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Sample records for pre-clinical pharmacology iftekhar

  1. Pre-clinical pharmacology of zolmitriptan (Zomig; formerly 311C90), a centrally and peripherally acting 5HT1B/1D agonist for migraine.

    PubMed

    Martin, G R

    1997-10-01

    discrete population of cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) and nucleus tractus solitarius. Direct evidence for a central neuromodulatory effect of zolmitriptan was provided by electrophysiological experiments which clearly demonstrated that the drug inhibits the excitability of cells in the TNC after systemic administration. This novel pre-clinical profile not only distinguishes zolmitriptan from sumatriptan, but raises intriguing questions about the clinical relevance of a dual action. Studies to date show that zolmitriptan indeed modulates cranial sensory processing in humans, yet central side-effects are no different from sumatriptan. This property may account for the remarkable consistency in clinical efficacy observed in clinical trials.

  2. Pre-clinical immunotoxicity studies of nanotechnology-formulated drugs: Challenges, considerations and strategy.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2015-12-28

    Assorted challenges in physicochemical characterization, sterilization, depyrogenation, and in the assessment of pharmacology, safety, and efficacy profiles accompany pre-clinical development of nanotechnology-formulated drugs. Some of these challenges are not unique to nanotechnology and are common in the development of other pharmaceutical products. However, nanoparticle-formulated drugs are biochemically sophisticated, which causes their translation into the clinic to be particularly complex. An understanding of both the immune compatibility of nanoformulations and their effects on hematological parameters is now recognized as an important step in the (pre)clinical development of nanomedicines. An evaluation of nanoparticle immunotoxicity is usually performed as a part of a traditional toxicological assessment; however, it often requires additional in vitro and in vivo specialized immuno- and hematotoxicity tests. Herein, I review literature examples and share the experience with the NCI Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory assay cascade used in the early (discovery-level) phase of pre-clinical development to summarize common challenges in the immunotoxicological assessment of nanomaterials, highlight considerations and discuss solutions to overcome problems that commonly slow or halt the translation of nanoparticle-formulated drugs toward clinical trials. Special attention will be paid to the grand-challenge related to detection, quantification and removal of endotoxin from nanoformulations, and practical considerations related to this challenge.

  3. Quality Assurance in Biobanking for Pre-Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Simeon-Dubach, Daniel; Zeisberger, Steffen M.; Hoerstrup, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that not less than USD 28 billion are spent each year in the USA alone on irreproducible pre-clinical research, which is not only a fundamental loss of investment and resources but also a strong inhibitor of efficiency for upstream processes regarding the translation towards clinical applications and therapies. The issues and cost of irreproducibility has mainly been published on pre-clinical research. In contrast to pre-clinical research, test material is often being transferred into humans in clinical research. To protect treated human subjects and guarantee a defined quality standard in the field of clinical research, the manufacturing and processing infrastructures have to strictly follow and adhere to certain (inter-)national quality standards. It is assumed and suggested by the authors that by an implementation of certain quality standards within the area of pre-clinical research, billions of USD might be saved and the translation phase of promising pre-clinical results towards clinical applications may substantially be improved. In this review, we discuss how an implementation of a quality assurance (QA) management system might positively improve sample quality and sustainability within pre-clinically focused biobank infrastructures. Biobanks are frequently positioned at the very beginning of the biomedical research value chain, and, since almost every research material has been stored in a biobank during the investigated life cycle, biobanking seems to be of substantial importance from this perspective. The role model of a QA-regulated biobank structure can be found in biobanks within the context of clinical research organizations such as in regenerative medicine clusters. PMID:27781023

  4. Rodents as pre-clinical models for predicting vaccine performance in humans.

    PubMed

    Riese, Peggy; Trittel, Stephanie; Schulze, Kai; Guzmán, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent a key building block for establishing a successful and sustainable control strategy against infectious diseases. Vaccine development often depends on the availability of correlates for protection and reliable animal models for the screening, selection and prioritization of potential vaccine candidates. This is performed according to their immunogenicity, efficacy and safety profiles in pre-clinical studies, which are also critical for identification of candidate antigens, selection of an optimal delivery system and design of appropriate vaccine formulations. Thus, pre-clinical studies in animal models are a prerequisite for addressing crucial issues and generating a solid pre-clinical package for the approval of clinical trials. This review addresses the strengths, limitations and perspectives of rodents as a vaccine development and pre-clinical validation tool. PMID:26268433

  5. Immunotherapy in new pre-clinical models of HPV-associated oral cancers.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Francesca; Massa, Silvia; Manni, Isabella; Franconi, Rosella; Venuti, Aldo

    2013-03-01

    Cervical, anal, penile and a sub-set of head and neck (HN) tumors are critical health problems caused by high risk Human Papilloma Viruses (HPVs), like HPV type 16. No specific/effective pharmacological treatments exist. A valid preventive vaccination as well as the immunotherapy of persistent infections, pre-cancerous lesions or early-stage cancers could drive the HPV disease burden down. These treatments might be featured through low-cost platforms like those based on DNA and plant biotechnologies to produce tailored and enhanced formulations taking profit from the use of plants as bio-factories and as a source of immune-stimulators. Finally, and regardless of the formulation type, pre-clinical tests and models are crucial to foresee efficacy of immunotherapy before clinical trials.   In this study, we created an orthotopic mouse model for HPV-related oral tumors, a subset of HN tumors for which no models have been generated before. The model was obtained by inducing the stable expression of the HPV16 E7 protein into the mouse oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) AT-84 (AT-84 E7). The AT-84 E7 cells were injected into the mouth pavement of C3H mice via an extra-oral route to obtain orthotopic tumors. The model turned out to mimic the natural history of the human HPV oral cancer. From AT-84 E7, through engineering to express luciferase, the bioluminescent AT-84 E7-Luc cells were obtained for a fast and easy monitoring by imaging. The AT-84 E7 and the AT-84 E7-Luc tumors were used to test the efficacy of E7-based therapeutic vaccines that we had previously generated and that had been already proven to be active in mice against non-orthotopic E7-expressing tumors (TC-1 cells). In particular, we used genetic and plant-derived formulations based on attenuated HPV16 E7 variants either fused to plant virus genes with immunological activity or produced by tobacco plants. Mice were monitored by imaging allowing to test the size reduction of the mouth implanted

  6. Sex and Gender: Critical Variables in Pre-Clinical and Clinical Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Eugenia; Frank, Aaron P; Santos, Roberta S; Fátima, Luciana A; Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2016-08-01

    In this Essay, we discuss the critical need to incorporate sex and gender in pre-clinical and clinical research to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which metabolic processes differ by sex and gender. This knowledge will allow for development of personalized medicine which will optimize therapies specific for individuals. PMID:27508869

  7. VARK Learning Preferences and Mobile Anatomy Software Application Use in Pre-Clinical Chiropractic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Amanda J.; Stomski, Norman J.; Innes, Stanley I.; Armson, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitous smartphone ownership and reduced face-to-face teaching time may lead to students making greater use of mobile technologies in their learning. This is the first study to report on the prevalence of mobile gross anatomy software applications (apps) usage in pre-clinical chiropractic students and to ascertain if a relationship exists…

  8. Problem-Solving in the Pre-Clinical Curriculum: The Uses of Computer Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Joel A.; Rovick, Allen A.

    1986-01-01

    Promotes the use of computer-based simulations in the pre-clinical medical curriculum as a means of providing students with opportunities for problem solving. Describes simple simulations of skeletal muscle loads, complex simulations of major organ systems and comprehensive simulation models of the entire human body. (TW)

  9. Ex vivo model for pre-clinical evaluation of dialyzers containing new membranes.

    PubMed

    Mahiout, A; Meinhold, H; Jörres, A; Krieg, R; Kessel, M; Tretzel, J; Baurmeister, U

    1985-01-01

    The ex vivo model which reflects hemodialysis modulating factors during the first twenty minutes of blood membrane interaction, is applicable as a pre-clinical test for new membranes. The biocompatibility of a new cellulosic membrane (MC) proved to be superior to regenerated cellulose and comparable to synthetic membranes such as PAN regarding complement activation.

  10. Tendinopathies and platelet-rich plasma (PRP): from pre-clinical experiments to therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Drion, Pierre; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The restorative properties of platelets, through the local release of growth factors, are used in various medical areas. This article reviews fundamental and clinical research relating to platelet-rich plasma applied to tendinous lesions. Materials and method: Articles in French and English, published between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2014. dealing with PRP and tendons were searched for using the Medline and Scopus data bases. Results: Forty-seven articles were identified which addressed pre-clinical and clinical studies: 27 relating to in vitro and in vivo animal studies and 20 relating to human studies. Of these, five addressed lateral epicondylitis, two addressed rotator cuff tendinopathies, ten dealt with patellar tendinopathies and three looked at Achilles tendinopathies. Conclusions: The majority of pre-clinical studies show that PRP stimulates the tendon’s healing process. However, clinical series remain more controversial and level 1, controlled, randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26195890

  11. Pre-clinical characterization of tissue engineering constructs for bone and cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, Jordan E.; Vo, Tiffany N.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical animal models play a crucial role in the translation of biomedical technologies from the bench top to the bedside. However, there is a need for improved techniques to evaluate implanted biomaterials within the host, including consideration of the care and ethics associated with animal studies, as well as the evaluation of host tissue repair in a clinically relevant manner. This review discusses non-invasive, quantitative, and real-time techniques for evaluating host-materials interactions, quality and rate of neotissue formation, and functional outcomes of implanted biomaterials for bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Specifically, a comparison will be presented for pre-clinical animal models, histological scoring systems, and non-invasive imaging modalities. Additionally, novel technologies to track delivered cells and growth factors will be discussed, including methods to directly correlate their release with tissue growth. PMID:25319726

  12. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology--a bidirectional translational approach.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Bütof, Rebecca; Krause, Mechthild; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained.

  13. Neuroimaging as a Selection Tool and Endpoint in Clinical and Pre-clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Muir, Keith W; Macrae, I Mhairi

    2016-10-01

    Standard imaging in acute stroke enables the exclusion of non-stroke structural CNS lesions and cerebral haemorrhage from clinical and pre-clinical ischaemic stroke trials. In this review, the potential benefit of imaging (e.g., angiography and penumbral imaging) as a translational tool for trial recruitment and the use of imaging endpoints are discussed for both clinical and pre-clinical stroke research. The addition of advanced imaging to identify a "responder" population leads to reduced sample size for any given effect size in phase 2 trials and is a potentially cost-efficient means of testing interventions. In pre-clinical studies, technical failures (failed or incomplete vessel occlusion, cerebral haemorrhage) can be excluded early and continuous multimodal imaging of the animal from stroke onset is feasible. Pre- and post-intervention repeat scans provide real time assessment of the intervention over the first 4-6 h. Negative aspects of advanced imaging in animal studies include increased time under general anaesthesia, and, as in clinical studies, a delay in starting the intervention. In clinical phase 3 trial designs, the negative aspects of advanced imaging in patient selection include higher exclusion rates, slower recruitment, overestimated effect size and longer acquisition times. Imaging may identify biological effects with smaller sample size and at earlier time points, compared to standard clinical assessments, and can be adjusted for baseline parameters. Mechanistic insights can be obtained. Pre-clinically, multimodal imaging can non-invasively generate data on a range of parameters, allowing the animal to be recovered for subsequent behavioural testing and/or the brain taken for further molecular or histological analysis. PMID:27543177

  14. Serum miRNAs as predictive and preventive biomarker for pre-clinical hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Chen, Jianguo; Chen, Xin; Tang, Jing; Guo, Huan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Qian, Ji; Luo, Guijuan; He, Fangping; Lu, Xiaomei; Ding, Yibo; Yang, Yingchen; Huang, Wentao; Hou, Guojun; Lin, Ximeng; Ouyang, Qin; Li, Hengyu; Wang, Ruoyu; Jiang, Feng; Pu, Rui; Lu, Jianhua; Jin, Mudan; Tan, Yexiong; Gonzalez, Frank J; Cao, Guangwen; Wu, Mengchao; Wen, Hao; Wu, Tangchun; Jin, Li; Chen, Lei; Wang, Hongyang

    2016-04-10

    The extremely poor prognosis of patients with symptomatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosed clinically at advanced stages suggests an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used for prospective surveillance and pre-clinical screening for early presence of pre-malignant lesions and tumors. In a retrospective longitudinal phase 3 biomarker study in seven medical centers of China, time-series and 6 months interval-serum samples were collected from chronic hepatitis B virus infected (CHB) patient cohorts at the pre-malignant or pre-clinical stages (average 6 months prior to clinical diagnosis) and CHB patients that did not develop cancer, and circulating miRNAs measured. A set of serum miRNAs including miR-193a-3p, miR-369-5p, miR-672, miR-429 and let-7i* were identified in pre-clinical HCC patients and have the potential to screen for CHB patients at high risk to develop HCC 6-12 months after miRNAs measurement. These circulating miRNAs combined with the conventional screening tools using α-fetoprotein and ultrasound, may have great promise for the prediction and prevention of HCC in high-risk populations. PMID:26850373

  15. Is your system calibrated? MRI gradient system calibration for pre-clinical, high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, James; Wells, Jack; Richardson, Simon; Holmes, Holly; Yu, Yichao; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Siow, Bernard; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    High-field, pre-clinical MRI systems are widely used to characterise tissue structure and volume in small animals, using high resolution imaging. Both applications rely heavily on the consistent, accurate calibration of imaging gradients, yet such calibrations are typically only performed during maintenance sessions by equipment manufacturers, and potentially with acceptance limits that are inadequate for phenotyping. To overcome this difficulty, we present a protocol for gradient calibration quality assurance testing, based on a 3D-printed, open source, structural phantom that can be customised to the dimensions of individual scanners and RF coils. In trials on a 9.4 T system, the gradient scaling errors were reduced by an order of magnitude, and displacements of greater than 100 µm, caused by gradient non-linearity, were corrected using a post-processing technique. The step-by-step protocol can be integrated into routine pre-clinical MRI quality assurance to measure and correct for these errors. We suggest that this type of quality assurance is essential for robust pre-clinical MRI experiments that rely on accurate imaging gradients, including small animal phenotyping and diffusion MR.

  16. Dissociating emotional and cognitive empathy in pre-clinical and clinical Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Maurage, Pierre; Lahaye, Magali; Grynberg, Delphine; Jeanjean, Anne; Guettat, Lamia; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Halkin, Stéphane; Heeren, Alexandre; Billieux, Joël; Constant, Eric

    2016-03-30

    Huntington's disease (HD) is centrally characterized by motor, neurocognitive and psychiatric symptoms, but impaired emotional decoding abilities have also been reported. However, more complex affective abilities are still to be explored, and particularly empathy, which is essential for social relations and is impaired in various psychiatric conditions. This study evaluates empathic abilities and social skills in pre-clinical and clinical HD, and explores the distinction between two empathy sub-components (emotional-cognitive). Thirty-six HD patients (17 pre-clinical) and 36 matched controls filled in the Empathy Quotient Scale, while controlling for psychopathological comorbidities. At the clinical stage of HD, no global empathy impairment was observed but rather a specific deficit for the cognitive sub-component, while emotional empathy was preserved. A deficit was also observed for social skills. Pre-clinical HD was not associated with any empathy deficit. Emotional deficits in clinical HD are thus not limited to basic emotion decoding but extend towards complex interpersonal abilities. The dissociation between impaired cognitive and preserved emotional empathy in clinical HD reinforces the proposal that empathy subtypes are sustained by distinct processes. Finally, these results underline the extent of distinct affective and social impairments in HD and the need to grasp them in clinical contexts.

  17. Healthspan Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mahtab

    2015-12-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present the case for shifting the focus of research on aging and anti-aging from lifespan pharmacology to what I like to call healthspan pharmacology, in which the desired outcome is the extension of healthy years of life rather than lifespan alone. Lifespan could be influenced by both genetic and epigenetic factors, but a long lifespan may not be a good indicator of an optimal healthspan. Without improving healthspan, prolonging longevity would have enormous negative socioeconomic outcomes for humans. Therefore, the goal of aging and anti-aging research should be to add healthy years to life and not merely to increase the chronological age. This article summarizes and compares two categories of pharmacologically induced lifespan extension studies in animal model systems from the last two decades-those reporting the effects of pharmacological interventions on lifespan extension alone versus others that include their effects on both lifespan and healthspan in the analysis. The conclusion is that the extrapolation of pharmacological results from animal studies to humans is likely to be more relevant when both lifespan and healthspan extension properties of pharmacological intervention are taken into account.

  18. Positron Emission Tomography for Pre-Clinical Sub-Volume Dose Escalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Christopher Paul

    Purpose: This dissertation focuses on establishment of pre-clinical methods facilitating the use of PET imaging for selective sub-volume dose escalation. Specifically the problems addressed are 1.) The difficulties associated with comparing multiple PET images, 2.) The need for further validation of novel PET tracers before their implementation in dose escalation schema and 3.) The lack of concrete pre-clinical data supporting the use of PET images for guidance of selective sub-volume dose escalations. Methods and materials: In order to compare multiple PET images the confounding effects of mispositioning and anatomical change between imaging sessions needed to be alleviated. To mitigate the effects of these sources of error, deformable image registration was employed. A deformable registration algorithm was selected and the registration error was evaluated via the introduction of external fiducials to the tumor. Once a method for image registration was established, a procedure for validating the use of novel PET tracers with FDG was developed. Nude mice were used to perform in-vivo comparisons of the spatial distributions of two PET tracers, FDG and FLT. The spatial distributions were also compared across two separate tumor lines to determine the effects of tumor morphology on spatial distribution. Finally, the research establishes a method for acquiring pre-clinical data supporting the use of PET for image-guidance in selective dose escalation. Nude mice were imaged using only FDG PET/CT and the resulting images were used to plan PET-guided dose escalations to a 5 mm sub-volume within the tumor that contained the highest PET tracer uptake. These plans were then delivered using the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) and the efficacy of the PET-guided plans was observed. Results and Conclusions: The analysis of deformable registration algorithms revealed that the BRAINSFit B-spline deformable registration algorithm available in SLICER3D was capable of

  19. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate B cell activity in pre-clinical models: Implications for the immune response to infections.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jarrett; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2016-08-15

    B cell antigen presentation, cytokine production, and antibody production are targets of pharmacological intervention in inflammatory and infectious diseases. Here we review recent pre-clinical evidence demonstrating that pharmacologically relevant levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from marine fish oils influence key aspects of B cell function through multiple mechanisms. N-3 PUFAs modestly diminish B cell mediated stimulation of classically defined naïve CD4(+) Th1 cells through the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II pathway. This is consistent with existing data showing that n-3 PUFAs suppress the activation of Th1/Th17 cells through direct effects on helper T cells and indirect effects on antigen presenting cells. Mechanistically, n-3 PUFAs lower antigen presentation and T cell signaling by disrupting the formation of lipid microdomains within the immunological synapse. We then review data to show that n-3 PUFAs boost B cell activation and antibody production in the absence and presence of antigen stimulation. This has potential benefits for several clinical populations such as the aged and obese that have poor humoral immunity. The mode of action by which n-3 PUFA boost B cell activation and antibody production remains unclear, but may involve Th2 cytokines, enhanced production of specialized proresolving lipid mediators, and targeting of protein lateral organization in lipid microdomains. Finally, we highlight evidence to show that different n-3 PUFAs are not biologically equivalent, which has implications for the development of future interventions to target B cell activity.

  20. Usefulness of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone test in pre-clinical acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Kazunori; Moriyama, Takako; Sakihara, Satoru; Takayasu, Shinobu; Nigawara, Takeshi; Suda, Toshihiro

    2005-08-01

    Acromegaly is caused primarily by pituitary growth hormone (GH)-secreting tumors. It is usually recognized because of characteristic manifestations, and diagnosed clinically. However, there exists a mild stage of acromegaly, which poses a diagnostic problem due to the absence of typical clinical manifestations. Here we present four patients with pre-clinical acromegaly, who showed minimal acromegaloid features with elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor-I. Basal GH levels were within normal levels in 3 of 4 cases, while insulin-like growth factor-I levels were elevated above normal in all cases. Plasma GH levels were elevated in response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in all cases, indicating a diagnostic value of the TRH stimulation test. In contrast, an oral glucose tolerance test was not useful for the diagnosis, because of the low GH levels (less than 1 ng/ml) and/or secondary to diabetes mellitus. In response to a dopamine agonist, GH levels were increased in the two cases, whereas GH levels were decreased or remained unchanged in the other two cases. We therefore suggest that the TRH stimulation test would be helpful to examine the presence of pre-clinical acromegaly. Diagnosis of the early stages of acromegaly is important to prevent progression to overt acromegaly. PMID:15997199

  1. Towards the pre-clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism caused by iodotyrosine deiodinase (DEHAL1) defects.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Ainhoa; García-Nimo, Laura; Cocho de Juan, José A; Moreno, José C

    2014-03-01

    DEHAL1 (also named IYD) is the thyroidal enzyme that deiodinates mono- and diiodotyrosines (MIT, DIT) and recycles iodine, a scarce element in the environment, for the efficient synthesis of thyroid hormone. Failure of this enzyme leads to the iodotyrosine deiodinase deficiency (ITDD), characterized by hypothyroidism, compressive goiter and variable mental retardation, whose diagnostic hallmark is the elevation of iodotyrosines in serum and urine. However, the specific diagnosis of this type of hypothyroidism is not routinely performed, due to technical and practical difficulties in iodotyrosine determinations. A handful of mutations in the DEHAL1 gene have been identified as the molecular basis for the ITDD. Patients harboring DEHAL1 defects so far described all belong to consanguineous families, and psychomotor deficits were present in some affected individuals. This is probably due to the lack of biochemical expression of the disease at the beginning of life, which causes ITDD being undetected in screening programs for congenital hypothyroidism, as currently performed. This worrying feature calls for efforts to improve pre-clinical detection of iodotyrosine deiodinase deficiency during the neonatal time. Such a challenge poses questions of patho-physiological (natural history of the disease, environmental factors influencing its expression) epidemiological (prevalence of ITDD) and technical nature (development of optimal methodology for safe detection of pre-clinical ITDD), which will be addressed in this review. PMID:24629858

  2. Voxel-level reproducibility assessment of modality independent elastography in a pre-clinical murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Katelyn M.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-03-01

    Changes in tissue mechanical properties, measured non-invasively by elastography methods, have been shown to be an important diagnostic tool, particularly for cancer. Tissue elasticity information, tracked over the course of therapy, may be an important prognostic indicator of tumor response to treatment. While many elastography techniques exist, this work reports on the use of a novel form of elastography that uses image texture to reconstruct elastic property distributions in tissue (i.e., a modality independent elastography (MIE) method) within the context of a pre-clinical breast cancer system.1,2 The elasticity results have previously shown good correlation with independent mechanical testing.1 Furthermore, MIE has been successfully utilized to localize and characterize lesions in both phantom experiments and simulation experiments with clinical data.2,3 However, the reproducibility of this method has not been characterized in previous work. The goal of this study is to evaluate voxel-level reproducibility of MIE in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer. Bland-Altman analysis of co-registered repeat MIE scans in this preliminary study showed a reproducibility index of 24.7% (scaled to a percent of maximum stiffness) at the voxel level. As opposed to many reports in the magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) literature that speak to reproducibility measures of the bulk organ, these results establish MIE reproducibility at the voxel level; i.e., the reproducibility of locally-defined mechanical property measurements throughout the tumor volume.

  3. A generalizable pre-clinical research approach for orphan disease therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of next-generation DNA sequencing, the pace of inherited orphan disease gene identification has increased dramatically, a situation that will continue for at least the next several years. At present, the numbers of such identified disease genes significantly outstrips the number of laboratories available to investigate a given disorder, an asymmetry that will only increase over time. The hope for any genetic disorder is, where possible and in addition to accurate diagnostic test formulation, the development of therapeutic approaches. To this end, we propose here the development of a strategic toolbox and preclinical research pathway for inherited orphan disease. Taking much of what has been learned from rare genetic disease research over the past two decades, we propose generalizable methods utilizing transcriptomic, system-wide chemical biology datasets combined with chemical informatics and, where possible, repurposing of FDA approved drugs for pre-clinical orphan disease therapies. It is hoped that this approach may be of utility for the broader orphan disease research community and provide funding organizations and patient advocacy groups with suggestions for the optimal path forward. In addition to enabling academic pre-clinical research, strategies such as this may also aid in seeding startup companies, as well as further engaging the pharmaceutical industry in the treatment of rare genetic disease. PMID:22704758

  4. Towards the pre-clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism caused by iodotyrosine deiodinase (DEHAL1) defects.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Ainhoa; García-Nimo, Laura; Cocho de Juan, José A; Moreno, José C

    2014-03-01

    DEHAL1 (also named IYD) is the thyroidal enzyme that deiodinates mono- and diiodotyrosines (MIT, DIT) and recycles iodine, a scarce element in the environment, for the efficient synthesis of thyroid hormone. Failure of this enzyme leads to the iodotyrosine deiodinase deficiency (ITDD), characterized by hypothyroidism, compressive goiter and variable mental retardation, whose diagnostic hallmark is the elevation of iodotyrosines in serum and urine. However, the specific diagnosis of this type of hypothyroidism is not routinely performed, due to technical and practical difficulties in iodotyrosine determinations. A handful of mutations in the DEHAL1 gene have been identified as the molecular basis for the ITDD. Patients harboring DEHAL1 defects so far described all belong to consanguineous families, and psychomotor deficits were present in some affected individuals. This is probably due to the lack of biochemical expression of the disease at the beginning of life, which causes ITDD being undetected in screening programs for congenital hypothyroidism, as currently performed. This worrying feature calls for efforts to improve pre-clinical detection of iodotyrosine deiodinase deficiency during the neonatal time. Such a challenge poses questions of patho-physiological (natural history of the disease, environmental factors influencing its expression) epidemiological (prevalence of ITDD) and technical nature (development of optimal methodology for safe detection of pre-clinical ITDD), which will be addressed in this review.

  5. The FDA Perspective on Pre-Clinical Testing for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Gerald R.

    2006-05-01

    In the U. S., the pre-market review of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices is carried out under the authority of the 1976 Medical Device Amendments to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Different regulatory mechanisms may apply depending on the complexity of the HIFU device and the indications for use, but in all cases pre-clinical testing is required. This testing typically includes ultrasound field characterization, thermal modeling and measurement, and may include demonstrating the accuracy of targeting and monitoring, if applicable. Because there are no guidance documents or standards for these tests at present, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) welcomes working with interested parties to develop acceptable procedures that can be incorporated into the regulatory review process.

  6. Electrochemotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma treatment: pre-clinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Leongito, Maddalena; Granata, Vincenza; Barbieri, Antonio; del Vecchio, Vitale; Falco, Michela; Nasto, Aurelio; Albino, Vittorio; Piccirillo, Mauro; Palaia, Raffaele; Amore, Alfonso; Giacomo, Raimondo di; Lastoria, Secondo; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; Fusco, Roberta; Petrillo, Antonella; Izzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is currently one of the deadliest cancers with high mortality rate. This disease leads to an aggressive local invasion and early metastases, and is poorly responsive to treatment with chemotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy. Radical resection is still the only curative treatment for pancreatic cancer, but it is generally accepted that a multimodality strategy is necessary for its management. Therefore, new alternative therapies have been considered for local treatment. Conclusions Chemotherapeutic resistance in pancreatic cancer is associated to a low penetration of drugs into tumour cells due to the presence of fibrotic stroma surrounding cells. In order to increase the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into tumour cells, electrochemotherapy can be used for treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma leading to an increased tumour response rate. This review will summarize the published papers reported in literature on the efficacy and safety of electrochemotherapy in pre-clinical and clinical studies on pancreatic cancer. PMID:27069445

  7. HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL GENE THERAPY: ASSESSING THE RELEVANCE OF PRE-CLINICAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Larochelle, Andre; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2013-01-01

    The modern laboratory mouse has become a central tool for biomedical research with a notable influence in the field of hematopoiesis. Application of retroviral-based gene transfer approaches to mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has led to a sophisticated understanding of the hematopoietic hierarchy in this model. However, the assumption that gene transfer methodologies developed in the mouse could be similarly applied to human HSCs for the treatment of human diseases left the field of gene therapy in a decade-long quandary. It is not until more relevant humanized xenograft mouse models and phylogenetically related large animal species were used to optimize gene transfer methodologies that unequivocal clinical successes were achieved. However, the subsequent reporting of severe adverse events in these clinical trials casted doubts on the predictive value of conventional pre-clinical testing, and encouraged the development of new assays for assessing the relative genotoxicity of various vector designs. PMID:24014892

  8. Functional and structural MRI biomarkers to detect pre-clinical neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Ronneberger, Olaf; Wolf, Robert Christian; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Saft, Carsten; Klöppel, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    The availability of an accurate genetic test to identify Huntington's Disease (HD) in the pre-symptomatic stage makes HD an important model to develop biomarkers for other neurodegenerative diseases, such as pre-clinical Alzheimer's Disease. We reasoned that functional changes, measured by functional MRI (fMRI), would precede gray matter changes and that performing a task specifically affected by the disease would carry the clearest signature. Separate cohorts of HD gene mutations carriers and controls performed four different fMRI tasks, probing functions either primarly affected by the disease (i.e. motor control), higher cognitive functions (i.e. working memory and irritability), or basic sensory functions (i.e. auditory system). With the aim to compare fMRI and structural MRI biomarkers, all subjects underwent an additional high-resolution T1-weighted MRI. Best classification performance was achived from fMRI-based activations with motor sequence tapping and task-induced irritation. Classification performance based on gray matter probability maps was also significantly above chance and similar to that of fMRI. Both were sufficiently informative to separate gene mutation carriers that were on average 17 years before predicted disease onset from controls with up to 80% accuracy. Further analyses showed that classification accuracy was best in regions of interest with low within-group heterogeneity in relation to disease specific changes. Our study indicates that structural and some functional markers can accurately detect pre-clinical neurodegeneration. However, the lower variability and easier processing of the strucutral MRI data make latter the more useful tool for disease detection in a clinical setting.

  9. Pharmacologic vitreolysis.

    PubMed

    Rhéaume, Marc-André; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2010-01-01

    It is now well recognized that vitreous plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various retinal disorders. In many instances it can be addressed with pars plana vitrectomy, although this approach, like any surgery, has its limitations. The search for alternatives or adjunct to surgery has led to the development of pharmacologic vitreolysis. The use of intravitreal agents to alter the vitreous in order to reduce or eliminate its role in disease seems promising. The purpose of this article is to summarize the present knowledge on pharmacologic vitreolysis. A review of the different agents used and of ongoing trials will be presented. Also, current understanding of vitreous structure and its interaction with the retina will be discussed.

  10. Towards developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical testing in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Miranda D.; Radley, Hannah G.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; De Luca, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses various issues to consider when developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical studies in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The review describes and evaluates a wide range of techniques used to measure parameters of muscle pathology in mdx mice and identifies some basic techniques that might comprise standardised approaches for evaluation. While the central aim is to provide a basis for the development of standardised procedures to evaluate efficacy of a drug or a therapeutic strategy, a further aim is to gain insight into pathophysiological mechanisms in order to identify other therapeutic targets. The desired outcome is to enable easier and more rigorous comparison of pre-clinical data from different laboratories around the world, in order to accelerate identification of the best pre-clinical therapies in the mdx mouse that will fast-track translation into effective clinical treatments for DMD. PMID:18499465

  11. Development and use of an instrument adapted to assess the clinical skills learning environment in the pre-clinical years

    PubMed Central

    Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Chappelle, Kathryn G.; Elliot, Diane L.; Litzelman, Debra K.; Palmer, Ryan; Biagioli, Frances E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Communication, Curriculum, and Culture (C3) instrument is a well-established survey for measuring the professional learning climate or hidden curriculum in the clinical years of medical school. However, few instruments exist for assessing professionalism in the pre-clinical years. We adapted the C3 instrument and assessed its utility during the pre-clinical years at two U.S. medical schools. Methods The ten-item Pre-Clinical C3 survey was adapted from the C3 instrument. Surveys were administered at the conclusion of the first and second years of medical school using a repeated cross-sectional design. Factor analysis was performed and Cronbach’s alphas were calculated for emerging dimensions. Results The authors collected 458 and 564 surveys at two medical schools during AY06-07 and AY07-09 years, respectively. Factor analysis of the survey data revealed nine items in three dimensions: “Patients as Objects”, “Talking Respectfully of Colleagues”, and “Patient-Centered Behaviors”. Reliability measures (Cronbach’s alpha) for the Pre-Clinical C3 survey data were similar to those of the C3 survey for comparable dimensions for each school. Gender analysis revealed significant differences in all three dimensions. Conclusions The Pre-Clinical C3 instrument’s performance was similar to the C3 instrument in measuring dimensions of professionalism. As medical education moves toward earlier and more frequent clinical and inter-professional educational experiences, the Pre-Clinical C3 instrument may be especially useful in evaluating the impact of curricular revisions. PMID:26509103

  12. Vets and Videos: Student Learning from Context-Based Assessment in a Pre-Clinical Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    To increase the perceived relevance of pre-clinical science courses to undergraduates, a context-based assessment item was introduced to a genetics course that occurs early within a five-year veterinary science programme. The aim was to make a direct link between genetic concepts and the future clinical profession of the students. In the…

  13. Heterologous Prime-Boost HIV-1 Vaccination Regimens in Pre-Clinical and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Scott A.; Surman, Sherri L.; Sealy, Robert; Jones, Bart G.; Slobod, Karen S.; Branum, Kristen; Lockey, Timothy D.; Howlett, Nanna; Freiden, Pamela; Flynn, Patricia; Hurwitz, Julia L.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there are more than 30 million people infected with HIV-1 and thousands more are infected each day. Vaccination is the single most effective mechanism for prevention of viral disease, and after more than 25 years of research, one vaccine has shown somewhat encouraging results in an advanced clinical efficacy trial. A modified intent-to-treat analysis of trial results showed that infection was approximately 30% lower in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group. The vaccine was administered using a heterologous prime-boost regimen in which both target antigens and delivery vehicles were changed during the course of inoculations. Here we examine the complexity of heterologous prime-boost immunizations. We show that the use of different delivery vehicles in prime and boost inoculations can help to avert the inhibitory effects caused by vector-specific immune responses. We also show that the introduction of new antigens into boost inoculations can be advantageous, demonstrating that the effect of ‘original antigenic sin’ is not absolute. Pre-clinical and clinical studies are reviewed, including our own work with a three-vector vaccination regimen using recombinant DNA, virus (Sendai virus or vaccinia virus) and protein. Promising preliminary results suggest that the heterologous prime-boost strategy may possibly provide a foundation for the future prevention of HIV-1 infections in humans. PMID:20407589

  14. Circadian rhythms and mood regulation: insights from pre-clinical models.

    PubMed

    McClung, Colleen A

    2011-09-01

    Affective disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder are associated with major disruptions in circadian rhythms. Indeed, altered sleep/wake cycles are a critical feature for diagnosis in the DSM IV and several of the therapies used to treat these disorders have profound effects on rhythm length and stabilization in human populations. Furthermore, multiple human genetic studies have identified polymorphisms in specific circadian genes associated with these disorders. Thus, there appears to be a strong association between the circadian system and mood regulation, although the mechanisms that underlie this association are unclear. Recently, a number of studies in animal models have begun to shed light on the complex interactions between circadian genes and mood-related neurotransmitter systems, the effects of light manipulation on brain circuitry, the impact of chronic stress on rhythms, and the ways in which antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs alter the clock. This review will focus on the recent advances that have been gleaned from the use of pre-clinical models to further our understanding of how the circadian system regulates mood.

  15. Electrophysiological Mechanisms of Brugada Syndrome: Insights from Pre-clinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Liu, Tong; Li, Ka H. C.; Laxton, Victoria; Chan, Yin W. F.; Keung, Wendy; Li, Ronald A.; Yan, Bryan P.

    2016-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS), is a primary electrical disorder predisposing affected individuals to sudden cardiac death via the development of ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation (VT/VF). Originally, BrS was linked to mutations in the SCN5A, which encodes for the cardiac Na+ channel. To date, variants in 19 genes have been implicated in this condition, with 11, 5, 3, and 1 genes affecting the Na+, K+, Ca2+, and funny currents, respectively. Diagnosis of BrS is based on ECG criteria of coved- or saddle-shaped ST segment elevation and/or T-wave inversion with or without drug challenge. Three hypotheses based on abnormal depolarization, abnormal repolarization, and current-load-mismatch have been put forward to explain the electrophysiological mechanisms responsible for BrS. Evidence from computational modeling, pre-clinical, and clinical studies illustrates that molecular abnormalities found in BrS lead to alterations in excitation wavelength (λ), which ultimately elevates arrhythmic risk. A major challenge for clinicians in managing this condition is the difficulty in predicting the subset of patients who will suffer from life-threatening VT/VF. Several repolarization risk markers have been used thus far, but these neglect the contributions of conduction abnormalities in the form of slowing and dispersion. Indices incorporating both repolarization and conduction and based on the concept of λ have recently been proposed. These may have better predictive values than the existing markers. PMID:27803673

  16. Evaluation of Aerosol Delivery of Nanosuspension for Pre-clinical Pulmonary Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Alsup, Jason W.; Lai, Yurong; Hu, Yiding; Heyde, Bruce R.; Tung, David

    2009-03-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are pulmonary diseases that are characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine production, and airway hyper-reactivity. Most of the effector cells responsible for these pathologies reside in the lungs. One of the most direct ways to deliver drugs to the target cells is via the trachea. In a pre-clinical setting, this can be achieved via intratracheal (IT), intranasal (IN), or aerosol delivery in the desired animal model. In this study, we pioneered the aerosol delivery of a nanosuspension formulation in a rodent model. The efficiency of different dosing techniques and formulations to target the lungs were compared, and fluticasone was used as the model compound. For the aerosol particle size determination, a ten-stage cascade impactor was used. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) was calculated based on the percent cumulative accumulation at each stage. Formulations with different particle size of fluticasone were made for evaluation. The compatibility of regular fluticasone suspension and nanosuspension for aerosol delivery was also investigated. The in vivo studies were conducted on mice with optimized setting. It was found that the aerosol delivery of fluticasone with nanosuspension was as efficient as intranasal (IN) dosing, and was able to achieve dose dependent lung deposition.

