teacher Candidates Analysis of the Results of Peer Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bektas, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine peer assessments that the classroom candidates applied at teaching practice on life study lesson. The cross sectional survey method which is one of the survey methods has been used in the research. In this study the sampling criteria, one of the purposive sampling methods, is used. Thus, in the fall semester…

  9. Physicians’ engagement in dual practices and the effects on labor supply in public hospitals: results from a register-based study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physician dual practice, a combination of public and private practice, has attracted attention due to fear of reduced work supply and a lack of key personnel in the public system, increase in low priority treatments, and conflicts of interest for physicians who may be competing for their own patients when working for private suppliers. In this article, we analyze both choice of dual practice among hospital physicians and the dual practices’ effect on work supply in public hospitals. Methods The sample consisted of 12,399 Norwegian hospital physicians working in public hospitals between 2001 and 2009. We linked hospital registry data on salaries and hospital working hours with data from national income and other registries covering non-hospital income, including income from dual work, cohabiting status, childbirths and socioeconomic characteristics. Our dataset also included hospital variables describing i.e. workload. We estimated odds ratio for choosing dual practice and the effects of dual practice on public working hours using different versions of mixed models. Results The percentage of physicians engaged in dual practice fell from 35.1% for men and 17.6% for women in 2001 to 25.0% and 14.2%, respectively, in 2009. For both genders, financial debt and interest payments were positively correlated and having a newborn baby was negatively correlated with engaging in dual practice. Larger family size and being cohabitating increased the odds ratio of dual practice among men but reduced it for women. The most significant internal hospital factor for choosing dual practice was high wages for extended working hours, which significantly reduced the odds ratio for dual practice. The total working hours in public hospitals were similar for both those who did and did not engage in dual practice; however, dual practice reduced public working hours in some specialties. Conclusion Economic factors followed by family variables are significant elements influencing

  10. [Evidence-based medicine. 1. The transfer of research results to clinical practice. The Italian Group for Evidence-Based Medicine-GIMBE].

    PubMed

    Cartabellotta, A

    1998-03-01

    Evidence-based Medicine, born officially in November 1992, during last five years is grown everywhere, showing its power to influence virtually all aspects of health care: clinical practice, medical education, patient information and health policy. Because of the raising interest also in Italy for the new paradigm of clinical practice, "Recently Progress in Medicina" launches a series of articles with the aim of giving to physicians tools and skills for searching, critically appraising and implementing in their own decisions the best results of clinical research. For a better explanation of practical aspects of Evidence-based Medicine, the first article discusses about several obstacles existing in transferring correctly and timely the results of research into clinical practice, and about the potential role of Evidence-based Medicine in the evolution of the medical art and the health systems of the third millennium.

  11. Optimum orientation versus orientation averaging description of cluster radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.; Ismail, M.; Refaie, A. I.; Amer, Laila H.

    2016-07-01

    While the optimum-orientation concept is frequently used in studies on cluster decays involving deformed nuclei, the orientation-averaging concept is used in most alpha decay studies. We investigate the different decay stages in both the optimum-orientation and the orientation-averaging pictures of the cluster decay process. For decays of 232,233,234U and 236,238Pu isotopes, the quantum knocking frequency and penetration probability based on the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation are used to find the decay width. The obtained decay width and the experimental half-life are employed to estimate the clusters preformation probability. We found that the orientation-averaged decay width is one or two orders of magnitude less than its value along the non-compact optimum orientation. Correspondingly, the extracted preformation probability based on the averaged decay width increases with the same orders of magnitude compared to its value obtained considering the optimum orientation. The cluster preformation probabilities estimated by the two considered schemes are in more or less comparable agreement with the Blendowske–Walliser (BW) formula based on the preformation probability of α ({S}α {{a}{{v}}{{e}}}) obtained from the orientation-averaging scheme. All the results, including the optimum-orientation ones, deviate substantially from the BW law based on {S}α {{o}{{p}}{{t}}} that was estimated from the optimum-orientation scheme. To account for the nuclear deformations, it is more relevant to calculate the decay width by averaging over the different possible orientations of the participating deformed nuclei, rather than considering the corresponding non-compact optimum orientation.

  12. Optimum orientation versus orientation averaging description of cluster radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.; Ismail, M.; Refaie, A. I.; Amer, Laila H.

    2016-07-01

    While the optimum-orientation concept is frequently used in studies on cluster decays involving deformed nuclei, the orientation-averaging concept is used in most alpha decay studies. We investigate the different decay stages in both the optimum-orientation and the orientation-averaging pictures of the cluster decay process. For decays of 232,233,234U and 236,238Pu isotopes, the quantum knocking frequency and penetration probability based on the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation are used to find the decay width. The obtained decay width and the experimental half-life are employed to estimate the clusters preformation probability. We found that the orientation-averaged decay width is one or two orders of magnitude less than its value along the non-compact optimum orientation. Correspondingly, the extracted preformation probability based on the averaged decay width increases with the same orders of magnitude compared to its value obtained considering the optimum orientation. The cluster preformation probabilities estimated by the two considered schemes are in more or less comparable agreement with the Blendowske-Walliser (BW) formula based on the preformation probability of α ({S}α {{a}{{v}}{{e}}}) obtained from the orientation-averaging scheme. All the results, including the optimum-orientation ones, deviate substantially from the BW law based on {S}α {{o}{{p}}{{t}}} that was estimated from the optimum-orientation scheme. To account for the nuclear deformations, it is more relevant to calculate the decay width by averaging over the different possible orientations of the participating deformed nuclei, rather than considering the corresponding non-compact optimum orientation.

  13. Community-Oriented Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Community-orientated medicine is a topical area for debate in the current discussions about medical education, but it can be argued that medical education has always been in the community because medical practice is located therein. It is widely accepted that community settings provide a wealth of learning opportunities for students and trainees…

  14. Diarrhoea in general practice: when should a Clostridium difficile infection be considered? Results of a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hensgens, M P M; Dekkers, O M; Demeulemeester, A; Buiting, A G M; Bloembergen, P; van Benthem, B H B; Le Cessie, S; Kuijper, E J

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) are frequent in hospitals, but also seem to increase in the community. Here, we aim to determine the incidence of CDI in general practice and to evaluate current testing algorithms for CDI. Three Dutch laboratories tested all unformed faeces (12,714) for C. difficile when diagnostic testing (for any enteric pathogen) was requested by a general practitioner (GP). Additionally, a nested case-control study was initiated, including 152 CDI patients and 304 age and sex-matched controls. Patients were compared using weighted multivariable logistic regression. One hundred and ninety-four samples (1.5%) were positive for C. difficile (incidence 0.67/10,000 patient years). This incidence was comparable to that of Salmonella spp. Compared with diarrhoeal controls, CDI was associated with more severe complaints, underlying diseases, antibiotic use and prior hospitalization. In our study, GPs requested a test for C. difficile in 7% of the stool samples, thereby detecting 40% of all CDIs. Dutch national recommendations advise testing for C. difficile when prior antibiotic use or hospitalization is present (18% of samples). If these recommendations were followed, 61% of all CDIs would have been detected. In conclusion, C. difficile is relatively frequent in general practice. Currently, testing for C. difficile is rare and only 40% of CDI in general practice is detected. Following recommendations that are based on traditional risk factors for CDI, would improve detection of CDI.

  15. Maternal feeding practices predict fruit and vegetable consumption in young children. Results of a 12-month longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Jane E; Paxton, Susan J; Brozovic, Anna M

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to explore the prospective relationship between maternal feeding practices and young children's frequency of consumption of fruits, vegetables and sweets, and also child weight-for-height z-scores. Participants were 60 mothers who completed questionnaires when their children were 1 year old and again when their children were 2 years old. Regression analyses were performed. After controlling for availability and prior child consumption of the target food, maternal use of pressure to eat at 1 year predicted lower child frequency of fruit consumption at 2 years and approached significance for lower vegetable consumption. Maternal modelling of healthy eating at 1 year predicted higher child frequency of vegetable consumption at 2 years. Restriction did not significantly predict child frequency of consumption of fruits, vegetables or sweets over time. Child weight-for-height scores at 2 years were predicted by weight-for-height at 1 year but not by feeding practices. The findings suggest that maternal feeding practices can influence child eating at a very young age. Interventions should focus on encouraging parents to model healthy eating to promote healthy eating in children. PMID:21569809

  16. Results of Infrapopliteal Endovascular Procedures Performed in Diabetic Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia and Tissue Loss from the Perspective of an Angiosome-Oriented Revascularization Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Acín, Francisco; Varela, César; López de Maturana, Ignacio; de Haro, Joaquín; Bleda, Silvia; Rodriguez-Padilla, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to describe our experience with infrapopliteal endovascular procedures performed in diabetic patients with ischemic ulcers and critical ischemia (CLI). A retrospective study of 101 procedures was performed. Our cohort was divided into groups according to the number of tibial vessels attempted and the number of patent tibial vessels achieved to the foot. An angiosome anatomical classification of ulcers were used to describe the local perfusion obtained after revascularization. Ischemic ulcer healing and limb salvage rates were measured. Ischemic ulcer healing at 12 months and limb salvage at 24 months was similar between a single revascularization and multiple revascularization attempts. The group in whom none patent tibial vessel to the foot was obtained presented lower healing and limb salvage rates. No differences were observed between obtaining a single patent tibial vessel versus more than one tibial vessel. Indirect revascularization of the ulcer through arterial-arterial connections provided similar results than those obtained after direct revascularization via its specific angiosome tibial artery. Our results suggest that, in CLI diabetic patients with ischemic ulcers that undergo infrapopliteal endovascular procedures, better results are expected if at least one patent vessel is obtained and flow is restored to the local ischemic area of the foot. PMID:24527215

  17. Orientation Transfer in Vernier and Stereoacuity Training.

    PubMed

    Snell, Nathaniel; Kattner, Florian; Rokers, Bas; Green, C Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Human performance on various visual tasks can be improved substantially via training. However, the enhancements are frequently specific to relatively low-level stimulus dimensions. While such specificity has often been thought to be indicative of a low-level neural locus of learning, recent research suggests that these same effects can be accounted for by changes in higher-level areas--in particular in the way higher-level areas read out information from lower-level areas in the service of highly practiced decisions. Here we contrast the degree of orientation transfer seen after training on two different tasks--vernier acuity and stereoacuity. Importantly, while the decision rule that could improve vernier acuity (i.e. a discriminant in the image plane) would not be transferable across orientations, the simplest rule that could be learned to solve the stereoacuity task (i.e. a discriminant in the depth plane) would be insensitive to changes in orientation. Thus, given a read-out hypothesis, more substantial transfer would be expected as a result of stereoacuity than vernier acuity training. To test this prediction, participants were trained (7500 total trials) on either a stereoacuity (N = 9) or vernier acuity (N = 7) task with the stimuli in either a vertical or horizontal configuration (balanced across participants). Following training, transfer to the untrained orientation was assessed. As predicted, evidence for relatively orientation specific learning was observed in vernier trained participants, while no evidence of specificity was observed in stereo trained participants. These results build upon the emerging view that perceptual learning (even very specific learning effects) may reflect changes in inferences made by high-level areas, rather than necessarily fully reflecting changes in the receptive field properties of low-level areas.

  18. A Simplified Model for the Optical Force exerted on a Vertically Oriented Cilium by an Optical Trap and the Resulting Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofgren, Ian; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Eukaryotic cilia are essentially whiplike structures extending from the cell body. Although their existence has been long known, their mechanical and functional properties are poorly understood. Optical traps are a non-contact method of applying a localized force to microscopic objects and an ideal tool for the study of ciliary mechanics. Starting with the discrete dipole approximation, a common means of calculating the optical force on an object that is not spherical, we tackle the problem of the optical force on a cilium. Treating the cilium as a homogeneous nonmagnetic cylinder and the electric field of the laser beam as linearly polarized results in a force applied in the direction of polarization. The force density in the polarization direction is derived from the force on an individual dipole within the cilium, which can be integrated over the volume of the cilium in order to find the total force. Utilizing Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, we integrate the force density over a cross section of the cilium and numerically solve a fourth order differential equation to obtain the final deformation of the cilium. This prediction will later be compared with experimental results to infer the mechanical stiffness of the cilium. Support from the National Institutes of Health, 1R15DK092716 is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Patient Safety Culture in Nephrology Nurse Practice Settings: Results by Primary Work Unit, Organizational Work Setting, and Primary Role.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Beth; Kear, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety culture is critical to the achievement of patient safety. In 2014, a landmark national study was conducted to investigate patient safety culture in nephrology nurse practice settings. In this secondary analysis of data from that study, we report the status of patient safety culture by primary work unit (chronic hemodialysis unit, acute hemodialysis unit, peritoneal dialysis unit) and organizational work setting (for-profit organization, not-for-profit organization), and compare the perceptions of direct care nurses and managers/administrators on components of patient safety culture.

  20. The Impact of Faculty-Student Interactions on Teaching Behavior: An Investigation of Perceived Student Encounter Orientation, Interactive Confidence, and Interactive Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Robert; Swanson, Scott R.

    2002-01-01

    Data from 221 marketing professors were used to classify critical student incidents as service system failures, response to student needs, or unprompted instructor actions. Resulting behavior changes included methods and materials changes, requirement clarification, reinforcement, student praise, and authoritativeness. Influential factors were…

  1. Spectra of electrons emitted as a result of the sticking and annihilation of low energy positrons to the surfaces of graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysler, M.; Chirayath, V.; McDonald, A.; Lim, Z.; Shastry, K.; Gladen, R.; Fairchild, A.; Koymen, A.; Weiss, A.

    Positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES) was used to study the positron induced low energy electron spectra from HOPG and a sample composed of 6-8 layers of graphene grown on polycrystalline copper. A low energy (~2eV) beam of positrons was used to implant positrons into a surface localized state on the graphene and HOPG samples. Measurements of the energy spectra of the positron induced electrons obtained using a TOF spectrometer indicate the presence of an annihilation induced KLL C Auger peak (at ~263 eV) along with a narrow low energy secondary peak due to an Auger mediated positron sticking (AMPS) process. A broad spectral feature was also observed below ~15 eV which we believe may be due to a VVV C Auger transition not previously observed. The energy dependence of the integrated intensity of the AMPS peak was measured for a series of incident positron kinetic energies ranging from ~1.5 eV up to 11 eV from which the binding energy of the surface localized positron state on graphene and HOPG was estimated. The implication of our results regarding the applicability of AMPS and PAES to the study of graphene surfaces and interfaces will be discussed. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR 1508719 and DMR 1338130.

  2. Relationships among moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave of nurse practitioners in emergency departments: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Jennifer; Epstein, Elizabeth; Rovnyak, Virginia; Snyder, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this research study were to investigate moral distress among emergency department (ED) nurse practitioners (NPs) and examine relationships between moral distress and level of practice independence as well as intent to leave a position. Moral distress has been studied regarding registered nurses and physicians (MDs) but less so in NPs. It is important to explore moral distress in NPs because they tread a unique path between nursing and physician roles. Moral distress may play a significant role in staff nurses' intention to leave practice, and level of practice independence is found to have a relationship with NPs' intention to leave. A convenience sample of ED NPs was obtained from a mailing list of a national nursing specialty organization, the Emergency Nurses Association. Using a correlational design, survey methods assessed moral distress with the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R), level of practice independence with the Dempster Practice Behavior Scale, and intent to leave with self-report. Correlational and regression analyses of data were conducted to characterize moral distress among ED NPs and associations between moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave. Results found ED NPs do experience moral distress with poor patient care results from inadequate staff communication and working with incompetent coworkers in their practice. The MDS-R was a significant predictor of intention to leave among respondents. This study is the first of its kind to explore moral distress in ED NPs. Results suggest moral distress influences ED NPs' intent to leave their position. Further studies are needed to explore the findings from this research and to formulate interventions to alleviate moral distress in ED NPs and improve retention in the clinical setting.