  17. From the Cover: Alterations in Optineurin Expression and Localization in Pre-clinical Parkinson's Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Wise, John Pierce; Cannon, Jason

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects ∼5 million people around the world. PD etiopathogenesis is poorly understood and curative or disease modifying treatments are not available. Mechanistic studies have identified numerous pathogenic pathways that overlap with many other neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in the protein optineurin (OPTN) have recently been identified as causative factors for glaucoma and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. OPTN has multiple recognized roles in neurons, notably in mediating autophagic flux, which has been found to be disrupted in most neurodegenerative diseases. OPTN(+ )aggregates have preliminarily been identified in cytoplasmic inclusions in numerous neurodegenerative diseases, however, whether OPTN has a role in PD pathogenesis has yet to be tested. Thus, we chose to test the hypothesis that OPTN expression and localization would be modulated in pre-clinical PD models. To test our hypothesis, we characterized midbrain OPTN expression in normal rats and in a rat rotenone PD model. For the first time, we show that OPTN is enriched in dopamine neurons in the midbrain, and its expression is modulated by rotenone treatment in vivo Here, animals were sampled at time-points both prior to overt neurodegeneration and after severe behavioral deficits, where a lesion to the nigrostriatal dopamine system is present. The effect and magnitude of OPTN expression changes are dependent on duration of treatment. Furthermore, OPTN colocalizes with LC3 (autophagic vesicle marker) and alpha-synuclein positive puncta in rotenone-treated animals, potentially indicating an important role in autophagy and PD pathogenesis. PMID:27473339

  18. Gastric motor dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease: Current pre-clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Carolina; Antonioli, Luca; Colucci, Rocchina; Ballabeni, Vigilio; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Bernardini, Nunzia; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with several non-motor symptoms, such as behavioral changes, urinary dysfunction, sleep disorders, fatigue and, above all, gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction, including gastric dysmotility, constipation and anorectal dysfunction. Delayed gastric emptying, progressing to gastroparesis, is reported in up to 100% of patients with PD, and it occurs at all stages of the disease with severe consequences to the patient's quality of life. The presence of α-synuclein (α-syn) aggregates in myenteric neurons throughout the digestive tract, as well as morpho-functional alterations of the enteric nervous system (ENS), have been documented in PD. In particular, gastric dysmotility in PD has been associated with an impairment of the brain-gut axis, involving the efferent fibers of the vagal pathway projecting directly to the gastric myenteric plexus. The present review intends to provide an integrated overview of available knowledge on the possible role played by the ENS, considered as a semi-autonomous nervous network, in the pathophysiology of gastric dysmotility in PD. Particular attention has been paid review how translational evidence in humans and studies in pre-clinical models are allowing a better understanding of the functional, neurochemical and molecular alterations likely underlying gastric motor abnormalities occurring in PD. PMID:26499757

  19. Pre-clinical Positron Emission Tomography Reconstruction Algorithm Effect on Cu-64 ATSM Lesion Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, Bal; Wood, Katie; Sonoda, Luke I; Gogbashian, Andrew; Lowe, Gerry; Nunes, Andre; Stirling, James; Shepherd, Chris; Beynon, Gwen; Wong, Wai Lup

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Application of distinct positron emission tomography (PET) scan reconstruction algorithms can lead to statistically significant differences in measuring lesion functional properties. We looked at the influence of two-dimensional filtered back projection (2D FBP), two-dimensional ordered subset expectation maximization (2D OSEM), three-dimensional ordered subset expectation maximization (3D OSEM) without 3D maximum a posteriori and with (3D OSEM MAP) on lesion hypoxia tracer uptake using a pre-clinical PET scanner. Methods: Reconstructed images of a rodent tumor model bearing P22 carcinosarcoma injected with hypoxia tracer Copper-64-Diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (i.e. Cu-64 ATSM) were analyzed at 10 minute intervals till 60 minute post injection. Lesion maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) and SUVmax/background SUVmean (T/B) were recorded and investigated after application of multiple algorithm and reconstruction parameters to assess their influence on Cu-64 ATSM measurements and associated trends over time. Results: SUVmaxSUVmax or T/B between 2D FBP, exhibited convergence for OSEM reconstructions while ANOVA results showed a significant difference in SUVmax or T/B between 2D FBP, 2D OSEM, 3D OSEM and 3D OSEM MAP reconstructions across all time frames. SUVmax and T/B were greatest in magnitude for 2D OSEM followed by 3D OSEM MAP, 3D OSEM and then 2D FBP at all time frames respectively. Similarly SUVmax and T/B standard deviations (SD) were lowest for 2D OSEM in comparison with other algorithms. Conclusion: Significantly higher magnitude lesion SUVmax and T/B combined with lower SD were observed using 2D OSEM reconstruction in comparison with 2D FBP, 3D OSEM and 3D OSEM MAP algorithms at all time frames. Results are SUVmax or T/B between 2D FBP, consistent with other published studies however more specimens are required for full validation. PMID:27299284

  20. VARK learning preferences and mobile anatomy software application use in pre-clinical chiropractic students.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Amanda J; Stomski, Norman J; Innes, Stanley I; Armson, Anthony J

    2016-05-01

    Ubiquitous smartphone ownership and reduced face-to-face teaching time may lead to students making greater use of mobile technologies in their learning. This is the first study to report on the prevalence of mobile gross anatomy software applications (apps) usage in pre-clinical chiropractic students and to ascertain if a relationship exists between preferred learning styles as determined by the validated VARK(©) questionnaire and use of mobile anatomy apps. The majority of the students who completed the VARK questionnaire were multimodal learners with kinesthetic and visual preferences. Sixty-seven percent (73/109) of students owned one or more mobile anatomy apps which were used by 57 students. Most of these students owned one to five apps and spent less than 30 minutes per week using them. Six of the top eight mobile anatomy apps owned and recommended by the students were developed by 3D4Medical. Visual learning preferences were not associated with time spent using mobile anatomy apps (OR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.12-1.40). Similarly, kinesthetic learning preferences (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 0.18-20.2), quadmodal preferences (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.06-9.25), or gender (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.48-4.81) did not affect the time students' spent using mobile anatomy apps. Learning preferences do not appear to influence students' time spent using mobile anatomy apps. Anat Sci Educ 9: 247-254. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26109371

  1. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  2. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Multiple Myeloma: Pre-Clinical Research and Translational Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Cirino; Gullà, Annamaria; Correale, Pierpaolo; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2014-01-01

    Immunosuppressive cells have been reported to play an important role in tumor-progression mainly because of their capability to promote immune-escape, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Among them, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been recently identified as immature myeloid cells, induced by tumor-associated inflammation, able to impair both innate and adaptive immunity. While murine MDSCs are usually identified by the expression of CD11b and Gr1, human MDSCs represent a more heterogeneous population characterized by the expression of CD33 and CD11b, low or no HLA-DR, and variable CD14 and CD15. In particular, the last two may alternatively identify monocyte-like or granulocyte-like MDSC subsets with different immunosuppressive properties. Recently, a substantial increase of MDSCs has been found in peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM) of multiple myeloma (MM) patients with a role in disease progression and/or drug resistance. Pre-clinical models recapitulating the complexity of the MM-related BM microenvironment (BMM) are major tools for the study of the interactions between MM cells and cells of the BMM (including MDSCs) and for the development of new agents targeting MM-associated immune-suppressive cells. This review will focus on current strategies for human MDSCs generation and investigation of their immunosuppressive function in vitro and in vivo, taking into account the relevant relationship occurring within the MM–BMM. We will then provide trends in MDSC-associated research and suggest potential application for the treatment of MM. PMID:25538892

  3. VARK learning preferences and mobile anatomy software application use in pre-clinical chiropractic students.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Amanda J; Stomski, Norman J; Innes, Stanley I; Armson, Anthony J

    2016-05-01

    Ubiquitous smartphone ownership and reduced face-to-face teaching time may lead to students making greater use of mobile technologies in their learning. This is the first study to report on the prevalence of mobile gross anatomy software applications (apps) usage in pre-clinical chiropractic students and to ascertain if a relationship exists between preferred learning styles as determined by the validated VARK(©) questionnaire and use of mobile anatomy apps. The majority of the students who completed the VARK questionnaire were multimodal learners with kinesthetic and visual preferences. Sixty-seven percent (73/109) of students owned one or more mobile anatomy apps which were used by 57 students. Most of these students owned one to five apps and spent less than 30 minutes per week using them. Six of the top eight mobile anatomy apps owned and recommended by the students were developed by 3D4Medical. Visual learning preferences were not associated with time spent using mobile anatomy apps (OR = 0.40, 95% CI 0.12-1.40). Similarly, kinesthetic learning preferences (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 0.18-20.2), quadmodal preferences (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.06-9.25), or gender (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.48-4.81) did not affect the time students' spent using mobile anatomy apps. Learning preferences do not appear to influence students' time spent using mobile anatomy apps. Anat Sci Educ 9: 247-254. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  4. Psychosocial problems of pre-clinical students in the University of Ibadan Medical School.

    PubMed

    Omokhodion, F O

    2003-06-01

    Recent changes in the psychosocial environment of the university campus such as the steep rise in student numbers, the high cost of living standards and the increase in violence and cult activities has prompted the need to assess the impact of these changes on the students. A cross sectional study was carried out among pre-clinical medical students to identify their psychosocial problems. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information about socio-demographic variables including age, sex, sources of financial support, type of accommodation, smoking and drinking habits and use of recreational facilities. Causes of insecurity and depression among students were also recorded. The General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12 was used to assess their mental health status. One hundred and seventy-six students responded to the enquiry, 94 males (53%) and 80 females (45%). One hundred and thirty-seven (79%) live on the campus while 37 (21%) live off campus. Only 9 of the students (5%) were smokers and 28 (16%) were drinkers. Monthly pocket money ranged from Naira 1,000 to Naira 25,000. Forty-one (23%) thought their pocket money was adequate, 92 (52%) thought it was fair and 39 (22%) thought it was inadequate. Causes of insecurity on the campus were cultism 34 (19%), lack of money 27 (15%), lack of textbooks 13 (7%) and stealing 10 (6%). Causes of depression include fear of failure of examinations, 62 (35%), lack of money, 48 (27%) and family problems 17 (10%). Mental health scores ranged from 1 to 10. Using a cut off point of 3 to delineate those with traits of poor mental health, 35 (21%) fell into the category 15 boys and 20 girls. Mean mental health score were higher for females, those living on campus, smokers and drinkers but this was not statistically significant. Fear of failure of examinations, cultism and lack of money are major concerns among medical students on the main university campus. Counselling services should be provided to assist students with

  5. Molecular pharmacology of human NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hedegaard, Maiken K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Andersen, Karen T.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate excitatory neurotransmission. NMDA receptors are also important drug targets that are implicated in a number of pathophysiological conditions. To facilitate the transition from lead compounds in pre-clinical animal models to drug candidates for human use, it is important to establish whether NMDA receptor ligands have similar properties at rodent and human NMDA receptors. Here, we compare amino acid sequences for human and rat NMDA receptor subunits and discuss inter-species variation in the context of our current knowledge of the relationship between NMDA receptor structure and function. We summarize studies on the biophysical properties of human NMDA receptors and compare these properties to those of rat orthologs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive pharmacological characterization that allows side-by-side comparison of agonists, un-competitive antagonists, GluN2B-selective non-competitive antagonists, and GluN2C/D-selective modulators at recombinant human and rat NMDA receptors. The evaluation of biophysical properties and pharmacological probes acting at different sites on the receptor suggest that the binding sites and conformational changes leading to channel gating in response to agonist binding are highly conserved between human and rat NMDA receptors. In summary, the results of this study suggest that no major detectable differences exist in the pharmacological and functional properties of human and rat NMDA receptors. PMID:22197913

  6. A new approach in training pre-clinical medical undergraduates in community medicine in Pondicherry, South India.

    PubMed

    Rotti, S B; Soudarssanane, M B; Srinivasa, D K; Kumar, V S; Premarajan, K C; Pradhan, P

    1992-01-01

    Pre-clinical medical undergraduates are taught Community Medicine using a variety of teaching methods keeping the didactic lectures to the minimum in conformity with the latest recommendations of Medical Council of India. Five of the total twelve topics were taught using group discussion during 1988-89. The present paper gives the details of lesson plans for two topics. Evaluation was done based on the results of the written test, opinions expressed by the students and on the spot observation by the faculty members. Suggestions given by the students to improve the sessions have also been highlighted. PMID:1293466

  7. Pre-Clinical Study of a Novel Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxin Derivative Engineered for Improved Safety

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin; Tenezaca, Luis; Angeles, Christopher; Syngkon, Aurelia; Liublinska, Victoria; Ichtchenko, Konstantin; Band, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Cyto-012 is a recombinant derivative of Botulinum neurotoxin Type A (BoNT/A). It primarily differs from wild type (wt) BoNT/A1 in that it incorporates two amino acid substitutions in the catalytic domain of the light chain (LC) metalloprotease (E224 > A and Y366 > A), designed to provide a safer clinical profile. Cyto-012 is specifically internalized into rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and cleaves Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 (SNAP-25), the substrate of wt BoNT/A, but exhibits slower cleavage kinetics and therefore requires a higher absolute dose to exhibit pharmacologic activity. The pharmacodynamics of Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A have similar onset and duration of action using the Digital Abduction Assay (DAS). Intramuscular LD50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A respectively, were 0.63 ug (95% CI = 0.61, 0.66) and 6.22 pg (95% CI = 5.42, 7.02). ED50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A were respectively, 0.030 ug (95% CI = 0.026, 0.034) and 0.592 pg (95% CI = 0.488, 0.696). The safety margin (intramuscular LD50/ED50 ratio) for Cyto-012 was found to be improved 2-fold relative to wt BoNT/A (p < 0.001). The DAS response to Cyto-012 was diminished when a second injection was administered 32 days after the first. These data suggest that the safety margin of BoNT/A can be improved by modulating their activity towards SNAP-25. PMID:27484492

  8. Pre-Clinical Study of a Novel Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxin Derivative Engineered for Improved Safety.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin; Tenezaca, Luis; Angeles, Christopher; Syngkon, Aurelia; Liublinska, Victoria; Ichtchenko, Konstantin; Band, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Cyto-012 is a recombinant derivative of Botulinum neurotoxin Type A (BoNT/A). It primarily differs from wild type (wt) BoNT/A1 in that it incorporates two amino acid substitutions in the catalytic domain of the light chain (LC) metalloprotease (E224 > A and Y366 > A), designed to provide a safer clinical profile. Cyto-012 is specifically internalized into rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and cleaves Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 (SNAP-25), the substrate of wt BoNT/A, but exhibits slower cleavage kinetics and therefore requires a higher absolute dose to exhibit pharmacologic activity. The pharmacodynamics of Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A have similar onset and duration of action using the Digital Abduction Assay (DAS). Intramuscular LD50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A respectively, were 0.63 ug (95% CI = 0.61, 0.66) and 6.22 pg (95% CI = 5.42, 7.02). ED50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A were respectively, 0.030 ug (95% CI = 0.026, 0.034) and 0.592 pg (95% CI = 0.488, 0.696). The safety margin (intramuscular LD50/ED50 ratio) for Cyto-012 was found to be improved 2-fold relative to wt BoNT/A (p < 0.001). The DAS response to Cyto-012 was diminished when a second injection was administered 32 days after the first. These data suggest that the safety margin of BoNT/A can be improved by modulating their activity towards SNAP-25.

  9. The influence of the cage environment on rodent physiology and behavior: Implications for reproducibility of pre-clinical rodent research.

    PubMed

    Toth, Linda A

    2015-08-01

    The reproducibility of pre-clinical research is an important concern that is now being voiced by constituencies that include the National Institutes of Health, the pharmaceutical industry, Congress, the public and the scientific community. An important facet of performing and publishing well-controlled reproducible pre-clinical research is to stabilize and more completely define the environment of the animal subjects. Scientists who use rodents in research generally recognize the importance of maintaining a stable animal environment. However, despite a theoretical and general awareness of these issues, many may lack a true appreciation of how significantly even seemingly minor variations in the environment can affect research outcomes. The purpose of this article is to help investigators gain a more comprehensive and substantiated understanding of the potentially significant impact of even seemingly minor environmental changes on the animals and the data. An important caveat to this article is that the examples presented were selected from a very large literature, admittedly in order to illustrate certain points. The goal of this article is not to provide an overview of the entire literature on how the environment affects rodents but rather to make preclinical scientists more aware of how these factors can potentially influence the experimental data and contribute to poor reproducibility of research.

  10. Intrastriatal convection-enhanced delivery results in widespread perivascular distribution in a pre-clinical model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Convection-enhanced delivery (CED), a direct method for drug delivery to the brain through intraparenchymal microcatheters, is a promising strategy for intracerebral pharmacological therapy. By establishing a pressure gradient at the tip of the catheter, drugs can be delivered in uniform concentration throughout a large volume of interstitial fluid. However, the variables affecting perivascular distribution of drugs delivered by CED are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether the perivascular distribution of solutes delivered by CED into the striatum of rats is affected by the molecular weight of the infused agent, by co-infusion of vasodilator, alteration of infusion rates or use of a ramping regime. We also wanted to make a preliminary comparison of the distribution of solutes with that of nanoparticles. Methods We analysed the perivascular distribution of 4, 10, 20, 70, 150 kDa fluorescein-labelled dextran and fluorescent nanoparticles at 10 min and 3 h following CED into rat striatum. We investigated the effect of local vasodilatation, slow infusion rates and ramping on the perivascular distribution of solutes. Co-localisation with perivascular basement membranes and vascular endothelial cells was identified by immunohistochemistry. The uptake of infusates by perivascular macrophages was quantified using stereological methods. Results Widespread perivascular distribution and macrophage uptake of fluorescein-labelled dextran was visible 10 min after cessation of CED irrespective of molecular weight. However, a significantly higher proportion of perivascular macrophages had taken up 4, 10 and 20 kDa fluorescein-labelled dextran than 150 kDa dextran (p < 0.05, ANOVA). Co-infusion with vasodilator, slow infusion rates and use of a ramping regime did not alter the perivascular distribution. CED of fluorescent nanoparticles indicated that particles co-localise with perivascular basement membranes throughout the striatum but

  11. Improving biological relevancy of transcriptional biomarkers experiments by applying the MIQE guidelines to pre-clinical and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dooms, M; Chango, A; Barbour, E; Pouillart, P; Abdel Nour, A M

    2013-01-01

    The "Minimum Information for the Publication of qPCR Experiments" (MIQE [3]) guidelines are very much targeted at basic research experiments and have to our knowledge not been applied to qPCR assays carried out in the context of clinical trials. This report details the use of the MIQE qPCR app for iPhone (App Store, Apple) to assess the MIQE compliance of one clinical and five pre-clinical trials. This resulted in the need to include 14 modifications that make the guidelines more relevant for the assessment of this special type of application. We also discuss the need for flexibility, since while some parameters increase experimental quality, they also require more reagents and more time, which is not always feasible in a clinical setting. PMID:22910527

  12. Hippocampal-dependent neurocognitive impairment following cranial irradiation observed in pre-clinical models: current knowledge and possible future directions.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Wolfgang A; Gökhan, Şölen; Gulinello, Maria E; Brodin, N Patrik; Heard, John; Mehler, Mark F; Guha, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the literature for studies pertaining to impaired adult neurogenesis leading to neurocognitive impairment following cranial irradiation in rodent models. This compendium was compared with respect to radiation dose, converted to equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) to allow for direct comparison between studies. The effects of differences between animal species and the dependence on animal age as well as for time after irradiation were also considered. One of the major sites of de novo adult neurogenesis is the hippocampus, and as such, this review also focuses on assessing evidence related to the expression and potential effects of inflammatory cytokines on neural stem cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and whether this correlates with neurocognitive impairment. This review also discusses potential strategies to mitigate the detrimental effects on neurogenesis and neurocognition resulting from cranial irradiation, and how the rationale for these strategies compares with the current outcome of pre-clinical studies.

  13. Two Years Later: Journals Are Not Yet Enforcing the ARRIVE Guidelines on Reporting Standards for Pre-Clinical Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David; Lidster, Katie; Sottomayor, Ana; Amor, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern that poor experimental design and lack of transparent reporting contribute to the frequent failure of pre-clinical animal studies to translate into treatments for human disease. In 2010, the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines were introduced to help improve reporting standards. They were published in PLOS Biology and endorsed by funding agencies and publishers and their journals, including PLOS, Nature research journals, and other top-tier journals. Yet our analysis of papers published in PLOS and Nature journals indicates that there has been very little improvement in reporting standards since then. This suggests that authors, referees, and editors generally are ignoring guidelines, and the editorial endorsement is yet to be effectively implemented. PMID:24409096

  14. Two years later: journals are not yet enforcing the ARRIVE guidelines on reporting standards for pre-clinical animal studies.

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Lidster, Katie; Sottomayor, Ana; Amor, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern that poor experimental design and lack of transparent reporting contribute to the frequent failure of pre-clinical animal studies to translate into treatments for human disease. In 2010, the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines were introduced to help improve reporting standards. They were published in PLOS Biology and endorsed by funding agencies and publishers and their journals, including PLOS, Nature research journals, and other top-tier journals. Yet our analysis of papers published in PLOS and Nature journals indicates that there has been very little improvement in reporting standards since then. This suggests that authors, referees, and editors generally are ignoring guidelines, and the editorial endorsement is yet to be effectively implemented.

  15. A Modified Collagen Gel Enhances Healing Outcome in a Pre-Clinical Swine Model of Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Elgharably, Haytham; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Abas, Motaz; DasGhatak, Piya; Das, Amitava; Mohammed, Kareem; Sen, Chandan K.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen-based dressings are of great interest in wound care. However, evidence supporting their mechanism of action in a wound setting in vivo is scanty. This work providesfirst results from a pre-clinical swine model of excisional wounds elucidating the mechanism of action of a modified collagen gel (MCG) dressing. Following wounding, wound-edge tissue was collected at specific time intervals (3, 7, 14, and 21 days post-wounding). On day 7, histological analysis showed significant increase in the length of rete ridges suggesting improved biomechanical properties of the healing wound tissue. Rapid and transient mounting of inflammation is necessary for efficient healing. MCG significantly accelerated neutrophil and macrophages recruitment to the wound site on day 3 and day 7 with successful resolution of inflammation on day 21. MCG induced MCP-1 expression in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells in vitro. In vivo, MCG treated wound tissue displayed elevated VEGF expression. Consistently, MCG-treated wounds displayed significantly higher abundance of endothelial cells with increased blood flow to the wound area indicating improved vascularization. This observation was explained by the finding that MCG enhanced proliferation of wound-site endothelial cells. In MCG-treated wound tissue, Masson’s Trichrome and Picrosirius red staining showed higher abundance of collagen and increased collagen type I:III ratio. This work presents first evidence from a pre-clinical experimental setting explaining how a collagen-based dressing may improve wound closure by targeting multiple key mechanisms as compared to standard of care i.e., Tegadem treated wounds. The current findings warrant additional studies to determine whether the responses to the MCG are different from other modified or unmodified collagen based products used in clinical setting. PMID:23607796

  16. Studies in neuroendocrine pharmacology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maickel, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The expertise and facilities available within the Medical Sciences Program section on Pharmacology were used along with informational input from various NASA sources to study areas relevant to the manned space effort. Topics discussed include effects of drugs on deprivation-induced fluid consumption, brain biogenic amines, biochemical responses to stressful stimuli, biochemical and behavioral pharmacology of amphetamines, biochemical and pharmacological studies of analogues to biologically active indole compounds, chemical pharmacology: drug metabolism and disposition, toxicology, and chemical methodology. Appendices include a bibliography, and papers submitted for publication or already published.

  17. Pharmacology for the Psychotherapist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Myron Michael

    This book covers those areas of pharmacology that are of importance and interest to the psychotherapist. The 1st chapter introduces the various types of drugs. The 2nd chapter presents an overview of pharmacology and its principles. The 3rd chapter reviews aspects of the human body of importance to understanding the workings of psychotropic drugs.…

  18. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  19. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  20. Curriculum Guidelines for Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacology embraces the physical and chemical properties of drugs; the preparation of pharmaceutical agents; the absorption, fate, and excretion of drugs; and the effects of drugs on living systems. These guidelines represent a consensus on what would constitute a minimally acceptable pharmacology course for predoctoral dental students. (MLW)

  1. Pharmacology of epigenetics in brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Pritika; Dragunow, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics is a rapidly growing field and holds great promise for a range of human diseases, including brain disorders such as Rett syndrome, anxiety and depressive disorders, schizophrenia, Alzheimer disease and Huntington disease. This review is concerned with the pharmacology of epigenetics to treat disorders of the epigenome whether induced developmentally or manifested/acquired later in life. In particular, we will focus on brain disorders and their treatment by drugs that modify the epigenome. While the use of DNA methyl transferase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors in in vitro and in vivo models have demonstrated improvements in disease-related deficits, clinical trials in humans have been less promising. We will address recent advances in our understanding of the complexity of the epigenome with its many molecular players, and discuss evidence for a compromised epigenome in the context of an ageing or diseased brain. We will also draw on examples of species differences that may exist between humans and model systems, emphasizing the need for more robust pre-clinical testing. Finally, we will discuss fundamental issues to be considered in study design when targeting the epigenome. PMID:20015091

  2. Pharmacometrics of Pterostilbene: Pre-Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism, Anti-Cancer, Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Oxidant, and Analgesic Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To evaluate the pre-clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of pterostilbene. Methods: Rat liver microsomes were used to evaluate in vitro phase I and II metabolism. Right jugular vein cannulated male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed intravenously with 20 mg/kg of pterostilbene and sam...

  3. Comparative Analysis of Nursing Students' Perspectives toward Avatar Learning Modality: Gain Pre-Clinical Experience via Self-Paced Cognitive Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commendador, Kathleen; Chi, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to better understand the nature of nursing students' perspectives toward simulative learning modality for gaining pre-clinical experience via self-paced cognitive tool--Avatar. Findings indicates that participants engaged in synchronous Avatar learning environment had higher levels of appreciation toward Avatar…

  4. Pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of a MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boqi; Wang, Juan; Guo, Yingying; Chen, Tanxiu; Ni, Weihua; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Nannan; Xie, Fei; Tai, Guixiang

    2016-04-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1), as an oncogene, plays a key role in the progression and tumorigenesis of many human adenocarcinomas and is an attractive target in tumor immunotherapy. Our previous study showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific Th1-dominant immune response, simulated MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing activity, and could significantly inhibit MUC1-expression B16 cells' growth in mice. To help move the vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial, in the current study, a pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of the vaccine was conducted. The evaluation was comprised of a single-dose acute toxicity study in mice, repeat-dose chronic toxicity and immunogenicity studies in rats, and pilot toxicity and immunogenicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys. The results showed that treatment with the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine did not cause any organ toxicity, except for arthritis or local nodules induced by BCG in several rats. Furthermore, the vaccine significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ in rats, indicating that Th1 cells were activated. In addition, the results showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific IgG antibody response both in rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Collectively, these data are beneficial to move the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial.

  5. Cardiac Safety Implications of hNav1.5 Blockade and a Framework for Pre-Clinical Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Erdemli, Gül; Kim, Albert M.; Ju, Haisong; Springer, Clayton; Penland, Robert C.; Hoffmann, Peter K.

    2012-01-01

    The human cardiac sodium channel (hNav1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene) is critical for action potential generation and propagation in the heart. Drug-induced sodium channel inhibition decreases the rate of cardiomyocyte depolarization and consequently conduction velocity and can have serious implications for cardiac safety. Genetic mutations in hNav1.5 have also been linked to a number of cardiac diseases. Therefore, off-target hNav1.5 inhibition may be considered a risk marker for a drug candidate. Given the potential safety implications for patients and the costs of late stage drug development, detection, and mitigation of hNav1.5 liabilities early in drug discovery and development becomes important. In this review, we describe a pre-clinical strategy to identify hNav1.5 liabilities that incorporates in vitro, in vivo, and in silico techniques and the application of this information in the integrated risk assessment at different stages of drug discovery and development. PMID:22303294

  6. Multi-day pre-clinical demonstration of glucose/galactose binding protein-based fiber optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Weidemaier, Kristin; Lastovich, Alexander; Keith, Steven; Pitner, J Bruce; Sistare, Mark; Jacobson, Ross; Kurisko, David

    2011-06-15

    We report here the first pre-clinical demonstration of continuous glucose tracking by fluorophore-labeled and genetically engineered glucose/galactose binding protein (GGBP). Acrylodan-labeled GGBP was immobilized in a hydrogel matrix at the tip of a small diameter optical fiber contained in a stainless steel needle. The fiber optic biosensors were inserted subcutaneously into Yucatan and Yorkshire swine, and the sensor response to changing glucose levels was monitored at intervals over a 7-day period. Sensor mean percent error on day 7 was 16.4±5.0% using a single daily reference blood glucose value to calibrate the sensor. The GGBP sensor's susceptibility to common interferents was tested in a well-plate system using human sera. No significant interference was observed from the tested interferents except for tetracycline at the drug's maximum plasma concentration. The robust performance of the GGBP-based fiber optic sensor in swine models and resistance to interferents indicates the potential of this technology for continuous glucose monitoring in humans.

  7. Pre-clinical evaluation of an adult extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system with active mixing for pediatric respiratory support.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, R Garrett; Mussin, Yerbol; Bulanin, Denis S; Lund, Laura W; Kocyildirim, Ergin; Zhumadilov, Zhaksybay Zh; Olzhayev, Farkhad S; Federspiel, William J; Wearden, Peter D

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to conduct pre-clinical feasibility studies to determine if a highly efficient, active-mixing, adult extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) system can safely be translated to the pediatric population. The Hemolung Respiratory Assist System (RAS) was tested in vitro and in vivo to evaluate its performance for pediatric veno-venous applications. The Hemolung RAS operates at blood flows of 350-550 ml/min and utilizes an integrated pump-gas exchange cartridge with a membrane surface area of 0.59 m² as the only component of the extracorporeal circuit. Both acute and seven-day chronic in vivo tests were conducted in healthy juvenile sheep using a veno-venous cannulation strategy adapted to the in vivo model. The Hemolung RAS was found to have gas exchange and pumping capabilities relevant to patients weighing 3-25 kg. Seven-day animal studies in juvenile sheep demonstrated that veno-venous extracorporeal support could be used safely and effectively with no significant adverse reactions related to device operation.

  8. Pre-Clinical Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Bourn, Rebecka; James, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is often preceded by immune dysregulation and clinical manifestations below the threshold for SLE classification. This review discusses current and evolving concepts about the pre-classification period of SLE, including clinical and mechanistic observations, and potential avenues for early identification and intervention. Recent findings Although incomplete lupus erythematosus (ILE) involves fewer clinical manifestations than SLE, ILE can cause organ damage and mortality. Common clinical features in ILE include antinuclear antibody seropositivity, polyarthritis, immunologic manifestations, and hematological disorders. Despite having lower disease activity and damage scores than SLE patients, ILE patients may develop pulmonary arterial hypertension or renal, neurological, or peripheral vascular damage. The recently proposed SLICC SLE classification criteria could shift the period considered “preclinical SLE”. Murine studies suggest that the balance of T helper/T regulatory cells, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity, and plasmacytoid dendritic cell pathways may be valuable targets for early intervention. Summary Advances in our understanding of early SLE, including stages before clinical features are fully developed, will improve our ability to identify individuals at high risk of classification for potential prevention trials, provide necessary information to improve diagnostic testing, and perhaps identify novel targets for directed therapeutics in clinical SLE. PMID:26125103

  9. Clinical pharmacology of bimatoprost.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Louis B

    2005-06-01

    Bimatoprost (Lumigan), Allergan) is a highly efficacious ocular hypotensive agent that provides good diurnal control of intraocular pressure in glaucoma and ocular hypertensive patients. Bimatoprost is a synthetic molecule that is structurally and pharmacologically similar to prostamide F(2), and appears to mimic the activity of the prostamides. Consistent with prostamide-mimetic activity, bimatoprost has potent inherent pharmacological activity in prostamide-sensitive preparations and essentially remains intact in the living primate eye. This is sufficient to explain its potent and efficacious ocular hypotensive activity, and suggests that bimatoprost is a pharmacologically unique compound. PMID:16922657

  10. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors. PMID:23020294

  11. A Grading System To Evaluate Objectively the Strength of Pre-Clinical Data of Acute Neuroprotective Therapies for Clinical Translation in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Okon, Elena B.; Tsai, Eve; Beattie, Michael S.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Magnuson, David K.; Reier, Paul J.; McTigue, Dana M.; Popovich, Phillip G.; Blight, Andrew R.; Oudega, Martin; Guest, James D.; Weaver, Lynne C.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The past three decades have seen an explosion of research interest in spinal cord injury (SCI) and the development of hundreds of potential therapies that have demonstrated some promise in pre-clinical experimental animal models. A growing number of these treatments are seeking to be translated into human clinical trials. Conducting such a clinical trial, however, is extremely costly, not only for the time and money required to execute it, but also for the limited resources that will then no longer be available to evaluate other promising therapies. The decision about what therapies have sufficient pre-clinical evidence of efficacy to justify testing in humans is therefore of utmost importance. Here, we have developed a scoring system for objectively grading the body of pre-clinical literature on neuroprotective treatments for acute SCI. The components of the system include an evaluation of a number of factors that are thought to be important in considering the “robustness” of a therapy's efficacy, including the animal species and injury models that have been used to test it, the time window of efficacy, the types of functional improvements effected by it, and whether efficacy has been independently replicated. The selection of these factors was based on the results of a questionnaire that was performed within the SCI research community. A modified Delphi consensus-building exercise was then conducted with experts in pre-clinical SCI research to refine the criteria and decide upon how to score them. Finally, the grading system was applied to a series of potential neuroprotective treatments for acute SCI. This represents a systematic approach to developing an objective method of evaluating the extent to which the pre-clinical literature supports the translation of a particular experimental treatment into human trials. PMID:20507235

  12. The pharmacology of psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Passie, Torsten; Seifert, Juergen; Schneider, Udo; Emrich, Hinderk M

    2002-10-01

    Psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) is the major psychoactive alkaloid of some species of mushrooms distributed worldwide. These mushrooms represent a growing problem regarding hallucinogenic drug abuse. Despite its experimental medical use in the 1960s, only very few pharmacological data about psilocybin were known until recently. Because of its still growing capacity for abuse and the widely dispersed data this review presents all the available pharmacological data about psilocybin.

  13. Combined AKT and MEK Pathway Blockade in Pre-Clinical Models of Enzalutamide-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toren, Paul; Kim, Soojin; Johnson, Fraser; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in patient outcomes using newer androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibitors, treatment resistance in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to remain a clinical problem. Co-targeting alternate resistance pathways are of significant interest to treat CRPC and delay the onset of resistance. Both the AKT and MEK signaling pathways become activated as prostate cancer develops resistance to AR-targeted therapies. This pre-clinical study explores co-targeting these pathways in AR-positive prostate cancer models. Using various in vitro models of prostate cancer disease states including androgen dependent (LNCaP), CRPC (V16D and 22RV1) and ENZ-resistant prostate cancer (MR49C and MR49F), we evaluate the relevance of targeting both AKT and MEK pathways. Our data reveal that AKT inhibition induces apoptosis and inhibits cell growth in PTEN null cell lines independently of their sensitivity to hormone therapy; however, AKT inhibition had no effect on the PTEN positive 22RV1 cell line. Interestingly, we found that MEK inhibition had greater effect on 22RV1 cells compared to LNCaP, V16D or ENZ-resistant cells MR49C and MR49F cells. In vitro, combination AKT and MEK blockade had evidence of synergy observed in some cell lines and assays, but this was not consistent across all results. In vivo, the combination of AKT and MEK inhibition resulted in more consistent tumor growth inhibition of MR49F xenografts and longer disease specific survival compared to AKT inhibitor monotherapy. As in our in vitro study, 22RV1 xenografts were more resistant to AKT inhibition while they were more sensitive to MEK inhibition. Our results suggest that targeting AKT and MEK in combination may be a valuable strategy in prostate cancer when both pathways are activated and further support the importance of characterizing the dominant oncogenic pathway in each patient’s tumor in order to select optimal therapy. PMID:27046225

  14. Pre-clinical Implants of the Levitronix PediVAS® Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device – Strategy for Regulatory Approval

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Timothy M.; Kocyildirim, Ergin; Marks, John D.; Bengston, Shawn G.; Olia, Salim E.; Callahan, Patrick M.; Kameneva, Marina V.; Franklin, Stephen; Borovetz, Harvey S.; Dasse, Kurt A.; Wearden, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    The PediVAS blood pump is a magnetically levitated centrifugal pump designed for pediatric bridge-to-decision or bridge-to-recovery in pediatric patients from 3–20kg in weight. In preparation for submission of an investigational device exemption (IDE) application, we completed a final six-animal series of pre-clinical studies. The studies were conducted under controlled conditions as prescribed by the recently released FDA guidance document for animal studies for cardiovascular devices. Three 30-day chronic left ventricular support studies were completed in a juvenile lamb model to demonstrate the safety and hemocompatibility of the PediVAS pump. Three additional 8-hour acute biventricular support studies were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach from a hemodynamic and systems standpoint. It is estimated that 50% of pediatric patients who require left ventricular support also require right ventricular support. All studies were successfully completed without complications, device malfunctions, or adverse events. End-organ function was normal for the chronic studies. We noted small surface lesions on one kidney from each chronic study as well as the presence of ring thrombus on connectors, as expected for these types of studies in animal models. The strategy and challenges imposed by performing a controlled cardiovascular device study in a juvenile lamb model are discussed. We believe that these successful implants demonstrate safety and performance for the PediVAS device for support of an IDE application to initiate human clinical trials and provide a roadmap for other researchers. PMID:23494160

  15. Combined AKT and MEK Pathway Blockade in Pre-Clinical Models of Enzalutamide-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Toren, Paul; Kim, Soojin; Johnson, Fraser; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent improvements in patient outcomes using newer androgen receptor (AR) pathway inhibitors, treatment resistance in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to remain a clinical problem. Co-targeting alternate resistance pathways are of significant interest to treat CRPC and delay the onset of resistance. Both the AKT and MEK signaling pathways become activated as prostate cancer develops resistance to AR-targeted therapies. This pre-clinical study explores co-targeting these pathways in AR-positive prostate cancer models. Using various in vitro models of prostate cancer disease states including androgen dependent (LNCaP), CRPC (V16D and 22RV1) and ENZ-resistant prostate cancer (MR49C and MR49F), we evaluate the relevance of targeting both AKT and MEK pathways. Our data reveal that AKT inhibition induces apoptosis and inhibits cell growth in PTEN null cell lines independently of their sensitivity to hormone therapy; however, AKT inhibition had no effect on the PTEN positive 22RV1 cell line. Interestingly, we found that MEK inhibition had greater effect on 22RV1 cells compared to LNCaP, V16D or ENZ-resistant cells MR49C and MR49F cells. In vitro, combination AKT and MEK blockade had evidence of synergy observed in some cell lines and assays, but this was not consistent across all results. In vivo, the combination of AKT and MEK inhibition resulted in more consistent tumor growth inhibition of MR49F xenografts and longer disease specific survival compared to AKT inhibitor monotherapy. As in our in vitro study, 22RV1 xenografts were more resistant to AKT inhibition while they were more sensitive to MEK inhibition. Our results suggest that targeting AKT and MEK in combination may be a valuable strategy in prostate cancer when both pathways are activated and further support the importance of characterizing the dominant oncogenic pathway in each patient's tumor in order to select optimal therapy.

  16. The prevalence and correlations of medical student burnout in the pre-clinical years: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mazurkiewicz, Rebecca; Korenstein, Deborah; Fallar, Robert; Ripp, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Burnout is a psychological syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and impaired personal accomplishment induced by repeated workplace stressors. Current research suggests that physician burnout may have its origins in medical school. The consequences of medical student burnout include both personal and professional distress, loss of empathy, and poor health. We hypothesized that burnout occurs prior to the initiation of the clinical years of medical education. This was a cross-sectional survey administered to third-year medical students at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (MSSM) in New York, New York (a traditional-style medical school with a marked division between pre-clinical and clinical training occurring at the beginning of the third year). Survey included an instrument used to measure job burnout, a sleep deprivation screen, and questions related to demographic information, current rotation, psychiatric history, time spent working/studying, participation in extracurricular activities, social support network, autonomy and isolation. Of the 86 medical students who participated, 71% met criteria for burnout. Burnt out students were significantly more likely to suffer from sleep deprivation (p = 0.0359). They were also more likely to disagree with the following statements: "I have control over my daily schedule" (p = 0.0286) and "I am confident that I will have the knowledge and skills necessary to become an intern when I graduate" (p = 0.0263). Our findings show that burnout is present at the beginning of the third year of medical school, prior to the initiation of the clinical years of medical training. Medical student burnout is quite common, and early efforts should be made to empower medical students to both build the knowledge and skills necessary to become capable physicians, as well as withstand the emotional, mental, and physical challenges inherent to medical school. PMID:21781020

  17. The value of integrating pre-clinical data to predict nausea and vomiting risk in humans as illustrated by AZD3514, a novel androgen receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Grant, Claire; Ewart, Lorna; Muthas, Daniel; Deavall, Damian; Smith, Simon A; Clack, Glen; Newham, Pete

    2016-04-01

    Nausea and vomiting are components of a complex mechanism that signals food avoidance and protection of the body against the absorption of ingested toxins. This response can also be triggered by pharmaceuticals. Predicting clinical nausea and vomiting liability for pharmaceutical agents based on pre-clinical data can be problematic as no single animal model is a universal predictor. Moreover, efforts to improve models are hampered by the lack of translational animal and human data in the public domain. AZD3514 is a novel, orally-administered compound that inhibits androgen receptor signaling and down-regulates androgen receptor expression. Here we have explored the utility of integrating data from several pre-clinical models to predict nausea and vomiting in the clinic. Single and repeat doses of AZD3514 resulted in emesis, salivation and gastrointestinal disturbances in the dog, and inhibited gastric emptying in rats after a single dose. AZD3514, at clinically relevant exposures, induced dose-responsive "pica" behaviour in rats after single and multiple daily doses, and induced retching and vomiting behaviour in ferrets after a single dose. We compare these data with the clinical manifestation of nausea and vomiting encountered in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer receiving AZD3514. Our data reveal a striking relationship between the pre-clinical observations described and the experience of nausea and vomiting in the clinic. In conclusion, the emetic nature of AZD3514 was predicted across a range of pre-clinical models, and the approach presented provides a valuable framework for predicition of clinical nausea and vomiting.

  18. The value of integrating pre-clinical data to predict nausea and vomiting risk in humans as illustrated by AZD3514, a novel androgen receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Grant, Claire; Ewart, Lorna; Muthas, Daniel; Deavall, Damian; Smith, Simon A; Clack, Glen; Newham, Pete

    2016-04-01

    Nausea and vomiting are components of a complex mechanism that signals food avoidance and protection of the body against the absorption of ingested toxins. This response can also be triggered by pharmaceuticals. Predicting clinical nausea and vomiting liability for pharmaceutical agents based on pre-clinical data can be problematic as no single animal model is a universal predictor. Moreover, efforts to improve models are hampered by the lack of translational animal and human data in the public domain. AZD3514 is a novel, orally-administered compound that inhibits androgen receptor signaling and down-regulates androgen receptor expression. Here we have explored the utility of integrating data from several pre-clinical models to predict nausea and vomiting in the clinic. Single and repeat doses of AZD3514 resulted in emesis, salivation and gastrointestinal disturbances in the dog, and inhibited gastric emptying in rats after a single dose. AZD3514, at clinically relevant exposures, induced dose-responsive "pica" behaviour in rats after single and multiple daily doses, and induced retching and vomiting behaviour in ferrets after a single dose. We compare these data with the clinical manifestation of nausea and vomiting encountered in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer receiving AZD3514. Our data reveal a striking relationship between the pre-clinical observations described and the experience of nausea and vomiting in the clinic. In conclusion, the emetic nature of AZD3514 was predicted across a range of pre-clinical models, and the approach presented provides a valuable framework for predicition of clinical nausea and vomiting. PMID:26876616

  19. Development of Pre-Clinical Models for Evaluating the Therapeutic Potential of Candidate siRNA Targeting STAT6

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Gareth D.; Lockridge, Jennifer A.; Zinnen, Shawn; Hopkin, Julian M.; Richards, Ivan; Walker, William

    2014-01-01

    Developing siRNA therapeutics poses technical challenges including appropriate molecular design and testing in suitable pre-clinical models. We previously detailed sequence-selection and modification strategies for siRNA candidates targeting STAT6. Here, we describe methodology that evaluates the suitability of candidate siRNA for respiratory administration. Chemically-modified siRNA exhibited similar inhibitory activity (IC50) against STAT6 in vitro compared to unmodified siRNA and apical exposure testing with Caco-2 cell monolayers showed modification was not associated with cellular toxicity. Use of a modified RNA extraction protocol improved the sensitivity of a PCR-based bio-analytical assay (lower limit of siRNA strand quantification  =  0.01 pg/µl) which was used to demonstrate that lung distribution profiles for both siRNAs were similar following intra-tracheal administration. However, after 6 hours, modified siRNA was detected in lung tissue at concentrations >1000-fold higher than unmodified siRNA. Evaluation in a rat model of allergic inflammation confirmed the persistence of modified siRNA in vivo, which was detectable in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, BAL cells and lung tissue samples, 72 hours after dosing. Based upon the concept of respiratory allergy as a single airway disease, we considered nasal delivery as a route for respiratory targeting, evaluating an intra-nasal exposure model that involved simple dosing followed by fine dissection of the nasal cavity. Notably, endogenous STAT6 expression was invariant throughout the nasal cavities and modified siRNA persisted for at least 3 days after administration. Coupled with our previous findings showing upregulated expression of inflammatory markers in nasal samples from asthmatics, these findings support the potential of intranasal siRNA delivery. In summary, we demonstrate the successful chemical modification of STAT6 targeting siRNA, which enhanced bio-availability without cellular

  20. SU-E-I-84: MRI Relaxation Properties of a Pre-Clinical Hypoxia-Sensitive MRI Contrast Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Wilson, G; Chavez, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A possible hypoxia-sensitive MRI agent, hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), has been tried to image oxygen level in proton-based MRI (Kodibagkar et al, NMR Biomed, 2008). The induced changes of T1 (or R1) value by the HMDSO as the oxygenation level changes are the principle that the hypoxia agent is based on: the R1 increases as the oxygen level increases. However, as reported previously, the range of R1 values (0.1–0.3 s-1, corresponding to 3–10 s of T1) is not in the range where a regular MRI technique can easily detect the change. In order for this agent to be widely applied in an MRI environment, more relaxation properties of this agent, including T1 in the rotating frame (T1rho) and T2, need to be explored. Here, the relaxation properties of this agent are explored. Methods: A phantom was made with HMDSO, water and mineral oil, each of which was prepared with oxygen and nitrogen, and was imaged in a 3T MRI system. The T1 properties were explored by the inversion recovery (TR=3000ms, TE=65ms) while varying the inversion time (TI), and also by the fast-field-echo (TR=2 ms, TE=2.8ms) while varying the flip angle (FA). T1rho was explored with a 5-pulse spin-locking technique (TR=5000ms, TE=10ms, spin-lock field=500Hz) while varying the spin-lock duration. T2 was explored with multi-shot TSE (TR=2500ms) while varying TE. Results: With the variable FA and TI, the signals of HMDSO with oxygen and nitrogen change in a similar way and do not respond well by the change of oxygen level, which confirms the large T1 value of HMDSO. The T1rho and T2, however, have a better sensitivity. Conclusion: For the possible pre-clinical hypoxia MRI agent (HMDSO), the detection of T1 (or R1) changes may be more challenging than the detection of other relaxation properties, particularly T2, as the oxygen level changes.

  1. Pharmacology. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials required to teach a competency-based course in pharmacology for practical nursing. The following are covered in the five instructional units: calculating medication dosages, documenting medications, identifying classification and effects of medications, administering medications, and assisting with…

  2. Pharmacological targeting of redox regulation systems as new therapeutic approach for psychiatric disorders: A literature overview.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Stefania; Trabace, Luigia

    2016-05-01

    Redox dysregulation occurs following a disequilibrium between reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing and degrading systems, i.e. mitochondria, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) on one hand and the principal antioxidant system, the glutathione, on the other hand. Increasing recent evidence points towards a pathogenetic role of an altered redox state in the development of several mental disorders, such as anxiety, bipolar disorders, depression, psychosis, autism and post-traumaticstress disorders (PTSD). In this regard, pharmacological targeting of the redox state regulating systems in the brain has been proposed as an innovative and promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of these mental diseases. This review will summarize current knowledge obtained from both pre-clinical and clinical studies in order to descant "lights and shadows" of targeting pharmacologically both the producing and degrading reactive oxygen species (ROS) systems in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26995306

  3. Should mild COPD be treated? Evidence for early pharmacological intervention.

    PubMed

    Elbehairy, Amany F; Webb, Katherine A; Neder, J Alberto; Alberto Neder, J; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2013-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and often progressive inflammatory disease of the airways that is both preventable and treatable. It is well established that those with mild-to-moderate disease severity represent the majority of patients with COPD, yet this subpopulation is relatively under-studied. Because of an insidious pre-clinical phase, COPD is both under-diagnosed and under-treated. Recent studies have confirmed that even patients with mild, grade 1 COPD [i.e. those with a reduced forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity ratio but normal FEV1], have measurable physiological impairment with increased morbidity and a higher risk of mortality compared with non-smoking healthy controls. Beyond the imperative of smoking cessation-the pivotal intervention in all COPD stages-the role of pharmacotherapy for prevention of disease progression has yet to be established. The main objective of this review is to provide a concise overview of the heterogeneous pathophysiology of COPD with only mild airway obstruction on spirometry and obstacles for early diagnosis. We emphasize that the absence of sufficiently powered trials involving a large number of patients precludes definitive recommendations in support of (or against) long-term pharmacological treatment in mild COPD. Despite these limitations, we present a rationale for earlier pharmacological intervention derived from recent physiological studies performed in symptomatic patients with mild COPD.

  4. Pharmacological strategies for detoxification.

    PubMed

    Diaper, Alison M; Law, Fergus D; Melichar, Jan K

    2014-02-01

    Detoxification refers to the safe discontinuation from a substance of dependence and is distinct from relapse prevention. Detoxification usually takes between a few days and a few weeks to complete, depending on the substance being misused, the severity of dependence and the support available to the user. Psychosocial therapies alongside pharmacological treatments are essential to improve outcome. The dependencies considered in this overview are detoxification from opioids (with methadone, buprenorphine, α2-adrenoceptor agonists and adjunct medications), alcohol (with benzodiazepines, anti-glutamatergics and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic drugs), stimulants and cannabis (with no clear recommended pharmacological treatments), benzodiazepines (with dose tapering) and nicotine (with nicotine replacement therapy, antidepressants and partial agonists). Evidence is limited by a lack of controlled trials robust enough for review bodies, and more research is required into optimal treatment doses and regimes, alone and in combination.

  5. Pharmacological strategies for detoxification.

    PubMed

    Diaper, Alison M; Law, Fergus D; Melichar, Jan K

    2014-02-01

    Detoxification refers to the safe discontinuation from a substance of dependence and is distinct from relapse prevention. Detoxification usually takes between a few days and a few weeks to complete, depending on the substance being misused, the severity of dependence and the support available to the user. Psychosocial therapies alongside pharmacological treatments are essential to improve outcome. The dependencies considered in this overview are detoxification from opioids (with methadone, buprenorphine, α2-adrenoceptor agonists and adjunct medications), alcohol (with benzodiazepines, anti-glutamatergics and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic drugs), stimulants and cannabis (with no clear recommended pharmacological treatments), benzodiazepines (with dose tapering) and nicotine (with nicotine replacement therapy, antidepressants and partial agonists). Evidence is limited by a lack of controlled trials robust enough for review bodies, and more research is required into optimal treatment doses and regimes, alone and in combination. PMID:24118014

  6. Pharmacological strategies for detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Diaper, Alison M; Law, Fergus D; Melichar, Jan K

    2014-01-01

    Detoxification refers to the safe discontinuation from a substance of dependence and is distinct from relapse prevention. Detoxification usually takes between a few days and a few weeks to complete, depending on the substance being misused, the severity of dependence and the support available to the user. Psychosocial therapies alongside pharmacological treatments are essential to improve outcome. The dependencies considered in this overview are detoxification from opioids (with methadone, buprenorphine, α2-adrenoceptor agonists and adjunct medications), alcohol (with benzodiazepines, anti-glutamatergics and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic drugs), stimulants and cannabis (with no clear recommended pharmacological treatments), benzodiazepines (with dose tapering) and nicotine (with nicotine replacement therapy, antidepressants and partial agonists). Evidence is limited by a lack of controlled trials robust enough for review bodies, and more research is required into optimal treatment doses and regimes, alone and in combination. PMID:24118014

  7. [Pharmacological biomodulation in cancer].

    PubMed

    Arvelo, F; Merentes, E

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the P-glycoprotein as a mediator of multidrug resistance (MDR) represents one of the most important research accomplishments in antineoplastic pharmacology during the last decade. Demonstration of Pgp in epithelial tissues, untreated and chemotherapeutically pretreated human malignancies, and identification of various agents capable of reversing in vitro resistance has generated enthusiasm for clinical studies throughout the world. This review discusses recent developments of experimental and clinical investigations of MDR reversing agents in cancer.

  8. Pharmacological effects of biotin.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    In the last few decades, more vitamin-mediated effects have been discovered at the level of gene expression. Increasing knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of these vitamins has opened new perspectives that form a connection between nutritional signals and the development of new therapeutic agents. Besides its role as a carboxylase prosthetic group, biotin regulates gene expression and has a wide repertoire of effects on systemic processes. The vitamin regulates genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism: Biotin has stimulatory effects on genes whose action favors hypoglycemia (insulin, insulin receptor, pancreatic and hepatic glucokinase); on the contrary, biotin decreases the expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key gluconeogenic enzyme that stimulates glucose production by the liver. The findings that biotin regulates the expression of genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism are in agreement with several observations that indicate that biotin supply is involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Biotin deficiency has been linked to impaired glucose tolerance and decreased utilization of glucose. On the other hand, the diabetic state appears to be ameliorated by pharmacological doses of biotin. Likewise, pharmacological doses of biotin appear to decrease plasma lipid concentrations and modify lipid metabolism. The effects of biotin on carbohydrate metabolism and the lack of toxic effects of the vitamin at pharmacological doses suggest that biotin could be used in the development of new therapeutics in the treatment of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, an area that we are actively investigating. PMID:15992683

  9. Pharmacological interactions of vasoconstrictors.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Cutando, Antonio; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    This article is the first of a series on pharmacological interactions involving medicaments commonly prescribed and/or used in odontology: vasoconstrictors in local anaesthetics and anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial analgesics. The necessity for the odontologist to be aware of adverse reactions as a result of the pharmacological interactions is due to the increase in medicament consumption by the general population. There is a demographic change with greater life expectancy and patients have increased chronic health problems and therefore have increased medicament intake. The presence of adrenaline (epinephrine) and other vasoconstrictors in local odontological anaesthetics is beneficial in relation to the duration and depth of anaesthesia and reduces bleeding and systemic toxicity of the local anaesthetic. However, it might produce pharmacological interactions between the injected vasoconstrictors and the local anaesthetic and adrenergic medicament administered exogenically which the odontologist should be aware of, especially because of the risk of consequent adverse reactions. Therefore the importance of conducting a detailed clinical history of the general state of health and include all medicaments, legal as well as illegal, taken by the patient. PMID:19114951

  10. Social Pharmacology: Expanding horizons

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of “social pharmacology” is not covered by the so-called “Phase IV” alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the “life cycle” of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  11. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  12. Overview of safety pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Goineau, Sonia; Lemaire, Martine; Froget, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Safety pharmacology entails the assessment of the potential risks of novel pharmaceuticals for human use. As detailed in the ICH S7A guidelines, safety pharmacology for drug discovery involves a core battery of studies on three vital systems: central nervous (CNS), cardiovascular (CV), and respiratory. Primary CNS studies are aimed at defining compound effects on general behavior, locomotion, neuromuscular coordination, seizure threshold, and vigilance. The primary CV test battery includes an evaluation of proarrhythmic risk using in vitro tests (hERG channel and Purkinje fiber assays) and in vivo measurements in conscious animals via telemetry. Comprehensive cardiac risk assessment also includes full hemodynamic evaluation in a large, anesthetized animal. Basic respiratory function can be examined in conscious animals using whole-body plethysmography. This allows for an assessment of whether the sensitivity to respiratory-depressant effects can be enhanced by exposure to increased CO2 . Other safety pharmacology topics detailed in this unit are the timing of such studies, ethical and animal welfare issues, and statistical evaluation. PMID:24510755

  13. Inhibition of precancerous lesions development in kidneys by chrysin via regulating hyperproliferation, inflammation and apoptosis at pre clinical stage.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Summya; Nafees, Sana; Vafa, Abul; Afzal, Shekh Muhammad; Ali, Nemat; Rehman, Muneeb U; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Siddiqi, Aisha; Barnwal, Preeti; Majed, Ferial; Sultana, Sarwat

    2016-09-15

    Chrysin (CH) is natural, biologically active compound, belongs to flavoniod family and possesses diverse pharmacological activities as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer. It is found in many plants, honey and propolis. In the present study, we investigated the chemopreventive efficacy of CH against N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) initiated and Fe-NTA induced precancerous lesions and its role in regulating oxidative injury, hyperproliferation, tumor incidences, histopathological alterations, inflammation, and apoptosis in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Renal cancer was initiated by single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of DEN (200 mg/kg bw) and promoted by twice weekly injection of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) 9 mg Fe/kg bw for 16 weeks. CH attenuated Fe-NTA enhanced renal lipid peroxidation, serum toxicity markers and restored renal anti oxidant armory significantly. CH supplementation suppressed the development of precancerous lesions via down regulation of cell proliferation marker like PCNA; inflammatory mediators like TNF-α, IL-6, NFkB, COX-2, iNOS; tumor incidences. CH up regulated intrinsic apoptotic pathway proteins like bax, caspase-9 and caspase-3 along with down regulation of Bcl-2 triggering apoptosis. Histopathological and ultra structural alterations further confirmed biochemical and immunohistochemical results. These results provide powerful evidence for the chemopreventive efficacy of CH against chemically induced renal carcinogenesis possibly by modulation of multiple molecular pathways.

  14. Inhibition of precancerous lesions development in kidneys by chrysin via regulating hyperproliferation, inflammation and apoptosis at pre clinical stage.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Summya; Nafees, Sana; Vafa, Abul; Afzal, Shekh Muhammad; Ali, Nemat; Rehman, Muneeb U; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Siddiqi, Aisha; Barnwal, Preeti; Majed, Ferial; Sultana, Sarwat

    2016-09-15

    Chrysin (CH) is natural, biologically active compound, belongs to flavoniod family and possesses diverse pharmacological activities as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer. It is found in many plants, honey and propolis. In the present study, we investigated the chemopreventive efficacy of CH against N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) initiated and Fe-NTA induced precancerous lesions and its role in regulating oxidative injury, hyperproliferation, tumor incidences, histopathological alterations, inflammation, and apoptosis in the kidneys of Wistar rats. Renal cancer was initiated by single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of DEN (200 mg/kg bw) and promoted by twice weekly injection of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) 9 mg Fe/kg bw for 16 weeks. CH attenuated Fe-NTA enhanced renal lipid peroxidation, serum toxicity markers and restored renal anti oxidant armory significantly. CH supplementation suppressed the development of precancerous lesions via down regulation of cell proliferation marker like PCNA; inflammatory mediators like TNF-α, IL-6, NFkB, COX-2, iNOS; tumor incidences. CH up regulated intrinsic apoptotic pathway proteins like bax, caspase-9 and caspase-3 along with down regulation of Bcl-2 triggering apoptosis. Histopathological and ultra structural alterations further confirmed biochemical and immunohistochemical results. These results provide powerful evidence for the chemopreventive efficacy of CH against chemically induced renal carcinogenesis possibly by modulation of multiple molecular pathways. PMID:27403965

  15. Pharmacology in space: pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pavy-Le Traon, A; Saivin, S; Soulez-LaRivière, C; Pujos, M; Güell, A; Houin, G

    1997-01-01

    This chapter summarized the information available on the pharmacological kits onboard spacecraft and on the use of drugs in space, while the next chapter is dedicated to the impacts of weightlessness on drug pharmacokinetics. The need of a selected group of drugs for the use of astronauts during short-term and long-term spaceflights has been discussed. Recommendations are made for a Space Pharmacopoeia as well as for the areas of research needed to adapt medication to the weightlessness of the space environment. Although the usefulness of these drugs has been clearly demonstrated, their use also raises several problems. Physiological changes due to weightlessness may induce changes in pharmacokinetic behavior of drugs and influence their dosage regimen. Inflight data obtained by salivary drug monitoring have shown changes in the distribution of scopolamine and a significant change in the disposition of the common pain-relief agent acetaminophen taken inflight, in both drug concentration and time course. The authors of this study emphasize, however, that their data are preliminary and as yet incomplete. Further simulation studies and, if possible, inflight experiments are required. In vitro studies of the antibacterial activity of antibiotics under space conditions have shown an increased resistance of Escherichia Coli to colistin and kanamycin, and a lowered resistance of Staphylococcus Aureus to oxacillin, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin. The possible consequences of these findings for the treatment of infections contracted by astronauts are yet to be elucidated. There is still a lack of pharmacological countermeasures, particularly for preventing the progressive bone demineralization occurring in weightlessness. The treatment of space motion sickness with drugs carries with it the problem of undesirable side-effects on psychomotor performance. In order to arrive at the most appropriate medical kit for a particular mission, the best trade-off of risk versus

  16. Optimization and qualification of an 8-color intracellular cytokine staining assay for quantifying T cell responses in rhesus macaques for pre-clinical vaccine studies

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Mitzi M.; Kao, Shing-Fen; Eslamizar, Leila; Gee, Connie; Koopman, Gerrit; Lifton, Michelle; Schmitz, Joern E.; Sylwester, Andrew W.; Wilson, Aaron; Hawkins, Natalie; Self, Steve G.; Roederer, Mario; Foulds, Kathryn E.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination and SIV challenge of macaque species is the best animal model for evaluating candidate HIV vaccines in pre-clinical studies. As such, robust assays optimized for use in nonhuman primates are necessary for reliable ex vivo measurement of immune responses and identification of potential immune correlates of protection. We optimized and qualified an 8-color intracellular cytokine staining assay for the measurement of IFNγ, IL-2, and TNF from viable CD4 and CD8 T cells from cryopreserved rhesus macaque PBMC stimulated with peptides. After optimization, five laboratories tested assay performance using the same reagents and PBMC samples; similar results were obtained despite the use of flow cytometers with different configurations. The 8-color assay was then subjected to a pre-qualification study to quantify specificity and precision. These data were used to set positivity thresholds and to design the qualification protocol. Upon completion of the qualification study, the assay was shown to be highly reproducible with low inter-aliquot, inter-day, and inter-operator variability according to the qualification criteria with an overall variability of 20–40% for each outcome measurement. Thus, the 8-color ICS assay was formally qualified according to the ICH guidelines Q2 (R1) for specificity and precision indicating that it is considered a standardized/robust assay acceptable for use in pre-clinical trial immunogenicity testing. PMID:22955212

  17. Pharmacologic treatment of paraphilias.

    PubMed

    Assumpção, Alessandra Almeida; Garcia, Frederico Duarte; Garcia, Heloise Delavenne; Bradford, John M W; Thibaut, Florence

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of paraphilias remains a challenge in the mental health field. Combined pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic treatment is associated with better efficacy. The gold standard treatment of severe paraphilias in adult males is antiandrogen treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been used in mild types of paraphilia and in cases of sexual compulsions and juvenile paraphilias. Antiandrogen treatments seem to be effective in severe paraphilic subjects committing sexual offenses. In particular, gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs have shown high efficacy working in a similar way to physical castration but being reversible at any time. Treatment recommendations, side effects, and contraindications are discussed.

  18. Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Leucht, S; Heres, S; Kissling, W; Davis, J M

    2013-05-01

    We present the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia based on a simple algorithm that starts with the most important decisions starting from the choice of an antipsychotic drug for an acutely ill patient and ends with maintenance treatment. It represents experts opinions, a formal guideline development process was not followed. Concerning acute treatment we present recommendations for the choice of drug in acutely patients, the treatment of agitated patients, persistent depression, negative symptoms and treatment resistance. Concerning maintenance treatment with antipsychotics we discuss indication, choice of drug, continuous versus intermittent treatment, duration of relapse prevention and dose.

  19. Neuroimmune pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter; Hassan, Ahmed; Jain, Piyush; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation is a major health problem which impairs the quality of life, impacts mental health and is exacerbated by stress and psychiatric disturbances which, in turn, can affect disease prognosis and response to treatment. Accumulating evidence indicates that the immune system is an important interface between intestinal inflammation and the enteric, sensory, central and autonomic nervous systems. In addition, the neuroimmune interactions originating from the gastrointestinal tract are orchestrated by the gut microbiota. This article reviews some major insights into this complex homeostatic network that have been achieved during the past two years and attempts to put these advances into perspective with novel opportunities of pharmacological intervention. PMID:26426677

  20. The pharmacology of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Durant, C; Christmas, D; Nutt, D

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the neurochemistry of anxiety is of fundamental importance in the development and use of novel anxiolytics. Through measuring peripheral markers of brain biochemistry, direct pharmacological challenges and brain neuroimaging techniques our understanding of this field has increased substantially in the past few decades. We review the four most studied neurotransmitter systems with respect to in anxiety disorders: gamma amino-butyric acid, serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine. We have focussed upon clinical studies to highlight the current techniques used to determine brain neurochemistry in vivo. Future research in this field will greatly benefit from recent advances in neuroimaging techniques and the discovery of novel ligands targeting specific receptors.

  1. [Pharmacological treatment of hyperinflation].

    PubMed

    Devillier, P; Roche, N

    2009-06-01

    Introduction Lung hyperinflation leads to breathlessness, limitation in exercise capacity and tolerance, and impaired quality of life. Thus, it is important to target this key and characteristic feature of COPD. Current knowledge Available pharmacological approaches rely mainly on bronchodilators, in particular beta2 agonists and anticholinergic agents. These treatments act through the reduction of expiratory airflow limitation. However, changes in classical indices of airflow obstruction do not accurately predict effects on hyperinflation and symptoms. The decrease in operating lung volumes (as reflected by inspiratory capacity or functional residual capacity) at rest and during exercise is one of the mechanisms by which these treatments improve quality of life and maybe also decrease the impact of exacerbations. The effect of beta2 agonists on hyperinflation might be amplified by concurrent treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. Perspectives The effect of new treatments targeting airways inflammation on hyperinflation remains to be explored. Conclusions Measuring the reduction in the degree of lung hyperinflation allows a better understanding of the symptomatic effect of COPD pharmacological treatments.

  2. The pharmacology of extinction.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, R J

    1992-08-01

    It is impossible to predict what compounds of pharmacological interest may be present in an unexamined species. The extinction of such species may result, therefore, in the loss of therapeutically significant compounds. The fact that science will never know what has been lost does not lessen the significance of the loss. A number of species are discussed to exemplify the potential loss. Ginkgo biloba is an ancient plant, apparently saved from a natural extinction by human intervention. From this tree, the ginkgolides have been isolated. These are potent inhibitors of platelet activating factor and hold promise in the treatment of cerebral ischemia and brain edema. Two species, the tree Taxus brevifolia and the leech Hirudo medicinalis, are threatened as a result of human activity. Both have recently yielded complex compounds of therapeutic importance. The antitumor agent, taxol, is obtained from T. brevifolia and the thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, is found in H. medicinalis. Catharanthus roseus, source of the anticancer agents vincristine and vinblastine, although not threatened, derives from a largely unexamined but severely stressed ecosystem of some 5000 plant species. In other examples, ethnobotanical knowledge of certain plants may be lost while the species survive, as exemplified by the suppression of the Aztec ethnobotany of Mesoamerica by the invading Spanish. Finally, the fallacy of the 'snail darter syndrome', where species may be viewed as too insignificant to worry about, is exposed by consideration of the pharmacological activities of a sea hare (a shell-less marine mollusc) and various leeches.

  3. Epigenetics and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Stefanska, Barbara; MacEwan, David J

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of gene regulation have shown there to be much more regulation of the genome than first thought, through epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic mechanisms are systems that have evolved to either switch off gene activity altogether, or fine-tune any existing genetic activation. Such systems are present in all genes and include chromatin modifications and remodelling, DNA methylation (such as CpG island methylation rates) and histone covalent modifications (e.g. acetylation, methylation), RNA interference by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). These systems regulate genomic activity 'beyond' simple transcriptional factor inducer or repressor function of genes to generate mRNA. Epigenetic regulation of gene activity has been shown to be important in maintaining normal phenotypic activity of cells, as well as having a role in development and diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's. Newer classes of drugs regulate epigenetic mechanisms to counteract disease states in humans. The reports in this issue describe some advances in epigenetic understanding that relate to human disease, and our ability to control these mechanisms by pharmacological means. Increasingly the importance of epigenetics is being uncovered - it is pharmacology that will have to keep pace.

  4. Epigenetics and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Stefanska, Barbara; MacEwan, David J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of gene regulation have shown there to be much more regulation of the genome than first thought, through epigenetic mechanisms. These epigenetic mechanisms are systems that have evolved to either switch off gene activity altogether, or fine-tune any existing genetic activation. Such systems are present in all genes and include chromatin modifications and remodelling, DNA methylation (such as CpG island methylation rates) and histone covalent modifications (e.g. acetylation, methylation), RNA interference by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). These systems regulate genomic activity ‘beyond’ simple transcriptional factor inducer or repressor function of genes to generate mRNA. Epigenetic regulation of gene activity has been shown to be important in maintaining normal phenotypic activity of cells, as well as having a role in development and diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's. Newer classes of drugs regulate epigenetic mechanisms to counteract disease states in humans. The reports in this issue describe some advances in epigenetic understanding that relate to human disease, and our ability to control these mechanisms by pharmacological means. Increasingly the importance of epigenetics is being uncovered – it is pharmacology that will have to keep pace. PMID:25966315

  5. Timing of Decompressive Surgery of Spinal Cord after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: An Evidence-Based Examination of Pre-Clinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Julio C.; Noonan, Vanessa; Cadotte, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While the recommendations for spine surgery in specific cases of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) are well recognized, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the role of the timing of surgical decompression of the spinal cord in the management of patients with SCI. Given this, we sought to critically review the literature regarding the pre-clinical and clinical evidence on the potential impact of timing of surgical decompression of the spinal cord on outcomes after traumatic SCI. The primary literature search was performed using MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. A secondary search strategy incorporated articles referenced in prior meta-analyses and systematic and nonsystematic review articles. Two reviewers independently assessed every study with regard to eligibility, level of evidence, and study quality. Of 198 abstracts of pre-clinical studies, 19 experimental studies using animal SCI models fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Despite some discrepancies in the results of those pre-clinical studies, there is evidence for a biological rationale to support early decompression of the spinal cord. Of 153 abstracts of clinical studies, 22 fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. While the vast majority of the clinical studies were level-4 evidence, there were two studies of level-2b evidence. The quality assessment scores varied from 7 to 25 with a mean value of 12.41. While 2 of 22 clinical studies assessed feasibility and safety, 20 clinical studies examined efficacy of early surgical intervention to stabilize and align the spine and to decompress the spinal cord; the most common definitions of early operation used 24 and 72 h after SCI as timelines. A number of studies indicated that patients who undergo early surgical decompression can have similar outcomes to patients who received a delayed decompressive operation. However, there is evidence to suggest that early surgical intervention is safe and feasible

  6. Basic obstetric pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Hebert, Mary F; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2014-12-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a variety of physiological changes that can alter the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several drugs. However, limited data exists on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the majority of the medications used in pregnancy. In this article, we first describe basic concepts (drug absorption, bioavailability, distribution, metabolism, elimination, and transport) in pharmacokinetics. Then, we discuss several physiological changes that occur during pregnancy that theoretically affect absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination. Further, we provide a brief review of the literature on the clinical pharmacokinetic studies performed in pregnant women in recent years. In general, pregnancy increases the clearance of several drugs and correspondingly decreases drug exposure during pregnancy. Based on current drug exposure measurements during pregnancy, alterations in the dose or dosing regimen of certain drugs are essential during pregnancy. More pharmacological studies in pregnant women are needed to optimize drug therapy in pregnancy.

  7. [Pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pierre

    2013-03-01

    Decades of practice in psychiatriy and hundreds of clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of antipsychotics on symptoms of schizophrenia. Recently, the knowledge acquired from non-interventional studies have supplemented the information needed in daily practice by raising the issue of efficiency by incorporating not only the effectiveness and safety of treatment but also its acceptability by the patient. Adherence to antipsychotic treatment has become the key issue of the prognosis. The pharmacological management of patients with an acute episode of schizophrenia requires rapid therapeutic decisions to treat a patient who is likely to be sometimes unhelpful and agitated. The choice of treatment will have a significant impact on the prevention of psychotic relapses, on the overall prognosis and on the quality of life of the patient. In many countries of the recommendations and treatment algorithms for the management of acute psychosis were distributed, considering factors specific to the patient and his environment, his mental characteristics and local care setting.

  8. Increased Cost of Motor Activity and Heat Transfer between Non-Shivering Thermogenesis, Motor Activity, and Thermic Effect of Feeding in Mice Housed at Room Temperature – Implications in Pre-Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Even, Patrick C.; Blais, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The components of energy expenditure, total metabolic rate (TMR), resting metabolic rate (RMR), thermogenic response to feeding (TEF), activity, and cost of activity were measured in fed and fasted mice housed at 22 and 30°C. Mice housed at 22°C had more than two times larger TMR and RMR. Mice at 22°C were less active when fasted but more active when fed. Cost of activity was nearly doubled in the fasted and in the fed state. Analysis of the short-term relation between TMR, RMR, and bouts of activity showed that, at 22°C, the bouts of activity induced a decrease in the intensity of RMR that reflected the reduced need for thermal regulation induced by the heat released from muscular contraction. This phenomenon induced a considerable underestimation of TEF and prevented its reliable measurement when mice were housed at 22°C. Correlation between TMR and activity measured across time in individual mice was very strong at both 22 and 30°C, but the correlation measured across mice was much weaker at 30°C and no longer significant at 22°C. We suspect that this phenomenon was due to the fact that RMR is a much more reliable predictor of TMR than activity. RMR is more variable at 22°C than at 30°C because of heat transfers between thermal regulation and heat released by other discontinuous processes, such as activity and TEF. Therefore, more noise is introduced into the correlations performed across multiple mice between TMR and activity at 22°C. On the other hand, it should be kept in mind that the doubling of TMR and RMR at 22°C is fueled by an increased non-shivering thermogenesis that can obviously modify how the mouse responds to pharmacological and nutritional challenges. Taken together, these results suggest that in pre-clinical studies, mice should be housed in conditions where thermal regulation is limited as is generally the case in humans. However, the increased sensitivity of mice to small changes in ambient temperature can also be used as a

  9. A combined pre-clinical meta-analysis and randomized confirmatory trial approach to improve data validity for therapeutic target validation

    PubMed Central

    Kleikers, Pamela WM.; Hooijmans, Carlijn; Göb, Eva; Langhauser, Friederike; Rewell, Sarah SJ.; Radermacher, Kim; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Howells, David W.; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; HHW Schmidt, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical research suffers from a dramatically poor translational success. For example, in ischemic stroke, a condition with a high medical need, over a thousand experimental drug targets were unsuccessful. Here, we adopt methods from clinical research for a late-stage pre-clinical meta-analysis (MA) and randomized confirmatory trial (pRCT) approach. A profound body of literature suggests NOX2 to be a major therapeutic target in stroke. Systematic review and MA of all available NOX2-/y studies revealed a positive publication bias and lack of statistical power to detect a relevant reduction in infarct size. A fully powered multi-center pRCT rejects NOX2 as a target to improve neurofunctional outcomes or achieve a translationally relevant infarct size reduction. Thus stringent statistical thresholds, reporting negative data and a MA-pRCT approach can ensure biomedical data validity and overcome risks of bias. PMID:26310318

  10. Antagonism of haloperidol-induced swim impairment in L-dopa and caffeine treated mice: a pre-clinical model to study Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Barodia, Sandeep Kumar; Raghubir, Ram

    2009-04-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibits symptoms of motor dysfunction such as tremor, akinesia and rigidity. Agents that selectively disrupt or destroy catecholaminergic systems, such as reserpine, methamphetamine, 6-hydroxydopamine and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine, have been used to develop PD models and to study the animal behavior like catalepsy, akinesia, swim-test, etc. The major apprehension while working with these chemicals is their irreversible neuro-toxic effect. Haloperidol is a classical antipsychotic drug, which produces extra-pyrimidal Parkinson's symptoms (EPS). Measuring catalepsy and akinesia in the treated mice monitored the haloperidol-induced EPS. Alternatively, swimming disability was tested as a new parameter to monitor haloperidol-induced EPS. The results showed that the restoration of swimming disability in haloperidol-induced L-dopa and caffeine pre-treated mice could be used as pre-clinical model to study PD.

  11. Monitoring of anti-cancer treatment with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT PET: a comprehensive review of pre-clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of solid tumors with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is an evolving field with continuous development of new PET tracers and discovery of new applications for already implemented PET tracers. During treatment of cancer patients, a general challenge is to measure treatment effect early in a treatment course and by that to stratify patients into responders and non-responders. With 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) and 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluorothymidine((18)F-FLT) two of the cancer hallmarks, altered energy metabolism and increased cell proliferation, can be visualized and quantified non-invasively by PET. With (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT PET changes in energy metabolism and cell proliferation can thereby be determined after initiation of cancer treatment in both clinical and pre-clinical studies in order to predict, at an early time-point, treatment response. It is hypothesized that decreases in glycolysis and cell proliferation may occur in tumors that are sensitive to the applied cancer therapeutics and that tumors that are resistant to treatment will show unchanged glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Whether (18)F-FDG and/or (18)F-FLT PET can be used for prediction of treatment response has been analyzed in many studies both following treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents but also following treatment with different targeted therapies, e.g. monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors. The results from these studies have been most variable; in some studies early changes in (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FLT uptake predicted later tumor regression whereas in other studies no change in tracer uptake was observed despite the treatment being effective. The present review gives an overview of pre-clinical studies that have used (18)F-FDG and/or (18)F-FLT PET for response monitoring of cancer therapeutics.