  3. Variation in infection prevention practices in dialysis facilities: results from the national opportunity to improve infection control in ESRD (End-Stage Renal Disease) project.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Carol E; Hines, Stephen C; Hall, Kendall K; Saran, Rajiv; Kalbfleisch, John D; Spencer, Teri; Frank, Kelly M; Carlson, Diane; Deane, Jan; Roys, Erik; Scholz, Natalie; Parrotte, Casey; Messana, Joseph M

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe patient care across hemodialysis facilities enrolled in the National Opportunity to Improve Infection Control in ESRD (end-stage renal disease) (NOTICE) project in order to evaluate adherence to evidence-based practices aimed at prevention of infection. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Thirty-four hemodialysis facilities were randomly selected from among 772 facilities in 4 end-stage renal disease participating networks. Facility selection was stratified on dialysis organization affiliation, size, socioeconomic status, and urban/rural status. MEASUREMENTS Trained infection control evaluators used an infection control worksheet to observe 73 distinct infection control practices at the hemodialysis facilities, from October 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012. RESULTS There was considerable variation in infection control practices across enrolled facilities. Overall adherence to recommended practices was 68% (range, 45%-92%) across all facilities. Overall adherence to expected hand hygiene practice was 72% (range, 10%-100%). Compliance to hand hygiene before and after procedures was high; however, during procedures hand hygiene compliance averaged 58%. Use of chlorhexidine as the specific agent for exit site care was 19% overall but varied from 0% to 35% by facility type. The 8 checklists varied in the frequency of perfect performance from 0% for meeting every item on the checklist for disinfection practices to 22% on the arteriovenous access practices at initiation. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that there are many areas for improvement in hand hygiene and other infection prevention practices in end-stage renal disease. These NOTICE project findings will help inform the development of a larger quality improvement initiative at dialysis facilities.

  4. Simulated crop yield in response to changes in climate and agricultural practices: results from a simple process based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldararu, S.; Smith, M. J.; Purves, D.; Emmott, S.

    2013-12-01

    Global agriculture will, in the future, be faced with two main challenges: climate change and an increase in global food demand driven by an increase in population and changes in consumption habits. To be able to predict both the impacts of changes in climate on crop yields and the changes in agricultural practices necessary to respond to such impacts we currently need to improve our understanding of crop responses to climate and the predictive capability of our models. Ideally, what we would have at our disposal is a modelling tool which, given certain climatic conditions and agricultural practices, can predict the growth pattern and final yield of any of the major crops across the globe. We present a simple, process-based crop growth model based on the assumption that plants allocate above- and below-ground biomass to maintain overall carbon optimality and that, to maintain this optimality, the reproductive stage begins at peak nitrogen uptake. The model includes responses to available light, water, temperature and carbon dioxide concentration as well as nitrogen fertilisation and irrigation. The model is data constrained at two sites, the Yaqui Valley, Mexico for wheat and the Southern Great Plains flux site for maize and soybean, using a robust combination of space-based vegetation data (including data from the MODIS and Landsat TM and ETM+ instruments), as well as ground-based biomass and yield measurements. We show a number of climate response scenarios, including increases in temperature and carbon dioxide concentrations as well as responses to irrigation and fertiliser application.

  5. A Results-Oriented Approach to OD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moravec, Milan

    1978-01-01

    Describes Bechtel Corporation's Organization Development (OD) system, which focuses on action/task identification, planning, operating decisions, and productivity. Presents eight-step process through which OD specialists help managers assess work-related problems (largely through interviews), action planning, implementation, and followup. Process…

  6. Acoustic positioning and orientation prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Aveni, Glenn; Putterman, Seth; Rudnick, Joseph

    1990-10-01

    A method is described for use with an acoustic positioner, which enables a determination of the equilibrium position and orientation which an object assumes in a zero gravity environment, as well as restoring forces and torques of an object in an acoustic standing wave field. An acoustic standing wave field is established in the chamber, and the object is held at several different positions near the expected equilibrium position. While the object is held at each position, the center resonant frequency of the chamber is determined, by noting which frequency results in the greatest pressure of the acoustic field. The object position which results in the lowest center resonant frequency is the equilibrium position. The orientation of a nonspherical object is similarly determined, by holding the object in a plurality of different orientations at its equilibrium position, and noting the center resonant frequency for each orientation. The orientation which results in the lowest center resonant frequency is the equilibrium orientation. Where the acoustic frequency is constant, but the chamber length is variable, the equilibrium position or orientation is that which results in the greatest chamber length at the center resonant frequency.

  7. Acoustic positioning and orientation prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Aveni, Glenn (Inventor); Putterman, Seth (Inventor); Rudnick, Joseph (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for use with an acoustic positioner, which enables a determination of the equilibrium position and orientation which an object assumes in a zero gravity environment, as well as restoring forces and torques of an object in an acoustic standing wave field. An acoustic standing wave field is established in the chamber, and the object is held at several different positions near the expected equilibrium position. While the object is held at each position, the center resonant frequency of the chamber is determined, by noting which frequency results in the greatest pressure of the acoustic field. The object position which results in the lowest center resonant frequency is the equilibrium position. The orientation of a nonspherical object is similarly determined, by holding the object in a plurality of different orientations at its equilibrium position, and noting the center resonant frequency for each orientation. The orientation which results in the lowest center resonant frequency is the equilibrium orientation. Where the acoustic frequency is constant, but the chamber length is variable, the equilibrium position or orientation is that which results in the greatest chamber length at the center resonant frequency.

  8. The Design and Use of a Practical Tests Assessment Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamir, Pinchas; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Following a discussion of the role and importance of practical laboratory tests, describes an instrument designed for inquiry-oriented practical examinations. The instrument consists of 21 categories representing different inquiry skills. Examples and illustrative data based on results in biology matriculation examination in Israel are reported.…

  9. [Sports cardiology - a general practice oriented update].

    PubMed

    Schmied, Christian

    2014-08-01

    As a sub-speciality, Sports Cardiology focuses on sport and physical training interacting with cardiac issues. Particularly, Sports Cardiology deals with the so-called "Sports Paradox", which implicates the fact the on one side regular physical training leads to a multitude of relevant health benefits. But on the other hand, exercise can also be a trigger for sudden cardiac death, particularly in case of an underlying cardiac disease. However, health benefits by regular training outweigh potential risks by far, but only if an adequate cardiac screening and individual recommendations for sports participation have been provided. This review highlights various aspects of Sports Cardiology like strategies to prevent sudden cardiac death in sports and training recommendations in patients with an underlying cardiovascular disease.

  10. Oriental Puzzle Gives Students Graphics Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddick, David B.; Johnson, Terri

    1985-01-01

    Describes a class assignment in which graphics students use an ancient Chinese puzzle called a tangram. Students arrange the five triangles, one square, and one rhomboid into an animate and an inanimate object. (HTH)

  11. Chapter 6: Essential Orientations and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In civic youth work program staff focus on larger outcomes and do not often attend to the importance of seemingly mundane and simple tasks. Young people talk about how these simple tasks have powerful meaning for them and their work even as adult volunteers talked about the challenges of working democratically with young people. To integrate these…

  12. Spiritually oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shafranske, Edward P

    2009-02-01

    Spiritually oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy pays particular attention to the roles that religious and spiritual beliefs, practices, and experiences play in the psychological life of the client. Contemporary psychoanalytic theorists offer multiple approaches to understand the functions of religious experience. Spirituality provides a means to address existential issues and provide a context to form personal meaning. Religious narratives present schemas of relationship and models of experiences salient to mental health, such as hope. God images or other symbolic representations of the transcendent have the power to evoke emotions, which in turn, influence motivation and behavior. While employing theories and techniques derived from psychodynamic psychotherapy, this therapeutic approach encourages the analysis of the functions religion and spirituality serve, while respecting the client's act of believing in faith. Psychotherapists address a client's spirituality by exploring the psychological meaning of such personal commitments and experiences and refrain from entering into discussion of faith claims.

  13. [Market oriented occupational medicine].

    PubMed

    Rurik, Imre; Cseh, Károly

    2012-09-01

    The history and the recent state of occupational medicine in Hungary, and its relation with governmental labor organizations are analyzed. In the past 20 years, large "socialist" factories were replaced by smaller companies employing fewer workers. They have been forced to establish contract with occupational health providers. Many of them offer primary care services, whereas family physicians having a board examination in occupational medicine are allowed to work in this field as well. The market of occupational medicine is less regulated, and ethical rules are not always considered. Undercutting prices is a common practice. The recent system could be improved by some regulations which should be respected. There is no reason to make rough changes establishing a new market for profit oriented insurance companies, and to allow employees and employers to work without specification neglecting international agreements. Occupational medicine should be supervised again by the health authorities instead of economists who have quite different, short-term priorities. PMID:22951411

  14. For the love of learning science: Connecting learning orientation and career productivity in physics and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Tai, Robert H.; Almarode, John

    2010-06-01

    An individual’s motivational orientation serves as a drive to action and can influence their career success. This study examines how goal orientation toward the pursuit of a graduate degree in physics and chemistry influences later success outcomes of practicing physicists and chemists. Two main categories of goal orientation are examined in this paper: performance orientation or motivation to demonstrate one’s ability or performance to others, and learning orientation or motivation through the desire to learn about a topic. The data were obtained as part of Project Crossover, a mixed-methods study which focused on studying the transition from graduate student to scientist in the physical sciences and included a survey of members of two national professional physical science organizations. Using regression analysis on data from 2353 physicists and chemists, results indicate that physicists and chemists who reported a learning orientation as their motivation for going to graduate school were more productive, in terms of total career primary and/or first-author publications and grant funding, than those reporting a performance orientation. Furthermore, given equal salary, learning-oriented individuals produced more primary and/or first-author publications than their nonlearning oriented counterparts.

  15. Rapid three-dimensional quantification of voxel-wise collagen fiber orientation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyi; Quinn, Kyle P; Speroni, Lucia; Arendt, Lisa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Defining fiber orientation at each voxel within a 3D biomedical image stack is potentially useful for a variety of applications, including cancer, wound healing and tissue regeneration. Current methods are typically computationally intensive or inaccurate. Herein, we present a 3D weighted orientation vector summation algorithm, which is a generalization of a previously reported 2D vector summation technique aimed at quantifying collagen fiber orientations simultaneously at each voxel of an image stack. As a result, voxel-wise fiber orientation information with 4° to 5° accuracy can be determined, and the computational time required to analyze a typical stack with the size of 512x512x100 voxels is less than 5 min. Thus, this technique enables the practical extraction of voxel-specific orientation data for characterizing structural anisotropy in 3D specimens. As examples, we use this approach to characterize the fiber organization in an excised mouse mammary gland and a 3D breast tissue model.

  16. Best Practices in Grid Integration of Variable Wind Power: Summary of Recent US Case Study Results and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. Charles; Parsons, Brian; Acker, Thomas; Milligan, Michael; Zavidil, Robert; Schuerger, Matthew; DeMeo, Edgar

    2010-01-22

    This paper will summarize results from a number of utility wind integration case studies conducted recently in the US, and outline a number of mitigation measures based on insights from those studies.

  17. The influence of age at disease onset on disease activity and disability: results from the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ruban, T N; Jacob, B; Pope, J E; Keystone, E C; Bombardier, C; Kuriya, B

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to compare characteristics between late-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and young-onset RA and determine the association between age at disease onset and disease severity. We cross-sectionally studied 971 patients at the time of entry into the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative, a registry of RA patients followed up in routine care. We restricted patients to ≤5 years of disease duration. Late-onset RA was defined as an onset ≥60 years of age and young-onset RA <60 years. Group differences were compared, and multivariate linear regression models were used to test the influence of age at onset on Disease Activity Score in 28 Joints with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR), Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI), and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores. The swollen joint count (6.2 vs. 5.3), acute phase reactants (C-reactive protein (CRP) 17.4 vs. 11.8 mg/L, ESR 30.6 vs. 21.5 mm/h), and comorbidity burden were higher in late-onset RA compared to young-onset RA (p < 0.01). Mean DAS28-ESR (4.6 vs. 4.3) and HAQ (1.2 vs. 1.1) scores were higher in late-onset RA patients (p < 0.05). Late-onset RA patients received more initial disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) monotherapy and corticosteroids in comparison to greater DMARD/biologic combination therapy in young-onset RA patients (p < 0.05). Adjusted multivariate analyses showed that late-onset RA was independently associated with higher mean DAS28-ESR and HAQ scores, but not CDAI. Late-onset RA patients have greater disease activity that may contribute to disability early in the disease course. Despite this, initial treatment consists of less combination DMARD and biologic use in late-onset RA patients. This may have implications for future response to therapy and development of joint damage, disability, and comorbidities in this group.

  18. "I Only Want to Know What You Know": The Use of Orienting Messages During Forensic Interviews and Their Effects on Child Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gwendolyn D; Anderson, Jennifer N; Krippner, Megan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate orienting messages within the CornerHouse Forensic Interview Protocol in two formats: provided both at the outset and as needed throughout the interview compared to previous practice in which orienting messages were provided only as the opportunity arose. Through the content analysis of 120 videotaped forensic interviews and corresponding case files in which children were interviewed for sexual abuse allegations, results suggest that the use of orienting messages both at the beginning and as needed lead to significantly more autonomous responses from children, that use of more orienting messages was significantly related to more autonomous responses from children, and that the specific orienting messages of "can't/won't say" and "ask me a question" significantly predict more autonomous responses among children. Implications for practice include the use of orienting messages as a way to provide a respectful and safe experience for children participating in forensic interviews.

  19. "I Only Want to Know What You Know": The Use of Orienting Messages During Forensic Interviews and Their Effects on Child Behavior.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gwendolyn D; Anderson, Jennifer N; Krippner, Megan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate orienting messages within the CornerHouse Forensic Interview Protocol in two formats: provided both at the outset and as needed throughout the interview compared to previous practice in which orienting messages were provided only as the opportunity arose. Through the content analysis of 120 videotaped forensic interviews and corresponding case files in which children were interviewed for sexual abuse allegations, results suggest that the use of orienting messages both at the beginning and as needed lead to significantly more autonomous responses from children, that use of more orienting messages was significantly related to more autonomous responses from children, and that the specific orienting messages of "can't/won't say" and "ask me a question" significantly predict more autonomous responses among children. Implications for practice include the use of orienting messages as a way to provide a respectful and safe experience for children participating in forensic interviews. PMID:27561121

  20. Orientation: the key to successful, engaged staff.

    PubMed

    Blackhurst, Kristi; Dowd, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Orientation programs are an important component of employee retention and engagement, yet the importance of orientation is often overlooked by many organizations. A lack of an adequate orientation program can result in new employees finding it difficult to adapt to the organization's culture,and may lead to high turnover rates. This article relates the story of Banner Baywood Medical Center's quest to cultivate an effective orientation program and increase retention of quality, engaged employees. PMID:21595338

  1. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Schmierer, Eric N.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  2. Improving Library Service Quality to Graduate Students: LibQual+[TM] Survey Results in a Practical Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowska, Maria Anna; Hertel, Karen; Young, Nancy J.

    2006-01-01

    The LibQUAL+[TM] survey was conducted to determine user satisfaction and expectations concerning library service quality. The results of the "22 items and a box" constituted a rich source of information for the University of Idaho (UI) Library's strategic planning process. Focusing on graduate students, this study used three methodologies to…

  3. Community health nurses’ learning needs in relation to the Canadian community health nursing standards of practice: results from a Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Canadian Community health nurses (CHNs) work in diverse urban, rural, and remote settings such as: public health units/departments, home health, community health facilities, family practices, and other community-based settings. Research into specific learning needs of practicing CHNs is sparsely reported. This paper examines Canadian CHNs learning needs in relation to the 2008 Canadian Community Health Nursing Standards of Practice (CCHN Standards). It answers: What are the learning needs of CHNs in Canada in relation to the CCHN Standards? What are differences in CHNs’ learning needs by: province and territory in Canada, work setting (home health, public health and other community health settings) and years of nursing practice? Methods Between late 2008 and early 2009 a national survey was conducted to identify learning needs of CHNs based on the CCHN Standards using a validated tool. Results Results indicated that CHNs had learning needs on 25 of 88 items (28.4%), suggesting CHNs have confidence in most CCHN Standards. Three items had the highest learning needs with mean scores > 0.60: two related to epidemiology (means 0.62 and 0.75); and one to informatics (application of information and communication technology) (mean = 0.73). Public health nurses had a greater need to know about “…evaluating population health promotion programs systematically” compared to home health nurses (mean 0.66 vs. 0.39, p <0.010). Nurses with under two years experience had a greater need to learn “… advocating for healthy public policy…” than their more experienced peers (p = 0.0029). Also, NPs had a greater need to learn about “…using community development principles when engaging the individual/community in a consultative process” compared to RNs (p = 0.05). Many nurses were unsure if they applied foundational theoretical frameworks (i.e., the Ottawa Charter of Health Promotion, the Jakarta Declaration, and the Population Health Promotion Model) in

  4. Primary Mathematics Teachers' Goal Orientations and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Throndsen, Inger; Turmo, Are

    2013-01-01

    Primary mathematics teachers' (N = 521) personal goal orientation and instructional practices were examined based on questionnaire responses. The teachers (grades 2 and 3) were oriented towards mastery goals and mastery approaches to instruction, and reported high teaching efficacy. Strong positive relation between performance orientation and…

  5. Teaching about Confidentiality in Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Evelyn S.

    1989-01-01

    The recent shift in pharmacy practice from product to information orientation, patients' desires to know more about medications, computerized access to records, and increased third-party payments may result in serious ethical dilemmas for pharmacists. Pharmacy schools must provide background in the responsibilities of health care professionals to…

  6. Multiple case studies of STEM teachers' orientations to science teaching through engineering design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, Madeline

    The following master's thesis is composed of two manuscripts describing STEM teachers' orientations to science teaching through engineering within the context of the Science Learning through Engineering Design (SLED) partnership. The framework guiding both studies was science teaching orientations, a component of pedagogical content knowledge. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, multi-day classroom observations, pre- and post-observation interviews, implementation plans, and written reflections. Data sources were analyzed to generate two orientations to science teaching through engineering design for each participant. The first manuscript illustrates a single case study conducted with a sixth grade STEM teacher. Results of this study revealed a detailed picture of the teacher's goals, practices, assessments, and general views when teaching science through engineering design. Common themes across the teacher's instruction were used to characterize her orientations to science teaching through engineering design. Overall, the teacher's orientations showed a shift in her practice from didactic to student-centered methods of teaching as a result of integrating engineering design-based curriculum. The second manuscript describes a comparative case study of two sixth grade SLED participants. Results of this study revealed more complex and diverse relationships between the teachers' orientations to teaching science through engineering design and their instruction. Participants' orientations served as filters for instruction, guided by their divergent purposes for science teaching. Furthermore, their orientations and resulting implementation were developed from knowledge gained in teacher education, implying that teacher educators and researchers can use this framework to learn more about how teachers' knowledge is used to integrate engineering and science practices in the K-12 classroom.