  12. Monitoring of anti-cancer treatment with 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET: a comprehensive review of pre-clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Functional imaging of solid tumors with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is an evolving field with continuous development of new PET tracers and discovery of new applications for already implemented PET tracers. During treatment of cancer patients, a general challenge is to measure treatment effect early in a treatment course and by that to stratify patients into responders and non-responders. With 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and 3’-deoxy-3’-[18F]fluorothymidine(18F-FLT) two of the cancer hallmarks, altered energy metabolism and increased cell proliferation, can be visualized and quantified non-invasively by PET. With 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET changes in energy metabolism and cell proliferation can thereby be determined after initiation of cancer treatment in both clinical and pre-clinical studies in order to predict, at an early time-point, treatment response. It is hypothesized that decreases in glycolysis and cell proliferation may occur in tumors that are sensitive to the applied cancer therapeutics and that tumors that are resistant to treatment will show unchanged glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Whether 18F-FDG and/or 18F-FLT PET can be used for prediction of treatment response has been analyzed in many studies both following treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents but also following treatment with different targeted therapies, e.g. monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors. The results from these studies have been most variable; in some studies early changes in 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT uptake predicted later tumor regression whereas in other studies no change in tracer uptake was observed despite the treatment being effective. The present review gives an overview of pre-clinical studies that have used 18F-FDG and/or 18F-FLT PET for response monitoring of cancer therapeutics. PMID:26550536

  13. Efficacy of multiple exposure with low level He-Ne laser dose on acute wound healing: a pre-clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Vijendra; Rao, Bola Sadashiva S.; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on the use of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) for wound healing especially with the red laser light have demonstrated its pro-healing potential on a variety of pre-clinical and surgical wounds. However, until now, in LLLT the effect of multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation on acute wound healing on well-designed pre-clinical model is not much explored. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of multiple exposure of low dose Helium Neon laser on healing progression of full thickness excision wounds in Swiss albino mice. Further, the efficacy of the multiple exposure of low dose laser irradiation was compared with the single exposure of optimum dose. Full thickness excision wounds (circular) of 15 mm diameter were created, and subsequently illuminated with the multiple exposures (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 exposure/ week until healing) of He-Ne (632.8 nm, 4.02 mWcm-2) laser at 0.5 Jcm-2 along with single exposure of optimum laser dose (2 J/cm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Classical biophysical parameters such as contraction kinetics, area under the curve and the mean healing time were documented as the assessment parameters to examine the efficacy of multiple exposures with low level laser dose. Experimental findings substantiated that either single or multiple exposures of 0.5 J/cm2 failed to produce any detectable alterations on wound contraction, area under the curve and mean healing time compared to single exposure of optimum dose (2 Jcm-2) and un-illuminated controls. Single exposure of optimum, laser dose was found to be ideal for acute wound healing.

  14. Basic advances in serotonin pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Fuller, R W

    1992-10-01

    Several advances in serotonin pharmacology have implications for psychiatry. The introduction of selective inhibitors of serotonin uptake into clinical use has established more firmly the relevance of brain serotonin neurons to depressive illness and is permitting an exploration of other therapeutic consequences of amplifying serotonergic function. A recent major advance in basic pharmacology has been the definition and characterization of multiple serotonin receptor subtypes in brain. Highly selective agonists and antagonists at these receptor subtypes are being developed as candidate drugs for therapy and as pharmacologic probes for assessing functionality of brain serotonin neurons in disease. Improved pharmacologic specificity will provide better tools for eliciting measurable responses mediated by brain serotonin receptors and for imaging key presynaptic and postsynaptic constituents of serotonin neuronal systems. Advances in serotonin pharmacology should therefore expand our understanding of serotonin's roles as a brain neurotransmitter in health and disease and lead to improved therapeutic agents.

  15. Pharmacological treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: current practice and novel perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ammirati, Enrico; Contri, Rachele; Coppini, Raffaele; Cecchi, Franco; Frigerio, Maria; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2016-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is entering a phase of intense translational research that holds promise for major advances in disease-specific pharmacological therapy. For over 50 years, however, HCM has largely remained an orphan disease, and patients are still treated with old drugs developed for other conditions. While judicious use of the available armamentarium may control the clinical manifestations of HCM in most patients, specific experience is required in challenging situations, including deciding when not to treat. The present review revisits the time-honoured therapies available for HCM, in a practical perspective reflecting real-world scenarios. Specific agents are presented with doses, titration strategies, pros and cons. Peculiar HCM dilemmas such as treatment of dynamic outflow obstruction, heart failure caused by end-stage progression and prevention of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias are assessed. In the near future, the field of HCM drug therapy will rapidly expand, based on ongoing efforts. Approaches such as myocardial metabolic modulation, late sodium current inhibition and allosteric myosin inhibition have moved from pre-clinical to clinical research, and reflect a surge of scientific as well as economic interest by academia and industry alike. These exciting developments, and their implications for future research, are discussed. PMID:27109894

  16. Pharmacological considerations for tenofovir and emtricitabine to prevent HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Peter L.; Kiser, Jennifer J.; Gardner, Edward M.; Rower, Joseph E.; Meditz, Amie; Grant, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of antiretroviral medications in HIV-negative individuals as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising approach to prevent HIV infection. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine exhibit desirable properties for PrEP including: favourable pharmacokinetics that support infrequent dosing; few major drug-drug or drug-food interactions; an excellent clinical safety record; and pre-clinical evidence for efficacy. Several large, randomized, controlled clinical trials are evaluating the safety and efficacy of TDF and emtricitabine for this new indication. A thorough understanding of variability in drug response will help determine future investigations in the field and/or implementation into clinical care. Because tenofovir and emtricitabine are nucleos(t)ide analogues, the HIV prevention and toxicity effects depend on the triphosphate analogue formed intracellularly. This review identifies important cellular pharmacology considerations for tenofovir and emtricitabine, which include drug penetration into relevant tissues and cell types, race/ethnicity/pharmacogenetics, gender, cellular activation state and appropriate episodic or alternative dosing strategies based on pharmacokinetic principles. The current state of knowledge in these areas is summarized and the future utility of intracellular pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics for the PrEP field is discussed. PMID:21118913

  17. [Pharmacological effects of hordenine].

    PubMed

    Hapke, H J; Strathmann, W

    1995-06-01

    Hordenine is an ingredient of some plants which are used as feed for animals, i.e. in sprouting barley. After ingestion of such feed hordenine may be detected in blood or urine of horses which in case of racing horses may be the facts of using prohibited compounds. Results of some experiments in pharmacological models show that hordenine is an indirectly acting adrenergic drug. It liberates norepinephrine from stores. In isolated organs and those structures with reduced epinephrine contents the hordenine-effect is only very poor. Experiments in intact animals (rats, dogs) show that hordenine has a positive inotropic effect upon the heart, increases systolic and diastolic blood pressure, peripheral blood flow volume, inhibits gut movements but has no effect upon the psychomotorical behaviour of mice. All effects are short and only possible after high doses which are not to be expected after ingestion of hordenine containing feed for horses. A measurable increase of the performance of racing horses is quite improbable.

  18. Pharmacological Inhibition of FTO

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Fiona; Demetriades, Marina; Aik, WeiShen; Merkestein, Myrte; Kramer, Holger; Andrew, Daniel S.; Scudamore, Cheryl L.; Hough, Tertius A.; Wells, Sara; Ashcroft, Frances M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Cox, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, a genome wide association study identified a SNP in intron one of the gene encoding human FTO that was associated with increased body mass index. Homozygous risk allele carriers are on average three kg heavier than those homozygous for the protective allele. FTO is a DNA/RNA demethylase, however, how this function affects body weight, if at all, is unknown. Here we aimed to pharmacologically inhibit FTO to examine the effect of its demethylase function in vitro and in vivo as a first step in evaluating the therapeutic potential of FTO. We showed that IOX3, a known inhibitor of the HIF prolyl hydroxylases, decreased protein expression of FTO (in C2C12 cells) and reduced maximal respiration rate in vitro. However, FTO protein levels were not significantly altered by treatment of mice with IOX3 at 60 mg/kg every two days. This treatment did not affect body weight, or RER, but did significantly reduce bone mineral density and content and alter adipose tissue distribution. Future compounds designed to selectively inhibit FTO’s demethylase activity could be therapeutically useful for the treatment of obesity. PMID:25830347

  19. Pharmacologic treatment of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Anton, Raymond F; Schacht, Joseph P; Book, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Progress in understanding the neuroscience of addiction has significantly advanced the development of more efficacious medications for the treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUD). While several medications have been approved by regulatory bodies around the world for the treatment of AUD, they are not universally efficacious. Recent research has yielded improved understanding of the genetics and brain circuits that underlie alcohol reward and its habitual use. This research has contributed to pharmacogenetic studies of medication response, and will ultimately lead to a more "personalized medicine" approach to AUD pharmacotherapy. This chapter summarizes work on clinically available medications (both approved by regulatory bodies and investigational) for the treatment of alcohol dependence, as well as the psychiatric disorders that are commonly comorbid with AUD. Studies that have evaluated genetic influences on medication response and those that have employed neuroimaging to probe mechanisms of medication action or response are highlighted. Finally, new targets discovered in animal models for possible pharmacologic intervention in humans are overviewed and future directions in medications development provided.

  20. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  1. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  2. Pharmacological profile of droxicam.

    PubMed

    Esteve, J; Farré, A J; Roser, R

    1988-01-01

    In Studies of anti-inflammatory activity, droxicam has shown itself to be as active as piroxicam and much more active than phenylbutazone, isoxicam and suprofen, both in acute studies such as carrageenin oedema, nystatin oedema and ultraviolet erythema, and in longer-term tests such as that of the cotton pellet. In the studies of anti-arthritic activity, which require long-term treatment, droxicam was as effective as piroxicam, both on primary and on secondary lesions. The study of analgaesic activity, conducted by means of the tests of protective activity against writhing induced by phenylbenzoquinone and acetylcholine bromide in the mouse and by acetic acid in the rat, droxicam activity was superior to that of acetylsalicylic acid, dipyrone, isoxicam and phenylbutazone. Droxicam also showed antipyretic activity in the rat, greater than that of acetylsalicylic acid, dipyrone and 4-aminoantipyrine, in the brewer's yeast and Salmonella typhi tests. Droxicam also acts as an ex vivo platelet aggregation inhibitor in the dog. In the study of inhibition of peritoneal capillary permeability in the mouse, droxicam was considerably more potent than isoxicam or phenylbutazone. Studies of general pharmacology have demonstrated that droxicam, at high doses, has no cardiovascular or respiratory effects, and that neither does it modify behaviour in rats and mice, determined by the Irwin test. Gastrointestinal tolerance of droxicam has been compared with that of piroxicam, and it has been found that droxicam is far better tolerated. The study of induction of gastrointestinal lesions in the rat demonstrated that the gastrolesive potential of droxicam is 10 times inferior to that of piroxicam.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3278945

  3. Pharmacology of bevantolol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, H R

    1986-11-26

    Bevantolol is a cardioselective, beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist, devoid of intrinsic beta sympathomimetic activity and with weak membrane-stabilizing and local anesthetic properties. The 3,4-dimethoxyphenylethylamino moiety, substituted on the side chain amine function, confers cardioselectivity, which has been confirmed by a number of experiments. In vitro, bevantolol demonstrated greater antagonism of atrial than tracheal responses to isoproterenol. In vivo, bevantolol preferentially inhibited isoproterenol-induced tachycardias in conscious and anesthetized dogs, compared with the nonselective agent propranolol. Conversely, its effect on blood pressure after isoproterenol was minimal compared with propranolol, reflecting its muted effect on beta 2 peripheral receptors. A functional difference between bevantolol and propranolol was demonstrated in histamine-challenged guinea pigs. Bevantolol had little effect on the antiasthmatic effect of isoproterenol, whereas propranolol blocked it totally. Bevantolol's lack of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity was demonstrated in normal and reserpinized dogs, where it was devoid of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity at doses up to 10 mg/kg. Similarly, intravenous doses of 10 mg/kg had to be administered before direct myocardial depression occurred in the reserpinized animals. Metabolite 3, which is excreted in trace amounts in human urine, demonstrates intrinsic sympathomimetic activity when administered in pharmacologic doses to dogs; however, any clinical relevance remains to be established. Several laboratories have demonstrated that bevantolol interacts at alpha-adrenergic sites. These data require further investigation. The dose-related antihypertensive effect of bevantolol has been demonstrated in spontaneously hypertensive and 2 kidney, 1 clip renal hypertensive rats. Animal experiments also suggest that bevantolol may be useful in angina: It caused a favorable redistribution of blood flow in dogs in which the left

  4. The pharmacology of neurosteroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Costa, E; Auta, J; Guidotti, A; Korneyev, A; Romeo, E

    1994-06-01

    In adrenal cortex and other steroidogenic tissues including glial cells, the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450scc located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. A complex mechanism operative in regulating cholesterol access to P450scc limits the rate of pregnenolone biosynthesis. Participating in this mechanism are DBI (diazepam binding inhibitor), an endogenous peptide that is highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and some of the DBI processing products including DBI 17-50 (TTN). DBI and TTN activate steroidogenesis by binding to a specific receptor located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, termed mitochondrial DBI receptor complex (MDRC). MDRC is a hetero-oligomeric protein: only the subunit that includes the DBI and benzodiazepine (BZD) recognition sites has been cloned. Several 2-aryl-3-indoleacetamide derivatives (FGIN-1-X) with highly selective affinity (nM) for MDRC were synthesized which can stimulate steroidogenesis in mitochondrial preparations. These compounds stimulate adrenal cortex steroidogenesis in hypophysectomized rats but not in intact animals. Moreover, this steroidogenesis is inhibited by the isoquinoline carboxamide derivative PK 11195, a specific high affinity ligand for MDRC with a low intrinsic steroidogenic activity. Some of the FGIN-1-X derivatives stimulate brain pregnenolone accumulation in adrenalectomized-castrated rats. The FGIN-1-X derivatives that increase brain pregnenolone content, elicit antineophobic activity and antagonize punished behavior in the Vogel conflict test in rats. These actions of FGIN-1-X are resistant to inhibition by flumazenil, a specific inhibitor of BZD action in GABAA receptors but are antagonized by PK 11195, a specific blocker of the steroidogenesis activation via MDRC stimulation. It is postulated that the pharmacological action of FGIN-1-X depends on a positive modulation of the GABA action on GABAA receptors mediated by the stimulation of brain

  5. Pharmacological profile of sulodexide.

    PubMed

    Hoppensteadt, D A; Fareed, J

    2014-06-01

    Since its introduction, sulodexide has been used on and off for several indications. More recently this agent has become revitalized and tested in newer indications. Sulodexide is composed of glycosaminoglycan that includes a mixture of fast-moving heparin and dermatan sulfate. It exerts its anticoagulant and antithrombotic action through interactions with both AT and HCII. Sulodexide has been proven to have effects on the fibrinolytic system, platelets, endothelial cells, inflammation and more recently metalloproteases. The administration of sulodexide results in the release of lipoprotein lipase and has been shown to reduce the circulating level of lipids. It has also shown to decrease the viscosity of both whole blood and plasma. Sulodexide differs from heparin in its oral bioavailability and longer half-life. There is also less bleeding associated with sulodexide. In addition, oral administration of sulodexide does not interfere with the pharmacologic actions of commonly used agents. Similar to heparin, sulodexide releases TFPI which contributes to its antithrombotic effect and anti-inflammatory properties. Sulodexide has been proven to be effective in peripheral arterial thrombosis and venous thrombosis. It is also clinically active in the treatment of venous leg ulcers and intermittent claudication. More recent data suggest that sulodexide can be used in tinnitus and in vascular vertigo. Additional studies in these indications are required. Sulodexide was generally safe and well tolerated in the clinical trials, without any severe bleeding complications. Therefore sulodexide appears to be a good treatment for all arterial and venous diseases and for the prevention of progression of disease. PMID:24936531

  6. NASA 2010 Pharmacology Evidence Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Institute of Medicine reviewed NASA's Human Research Program Evidence in assessing the Pharmacology risk identified in NASA's Human Research Program Requirements Document (PRD). Since this review there was a major reorganization of the Pharmacology discipline within the HRP, as well as a re-evaluation of the Pharmacology evidence. This panel is being asked to review the latest version of the Pharmacology Evidence Report. Specifically, this panel will: (1) Appraise the descriptions of the human health-related risk in the HRP PRD. (2) Assess the relevance and comprehensiveness of the evidence in identifying potential threats to long-term space missions. (3) Assess the associated gaps in knowledge and identify additional areas for research as necessary.

  7. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  8. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  9. [Social pharmacology: a new topic in clinical pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Montastruc, J L

    2002-01-01

    Social Pharmacology, a new field in Clinical Pharmacology, describes the relationships between Society and Drugs. Topics of Social Pharmacology are first, the social consequences of populations' exposure to drugs and, secondly, the social factors explaining drug use behind clinical or rational explanations. Social Pharmacology also investigates the reasons for prescription, delivery, consumption and self-medication of drugs (behind clinical or rational factors). The paper discusses the role of the different players of Social Pharmacology in the field of drug development, evaluation, prescription and consumption. For example, the pharmaceutical industry should play an important role in the discovery of new medically and socially "desirable" drugs. Drug companies are also involved in this field for drug information to doctors but also patients. Regulatory agencies are concerned by social factors involved in drug approval, regulation of the maximal level of drug use, application and transferability of clinical trials to daily clinical practice. Social Pharmacologists also investigate the factors (others than clinical or rational) regulating drug use. Drug consumption varies according to social characteristics of physicians (sub-speciality, medical education, cultural origin, etc) or patients (gender, age, education, country, kind of work, social status etc). Relationships between drugs and religion make up a large chapter of Social Pharmacology. Other topics in Social Pharmacology involving other health professionals (pharmacists), lawyers and the media are also discussed. Finally, drugs should be considered as important social markers of population behaviour. The role of the Social Pharmacologist is to identify these social and irrational factors governing drug use in order to adapt and rationalize drug utilization in daily clinical practice.

  10. [Pharmacological therapy of obesity].

    PubMed

    Pagotto, Uberto; Vanuzzo, Diego; Vicennati, Valentina; Pasquali, Renato

    2008-04-01

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and it is correlated with various comorbidities, among which the most relevant are diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Obesity management is a modern challenge because of the rapid evolution of unfavorable lifestyles and unfortunately there are no effective treatments applicable to the large majority of obese/overweight people. The current medical attitude is to treat the complications of obesity (e.g. dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases). However, the potential of treating obesity is enormous, bearing in mind that a volitional weight loss of 10 kg is associated with important risk factor improvement: blood pressure -10 mmHg, total cholesterol -10%, LDL cholesterol -15%, triglycerides -30%, fasting glucose -50%, HDL cholesterol +8%. Drug treatment for obesity is an evolving branch of pharmacology, burdened by severe side effects and consequences of the early drugs, withdrawn from the market, and challenged by the lack of long-term data on the effect of medications on obesity-related morbidity and mortality, first of all cardiovascular diseases. In Europe three antiobesity drugs are currently licensed: sibutramine, orlistat, and rimonabant; important trials with clinical endpoints are ongoing for sibutramine and rimonabant. While waiting for their results, it is convenient to evaluate these drugs for their effects on body weight and cardiometabolic risk factors. Sibutramine is a centrally acting serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor that mainly increases satiety. At the level of brown adipose tissue, sibutramine can also facilitate energy expenditure by increasing thermogenesis. The long-term studies (five) documented a mean differential weight reduction of 4.45 kg for sibutramine vs placebo. Considering the principal studies, attrition rate was 43%. This drug not only reduces body weight and waist circumference, but it decreases triglycerides and

  11. The pre-clinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties of IPI-926, an orally bioavailable antagonist of the hedgehog signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sherri; Hoyt, Jennifer; Whitebread, Nigel; Manna, Joseph; Peluso, Marisa; Faia, Kerrie; Campbell, Veronica; Tremblay, Martin; Nair, Somarajan; Grogan, Michael; Castro, Alfredo; Campbell, Matthew; Ferguson, Jeanne; Arsenault, Brendan; Nevejans, Jylle; Carter, Bennett; Lee, John; Dunbar, Joi; McGovern, Karen; Read, Margaret; Adams, Julian; Constan, Alexander; Loewen, Gordon; Sydor, Jens; Palombella, Vito; Soglia, John

    2013-10-01

    1. IPI-926 is a novel semisynthetic cyclopamine derivative that is a potent and selective Smoothened inhibitor that blocks the hedgehog signal transduction pathway. 2. The in vivo clearance of IPI-926 is low in mouse and dog and moderate in monkey. The volume of distribution is high across species. Oral bioavailability ranges from moderate in monkey to high in mouse and dog. Predicted human clearance using simple allometry is low (24 L h(-1)), predicted volume of distribution is high (469 L) and predicted half-life is long (20 h). 3. IPI-926 is highly bound to plasma proteins and has minimal interaction with human α-1-acid glycoprotein. 4. In vitro metabolic stability ranges from stable to moderately stable. Twelve oxidative metabolites were detected in mouse, rat, dog, monkey and human liver microsome incubations and none were unique to human. 5. IPI-926 is not a potent reversible inhibitor of CYP1A2, 2C8, 2C9 or 3A4 (testosterone). IPI-926 is a moderate inhibitor of CYP2C19, 2D6 and 3A4 (midazolam) with KI values of 19, 16 and 4.5 µM, respectively. IPI-926 is both a substrate and inhibitor (IC50 = 1.9 µM) of P-glycoprotein. 6. In summary, IPI-926 has desirable pre-clinical absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties. PMID:23527529

  12. Application of 212Pb for Targeted α-particle Therapy (TAT): Pre-clinical and Mechanistic Understanding through to Clinical Translation

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon; Brechbiel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Targeted α-particle therapy (TAT), in which an α-particle emitting radionuclide is specifically directed to a biological target, is gaining more attention to treat cancers as new targets are validated. Bio-vectors such as monoclonal antibodies are able to selectively transport α-particles to destroy targeted cancer cells. TAT has the potential for an improved therapeutic ratio over β-particle targeted conjugate therapy. The short path length and the intense ionization path generated render α-emitters suitable for treatment and management of minimal disease such as micrometastases or residual tumor after surgical debulking. 212Pb is the longer-lived parent radionuclide of 212Bi and serves as an in vivo generator of 212Bi. 212Pb has demonstrated significant utility in both in vitro and in vivo models. Recent evaluation of 212Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab in a Phase I clinical trial has demonstrated the feasibility of 212Pb in TAT for the treatment of ovarian cancer patients. This review highlights progress in radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, molecular mechanisms, and application of 212Pb to targeted pre-clinical and clinical radiation therapy for the management and treatment of cancer. PMID:26858987

  13. A Rapid, Cost-Effective Pre-Clinical Method to Screen for Pro- or Antiarrhythmic Effects of Substances in an Isolated Heart Preparation.

    PubMed

    Borg, John Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a rapid, cost-effective pre-clinical method to screen for pro- or antiarrhythmic effects of substances in an isolated heart preparation in line with the regulatory requirements of ICHS7B. The computational method "MFC method" quantifies arrhythmic episodes from isolated perfused hearts based on measuring the variation in the maximum force of contraction. Experiments were performed on hearts isolated from male Wistar rats. Arrhythmias were induced by the addition of tefluthrin or by ligation of the left coronary artery. The "MFC method" accurately measures the maximum force of every myocardial contraction and correlates it with the magnitude of the preceding beat. Arrhythmias were quantified by determining the coefficient of variation in the maximum force of contraction. This method is a useful approach to quickly identify the pro- or antiarrhythmic effects of drugs prior to more detailed analysis; particularly where the effects are varied and not easily classified under the Lambeth Conventions. Therefore, the "MFC method" can be used as a rapid screen for the antiarrhythmic effects of novel compounds or for rapidly determining potential cardiac toxicity. PMID:26839822

  14. Clinical pharmacology of axitinib.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Tortorici, Michael A; Garrett, May; Hee, Brian; Klamerus, Karen J; Pithavala, Yazdi K

    2013-09-01

    Axitinib is a potent and selective second-generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3 that is approved in the US and several other countries for treatment of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma after failure of one prior systemic therapy. The recommended clinical starting dose of axitinib is 5 mg twice daily, taken with or without food. Dose increase (up to a maximum of 10 mg twice daily) or reduction is permitted based on individual tolerability. Axitinib pharmacokinetics are dose-proportional within 1-20 mg twice daily, which includes the clinical dose range. Axitinib has a short effective plasma half-life (range 2.5-6.1 h), and the plasma accumulation of axitinib is in agreement with what is expected based on the plasma half-life of the drug. Axitinib is absorbed relatively rapidly, reaching maximum observed plasma concentrations (C max) within 4 h of oral administration. The mean absolute bioavailability of axitinib is 58 %. Axitinib is highly (>99 %) bound to human plasma proteins with preferential binding to albumin and moderate binding to α1-acid glycoprotein. In patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma, at the 5-mg twice-daily dose in the fed state, the geometric mean (% coefficient of variation) C max and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0-24 h (AUC24) were 27.8 ng/mL (79 %) and 265 ng·h/mL (77 %), respectively. Axitinib is metabolized primarily in the liver by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/5 and, to a lesser extent (<10 % each), by CYP1A2, CYP2C19, and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1. The two major human plasma metabolites, M12 (sulfoxide product) and M7 (glucuronide product), are considered pharmacologically inactive. Axitinib is eliminated via hepatobiliary excretion with negligible urinary excretion. Although mild hepatic impairment does not affect axitinib plasma exposures compared with subjects with normal hepatic function, there was a 2

  15. Network analyses in systems pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Seth I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Systems pharmacology is an emerging area of pharmacology which utilizes network analysis of drug action as one of its approaches. By considering drug actions and side effects in the context of the regulatory networks within which the drug targets and disease gene products function, network analysis promises to greatly increase our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the multiple actions of drugs. Systems pharmacology can provide new approaches for drug discovery for complex diseases. The integrated approach used in systems pharmacology can allow for drug action to be considered in the context of the whole genome. Network-based studies are becoming an increasingly important tool in understanding the relationships between drug action and disease susceptibility genes. This review discusses how analysis of biological networks has contributed to the genesis of systems pharmacology and how these studies have improved global understanding of drug targets, suggested new targets and approaches for therapeutics, and provided a deeper understanding of the effects of drugs. Taken together, these types of analyses can lead to new therapeutic options while improving the safety and efficacy of existing medications. Contact: ravi.iyengar@mssm.edu PMID:19648136

  16. The Pharmacology of Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Justin M.; Furth, Mark E.; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase “regenerative pharmacology” to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is “the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues.” As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all. PMID:23818131

  17. Pharmacological Effects of Rosa Damascena

    PubMed Central

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Saberi, Zahra; Amini, Somayeh

    2011-01-01

    Rosa damascena mill L., known as Gole Mohammadi in is one of the most important species of Rosaceae family flowers. R. damascena is an ornamental plant and beside perfuming effect, several pharmacological properties including anti-HIV, antibacterial, antioxidant, antitussive, hypnotic, antidiabetic, and relaxant effect on tracheal chains have been reported for this plant. This article is a comprehensive review on pharmacological effects of R. damascena. Online literature searches were performed using Medline, medex, Scopus, and Google Scholar websites backed to 1972 to identify researches about R. damascena. Searches also were done by going through the author's files and the bibliographies of all located papers. PMID:23493250

  18. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  19. Radiation induced brain injury: assessment of white matter tracts in a pre-clinical animal model using diffusion tensor MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Silun; Qiu, Deqiang; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Ed X; Leung, Lucullus H T; Gu, Jing; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2013-03-01

    We aim to study radiation induced white matter injury in a pre-clinical model using Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI). Nineteen 12-week old Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated to the right hemisphere using a linear accelerator. The dose distribution map was coregistered to the DTI map to generate the actual radiation dose to each white matter tract. Rats underwent longitudinal DTI scans at five time points from 4 to 48 weeks post-radiation with histological evaluations. Fractional anisotropy (FA) of the external capsule, fornix, cerebral peduncle, anterior commissure, optic tract and optic nerve was evaluated. Radiation dose was highest at the ipsilateral external capsule and fornix (29.4 ± 1.3 and 29.8 ± 1.1 Gy, respectively). Optic nerve received 50 % dose to the external capsule and other white matter tracts received 80 % dose. Significantly lower FA was firstly found in the ipsilateral external capsule at 4 weeks post-radiation and in the ipsilateral fornix at 40 weeks post-radiation compared to the contralateral side. Significantly lower FA was found in contralateral optic nerve compared to ipsilateral optic nerve at 48 weeks post-radiation despite ipsilateral optic nerves receiving higher radiation dose than contralateral optic nerve (p = 0.021). No differences were found in other white matter regions until 48 weeks. Histology indicated demyelination, axonal degeneration and coagulative necrosis in all injured white matter. DTI can serve as a promising tool for assessment of radiation induced white matter injury and regional radiosensitivity of white matter tracts. PMID:23334608

  20. Development of Immunoassays for the Quantitative Assessment of Amyloid-β in the Presence of Therapeutic Antibody: Application to Pre-Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bogstedt, Anna; Groves, Maria; Tan, Keith; Narwal, Rajesh; McFarlane, Mary; Höglund, Kina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Utilizing decision making biomarkers in drug development requires thorough assay validation. Special considerations need to be taken into account when monitoring biomarkers using immunoassays in the presence of therapeutic antibodies. We have developed robust and sensitive assays to assess target engagement and proof of mechanism to support the clinical progression of a human monoclonal antibody against the neurotoxic amyloid-β (Aβ)42 peptide. Here we present the introduction of novel pre-treatment steps to ensure drug-tolerant immunoassays and describe the validation of the complete experimental procedures to measure total Aβ42 concentration (bound and unbound) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma, free Aβ42 concentration (unbound) in CSF, and Aβ40 concentration in CSF. The difference in composition of the matrices (CSF and plasma) and antigen levels therein, in combination with the hydrophobic properties of Aβ protein, adds to the complexity of validation. Monitoring pharmacodynamics of an Aβ42 specific monoclonal antibody in a non-human primate toxicology study using these assays, we demonstrated a 1500-fold and a 3000-fold increase in total Aβ42 in plasma, a 4-fold and 8-fold increase in total Aβ42 in CSF together with a 95% and 96% reduction of free Aβ42 in CSF following weekly intravenous injections of 10 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg, respectively. Levels of Aβ40 were unchanged. The accuracy of these data is supported by previous pre-clinical studies as well as predictive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics modeling. In contrast, when analyzing the same non-human primate samples excluding the pre-treatment steps, we were not able to distinguish between free and total Aβ42. Our data clearly demonstrate the importance of thorough evaluation of antibody interference and appropriate validation to monitor different types of biomarkers in the presence of a therapeutic antibody. PMID:26402635

  1. SU-D-304-04: Pre-Clinical Feasibility Study for Intensity Modulated Grid Proton Therapy (IMgPT) Using a Newly Developed Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiamas, P; Moskvin, V; Shin, J; Axente, M; Pirlepesov, F; Krasin, M; Merchant, T; Farr, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to characterize and evaluate intensity-modulated proton grid therapy (IMgPT) using a clinical proton beam. Methods: A TOPAS MC model of a new developmental mode (pre-clinical) of the Hitachi proton therapy system (PROBEAT) was used for simulation and characterization of proton grid therapy. TOPAS simulations of different energy ranges, depths and spot separation distances were performed. LET spectra for various energies and depths were produced with FLUKA MC code for evaluation potential interplay between planning parameters and their effect on the characterization of areas (valley) between spots. IMgPT planning aspects (spot spacing, skin dose, peak-to-valley ratios, beam selection, etc.) were evaluated for different phantom and patient cases. Raysearch software (v4.51) was used to perform the evaluation. Results: Calculated beam peak-to-valley ratios scenarios showed strong energy and depth dependence with ratios to be larger for higher energies and shallower depths. Peak-to-valley ratios for R90 range and for spot spacing of 1cm varied from 30% (E = 221.3 MeV, depth 30.6 cm) to 80% (E = 70.3 MeV, depth 4 cm). LET spectra calculations showed spectral hardening with depth, which might potential increase, spot separation distance and improve peak-to-valley ratios. IMgPT optimization, using constant spot spacing, showed skin dose reduction between peak regions of dose due to the irradiation of less skin. Single beam for bulky shallower tumors might be a potential candidate for proton grid therapy. Conclusions: Proton grid therapy using a clinical beam is a promising technique that reduces skin dose between peak regions of dose and may be suitable for the treatment of shallow tumors. IMgPT may be considered for use when bystander effects in off peak regions would be appropriate.

  2. Safety data on 19 vehicles for use in 1 month oral rodent pre-clinical studies: administration of hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin causes renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Healing, Guy; Sulemann, Tabassum; Cotton, Peter; Harris, Jayne; Hargreaves, Adam; Finney, Rowena; Kirk, Sarah; Schramm, Carolin; Garner, Clare; Pivette, Perrine; Burdett, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Potential new drugs are assessed in pre-clinical in vivo studies to determine their safety profiles. The drugs are formulated in vehicles suitable for the route of administration and the physicochemical properties of the drug, aiming to achieve optimal exposure in the test species. The availability of safety data on vehicles is often limited (incomplete data, access restricted/private databases). Nineteen potentially useful vehicles that contained new and/or increased concentrations of excipients and for which little safety data have been published were tested. Vehicles were dosed orally once daily to HanWistar rats for a minimum of 28 days and a wide range of toxicological parameters were assessed. Only 30% (w/v) hydroxypropyl-ß-cyclodextrin was found unsuitable owing to effects on liver enzymes (AST, ALT and GLDH), urinary volume and the kidneys (tubular vacuolation and tubular pigment). 20% (v/v) oleic acid caused increased salivation and hence this vehicle should be used with caution. As 40% (v/v) tetraethylene glycol affected urinary parameters, its use should be carefully considered, particularly for compounds suspected to impact the renal system and studies longer than 1 month. There were no toxicologically significant findings with 10% (v/v) dimethyl sulphoxide, 20% (v/v) propylene glycol, 33% (v/v) Miglyol®812, 20% (w/v) Kolliphor®RH40, 10% (w/v) Poloxamer 407, 5% (w/v) polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 or 10% (v/v) Labrafil®M1944. All other vehicles tested caused isolated or low magnitude effects which would not prevent their use. The aim of sharing these data, including adverse findings, is to provide meaningful information for vehicle selection, thereby avoiding repetition of animal experimentation.

  3. Digital Droplet PCR for the Absolute Quantification of Exon Skipping Induced by Antisense Oligonucleotides in (Pre-)Clinical Development for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Verheul, Ruurd C; van Deutekom, Judith C T; Datson, Nicole A

    2016-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) aim to induce skipping of a specific exon of the dystrophin transcript during pre-mRNA splicing. This results in restoration of the open reading frame and consequently synthesis of a dystrophin protein with a shorter yet functional central rod domain. To monitor the molecular therapeutic effect of exon skip-inducing AONs in clinical studies, accurate quantification of pre- and post-treatment exon skip levels is required. With the recent introduction of 3rd generation digital droplet PCR (ddPCR), a state-of-the-art technology became available which allows absolute quantification of transcript copy numbers with and without specific exon skip with high precision, sensitivity and reproducibility. Using Taqman assays with probes targeting specific exon-exon junctions, we here demonstrate that ddPCR reproducibly quantified cDNA fragments with and without exon 51 of the DMD gene over a 4-log dynamic range. In a comparison of conventional nested PCR, qPCR and ddPCR using cDNA constructs with and without exon 51 mixed in different molar ratios using, ddPCR quantification came closest to the expected outcome over the full range of ratios (0-100%), while qPCR and in particular nested PCR overestimated the relative percentage of the construct lacking exon 51. Highest accuracy was similarly obtained with ddPCR in DMD patient-derived muscle cells treated with an AON inducing exon 51 skipping. We therefore recommend implementation of ddPCR for quantification of exon skip efficiencies of AONs in (pre)clinical development for DMD. PMID:27612288

  4. Inhibition of DNA-repair genes Ercc1 and Mgmt enhances temozolomide efficacy in gliomas treatment: a pre-clinical study.