  7. Sustainable Permaculture systems demonstration in the high mountain desert region of New Mexico -- results of five years practice

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, V.

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports on five years of results in the Permaculture restoration of a mountain drylands ranch outside Santa Fe, New Mexico. Dramatic results have been produced in the areas of erosion control, pastureland restoration, wild species propagation, aquaculture, riparian zone (wetland) restoration, edible landscape design and installation methodologies. Recently completed work includes a grant-financed (US Fish and Wildlife Service Partners for Wildlife Program) replanting and redevelopment of the entire riparian zone of the ranch and the design and development of a trout-spawning pond system that is self contained and self-purifying, with circulation through a structured wetland provided by a photovoltaic pumping system. The paper presents the design philosophy, overall design strategy and significant details of specific strategies, projects, and systems.

  8. Sustainable permaculture systems demonstration in the high mountain desert region of New Mexico -- results of three years practice

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, V.

    1995-11-01

    This paper reports on three years of results in the Permaculture restoration of a mountain drylands ranch outside Santa Fe, New Mexico which receives less than 11 inches rainfall/year. Dramatic results have been produced in the areas of erosion control, pastureland restoration, wild species propagation, aquaculture, riparian zone (wetland) restoration, edible landscape design and installation methodologies. Additionally, significant work has been performed in the area of youth education and community development. Current work includes a grant-financed (US Fish and Wildlife Service ``Partners for Wildlife`` Program) replanting and redevelopment of the entire riparian zone of the ranch and the design and development of a trout-spawning pond system that is self contained and self-purifying, with circulation through a structured wetland provided by a photovoltaic pumping system. This paper presents the design philosophy, overall design strategy and significant details of specific strategies, projects, and systems.

  9. Assessment of Environmental Qualification Practices and Condition Monitoring Techniques for Low-Voltage Electric Cables: LOCA Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lofaro, R.; Grove, E.; Villaran, M.; Soo, P.; Hsu, F.

    2001-02-01

    This report documents the results of a research program addressing issues related to the qualification process for low-voltage instrumentation and control (I&C) electric cables used in commercial nuclear power plants. Three commonly used types of I&C cable were tested: Cross-Linked Polyethylene (XLPE) insulation with a Neoprene® jacket, Ethylene Propylene Rubber (EPR) insulation with an unbonded Hypalon® jacket, and EPR with a bonded Hypalon® jacket. Each cable type received accelerated aging to simulate 20, 40, and 60 years of qualified life. In addition, naturally aged cables of the same types were obtained from decommissioned nuclear power plants and tested. The cables were subjected to simulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) conditions, which included the sequential application of LOCA radiation followed by exposure to steam at high temperature and pressure, as well as to chemical spray. Periodic condition monitoring (CM) was performed using nine different techniques to obtain data on the condition of the cable, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of those CM techniques for in situ monitoring of cables. Volume 1 of this report presents the results of the LOCA tests, and Volume 2 discusses the results of the condition monitoring tests.

  10. Randomised controlled trial evaluating cardiovascular screening and intervention in general practice: principal results of British family heart study. Family Heart Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To measure the change in cardiovascular risk factors achievable in families over one year by a cardiovascular screening and lifestyle intervention in general practice. DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial in 26 general practices in 13 towns in Britain. SUBJECTS--12,472 men aged 40-59 and their partners (7460 men and 5012 women) identified by household. INTERVENTION--Nurse led programme using a family centred approach with follow up according to degree of risk. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--After one year the pairs of practices were compared for differences in (a) total coronary (Dundee) risk score and (b) cigarette smoking, weight, blood pressure, and random blood cholesterol and glucose concentrations. RESULTS--In men the overall reduction in coronary risk score was 16% (95% confidence interval 11% to 21%) in the intervention practices at one year. This was partitioned between systolic pressure (7%), smoking (5%), and cholesterol concentration (4%). The reduction for women was similar. For both sexes reported cigarette smoking at one year was lower by about 4%, systolic pressure by 7 mm Hg, diastolic pressure by 3 mm Hg, weight by 1 kg, and cholesterol concentration by 0.1 mmol/l, but there was no shift in glucose concentration. Weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol concentration showed the greatest difference at the top of the distribution. If maintained long term the differences in risk factors achieved would mean only a 12% reduction in risk of coronary events. CONCLUSIONS--As most general practices are not using such an intensive programme the changes in coronary risk factors achieved by the voluntary health promotion package for primary care are likely to be even smaller. The government's screening policy cannot be justified by these results. PMID:8124121

  11. Integrating a portable biofeedback device into clinical practice for patients with anxiety disorders: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Robert

    2008-03-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a portable Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) biofeedback device as an adjunct to CBT in persons with anxiety disorders and other disorders associated with autonomic dysfunction attending outpatient treatment. Participants were 24 individuals attending outpatient cognitive behavioral treatment for a range of anxiety disorders. Participants were assessed over a 3 week period. Outcomes included measures of anxiety (STAI-Y), sleep disturbances (PSQI), anger (STAEI), and subjective questions about the effectiveness of the device as a treatment adjunct. Significant reductions were found for anxiety and anger and for certain sleep variables (e.g. sleep latency). There was a significant dos-effect in that those who were more compliant had significantly greater reductions in most domains including sleep, anger and trait anxiety. Overall, participants found the device more helpful than other relaxation techniques such as mediation, yoga and unassisted breathing techniques but less helpful than exercise. The most frequently endorsed side effects were dizziness (15%) and sleepiness (55%). These preliminary results suggest that portable RSA biofeedback appears to be a promising treatment adjunct for disorders of autonomic arousal and is easily integrated into treatment. Results support the need for further investigation with more rigorous experimental designs.

  12. Praxis to Practice: Putting Qualitative Methods To Work for Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Barbara Kent

    This paper examines issues and areas of concern for the educational researcher moving from the relative safety of academic research to the more perilous arena of practice-oriented or action-oriented qualitative research. The first question is one of purity or objectivity: giving credibility to research results by imposing adequate rigor on methods…

  13. Role of epidural anesthesia in a fast track liver resection protocol for cirrhotic patients - results after three years of practice

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Bardi, Tommaso; Laici, Cristiana; Gamberini, Elisa; Francorsi, Letizia; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the potential benefits and risks of the use of epidural anaesthesia within an enhanced recovery protocol in this specific subpopulation. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted, including all cirrhotic patients who underwent open liver resection between January 2013 and December 2015 at Bologna University Hospital. Patients with an abnormal coagulation profile contraindicating the placement of an epidural catheter were excluded from the analysis. The control group was composed by patients refusing epidural anaesthesia. RESULTS Of the 183 cirrhotic patients undergoing open liver resections, 57 had contraindications to the placement of an epidural catheter; of the remaining 126, 86 patients received general anaesthesia and 40 combined anaesthesia. The two groups presented homogeneous characteristics. Intraoperatively the metabolic data did not differ between the two groups, whilst the epidural group had a lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.041) and received more colloid infusions (P = 0.007). Postoperative liver and kidney function did not differ significantly. Length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003) and hospital stay (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the epidural group. No complications related to the epidural catheter placement or removal was recorded. CONCLUSION The use of Epidural Anaesthesia within a fast track protocol for cirrhotic patients undergoing liver resections had a positive impact on the patient’s outcomes and comfort as demonstrated by a significantly lower length of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay in the epidural group. The technique appears to be safely manageable in this fragile population even though these results need confirmation in larger studies. PMID:27660677

  14. Quality initiatives: improving patient flow for a bone densitometry practice: results from a Mayo Clinic radiology quality initiative.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Kenneth T; Valley, Timothy B; O'Connor, Michael K

    2010-03-01

    Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies have been used in manufacturing for some time. However, Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies also are applicable to radiology as a way to identify opportunities for improvement in patient care delivery settings. A multidisciplinary team of physicians and staff conducted a 100-day quality improvement project with the guidance of a quality advisor. By using the framework of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control), time studies were performed for all aspects of patient and technologist involvement. From these studies, value stream maps for the current state and for the future were developed, and tests of change were implemented. Comprehensive value stream maps showed that before implementation of process changes, an average time of 20.95 minutes was required for completion of a bone densitometry study. Two process changes (ie, tests of change) were undertaken. First, the location for completion of a patient assessment form was moved from inside the imaging room to the waiting area, enabling patients to complete the form while waiting for the technologist. Second, the patient was instructed to sit in a waiting area immediately outside the imaging rooms, rather than in the main reception area, which is far removed from the imaging area. Realignment of these process steps, with reduced technologist travel distances, resulted in a 3-minute average decrease in the patient cycle time. This represented a 15% reduction in the initial patient cycle time with no change in staff or costs. Radiology process improvement projects can yield positive results despite small incremental changes.

  15. Role of epidural anesthesia in a fast track liver resection protocol for cirrhotic patients - results after three years of practice

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Gamberini, Lorenzo; Bardi, Tommaso; Laici, Cristiana; Gamberini, Elisa; Francorsi, Letizia; Faenza, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the potential benefits and risks of the use of epidural anaesthesia within an enhanced recovery protocol in this specific subpopulation. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted, including all cirrhotic patients who underwent open liver resection between January 2013 and December 2015 at Bologna University Hospital. Patients with an abnormal coagulation profile contraindicating the placement of an epidural catheter were excluded from the analysis. The control group was composed by patients refusing epidural anaesthesia. RESULTS Of the 183 cirrhotic patients undergoing open liver resections, 57 had contraindications to the placement of an epidural catheter; of the remaining 126, 86 patients received general anaesthesia and 40 combined anaesthesia. The two groups presented homogeneous characteristics. Intraoperatively the metabolic data did not differ between the two groups, whilst the epidural group had a lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.041) and received more colloid infusions (P = 0.007). Postoperative liver and kidney function did not differ significantly. Length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.003) and hospital stay (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the epidural group. No complications related to the epidural catheter placement or removal was recorded. CONCLUSION The use of Epidural Anaesthesia within a fast track protocol for cirrhotic patients undergoing liver resections had a positive impact on the patient’s outcomes and comfort as demonstrated by a significantly lower length of mechanical ventilation and hospital stay in the epidural group. The technique appears to be safely manageable in this fragile population even though these results need confirmation in larger studies.

  16. Quality initiatives: improving patient flow for a bone densitometry practice: results from a Mayo Clinic radiology quality initiative.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Kenneth T; Valley, Timothy B; O'Connor, Michael K

    2010-03-01

    Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies have been used in manufacturing for some time. However, Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodologies also are applicable to radiology as a way to identify opportunities for improvement in patient care delivery settings. A multidisciplinary team of physicians and staff conducted a 100-day quality improvement project with the guidance of a quality advisor. By using the framework of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control), time studies were performed for all aspects of patient and technologist involvement. From these studies, value stream maps for the current state and for the future were developed, and tests of change were implemented. Comprehensive value stream maps showed that before implementation of process changes, an average time of 20.95 minutes was required for completion of a bone densitometry study. Two process changes (ie, tests of change) were undertaken. First, the location for completion of a patient assessment form was moved from inside the imaging room to the waiting area, enabling patients to complete the form while waiting for the technologist. Second, the patient was instructed to sit in a waiting area immediately outside the imaging rooms, rather than in the main reception area, which is far removed from the imaging area. Realignment of these process steps, with reduced technologist travel distances, resulted in a 3-minute average decrease in the patient cycle time. This represented a 15% reduction in the initial patient cycle time with no change in staff or costs. Radiology process improvement projects can yield positive results despite small incremental changes. PMID:20067999

  17. Implementation of Departmental Quality Strategies Is Positively Associated with Clinical Practice: Results of a Multicenter Study in 73 Hospitals in 7 European Countries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Given the amount of time and resources invested in implementing quality programs in hospitals, few studies have investigated their clinical impact and what strategies could be recommended to enhance its effectiveness. Objective To assess variations in clinical practice and explore associations with hospital- and department-level quality management systems. Design Multicenter, multilevel cross-sectional study. Setting and Participants Seventy-three acute care hospitals with 276 departments managing acute myocardial infarction, deliveries, hip fracture, and stroke in seven countries. Intervention None. Measures Predictor variables included 3 hospital- and 4 department-level quality measures. Six measures were collected through direct observation by an external surveyor and one was assessed through a questionnaire completed by hospital quality managers. Dependent variables included 24 clinical practice indicators based on case note reviews covering the 4 conditions (acute myocardial infarction, deliveries, hip fracture and stroke). A directed acyclic graph was used to encode relationships between predictors, outcomes, and covariates and to guide the choice of covariates to control for confounding. Results and Limitations Data were provided on 9021 clinical records by 276 departments in 73 hospitals. There were substantial variations in compliance with the 24 clinical practice indicators. Weak associations were observed between hospital quality systems and 4 of the 24 indicators, but on analyzing department-level quality systems, strong associations were observed for 8 of the 11 indicators for acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Clinical indicators supported by higher levels of evidence were more frequently associated with quality systems and activities. Conclusions There are significant gaps between recommended standards of care and clinical practice in a large sample of hospitals. Implementation of department-level quality strategies was significantly

  18. Current worldwide nuclear cardiology practices and radiation exposure: results from the 65 country IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Cross-Sectional Study (INCAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Pascual, Thomas N. B.; Mercuri, Mathew; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Vitola, João V.; Mahmarian, John J.; Better, Nathan; Bouyoucef, Salah E.; Hee-Seung Bom, Henry; Lele, Vikram; Magboo, V. Peter C.; Alexánderson, Erick; Allam, Adel H.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H.; Flotats, Albert; Jerome, Scott; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Luxenburg, Osnat; Shaw, Leslee J.; Underwood, S. Richard; Rehani, Madan M.; Kashyap, Ravi; Paez, Diana; Dondi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Aims To characterize patient radiation doses from nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and the use of radiation-optimizing ‘best practices’ worldwide, and to evaluate the relationship between laboratory use of best practices and patient radiation dose. Methods and results We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of protocols used for all 7911 MPI studies performed in 308 nuclear cardiology laboratories in 65 countries for a single week in March–April 2013. Eight ‘best practices’ relating to radiation exposure were identified a priori by an expert committee, and a radiation-related quality index (QI) devised indicating the number of best practices used by a laboratory. Patient radiation effective dose (ED) ranged between 0.8 and 35.6 mSv (median 10.0 mSv). Average laboratory ED ranged from 2.2 to 24.4 mSv (median 10.4 mSv); only 91 (30%) laboratories achieved the median ED ≤ 9 mSv recommended by guidelines. Laboratory QIs ranged from 2 to 8 (median 5). Both ED and QI differed significantly between laboratories, countries, and world regions. The lowest median ED (8.0 mSv), in Europe, coincided with high best-practice adherence (mean laboratory QI 6.2). The highest doses (median 12.1 mSv) and low QI (4.9) occurred in Latin America. In hierarchical regression modelling, patients undergoing MPI at laboratories following more ‘best practices’ had lower EDs. Conclusion Marked worldwide variation exists in radiation safety practices pertaining to MPI, with targeted EDs currently achieved in a minority of laboratories. The significant relationship between best-practice implementation and lower doses indicates numerous opportunities to reduce radiation exposure from MPI globally. PMID:25898845

  19. Assessing Rates of Inadequate Feeding Practices Among Children 12-24 months: Results from a Cross-Sectional Survey in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Thet, May Me; Richards, Leah-Mari; Sudhinaraset, May; Paw, Naw Eh Thi; Diamond-Smith, Nadia

    2016-08-01

    Objectives To ensure proper nutrition and optimal health outcomes, it is critical that infants are exclusively breastfed (0-6 months) and then receive adequate feeding from 6-23 months (breastfeeding and frequent feedings of complementary foods). Despite policies and guidelines on adequate feeding in Myanmar, past research has found low rates of adequately fed infants 0-11 months and little is known about the adequacy of feeding practices for children 12-23 months. The aim of this study is to understand the feeding practices of children aged 0-24 months in Myanmar and maternal characteristics associated with adequate feeding practices. Methods This study examines the rates of adequately fed infants and young children (0-23 months) in hard-to-reach townships in Myanmar from a cross-sectional, multistage cluster survey. Survey data on nutritional practices were collected from 489 mothers. Data were analyzed using multivariate regressions. Results We found that 41.8 % of infants under 6 months were exclusively breastfed, 63.2 % of those aged 6-11 months were adequately fed, and 10.3 % of 12-23 month-olds were adequately fed. In multivariate regressions we found that antenatal care visits [1-4 visits, AOR = 6.59 (p < 0.01) and >4 visits, AOR = 6.63 (p < 0.05)] was associated with exclusive breastfeeding for under 6 month old infants. Having >4 antenatal care visits [AOR = 9.97 (p < 0.05)] was associated with adequate feeding for 6-11 months old infants. Conclusions Future nutritional interventions and policies should focus on improving messaging about adequate feeding practices, especially for 12-23 months olds. PMID:27003151

  20. Evidence supporting primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases with statins: Gaps between updated clinical results and actual practice.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The use of pharmacological lipid-lowering intervention in individuals with hypercholesterolaemia and known cardiovascular disease or diabetes/chronic kidney disease is well established. Current European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend immediate initiation of drugs in adjunct to lifestyle intervention in these patients at high or very high cardiovascular risk. In these clinical settings, statins are generally chosen as the first-choice drug intervention, in consideration of the robust evidence showing a reduction in all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In contrast, primary prevention with statins, even in the subset of patients at high-risk of cardiovascular events, is not well implemented. This might be related to a lack of public awareness regarding the actual risk associated with prolonged exposure to high concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and uncertainties in the clinical evidence coming from the earliest trials in this patient subset. However, recent observational studies suggest that lowering LDL-C earlier in life and for a longer duration can substantially decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Moreover, results from recent well-conducted large meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials showed that primary prevention with statins reduced all-cause mortality by 14% and MACE by > 20% - findings similar to those observed for the use of statins in secondary prevention. Recently published American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology guidelines on the treatment of blood cholesterol emphasize that primary prevention using high-dose statins in individuals with LDL-C ≥ 190 mg/dL induces a benefit in atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk reduction that clearly exceeds the potential for adverse effects. We aim in this review to discuss the new data that advocate the use of statins in primary prevention earlier and more frequently, putting the efficacy evidence into

  1. Practice guidance on the management of acute and chronic gastrointestinal problems arising as a result of treatment for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Susan E; Gillespie, Catherine; Allum, William H; Swarbrick, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Backgound The number of patients with chronic gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms after cancer therapies which have a moderate or severe impact on quality of life is similar to the number diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease annually. However, in contrast to patients with inflammatory bowel disease, most of these patients are not referred for gastroenterological assessment. Clinicians who do see these patients are often unaware of the benefits of targeted investigation (which differ from those required to exclude recurrent cancer), the range of available treatments and how the pathological processes underlying side effects of cancer treatment differ from those in benign GI disorders. This paper aims to help clinicians become aware of the problem and suggests ways in which the panoply of syndromes can be managed. Methods A multidisciplinary literature review was performed to develop guidance to facilitate clinical management of GI side effects of cancer treatments. Results Different pathological processes within the GI tract may produce identical symptoms. Optimal management requires appropriate investigations and coordinated multidisciplinary working. Lactose intolerance, small bowel bacterial overgrowth and bile acid malabsorption frequently develop during or after chemotherapy. Toxin-negative Clostridium difficile and cytomegalovirus infection may be fulminant in immunosuppressed patients and require rapid diagnosis and treatment. Hepatic side effects include reactivation of viral hepatitis, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, steatosis and steatohepatitis. Anticancer biological agents have multiple interactions with conventional drugs. Colonoscopy is contraindicated in neutropenic enterocolitis but endoscopy may be life-saving in other patients with GI bleeding. After cancer treatment, simple questions can identify patients who need referral for specialist management of GI symptoms. Other troublesome pelvic problems (eg, urinary, sexual, nutritional) are frequent

  2. Through fiber orientation investigation to visualize compression molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Chung; Chiu, Hsien-Sen; Huang, Chao-Tsai; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2014-05-01

    Please leave one line blank after the abstract. In a pure compression process, polymer melt is compressed to flow by moving the movable platen of the mold to complete melt filling. Compression of the melt is then continued by the pressure exerted from the mold wall of the core side. This process provides a more uniform pressure on the cavity wall and requires a lower molding pressure for the post-filling process. Since the fiber orientation distribution affects both the elastic properties of the finished part, it is important to know the influence in the development of shrinkage and warpage. This study introduces a true 3D finite volume based simulation tool to simulate the nonisothermal compression molding process with the fiber orientation prediction. For the compression action, a novel dynamic moving grid approach is adopted, where the computational domain will deform with time to realize the complex advancing flow front during compression. By means of simulation tool, the distribution of fiber orientation can be tailored through the interpolation of fiber orientation tensor and further investigate the effect of different initial orientation assignment in the pre-filled charge area. The results illustrate the potential practice of an effective 3D approach tool of being an extremely cost effective method to optimize the process.

  3. Computerized background-oriented schlieren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, G. E. A.

    2002-06-01

    A schlieren measurement technique based on computer evaluation of image variations due to refractive index variations in the propagation medium is presented; in what follows, this concept is referred to as the "background-oriented schlieren" (BOS) method. The differences between BOS and other optical techniques for refractive index measurement are the governing role of numerical methods, the extremely small amount of optical equipment, the high accuracy, the bidirectional sensitivity, the fast evaluation, and the missing field limitations. The principle of the method is the numerical comparison of a schlieren distorted and an undistorted image of a deliberate background. The method has become usable in practice owing to the immense progress in computing power and to newly developed fast-correlation algorithms. The extension of this method to space resolving techniques is possible. Some experimental studies show the applicability. Examples are a mixing turbulent jet, a supersonic jet, a shed vortex, and the sound wave of a gun shot. These few results underline the encouraging prospect for the future applicability of this technique. The BOS method offers not only the possibility of qualitative and quantitative schlieren investigations but also has the potential to determine density fields by integration of the measured gradient fields.

  4. Lunar orientation in a beetle.

    PubMed Central

    Dacke, Marie; Byrne, Marcus J.; Scholtz, Clarke H.; Warrant, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    Many animals use the sun's polarization pattern to orientate, but the dung beetle Scarabaeus zambesianus is the only animal so far known to orientate using the million times dimmer polarization pattern of the moonlit sky. We demonstrate the relative roles of the moon and the nocturnal polarized-light pattern for orientation. We find that artificially changing the position of the moon, or hiding the moon's disc from the beetle's field of view, generally did not influence its orientation performance. We thus conclude that the moon does not serve as the primary cue for orientation. The effective cue is the polarization pattern formed around the moon, which is more reliable for orientation. Polarization sensitivity ratios in two photoreceptors in the dorsal eye were found to be 7.7 and 12.9, similar to values recorded in diurnal navigators. These results agree with earlier results suggesting that the detection and analysis of polarized skylight is similar in diurnal and nocturnal insects. PMID:15101694

  5. Lateral orientation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest, and the ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the body. An example of medial orientation is the eyes, which are medial to the ears on the head.

  6. They Call it Orienteering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Mark

    1977-01-01

    Through the use of personal anecdotes, the author details his initial experience with orienteering, a sport rapidly increasing in popularity that teaches people not to get lost in the woods. Sources of information about orienteering are provided. (BT)

  7. Adults with ADHD Benefit from Cognitive-Behaviorally Oriented Group Rehabilitation: A Study of 29 Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virta, Maarit; Vedenpaa, Anita; Gronroos, Nina; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Vataja, Risto; Kaski, Markus; Iivanainen, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective nonpharmacological treatments of adult ADHD. The authors present results from a cognitive-behaviorally oriented psychological group rehabilitation for adult ADHD. Method: A total of 29 adults with ADHD participated. Rehabilitation consisted of 10 or 11 weekly sessions.…

  8. Media Credibility and Cognitive Authority. The Case of Seeking Orienting Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savolainen, Reijo

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: This article results from a qualitative case study focusing on the information seeking practices of environmental activists. The main attention was devoted to their perceptions of media credibility and cognitive authority in the context of seeking orienting information about environmental issues in particular. Method: The empirical…

  9. An international effort towards developing standards for best practices in analysis, interpretation and reporting of clinical genome sequencing results in the CLARITY Challenge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is tremendous potential for genome sequencing to improve clinical diagnosis and care once it becomes routinely accessible, but this will require formalizing research methods into clinical best practices in the areas of sequence data generation, analysis, interpretation and reporting. The CLARITY Challenge was designed to spur convergence in methods for diagnosing genetic disease starting from clinical case history and genome sequencing data. DNA samples were obtained from three families with heritable genetic disorders and genomic sequence data were donated by sequencing platform vendors. The challenge was to analyze and interpret these data with the goals of identifying disease-causing variants and reporting the findings in a clinically useful format. Participating contestant groups were solicited broadly, and an independent panel of judges evaluated their performance. Results A total of 30 international groups were engaged. The entries reveal a general convergence of practices on most elements of the analysis and interpretation process. However, even given this commonality of approach, only two groups identified the consensus candidate variants in all disease cases, demonstrating a need for consistent fine-tuning of the generally accepted methods. There was greater diversity of the final clinical report content and in the patient consenting process, demonstrating that these areas require additional exploration and standardization. Conclusions The CLARITY Challenge provides a comprehensive assessment of current practices for using genome sequencing to diagnose and report genetic diseases. There is remarkable convergence in bioinformatic techniques, but medical interpretation and reporting are areas that require further development by many groups. PMID:24667040

  10. Effectiveness of an educational intervention to improve child feeding practices and growth in rural China: updated results at 18 months of age.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxu; Shi, Ling; Chen, Da-Fang; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate complementary feeding practices have led to, in part, significant disparities in growth and nutritional status between rural and urban children in China. A cluster-randomised, controlled trial was implemented in Laishui, China to assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on caregivers' feeding practices and children's growth. Eight townships were randomly assigned to the intervention or control. Five hundred ninety-nine healthy infants were enrolled at 2-4 months old, and were followed up at ages 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months. The intervention group received information on enhanced home-prepared recipes and food preparation and hygiene through group training, counselling and home visit. Key outcomes were children's physical growth, caregivers' knowledge and behaviours on complementary feeding, and the infant and child feeding index (ICFI). Analysis was by intention to treat. The intervention group achieved better knowledge and practices related to complementary feeding, and significantly higher ICFI scores at each follow-up point. Children in the intervention group achieved higher z-scores for weight-for-age (WAZ) and weight-for-height (WHZ) than the control (0.18 vs. 0.01 and 0.49 vs. 0.19, respectively) at 18 months old, and were less likely to have stunted growth (odds ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval: 0.53-0.94). Mixed model showed that the intervention group achieved significantly better linear growth over time, including WAZ (P = 0.016), WHZ (P = 0.030) and HAZ (P = 0.078). These results indicated that an educational intervention delivered through local health services can enhance caregivers' knowledge and practices of complementary feeding and ultimately improve children's growth.

  11. Late Triassic paleomagnetic result from the Baoshan Terrane, West Yunnan of China: Implication for orientation of the East Paleotethys suture zone and timing of the Sibumasu-Indochina collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Huang, Baochun; Yan, Yonggang; Zhang, Donghai

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the paleogeographic position of the Baoshan Terrane in the northernmost part of the Sibumasu Block during formation of the Pangea supercontinent, a paleomagnetic study has been conducted on Late Triassic basaltic lavas from the southern part of the Baoshan Terrane in the West Yunnan region of Southwest China. Following detailed rock magnetic investigations and progressive thermal demagnetization, stable characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRMs) were successfully isolated from Late Triassic Niuhetang lava flows. The ChRMs are of dual polarity and pass fold and reversal tests with magnetic carriers dominated by magnetite and subordinate oxidation-induced hematite; we thus interpret them as a primary remanence. This new paleomagnetic result indicates that the Baoshan Terrane was located at low paleolatitudes of ∼15°N in the Northern Hemisphere during Late Triassic times. Together with available paleomagnetic data from the Baoshan Terrane and surrounding areas, a wider paleomagnetic comparison supports the view that the East Paleotethys Ocean separated the Sibumasu and Indochina blocks and closed no later than Late Triassic times. We argue that the currently approximately north-to-south directed Changning-Menglian suture zone is very likely to have been oriented nearly east-to-west at the time of the Sibumasu-Indochina collision.

  12. Use of evidence based practices to improve survival without severe morbidity for very preterm infants: results from the EPICE population based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Manktelow, Bradley N; Piedvache, Aurelie; Cuttini, Marina; Boyle, Elaine; van Heijst, Arno; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Van Reempts, Patrick; Huusom, Lene; Weber, Tom; Schmidt, Stephan; Barros, Henrique; Dillalo, Dominico; Toome, Liis; Norman, Mikael; Blondel, Beatrice; Bonet, Mercedes; Draper, Elisabeth S; Maier, Rolf F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the implementation of four high evidence practices for the care of very preterm infants to assess their use and impact in routine clinical practice and whether they constitute a driver for reducing mortality and neonatal morbidity. Design Prospective multinational population based observational study. Setting 19 regions from 11 European countries covering 850 000 annual births participating in the EPICE (Effective Perinatal Intensive Care in Europe for very preterm births) project. Participants 7336 infants born between 24+0 and 31+6 weeks’ gestation in 2011/12 without serious congenital anomalies and surviving to neonatal admission. Main outcome measures Combined use of four evidence based practices for infants born before 28 weeks’ gestation using an “all or none” approach: delivery in a maternity unit with appropriate level of neonatal care; administration of antenatal corticosteroids; prevention of hypothermia (temperature on admission to neonatal unit ≥36°C); surfactant used within two hours of birth or early nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Infant outcomes were in-hospital mortality, severe neonatal morbidity at discharge, and a composite measure of death or severe morbidity, or both. We modelled associations using risk ratios, with propensity score weighting to account for potential confounding bias. Analyses were adjusted for clustering within delivery hospital. Results Only 58.3% (n=4275) of infants received all evidence based practices for which they were eligible. Infants with low gestational age, growth restriction, low Apgar scores, and who were born on the day of maternal admission to hospital were less likely to receive evidence based care. After adjustment, evidence based care was associated with lower in-hospital mortality (risk ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.87) and in-hospital mortality or severe morbidity, or both (0.82, 0.73 to 0.92), corresponding to an estimated 18% decrease

  13. Possibilities of the Integration of the Method of the Ecologically Oriented Independent Scientific Research in the Study Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grizans, Jurijs; Vanags, Janis

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse possibilities of the integration of the method of the ecologically oriented independent scientific research in the study process. In order to achieve the set aim, the following scientific research methods were used: analysis of the conceptual guidelines for the development of environmentally oriented entrepreneurship, interpretation of the experts' evaluation of the ecologically oriented management, analysis of the results of the students' ecologically oriented independent scientific research, as well as monographic and logically constructive methods. The results of the study give an opportunity to make conclusions and to develop conceptual recommendations on how to introduce future economics and business professionals with the theoretical and practical aspects of ecologically oriented management during the study process.

  14. Design oriented structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Desirable characteristics and benefits of design oriented analysis methods are described and illustrated by presenting a synoptic description of the development and uses of the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. ELAPS is a design oriented structural analysis method which is intended for use in the early design of aircraft wing structures. Model preparation is minimized by using a few large plate segments to model the wing box structure. Computational efficiency is achieved by using a limited number of global displacement functions that encompass all segments over the wing planform. Coupling with other codes is facilitated since the output quantities such as deflections and stresses are calculated as continuous functions over the plate segments. Various aspects of the ELAPS development are discussed including the analytical formulation, verification of results by comparison with finite element analysis results, coupling with other codes, and calculation of sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of ELAPS for multidisciplinary design application is illustrated by describing its use in design studies of high speed civil transport wing structures.