    PubMed

    Boccard, Sandra G; Marand, Sandie V; Geraci, Sandra; Pycroft, Laurie; Berger, François R; Pelletier, Laurent A

    2015-10-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. To date, therapies do not allow curing patients, and glioblastomas (GBMs) are associated with remarkably poor prognosis. This situation is at least partly due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment, especially to chemotherapy. In 2005, temozolomide (TMZ) has become the first chemotherapeutic drug validated for GBM. Nevertheless TMZ efficacy depends on Mgmt status. While the methylation of Mgmt promoter was considered so far as a prognostic marker, its targeting is becoming an effective therapeutic opportunity. Thus, arrival of both TMZ and Mgmt illustrated that considerable progress can still be realized by optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy. A part of this progress could be accomplished in the future by overcoming residual resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of a set of other DNA-repair genes in glioma resistance to temozolomide. We focused on DNA-repair genes located in the commonly deleted chromosomal region in oligodendroglioma (1p/19q) highly correlated with patient response to chemotherapy. We measured effects of inhibition of ten DNA-repair genes expression using siRNAs on astrocytoma cell response to cisplatin (CDDP) and TMZ. SiRNAs targeting ercc1, ercc2, mutyh, and pnkp significantly sensitized cells to chemotherapy, increasing cell death by up to 25%. In vivo we observed a decrease of subcutaneous glioma tumor growth after injection of siRNA in conjunction with absorption of TMZ. We demonstrated in this pre-clinical study that targeting of DNA-repair genes such as Ercc1 could be used as an adjuvant chemosensitization treatment, similarly to Mgmt inhibition. PMID:26336131

  5. Digital Droplet PCR for the Absolute Quantification of Exon Skipping Induced by Antisense Oligonucleotides in (Pre-)Clinical Development for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Verheul, Ruurd C.; van Deutekom, Judith C. T.; Datson, Nicole A.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) in clinical development for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) aim to induce skipping of a specific exon of the dystrophin transcript during pre-mRNA splicing. This results in restoration of the open reading frame and consequently synthesis of a dystrophin protein with a shorter yet functional central rod domain. To monitor the molecular therapeutic effect of exon skip-inducing AONs in clinical studies, accurate quantification of pre- and post-treatment exon skip levels is required. With the recent introduction of 3rd generation digital droplet PCR (ddPCR), a state-of-the-art technology became available which allows absolute quantification of transcript copy numbers with and without specific exon skip with high precision, sensitivity and reproducibility. Using Taqman assays with probes targeting specific exon-exon junctions, we here demonstrate that ddPCR reproducibly quantified cDNA fragments with and without exon 51 of the DMD gene over a 4-log dynamic range. In a comparison of conventional nested PCR, qPCR and ddPCR using cDNA constructs with and without exon 51 mixed in different molar ratios using, ddPCR quantification came closest to the expected outcome over the full range of ratios (0–100%), while qPCR and in particular nested PCR overestimated the relative percentage of the construct lacking exon 51. Highest accuracy was similarly obtained with ddPCR in DMD patient-derived muscle cells treated with an AON inducing exon 51 skipping. We therefore recommend implementation of ddPCR for quantification of exon skip efficiencies of AONs in (pre)clinical development for DMD. PMID:27612288

  6. Effect of Currently Approved Carriers and Adjuvants on the Pre-Clinical Efficacy of a Conjugate Vaccine against Oxycodone in Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, Marco; Vervacke, Jeffrey S.; Distefano, Mark D.; Tucker, Ashli M.; Laudenbach, Megan; Pentel, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against the highly abused prescription opioid oxycodone has shown pre-clinical efficacy for blocking oxycodone effects. The current study further evaluated a candidate vaccine composed of oxycodone derivatized at the C6 position (6OXY) conjugated to the native keyhole limpet hemocyanin (nKLH) carrier protein. To provide an oxycodone vaccine formulation suitable for human studies, we studied the effect of alternative carriers and adjuvants on the generation of oxycodone-specific serum antibody and B cell responses, and the effect of immunization on oxycodone distribution and oxycodone-induced antinociception in mice and rats. 6OXY conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT) or a GMP grade KLH dimer (dKLH) was as effective as 6OXY conjugated to the nKLH decamer in mice and rats, while the 6OXY hapten conjugated to a TT-derived peptide was not effective in preventing oxycodone-induced antinociception in mice. Immunization with 6OXY-TT s.c. absorbed on alum adjuvant provided similar protection to 6OXY-TT administered i.p. with Freund’s adjuvant in rats. The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant, alone or in combination with alum, offered no advantage over alum alone for generating oxycodone-specific serum antibodies or 6OXY-specific antibody secreting B cells in mice vaccinated with 6OXY-nKLH or 6OXY-TT. The immunogenicity of oxycodone vaccines may be modulated by TLR4 signaling since responses to 6OXY-nKLH in alum were decreased in TLR4-deficient mice. These data suggest that TT, nKLH and dKLH carriers provide consistent 6OXY conjugate vaccine immunogenicity across species, strains and via different routes of administration, while adjuvant formulations may need to be tailored to individual immunogens or patient populations. PMID:24797666

  7. Development of Immunoassays for the Quantitative Assessment of Amyloid-β in the Presence of Therapeutic Antibody: Application to Pre-Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Bogstedt, Anna; Groves, Maria; Tan, Keith; Narwal, Rajesh; McFarlane, Mary; Höglund, Kina

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing decision making biomarkers in drug development requires thorough assay validation. Special considerations need to be taken into account when monitoring biomarkers using immunoassays in the presence of therapeutic antibodies. We have developed robust and sensitive assays to assess target engagement and proof of mechanism to support the clinical progression of a human monoclonal antibody against the neurotoxic amyloid-β (Aβ)42 peptide. Here we present the introduction of novel pre-treatment steps to ensure drug-tolerant immunoassays and describe the validation of the complete experimental procedures to measure total Aβ42 concentration (bound and unbound) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma, free Aβ42 concentration (unbound) in CSF, and Aβ40 concentration in CSF. The difference in composition of the matrices (CSF and plasma) and antigen levels therein, in combination with the hydrophobic properties of Aβ protein, adds to the complexity of validation. Monitoring pharmacodynamics of an Aβ42 specific monoclonal antibody in a non-human primate toxicology study using these assays, we demonstrated a 1500-fold and a 3000-fold increase in total Aβ42 in plasma, a 4-fold and 8-fold increase in total Aβ42 in CSF together with a 95% and 96% reduction of free Aβ42 in CSF following weekly intravenous injections of 10 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg, respectively. Levels of Aβ40 were unchanged. The accuracy of these data is supported by previous pre-clinical studies as well as predictive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamics modeling. In contrast, when analyzing the same non-human primate samples excluding the pre-treatment steps, we were not able to distinguish between free and total Aβ42. Our data clearly demonstrate the importance of thorough evaluation of antibody interference and appropriate validation to monitor different types of biomarkers in the presence of a therapeutic antibody. PMID:26402635

  8. Inhibition of DNA-repair genes Ercc1 and Mgmt enhances temozolomide efficacy in gliomas treatment: a pre-clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Boccard, Sandra G.; Marand, Sandie V.; Geraci, Sandra; Pycroft, Laurie; Berger, François R.; Pelletier, Laurent A.

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. To date, therapies do not allow curing patients, and glioblastomas (GBMs) are associated with remarkably poor prognosis. This situation is at least partly due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment, especially to chemotherapy. In 2005, temozolomide (TMZ) has become the first chemotherapeutic drug validated for GBM. Nevertheless TMZ efficacy depends on Mgmt status. While the methylation of Mgmt promoter was considered so far as a prognostic marker, its targeting is becoming an effective therapeutic opportunity. Thus, arrival of both TMZ and Mgmt illustrated that considerable progress can still be realized by optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy. A part of this progress could be accomplished in the future by overcoming residual resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of a set of other DNA-repair genes in glioma resistance to temozolomide. We focused on DNA-repair genes located in the commonly deleted chromosomal region in oligodendroglioma (1p/19q) highly correlated with patient response to chemotherapy. We measured effects of inhibition of ten DNA-repair genes expression using siRNAs on astrocytoma cell response to cisplatin (CDDP) and TMZ. SiRNAs targeting ercc1, ercc2, mutyh, and pnkp significantly sensitized cells to chemotherapy, increasing cell death by up to 25%. In vivo we observed a decrease of subcutaneous glioma tumor growth after injection of siRNA in conjunction with absorption of TMZ. We demonstrated in this pre-clinical study that targeting of DNA-repair genes such as Ercc1 could be used as an adjuvant chemosensitization treatment, similarly to Mgmt inhibition. PMID:26336131

  9. Learning of medical pharmacology via innovation: a personal experience at McMaster and in Asia.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Chiu-Yin

    2004-09-01

    Pharmacology, a discrete preclinical discipline of the traditional medical curriculum, identifies itself distinctly different from the other preclinical or clinical subjects in knowledge base as well as learning/teaching instructions. It exists in series with other pre-clinical courses (e.g., anatomy, biochemistry and physiology), and in parallel with other paraclinical courses such as pathology, microbiology and community medicine. Such arrangement makes learning of pharmacology rather difficult and deficient with regard to its therapeutic relevance and clinical application. In recent years, medical curricula based on clinical cases have emerged as a platform in which pharmacology is one integrated component in a holistic approach to medical education. In this problem-based learning (PBL) model, students learn, with teachers' facilitation, in a student-centered environment, based on self-directed, clinically relevant and case-oriented approach, usually in a small-group tutorial format. In PBL, pharmacology is learned in concert with other subject issues relevant to the case-problem in question, such as anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, population health, behavior science, etc. Students learn via problem-evoked curiosity and motivation, in an environment which encourages free inquiries and intensive discussions in a cooperative rather than competitive atmosphere. Teachers facilitate students' learning objectives rather than deliver pre-packed knowledge and dictate what they think students should learn. A change towards PBL curriculum appears to be beneficial in better preparing the medical students as life-long learners capable of coping with changes in knowledge and skills associated with the progressive and dynamic social/economic transformation in the Asia-Pacific regions. Evidence is presented that this is indeed happening. PMID:15339396

  10. Pharmacology Experiments on the Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    A computer program that replaces a set of pharmacology and physiology laboratory experiments on live animals or isolated organs is described and illustrated. Five experiments are simulated: dose-effect relationships on smooth muscle, blood pressure and catecholamines, neuromuscular signal transmission, acetylcholine and the circulation, and…

  11. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A.; Welsh, Jessemae L.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Allen, Bryan G.; Wagner, Brett A.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Doskey, Claire M.; Strother, Robert K.; Button, Anna M.; Mott, Sarah L.; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Since pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in non-tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacological ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacological ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  12. Pharmacology of Marihuana (Cannabis sativa)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maickel, Roger P.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed discussion of marihuana (Cannabis sativa) providing the modes of use, history, chemistry, and physiologic properties of the drug. Cites research results relating to the pharmacologic effects of marihuana. These effects are categorized into five areas: behavioral, cardiovascular-respiratory, central nervous system, toxicity-toxicology,…

  13. The Pharmacological Potential of Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This review describes pharmacologically active compounds from mushrooms. Compounds and complex substances with antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antiallergic, immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory, antiatherogenic, hypoglycemic, hepatoprotective and central activities are covered, focusing on the review of recent literature. The production of mushrooms or mushroom compounds is discussed briefly. PMID:16136207

  14. First update of the International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--Chapter 4: pre-clinical efficacy and complication data required to justify a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David K C; Bottino, Rita; Gianello, Pierre; Graham, Melanie; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Kirk, Allan D; Korsgren, Olle; Park, Chung-Gyu; Weber, Collin

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, the International Xenotransplantation Association (IXA) published a consensus document that provided guidelines and "recommendations" (not regulations) for those contemplating clinical trials of porcine islet transplantation. These guidelines included the IXA's opinion on what constituted "rigorous pre-clinical studies using the most relevant animal models" and were based on "non-human primate testing." We now report our discussion following a careful review of the 2009 guidelines as they relate to pre-clinical testing. In summary, we do not believe there is a need to greatly modify the conclusions and recommendations of the original consensus document. Pre-clinical studies should be sufficiently rigorous to provide optimism that a clinical trial is likely to be safe and has a realistic chance of success, but need not be so demanding that success might only be achieved by very prolonged experimentation, as this would not be in the interests of patients whose quality of life might benefit immensely from a successful islet xenotransplant. We believe these guidelines will be of benefit to both investigators planning a clinical trial and to institutions and regulatory authorities considering a proposal for a clinical trial. In addition, we suggest consideration should be given to establishing an IXA Clinical Trial Advisory Committee that would be available to advise (but not regulate) researchers considering initiating a clinical trial of xenotransplantation. PMID:26916706

  15. Perioperative pharmacology: blood coagulation modifiers.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W; Wanzer, Linda J; Goeckner, Bradlee

    2011-06-01

    Blood coagulation is the process that results in the formation of a blood clot to stop bleeding from a damaged blood vessel. Various pharmacologic agents can affect the coagulation process. The American College of Chest Physicians' evidence-based practice guidelines for perioperative management of antithrombotic therapy provide guidance for anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy and bridge therapy. Perioperative nurses must understand the pharmacologic principles of the most common blood coagulation modifiers related to perioperative use. The perioperative nurse's responsibilities regarding administration of blood coagulation modifiers include reviewing the patient's pertinent laboratory results (eg, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, international normalized ratio), recognizing the underlying conditions that require blood coagulation therapy, and documenting all pertinent information. Perioperative nurses also should participate in development of detailed storage and retrieval policies related to heparin.

  16. Clinical Pharmacology in Sleep Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Ashley; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2012-01-01

    The basic treatment goals of pharmacological therapies in sleep medicine are to improve waking function by either improving sleep or by increasing energy during wakefulness. Stimulants to improve waking function include amphetamine derivatives, modafinil, and caffeine. Sleep aids encompass several classes, from benzodiazepine hypnotics to over-the-counter antihistamines. Other medications used in sleep medicine include those initially used in other disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and psychiatric disorders. As these medications are prescribed or encountered by providers in diverse fields of medicine, it is important to recognize the distribution of adverse effects, drug interaction profiles, metabolism, and cytochrome substrate activity. In this paper, we review the pharmacological armamentarium in the field of sleep medicine to provide a framework for risk-benefit considerations in clinical practice. PMID:23213564

  17. Pharmacological potential of cerium oxidenanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celardo, Ivana; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in pharmacology to improve or create ex novo therapies. Cerium oxidenanoparticles (nanoceria), well-known as catalysts, possess an astonishing pharmacological potential due to their antioxidant properties, deriving from a fraction of Ce3+ ions present in CeO2. These defects, compensated by oxygen vacancies, are enriched at the surface and therefore in nanosized particles. Reactions involving redox cycles between the Ce3+ and Ce4+oxidation states allow nanoceria to react catalytically with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, mimicking the behavior of two key antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, potentially abating all noxious intracellularreactive oxygen species (ROS) via a self-regenerating mechanism. Hence nanoceria, apparently well tolerated by the organism, might fight chronic inflammation and the pathologies associated with oxidative stress, which include cancer and neurodegeneration. Here we review the biological effects of nanoceria as they emerge from in vitro and in vivo studies, considering biocompatibility and the peculiar antioxidant mechanisms.

  18. The Pharmacological Activities of Licorice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Wang, Li-qiang; Yuan, Bo-chuan; Liu, Ying

    2015-12-01

    Licorice is one of the oldest and most frequently used herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. It contains more than 20 triterpenoids and 300 flavonoids. In recent years, a lot of studies have reported that the active compounds isolated from licorice possess antitumor, antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory, and several other activities that contribute to the recovery and protection of the nervous, alimentary, respiratory, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems. In this paper, nine different pharmacological activities of licorice are summarized. The active compounds responsible for these pharmacological activities, the molecular mechanisms, and in vivo and in vitro studies are listed in detail. Furthermore, the clinical therapeutics and toxicity studies of licorice are also discussed. We hope this work can provide a basis for further studies concerning with the safe and effective use of licorice.

  19. [Pharmacologic treatment of Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Satoru

    2007-03-01

    Asperger syndrome is associated with various dysfunctional and problematic behaviors, in addition to the core features of communication and social skills dysfunction that define these conditions. Although there is currently no pharmacologic cure for the core features of Asperger syndrome. This article discusses the various medications for the behavioral symptoms of Asperger syndrome, which include hyperactivity, aggression, tantrums, self-injury, depression, obsession and so on. Methylphenidate, SSRIs, atypical antipsychotics and mood stabilizer were introduced.

  20. The pharmacology of bimatoprost (Lumigan).

    PubMed

    Woodward, D F; Krauss, A H; Chen, J; Lai, R K; Spada, C S; Burk, R M; Andrews, S W; Shi, L; Liang, Y; Kedzie, K M; Chen, R; Gil, D W; Kharlamb, A; Archeampong, A; Ling, J; Madhu, C; Ni, J; Rix, P; Usansky, J; Usansky, H; Weber, A; Welty, D; Yang, W; Tang-Liu, D D; Garst, M E; Brar, B; Wheeler, L A; Kaplan, L J

    2001-05-01

    Bimatoprost (Lumigan) is a pharmacologically unique and highly efficacious ocular hypotensive agent. It appears to mimic the activity of a newly discovered family of fatty acid amides, termed prostamides. One biosynthetic route to the prostamides involves anandamide as the precursor. Bimatoprost pharmacology has been extensively characterized by binding and functional studies at more than 100 drug targets, which comprise a diverse variety of receptors, ion channels, and transporters. Bimatoprost exhibited no meaningful activity at receptors known to include antiglaucoma drug targets as follows: adenosine (A(1-3)), adrenergic (alpha(1), alpha(2), beta(1), beta(2)), cannabinoid (CB(1), CB(2)), dopamine (D(1-5)), muscarinic (M(1-5)), prostanoid (DP, EP(1-4), FP, IP, TP), and serotonin (5HT(1-7)). Bimatoprost does, however, exhibit potent inherent pharmacological activity in the feline iris sphincter preparation, which is prostamide-sensitive. Bimatoprost also resembles the prostamides in that it is a potent and highly efficacious ocular hypotensive agent. A single dose of bimatoprost markedly reduces intraocular pressure in dogs and laser-induced ocular hypertensive monkeys. Decreases in intraocular pressure are well maintained for at least 24 hr post-dose. Human studies have demonstrated that systemic exposure to bimatoprost is low and that accumulation does not occur. The sclera is the preferred route of accession to the eye. The high scleral permeability coefficient Papp is a likely contributing factor to the rapid onset and long-acting ocular hypotensive profile of bimatoprost. PMID:11434936

  1. [The future of pharmacological models].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M

    1995-01-01

    Do pharmacological models have a future? This was the question that had to be answered during seminar n.3 of the annual clinical pharmacology meeting in GIENS. The concept of 'model' is very extensive: it comprises both simple physiological testing and the replication in animals of human diseases. The main problems of pharmacological models are their predictive value and their validity in relation to the pragmatic target of finding new active molecules. Among numerous models proposed by the participants, three types have been selected as examples in this paper: a human model (cholecystokinin inducing panic attacks), the goal of which is to discover new molecules active in panic disorders. an animal model close to clinical features (coronary restenosis) which was to date unable to help in identifying molecules acting in human pathology transgenic animals as tools in drug development. The guidelines are very clear: models, however far they are from human pathology, are useful in predicting new molecular developments. Models are necessary steps to go from receptors to ill patients.

  2. Pharmacological disruption of maladaptive memory.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane R; Torregrossa, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by intrusive, distracting, and disturbing memories that either perpetuate the illness or hinder successful treatment. For example, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves such strong reemergence of memories associated with a traumatic event that the individual feels like the event is happening again. Furthermore, drug addiction is characterized by compulsive use and repeated relapse that is often driven by internal memories of drug use and/or by exposure to external stimuli that were associated with drug use. Therefore, identifying pharmacological methods to weaken the strength of maladaptive memories is a major goal of research efforts aimed at finding new treatments for these disorders. The primary mechanism by which memories could be pharmacologically disrupted or altered is through manipulation of memory reconsolidation. Reconsolidation occurs when an established memory is remembered or reactivated, reentering a labile state before again being consolidated into long-term memory storage. Memories are subject to disruption during this labile state. In this chapter we will discuss the preclinical and clinical studies identifying potential pharmacological methods for disrupting the integrity of maladaptive memory to treat mental illness.

  3. [Pharmacologic therapy in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pettenati, C

    2001-05-01

    The pharmacological treatment in the older people should be carefully considered: older patients are at the same time the greatest consumers of drugs and the population with the greatest risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR). The ADR are in the old patient more frequent and serious for the greater number of concurrent drugs. The incorrect drug's use consists in prescribing too much or too little, for an excessive period, without a defined diagnosis and an appropriate selection of the better compound. Moreover, beneficial drugs may be frequent underused, some chronic conditions do not receive adequate pharmacologic treatment, and an ADR may be misinterpreted as a new pathological condition that requires a new prescription. The unusual presentation of many diseases in elderly play a role to complicate the clinical process necessary to optimising the drug treatment. About the risks and the benefits of pharmacological treatment, adequate data in older patients are in general lacking for the poor inclusion in clinical trials of the elderly subjects, especially frail persons. PMID:11413893

  4. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  5. Information technology in veterinary pharmacology instruction.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary clinical pharmacology encompasses all interactions between drugs and animals and applies basic and clinical knowledge to improve rational drug use and patient outcomes. Veterinary pharmacology instructors set educational goals and objectives that, when mastered by students, lead to improved animal health. The special needs of pharmacology instruction include establishing a functional interface between basic and clinical knowledge, managing a large quantity of information, and mastering quantitative skills essential to successful drug administration and analysis of drug action. In the present study, a survey was conducted to determine the extent to which veterinary pharmacology instructors utilize information technology (IT) in their teaching. Several IT categories were investigated, including Web-based instructional aids, stand-alone pharmacology software, interactive videoconferencing, databases, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and e-book applications. Currently IT plays a largely ancillary role in pharmacology instruction. IT use is being expanded primarily through the efforts of two veterinary professional pharmacology groups, the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology (ACVCP) and the American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (AAVPT). The long-term outcome of improved IT use in pharmacology instruction should be to support the larger educational mission of active learning and problem solving. Creation of high-quality IT resources that promote this goal has the potential to improve veterinary pharmacology instruction within and across institutions. PMID:14976618

  6. Pre-clinical evidence of PIM kinase inhibitor activity in BCR-ABL1 unmutated and mutated Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Curi, Dany A.; Beauchamp, Elspeth M.; Blyth, Gavin T.; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Donato, Nicholas J.; Giles, Francis J.; Altman, Jessica K.; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of targeting the PIM kinase pathway in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias. We provide evidence that inhibition of PIM, with the pan-PIM inhibitor SGI-1776, results in suppression of classic PIM effectors and also elements of the mTOR pathway, suggesting interplay between PIM and mTOR signals. Our data demonstrate that PIM inhibition enhances the effects of imatinib mesylate on Ph+ leukemia cells. We also found that PIM inhibition results in suppression of leukemic cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis of Ph+ leukemia cells, including those resistant to imatinib mesylate. Importantly, inhibition of PIM results in enhanced suppression of primary leukemic progenitors from patients with CML. Altogether these findings suggest that pharmacological PIM targeting may provide a unique therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ph+ leukemias. PMID:26375673

  7. Local anesthetics: pharmacology and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Moore, Paul A; Hersh, Elliot V

    2010-10-01

    The development of safe and effective local anesthetic agents has possibly been the most important advancement in dental science to occur in the last century. The agents currently available in dentistry are extremely safe and fulfill most of the characteristics of an ideal local anesthetic. These local anesthetic agents can be administered with minimal tissue irritation and with little likelihood of inducing allergic reactions. A variety of agents are available that provide rapid onset and adequate duration of surgical anesthesia. This introductory article provides a brief update of the clinical pharmacology of local anesthetic agents and formulations used in dentistry at present.

  8. Pharmacologic considerations for Shuttle astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santy, Patricia A.; Bungo, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Medication usage by crewmembers in the preflight and inflight mission periods is common in the Shuttle Program. The most common medical reports for which medication is used are: space motion sickness (SMS), sleeplessness, headache, and backache. A number of medications are available in the Shuttle Medical Kit to treat these problems. Currently, astronauts test all frequently used medications before mission assignment to identify potential side-effects, problems related to performance, personal likes/dislikes, and individual therapeutic effect. However, microgravity-induced changes in drug pharmacokinetics, in combination with multiple operational factors, may significantly alter crewmember responses inflight. This article discusses those factors that may impact pharmacologic efficacy during Shuttle missions.

  9. Low back pain: pharmacologic management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan M

    2012-09-01

    Adequate treatment of low back pain is essential, but has been challenging for many primary care physicians. Most patients with low back pain can be treated in the primary care environment, provided the physician has enough knowledge of the medications used to treat low back pain. The main treatment goal for acute low back pain is to control the pain and maintain function. For patients with chronic back pain, the goal is continual pain management and prevention of future exacerbations. This article reviews current pharmacological options for the treatment of low back pain, and possible future innovations. PMID:22958559

  10. Pharmacologic management of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sum; Hilas, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a prevalent and costly condition that can affect any age group. Typical symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence and nocturia. OAB occurs as a result of abnormal contractions of the bladder detrusor muscle caused by the stimulation of certain muscarinic receptors. Therefore, antimuscarinic agents have long been considered the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment for OAB. Currently, there are five such agents approved for the management of OAB in the United States: oxybutynin, tolterodine, trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin. This article summarizes the efficacy, contraindications, precautions, dosing and common side effects of these agents. All available clinical trials on trospium, solifenacin and darifenacin were reviewed to determine its place in therapy.

  11. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  12. Pharmacologic interventions in aging hair

    PubMed Central

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of hair plays an important role in people’s overall physical appearance and self-perception. With today’s increasing life-expectations, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever. The hair care industry has become aware of this and is delivering active products directed towards meeting this consumer demand. The discovery of pharmacological targets and the development of safe and effective drugs also indicate strategies of the drug industry for maintenance of healthy and beautiful hair. Hair aging comprises weathering of the hair shaft, decrease of melanocyte function, and decrease in hair production. The scalp is subject to intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Intrinsic factors are related to individual genetic and epigenetic mechanisms with interindividual variation: prototypes are familial premature graying, and androgenetic alopecia. Currently available pharmacologic treatment modalities with proven efficacy for treatment of androgenetic alopecia are topical minoxidil and oral finasteride. Extrinsic factors include ultraviolet radiation and air pollution. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress also plays a role in hair aging. Topical anti-aging compounds include photoprotectors and antioxidants. In the absence of another way to reverse hair graying, hair colorants remain the mainstay of recovering lost hair color. Topical liposome targeting for melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles are currently under investigation. PMID:18044109

  13. Integrating pharmacology and clinical pharmacology in pharmaceutical companies.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jackie A

    2012-06-01

    Integration of clinical and preclinical pharmacology in pharmaceutical companies could be improved by several key recommendations: Companies should ensure that there is an adequate pool of trained clinical pharmacologists and preclinical pharmacologists. Training should include topics that allow clinical pharmacologists to be cognizant of the methods, issues and challenges faced by the preclinical pharmacologists and vice versa. Companies should incentivize such integration internally by aligning objectives and metrics/incentives. In academic medicine and the NHS there should be support for involvement of clinical pharmacologists in basic academic research and industrial R & D and new ways of facilitating and incentivizing preclinical pharmacologists and clinical pharmacologists to move between these various environments should be sought.

  14. The First 50 Years of Molecular Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joan Heller; Catterall, William A; Conn, P Jeffrey; Cull-Candy, Stuart G; Dingledine, Ray; Harden, T Kendall; Insel, Paul A; Milligan, Graeme; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    In this Perspective, former and current editors of Molecular Pharmacology, together with the guest editors for this 50th Anniversary Issue, provide a historical overview of the journal since its founding in 1965. The substantial impact that Molecular Pharmacology has had on the field of pharmacology as well as on biomedical science is discussed, as is the broad scope of the journal. The authors conclude that, true to the original goals for the journal, Molecular Pharmacology today remains an outstanding venue for work that provides a mechanistic understanding of drugs, molecular probes, and their biologic targets.

  15. Pharmacological Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, RM; Vieira, CS; Ferriani, RA; Candido-dos-Reis, FJ; Brito, LGO

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (UF) are common, benign gynecologic tumors, affecting one in three to four women, with estimates of up to 80%, depending on the population studied. Their etiology is not well established, but it is under the influence of several risk factors, such as early menarche, nulliparity and family history. More than 50% of affected women are asymptomatic, but the lesions may be related to bothersome symptoms, such as abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain and bloating or urinary symptoms. The treatment of UF is classically surgical; however, various medical options are available, providing symptom control while minimizing risks and complications. A large number of clinical trials have evaluated commonly used medical treatments and potentially effective new ones. Through a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Scopus and Google Scholar databases, through which we included 41 studies out of 7658 results, we thoroughly explored the different pharmacological options available for management of UF, their indications, advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25364587

  16. Pharmacologic management of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Kivity, Shaye; Baker, Britain; Arango, Maria-Teresa; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus affects above 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and may span from mild symptoms to acute devastating life-threatening ones. Owing to the clinical variability, most pharmacological data rely on small, uncontrolled trials and case reports. The mainstay of therapy relies on immune-suppression by glucocorticoids, in adjunction with cyclophosphamide or anti-B-cell therapy, in moderate to severe cases. In selected scenarios (e.g., chorea) intravenous immunoglobulin or plasmapheresis may be effective. Anticoagulation is warranted if anti-phospholipid antibodies are present. In parallel there may be a need for symptomatic treatment such as anti-epileptic or anti-depressive treatments, etc. In the future, more studies addressed to assess pathogenesis and preferred treatments of specific manifestations are needed in order to personalize treatments.

  17. Psychostimulants: Basic and Clinical Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    McCreary, Andrew C; Müller, Christian P; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Substance use disorder, and particularly psychostimulant use disorder, has considerable socioeconomic burden globally. The psychostimulants include several chemical classes, being derivatives of benzoylecgonine, phenethylamine, phenylpropanolamine, or aminoaryloxazoline. Psychostimulant drugs activate the brain reward pathways of the mesoaccumbal system, and continued use leads to persistent neuroplastic and dysfunctional changes of a variety of structures involved in learning and memory, habit-forming learning, salience attribution, and inhibitory control. There are a variety of neurochemical and neurobehavioral changes in psychostimulant addiction, for example, dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic (5-HT-ergic), and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) changes have all noted. In this chapter, we will review pharmacological changes associated with psychostimulant use and abuse in humans and animals, and on the basis of the best characterized and most widely abused psychostimulants (amphetamines, cocaine) discuss why use transitions into abuse and review basic science and clinical strategies that might assist in treating psychostimulant abuse.

  18. The Chemical Basis of Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Molecular biology now dominates pharmacology so thoroughly that it is difficult to recall that only a generation ago the field was very different. To understand drug action today, we characterize the targets through which they act and new drug leads are discovered on the basis of target structure and function. Until the mid-1980s the information often flowed in reverse: investigators began with organic molecules and sought targets, relating receptors not by sequence or structure but by their ligands. Recently, investigators have returned to this chemical view of biology, bringing to it systematic and quantitative methods of relating targets by their ligands. This has allowed the discovery of new targets for established drugs, suggested the bases for their side effects, and predicted the molecular targets underlying phenotypic screens. The bases for these new methods, some of their successes and liabilities, and new opportunities for their use are described. PMID:21058655

  19. Toxicological evidence in forensic pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, R E

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory evidence of the presence and concentration of a drug in a person who has come to harm is often helpful in forensic pharmacology, and may be crucial. However, its value depends on two critical interpretations by the expert. First, the expert must make a careful analysis of the relationship between the results as measured in the sample and the drug in the patient at the time that harm occurred. That is especially difficult with post-mortem samples. Secondly, the expert must syntheses the laboratory information with the available clinical history and clinical or pathological findings. Even in the most favourable circumstances, when the sample is correctly obtained, identified, and analyzed, it can be hard to say that beyond reasonable doubt a given concentration had a given effect.

  20. Pharmacologic management of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Hue Jung; Moon, Dong Eon

    2010-06-01

    Chronic pain is a multifactorial condition with both physical and psychological symptoms, and it affects around 20% of the population in the developed world. In spite of outstanding advances in pain management over the past decades, chronic pain remains a significant problem. This article provides a mechanism- and evidence-based approach to improve the outcome for pharmacologic management of chronic pain. The usual approach to treat mild to moderate pain is to start with a nonopioid analgesic. If this is inadequate, and if there is an element of sleep deprivation, then it is reasonable to add an antidepressant with analgesic qualities. If there is a component of neuropathic pain or fibromyalgia, then a trial with one of the gabapentinoids is appropriate. If these steps are inadequate, then an opioid analgesic may be added. For moderate to severe pain, one would initiate an earlier trial of a long term opioid. Skeletal muscle relaxants and topicals may also be appropriate as single agents or in combination. Meanwhile, the steps of pharmacologic treatments for neuropathic pain include (1) certain antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), calcium channel alpha(2)-delta ligands (gabapentin and pregabalin) and topical lidocaine, (2) opioid analgesics and tramadol (for first-line use in selected clinical circumstances) and (3) certain other antidepressant and antiepileptic medications (topical capsaicin, mexiletine, and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists). It is essential to have a thorough understanding about the different pain mechanisms of chronic pain and evidence-based multi-mechanistic treatment. It is also essential to increase the individualization of treatment. PMID:20556211

  1. Gene expression in mdx mouse muscle in relation to age and exercise: aberrant mechanical-metabolic coupling and implications for pre-clinical studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Cannone, Maria; Giustino, Arcangela; Massari, Ada Maria; Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; De Luca, Annamaria

    2014-11-01

    Weakness and fatigability are typical features of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and are aggravated in dystrophic mdx mice by chronic treadmill exercise. Mechanical activity modulates gene expression and muscle plasticity. Here, we investigated the outcome of 4 (T4, 8 weeks of age) and 12 (T12, 16 weeks of age) weeks of either exercise or cage-based activity on a large set of genes in the gastrocnemius muscle of mdx and wild-type (WT) mice using quantitative real-time PCR. Basal expression of the exercise-sensitive genes peroxisome-proliferator receptor γ coactivator 1α (Pgc-1α) and Sirtuin1 (Sirt1) was higher in mdx versus WT mice at both ages. Exercise increased Pgc-1α expression in WT mice; Pgc-1α was downregulated by T12 exercise in mdx muscles, along with Sirt1, Pparγ and the autophagy marker Bnip3. Sixteen weeks old mdx mice showed a basal overexpression of the slow Mhc1 isoform and Serca2; T12 exercise fully contrasted this basal adaptation as well as the high expression of follistatin and myogenin. Conversely, T12 exercise was ineffective in WT mice. Damage-related genes such as gp91-phox (NADPH-oxidase2), Tgfβ, Tnfα and c-Src tyrosine kinase were overexpressed in mdx muscles and not affected by exercise. Likewise, the anti-inflammatory adiponectin was lower in T12-exercised mdx muscles. Chronic exercise with minor adaptive effects in WT muscles leads to maladaptation in mdx muscles with a disequilibrium between protective and damaging signals. Increased understanding of the pathways involved in the altered mechanical-metabolic coupling may help guide appropriate physical therapies while better addressing pharmacological interventions in translational research.

  2. The development of self-regulated learning during the pre-clinical stage of medical school: a comparison between a lecture-based and a problem-based curriculum.

    PubMed

    Lucieer, Susanna M; van der Geest, Jos N; Elói-Santos, Silvana M; de Faria, Rosa M Delbone; Jonker, Laura; Visscher, Chris; Rikers, Remy M J P; Themmen, Axel P N

    2016-03-01

    Society expects physicians to always improve their competencies and to be up to date with developments in their field. Therefore, an important aim of medical schools is to educate future medical doctors to become self-regulated, lifelong learners. However, it is unclear if medical students become better self-regulated learners during the pre-clinical stage of medical school, and whether students develop self-regulated learning skills differently, dependent on the educational approach of their medical school. In a cross-sectional design, we investigated the development of 384 medical students' self-regulated learning skills with the use of the Self-Regulation of Learning Self-Report Scale. Next, we compared this development in students who enrolled in two distinct medical curricula: a problem-based curriculum and a lectured-based curriculum. Analysis showed that more skills decreased than increased during the pre-clinical stage of medical school, and that the difference between the curricula was mainly caused by a decrease in the skill evaluation in the lecture-based curriculum. These findings seem to suggest that, irrespective of the curriculum, self-regulated learning skills do not develop during medical school.

  3. First Employment of British Pharmacology Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Michael; Markham, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted in UK Universities to identify the employment of pharmacology graduates (BSc, MSc and PhD) 6 months after graduation in 2003. The aim was to provide data for the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) so they could offer advice to interested bodies and to University staff for careers information. 85% of 52 Universities…

  4. Rate dependency, behavioral mechanisms, and behavioral pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Branch, M N

    1984-11-01

    Behavioral pharmacology has become increasingly independent of the experimental analysis of behavior. At its beginning, behavioral pharmacology was closely related to the experimental analysis of behavior, with developments in each field aiding the other. Early attempts to systematize data in behavioral pharmacology culminated with the development of the rate-dependency concept, but as this principle was found to have more limited generality than originally was hoped, a theoretical void developed. This circumstance was followed by increased reliance on pharmacological theory as a basis for experimentation and interpretation, with an attendant decrease in emphasis on environmental variables and behavioral interpretations. Lack of interplay between behavioral pharmacology and the experimental analysis of behavior is detrimental to both disciplines because each could contribute significantly to the other. The current trend might be reversed if more research were directed at elucidating behavioral mechanisms of drug action.

  5. The New 3D Printed Left Atrial Appendage Closure with a Novel Holdfast Device: A Pre-Clinical Feasibility Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Brzeziński, M.; Bury, K.; Dąbrowski, L.; Holak, P.; Sejda, A.; Pawlak, M.; Jagielak, D.; Adamiak, Z.; Rogowski, J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many patients undergoing cardiac surgery have risk factors for both atrial fibrillation (AF) and stroke. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is the primary site for thrombi formation. The most severe complication of emboli derived from LAA is stroke, which is associated with a 12-month mortality rate of 38% and a 12-month recurrence rate of 17%. The most common form of treatment for atrial fibrillation and stroke prevention is the pharmacological therapy with anticoagulants. Nonetheless this form of therapy is associated with high risk of major bleeding. Therefore LAA occlusion devices should be tested for their ability to reduce future cerebral ischemic events in patients with high-risk of haemorrhage. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of a novel left atrial appendage exclusion device with a minimally invasive introducer in a swine model. Materials and Methods A completely novel LAA device, which is composed of two tubes connected together using a specially created bail, was designed using finite element modelling (FEM) to obtain an optimal support force of 36 N at the closure line. The monolithic form of the occluder was obtained by using additive manufacturing of granular PA2200 powder with the technology of selective laser sintering (SLS). Fifteen swine were included in the feasibility tests, with 10 animals undergoing fourteen days of follow-up and 5 animals undergoing long-term observation of 3 months. For one animal, the follow-up was further prolonged to 6 months. The device was placed via minithoracotomy. After the observation period, all of the animals were euthanized, and their hearts were tested for LAA closure and local inflammatory and tissue response. Results After the defined observation period, all fifteen hearts were explanted. In all cases the full closure of the LAA was achieved. The macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of the explanted hearts showed that all devices were securely integrated in the

  6. Glucocorticoid physiology, pharmacology and stress.

    PubMed

    Munck, A; Guyre, P M

    1986-01-01

    Basal levels of glucocorticoids maintained by negative feedback regulation are known to modulate a wide range of physiological processes, through a variety of effects such as those on carbohydrate metabolism and "permissive" actions on effects of other hormones. Glucocorticoid levels increase sharply in response to the stress of any kind of threat to homeostasis. The increased levels have traditionally been ascribed the function of enhancing the organism's resistance to stress. How known physiological and pharmacological effects of high levels of glucocorticoids might accomplish this function, however, has been a mystery. A generalization that is beginning to emerge is that many of these effects may be secondary to modulation by glucocorticoids of the actions of numerous intercellular mediators, including established hormones, prostanoids, neutral proteinases, and cytokines such as interferon. These mediators participate in physiological mechanisms--endocrine, renal, immune, neural, etc.--that mount a first line of defense against such challenges to homeostasis as hemorrhage, metabolic disturbances, infection, anxiety, and others. Contrary to the traditional view that the role of glucocorticoids in stress is to enhance these defense mechanisms, it has become increasingly clear that glucocorticoids at moderate to high levels generally suppress them. This paradox first emerged when glucocorticoids were discovered to be antiinflammatory agents, and had remained a major obstacle to a unified picture of glucocorticoid function. We have suggested that stress-induced increases in glucocorticoid levels protect not against the source of stress itself but rather against the body's normal reactions to stress, preventing those reactions from overshooting and themselves threatening homeostasis. This hypothesis, the seeds of which are to be found in many earlier discussions of glucocorticoid effects, immediately accounts for the paradox noted above, and provides glucocorticoid

  7. Pharmacology of sexually compulsive behavior.

    PubMed

    Codispoti, Victoria L

    2008-12-01

    In a meta-analysis on controlled outcomes evaluations of 22,000 sex offenders, Losel and Schmucker found 80 comparisons between treatment and control groups. The recidivism rate averaged 19% in treated groups, and 27% in controls. Most other reviews reported a lower rate of sexual recidivism in treated sexual offenders. Of 2039 citations in this study (including literature in five languages), 60 studies held independent comparisons. Problematic issues included the control groups; various hormonal, surgical, cognitive behavioral, and psychotherapeutic treatments; and sample sizes. In the 80 studies compared after the year 2000, 32% were reported after 2000, 45% originated in the United States, 45% were reported in journals, and 36% were unpublished. Treatment characteristics showed a significant lack of pharmacologic treatment (7.5%), whereas use cognitive and classical behavioral therapy was 64%. In 68% of the studies, no information was available on the integrity of the treatment implementation; 36% of the treatment settings were outpatient only, 31% were prison settings, and 12% were mixed settings (prison, hospital, and outpatient). Integrating research interpretations is complicated by the heterogeneity of sex offenders, with only 56% being adult men and 17.5% adolescents. Offense types reported included 74% child molestation, 48% incest, and 30% exhibitionism. Pedophilia was not singled out. Follow-up periods varied from 12 months to greater than 84 months. The definition of recidivism ran the gamut from arrest (24%), conviction (30%), charges (19%), and no indication (16%). Results were difficult to interpret because of the methodological problems with this type of study. Overall, a positive outcome was noted with sex offender treatment. Cognitive-behavioral and hormonal treatment were the most promising. Voluntary treatment led to a slightly better outcome than mandatory participation. When accounting for a low base rate of sexual recidivism, the reduction

  8. [Early diagnostics, prophylaxis, and non-pharmacological treatment of the preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bykov, A T; Chernyshev, A V; Vartazaryan, M A; Lobastov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death in most countries, including Russia. Non-pharmacological-modalities intended for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease including hypertension and atherosclerosis currently acquire special significance. The objective of the present*study was to develop a system of methods for early diagnostics, prevention and treatment of the preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and hypertension Another objective was to estimate the effectiveness of these methods. A total of 310 patients at risk-of arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis or with pre-clinical stages of these conditions were examined during a two year observation period. The system of early diagnosis and non-pharmacological primary prevention of cardiovascular disease was developed and evaluated using climatotherapeutic and physiotherapeutic methods in combination with and personalized dietary therapy, hypoxic-hypercapnic factors and educational programs. The study has demonstrated that the proposed system allowed to significantly (p < 0.05) reduce cardiovascular morbidity. The patients of the main group experienced the reduction of abdominal obesity and blood pressure along with the improvement of the blood lipid profile and other indicators. These parameters remained unaltered in the patients comprising the control group. In the main group, the incidence of coronary heart disease and hypertension was 62.5% and 81.25% lower respectively than in the control group.

  9. [Early diagnostics, prophylaxis, and non-pharmacological treatment of the preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bykov, A T; Chernyshev, A V; Vartazaryan, M A; Lobastov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death in most countries, including Russia. Non-pharmacological-modalities intended for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease including hypertension and atherosclerosis currently acquire special significance. The objective of the present*study was to develop a system of methods for early diagnostics, prevention and treatment of the preclinical stages of atherosclerosis and hypertension Another objective was to estimate the effectiveness of these methods. A total of 310 patients at risk-of arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis or with pre-clinical stages of these conditions were examined during a two year observation period. The system of early diagnosis and non-pharmacological primary prevention of cardiovascular disease was developed and evaluated using climatotherapeutic and physiotherapeutic methods in combination with and personalized dietary therapy, hypoxic-hypercapnic factors and educational programs. The study has demonstrated that the proposed system allowed to significantly (p < 0.05) reduce cardiovascular morbidity. The patients of the main group experienced the reduction of abdominal obesity and blood pressure along with the improvement of the blood lipid profile and other indicators. These parameters remained unaltered in the patients comprising the control group. In the main group, the incidence of coronary heart disease and hypertension was 62.5% and 81.25% lower respectively than in the control group. PMID:26852497

  10. Canine osteosarcoma cell lines contain stem-like cancer cells: biological and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Wurth, Roberto; Vito, Guendalina; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Thellung, Stefano; Maniscalco, Lorella; De Maria, Raffaella; Villa, Valentina; Corsaro, Alessandro; Nizzari, Mario; Bajetto, Adriana; Ratto, Alessandra; Ferrari, Angelo; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of cells responsible for tumor formation and progression, drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasization. CSCs have been identified in many human tumors including osteosarcoma (OSA). CSC distinctive properties are the expression of stem cell markers, sustained growth, self-renewal and tumorigenicity. Here we report the isolation of stem-like cells from two canine OSA cultures, characterized by self-renewal, evaluated by sphere formation ability, differential marker expression, and in vitro proliferation when cultured in a medium containing EGF and bFGF. Current therapies for OSA increased survival time, but prognosis remains poor, due to the development of drug resistance and metastases. Chemotherapy shrinks the tumor mass but CSCs remain unaffected, leading to tumor recurrence. Metformin, a drug for type 2 diabetes, has been shown to possess antitumor properties affecting CSC survival in different human and animal cancers. Here we show that metformin has a significant antiproliferative effect on canine OSA stem-like cells, validating this in vitro model for further pre-clinical drug evaluations. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining CSC-enriched cultures from primary canine OSA cells as a promising model for biological and pharmacological studies of canine and human OSAs.

  11. Canine osteosarcoma cell lines contain stem-like cancer cells: biological and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Gatti, Monica; Wurth, Roberto; Vito, Guendalina; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Thellung, Stefano; Maniscalco, Lorella; De Maria, Raffaella; Villa, Valentina; Corsaro, Alessandro; Nizzari, Mario; Bajetto, Adriana; Ratto, Alessandra; Ferrari, Angelo; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-05-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a small subpopulation of cells responsible for tumor formation and progression, drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasization. CSCs have been identified in many human tumors including osteosarcoma (OSA). CSC distinctive properties are the expression of stem cell markers, sustained growth, self-renewal and tumorigenicity. Here we report the isolation of stem-like cells from two canine OSA cultures, characterized by self-renewal, evaluated by sphere formation ability, differential marker expression, and in vitro proliferation when cultured in a medium containing EGF and bFGF. Current therapies for OSA increased survival time, but prognosis remains poor, due to the development of drug resistance and metastases. Chemotherapy shrinks the tumor mass but CSCs remain unaffected, leading to tumor recurrence. Metformin, a drug for type 2 diabetes, has been shown to possess antitumor properties affecting CSC survival in different human and animal cancers. Here we show that metformin has a significant antiproliferative effect on canine OSA stem-like cells, validating this in vitro model for further pre-clinical drug evaluations. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining CSC-enriched cultures from primary canine OSA cells as a promising model for biological and pharmacological studies of canine and human OSAs. PMID:27506084

  12. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  13. Histamine receptors and cancer pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Vanina A; Rivera, Elena S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been collected indicating that histamine can modulate proliferation of different normal and malignant cells. High histamine biosynthesis and content together with histamine receptors have been reported in different human neoplasias including melanoma, colon and breast cancer, as well as in experimental tumours in which histamine has been postulated to behave as an important paracrine and autocrine regulator of proliferation. The discovery of the human histamine H4 receptor in different tissues has contributed to our understanding of histamine role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions revealing novel functions for histamine and opening new perspectives in histamine pharmacology research. In the present review we aimed to briefly summarize current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor involvement in cancer before focusing on some recent evidence supporting the novel role of histamine H4 receptor in cancer progression representing a promising molecular target and avenue for cancer drug development. LINKED ARTICLES BJP has previously published a Histamine themed issue (2009). To view this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2009.157.issue-1 PMID:20636392

  14. Safety Pharmacology Evaluation of Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Amouzadeh, Hamid R; Engwall, Michael J; Vargas, Hugo M

    2015-01-01

    Biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals or biopharmaceuticals (BPs) are molecules such as monoclonal antibodies, soluble/decoy receptors, hormones, enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors that are produced in various biological expression systems and are used to diagnose, treat, or prevent various diseases. Safety pharmacology (SP) assessment of BPs has evolved since the approval of the first BP (recombinant human insulin) in 1982. This evolution is ongoing and is informed by various international harmonization guidelines. Based on these guidelines, the potential undesirable effect of every drug candidate (small molecule or BP) on the cardiovascular, central nervous, and respiratory systems, referred to as the "core battery," should be assessed prior to first-in-human administration. However, SP assessment of BPs poses unique challenges such as choice of test species and integration of SP parameters into repeat-dose toxicity studies. This chapter reviews the evolution of SP assessment of BPs using the approval packages of marketed BPs and discusses the past, current, and new and upcoming approach and methods that can be used to generate high-quality data for the assessment of SP of BPs.

  15. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  16. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly.

  17. Cardiovascular Safety Pharmacology of Sibutramine

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jaesuk; Chung, Eunyong; Choi, Ki Hwan; Cho, Dae Hyun; Song, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyoung Moon; Cha, Hey Jin; Shin, Ji Soon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sibutramine is an anorectic that has been banned since 2010 due to cardiovascular safety issues. However, counterfeit drugs or slimming products that include sibutramine are still available in the market. It has been reported that illegal sibutramine-contained pharmaceutical products induce cardiovascular crisis. However, the mechanism underlying sibutramine-induced cardiovascular adverse effect has not been fully evaluated yet. In this study, we performed cardiovascular safety pharmacology studies of sibutramine systemically using by hERG channel inhibition, action potential duration, and telemetry assays. Sibutramine inhibited hERG channel current of HEK293 cells with an IC50 of 3.92 μM in patch clamp assay and increased the heart rate and blood pressure (76 Δbpm in heart rate and 51 ΔmmHg in blood pressure) in beagle dogs at a dose of 30 mg/kg (per oral), while it shortened action potential duration (at 10 μM and 30 μM, resulted in 15% and 29% decreases in APD50, and 9% and 17% decreases in APD90, respectively) in the Purkinje fibers of rabbits and had no effects on the QTc interval in beagle dogs. These results suggest that sibutramine has a considerable adverse effect on the cardiovascular system and may contribute to accurate drug safety regulation. PMID:26157557

  18. Designer psychostimulants: pharmacology and differences.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Leslie; White, Michael; Treble, Ric

    2014-12-01

    More than 200 novel psychoactive drugs have been reported in Europe, with 73 added in 2012 and additional compounds encountered every week in 2013. Many of these are "designer psychostimulants" which aim to mimic the subjective effects of amphetamines, cocaine or 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy"). Several drugs are based on the beta-ketoamphetamine cathinone chemical structure, others include aminoindanes, aminotetralins, piperazines, amphetamine analogues and pipradrol derivatives. Although a detailed analysis of the pharmacology of these novel drugs is largely lacking, a number of scientific studies have been reported in 2011-2013 and these are reviewed. All of the novel psychostimulants activate monoamine systems in the brain - with differing dopamine (DA) v serotonin (5-HT) preferences. Those activating principally DA systems are amphetamine-like stimulants, such as naphyrone, desoxypipradrol, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and benzylpiperazine while those preferentially activating 5-HT mechanisms are MDMA-like or cocaine-like stimulants, such as mephedrone, methylone and other substituted cathinones, aminoindanes, aminotetralins and piperazines. The ability of mephedrone and other novel psychostimulants to substitute for methylamphetamine or cocaine in drug discrimination tests in rats, and the ability of mephedrone to induce conditioned place preference and to sustain self-administration behaviour suggests that this and other cocaine/methylamphetamine-like drugs have dependence liability. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. PMID:24456744

  19. Cardiovascular Safety Pharmacology of Sibutramine.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jaesuk; Chung, Eunyong; Choi, Ki Hwan; Cho, Dae Hyun; Song, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyoung Moon; Cha, Hey Jin; Shin, Ji Soon; Seong, Won-Keun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung Soo

    2015-07-01

    Sibutramine is an anorectic that has been banned since 2010 due to cardiovascular safety issues. However, counterfeit drugs or slimming products that include sibutramine are still available in the market. It has been reported that illegal sibutramine-contained pharmaceutical products induce cardiovascular crisis. However, the mechanism underlying sibutramine-induced cardiovascular adverse effect has not been fully evaluated yet. In this study, we performed cardiovascular safety pharmacology studies of sibutramine systemically using by hERG channel inhibition, action potential duration, and telemetry assays. Sibutramine inhibited hERG channel current of HEK293 cells with an IC50 of 3.92 μM in patch clamp assay and increased the heart rate and blood pressure (76 Δbpm in heart rate and 51 ΔmmHg in blood pressure) in beagle dogs at a dose of 30 mg/kg (per oral), while it shortened action potential duration (at 10 μM and 30 μM, resulted in 15% and 29% decreases in APD50, and 9% and 17% decreases in APD90, respectively) in the Purkinje fibers of rabbits and had no effects on the QTc interval in beagle dogs. These results suggest that sibutramine has a considerable adverse effect on the cardiovascular system and may contribute to accurate drug safety regulation. PMID:26157557

  20. Anti-aging pharmacology: Promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Vaiserman, Alexander M; Lushchak, Oleh V; Koliada, Alexander K

    2016-11-01

    Life expectancy has grown dramatically in modern times. This increase, however, is not accompanied by the same increase in healthspan. Efforts to extend healthspan through pharmacological agents targeting aging-related pathological changes are now in the spotlight of geroscience, the main idea of which is that delaying of aging is far more effective than preventing the particular chronic disorders. Currently, anti-aging pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline. It is a preventive field of health care, as opposed to conventional medicine which focuses on treating symptoms rather than root causes of illness. A number of pharmacological agents targeting basic aging pathways (i.e., calorie restriction mimetics, autophagy inducers, senolytics etc.) are now under investigation. This review summarizes the literature related to advances, perspectives and challenges in the field of anti-aging pharmacology. PMID:27524412

  1. Integrating Behavioral and Pharmacological Therapeutic Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Samuel F.

    1986-01-01

    Fear of dental procedures and associated anxiety are widely accepted as important deterents to optimal oral health. Such health care-related fears and anxieties are also common in many areas of medicine. For both medical and dental care a large body of psychologically derived therapeutic modalities have evolved. These methods have been shown to interact positively with pharmacological therapies also designed to help patients better tolerate medical and dental treatment. Despite these findings, behavioral interventions have not found widespread acceptance in medical and dental practice. A multidimensional model which emphasizes the simultaneous consideration of pharmacologic, psychologic, and clinical dental factors is suggested in order to arrive at therapeutic decisions. Further research could address more powerful behavioral modalities, safer pharmacologic methods, and behavioral and pharmacologic combinations which interact optimally for particular clinical conditions. PMID:3458386

  2. INTERSPECIES DOSIMETRY MODELS FOR PULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies Dosimetry Models for Pulmonary Pharmacology

    Ted B. Martonen, Jeffry D. Schroeter, and John S. Fleming

    Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  3. Pharmacological prophylaxis of venous thrombo-embolism.

    PubMed

    Flute, P T

    1976-02-01

    The pathogenesis of venous thrombosis is briefly discussed as a basis for the understanding of preventive measures used in this condition. Prophylaxis in venous thrombosis is then reviewed with emphasis on pharmacological treatment, and more particularly on heparin.

  4. Anti-aging pharmacology: Promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Vaiserman, Alexander M; Lushchak, Oleh V; Koliada, Alexander K

    2016-11-01

    Life expectancy has grown dramatically in modern times. This increase, however, is not accompanied by the same increase in healthspan. Efforts to extend healthspan through pharmacological agents targeting aging-related pathological changes are now in the spotlight of geroscience, the main idea of which is that delaying of aging is far more effective than preventing the particular chronic disorders. Currently, anti-aging pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline. It is a preventive field of health care, as opposed to conventional medicine which focuses on treating symptoms rather than root causes of illness. A number of pharmacological agents targeting basic aging pathways (i.e., calorie restriction mimetics, autophagy inducers, senolytics etc.) are now under investigation. This review summarizes the literature related to advances, perspectives and challenges in the field of anti-aging pharmacology.

  5. Antimalarial pharmacology and therapeutics of atovaquone

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Gemma L.; Moss, Darren M.; Shone, Alison E.; Lalloo, David G.; Fisher, Nicholas; O'Neill, Paul M.; Ward, Stephen A.; Biagini, Giancarlo A.

    2013-01-01

    Atovaquone is used as a fixed-dose combination with proguanil (Malarone) for treating children and adults with uncomplicated malaria or as chemoprophylaxis for preventing malaria in travellers. Indeed, in the USA, between 2009 and 2011, Malarone prescriptions accounted for 70% of all antimalarial pre-travel prescriptions. In 2013 the patent for Malarone will expire, potentially resulting in a wave of low-cost generics. Furthermore, the malaria scientific community has a number of antimalarial quinolones with a related pharmacophore to atovaquone at various stages of pre-clinical development. With this in mind, it is timely here to review the current knowledge of atovaquone, with the purpose of aiding the decision making of clinicians and drug developers involved in the future use of atovaquone generics or atovaquone derivatives. PMID:23292347

  6. Pre-clinical and preliminary dose-finding and safety studies to identify candidate antivenoms for treatment of envenoming by saw-scaled or carpet vipers (Echis ocellatus) in northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, S B; Abubakar, I S; Habib, A G; Nasidi, A; Durfa, N; Yusuf, P O; Larnyang, S; Garnvwa, J; Sokomba, E; Salako, L; Laing, G D; Theakston, R D G; Juszczak, E; Alder, N; Warrell, D A

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify candidate antivenoms with specific activity against the venom of the saw-scaled or carpet viper (Echis ocellatus) in northern Nigeria, where bites by this species cause great morbidity and mortality but where effective antivenoms have become scarce and unaffordable. Selected antivenoms were destined to be compared by randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Standard pre-clinical neutralisation assays were carried out in rodents. We included two licensed antivenoms of established clinical efficacy and 6 candidate antivenoms. Although 6 of the tested antivenoms showed promising efficacy, all but 3 were excluded from further study because of inadequate pre-clinical efficacy or because they were unavailable or unaffordable for the anticipated RCTs. Median effective doses (ED(50)) of the remaining three candidate antivenoms suggested that the following doses might neutralise the maximum observed venom yield of 24.8 mg (dry weight) of venom milked from captive E. ocellatus: 10 ml of MicroPharm "EchiTAb G" (ET-G) antivenom; 30 ml of Instituto Clodomiro Picado "EchiTAb-Plus-ICP" (ET-Plus) antivenom; 50 ml of VacSera, Cairo "EgyVac" antivenom. A preliminary clinical dose-finding and safety study of these three antivenoms was carried out in 24 patients with incoagulable blood after E. ocellatus bites who were not severely envenomed. A 3+3 dose escalation design was employed. Initial doses of 10 ml ET-G and 30 ml ET-Plus restored blood coagulability in groups of 6 patients with early mild reactions (pruritus only) in not more than one third of them. EgyVac antivenom did not fulfil efficacy or safety criteria in 12 patients. On the basis of these results, ET-G and ET-Plus were selected for comparison in a RCT. PMID:19874841

  7. Pharmacology of myocardial calcium-handling.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Julia; Eckardt, Lars

    2012-07-01

    Disturbed myocardial calcium (Ca(+)) handling is one of the pathophysiologic hallmarks of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy, and certain types of tachyarrhythmias. Pharmacologic treatment of these diseases thus focuses on restoring myocardial Ca(2+) homeostasis by interacting with Ca(2+)-dependent signaling pathways. In this article, we review the currently used pharmacologic agents that are able to restore or maintain myocardial Ca(2+) homeostasis and their mechanism of action as well as emerging new substances.

  8. [Non-pharmacological methods of stroke prevention].

    PubMed

    Planjar-Prvan, Miljenka

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is a major health problem and the leading cause of functional disability, so that effective primary prevention remains the best, easiest and most cost-effective approach to reduce serious consequences of stroke. It is well known that prevention includes pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. However, it seems that non-pharmacological methods of stroke prevention are generally neglected and placed in an inferior position in relation to pharmacological prevention. Therefore, the objective of this review is to present the most relevant literature data on non-pharmacological methods of stroke prevention and highlight their effectiveness with the use of quantitative parameters of evidence-based medicine. The main sources of data were the American, European and Croatian guidelines for stroke prevention, along with recent research results. Literature data have shown the relative risk of stroke to be greater than 2.0 in the group with unhealthy lifestyle; in fact, healthy lifestyle predicts more than twofold difference in the incidence of stroke. It is important to emphasize the public health value of non-pharmacological stroke prevention and to underline that it should be constant, irrespective of taking pharmacotherapy for stroke prevention or not. Healthy lifestyle is fundamental for non-pharmacological stroke prevention and includes healthy diet, regular physical activity, low-normal body mass index, smoking abstinence, and moderate drinking of alcohol. It is essential to inform patients on the importance, value and benefits of non-pharmacological stroke prevention, in particular when it remains the only therapeutic option in case of adverse side effects of pharmacotherapy prevention. Numerous studies demonstrated that even small lifestyle modifications could significantly reduce the risk of stroke. Therefore, it is necessary that physicians promote moderate and healthy lifestyle and habits in primary and secondary stroke prevention because there is

  9. Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer with Pharmacological Ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, John A.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains dismal, with less than 3% survival at 5 years. Recent studies have demonstrated that high-dose, intravenous pharmacological ascorbate (ascorbic acid, vitamin C) induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress selectively in pancreatic cancer cells vs. normal cells, suggesting a promising new role of ascorbate as a therapeutic agent. At physiologic concentrations, ascorbate functions as a reducing agent and antioxidant. However, when pharmacological ascorbate is given intravenously, it is possible to achieve millimolar plasma concentration. At these pharmacological levels, and in the presence of catalytic metal ions, ascorbate can induce oxidative stress through the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated ascorbate oxidation occurs extracellularly, generating H2O2 flux into cells resulting in oxidative stress. Pharmacologic ascorbate also inhibits the growth of pancreatic tumor xenografts and displays synergistic cytotoxic effects when combined with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Phase I trials of pharmacological ascorbate in pancreatic cancer patients have demonstrated safety and potential efficacy. In this chapter, we will review the mechanism of ascorbate-induced cytotoxicity, examine the use of pharmacological ascorbate in treatment and assess the current data supporting its potential as an adjuvant in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26201606

  10. Methodological innovations expand the safety pharmacology horizon.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, M K; Curtis, M J

    2012-09-01

    Almost uniquely in pharmacology, drug safety assessment is driven by the need for elaboration and validation of methods for detecting drug actions. This is the 9th consecutive year that the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM) has published themed issues arising from the annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS). The SPS is now past its 10th year as a distinct (from pharmacology to toxicology) discipline that integrates safety pharmacologists from industry with those in academia and the various global regulatory authorities. The themes of the 2011 meeting were (i) the bridging of safety assessment of a new chemical entity (NCE) between all the parties involved, (ii) applied technologies and (iii) translation. This issue of JPTM reflects these themes. The content is informed by the regulatory guidance documents (S7A and S7B) that apply prior to first in human (FIH) studies, which emphasize the importance of seeking model validation. The manuscripts encompass a broad spectrum of safety pharmacology topics including application of state-of-the-art techniques for study conduct and data processing and evaluation. This includes some exciting novel integrated core battery study designs, refinements in hemodynamic assessment, arrhythmia analysis algorithms, and additionally an overview of safety immunopharmacology, and a brief survey discussing similarities and differences in business models that pharmaceutical companies employ in safety pharmacology, together with SPS recommendations on 'best practice' for the conduct of a non-clinical cardiovascular assessment of a NCE.

  11. The pharmacology of topical analgesics.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L

    2013-07-01

    Pain management of patients continues to pose challenges to clinicians. Given the multiple dimensions of pain--whether acute or chronic, mild, moderate, or severe, nociceptive or neuropathic--a multimodal approach may be needed. Fortunately, clinicians have an array of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment choices; however, each modality must be chosen carefully, because some often used oral agents are associated with safety and tolerability issues that restrict their use in certain patients. In particular, orally administered nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, opioids, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are known to cause systemic adverse effects in some patients. To address this problem, a number of topical therapies in various therapeutic classes have been developed to reduce systemic exposure and minimize the risks of patients developing adverse events. For example, topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug formulations produce a site-specific effect (ie, cyclo-oxygenase inhibition) while decreasing the systemic exposure that may lead to undesired effects in patients. Similarly, derivatives of acetylsalicylic acid (ie, salicylates) are used in topical analgesic formulations that do not significantly enter the patient's systemic circulation. Salicylates, along with capsaicin, menthol, and camphor, compose the counterirritant class of topical analgesics, which produce analgesia by activating and then desensitizing epidermal nociceptors. Additionally, patches and creams that contain the local anesthetic lidocaine, alone or co-formulated with other local anesthetics, are also used to manage patients with select acute and chronic pain states. Perhaps the most common topical analgesic modality is the cautious application of cutaneous cold and heat. Such treatments may decrease pain not by reaching the target tissue through systemic distribution, but by acting more directly on the affected tissue. Despite the tolerability benefits associated with avoiding

  12. Finding a VOICE for UK clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2012-06-01

    At a James Black Conference held in Oxford on 20-22 June 2011, a group of senior clinical pharmacologists and their junior colleagues, other medical specialists, and pharmacists discussed an agenda for UK clinical pharmacology for the next 5 years, addressing the following broad questions. How should UK clinical pharmacology be further developed and delivered as a discipline in universities, the NHS, pharmaceutical companies, and regulatory authorities? How should teaching and training in UK clinical pharmacology and therapeutics be delivered and assessed? What topics should be priorities for research in UK academic clinical pharmacology? How should clinical pharmacology contribute to UK drugs policy? How should pharmacology and clinical pharmacology be further integrated, to the benefit of both? Numerous recommendations emerged, under the collective acronym VOICE, standing for Visibility, Outreach, Integration, Coverage and Emissaries. VISIBILITY: The visibility of the discipline needs to be increased. This could be done, for example, by increased activities in acute general medicine/toxicology, through activities of Medicines and Therapeutics Committees, participation in grand rounds, teaching and training, and monitoring therapeutic interventions, and by offering bolt-on training for other specialists (for example, short courses, MSc courses, and training programmes). OUTREACH: Methods of increasing outreach include roadshows in schools/medical schools, national special study modules, public education, press coverage, and social marketing. INTEGRATION: Closer collaborations with pharmacologists, clinical pharmacists, other prescribers, and pharmaceutical companies (e.g. through joint training programmes) are desirable. COVERAGE: Attention to neglected areas, such as general practice, paediatrics, obstetrics, geriatrics, anaesthetics, cancer, and immunology. EMISSARIES: Trainees to spread the word. PMID:22360150

  13. Finding a VOICE for UK clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2012-06-01

    At a James Black Conference held in Oxford on 20-22 June 2011, a group of senior clinical pharmacologists and their junior colleagues, other medical specialists, and pharmacists discussed an agenda for UK clinical pharmacology for the next 5 years, addressing the following broad questions. How should UK clinical pharmacology be further developed and delivered as a discipline in universities, the NHS, pharmaceutical companies, and regulatory authorities? How should teaching and training in UK clinical pharmacology and therapeutics be delivered and assessed? What topics should be priorities for research in UK academic clinical pharmacology? How should clinical pharmacology contribute to UK drugs policy? How should pharmacology and clinical pharmacology be further integrated, to the benefit of both? Numerous recommendations emerged, under the collective acronym VOICE, standing for Visibility, Outreach, Integration, Coverage and Emissaries. VISIBILITY: The visibility of the discipline needs to be increased. This could be done, for example, by increased activities in acute general medicine/toxicology, through activities of Medicines and Therapeutics Committees, participation in grand rounds, teaching and training, and monitoring therapeutic interventions, and by offering bolt-on training for other specialists (for example, short courses, MSc courses, and training programmes). OUTREACH: Methods of increasing outreach include roadshows in schools/medical schools, national special study modules, public education, press coverage, and social marketing. INTEGRATION: Closer collaborations with pharmacologists, clinical pharmacists, other prescribers, and pharmaceutical companies (e.g. through joint training programmes) are desirable. COVERAGE: Attention to neglected areas, such as general practice, paediatrics, obstetrics, geriatrics, anaesthetics, cancer, and immunology. EMISSARIES: Trainees to spread the word.

  14. Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers - Current Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Kumar, Kuldip; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2015-07-01

    Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in thinking, knowing, remembering, judging, and problem solving. Cognitive dysfunctions are an integral part of neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in healthy ageing. Cognitive Enhancers are molecules that help improve aspects of cognition like memory, intelligence, motivation, attention and concentration. Recently, Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers have gained popularity as effective and safe alternative to various established drugs. Many of these Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers seem to be more efficacious compared to currently available Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers. This review describes and summarizes evidence on various Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers such as physical exercise, sleep, meditation and yoga, spirituality, nutrients, computer training, brain stimulation, and music. We also discuss their role in ageing and different neuro-psychiatric disorders, and current status of Cochrane database recommendations. We searched the Pubmed database for the articles and reviews having the terms 'non pharmacological and cognitive' in the title, published from 2000 till 2014. A total of 11 results displayed, out of which 10 were relevant to the review. These were selected and reviewed. Appropriate cross-references within the articles along with Cochrane reviews were also considered and studied. PMID:26393186

  15. Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers – Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kuldip; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in thinking, knowing, remembering, judging, and problem solving. Cognitive dysfunctions are an integral part of neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in healthy ageing. Cognitive Enhancers are molecules that help improve aspects of cognition like memory, intelligence, motivation, attention and concentration. Recently, Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers have gained popularity as effective and safe alternative to various established drugs. Many of these Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers seem to be more efficacious compared to currently available Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers. This review describes and summarizes evidence on various Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers such as physical exercise, sleep, meditation and yoga, spirituality, nutrients, computer training, brain stimulation, and music. We also discuss their role in ageing and different neuro-psychiatric disorders, and current status of Cochrane database recommendations. We searched the Pubmed database for the articles and reviews having the terms ‘non pharmacological and cognitive’ in the title, published from 2000 till 2014. A total of 11 results displayed, out of which 10 were relevant to the review. These were selected and reviewed. Appropriate cross-references within the articles along with Cochrane reviews were also considered and studied. PMID:26393186

  16. Investigational pharmacology for low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Avinash K; Chimes, Gary P; Malanga, Gerard A

    2010-01-01

    Study design: Review and reinterpretation of existing literature. Objective: This review article summarizes the anatomy and pathogenesis of disease processes that contribute to low back pain, and discusses key issues in existing therapies for chronic low back pain. The article also explains the scientific rationale for investigational pharmacology and highlights emerging compounds in late development. Results/conclusion: While the diverse and complex nature of chronic low back pain continues to challenge clinicians, a growing understanding of chronic low back pain on a cellular level has refined our approach to managing chronic low back pain with pharmacology. Many emerging therapies with improved safety profiles are currently in the research pipeline and will contribute to a multimodal therapeutic algorithm in the near future. With the heterogeneity of the patient population suffering from chronic low back pain, the clinical challenge will be accurately stratifying the optimal pharmacologic approach for each patient. PMID:21197321

  17. [Recent advances in pharmacological intervention for prediabetes].

    PubMed

    Lan, Jia-qi; Zhu, Chuan-jiang

    2015-12-01

    Prediabetes is an abnormal condition between normal glucose metabolism and diabetes mellitus. Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is an indicator of high-risk state of prediabetes. Positive interventions of IGT, including life style changes and pharmacological intervention, can effectively postpone and reduce the development of prediabetes into type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggesting that IGT is a key point of diabetes prevention. Currently, pharmacological intervention for prediabetes is still at early stage. In this review, we summarizes recent clinical and preclinical studies on pharmacological intervention for prediabetes, and studies in the development of animal models with IGT and the application of new techniques. We also discuss the prospects of drugs for diabetes prevention, especially with the traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:27169278

  18. Towards a genealogy of pharmacological practice.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Ricardo; Ried, Nicolás

    2016-03-01

    Following Foucault's work on disciplinary power and biopolitics, this article maps an initial cartography of the research areas to be traced by a genealogy of pharmacological practice. Pharmacology, as a practical activity, refers to the creation, production and sale of drugs/medication. This work identifies five lines of research that, although often disconnected from each other, may be observed in the specialized literature: (1) pharmaceuticalization; (2) regulation of the pharmaceutical industry; (3) the political-economic structure of the pharmaceutical industry; (4) consumption/consumerism of medications; (5) and bio-knowledge. The article suggests that a systematic analysis of these areas leads one to consider pharmacological practice a sui generis apparatus of power, which reaches beyond the purely disciplinary and biopolitical levels to encompass molecular configurations, thereby giving rise not only to new types of government over life, but also to new struggles for life, extending from molecular to population-wide levels. PMID:25956710

  19. Novel pharmacological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, which represents a major cost to healthcare services. Current pharmacological treatment includes fibre supplements, antispasmodics, laxatives, loperamide and antidepressants. This article reviews the novel pharmacological treatments already or recently approved for patients with IBS-C (lubiprostone, linaclotide) and IBS-D (alosetron, ramosetron, rifaximin, eluxadoline). Furthermore, results for drugs in development (plecanatide, ibudutant and ebastine) or used in chronic constipation or for other indications, with potential application in IBS (prucalopride, elobixibat, mesalazine, ondansetron and colesevelam) are also reviewed. PMID:26907518

  20. Ginsenoside Re: pharmacological effects on cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lu; Sun, Shi; Xie, Lai-Hua; Wicks, Sheila M; Xie, Jing-Tian

    2012-08-01

    Ginsenosides are the bioactive constituents of ginseng, a key herb in traditional Chinese medicine. As a single component of ginseng, ginsenoside Re (G-Re) belongs to the panaxatriol group. Many reports demonstrated that G-Re possesses the multifaceted beneficial pharmacological effects on cardiovascular system. G-Re has negative effect on cardiac contractility and autorhythmicity. It causes alternations in cardiac electrophysiological properties, which may account for its antiarrhythmic effect. In addition, G-Re also exerts antiischemic effect and induces angiogenic regeneration. In this review, we first outline the chemistry and the pharmacological effects of G-Re on the cardiovascular system.

  1. Pharmacologic issues in management of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    DeSevo, Gina; Klootwyk, Jacqueline

    2012-06-01

    A significant portion of the adult population uses one or more medications on a regular basis to manage chronic conditions. As the number of medications that patients are prescribed increases, an increase in pharmacologic-related issues and complications may occur, such as polypharmacy, inappropriate prescribing, medication nonadherence and nonpersistence, and adverse drug reactions and events. Risk factors and consequences of these issues have been identified and are discussed in this article. In addition, a review is presented of the numerous methods that have been evaluated to help prevent and minimize these pharmacologic issues in the management of chronic disease.

  2. Rhein: A Review of Pharmacological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Xi; Xia, Wei; Yue, Wei; Peng, Cheng; Rahman, Khalid; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Rhein (4, 5-dihydroxyanthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid) is a lipophilic anthraquinone extensively found in medicinal herbs, such as Rheum palmatum L., Cassia tora L., Polygonum multiflorum Thunb., and Aloe barbadensis Miller, which have been used medicinally in China for more than 1,000 years. Its biological activities related to human health are being explored actively. Emerging evidence suggests that rhein has many pharmacological effects, including hepatoprotective, nephroprotective, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, and antimicrobial activities. The present review provides a comprehensive summary and analysis of the pharmacological properties of rhein, supporting the potential uses of rhein as a medicinal agent. PMID:26185519

  3. Strychnos potatorum: Phytochemical and pharmacological review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Kavita N.; Kadam, Prasad V.; Patel, Jigna A.; Patil, Manohar J.

    2014-01-01

    In traditional system of medicine, the seeds of Strychnos potatorum Linn. (family: Loganiaceae) are used in the treatment of gonorrhea, leukorrhea leukeorrhea, gastropathy, bronchitis, chronic diarrhea, dysentery, renal and vesicle calculi, diabetes, conjunctivitis, scleritis, ulcers and other eye disease. An attempt has been made to highlight this medicinal seeds through phytochemical and pharmacological study. The present review deals with the phytochemical and pharmacological screening of therapeutic importance from Strychnos potatorum L., an important medicinal plant. This study includes the collective information of different medicinal uses of Strychnos potatorum. The generated data has provided the basis for its wide use as the therapeutant both in the traditional and folk medicines. PMID:24600197

  4. Pharmacological Treatment Effects on Eye Movement Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James L.; Lencer, Rebekka; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Keedy, Sarah; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing use of eye movement paradigms to assess the functional integrity of brain systems involved in sensorimotor and cognitive processing in clinical disorders requires greater attention to effects of pharmacological treatments on these systems. This is needed to better differentiate disease and medication effects in clinical samples, to…

  5. [Multimedia methods for the teaching of pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, G

    2001-01-01

    Pharmacology is by definition a subject of integration. Students take on a passive role during the learning process and do not count with image aids that could foster understanding, fixation and evocation. Therefore, a hypermedia pharmacology CD ROM program was developed. Such a program includes the following features: hypertext format set up as a network of nodes and arcs, multimedia technology, highly interactive and customized navigation. The prototype thoroughly develops cholinergic neurotransmission pharmacology in its historical, anatomic, physiological, biochemical, pharmacological and therapeutic aspects. The program is divided into three modules; namely, information, exercises and evaluation. Each network node may contain a text, hypertext, images, 3D animation and experimental videos. Information resources include the navigation conceptual map for the chosen node, a track record to go back or forward immediately, the possibility of adding text or images, a text search function, images, animation and videos to find such objects in the different nodes together with the possibility of printing any of the contents. Apart from the information framework, the model has manifold useful integration exercises to assess the learning improvement and prompt the student accordingly to review the topic whenever mistakes exceed a certain amount. This program promotes knowledge integration and building through association of contents. To access to the program's demo, consult the following page.

  6. Clinical pharmacology of old age syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, C; Wilson, K C M; Kinirons, M T; Wagg, A; Dhesi, J K

    2003-01-01

    Several syndromes occur in old age. They are often associated with increased mortality and in all there is a paucity of basic and clinical research. The recent developments in the clinical pharmacology of three common syndromes of old age (delirium, urinary incontinence, and falls) are discussed along with directions for future research. PMID:12919174

  7. The parallel evolution of immunology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Conti, A A

    2010-01-01

    Immunology is the systematic evaluation of the means through which human beings protect themselves and respond to the attack of internal and external agents, and Edward Jenner (1749-1823) and Louis Pasteur (1822-1895) are considered pioneers of this field. Jenner observed the protective effect of cowpox against smallpox and inoculated the cowpox in human beings to protect them from the often lethal smallpox. Pasteur developed in his laboratory a vaccine against rabies and elaborated methods for attenuating the virulence of pathogenic microorganisms while maintaining their immunogenicity. Pharmacology is the area of medical science dealing with drugs and their uses, and it was during the nineteenth century that it assumed its status of scientific specialty, mainly in German-speaking Europe, through the establishment of pharmacological institutes and dedicated laboratories. The discovery and the synthesis of drugs and the systematic evaluation of their activity have constituted through time a scientific field in which immunology and pharmacology have met and given origin to notable progress in the history of science. The development of chemotherapy, as well as of organ and tissue transplantation, in the twentieth century has been decisively promoted by both immunology and pharmacology. In the last three decades the relationship between these two scientific branches has become increasingly closer in basic research, clinical science, medical education and also editorial scientific activity, as documented by the Journal hosting this paper. PMID:20646363

  8. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level.