  15. TBV-361 RESOLUTION ANALYSIS: EMPLACEMENT DRIFT ORIENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    M. Lin; D.C. Kicker; M.D. Sellers

    1999-07-17

    The purpose of this To Be Verified/To Be Determined (TBX) resolution analysis is to release ''To Be Verified'' (TBV)-361 related to the emplacement drift orientation. The system design criterion in ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 1998a, p.9) specifies that the emplacement drift orientation relative to the dominant joint orientations should be at least 30 degrees. The specific objectives for this analysis include the following: (1) Collect and evaluate key block data developed for the repository host horizon rock mass. (2) Assess the dominant joint orientations based on available fracture data. (3) Document the maximum block size as a function of drift orientation. (4) Assess the applicability of the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion in the ''Subsurface Facility System Description Document'' (CRWMS M&O 1998a, p.9). (5) Consider the effects of seepage on drift orientation. (6) Verify that the viability assessment (VA) drift orientation complies with the drift orientation/joint orientation offset criterion, or provide justifications and make recommendations for modifying the VA emplacement drift layout. In addition to providing direct support to the System Description Document (SDD), the release of TBV-361 will provide support to the Repository Subsurface Design Department. The results from this activity may also provide data and information needs to support the MGR Requirements Department, the MGR Safety Assurance Department, and the Performance Assessment Organization.

  16. Results from a National Central Auditory Processing Disorder Service: A Real-World Assessment of Diagnostic Practices and Remediation for Central Auditory Processing Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Sharon; Glyde, Helen; Dillon, Harvey; King, Alison; Gillies, Karin

    2015-11-01

    This article describes the development and evaluation of a national service to diagnose and remediate central auditory processing disorder (CAPD). Data were gathered from 38 participating Australian Hearing centers over an 18-month period from 666 individuals age 6, 0 (years, months) to 24, 8 (median 9, 0). A total of 408 clients were diagnosed with either a spatial processing disorder (n = 130), a verbal memory deficit (n = 174), or a binaural integration deficit (n = 104). A hierarchical test protocol was used so not all children were assessed on all tests in the battery. One hundred fifty clients decided to proceed with deficit-specific training (LiSN & Learn or Memory Booster) and/or be fitted with a frequency modulation system. Families were provided with communication strategies targeted to a child's specific listening difficulties and goals. Outcomes were measured using repeat assessment of the relevant diagnostic test, as well as the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement measure and Listening Inventories for Education teacher questionnaire. Group analyses revealed significant improvements postremediation for all training/management options. Individual posttraining performance and results of outcome measures also are discussed. PMID:27587910

  17. Patients with Postpartum Depression in Gynaecological Practices in Germany – Results of a Representative Survey of Local Gynaecologists about Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Pawils, S.; Metzner, F.; Wendt, C.; Raus, S.; Shedden-Mora, M.; Wlodarczyk, O.; Härter, M.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical Background and Current Issues: For the sake of pre-emptive child protection it is necessary to recognise signs of postpartum depression (PPD) in pregnant women and young mothers as early as possible and to initiate adequate assistance. Because of their high acceptance, especially in the phases of pregnancy and birth, the local gynaecologists offer ideal prerequisites for access to the parents. This study evaluates the current status of diagnosis and management of PPD in gynaecological practices. Material and Methods: In a representative German nation-wide questionnaire survey taking the regional distribution into account n = 3000 local gynaecologists were selected at random and contacted by post. The questionnaire addressed their approaches to the diagnosis and management of PPD as well as the encountered barriers. Results: Among the n = 1034 participating gynaecologists (response rate: 35 %) half of them dealt actively with PPD; 16 % used a questionnaire for this purpose. Consultation by the gynaecologist (84 %) or referral to therapists or hospitals (86 %) were among the most common interventions in the management of PPD. A need for improvement in the management of women with PPD was recognised equally often. As barriers the gynaecologists mentioned above all the lack of time, the low reimbursements for consultations and the lack of effective treatment options. Predictors for an active anamnesis were found to be female gender of the gynaecologist, possession of an additional psychosomatic qualification and practice located in an urban catchment area or state of the former West Germany. Conclusion: The results clearly demonstrate a high acceptance for the management of PPD by gynaecologists as well as the need for further action to improve the care of patients with PPD in gynaecological practices. PMID:27582583

  18. Task-oriented situation recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Alexander; Fischer, Yvonne

    2010-04-01

    From the advances in computer vision methods for the detection, tracking and recognition of objects in video streams, new opportunities for video surveillance arise: In the future, automated video surveillance systems will be able to detect critical situations early enough to enable an operator to take preventive actions, instead of using video material merely for forensic investigations. However, problems such as limited computational resources, privacy regulations and a constant change in potential threads have to be addressed by a practical automated video surveillance system. In this paper, we show how these problems can be addressed using a task-oriented approach. The system architecture of the task-oriented video surveillance system NEST and an algorithm for the detection of abnormal behavior as part of the system are presented and illustrated for the surveillance of guests inside a video-monitored building.

  19. Understanding the emergence of state goal orientation in organizational work groups: the role of leadership and multilevel climate perceptions.

    PubMed

    Dragoni, Lisa

    2005-11-01

    This article attends to a broad range of practically significant employee motivations and provides insight into how to enhance individual-level performance by examining individual-level state goal orientation emergence in organizational work groups. Leadership and multilevel climate processes are theorized to parallel each dimension of state goal orientation to cue and ultimately induce the corresponding achievement focus among individual work group members. It is argued that the patterns of leader behavior, which elucidate the leader's achievement priority, shape group members' psychological and work group climate to embody this priority. Resulting multilevel climate perceptions signal and compel group members to adopt the ascribed form of state goal orientation. The quality of the leader-member exchange relationship is viewed as a means to clarify leader messages in the formation of group members' psychological climate and internalize these cues in the emergence of state goal orientation. Considerations for future research and practice are discussed.

  20. Exploring the interplay between the motivational climate and goal orientation in predicting maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Buch, Robert; Nerstad, Christina G L; Aandstad, Anders; Säfvenbom, Reidar

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon achievement goal theory, this study explored the interplay between the perceived motivational climate, achievement goals and objective measurements of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The results of a study of 123 individuals from three Norwegian military academies revealed that under the condition of a high-performance orientation there is a stronger positive relationship between performance climate and VO2max for individuals reporting a low (rather than high)-mastery orientation. Furthermore, we found that for individuals with a high-mastery orientation there is a stronger positive relationship between mastery climate and VO2max for individuals reporting a low (rather than high)-performance orientation. These findings contribute to achievement goal theory by providing support for an interactionist person-environment fit perspective. Implications for future research and practice are discussed. PMID:25995068

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 31: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SME mail survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with, not necessarily belonging to, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME).

  2. Convex Image Orientation from Relative Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, M.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a novel workflow for the estimation of global image orientations given relative orientations between pairs of overlapping images. Our approach is convex and independent on initial values. First, global rotations are estimated in a relaxed semidefinite program (SDP) and refined in an iterative least squares adjustment in the tangent space of SO(3). A critical aspect is the handling of outliers in the relative orientations. We present a novel heuristic graph based approach for filtering the relative rotations that outperforms state-of-the-art robust rotation averaging algorithms. In a second part we make use of point-observations, tracked over a set of overlapping images and formulate a linear homogeneous system of equations to transfer the scale information between triplets of images, using estimated global rotations and relative translation directions. The final step consists of refining the orientation parameters in a robust bundle adjustment. The proposed approach handles outliers in the homologous points and relative orientations in every step of the processing chain. We demonstrate the robustness of the procedure on synthetic data. Moreover, the performance of our approach is illustrated on real world benchmark data.

  3. The use of risk sharing tools for post adoption surveillance of a non pharmacological technology in routine practice: results after one year

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To report results obtained by combining risk sharing tools with post-adoption surveillance mechanisms in order to control quality of care and implement a value-based reimbursement scheme for Neuro-reflexotherapy (NRT), a non-pharmacological treatment proven effective for neck pain (NP), thoracic pain (TP) and low back pain (LBP). Methods Pre-post prospective cohort study in routine clinical practice, carried out in primary care centers in the Spanish National Health Service in the Balearic Islands (Ib-Salut). Eight-hundred and seventy-one subacute and chronic NP, TP and LBP patients treated in Ib-Salut, who underwent NRT during 2011. A shared risk contract (SRC) was developed, where payments for NRT were linked to results on patients’ clinical evolution, reduction in medication and proportion of patients undergoing spinal surgery. Main outcome measures were local pain (NP, TP or LBP), referred pain, LBP-related disability and NP-related disability, measured using previously validated instruments at referral and 3 months later, use of medication assessed at referral and discharge, and rates of spinal surgery prescription after undergoing NRT. Results Median improvements at discharge corresponded to 57.1% of baseline value for local pain, 75.0% for referred pain, 53.8% for LBP-related disability and 45.0% for NP-related disability. Patients taking medication at discharge represented 29.0% of those taking it at referral. The proportion of patients in whom spinal surgery was prescribed after undergoing NRT was 0%. These results were consistent with those from previous randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and studies in routine practice, and complied with the standards set in the SRC. Conclusions It is feasible and effective to enhance post adoption surveillance methods with risk sharing tools to improve quality control and support value-based reimbursement decisions for NRT. The feasibility of generalising this approach to other settings and to other non

  4. US Urban Elementary Teachers' Knowledge and Practices in Teaching Science to English Language Learners: Results from the First Year of a Professional Development Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santau, Alexandra O.; Secada, Walter; Maerten-Rivera, Jaime; Cone, Neporcha; Lee, Okhee

    2010-01-01

    The study examined US elementary teachers' knowledge and practices in four key domains of science instruction with English language learning (ELL) students. The four domains included: (1) teachers' knowledge of science content, (2) teaching practices to promote scientific understanding, (3) teaching practices to promote scientific inquiry, and (4)…

  5. [Nurses in geriatrics and Alzheimer's disease: knowledge, image, and common practice-results from a survey in a French area (Alsace)].

    PubMed

    Grosclaude, Michèle

    2007-06-01

    From the data of a multicentric investigation, performed in a French area (Alsace) using questionnaires filled by 800 geriatrics nurses, the author analyses their current knowledge and representations of Alzheimer's disease, their attitudes and practice concerning the disclosure of the diagnosis to the patients, and the influence of these data for the patients care. The results show three principal common aspects: first very important gaps, difficulties and contradictions concerning Alzheimer's disease knowledge; then heavy feelings of incompetence, loneliness, and therapeutic inanity with regard to the problems of their practice; last of all, their requests insisting on their need of information, formation, and aid, all missing for them. The nurses' language was devoid of specific and professional contents. It was similar to the general public, mediatic, and societal speeches, loaded with aprioristic assertions, reducing Alzheimer's disease to an organic process of humanity decline. This alarming picture calls to question its ground, mechanisms and solutions concerning the needs conveyed by the nurses, and the pertinency of the common concept of Alzheimer's disease. It enjoins to reconsider the nurses formation and a transdisciplinar further reflection about the notion of Alzheimer's disease and the messages which are transmitted by it. PMID:17556220

  6. A biologic perspective on sexual orientation.

    PubMed

    Pillard, R C; Bailey, J M

    1995-03-01

    Sexual orientation may be defined as the sustained erotic attraction to members of one's own gender, the opposite gender, or both--homosexual, heterosexual, or bisexual, respectively. Interest in sexual orientation is as old as the science of psychology, yet many fundamental issues remain unresolved. This article reviews research in the development and psychopathology of sexual orientation as well as the results of family and twin studies. Research in genetic linkage, sex hormones, and brain differences also is discussed. PMID:7761309

  7. Group-Oriented Fingerprinting for Multimedia Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Jane; Wu, Min; Trappe, Wade; Liu, K. J. Ray

    2004-12-01

    Digital fingerprinting of multimedia data involves embedding information in the content signal and offers protection to the digital rights of the content by allowing illegitimate usage of the content to be identified by authorized parties. One potential threat to fingerprinting is collusion, whereby a group of adversaries combine their individual copies in an attempt to remove the underlying fingerprints. Former studies indicate that collusion attacks based on a few dozen independent copies can confound a fingerprinting system that employs orthogonal modulation. However, in practice an adversary is more likely to collude with some users than with other users due to geographic or social circumstances. To take advantage of prior knowledge of the collusion pattern, we propose a two-tier group-oriented fingerprinting scheme where users likely to collude with each other are assigned correlated fingerprints. Additionally, we extend our construction to represent the natural social and geographic hierarchical relationships between users by developing a more flexible tree-structure-based fingerprinting system. We also propose a multistage colluder identification scheme by taking advantage of the hierarchial nature of the fingerprints. We evaluate the performance of the proposed fingerprinting scheme by studying the collusion resistance of a fingerprinting system employing Gaussian-distributed fingerprints. Our results show that the group-oriented fingerprinting system provides the superior collusion resistance over a system employing orthogonal modulation when knowledge of the potential collusion pattern is available.

  8. [Dimensions of parental rearing styles in alcohol dependent patients: first results of the questionnaire on parental attitudes and rearing practices (FEPS)].

    PubMed

    Lotzin, Annett; Kriston, Levente; Richter-Appelt, Hertha; Leichsenring, Irina; Ramsauer, Brigitte; Schäfer, Ingo

    2013-07-01

    To date no instrument for the assessment of parenting styles is available in the German -language area that has been validated in patients with addictive disorders. Therefore the aim of this study was the confirmatory evaluation of the factor structure of the Questionnaire on Parental Attitudes and Rearing Practices (FEPS) in 186 alcohol dependent patients. The model as proposed by the test developers with the 4 factors Care, Autonomy, Low Punishment, and Low Material Reinforcement showed acceptable fit when residual correlations were allowed (mother: χ(2)/df=1,92, RMSEA=0,07, TLI=0,79; father: χ(2)/df=1,75, RMSEA=0,07, TLI=0,82). All factors showed sufficient factor reliabilities as well as good to very good internal consistencies. Factor loadings, discriminations and difficulties of the indicators could be regarded as good, with the exception of 2 items. These results indicate the factorial validity of the FEPS in patients with alcohol dependence.

  9. Competing strategically through market orientation.

    PubMed

    Rapert, M I; Yarbrough, L

    1997-01-01

    As organizations seek to better understand their customers, competitors, and environments, the marketing function effectively serves as the support mechanism for these activities in many industries. Accordingly, in many organizations the marketing concept has been elevated to the stature of a strategic weapon, manifested in the form of market orientation. Market-oriented firms emphasize the collection, organization, and dissemination of information regarding both customers and competitors. This strategy is especially well-suited for the health care industry where customer knowledge is of paramount importance, customer interaction is instantaneous, and customer satisfaction is essential. Results of a national study of general service hospitals suggest that firms which embrace a market orientation benefit through enhanced customer satisfaction and quality.

  10. Competing strategically through market orientation.

    PubMed

    Rapert, M I; Yarbrough, L

    1997-01-01

    As organizations seek to better understand their customers, competitors, and environments, the marketing function effectively serves as the support mechanism for these activities in many industries. Accordingly, in many organizations the marketing concept has been elevated to the stature of a strategic weapon, manifested in the form of market orientation. Market-oriented firms emphasize the collection, organization, and dissemination of information regarding both customers and competitors. This strategy is especially well-suited for the health care industry where customer knowledge is of paramount importance, customer interaction is instantaneous, and customer satisfaction is essential. Results of a national study of general service hospitals suggest that firms which embrace a market orientation benefit through enhanced customer satisfaction and quality. PMID:10179668

  11. Combining Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Training of the DLPFC with N-Back Practice Results in Neuroplastic Effects Confined to the Neurofeedback Target Region

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Matthew S.; Weisend, Michael P.; Kane, Jessica H.; Parker, Jason G.