  9. New approaches to pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis has been recognized as a major public health problem for less than two decades. The increasing incidence of fragility fractures, such as vertebral, hip, and wrist fractures, first became apparent from epidemiological studies in the early and mid-1980s, when effective treatment was virtually unavailable. Pharmacological therapies that effectively reduce the number of fractures by improving bone mass are now available widely in countries around the world. Most current agents inhibit bone loss by reducing bone resorption, but emerging therapies may increase bone mass by directly promoting bone formation--as is the case with parathyroid hormone. Current treatment alternatives include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and selective estrogen receptor modulators, but sufficient calcium and vitamin D are a prerequisite. The availability of evidence-based data that show reductions in the incidence of fractures of 30-50% during treatment has been a major step forward in the pharmacological prevention of fractures. With all agents, fracture reduction is most pronounced for vertebral fracture in high-risk individuals; alendronate and risedronate also may protect against hip fracture in the elderly. New approaches to pharmacological treatment will include further development of existing drugs, especially with regard to tolerance and frequency of dosing. New avenues for targeting the condition will emerge as our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of bone remodelling increases, although issues of tissue specificity may be difficult to solve. In the long term, information gained through knowledge of bone genetics may be used to adapt pharmacological treatments more precisely to each individual. PMID:14710507

  10. [Non-pharmacologic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Curković, Bozidar

    2010-01-01

    Non-pharmacologic interventions are the part of comprehensive therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, proposed by all guidelines and recommendations. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have pain, limited joint mobility, and impaired quality of life. Physical modalities are prescribed exactly with idea to diminish pain, iprove joint mobility and quality of life. Physical procedures are generally safe and well tolerated.

  11. Pharmacological Interventions for Students with ADD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Vance L.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the research on pharmacological interventions for students with attention deficit disorder finds that psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (Ritalin) are effective in improving focus and impulse control, but should be used in conjunction with psychosocial and behavioral interventions. Comprehensive medical screenings and guidelines…

  12. Disrupting Reconsolidation: Pharmacological and Behavioral Manipulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soeter, Marieke; Kindt, Merel

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that disrupting reconsolidation by pharmacological manipulations "deleted" the emotional expression of a fear memory in humans. If we are to target reconsolidation in patients with anxiety disorders, the disruption of reconsolidation should produce content-limited modifications. At the same time, the fear-erasing effects…

  13. Systems Pharmacology in Small Molecular Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yonghua; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery is a risky, costly and time-consuming process depending on multidisciplinary methods to create safe and effective medicines. Although considerable progress has been made by high-throughput screening methods in drug design, the cost of developing contemporary approved drugs did not match that in the past decade. The major reason is the late-stage clinical failures in Phases II and III because of the complicated interactions between drug-specific, human body and environmental aspects affecting the safety and efficacy of a drug. There is a growing hope that systems-level consideration may provide a new perspective to overcome such current difficulties of drug discovery and development. The systems pharmacology method emerged as a holistic approach and has attracted more and more attention recently. The applications of systems pharmacology not only provide the pharmacodynamic evaluation and target identification of drug molecules, but also give a systems-level of understanding the interaction mechanism between drugs and complex disease. Therefore, the present review is an attempt to introduce how holistic systems pharmacology that integrated in silico ADME/T (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), target fishing and network pharmacology facilitates the discovery of small molecular drugs at the system level. PMID:26901192

  14. Pharmacology and function of melatonin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-09-01

    The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily from the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone, through an action in the brain, appears to be involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes that are cued by the daily change in photoperiod. This article reviews the pharmacological characteristics and function of melatonin receptors in the central nervous system, and the role of melatonin in mediating physiological functions in mammals. Melatonin and melatonin agonists, at picomolar concentrations, inhibit the release of dopamine from retina through activation of a site that is pharmacologically different from a serotonin receptor. These inhibitory effects are antagonized by the novel melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole (N-0774), which suggests that melatonin activates a presynaptic melatonin receptor. In chicken and rabbit retina, the pharmacological characteristics of the presynaptic melatonin receptor and the site labeled by 2-(125I)iodomelatonin are identical. It is proposed that 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding sites (e.g., chicken brain) that possess the pharmacological characteristics of the retinal melatonin receptor site (order of affinities: 2-iodomelatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-di-chloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than or equal to luzindole greater than N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine greater than 5-methoxytryptamine much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine) be classified as ML-1 (melatonin 1). The 2-(125I)iodomelatonin binding site of hamster brain membranes possesses different binding and pharmacological characteristics from the retinal melatonin receptor site and should be classified as ML-2. 64 references.

  15. Pharmacological profile of novel psychoactive benzofurans

    PubMed Central

    Rickli, Anna; Kopf, Simone; Hoener, Marius C; Liechti, Matthias E

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Benzofurans are newly used psychoactive substances, but their pharmacology is unknown. The aim of the present study was to pharmacologically characterize benzofurans in vitro. Experimental Approach We assessed the effects of the benzofurans 5-APB, 5-APDB, 6-APB, 6-APDB, 4-APB, 7-APB, 5-EAPB and 5-MAPDB and benzodifuran 2C-B-FLY on the human noradrenaline (NA), dopamine and 5-HT uptake transporters using HEK 293 cells that express the respective transporters. We also investigated the release of NA, dopamine and 5-HT from monoamine-preloaded cells, monoamine receptor-binding affinity and 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B receptor activation. Key Results All of the benzofurans inhibited NA and 5-HT uptake more than dopamine uptake, similar to methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and unlike methamphetamine. All of the benzofurans also released monoamines and interacted with trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TA1 receptor), similar to classic amphetamines. Most benzofurans were partial 5-HT2A receptor agonists similar to MDMA, but also 5-HT2B receptor agonists, unlike MDMA and methamphetamine. The benzodifuran 2C-B-FLY very potently interacted with 5-HT2 receptors and also bound to TA1 receptors. Conclusions and Implications Despite very similar structures, differences were found in the pharmacological profiles of different benzofurans and compared with their amphetamine analogues. Benzofurans acted as indirect monoamine agonists that interact with transporters similarly to MDMA. The benzofurans also interacted with 5-HT receptors. This pharmacological profile probably results in MDMA-like entactogenic psychoactive properties. However, benzofurans induce 5-HT2B receptor activation associated with heart valve fibrosis. The pharmacology of 2C-B-FLY indicates predominant hallucinogenic properties and a risk for vasoconstriction. PMID:25765500

  16. Relevance of Excitable Media Theory and Retinal Spreading Depression Experiments in Preclinical Pharmacological Research

    PubMed Central

    V.M, Fernandes de Lima; W, Hanke

    2014-01-01

    In preclinical neuropharmacological research, molecular, cell-based, and systems using animals are well established. On the tissue level the situation is less comfortable, although during the last decades some effort went into establishing such systems, i.e. using slices of the vertebrate brain together with optical and electrophysiological techniques. However, these methods are neither fast, nor can they be automated or upscaled. By contrast, the chicken retina can be used as a suitable model. It is easy accessible and can be kept alive in vitro for hours up to days. Due to its structure, in addition the retina displays remarkable intrinsic optical signals, which can be easily used in experiments. Also to electrophysiological methods the retina is well accessible. In excitable tissue, to which the brain and the retina belong, propagating excitation waves can be expected, and the spreading depression is such a phenomenon. It has been first observed in the forties of the last century. Later, Martins-Ferreira established it in the chicken retina (retinal spreading depression or RSD). The electrophysiological characteristics of it are identical with those of the cortical SD. The metabolic differences are known and can be taken into account. The experimental advantage of the RSD compared to the cortical SD is the pronounced intrinsic optical signal (IOS) associated with the travelling wave. This is due to the maximum transparency of retinal tissue in the functional state; thus any physiological event will change it markedly and therefore can be easily seen even by naked eye. The theory can explain wave spread in one (action potentials), two (RSDs) and three dimensions (one heart beat). In this review we present the experimental and the excitable media context for the data interpretation using as example the cholinergic pharmacology in relation to functional syndromes. We also discuss the intrinsic optical signal and how to use it in pre-clinical research. PMID:25426010

  17. Publication trends in Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology: focus on pharmacology in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Michel, Martin C

    2013-11-01

    In a previous analysis of the country of origin of papers published in Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, a major shift toward contributions from emerging market countries, was noticed in comparison of 2010 to 2001 publications. Repeating such analysis for 2012 publications in the journal confirmed this trend. An interesting new trend was the emerging presence of papers from a variety of Islamic countries including Egypt. Based on this trend, we shortly review the history and current structure of pharmacology in Egypt. It appears that the presence of Egyptian pharmacology in international journals including pharmacology journals has sharply been increasing over the last two decades. Challenges for a continuation of this encouraging trend are being discussed.

  18. Effectiveness of Psychological and Pharmacological Treatments for Nocturnal Enuresis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houts, Arthur C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Assesses overall effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments, relative effectiveness of specific treatments, and moderators of treatment effectiveness for nocturnal enuretic children via quantitative integration of research. Findings confirm that more children benefit from psychological than from pharmacological interventions and…

  19. [Non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of arterial hypertension: current situation].

    PubMed

    Hoyer, J

    2012-11-01

    A permanent and successful treatment of high blood pressure is based on a combination of non-pharmacological treatment measures and pharmacological therapy. The most proven non-pharmacological measures are physical and sports activities, weight reduction, dietary adaption and reduction of salt intake as well as nicotine abstinence and moderate alcohol consumption. A blood pressure reducing effect of evidence grade A was demonstrated for these 4 pillars of non-pharmacological therapy in studies. For pharmacological treatment five main substance groups are available: thiazide diuretics, ACE inhibitors, AT1 blockers, calcium channel blockers and beta blockers. A very good blood pressure reducing effect with an advantageous side effect profile has been proven for all substances. The initial high blood pressure therapy can be carried out with monotherapy but therapy with several antihypertensives is often necessary for the very varied combination of compounds which are available in a meaningful combination and dosage of effective ingredients. For the treatment of comorbid hypertensive patients recommendations are available for an individualized pharmacological treatment corresponding to the specific cardiovascular risk and comorbidity. High blood pressure therapy must be continuously carried out over many years. For permanent success of the therapy good compliance is indispensible which can be encouraged by integration in the therapy and should be regularly controlled.

  20. A critical review of the pharmacology of the plant extract of Pygeum africanum in the treatment of LUTS.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Alan D; Levin, Robert; Constantinou, Christos E; Denis, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Despite an unremitting increase in the number of patients presenting symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), the viable treatment options remain relatively limited when compared to other disorders of aging. This has spurred an interest in so-called alternative medicines, many of which continue to be used in spite of the more recent emergence of rationally targeted therapies. Nonetheless, in the case of plant extracts, the vast majority of these have not been subjected to the same rigorous pre-clinical pharmacological testing and large-scale clinical trials now required by health authorities. Furthermore, demonstration of their clinical efficacy in BPH has been hindered by trials of limited duration with a high placebo response. Beginning with a preliminary demonstration of in vitro inhibition of growth factor-mediated fibroblast proliferation with Pygeum africanum extract, a detailed series of in vitro and in vivo studies on prostate growth and bladder function were undertaken. These studies, reviewed herein, have permitted the identification of putative molecular targets of Pygeum africanum extract affecting both growth factor-mediated prostate growth as well as specific parameters of bladder function. These results, corroborated in part by short-term clinical efficacy, set the stage for a large-scale clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of Pygeum africanum extract in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms.

  1. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  2. Preclinical toxicity evaluation of AAV for pain: evidence from human AAV studies and from the pharmacology of analgesic drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy with adeno-associated virus (AAV) has advanced in the last few years from promising results in animal models to >100 clinical trials (reported or under way). While vector availability was a substantial hurdle a decade ago, innovative new production methods now routinely match the scale of AAV doses required for clinical testing. These advances may become relevant to translational research in the chronic pain field. AAV for pain targeting the peripheral nervous system was proven to be efficacious in rodent models several years ago, but has not yet been tested in humans. The present review addresses the steps needed for translation of AAV for pain from the bench to the bedside focusing on pre-clinical toxicology. We break the potential toxicities into three conceptual categories of risk: First, risks related to the delivery procedure used to administer the vector. Second, risks related to AAV biology, i.e., effects of the vector itself that may occur independently of the transgene. Third, risks related to the effects of the therapeutic transgene. To identify potential toxicities, we consulted the existing evidence from AAV gene therapy for other nervous system disorders (animal toxicology and human studies) and from the clinical pharmacology of conventional analgesic drugs. Thereby, we identified required preclinical studies and charted a hypothetical path towards a future phase I/II clinical trial in the oncology-palliative care setting. PMID:25183392

  3. Future pharmacological treatments for substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Forray, Ariadna; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Substance use disorders represent a serious public health and social issue worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the addictive processes have led to the development of a growing number of pharmacological agents to treat addictions. Despite this progress, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for cocaine, methamphetamine and cannabis addiction. Moving treatment development to the next stage will require novel ways of approaching substance use disorders. One such novel approach is to target individual vulnerabilities, such as cognitive function, sex differences and psychiatric comorbidities. This review provides a summary of promising pharmacotherapies for alcohol, opiate, stimulant and nicotine addictions. Many medications that target positive and negative reinforcement of drugs, as well as individual vulnerabilities to addiction, are in different phases of development. Clinical trials testing the efficacy of these medications for substance use disorder are warranted. PMID:23039267

  4. Aripiprazole: from pharmacological profile to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Di Sciascio, Guido; Riva, Marco Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Clinical experience with aripiprazole has confirmed the effectiveness and the safety of this novel antipsychotic drug in patients with schizophrenia as well as for the treatment of mania in type I bipolar disorder. However the generalization of the results from clinical trials requires further effort in order to address some issues and to overcome incorrect and partial interpretation of the clinical evidence. This article provides some straightforward guidance that may help clinical psychiatrists to translate the mechanism of action of aripiprazole into clinical setting, thus improving the appropriate use of the drug through rational application of its pharmacological profile. Examples of paradigmatic clinical situations are presented and discussed, suggesting possible intervention strategies, which may contribute to achieving the most appropriate use of the pharmacological properties of aripiprazole in real life settings. PMID:26508859

  5. Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Carthamus tinctorius L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le-Le; Tian, Ke; Tang, Zheng-Hai; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Wang, Yi-Tao; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Carthamus tinctorius L. is a multifunctional cash crop. Its flowers and seeds are extensively used in traditional herbal medicine in China, Korea, Japan, and other Asian countries, for treating various ailments such as gynecological, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular diseases as well as blood stasis and osteoporosis. More than 100 compounds have been isolated and identified from C. tinctorius. Flavonoids and alkaloids, especially the quinochalcone c-glycoside hydroxysafflor yellow A, N-(p-Coumaroyl)serotonin, and N-feruloylserotonin, are responsible for most of the pharmacological activities of C. tinctorius. In this paper, comprehensive and up-to-date information on the phytochemistry and pharmacology of C. tinctorius is presented. This information will be helpful for further explorations of the therapeutic potential of C. tinctorius and may provide future research opportunities.

  6. Advances in Pediatric Pharmacology, Therapeutics, and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Paul, Ian M.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Significant advancements have been made in pediatric therapeutics and pharmacology over the last two years. In the United States, passage of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act has made the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act and Pediatric Research Equity Act permanent, and ensured that studies will be conducted in neonates. In Europe, the Pediatric Regulation, which went into effect in early 2007, has also provided a framework encouraging an expansion of pediatric research. Because of such regulatory involvement, a greater number of studies are being performed, and more pediatric dosing, efficacy, and safety information is being incorporated into product labels. The goal of this publication is to highlight important advancements made in the field of pediatric pharmacology, toxicology, and therapeutics from January 2012 to December 2013. PMID:25037123

  7. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  8. Pharmacological Therapy of Tachyarrhythmias During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yaksh, Ameeta; van der Does, Lisette JME; Lanters, Eva AH; de Groot, Natasja MS

    2016-01-01

    Tachyarrhythmias are the most frequently observed cardiac complications during pregnancy. The majority of these maternal and foetal arrhythmias are supraventricular tachyarrhythmias; ventricular tachyarrhythmias are rare. The use of anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) during pregnancy is challenging due to potential foetal teratogenic effects. Maintaining stable and effective therapeutic maternal drug levels is difficult due to haemodynamic and metabolic alterations. Pharmacological treatment of tachyarrhythmias is indicated in case of maternal haemodynamic instability or hydrops fetalis. Evidenc e regarding the efficacy and safety of AAD therapy during pregnancy is scarce and the choice of AAD should be based on individual risk assessments for both mother and foetus. This review outlines the current knowledge on the development of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy, the indications for and considerations of pharmacological treatment and its potential side-effects. PMID:27408722

  9. Systems pharmacology augments drug safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lorberbaum, T; Nasir, M; Keiser, M J; Vilar, S; Hripcsak, G; Tatonetti, N P

    2015-02-01

    Small molecule drugs are the foundation of modern medical practice, yet their use is limited by the onset of unexpected and severe adverse events (AEs). Regulatory agencies rely on postmarketing surveillance to monitor safety once drugs are approved for clinical use. Despite advances in pharmacovigilance methods that address issues of confounding bias, clinical data of AEs are inherently noisy. Systems pharmacology-the integration of systems biology and chemical genomics-can illuminate drug mechanisms of action. We hypothesize that these data can improve drug safety surveillance by highlighting drugs with a mechanistic connection to the target phenotype (enriching true positives) and filtering those that do not (depleting false positives). We present an algorithm, the modular assembly of drug safety subnetworks (MADSS), to combine systems pharmacology and pharmacovigilance data and significantly improve drug safety monitoring for four clinically relevant adverse drug reactions.

  10. Spectroscopic properties of pharmacologically active phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Bel'kov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Polozov, G. I.; Sorokin, V. L.; Ksendzova, G. A.

    2012-05-01

    The IR Fourier-transform spectra of pharmacologically active phenol molecules in solutions in CCl4 and in the crystalline state have been studied. Phenol derivatives with different directivities and different levels of pharmacological efficiency have been examined. Based on analysis of the IR spectra of screened phenols, the antimicrobial activity of phenols with free hydroxyl groups has been shown to be highest. The high antimicrobial activity of aminophenols is related to the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. For aminophenols that are active against herpesviruses, O-H...N hydrogen bonds are formed in molecules. The main characteristic of the high antiviral activity against A-type influenza is predominance of intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the O-H...O=C type in molecules. Sulfur-containing aminophenols, which manifest activity against HIV infection, are characterized by the occurrence of hydrogen bonds that involve the participation of the OH, NH, and SO2 groups.

  11. Future pharmacological treatments for substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Forray, Ariadna; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2014-02-01

    Substance use disorders represent a serious public health and social issue worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the addictive processes have led to the development of a growing number of pharmacological agents to treat addictions. Despite this progress, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for cocaine, methamphetamine and cannabis addiction. Moving treatment development to the next stage will require novel ways of approaching substance use disorders. One such novel approach is to target individual vulnerabilities, such as cognitive function, sex differences and psychiatric comorbidities. This review provides a summary of promising pharmacotherapies for alcohol, opiate, stimulant and nicotine addictions. Many medications that target positive and negative reinforcement of drugs, as well as individual vulnerabilities to addiction, are in different phases of development. Clinical trials testing the efficacy of these medications for substance use disorder are warranted.

  12. Physiology and pharmacology of myocardial preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Jacob

    2010-03-01

    Perioperative myocardial ischemia and infarction are not only major sources of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing surgery but also important causes of prolonged hospital stay and resource utilization. Ischemic and pharmacological preconditioning and postconditioning have been known for more than two decades to provide protection against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion and limit myocardial infarct size in many experimental animal models, as well as in clinical studies (1-3). This paper will review the physiology and pharmacology of ischemic and drug-induced preconditioning and postconditioning of the myocardium with special emphasis on the mechanisms by which volatile anesthetics provide myocardial protection. Insights gained from animal and clinical studies will be presented and reviewed and recommendations for the use of perioperative anesthetics and medications will be given.

  13. Pharmacological Therapy of Tachyarrhythmias During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yaksh, Ameeta; van der Does, Lisette Jme; Lanters, Eva Ah; de Groot, Natasja Ms

    2016-05-01

    Tachyarrhythmias are the most frequently observed cardiac complications during pregnancy. The majority of these maternal and foetal arrhythmias are supraventricular tachyarrhythmias; ventricular tachyarrhythmias are rare. The use of anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) during pregnancy is challenging due to potential foetal teratogenic effects. Maintaining stable and effective therapeutic maternal drug levels is difficult due to haemodynamic and metabolic alterations. Pharmacological treatment of tachyarrhythmias is indicated in case of maternal haemodynamic instability or hydrops fetalis. Evidenc e regarding the efficacy and safety of AAD therapy during pregnancy is scarce and the choice of AAD should be based on individual risk assessments for both mother and foetus. This review outlines the current knowledge on the development of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy, the indications for and considerations of pharmacological treatment and its potential side-effects. PMID:27408722

  14. Pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    None of the drugs currently available for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are able to reduce the progressive decline in lung function which is the hallmark of this disease. Smoking cessation is the only intervention that has proved effective. The current pharmacological treatment of COPD is symptomatic and is mainly based on bronchodilators, such as selective β2-adrenergic agonists (short- and long-acting), anticholinergics, theophylline, or a combination of these drugs. Glucocorticoids are not generally recommended for patients with stable mild to moderate COPD due to their lack of efficacy, side effects, and high costs. However, glucocorticoids are recommended for severe COPD and frequent exacerbations of COPD. New pharmacological strategies for COPD need to be developed because the current treatment is inadequate. PMID:18044097

  15. Evolving pharmacology of orphan GPCRs: IUPHAR Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Anthony P; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The award of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Robert Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka for their work on the structure and function of GPCRs, spanning a period of more than 20 years from the cloning of the human β2-adrenoceptor to determining the crystal structure of the same protein, has earned both researchers a much deserved place in the pantheon of major scientific discoveries. GPCRs comprise one of the largest families of proteins, controlling many major physiological processes and have been a major focus of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR) since its inception in 1987. We report here recent efforts by the British Pharmacological Society and NC-IUPHAR to define the endogenous ligands of ‘orphan’ GPCRs and to place authoritative and accessible information about these crucial therapeutic targets online. PMID:23957221

  16. Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Carthamus tinctorius L.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le-Le; Tian, Ke; Tang, Zheng-Hai; Chen, Xiao-Jia; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Wang, Yi-Tao; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Carthamus tinctorius L. is a multifunctional cash crop. Its flowers and seeds are extensively used in traditional herbal medicine in China, Korea, Japan, and other Asian countries, for treating various ailments such as gynecological, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular diseases as well as blood stasis and osteoporosis. More than 100 compounds have been isolated and identified from C. tinctorius. Flavonoids and alkaloids, especially the quinochalcone c-glycoside hydroxysafflor yellow A, N-(p-Coumaroyl)serotonin, and N-feruloylserotonin, are responsible for most of the pharmacological activities of C. tinctorius. In this paper, comprehensive and up-to-date information on the phytochemistry and pharmacology of C. tinctorius is presented. This information will be helpful for further explorations of the therapeutic potential of C. tinctorius and may provide future research opportunities. PMID:27080938

  17. Chemical and pharmacological profiles of Echinacea complex.

    PubMed

    Capek, Peter; Šutovská, Martina; Kocmálová, Michaela; Fraňová, Soňa; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Gancarz, Roman

    2015-08-01

    Echinacea purpurea has a long history in traditional medicine. To verify the pharmacological efficacy of active principles, a polysaccharide-phenolic-protein complex has been isolated from flowering parts of herb by alkaline extraction. It showed on GPC and HPLC one peak of molecular mass around 10 kDa. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses revealed carbohydrate, phenolic and protein contents in Echinacea complex. Pharmacological tests have shown its marked cough suppressing and bronchodilatory effects. The antitussive effect of Echinacea was similar to the narcotic drug codeine and the bronchodilatory effect was more significant than salbutamol, the antiasthmatic drug used in a clinical practice. Pharmacodynamic study shows the beneficial effects of Echinacea complex on the respiratory system and highlights the great potential for development of antitussive and bronchodilatory drugs from natural sources.

  18. Non-pharmacological factors in drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Hartnoll, R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the relevance of laboratory models of drug abuse to drug taking in human societies, and discusses their significance relative to other explanatory frameworks. It argues that self-administration models are poor predictors of the prevalence of drug taking, and offer an inadequate basis for both explanation and intervention. Non-pharmacological factors that may be of greater importance derive from social perspectives (notably economic and market factors, socio-economic conditions, and cultural and subcultural processes) and psychological approaches (individual, social learning, cognitive and developmental). It is concluded that drug abuse should be understood within the same framework of explanation as other human behaviour and sentiment, having major cultural, social and cognitive dimensions as well as the strictly behavioural and pharmacological.

  19. Systems pharmacology augments drug safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Lorberbaum, T; Nasir, M; Keiser, M J; Vilar, S; Hripcsak, G; Tatonetti, N P

    2015-02-01

    Small molecule drugs are the foundation of modern medical practice, yet their use is limited by the onset of unexpected and severe adverse events (AEs). Regulatory agencies rely on postmarketing surveillance to monitor safety once drugs are approved for clinical use. Despite advances in pharmacovigilance methods that address issues of confounding bias, clinical data of AEs are inherently noisy. Systems pharmacology-the integration of systems biology and chemical genomics-can illuminate drug mechanisms of action. We hypothesize that these data can improve drug safety surveillance by highlighting drugs with a mechanistic connection to the target phenotype (enriching true positives) and filtering those that do not (depleting false positives). We present an algorithm, the modular assembly of drug safety subnetworks (MADSS), to combine systems pharmacology and pharmacovigilance data and significantly improve drug safety monitoring for four clinically relevant adverse drug reactions. PMID:25670520

  20. Pharmacological correction of misfolding of ABC proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Rudashevskaya, Elena L.; Stockner, Thomas; Trauner, Michael; Freissmuth, Michael; Chiba, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control system distinguishes between correctly and incorrectly folded proteins to prevent processing of aberrantly folded conformations along the secretory pathway. Non-synonymous mutations can lead to misfolding of ABC proteins and associated disease phenotypes. Specific phenotypes may at least partially be corrected by small molecules, so-called pharmacological chaperones. Screening for folding correctors is expected to open an avenue for treatment of diseases such as cystic fibrosis and intrahepatic cholestasis. PMID:25027379

  1. [Pharmacological treatment of vascular cognitive impairment].

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek

    2006-01-01

    Vascular dementia is second most common cause of dementia. The paper highlights the most important trends in pharmacological treatment of vascular dementia. Result of a clinical trial of some agents appears to be promising. Pentoxifyline appears to be useful in multi-infarct vascular dementia. Nimodipine produced improvement in subcortical dementia. Some other agents like ginkgo biloba, acetylocholinesterase inhibitors, memantine and other also have shown mild benefit or at least were associated with some stabilization of dementia. PMID:16969897

  2. The mass action equation in pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, Terry

    2016-01-01

    The mass action equation is the building block from which all models of drug-receptor interaction are built. In the simplest case, the equation predicts a sigmoidal relationship between the amount of drug-receptor complex and the logarithm of the concentration of drug. The form of this function is also the same as most dose-response relationships in pharmacology (such as enzyme inhibition and the protein binding of drugs) but the potency term in dose-response relationships very often differs in meaning from the similar term in the simple mass action relationship. This is because (i) most pharmacological systems are collections of mass action reactions in series and/or in parallel and (ii) the important assumptions in the mass action reaction are violated in complex pharmacological systems. In some systems, the affinity of the receptor R for some ligand A is modified by interaction of the receptor with the allosteric ligand B and concomitantly the affinity of the receptor for ligand B is modified to the same degree. When this occurs, the observed affinity of the ligand A for the receptor will depend on both the concentration of the co-binding allosteric ligand and its nature. The relationships between drug potency in pharmacological models and the equilibrium dissociation constants defined in single mass action reactions are discussed. More detailed knowledge of efficacy has led to new models of drug action that depend on the relative probabilities of different states, and these have taken knowledge of drug-receptor interactions beyond Guldberg and Waage.

  3. Opiate Pharmacology and Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids remain the mainstay of severe pain management in patients with cancer. The hallmark of pain management is individualization of therapy. Although almost all clinically used drugs act through mu opioid receptors, they display subtle but important differences pharmacologically. Furthermore, not all patients respond equally well to all drugs. Evidence suggests that these variable responses among patients have a biologic basis and are likely to involve both biased agonism and the many mu opioid receptor subtypes that have been cloned. PMID:24799496

  4. Cocaine and "pharmacological kindling" in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stripling, J S

    1983-11-01

    The concept of "pharmacological kindling" has been used to explain the behavioral sensitization to cocaine produced by repeated administration of subconvulsive doses. This idea was tested by the repeated administration of cocaine to rats followed by electrical kindling of the olfactory bulb (a site at which cocaine has prominent electrophysiologic effects). No significant effect of cocaine on kindling was found. The relationship of this finding to studies using other drugs is discussed.

  5. Non-pharmacological biological therapies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gazdag, Gabor; Ungvari, Gabor S

    2011-12-01

    Non-pharmacological biological therapies of schizophrenia have dramatically developed over the last eight decades. Starting from a historical perspective authors aim to give an overview about the development of convulsive therapy. Recommendations of the most influential guidelines and the controversies in the worldwide clinical practice are discussed and clinical conditions responsive to electroconvulsive therapy are reviewed. Finally, the place of the new neurostimulation techniques, particularly TMS is outlined.

  6. Pharmacological correction of misfolding of ABC proteins.

    PubMed

    Rudashevskaya, Elena L; Stockner, Thomas; Trauner, Michael; Freissmuth, Michael; Chiba, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control system distinguishes between correctly and incorrectly folded proteins to prevent processing of aberrantly folded conformations along the secretory pathway. Non-synonymous mutations can lead to misfolding of ABC proteins and associated disease phenotypes. Specific phenotypes may at least partially be corrected by small molecules, so-called pharmacological chaperones. Screening for folding correctors is expected to open an avenue for treatment of diseases such as cystic fibrosis and intrahepatic cholestasis. PMID:25027379

  7. Pharmacological treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Ajel, Khalil I; Garner, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is common in community and clinical settings. The individual and societal burden associated with GAD is substantial, but many of those who could benefit from treatment are not recognized or treated. Recent evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of patients with GAD have recommended initial treatment with either a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), on the basis of their proven efficacy and reasonable tolerability in randomized placebo-controlled trials. However, there is much room for improvement in both the efficacy and the tolerability of treatment. Response rates to first-line treatment can be disappointing and it is hard to predict reliably which patients will respond well and which will have only a limited treatment response. Many patients worry about becoming dependent on medication, a substantial proportion experience troublesome adverse effects, and these problems limit the effectiveness of pharmacological treatments in clinical practice. The relative lack of longitudinal studies of clinical outcomes in GAD, and the small number of placebo-controlled relapse prevention studies lead to uncertainty about the optimal duration of treatment after a satisfactory initial response. There have been few investigations of the further management of patients who have not responded to first-line treatment and there is a pressing need for further augmentation studies in patients who have not responded to an SSRI or SNRI, or to other initial pharmacological approaches. Future treatment guidelines for GAD will be influenced by emerging data for established and novel pharmacological approaches, and possibly through the more accurate identification of certain patient subgroups who are likely to respond preferentially to particular interventions.

  8. SOME PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDIES ON CARDIOSPERMUM HALICACABUM LINN

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, N. R.; Vijayamma, N.

    1985-01-01

    Cardiospermum halicacabum used in Ayurveda has been investigated for various pharmacological actions in a number of experimental animal models. On central nervous system the decoction of the plant showed sedative effect. It exhibited significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. The drug also showed vasadepressant activity which is considered to be transcient in nature. In vitro studies also revealed its antispasmodic effect. These findigns are in support of its use in Ayurvedic medicine. PMID:22557496

  9. [PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF NANOMATERIALS].

    PubMed

    Chekman, I S

    2015-01-01

    Literature data and results of our department studies on theoretical and practical basics of nanoscience were summarized in the article. Much attention is paid to research in the field of physical, chemical, biological, medical, physiological, pharmacological, and toxicological properties of nanomaterials with the aim of their wider implementation into practice lately. The discovery of new quantum/wave properties of nanoparticles is of particular importance. The author of the article advances an idea: wave properties of nanomaterials play greater role with a decrease in particle size. The preponderance of wave properties compared with corpuscular ones in nanostructures determines a great change in their physical. chemical properties and an increase in physical, mechanical biological, physiological, pharmacological, and toxicologica activity. The idea advanced in the article hasn't been verified by theoretical or experimental studies for now. Joined efforts of scientists of different scientific fields are needed. A confirmation of hypothesis by specific findings will be of great importance for physiology, medicine, pharmacology and promote an implementation of new efficacious preparations into clinical practice. New fundamental discoveries could be made only by multidisciplinary approach.

  10. Inflammation and Pharmacological Treatment in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kaštelan, Snježana; Tomić, Martina; Gverović Antunica, Antonela; Salopek Rabatić, Jasminka; Ljubić, Spomenka

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is estimated to be the leading cause of new blindness in the working population of developed countries. Primary interventions such as intensive glycemic control, strict blood pressure regulation, and lipid-modifying therapy as well as local ocular treatment (laser photocoagulation and pars plana vitrectomy) can significantly reduce the risk of retinopathy occurrence and progression. Considering the limitations of current DR treatments development of new therapeutic strategies, it becomes necessary to focus on pharmacological treatment. Currently, there is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes have a considerable role in the pathogenesis of DR with multiple studies showing an association of various systemic as well as local (vitreous and aqueous fluid) inflammatory factors and the progression of DR. Since inflammation is identified as a relevant mechanism, significant effort has been directed to the development of new concepts for the prevention and treatment of DR acting on the inflammatory processes and the use of pharmacological agents with anti-inflammatory effect. Inhibiting the inflammatory pathway could be an appealing treatment option for DR in future practices, and as further prospective randomized clinical trials accumulate data, the role and guidelines of anti-inflammatory pharmacologic treatments will become clearer. PMID:24288441

  11. Pharmacological Management of Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Yasir Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Background. Soft esophageal bolus impaction is an emergency that requires skilled endoscopic removal if persistent obstructive symptoms do not resolve spontaneously after careful observation. Expedited care of these patients is crucial to avoid respiratory and mechanical complications. Other possible options for management include medical agents used to manage it prior to performing endoscopy if access to endoscopy was not available or declined by the patient. Aim. To review the available pharmacological and other nonmedicinal options and their mechanism of relief for soft esophageal impaction. Method. Pubmed, Medline and Ovid were used for search of MESH terms pertinent including “foreign body, esophageal, esophageal bolus and medical” for pharmacological and non medicinial agents used for management of esophageal soft bolus impaction as well as manual review of the cross-references. Results. Several agents were identified including Buscopan, Glucagon, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and papaveretum. Non medicinal agents are water, effervescent agents, and papain. No evidence was found to suggest preference or effectiveness of use of a certain pharmacological agent compared to others. Buscopan, Glucagon, benzodiazepines, and nitrates were studied extensively and may be used in selected patients with caution. Use of papain is obsolete in management of soft bolus impaction. PMID:23738071

  12. Pharmacological enhancement of fear reduction: preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Bronwyn M; Langton, Julia M; Richardson, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety disorders have a high prevalence, and despite the substantial advances in the psychological treatment of anxiety, relapse is still a common problem. One approach to improving existing psychological treatments for anxiety has been to develop pharmacological agents that can be used to enhance the processes underlying exposure therapy, which is the most commonly used and empirically validated psychological treatment for anxiety during which individuals are taught to appropriately inhibit fear. Animal models of exposure therapy, particularly fear extinction, have proved to be a very useful way of examining the neural and molecular correlates of fear inhibition, which has in turn led to the identification of numerous drugs that enhance these processes in rats. Several of these drugs have subsequently been tested as novel pharmacological adjuncts to exposure therapy in humans with a range of anxiety disorders. The purpose of this review is to outline the key animal models of exposure therapy and to describe how these have been used to develop potential pharmacological adjuncts for anxiety disorders. Drugs that are currently in clinical use, as well as those currently in the preclinical stages of investigation, are described. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-4 PMID:21175588

  13. Pharmacological animal models of tic disorders.

    PubMed

    McCairn, Kevin W; Isoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes animal models of Tourette syndrome (TS) and associated tic disorders that have been developed through pharmacological manipulation. These models provide a useful platform to explore the pathophysiology and the therapeutic interventions available for these disorders. The current pharmacological models, primarily using rodents and nonhuman primates, are classified in this review into two major categories depending on the methodology used for administration, that is, systemic and focal (intracerebral) injection protocols. The systemic protocol primarily targets monoamines such as dopamine and serotonin, whereas the focal protocol mainly manipulates local transmission of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Each category is capable of inducing behavioral abnormalities that are characteristic of TS spectrum disorders, ranging from sensorimotor to cognitive and emotional symptoms to various degrees. Among a variety of pharmacological models, focal microinjection of GABA antagonists into the sensorimotor striatum has helped identify abnormal neural discharge in the global networks which underlie tourettism, including not only the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia but also the cerebellum, consistent with recent neuroimaging studies for TS subjects. This unique model also provides the opportunity to clarify the effect and mechanisms of therapeutic deep brain stimulation. Continuing efforts to incorporate cutting-edge knowledge into the existing models, as well as to combine different model platforms, will allow further refinement of animal models, thereby leading to a greater understanding of TS and associated tic disorders.