    2016-01-01

    In traditional fMRI, individuals respond to exogenous stimuli and are naïve to the effects of the stimuli on their neural activity patterns. Changes arising in the fMRI signal are analyzed post-hoc to elucidate the spatial and temporal activation of brain regions associated with the tasks performed. The advent of real-time fMRI has enabled a new method to systematically alter brain activity across space and time using neurofeedback training (NFT), providing a new tool to study internally-driven processes such as neuroplasticity. In this work, we combined n-back practice with fMRI-NFT of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) to better understand the relationship between open- and closed-loop neuromodulation. FMRI data were acquired during both traditional n-back and NFT across five imaging sessions. Region-of-interest (ROI) and voxel-wise 2 × 2 within subjects ANOVAs were carried out to determine the effects of, and interaction between, training session and neuromodulation type. A main effect of training session was identified for only a single, highly focused cluster that shared spatial properties with the fMRI-NFT target region (left DLPFC). This finding indicates that combined open- and closed-loop neuroplastic enhancement techniques result in focal changes that are confined to the target area of NFT, and do not affect up- or down-stream network components that are normally engaged during working memory. Additionally, we identified a main effect of neuromodulation type for 15 clusters with significantly different activation between open- and closed-loop neuromodulation during training, 12 of which demonstrated higher activity during the open-loop neuromodulation. Our results, taken together with previous reports, indicate that fMRI-NFT combined with n-back practice leads to a highly focal volume exhibiting neuroplasticity without additional network effects. PMID:27445733

  12. Estimating Orientation of Flying Fruit Flies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi En; Wang, Shuo Hong; Qian, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2015-01-01

    The recently growing interest in studying flight behaviours of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, has highlighted the need for developing tools that acquire quantitative motion data. Despite recent advance of video tracking systems, acquiring a flying fly's orientation remains a challenge for these tools. In this paper, we present a novel method for estimating individual flying fly's orientation using image cues. Thanks to the line reconstruction algorithm in computer vision field, this work can thereby focus on the practical detail of implementation and evaluation of the orientation estimation algorithm. The orientation estimation algorithm can be incorporated into tracking algorithms. We rigorously evaluated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm by running experiments both on simulation data and on real-world data. This work complements methods for studying the fruit fly's flight behaviours in a three-dimensional environment.

  13. Estimating Orientation of Flying Fruit Flies

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xi En; Wang, Shuo Hong; Qian, Zhi-Ming; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2015-01-01

    The recently growing interest in studying flight behaviours of fruit flies, Drosophila melanogaster, has highlighted the need for developing tools that acquire quantitative motion data. Despite recent advance of video tracking systems, acquiring a flying fly’s orientation remains a challenge for these tools. In this paper, we present a novel method for estimating individual flying fly’s orientation using image cues. Thanks to the line reconstruction algorithm in computer vision field, this work can thereby focus on the practical detail of implementation and evaluation of the orientation estimation algorithm. The orientation estimation algorithm can be incorporated into tracking algorithms. We rigorously evaluated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed algorithm by running experiments both on simulation data and on real-world data. This work complements methods for studying the fruit fly’s flight behaviours in a three-dimensional environment. PMID:26173128

  14. Torture, sex and military Orientalism.

    PubMed

    Owens, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This article revisits the debate about recent American torture practices, particularly the use of discredited anthropological texts to validate long-held Orientalist assumptions about the sexual vulnerability of Muslim males. Such practices are placed in an historical context of older imperial constructions of sexually deviant Muslims as well as of more general forms of gendered and sexual subordination required for war. American torturers intended to produce very particular objects of torture—ones willing and able to confess their 'true' orientation in terms of a binary hetero/homo sexual code established in 19th-century Europe. The torturers had the power to confirm through confession and re-enactment their crude assumptions, irrespective of the actual sexualities of those being tortured, with consequences for the transnational and reactionary politics of sexual identity. PMID:21280374

  15. Modeling dry and wet deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ions in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China using a source-oriented CMAQ model: Part I. Base case model results.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Tang, Ya; Hu, Jianlin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jingyi; Kota, Sri Harsha; Wu, Li; Gao, Huilin; Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2015-11-01

    A source-oriented Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model driven by the meteorological fields generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to study the dry and wet deposition of nitrate (NO3(-)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), and ammonium (NH4(+)) ions in the Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve (JNNR), China from June to August 2010 and to identify the contributions of different emission sectors and source regions that were responsible for the deposition fluxes. The model performance is evaluated in this paper and the source contribution analyses are presented in a companion paper. The results show that WRF is capable of reproducing the observed precipitation rates with a Mean Normalized Gross Error (MNGE) of 8.1%. Predicted wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) and NO3(-) at the Long Lake (LL) site (3100 m a.s.l.) during the three-month episode are 2.75 and 0.34 kg S(N) ha(-1), which agree well with the observed wet deposition fluxes of 2.42 and 0.39 kg S(N) ha(-1), respectively. Temporal variations in the weekly deposition fluxes at LL are also well predicted. Wet deposition flux of NH4(+) at LL is over-predicted by approximately a factor of 3 (1.60 kg N ha(-1)vs. 0.56 kg N ha(-1)), likely due to missing alkaline earth cations such as Ca(2+) in the current CMAQ simulations. Predicted wet deposition fluxes are also in general agreement with observations at four Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) sites in western China. Predicted dry deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) (including gas deposition of SO2) and NO3(-) (including gas deposition of HNO3) are 0.12 and 0.12 kg S(N) h a(-1) at LL and 0.07 and 0.08 kg S(N) ha(-1) at Jiuzhaigou Bureau (JB) in JNNR, respectively, which are much lower than the corresponding wet deposition fluxes. Dry deposition flux of NH4(+) (including gas deposition of NH3) is 0.21 kg N ha(-1) at LL, and is also much lower than the predicted wet deposition flux. For both dry and wet deposition fluxes, predictions

  16. Modeling dry and wet deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ions in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China using a source-oriented CMAQ model: Part I. Base case model results.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Tang, Ya; Hu, Jianlin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Jingyi; Kota, Sri Harsha; Wu, Li; Gao, Huilin; Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2015-11-01

    A source-oriented Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model driven by the meteorological fields generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to study the dry and wet deposition of nitrate (NO3(-)), sulfate (SO4(2-)), and ammonium (NH4(+)) ions in the Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve (JNNR), China from June to August 2010 and to identify the contributions of different emission sectors and source regions that were responsible for the deposition fluxes. The model performance is evaluated in this paper and the source contribution analyses are presented in a companion paper. The results show that WRF is capable of reproducing the observed precipitation rates with a Mean Normalized Gross Error (MNGE) of 8.1%. Predicted wet deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) and NO3(-) at the Long Lake (LL) site (3100 m a.s.l.) during the three-month episode are 2.75 and 0.34 kg S(N) ha(-1), which agree well with the observed wet deposition fluxes of 2.42 and 0.39 kg S(N) ha(-1), respectively. Temporal variations in the weekly deposition fluxes at LL are also well predicted. Wet deposition flux of NH4(+) at LL is over-predicted by approximately a factor of 3 (1.60 kg N ha(-1)vs. 0.56 kg N ha(-1)), likely due to missing alkaline earth cations such as Ca(2+) in the current CMAQ simulations. Predicted wet deposition fluxes are also in general agreement with observations at four Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET) sites in western China. Predicted dry deposition fluxes of SO4(2-) (including gas deposition of SO2) and NO3(-) (including gas deposition of HNO3) are 0.12 and 0.12 kg S(N) h a(-1) at LL and 0.07 and 0.08 kg S(N) ha(-1) at Jiuzhaigou Bureau (JB) in JNNR, respectively, which are much lower than the corresponding wet deposition fluxes. Dry deposition flux of NH4(+) (including gas deposition of NH3) is 0.21 kg N ha(-1) at LL, and is also much lower than the predicted wet deposition flux. For both dry and wet deposition fluxes, predictions

  17. When rheumatologists report that they agree with a guideline, does this mean that they practise the guideline in clinical practice? Results of the International Recommendation Implementation Study (IRIS)

    PubMed Central

    Gvozdenović, Emilia; Allaart, Cornelia F; van der Heijde, Désirée; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Smolen, Josef S; Huizinga, Tom W J; Landewé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the treat-to-target (T2T) principles have been developed in order to improve the treatment outcome of patients with RA, and have received broad attention. It is not clear, though, whether these recommendations are indeed followed up in clinical practice. Objective To investigate if rheumatologists that report to agree with existing guidelines indeed follow them up in clinical practice. Methods The International Recommendation Implementation Study (IRIS) included 132 participating rheumatologists from 14 countries. Participating rheumatologists received a questionnaire measuring their awareness/commitment with the EULAR/T2T recommendations and followed a dedicated educational programme. Subsequently, they were asked to enrol 5–10 patients with new-onset RA in the online IRIS database and monitor disease activity and treatment for a period of 1–2 years. Four recommendations (3 from the EULAR recommendations and one from the T2T recommendations) were selected on the basis of testability, and analysed with regard to compliance by participating rheumatologists. Results In total, 72 of the 132 participating rheumatologists contributed 378 patients to the database. Of these participants, 70 (98%) agreed upfront with the recommendation that disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy should be started as soon as possible after diagnosis in every patient; 69 (96%) of the rheumatologists agreed with the recommendation that methotrexate (MTX) should be part of the first treatment strategy. When measuring the actual performance, it was found that the recommendation on early DMARD start was met in 253 (67%) of the recorded patients, and the recommendation on MTX in 225 (60%) of the recorded patients. Of the participants, 60 (83%) agreed that composite measures should be recorded regularly, but only in 134(54%) of the patients were

  18. Teaching Orienteering. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Carol; Cory-Wright, Jean; Renfrew, Tom

    The educational value provided by orienteering's blend of navigational and physical skills has given it a permanent place in the primary and secondary school curriculum in the United Kingdom. This book is a reference to orienteering for teachers, leaders, and coaches. It provides a "how to" approach to introducing and developing the skills and…

  19. Orientation in operator algebras

    PubMed Central

    Alfsen, Erik M.; Shultz, Frederic W.

    1998-01-01

    A concept of orientation is relevant for the passage from Jordan structure to associative structure in operator algebras. The research reported in this paper bridges the approach of Connes for von Neumann algebras and ourselves for C*-algebras in a general theory of orientation that is of geometric nature and is related to dynamics. PMID:9618457

  20. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 24: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 SAE mail survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists affiliated with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 33: The technical communications practices of US aerospace engineers and scientists: Results of the phase 1 AIAA mail survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the technical communications practices of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists who are members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).

  2. Current Practices and the Provider Perspectives on Inconclusive Genetic Test Results for Osteogenesis Imperfecta in Children with Unexplained Fractures: ELSI Implications.

    PubMed

    Youngblom, Emily; Murray, Mitzi Leah; Byers, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    Genetic testing can be used to determine if unexplained fractures in children could have resulted from a predisposition to bone fractures, e.g., osteogenesis imperfecta. However, uncertainty is introduced if a variant of unknown significance (VUS) is identified. Proper interpretation of VUS in these situations is critical because of its influence on clinical care and in court rulings. This study sought to understand how VUS are interpreted and used by practitioners when there is a differential diagnosis including both osteogenesis imperfecta and non-accidental injury.A 15-question survey was emailed to physicians who requested analysis of two genes, COL1A1 and COL1A2, from the University of Washington from 2005-2013 for patient cases involving suspicion of child abuse.Among the 89 participants, responses differed about when genetic testing should be ordered for osteogenesis imperfecta, who should be consulted about utilization of VUS test results, follow-up procedures, and who should receive the VUS results.There are no clear guidelines for how to interpret and follow up on VUS. In the legal setting, misinterpreted VUS could lead to unintended consequences and deleterious ramifications for family members. The need for better practice guidelines to help promote more equitable handling of these sensitive legal cases is clear. PMID:27587455

  3. Sexual Orientation, Public Schools, and the Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossey, Richard; DeMitchell, Todd A.; Eckes, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Schools are experiencing an increased level of litigation about issues pertaining to sexual orientation. This monograph provides educators and attorneys with a comprehensive analysis of this litigation along with practical tips for avoiding lawsuits in this sensitive area. The monograph consists of six chapters and addresses the following topics:…

  4. Mobile Technology and Social Media in the Clinical Practice of Young Radiation Oncologists: Results of a Comprehensive Nationwide Cross-sectional Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bibault, Jean-Emmanuel; Leroy, Thomas; Blanchard, Pierre; Biau, Julian; Cervellera, Mathilde; Diaz, Olivia; Faivre, Jean Christophe; and others

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Social media and mobile technology are transforming the way in which young physicians are learning and practicing medicine. The true impact of such technologies has yet to be evaluated. Methods and Materials: We performed a nationwide cross-sectional survey to better assess how young radiation oncologists used these technologies. An online survey was sent out between April 24, 2013, and June 1, 2013. All residents attending the 2013 radiation oncology French summer course were invited to complete the survey. Logistic regressions were performed to assess predictors of use of these tools in the hospital on various clinical endpoints. Results: In all, 131 of 140 (93.6%) French young radiation oncologists answered the survey. Of these individuals, 93% owned a smartphone and 32.8% owned a tablet. The majority (78.6%) of the residents owning a smartphone used it to work in their department. A total of 33.5% had more than 5 medical applications installed. Only 60.3% of the residents verified the validity of the apps that they used. In all, 82.9% of the residents had a social network account. Conclusions: Most of the residents in radiation oncology use their smartphone to work in their department for a wide variety of tasks. However, the residents do not consistently check the validity of the apps that they use. Residents also use social networks, with only a limited impact on their relationship with their patients. Overall, this study highlights the irruption and the risks of new technologies in the clinical practice and raises the question of a possible regulation of their use in the hospital.

  5. [Physician Counseling about Physical and Sports Activity in Neurological Practices in Germany: Results of a Survey Among Members of the German Neurological Society].

    PubMed

    Reimers, C D; Reuter, I; Straube, A; Tettenborn, B; Braumann, K M; Reimers, A K

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a major but modifiable risk factor for morbidity and mortality. Regular physical activity has preventive and therapeutic effects on numerous diseases including neurological disorders. Therefore, it is desirable that physicians motivate their patients to increase their physical and sports activities and that they help them to overcome barriers to exercising. The present study is a survey of neurologists who are members of the German Neurological Society with their own practices; they were asked whether they advised their patients on the benefits of physical activity. Details on physician counseling on physical activity were obtained, such as the frequency of counseling, the neurological disorders considered by the practitioners to be worth the effort of counseling, and the barriers to exercise on the part of patients. More than 80 % of the participants who responded to the survey stated that they frequently provide their patients with advice on the preventive and therapeutic aspects of physical activity. Almost all of them recommended endurance sports; this was followed by Far Eastern types of sport such as tai chi or yoga (70 % of all physicians who advice sports activities). The frequency of counseling about physical activity significantly correlated to the physician's own sports activity. Frequency of counseling was reduced if the physician assessed the patients to be incapable of adopting and maintaining a lifestyle of habitual physical activity. Lack of time as well as an insufficient reimbursement of the counseling, however, did not significantly influence the frequency of counseling. The physician's own sports activity matched that of individuals with similar social status. Thus, a selection bias does not seem to be of importance regarding the results of the survey. However, since only 169 of the 784 invited neurologists (21.6 %) responded to the questionnaire, the representativeness of the survey may be limited. Counseling about

  6. A Qualitative Investigation of Practicing Psychologists' Attitudes Toward Research-Informed Practice: Implications for Dissemination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rebecca E.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Chambless, Dianne L.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a qualitative analysis of interviews with 25 psychologists in independent practice, investigating everyday treatment decisions and attitudes about treatment outcome research and empirically supported treatments (ESTs). Clinicians noted positive aspects about treatment outcome research, such as being interested in what works. However, they had misgivings about the application of controlled research findings to their practices, were skeptical about using manualized protocols, and expressed concern that nonpsychologists would use EST lists to dictate practice. Clinicians reported practicing in an eclectic framework, and many reported including cognitive-behavioral elements in their practice. To improve their practice, they reported valuing clinical experience, peer networks, practitioner-oriented books, and continuing education when it was not too basic. Time and financial barriers concerned nearly all participants. Clinicians suggested they might be interested in ESTs if they could integrate them into their current frameworks, and if resources for learning ESTs were improved. PMID:22654246

  7. Market Orientation in University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuster, Ines; Aviles-Valenzuela, Maria Elena

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to analyse the relationship between market orientation (MO) and results in the field of higher education, considering the importance of university teaching staff MO in relation to satisfaction and establishing that this orientation is directly and positively affected by the MO of the upper hierarchical levels. The focus is…

  8. Problems, Visions and Concerns of Pre-Service Music and General Education Teachers in Greece Resulting from Their Teaching Practice in Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkidou, May; Dionyssiou, Zoe; Androutsos, Polyvios

    2014-01-01

    This study explores music education teaching practice in Greece, collecting data from three university departments: two music departments (M1 and M2) and one primary education department (P) during the academic year 2006-2007. The project was based on data from 84 students (N = 84). Fieldwork in students' teaching practice comprised a…

  9. From Research to Practice: The Application of Research Results to Program Improvement across After-School, Camp, and Community Recreation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Troy

    2016-01-01

    Academic researchers dedicated to contributing to quality improvement in professional practice need to find more effective ways to bridge the gap between research and practice. Bridging the gap requires understanding what encourages the use of research findings by practitioners and what discourages it, as well as understanding how practitioners…

  10. Social workers' use of spiritual practices in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Dane, Barbara; Moore, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined client use of spiritual and/or religious practices to cope with illness and adversity. This study explores social workers' use of spiritual practices as reflected in their work with palliative care clients. Survey results (n = 327) indicated significant relationships of spiritual practices such as yoga, prayer and meditation to working with palliative care clients. The total number of these approaches is predicted by factors such as theoretical orientation and the social workers' own struggles with palliative care and other issues. Our study supports the need for additional investigation of spiritual issues in practice.

  11. Emotion recognition (sometimes) depends on horizontal orientations

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Carol M; Balas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Face recognition depends critically on horizontal orientations (Goffaux & Dakin, 2010). Face images that lack horizontal features are harder to recognize than those that have that information preserved. Presently, we asked if facial emotional recognition also exhibits this dependency by asking observers to categorize orientation-filtered happy and sad expressions. Furthermore, we aimed to dissociate image-based orientation energy from object-based orientation by rotating images 90-degrees in the picture-plane. In our first experiment, we showed that the perception of emotional expression does depend on horizontal orientations and that object-based orientation constrained performance more than image-based orientation. In Experiment 2 we showed that mouth openness (i.e. open versus closed-mouths) also influenced the emotion-dependent reliance on horizontal information. Lastly, we describe a simple computational analysis that demonstrates that the impact of mouth openness was not predicted by variation in the distribution of orientation energy across horizontal and vertical orientation bands. Overall, our results suggest that emotion recognition does largely depend on horizontal information defined relative to the face, but that this bias is modulated by multiple factors that introduce variation in appearance across and within distinct emotions. PMID:24664854

  12. Using partial sensor information to orient parts

    SciTech Connect

    Akella, S.; Mason, M.T.

    1999-10-01

    Parts orienting, the process of bringing parts in initially unknown orientations to a goal orientation, is an important aspect of automated assembly. The most common industrial orienting systems are vibratory bowl feeders, which use the shape and mass properties of parts to orient them. Bowl feeders rely on a sequence of mechanical operations and typically do not use sensors. In this paper, the authors describe the use of partial information sensors along with a sequence of pushing operations to eliminate uncertainty in the orientation of parts. The authors characterize the shorter execution lengths of sensor-based plans and show that sensor-based plans are more powerful than sensorless plans in that they can bring a larger class of parts to distinct orientations. The authors characterize the relation among part shape, orientability; and recognizability to identify conditions under which a single plan can orient and recognize multiple part shapes. Although part shape determines the results of the actions and the sensed information, the authors establish that differences in part shape do not always lead to differences in part behavior. The authors show that for any convex polygon, there exists an infinite set of nonsimilar convex polygons that behave identically under linear normal pushes. Furthermore, there exists a infinite set of nonsimilar convex polygons whose behavior cannot be distinguished even with diameter sensing after each push. They authors have implemented several planners and demonstrated generated plans in experiments.

  13. Dose-response relationships in chemical carcinogenesis: superposition of different mechanisms of action, resulting in linear-nonlinear curves, practical thresholds, J-shapes.

    PubMed

    Lutz, W K

    1998-09-20

    The shape of a carcinogen dose-cancer incidence curve is discussed as the result of a superposition of dose-response relationships for various effects of the carcinogen on the process of carcinogenesis. Effects include direct DNA damage, e.g., by covalent binding, indirect DNA damage, e.g., by increased formation of reactive oxygen species or interaction with DNA replication or chromosome integrity. The 'fixation' of a DNA adduct as a heritable mutation depends on its pro-mutagenic potency and on the rates of DNA repair and DNA replication. Endogenous and unavoidable DNA damage is responsible for a background rate of the process of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and forms the basis of spontaneous cancer incidence. For DNA-reactive carcinogens, linearity of the dose response at the low-dose end is expected. With increasing dose, saturation of DNA repair can introduce a sublinearity (example: dimethylnitrosamine). Stimulation of cell division as a result of high-dose toxicity and regenerative proliferation also results in a sublinear deviation from low-dose linearity. If the DNA-damaging potency of the carcinogen is low in comparison with the high-dose effects, the linear part of the low dose-cancer incidence curve might be hidden within the background variability. Under such conditions, 'practical thresholds' could be discussed (formaldehyde). If a carcinogen increases the rate of cell division or the level of oxidative stress at high dose but has an antimitogenic or antioxidative effect at low dose, a J-shaped (or: U-shaped) curve with a decrease of the spontaneous tumor incidence at low dose could result (caffeic acid; TCDD). This phenomenon has been observed even under conditions of a genotoxic contribution (ionizing radiation; diesel exhaust particles). For a mechanism-based assessment of a low-dose cancer risk, information on the various modes of action and modulations should be available over the full dose range, and models should be refined to incorporate the

  14. Safety and effectiveness of controlled-release paroxetine in routine clinical practice: results of a postmarketing surveillance study of patients with depression

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaki; Kimura, Toshifumi; Kimura, Takeshi; Hara, Terufumi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are commonly used in the pharmacotherapy of depression. However, adverse events can lead to their early discontinuation. This study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of paroxetine controlled-release (CR) tablets in Japanese patients with depression/depressive state (hereafter referred to as depression) in routine clinical practice in Japan. Patients and methods This was an open-label, noninterventional, prospective, postmarketing surveillance study. A total of 3,213 patients aged 12–92 years with depression were prescribed paroxetine CR for 8 weeks at the physician’s discretion. Safety was evaluated on the basis of the reporting of adverse drug reactions. Effectiveness was evaluated on the basis of the physician’s assessment using the Clinical Global Impression-Global Improvement (CGI-GI) and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness (CGI-SI) scales, as well as on the basis of the patients’ self-reported satisfaction. The primary effectiveness outcome was the improvement rate based on the physician’s assessment using the CGI-GI. Results The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 11.2% (359/3,213; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.1%–12.3%). The common adverse drug reactions that accounted for 1.0% or more of the incidence were nausea (3.5%) and somnolence (2.7%). The proportion of patients who continued paroxetine CR at week 8 was 80.2% (2,577/3,213; 95% CI: 78.8%–81.6%). The improvement rate at week 8 (last observation carried forward) was 72.8% (2,132/2,927; 95% CI: 71.2%–74.4%). The proportion of patients with CGI-SI scores of moderately or severely ill decreased from 63.6% at baseline to 17.9% at week 8. The proportion of patients who were satisfied with paroxetine CR treatment was 69.8% (2,040/2,921; 95% CI: 68.1%–71.5%). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that paroxetine CR is a well-tolerated and efficacious treatment for depression in routine clinical practice. PMID

  15. Orientation-independent measures of ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.; Watson-Lamprey, Jennie; Abrahamson, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    The geometric mean of the response spectra for two orthogonal horizontal components of motion, commonly used as the response variable in predictions of strong ground motion, depends on the orientation of the sensors as installed in the field. This means that the measure of ground-motion intensity could differ for the same actual ground motion. This dependence on sensor orientation is most pronounced for strongly correlated motion (the extreme example being linearly polarized motion), such as often occurs at periods of 1 sec or longer. We propose two new measures of the geometric mean, GMRotDpp, and GMRotIpp, that are independent of the sensor orientations. Both are based on a set of geometric means computed from the as-recorded orthogonal horizontal motions rotated through all possible non-redundant rotation angles. GMRotDpp is determined as the ppth percentile of the set of geometric means for a given oscillator period. For example, GMRotDOO, GMRotD50, and GMRotD100 correspond to the minimum, median, and maximum values, respectively. The rotations that lead to GMRotDpp depend on period, whereas a single-period-independent rotation is used for GMRotIpp, the angle being chosen to minimize the spread of the rotation-dependent geometric mean (normalized by GMRotDpp) over the usable range of oscillator periods. GMRotI50 is the ground-motion intensity measure being used in the development of new ground-motion prediction equations by the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Center Next Generation Attenuation project. Comparisons with as-recorded geometric means for a large dataset show that the new measures are systematically larger than the geometric-mean response spectra using the as-recorded values of ground acceleration, but only by a small amount (less than 3%). The theoretical advantage of the new measures is that they remove sensor orientation as a contributor to aleatory uncertainty. Whether the reduction is of practical significance awaits detailed studies of large

  16. Quality-Oriented Management of Educational Innovation at Madrasah Ibtidaiyah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofanudin, Aji; Rokhman, Fathur; Wasino; Rusdarti

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the quality-oriented management of educational innovation at Madrasah Ibtidaiyah. Quality-Oriented Management of Educational Innovation is the process of managing new resources (ideas, practices, objects, methods) in the field of education to achieve educational goals or solve the problem of education. New ideas,…

  17. Family-Oriented Nutrition Education and Preschool Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venters, Maurine; Mullis, Rebecca

    1984-01-01

    Explores implications of interdisciplinary findings in an attempt to: (1) identify family practices and behaviors that contribute to preschool obesity; and (2) suggest effective obesity control strategies that can guide family-oriented nutrition education and counseling efforts. (JN)

  18. Regional orientation program for the department of clinical neurosciences.

    PubMed

    Wong, Frankie W H

    2006-01-01

    A regional orientation program increases the efficient and effective use of resources such as classroom, equipment, and educator time. It provides consistent information to all new nurses and maintains standards of nursing practice throughout the Department of Clinical Neurosciences.

  19. An Assessment of Caribbean Integrated Science Textbooks' Practical Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the structure and skill level of the tasks in the practical activities prescribed in eight process-oriented integrated science textbooks for Caribbean students in grades seven through nine. Results indicate that most of the tasks are structured and deductive in approach. Contains 42 references. (DDR)

  20. Evidence-Centered Design: Recommendations for Implementation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Amy; Ewing, Maureen; Kaliski, Pamela; Huff, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-centered design (ECD) is an orientation towards assessment development. It differs from conventional practice in several ways and consists of multiple activities. Each of these activities results in a set of useful documentation: domain analysis, domain modeling, construction of the assessment framework, and assessment…

  1. Orientation of Dental Professionals in India towards Integrative Medicine: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gayathri, Haritheertham; Garhnayak, Mirna; Naik, Eslavath Seena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a growing demand on our health care system, including Dentistry, to shift from a bio-medical approach to Integrative model of care. The attitudes of health professionals towards Integrative Medicine (IM) are an important factor that influences this transition. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the orientation of the dental professionals in India towards the principles and practice of Integrative Medicine. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 286 dental faculty and postgraduate students from three dental schools in India. The participants voluntarily and anonymously completed the “Integrative Medicine-30’ questionnaire, a 30 item self-report instrument that measures the health care provider’s orientation towards Integrative Medicine in five subscales. Data analysis included summary statistics and intergroup comparisons by gender and professional status with independent samples Mann-Whitney U test. Results The overall orientation of the dental professionals towards IM was almost neutral. While the use of learning resources on Complementary and Alternative Medicine was lower, they showed a more positive orientation towards patient-centred care. Compared to postgraduate students of Dentistry, the dental faculty were more oriented towards IM (median score of 82 vs. 79.5, p<0.01), especially in terms of learning from alternate paradigms (14 vs. 12, p<0.01) and safety of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (13 vs. 12, p<0.01). Females scored better than males both in terms of overall orientation (82 vs. 78, p<0.01) and towards patient-centred care (12 vs. 11, p<0.001). Conclusion The results highlight the impending need to improve the orientation of dental professionals in India towards the principles and practice of IM. PMID:27042588

  2. Personal Breathing Zone Exposures among Hot-Mix Asphalt Paving Workers; Preliminary Analysis for Trends and Analysis of Work Practices That Resulted in the Highest Exposure Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Linda V.; Snawder, John E.; Kriech, Anthony J.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; McClean, Michael D.; Herrick, Robert F.; Blackburn, Gary R.; Olsen, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    An exposure assessment of hot-mix asphalt (HMA) paving workers was conducted to determine which of four exposure scenarios impacted worker exposure and dose. Goals of this report are to present the personal-breathing zone (PBZ) data, discuss the impact of substituting the releasing/cleaning agent, and discuss work practices that resulted in the highest exposure concentration for each analyte. One-hundred-seven PBZ samples were collected from HMA paving workers on days when diesel oil was used as a releasing/cleaning agent. An additional 36 PBZ samples were collected on days when B-100 (100% biodiesel, containing no petroleum-derived products) was used as a substitute releasing/cleaning agent. Twenty-four PBZ samples were collected from a reference group of concrete workers, who also worked in outdoor construction but had no exposure to asphalt emissions. Background and field blank samples were also collected daily. Total particulates and the benzene soluble fraction were determined gravimetrically. Total organic matter was determined using gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection and provided qualitative information about other exposure sources contributing to worker exposure besides asphalt emissions. Thirty-three individual polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) were determined using GC with time-offlight mass spectrometry; results were presented as either the concentration of an individual PAC or a summation of the individual PACs containing either 2- to 3-rings or 4- to 6-rings. Samples were also screened for PACs containing 4- to 6-rings using fluorescence spectroscopy. Arithmetic means, medians, and box plots of the PBZ data were used to evaluate trends in the data. Box plots illustrating the diesel oil results were more variable than the B-100. Also, the highest diesel oil results were much higher in concentration than the highest B-100 results. An analysis of the highest exposure results and field notes revealed a probable association between

  3. [German qualified doctors license to continue practice in south Jutland after the reunion. (Application of danish jus practicandi, process and result)].

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    At the reunion of the southern part of Jutland with Denmark 1920 danish legislation had to be introduced in the new incorporated region. According to a special law doctors educated in Germany could obtain danish medical authorization, if they were born or established in the region before 1.1.1918, under certain circumstances it was possible to dispense from this date. The law meant that all doctors, in the region had to ask for danish authorization. Matrimonial relationship and personal connections were strong arguments for a dispensation, but not always sufficient. In more cases a refusal was given because of a german attitude at the applicant in spite of matrimonial relationship, with the result that the applicant had to leave an established practice and Denmark. 53 doctors were given danish authorization immediately. 8 got an authorization by dispensation and 10 got a refusal. A survey of the applications and the corrected archives shows, that the cases mostly were handled without problems. But the cases, where dispensation and especially refusal were given, were often very complicated and followed by heavy local national reactions. This paper describes the background of the special law and the course of the cases with particular weight on the cases where dispensation or refusal were given.

  4. Randomized controlled trial of a computer-tailored multiple health behaviour intervention in general practice: 12-month follow-up results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective strategies to address risk factors of non-communicable diseases are required to curtail the expanding costs of health care. This trial tested the effectiveness over one year of a minimal intervention targeting multiple health behaviours (diet, physical activity, alcohol and smoking) in a general practice setting, through the provision of personalised, computer-tailored feedback. Methods Patients who had attended a general practice in the previous 6 months were recruited from 21 general practitioners in Brisbane, Australia. Baseline data were collected using self-reports on adherence to ten health behaviours and summarised into a health score from 0 to 10. This randomised controlled trial used a 2×2 factorial design, with one arm randomising subjects to the intervention or control group. The other arm was either feedback at baseline (single contact) or an additional assessment with feedback at 3 months (dual contact). As such, 4 study groups created were, to which participants were randomised blindly: A. Intervention with single contact; B. Intervention with dual contact; C. Control with single contact and D. Control with dual contact. All participants were assessed again at 12 months. Results Of the 4676 participants randomised, 3065 completed questionnaires at 12 months. Both single and dual contact groups improved their 10 item health scores (+0.31 and +0.49 respectively) relative to control group outcomes (+0.02; p < 0.01). Improvement in adherence to guidelines for fish intake, type of milk consumed, vegetable and fruit intake, and alcohol intake were observed in single and dual contact intervention groups (p < 0.01). Both intervention groups showed greater improvement than controls for individual health behaviours, apart from red meat intake, smoking behaviour, physical activity and body weight. Interestingly, there was an improvement in reported non-smoking rates in both intervention and control groups (3% single contact; 4

  5. Response to belimumab among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in clinical practice settings: 24-month results from the OBSErve study in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C E; Dall'Era, M; Kan, H; Macahilig, C; Molta, C; Koscielny, V; Chang, D J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine disease activity and clinical outcomes, and describe overall patterns of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) care in patients who received belimumab in a real-world clinical setting. Methods This observational cohort study was conducted in US clinical practices. Rheumatologists (n=92) identified adults with SLE who had received ≥8 infusions of belimumab plus standard of care (SoC). Physicians assessed disease outcomes at 6-month intervals using patient medical charts, for up to 24 months. The primary outcome was physician-assessed change in SLE disease. Other outcomes included change in steroid use, laboratory tests and healthcare resource utilisation (HCRU). Results Of 501 patients (intent-to-treat population (ITT)), 446 were female, mean age was 43.3 years and 98% had moderate/severe disease activity at baseline (first dose of belimumab). Data for 277 patients who completed 24 months of belimumab treatment were available. Among the ITT, a ≥50% improvement in overall clinical response between baseline and month 6 was reported for 48.7% of patients; continued improvement was seen at all subsequent 6-month intervals relative to the previous timepoint. The percentage of patients with moderate/severe disease also decreased at each timepoint. At baseline, 77.0% of patients received steroids at a mean (SD) prednisone equivalent dose of 19.9 (14.39) mg/day, which decreased to 8.4 (7.35) mg/day at month 6 and 6.1 (9.31) mg/day at month 24. Abnormal laboratory values typically associated with SLE also demonstrated improvements at month 6, which continued through 24 months. HCRU decreased over the duration of the study. Conclusions Patients with SLE who received belimumab plus SoC for up to 24 months demonstrated improvements in disease severity and laboratory values and a reduction in steroid use and HCRU as early as month 6. Improvements continued through 24 months, providing evidence of reduced disease activity among patients taking

  6. Spatially oriented plasmonic 'nanograter' structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Cui, Ajuan; Gong, Zhijie; Li, Hongqiang; Xia, Xiaoxiang; Shen, Tiehan H; Li, Junjie; Yang, Haifang; Li, Wuxia; Gu, Changzhi

    2016-01-01

    One of the key motivations in producing 3D structures has always been the realization of metamaterials with effective constituent properties that can be tuned in all propagation directions at various frequencies. Here, we report the investigation of spatially oriented "Nanograter" structures with orientation-dependent responses over a wide spectrum by focused-ion-beam based patterning and folding of thin film nanostructures. Au nano units of different shapes, standing along specifically designated orientations, were fabricated. Experimental measurements and simulation results show that such structures offer an additional degree of freedom for adjusting optical properties with the angle of inclination, in additional to the size of the structures. The response frequency can be varied in a wide range (8 μm-14 μm) by the spatial orientation (0°-180°) of the structures, transforming the response from magnetic into electric coupling. This may open up prospects for the fabrication of 3D nanostructures as optical interconnects, focusing elements and logic elements, moving toward the realization of 3D optical circuits. PMID:27357610

  7. Cultural Orientations, Daily Activities, and Adjustment in Mexican American Youth

    PubMed Central

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Cansler, Emily

    2009-01-01

    The links between youth’s daily activities and adjustment and the role of cultural practices and values in these links were studied in 469 youth from 237 Mexican American families. In home interviews, data on mothers’, fathers’, and two adolescent-age siblings’ cultural practices (language use, social contacts) and values (for familism, for education achievement) were collected, along with data on youth risky behavior and depressive symptoms. In 7 nightly phone calls, youth reported on their day’s free time activities (i.e., sports, academics, religious activities, television viewing, and hanging out). Analyses revealed that youth who spent more time in unsupervised hanging out reported more depressive symptoms and risky behavior, and those who spent more time in academic activities reported less risky behavior. Results also indicated that more Anglo-oriented youth spent more time in sports, that more Mexican-oriented youth spent more time watching television, that fathers’ familism values were related to youth’s time in religious activities, and that parents’ educational values were linked to youth’s time in academic activities. Some evidence indicated that parents’ cultural practices and values, particularly fathers’, moderated the links between daily activities and youth adjustment. PMID:19636760

  8. Implementing Strategic Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Arthur K.; Brownback, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    An HRM case dealing with problems and issues of setting up orientation programs which align with corporate strategy. Discussion concerns how such a case can be used to exhibit the alignment between HRM and business strategy.

  9. Passive orientation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Martinez, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus that can return a payload to a known orientation after unknown motion, without requiring external power or complex mechanical systems. The apparatus comprises a faceted cage that causes the system to rest in a stable position and orientation after arbitrary motion. A gimbal is mounted with the faceted cage and holds the payload, allowing the payload to move relative to the stable faceted cage. The payload is thereby placed in a known orientation by the interaction of gravity with the geometry of the faceted cage, the mass of the system, and the motion of the payload and gimbal. No additional energy, control, or mechanical actuation is required. The apparatus is suitable for use in applications requiring positioning of a payload to a known orientation after arbitrary or uncontrolled motion, including remote sensing and mobile robot applications.

  10. Orientability and Diffusion Maps

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Amit; Wu, Hau-tieng

    2010-01-01

    One of the main objectives in the analysis of a high dimensional large data set is to learn its geometric and topological structure. Even though the data itself is parameterized as a point cloud in a high dimensional ambient space ℝp, the correlation between parameters often suggests the “manifold assumption” that the data points are distributed on (or near) a low dimensional Riemannian manifold ℳd embedded in ℝp, with d ≪ p. We introduce an algorithm that determines the orientability of the intrinsic manifold given a sufficiently large number of sampled data points. If the manifold is orientable, then our algorithm also provides an alternative procedure for computing the eigenfunctions of the Laplacian that are important in the diffusion map framework for reducing the dimensionality of the data. If the manifold is non-orientable, then we provide a modified diffusion mapping of its orientable double covering. PMID:21765628

  11. Sexual Orientation (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Transgender People Teaching Your Child Tolerance STDs Understanding Early ... and Romance Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Transgender People Sexual Attraction and Orientation Contact Us Print ...

  12. Orientation field estimation for latent fingerprint enhancement.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianjiang; Zhou, Jie; Jain, Anil K

    2013-04-01

    Identifying latent fingerprints is of vital importance for law enforcement agencies to apprehend criminals and terrorists. Compared to live-scan and inked fingerprints, the image quality of latent fingerprints is much lower, with complex image background, unclear ridge structure, and even overlapping patterns. A robust orientation field estimation algorithm is indispensable for enhancing and recognizing poor quality latents. However, conventional orientation field estimation algorithms, which can satisfactorily process most live-scan and inked fingerprints, do not provide acceptable results for most latents. We believe that a major limitation of conventional algorithms is that they do not utilize prior knowledge of the ridge structure in fingerprints. Inspired by spelling correction techniques in natural language processing, we propose a novel fingerprint orientation field estimation algorithm based on prior knowledge of fingerprint structure. We represent prior knowledge of fingerprints using a dictionary of reference orientation patches. which is constructed using a set of true orientation fields, and the compatibility constraint between neighboring orientation patches. Orientation field estimation for latents is posed as an energy minimization problem, which is solved by loopy belief propagation. Experimental results on the challenging NIST SD27 latent fingerprint database and an overlapped latent fingerprint database demonstrate the advantages of the proposed orientation field estimation algorithm over conventional algorithms.

  13. Characteristics of interventional cardiologists and their work practices for the study on radiation-induced lens opacities based on the methodology developed by ELDO—preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Domienik, Joanna; Gryglak, Szymon; Jurewicz, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary results of the Polish epidemiology study on eye lens opacities among interventional cardiologists (ICs), based on the methodology proposed by ELDO (epidemiological studies of radio-induced cataracts in interventional cardiologists and radiologists: methodology implementation), are presented. The aim of the study is to test the hypothesis concerning the excess risk of cataract in the group of ICs. The first results concern the study population characteristics, including the most important confounding factors for cataract, as well as a detailed description of the work practices in interventional cardiology needed in order to reconstruct the cumulative eye lens dose. The data from 69 ICs and 23 controls collected based on the general medical questionnaire and the occupational questionnaire (for ICs only) were analyzed. The mean age of ICs and of the control group was 41 and 44, respectively, while the mean duration of work for exposed physicians was 9 years. The analysis of the data from the occupational questionnaire concerning the procedures performed, the use of various access routes, as well as radiation protection tools (eye lens glasses, ceiling suspended transparent shield, etc.) are also presented. On the basis of this information and additional assumptions about the doses per procedure (as well as reduction factors for various types of radiation measures), the cumulative doses to the eye lens of ICs were evaluated. They ranged up to 1.55 Sv and 0.4 Sv for left and right eye, respectively; however, the dose to only 3% of ICs exceeded the new threshold for development of eye lens opacities (0.5 Gy) proposed by the ICRP. PMID:26983990

  14. Food use in middle and high school fundraising: Does policy support healthy practice? Results from a survey of Minnesota school principals

    PubMed Central

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Farbakhsh, Kian; Moe, Stacey; Samuelson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive, cross-sectional study aimed to examine classroom, school-wide and club/sports teams fundraising policies and practices of middle and high schools; concordance between policy and practice; and associations between healthy policy/practice scores and selected school characteristics. In 2006, principals/designees of middle (n=45) and high (n=71) schools in the St. Paul/Minneapolis, Minnesota metropolitan area completed a self-administered mailed survey. Schools were attended by a convenience sample of students (n=349) participating in a longitudinal measurement study of children and their environments to assess obesity-related factors. Descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and multivariate linear regression were used to examine variables and associations of interest. Across schools, 50% had policies addressing the nutrient quality of food/drink items used in fundraising or disallowed food use for fundraising. About one-third used chocolate, candy and high-fat baked goods for classroom and school-wide fundraising; 60% sold these items for club/sports teams fundraising. More middle than high schools reported healthy fundraising policies or practices, as well as greater concordance between policies and practices. For all fundraising activities, high schools had significantly lower healthy policy/practice scores than middle schools (p < 0.01). For school-wide fundraising, scores were significantly lower for public than private schools (p=0.02). Policies to regulate food used for fundraising were common and most supported healthy practice, particularly in middle schools. However, the use of foods high in fat and added sugars remains a prevalent fundraising practice, especially in high schools and for club/sports teams, and requires further attention. PMID:19559138

  15. Leading a Recovery-oriented Social Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Raeburn, Toby; Hungerford, Catherine; Sayers, Jan; Escott, Phil; Lopez, Violeta; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    Recovery-oriented mental health services promote the principles of recovery, such as hope and optimism, and are characterized by a personalized approach to developing consumer self-determination. Nurse leaders are increasingly developing such services as social enterprises, but there is limited research on the leadership of these programs. Leading a recovery-oriented mental health nurse social enterprise requires visionary leadership, collaboration with consumers and local health providers, financial viability, and commitment to recovery-focused practice. This article describes the framework of an Australian mental health nursing social enterprise, including the service attributes and leadership lessons that have been learned from developing program sustainability. PMID:26090553

  16. Design of orienting and aiming instrument based on fiber optic gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Wang, Limin; Sun, Jiyu

    2007-12-01

    In order to improve the ground viability of missile weapon system, a quick orienting and aiming instrument is cried for the missile launching in modern war. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) based on Sagnac effect is a new type of all solid state rotation rate sensor that detects angular changes or angular rates relative to inertial space, which has many fine characteristics compared with traditional mechanical electronic gyro, such as low cost, light weight, long life, high reliability, wide dynamic range, etc. For the need of missile photoelectric aiming facility, It is necessary to design and manufacture a set of orienting and aiming instrument based on single axis FOG, to solve the close quarters aiming of missile launching, to measure the azimuth reference. Based on practical project, the principle of FOG orienting system and laser collimation theodolite aiming system is discussed and studied in this paper. Orienting and aiming system are constructed in the same basement. The influence of platform tilt on the precision of orientation is analyzed. An accelerator is used to compensate deviation caused by base tilt. The aiming precision affected by eccentricity of the encoders for laser collimation theodolite and the FOG orientation system are analyzed. The test results show that the aiming accuracy is 6' in three minutes. It is suitable for missile aiming in short range.

  17. Impact of a peer-counseling intervention on breastfeeding practices in different socioeconomic strata: results from the equity analysis of the PROMISE-EBF trial in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Eide, Kristiane Tislevoll; Fadnes, Lars Thore; Engebretsen, Ingunn Marie Stadskleiv; Onarheim, Kristine Husøy; Wamani, Henry; Tumwine, James K.; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2016-01-01

    Background Undernutrition is highly prevalent among infants in Uganda. Optimal infant feeding practices may improve nutritional status, health, and survival among children. Objective Our study evaluates the socioeconomic distribution of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) and growth outcomes among infants included in a trial, which promoted EBF by peer counselors in Uganda. Design Twenty-four clusters comprising one to two communities in Uganda were randomized into intervention and control arms, including 765 mother-infant pairs (PROMISE-EBF trial, 200608, ClinicalTrials.gov no. NCT00397150). Intervention clusters received the promotion of EBF by peer counselors in addition to standard care. Breastfeeding and growth outcomes were compared according to wealth quintiles and intervention/control arms. Socioeconomic inequality in breastfeeding and growth outcomes were measured using the concentration index 12 and 24 weeks postpartum. We used the decomposition of the concentration index to identify factors contributing to growth inequality at 24 weeks. Results EBF was significantly concentrated among the poorest in the intervention group at 24 weeks postpartum, concentration index −0.060. The control group showed a concentration of breastfeeding among the richest part of the population, although not statistically significant. Stunting, wasting, and underweight were similarly significantly concentrated among the poorest in the intervention group and the total population at 24 weeks, but showing non-significant concentrations for the control group. Conclusion This study shows that EBF can be successfully promoted among the poor. In addition, socioeconomic inequality in growth outcomes starts early in infancy, but the breastfeeding intervention was not strong enough to counteract this influence. PMID:27473676

  18. Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Daniel T.; Shaffer, Jenny L.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest.

  19. Breastfeeding Progression in Preterm Infants Is Influenced by Factors in Infants, Mothers and Clinical Practice: The Results of a National Cohort Study with High Breastfeeding Initiation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Hansen, Bo Moelholm; Kronborg, Hanne; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Hallum, Karin; Frandsen, Annemi; Kyhnaeb, Anne; Svarer, Inge; Hallström, Inger

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim Many preterm infants are not capable of exclusive breastfeeding from birth. To guide mothers in breastfeeding, it is important to know when preterm infants can initiate breastfeeding and progress. The aim was to analyse postmenstrual age (PMA) at breastfeeding milestones in different preterm gestational age (GA) groups, to describe rates of breastfeeding duration at pre-defined times, as well as analyse factors associated with PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Methods The study was part of a prospective survey of a national Danish cohort of preterm infants based on questionnaires and structured telephone interviews, including 1,221 mothers and their 1,488 preterm infants with GA of 24–36 weeks. Results Of the preterm infants, 99% initiated breastfeeding and 68% were discharged exclusively breastfed. Breastfeeding milestones were generally reached at different PMAs for different GA groups, but preterm infants were able to initiate breastfeeding at early times, with some delay in infants less than GA 32 weeks. Very preterm infants had lowest mean PMA (35.5 weeks) at first complete breastfeed, and moderate preterm infants had lowest mean PMA at the establishment of exclusive breastfeeding (36.4 weeks). Admitting mothers to the NICU together with the infant and minimising the use of a pacifier during breastfeeding transition were associated with 1.6 (95% CI 0.4–2.8) and 1.2 days (95% CI 0.1–2.3) earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding respectively. Infants that were small for gestational age were associated with 5.6 days (95% CI 4.1–7.0) later establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusion Breastfeeding competence is not developed at a fixed PMA, but is influenced by multiple factors in infants, mothers and clinical practice. Admitting mothers together with their infants to the NICU and minimising the use of pacifiers may contribute to earlier establishment of exclusive breastfeeding. PMID:25251690

  20. Developing an orientation program.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K

    1999-01-01

    When the local area experienced tremendous growth and change, the radiology department at Maury Hospital in Columbia, Tennessee looked seriously at its orientation process in preparation for hiring additional personnel. It was an appropriate time for the department to review its orientation process and to develop a manual to serve as both a tool for supervisors and an ongoing reference for new employees. To gather information for the manual, supervisors were asked to identify information they considered vital for new employees to know concerning the daily operations of the department, its policies and procedures, the organizational structure of the hospital, and hospital and departmental computer systems. That information became the basis of the orientation manual, and provided an introduction to the hospital and radiology department; the structure of the organization; an overview of the radiology department; personnel information; operating procedures and computer systems; and various policies and procedures. With the manual complete, the radiology department concentrated on an orientation process that would meet the needs of supervisors who said they had trouble remembering the many details necessary to teach new employees. A pre-orientation checklist was developed, which contained the many details supervisors must handle between the time an employee is hired and arrives for work. The next step was the creation of a checklist for use by the supervisor during a new employee's first week on the job. A final step in the hospital's orientation program is to have each new employee evaluate the entire orientation process. That information is then used to update and revise the manual. PMID:10346648