  14. Physical Properties and Effect in a Battery of Safety Pharmacology Models for Three Structurally Distinct Enteric Polymers Employed as Spray-Dried Dispersion Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Patel, Mita; Zhang, Xiaomei; Baum-Kroker, Katja S.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Linehan, Brian; Tseng, Yin-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a wide therapeutic index (TI) for pre-clinical safety is important during lead optimization (LO) in research, prior to clinical development, although is often limited by a molecules physiochemical characteristics. Recent advances in the application of the innovative vibrating mesh spray-drying technology to prepare amorphous solid dispersions may offer an opportunity to achieve high plasma concentrations of poorly soluble NCEs to enable testing and establishment of a wide TI in safety pharmacology studies. While some of the amorphous solid dispersion carriers are generally recognized as safe for clinical use, whether they are sufficiently benign to enable in vivo pharmacology studies has not been sufficiently demonstrated. Thus, the physical properties, and effect in a battery of in vivo safety pharmacology models, were assessed in three classes of polymers employed as spray-dried dispersion carriers. The polymers (HPMC-AS, Eudragit, PVAP) displayed low affinity with acetone/methanol, suitable for solvent-based spray drying. The water sorption of the polymers was moderate, and the degree of hysteresis of HPMC-AS was smaller than Eudragit and PVAP indicating the intermolecular interaction of water-cellulose molecules is weaker than water-acrylate or water-polyvinyl molecules. The polymer particles were well-suspended without aggregation with a mean particle size less than 3 μm in an aqueous vehicle. When tested in conscious Wistar Han rats in safety pharmacology models (n = 6–8/dose/polymer) investigating effects on CNS, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular function, no liabilities were identified at any dose tested (30–300 mg/kg PO, suspension). In brief, the polymers had no effect in a modified Irwin test that included observational and evoked endpoints related to stereotypies, excitation, sedation, pain/anesthesia, autonomic balance, reflexes, and others. No effect of the polymers on gastric emptying or intestinal transit was observed when

  15. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    A novel functional-genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in "big data" providing comprehensive information about the drugs' targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In "process pharmacology", drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high-dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. PMID:27069773

  16. Disrupting reconsolidation: pharmacological and behavioral manipulations.

    PubMed

    Soeter, Marieke; Kindt, Merel

    2011-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that disrupting reconsolidation by pharmacological manipulations "deleted" the emotional expression of a fear memory in humans. If we are to target reconsolidation in patients with anxiety disorders, the disruption of reconsolidation should produce content-limited modifications. At the same time, the fear-erasing effects should not be restricted to the feared cue itself considering that fear generalization is a main characteristic of anxiety disorders. In Experiment I and Experiment I(b), we addressed these issues using a within-subject differential startle fear conditioning paradigm and a test of fear generalization. In Experiment II, we tested whether a behavioral approach targeting the reconsolidation through extinction learning was also effective in weakening the original fear memory. A behavioral procedure is evidently preferred over drug manipulations provided that similar effects can be obtained. Here, the extinction procedure subsequent to retrieval did not "erase" the emotional expression of the fear memory as the retrieval techniques (i.e., reminder shocks and reacquisition) unveiled a return of the startle fear response to the fear-relevant stimuli. In contrast, β-adrenergic receptor blockade during reconsolidation selectively deleted the fear-arousing aspects of the memory (i.e., startle fear response) along with its category-related information. The pharmacological manipulation rendered the core memory trace too weak to observe fear generalization after successful reacquisition. Hence, relearning following the disruption of reconsolidation seems to be qualitatively different from initial learning. Our findings demonstrate that disrupting reconsolidation by pharmacological manipulations, although selective, undermines the generalization of fear, a key feature of anxiety disorders. PMID:21576515

  17. Pharmacological foundations of cardio-oncology.

    PubMed

    Minotti, Giorgio; Salvatorelli, Emanuela; Menna, Pierantonio

    2010-07-01

    Anthracyclines and many other antitumor drugs induce cardiotoxicity that occurs "on treatment" or long after completing chemotherapy. Dose reductions limit the incidence of early cardiac events but not that of delayed sequelae, possibly indicating that any dose level of antitumor drugs would prime the heart to damage from sequential stressors. Drugs targeted at tumor-specific moieties raised hope for improving the cardiovascular safety of antitumor therapies; unfortunately, however, many such drugs proved unable to spare the heart, aggravated cardiotoxicity induced by anthracyclines, or were safe in selected patients of clinical trials but not in the general population. Cardio-oncology is the discipline aimed at monitoring the cardiovascular safety of antitumor therapies. Although popularly perceived as a clinical discipline that brings oncologists and cardiologists working together, cardio-oncology is in fact a pharmacology-oriented translational discipline. The cardiovascular performance of survivors of cancer will only improve if clinicians joined pharmacologists in the search for new predictive models of cardiotoxicity or mechanistic approaches to explain how a given drug might switch from causing systolic failure to inducing ischemia. The lifetime risk of cardiotoxicity from antitumor drugs needs to be reconciled with the identification of long-lasting pharmacological signatures that overlap with comorbidities. Research on targeted drugs should be reshaped to appreciate that the terminal ballistics of new "magic bullets" might involve cardiomyocytes as innocent bystanders. Finally, the concepts of prevention and treatment need to be tailored to the notion that late-onset cardiotoxicity builds on early asymptomatic cardiotoxicity. The heart of cardio-oncology rests with such pharmacological foundations.

  18. Alteration of mTOR signaling occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer disease (AD): analysis of brain from subjects with pre-clinical AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment and late-stage AD.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, Antonella; Triplett, Judy C; Di Domenico, Fabio; Niedowicz, Dana M; Murphy, Michael P; Coccia, Raffaella; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2015-06-01

    The clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) include a gradual memory loss and subsequent dementia, and neuropathological deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. At the molecular level, AD subjects present overt amyloid β (Aβ) production and tau hyperphosphorylation. Aβ species have been proposed to overactivate the phosphoinositide3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) axis, which plays a central role in proteostasis. The current study investigated the status of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in post-mortem tissue from the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) at three different stages of AD: late AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and pre-clinical AD (PCAD). Our findings suggest that the alteration of mTOR signaling and autophagy occurs at early stages of AD. We found a significant increase in Aβ (1-42) levels, associated with reduction in autophagy (Beclin-1 and LC-3) observed in PCAD, MCI, and AD subjects. Related to the autophagy impairment, we found a hyperactivation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in IPL of MCI and AD subjects, but not in PCAD, along with a significant decrease in phosphatase and tensin homolog. An increase in two mTOR downstream targets, p70S6K and 4EBP1, occurred in AD and MCI subjects. Both AD and MCI subjects showed increased, insulin receptor substrate 1, a candidate biomarker of brain insulin resistance, and GSK-3β, a kinase targeting tau phosphorylation. Nevertheless, tau phosphorylation was increased in the clinical groups. The results hint at a link between Aβ and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis and provide further insights into the relationship between AD pathology and insulin resistance. In addition, we speculate that the alteration of mTOR signaling in the IPL of AD and MCI subjects, but not in PCAD, is due to the lack of substantial increase in oxidative stress. The figure represents the three different stages of Alzheimer Disease: Preclinical Alzheimer Disease (PCAD), Mild cognitive impairment (MCI

  19. Pharmacological intervention in antibody mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Coutts, S M; Plunkett, M L; Iverson, G M; Barstad, P A; Berner, C M

    1996-04-01

    The use of single signal anergy to inactive pathological B cells in an antigen-specific manner is discussed. Cross-linking surface immunoglobulin, with a construct which contains oligovalent B cell epitopes on a non-immunogenic molecular framework can be used to inactivate the target B cells if the construct lacks T cells epitopes. An example of such a B cell toleragen is LJP 394, which inactivates anti-dsDNA-specific B cells in vivo in murine immunized and spontaneous disease models. The drug enhances survival and lowers renal pathology in BXSB mice. Appropriate definition of epitopes of pathological (auto) antibodies thus offers an opportunity for pharmacological intervention.

  20. Pharmacologic Strategies for Treatment of Poisonings.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Eric; Gooch, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Poisoning is the leading cause of injury-related mortality in the United States. Data suggest that nonmedical use of pharmaceuticals is increasing, along with a proportional increase in subsequent adverse events. The widespread use of illegal drugs contributes to the challenge, because these drugs may produce a wide array of clinical presentations that warrant time-critical recognition and treatment. Common legal and illegal poisonings highlighting clinical presentations in terms of toxidromes as a means of categorically recognizing these emergencies is the focus of this article. To optimize outcomes for situations such as these, pharmacologic considerations are discussed and explored. PMID:26897424

  1. Mirtazapine: pharmacology in relation to adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Nutt, D

    1997-01-01

    Mirtazapine is a new antidepressant that falls into the general class of receptor-blocking drugs rather than being an uptake or enzyme inhibitor. It can be described as a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA). The unique pharmacology of mirtazapine means that it has a very different side effect profile from the tricyclic antidepressants, producing less alpha 1 adrenergic and muscarinic blockade, and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), causing much less nausea and sexual dysfunction by virtue of its blockade of 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:9265949

  2. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis. PMID:22640851

  3. Chemistry and Pharmacology of Citrus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Favela-Hernández, Juan Manuel J; González-Santiago, Omar; Ramírez-Cabrera, Mónica A; Esquivel-Ferriño, Patricia C; Camacho-Corona, María del Rayo

    2016-01-01

    Presently the search for new drugs from natural resources is of growing interest to the pharmaceutical industry. Natural products have been the source of new drugs since ancient times. Plants are a good source of secondary metabolites which have been found to have beneficial properties. The present study is a review of the chemistry and pharmacology of Citrus sinensis. This review reveals the therapeutic potential of C. sinensis as a source of natural compounds with important activities that are beneficial for human health that could be used to develop new drugs.

  4. Pharmacologic agents for mucus clearance in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Girish B; Ilowite, Jonathan S

    2012-06-01

    There are no approved pharmacologic agents to enhance mucus clearance in non-cystic fibrosis (CF) bronchiectasis. Evidence supports the use of hyperosmolar agents in CF, and studies with inhaled mannitol and hypertonic saline are ongoing in bronchiectasis. N-acetylcysteine may act more as an antioxidant than a mucolytic in other lung diseases. Dornase α is beneficial to patients with CF, but is not useful in patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. Mucokinetic agents such as β-agonists have the potential to improve mucociliary clearance in normals and many disease states, but have not been adequately studied in patients with bronchiectasis.

  5. Sarcopenia: Pharmacology of Today and Tomorrow

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Eduardo L.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia remains largely undiagnosed and undertreated because of the lack of a universally accepted definition, effective ways to measure it, and identification of the outcomes that should guide treatment efficacy. An ever-growing number of clinicians and researchers along with funding and regulatory agencies have gradually recognized that sarcopenia is a human condition that requires both prevention and treatment. In this article, we review sarcopenia and its common and less known pharmacological treatments, attempt to define sarcopenia in its broader context, and present some new ideas for potential future treatment for this devastating condition. PMID:22929991

  6. Paediatric clinical pharmacology in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Imti; Sammons, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric clinical pharmacology is the scientific study of medicines in children and is a relatively new subspecialty in paediatrics in the UK. Training encompasses both the study of the effectiveness of drugs in children (clinical trials) and aspects of drug toxicity (pharmacovigilance). Ethical issues in relation to clinical trials and also studies of the pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism in children are crucial. Paediatric patients require formulations that young children in particular are able to take. The scientific evidence generated from clinical trials, pharmacokinetic studies and studies of drug toxicity all need to be applied in order to ensure that medicines are used rationally in children. PMID:25202131

  7. Oleuropein in Olive and its Pharmacological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Syed Haris

    2010-01-01

    Olive from Olea europaea is native to the Mediterranean region and, both the oil and the fruit are some of the main components of the Mediterranean diet. The main active constituents of olive oil include oleic acid, phenolic constituents, and squalene. The main phenolic compounds, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein, give extra-virgin olive oil its bitter, pungent taste. The present review focuses on recent works that have analyzed the relationship between the major phenolic compound oleuropein and its pharmacological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenic, anti-cancer activities, antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, hypolipidemic and hypoglycemic effect. PMID:21179340

  8. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    PubMed

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-01

    properties and patterns of expression of proteases expressed in human mast cell subsets, and in humans versus other mammals. These considerations are influencing prioritization of specific protease targets for therapeutic inhibition, as well as options of pre-clinical models, disease indications, and choice of topical versus systemic routes of inhibitor administration. PMID:25958181

  9. Current status and challenges of cytokine pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Zídek, Z; Anzenbacher, P; Kmoníčková, E

    2009-01-01

    The major concern of pharmacology about cytokines has originated from plentiful data showing association between gross changes in their production and pathophysiological processes. Despite the enigmatic role of cytokines in diseases, a number of them have become a subject of cytokine and anti-cytokine immunotherapies. Production of cytokines can be influenced by many endogenous and exogenous stimuli including drugs. Cells of the immune system, such as macrophages and lymphocytes, are richly endowed with receptors for the mediators of physiological functions, such as biogenic amines, adenosine, prostanoids, steroids, etc. Drugs, agonists or antagonists of these receptors can directly or indirectly up- and down-regulate secretion of cytokines and expression of cytokine receptors. Vice versa, cytokines interfere with drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics through the interactions with cytochrome P450 and multiple drug resistance proteins. The aim of the review is to encourage more intensive studies in these fields of cytokine pharmacology. It also outlines major areas of searching promising candidates for immunotherapeutic interventions. PMID:19371342

  10. Behavioral and pharmacologic therapies for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Marion L.; Faulconbridge, Lucy F.; Webb, Victoria L.; Wadden, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews novel developments in the behavioral and pharmacologic treatment of obesity and explores the potential contribution of genomics research to weight control. A comprehensive program of lifestyle modification, comprised of diet, physical activity and behavior therapy, induces a mean loss of 7–10% of initial weight in individuals with obesity. Two trials demonstrated that weight loss of this magnitude, combined with increased physical activity, substantially reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus in individuals with impaired glucose tolerance. A third trial is now investigating whether a lifestyle intervention will reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in overweight individuals who already have diabetes mellitus. Pharmacotherapy is recommended, in some patients, as an adjunct to lifestyle modification. Two medications—orlistat and sibutramine—are currently approved in the US for long-term weight loss. Both are efficacious when combined with lifestyle modification, although health concerns have been raised about the use of sibutramine. Several novel combination therapies, which target multiple hypothalamic pathways that regulate appetite and body weight, are currently under investigation. Genomic studies provide further evidence for the role of these pathways in the regulation of body weight. Identification of new genes controlling satiety and energy expenditure may yield valuable clues for the development of novel pharmacologic treatments. PMID:20680034

  11. Bevantolol hydrochloride--preclinical pharmacologic profile.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, H R

    1986-03-01

    Bevantolol hydrochloride, a beta adrenoceptor antagonist, can be categorized using conventional schemes as being cardioselective, devoid of intrinsic sympathomimetic activity and having weak membrane-stabilizing and local anesthetic properties. The cardioselectivity of bevantolol was conferred by the incorporation of a 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl moiety into the terminal amino portion of the molecule. This portion of the molecule also appears to account for bevantolol's in vitro binding affinity at alpha-adrenoceptor sites; the in vivo significance of which remains unclear. In the various cardiovascular disease-state models, bevantolol's profile differed from that of propranolol, i.e., there was no initial pressor response in spontaneously hypertensive or renal hypertensive rats. In a myocardial ischemia model, bevantolol, unlike propranolol, increased contractile function in the ischemic myocardium. A ring hydroxylated urinary metabolite, which occurred only in trace amounts in human urine, had an interesting profile when studied in animals at pharmacologic doses. It ranked high in cardioselectivity (like bevantolol), but unlike bevantolol showed significant intrinsic beta sympathomimetic activity. The clinical significance of this metabolite, if any, remains to be established. Collectively the preclinical profile of bevantolol showed it to have an interesting profile for a beta adrenoceptor antagonist in a variety of pharmacologic test systems.

  12. Phytochemical and pharmacological review of Lagenaria sicereria.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Rakesh P; Kalariya, Manisha; Parmar, Sachin K; Sheth, Navin R

    2010-10-01

    Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) standley (LS) (Family: Cucurbitaceae) is an annual herbaceous climbing plant with a long history of traditional medicinal uses in many countries, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Since ancient times the climber has been known for its curative properties, and has been utilized for treatment of various ailments, including jaundice, diabetes, ulcer, piles, colitis, insanity, hypertension, congestive cardiac failure (CCF), and skin diseases. Its fruit pulp is used both as an emetic and purgative, and for its cooling, diuretic, antibilious, and pectoral properties. Boiled in oil this pulp is used to treat rheumatism and insomnia. A wide range of chemical compounds including sterols, terpenoids, flavonoids, and saponins have been isolated from the species. Its extracts have been found to possess various pharmacological activities. Below, we give a comprehensive review of its ethnomedical uses, chemical constituents, and pharmacological profile as a medicinal plant. Particular attention is given to its analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antihyperlipidemic, diuretic, hepatoprotective, anthelmintic, and antibacterial effects so that its potential uses in pharmaceutics can be better evaluated.

  13. Prostamides (prostaglandin-ethanolamides) and their pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, D F; Liang, Y; Krauss, A H-P

    2008-02-01

    The prostamides are part of a large and continually expanding series of pharmacologically unique neutral lipids. They are COX-2 derived oxidation products of the endocannabinoid/endovanniloid anandamide. Prostamide pharmacology is unique and, as in the case of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol, bears little resemblance to that of the corresponding free acids. By virtue of its close relationship to the anti-glaucoma drug bimatoprost, prostamide F(2alpha) has received the greatest research attention. Prostamide F(2alpha) and bimatoprost effects appear independent of prostanoid FP receptor activation, according to a litany of agonist studies. Studies involving freshly isolated and separate feline iridial smooth muscle cells revealed that bimatoprost and FP receptor agonists stimulated different cells, without exception. This suggests the existence of receptors that preferentially recognize prostamide F(2alpha). The recent discovery of prostamide antagonists has provided further support for prostamide receptors as discrete entities. The prototypical prostamide antagonists, AGN 204396 and 7, blocked the effects of prostamide F(2alpha) and bimatoprost but not those of PGF(2alpha) and FP receptor agonists in the feline iris. Second generation more potent prostamide antagonists, such as AGN 211334, should allow the role of prostamides in health and disease to be elucidated. From the therapeutics standpoint, the prostamide F(2alpha) analogue bimatoprost is the most efficacious ocular hypotensive agent currently available for the treatment of glaucoma. PMID:17721551

  14. Phytochemistry and pharmacology of berberis species.

    PubMed

    Mokhber-Dezfuli, Najmeh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Kurepaz-Mahmoodabadi, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    The genus Berberis (Berberidaceae) includes about 500 species worldwide, some of which are widely cultivated in the north-eastern regions of Iran. This genus consists of spiny deciduous evergreen shrubs, characterized by yellow wood and flowers. The cultivation of seedless barberry in South Khorasan goes back to two hundred years ago. Medicinal properties for all parts of these plants have been reported, including: Antimicrobial, antiemetic, antipyretic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-arrhythmic, sedative, anti-cholinergic, cholagogic, anti-leishmaniasis, and anti-malaria. The main compounds found in various species of Berberis, are berberine and berbamine. Phytochemical analysis of various species of this genus revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, phenolic compounds, sterols and triterpenes. Although there are some review articles on Berberis vulgaris (as the most applied species), there is no review on the phytochemical and pharmacological activities of other well-known species of the genus Berberis. For this reason, the present review mainly focused on the diverse secondary metabolites of various species of this genus and the considerable pharmacological and biological activities together with a concise story of the botany and cultivation.

  15. Phytochemistry and Pharmacology of Berberis Species

    PubMed Central

    Mokhber-Dezfuli, Najmeh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Gohari, Ahmad Reza; Kurepaz-Mahmoodabadi, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    The genus Berberis (Berberidaceae) includes about 500 species worldwide, some of which are widely cultivated in the north-eastern regions of Iran. This genus consists of spiny deciduous evergreen shrubs, characterized by yellow wood and flowers. The cultivation of seedless barberry in South Khorasan goes back to two hundred years ago. Medicinal properties for all parts of these plants have been reported, including: Antimicrobial, antiemetic, antipyretic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-arrhythmic, sedative, anti-cholinergic, cholagogic, anti-leishmaniasis, and anti-malaria. The main compounds found in various species of Berberis, are berberine and berbamine. Phytochemical analysis of various species of this genus revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, phenolic compounds, sterols and triterpenes. Although there are some review articles on Berberis vulgaris (as the most applied species), there is no review on the phytochemical and pharmacological activities of other well-known species of the genus Berberis. For this reason, the present review mainly focused on the diverse secondary metabolites of various species of this genus and the considerable pharmacological and biological activities together with a concise story of the botany and cultivation. PMID:24600191

  16. Current pharmacological interventions in panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Freire, Rafael C; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the recent evidences regarding the pharmacological treatment of panic disorder (PD). The authors performed a review of the literature regarding the pharmacological treatment of PD since the year 2000. The research done in the last decade brought strong evidences of effectiveness for paroxetine, venlafaxine, sertraline, fluvoxamine, citalopram, fluoxetine, clonazepam, and the relatively novel agent escitalopram. There are evidences indicating that the other new compounds inositol, duloxetine, mirtazapine, milnacipran, and nefazodone have antipanic properties and may be effective compounds in the treatment of PD. The effectiveness of reboxetine and anticonvulsants is a subject of controversy. In addition to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, benzodiazepines and atypical antipsychotics may be valid alternatives in the treatment of PD. Recent data indicate that augmentation strategies with aripiprazole, olanzapine, pindolol or clonazepam may be effective. D-cycloserine is a promising agent in the augmentation of cognitive behavioral therapy. PMID:24923349

  17. Pharmacological potentials of Premna integrifolia L.

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Prashant Y.

    2016-01-01

    Premna integrifolia Linn. (Verbenaceae) is an important constituent of the formulation of ten roots of herbs known as Daśamūla and is widely used for treating various ailments in the Indian system of medicine. Aim of this review is to provide comprehensive information on the pharmacological activities of various parts of P. integrifolia. All the relevant universally accepted electronic databases were searched with respect to the terms “Agnimanthā”, “Headache tree”, “Premna integrifolia”, “Premna obtusifolia”, “Premna serratifolia” including Indian classical texts, pharmacopoeias, Ayurvedic books, journals, etc., for information without specific timeline. Complete information of the plant has been collected manually since the year 1964 and has been arranged chronologically. The collected data reflects that many ethno-medicinal claims have been confirmed through the modern in-vitro and in-vivo pharmacological studies using different extracts and their isolates of P. integrifolia. The isolation of active constituents, their biological actions, clinical safety and validation of traditional uses of P. integrifolia could provide leads for further scientific research. The information collected here will be useful to set-up research protocols for modern drugs and Ayurvedic formulation development. PMID:27143797

  18. Pharmacology of Ativisha, Musta and their substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, M; Kuruvilla, Gina R; Kumar, K Subrahmanya; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2015-01-01

    The Ayurvedic literature during the medieval period suggests the use of Musta (Cyperus rotundus), a common weed, as a pratinidhi dravya (substitute) for Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum), an endangered species. Contemporary Ayurvedic practice also uses Cryptocoryne spiralis, (known as Naattu Atividayam in South India) and Nagaramusta (Cyperus scariosus) as substitutes for Ativisha and Musta, respectively. This article reviews published literature on the pharmacology of the above four species. Both A. heterophyllum and C. rotundus are reported to possess antiinflammatory, antipyretic, antibacterial and antidiarrhoeal properties, while antiinflammatory and antibacterial activities are attributed to C. scariosus. No reports exist on the bioactivity of Cryptocoryne spiralis. It is interesting to note that other than the veerya which is different, the biological properties of Ativisha and Musta are similar according to Ayurvedic classification of dravyaguna. This is also supported by modern pharmacological studies, which show that, both A. heterophyllum and C. rotundus have antidiarrheal, antipyretic, antiinflammatory, antihyperlipidemic and hypoglycemic activities. However, the similarities between the discussed species cannot be attributed to their phytochemical composition or taxonomical classification as these are quite distinct. The dravyaguna method of classifying materials, which we are calling as "pharmaco-taxonomy", offers a unique way of classifying those plant materials which lack similarity at the botanical or chemical level, but are similar at the level of biological functions.

  19. Pharmacology of Ativisha, Musta and their substitutes

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, M.; Kuruvilla, Gina R.; Kumar, K. Subrahmanya; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2015-01-01

    The Ayurvedic literature during the medieval period suggests the use of Musta (Cyperus rotundus), a common weed, as a pratinidhi dravya (substitute) for Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum), an endangered species. Contemporary Ayurvedic practice also uses Cryptocoryne spiralis, (known as Naattu Atividayam in South India) and Nagaramusta (Cyperus scariosus) as substitutes for Ativisha and Musta, respectively. This article reviews published literature on the pharmacology of the above four species. Both A. heterophyllum and C. rotundus are reported to possess antiinflammatory, antipyretic, antibacterial and antidiarrhoeal properties, while antiinflammatory and antibacterial activities are attributed to C. scariosus. No reports exist on the bioactivity of Cryptocoryne spiralis. It is interesting to note that other than the veerya which is different, the biological properties of Ativisha and Musta are similar according to Ayurvedic classification of dravyaguna. This is also supported by modern pharmacological studies, which show that, both A. heterophyllum and C. rotundus have antidiarrheal, antipyretic, antiinflammatory, antihyperlipidemic and hypoglycemic activities. However, the similarities between the discussed species cannot be attributed to their phytochemical composition or taxonomical classification as these are quite distinct. The dravyaguna method of classifying materials, which we are calling as “pharmaco-taxonomy”, offers a unique way of classifying those plant materials which lack similarity at the botanical or chemical level, but are similar at the level of biological functions. PMID:26167002

  20. Pharmacology of Ativisha, Musta and their substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, M; Kuruvilla, Gina R; Kumar, K Subrahmanya; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2015-01-01

    The Ayurvedic literature during the medieval period suggests the use of Musta (Cyperus rotundus), a common weed, as a pratinidhi dravya (substitute) for Ativisha (Aconitum heterophyllum), an endangered species. Contemporary Ayurvedic practice also uses Cryptocoryne spiralis, (known as Naattu Atividayam in South India) and Nagaramusta (Cyperus scariosus) as substitutes for Ativisha and Musta, respectively. This article reviews published literature on the pharmacology of the above four species. Both A. heterophyllum and C. rotundus are reported to possess antiinflammatory, antipyretic, antibacterial and antidiarrhoeal properties, while antiinflammatory and antibacterial activities are attributed to C. scariosus. No reports exist on the bioactivity of Cryptocoryne spiralis. It is interesting to note that other than the veerya which is different, the biological properties of Ativisha and Musta are similar according to Ayurvedic classification of dravyaguna. This is also supported by modern pharmacological studies, which show that, both A. heterophyllum and C. rotundus have antidiarrheal, antipyretic, antiinflammatory, antihyperlipidemic and hypoglycemic activities. However, the similarities between the discussed species cannot be attributed to their phytochemical composition or taxonomical classification as these are quite distinct. The dravyaguna method of classifying materials, which we are calling as "pharmaco-taxonomy", offers a unique way of classifying those plant materials which lack similarity at the botanical or chemical level, but are similar at the level of biological functions. PMID:26167002

  1. Pharmacology of the lower urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Hennenberg, Martin; Stief, Christian G.; Gratzke, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacology of the lower urinary tract provides the basis for medical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Therapy of LUTS addresses obstructive symptoms (frequently explained by increased prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate enlargement) in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and storage symptoms in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). Targets for medical treatment include G protein-coupled receptors (α1-adrenoceptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, β3-adrenoceptors) or intracellular enzymes (5α-reductase; phosphodiesterase-5, PDE5). Established therapies of obstructive symptoms aim to induce prostate smooth muscle relaxation by α1-blockers or PDE5 inhibitors, or to reduce prostate growth and volume with 5α-reductase inhibitors. Available options for treatment of OAB comprise anitmuscarinics, β3-adrenoceptor agonists, and botulinum toxin A, which improve storage symptoms by inhibition of bladder smooth muscle contraction. With the recent approval of β3-antagonists, PDE inhibitors, and silodosin for therapy of LUTS, progress from basic research of lower urinary tract pharmacology was translated into new clinical applications. Further targets are in preclinical stages of examination, including modulators of the endocannabinoid system and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. PMID:24744518

  2. Pharmacology of Heparin and Related Drugs.

    PubMed

    Mulloy, Barbara; Hogwood, John; Gray, Elaine; Lever, Rebecca; Page, Clive P

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been recognized as a valuable anticoagulant and antithrombotic for several decades and is still widely used in clinical practice for a variety of indications. The anticoagulant activity of heparin is mainly attributable to the action of a specific pentasaccharide sequence that acts in concert with antithrombin, a plasma coagulation factor inhibitor. This observation has led to the development of synthetic heparin mimetics for clinical use. However, it is increasingly recognized that heparin has many other pharmacological properties, including but not limited to antiviral, anti-inflammatory, and antimetastatic actions. Many of these activities are independent of its anticoagulant activity, although the mechanisms of these other activities are currently less well defined. Nonetheless, heparin is being exploited for clinical uses beyond anticoagulation and developed for a wide range of clinical disorders. This article provides a "state of the art" review of our current understanding of the pharmacology of heparin and related drugs and an overview of the status of development of such drugs.

  3. Constellation pharmacology: a new paradigm for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Russell W; Schmidt, Eric W; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2015-01-01

    Constellation pharmacology is a cell-based high-content phenotypic-screening platform that utilizes subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate the cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types. Heterogeneous populations of native cells, in which the different individual cell types have been identified and characterized, are the foundation for this screening platform. Constellation pharmacology is useful for screening small molecules or for deconvoluting complex mixtures of biologically active natural products. This platform has been used to purify natural products and discover their molecular mechanisms. In the ongoing development of constellation pharmacology, there is a positive feedback loop between the pharmacological characterization of cell types and screening for new drug candidates. As constellation pharmacology is used to discover compounds with novel targeting-selectivity profiles, those new compounds then further help to elucidate the constellations of specific cell types, thereby increasing the content of this high-content platform.

  4. Pharmacology in space. Part 2. Controlling motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    In this second article in the two-part series on pharmacology in space, Claire Lathers and colleagues discuss the pharmacology of drugs used to control motion sickness in space and note that the pharmacology of the 'ideal' agent has yet to be worked out. That motion sickness may impair the pharmacological action of a drug by interfering with its absorption and distribution because of alteration of physiology is a problem unique to pharmacology in space. The authors comment on the problem of designing suitable ground-based studies to evaluate the pharmacological effect of drugs to be used in space and discuss the use of salivary samples collected during space flight to allow pharmacokinetic evaluations necessary for non-invasive clinical drug monitoring.

  5. The potential of translational bioinformatics approaches for pharmacology research.

    PubMed

    Li, Lang

    2015-10-01

    The field of bioinformatics has allowed the interpretation of massive amounts of biological data, ushering in the era of 'omics' to biomedical research. Its potential impact on pharmacology research is enormous and it has shown some emerging successes. A full realization of this potential, however, requires standardized data annotation for large health record databases and molecular data resources. Improved standardization will further stimulate the development of system pharmacology models, using translational bioinformatics methods. This new translational bioinformatics paradigm is highly complementary to current pharmacological research fields, such as personalized medicine, pharmacoepidemiology and drug discovery. In this review, I illustrate the application of transformational bioinformatics to research in numerous pharmacology subdisciplines.

  6. [Pharmacological treatment of the premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Jurado López, A R

    2014-07-01

    Biomedical approach to premature ejaculation (PE) has permited a better phisiopatologycal knowledge and so the use of pharmacological agents for the treatment of this sexual dysfuncion. Most of the studies to evaluate the eficacy of these drugs were not carried at all the parameters which actually define PE: intravaginal ejaculatory latencie time (IELT) tested with watch, ejaculation control self perception cuantification (questionaries) and cuantification of generated consequences in patient and partner, if it existes. For this reason, it is difficult to analyse the scientific evidence and we use medicines with no approved indication for PE ("off label"). This text is a review of pharmacologycal agents with no approved indication (PDE type 5 inhibitors, α-blockers, tramadol, SSRI, clomipramine), and pharmacologycal agents developed to be used in the treatment of PE and having got indication in this sexual dysfunction or "on label" drugs (topic anesthesics, dapoxetine).

  7. The neurochemistry and pharmacology of extinction behavior.

    PubMed

    Mason, S T

    1983-01-01

    The role of various neurotransmitter systems in the brain in extinction behavior is examined. An attempt is made to suggest psychological mechanisms (such as attention, secondary reinforcement or internal inhibition) by which the neurotransmitter systems or drugs act to produce the observed alteration in extinction behavior. The putative neurotransmitters acetylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, endorphins and the peptides are reviewed, as are pharmacological agents such as the benzodiazepines, the barbiturates, the psychodelics, the neuroleptics, the psychomotor stimulants and cannabinoids. Other treatments and factors are considered such as peripheral hormones and the adrenal-pituitary axis. It is suggested that the noradrenergic system may be involved in the expression of extinction behavior by a role in selective attention, the dopamine system via an involvement with secondary reinforcement, the cholinergic system by a mechanism of response inhibition and the barbiturates and benzodiazepines by a block of nonreward.

  8. The clinical pharmacology of appetite suppressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, T; Goodall, E

    1984-01-01

    One way of gaining a greater understanding of the central mechanisms underlying hunger and the regulation of feeding behaviour in humans is to examine the actions and interactions on hunger and food intake of drugs with known or presumed pharmacological modes of action. To this end we have undertaken a number of studies which fall into three main categories: the mechanisms by which amphetamine anorexia is induced; the possible role of endogenous opioids in feeding; the action of amino acids thought to be involved in the regulation of feeding. In this field the potential for cross-fertilization between basic scientists working with laboratory animals and clinical scientists working with human subjects exists. For example, the clinical pharmacologist has been able to test out hypotheses on human subjects which could only have been developed using laboratory animals. Furthermore, using human subjects it is possible to extend the field of inquiry into an exploration of the subjective dimensions of appetite and hunger.

  9. Alcohol and cocaine. Clinical and pharmacological interactions.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, D A

    1992-01-01

    Both clinical experience and epidemiological studies in community and specialized (e.g., treatment) populations indicate that the prevalence of co-use of alcohol and cocaine, and the comorbidity of alcoholism and cocaine addiction, are greater than would be expected from the chance occurrence of two independent conditions. Alcohol and cocaine have pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions that may account for some of this co-use. While their reinforcing properties have neuropharmacological and behavioral differences, a unified theory of reinforcement by alcohol and cocaine has been proposed, involving dopamine activity in the ventral tegmental area-nucleus accumbens circuit. Regardless of their pharmacology, the prevalent co-use of alcohol and cocaine has important implications for drug abuse treatment and indicates the need for future research on this topic.

  10. [Pharmacological therapy of temporomandibular joint pain].

    PubMed

    Hugger, Alfons; Schindler, Hans J; Türp, Jens C; Hugger, Sybille

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological interventions in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain differ from corresponding therapeutic interventions of jaw muscle (myofascial) pain. An actual systematic literature search lists and evaluates available articles on randomised controlled trials for treatment of arthralgia of the TMJ. On the basis of the few available trial reports, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) seem to be effective, but side effects and drug interactions need to be considered. In relation to other therapeutic modalities, the rapidity of the onset of action of NSAIDs seems to be different, and the extension of side effects can be varied or reduced by changing the application route (oral versus topical). Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) as dietary supplement for special medical purposes can apparently evoke positive therapeutic effects in TMJ arthralgia which need to be analysed in further studies.

  11. The pharmacology of a molluscan smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    TWAROG, B M

    1959-09-01

    The effects of a number of pharmacologically active substances on contraction and on membrane polarization of the anterior byssal retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis, L., have been studied. Tetramethylammonium bromide, trimethyl(4-oxopentyl)ammonium chloride and nicotine, like acetylcholine, produced depolarization and sustained contraction. Nicotine, on repeated application, lost acetylcholine-like activity and effectively blocked acetylcholine. In order of decreasing potency, methanthelinium, tubocurarine, benzoquinonium, tetraethylammonium, atropine, pentamethonium, and decamethonium blocked acetylcholine action. These agents did not show initial acetylcholine-like action and did not relax sustained contractions. Adrenaline, noradrenaline, tyramine, dibenamine, phentolamine, and lysergic acid diethylamide relaxed sustained contractions without reducing initial depolarization and tension development in response to acetylcholine or electrical stimuli. Adrenaline and noradrenaline often caused depolarization and contraction when first applied, and displayed relaxing action on subsequent application.

  12. Radioimmunoassay in basic and clinical pharmacology

    SciTech Connect

    Patrono, C.; Peskar, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The subject of the book is the development, validation and application of radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques for the measurement of a variety of substances in animal and human body fluids. The book discusses methodological and conceptual issues related to the main classes of mediators of drug action and to drugs themselves, as assayed by this particular analytical technique. A number of introductory chapters provide basic information concerning production and characterization of antibodies, labeling techniques, statistical aspects and validation criteria, insight into problems related to the development and validation of RIA for the newly discovered mediator(s). In the following chapters, the emphasis is placed on the technical details relevant to each class of compounds and on specific aspects of their applications to basic and/or clinical pharmacological studies. New developments in this area, such as monoclonal antibodies and non-radioactive labeling techniques, are also covered.

  13. Pharmacologic advances in canine and feline reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Valerie J; Howard, James P

    2009-05-01

    Substantial improvements in therapeutic options for companion animal reproduction and gynecologic emergencies have been made over the last decade. New, alternative drug treatments, with fewer side effects and improved efficacy, are available. This has widened the spectrum of therapeutic possibilities for diseases that were previously treated only by surgical intervention. New drugs are available for estrus induction and pregnancy termination, as well as for the treatment of pyometra. This review summarizes the pharmacology and toxicology of reproductive agents currently in use for contraception, pyometra, dystocia, eclampsia, premature labor, agalactia, mastitis, metritis, and prostatic disorders, and compares their efficacy and safety with newer agents. Drug use and exposure during pregnancy and lactation, and subsequent risks to the fetuses, are also explored, with emphasis on antimicrobials, antifungals, anthelminthics, anesthetics, and vaccinations. PMID:19501345

  14. The GPCR heterotetramer: challenging classical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi

    2015-03-01

    Two concepts are gaining increasing acceptance in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pharmacology: (i) pre-coupling of GPCRs with their preferred signaling molecules, and (ii) GPCR oligomerization. This is begging for the introduction of new models such as GPCR oligomer-containing signaling complexes with GPCR homodimers as functional building blocks. This model favors the formation of GPCR heterotetramers - heteromers of homodimers coupled to their cognate G protein. The GPCR heterotetramer offers an optimal framework for a canonical antagonistic interaction between activated Gs and Gi proteins, which can simultaneously bind to their respective preferred receptors and to adenylyl cyclase (AC) catalytic units. This review addresses the current evidence for pre-coupling of the various specific components that provide the very elaborate signaling machinery exemplified by the Gs-Gi-AC-coupled GPCR heterotetramer.

  15. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. PMID:25300547

  16. Non-pharmacological Approaches to Cognitive Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Áine M

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and medical devices hold the promise of enhancing brain function, not only of those suffering from neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric or neurodegenerative illnesses, but also of healthy individuals. However, a number of lifestyle interventions are proven cognitive enhancers, improving attention, problem solving, reasoning, learning and memory or even mood. Several of these interventions, such as physical exercise, cognitive, mental and social stimulation, may be described as environmental enrichments of varying types. Use of these non-pharmacological cognitive enhancers circumvents some of the ethical considerations associated with pharmaceutical or technological cognitive enhancement, being low in cost, available to the general population and presenting low risk to health and well-being. In this chapter, there will be particular focus on the effects of exercise and enrichment on learning and memory and the evidence supporting their efficacy in humans and in animal models will be described.

  17. [Negative symptoms in schizophrenia: new pharmacological approaches].

    PubMed

    Lodovighi, M-A; Palomba, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The management of negative symptoms appears to be a major challenge because of functional disability induced by these symptoms and their relative resistance to treatments currently on the market. The aim of this article is to review new approaches that may enable optimal management of these symptoms. First, we describe the methodological difficulties that hindered the development and evaluation of specific treatment, and objectives currently defined to enable the development of new pharmacological approaches. Then we present the monotherapy and adjuvant therapies that have been assessed, including first and second generation antipsychotics, psychostimulants, antidepressants, cholinergic and glutamatergic agents, the oxytocin, hormones and more invasive therapies such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Other molecules are under development and evaluation such alpha-7 nicotinic receptor agonists.

  18. Pharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) affects up to 2.5% of the population of the course of a lifetime and produces substantial morbidity. Approximately 70% of patients can experience significant symptomatic relief with appropriate pharmacotherapy. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the main stay of pharmacological treatment. These are typically used at higher doses and for longer periods than in depression. Remission is, unfortunately, uncommon. Proven second-line treatments include the tricyclic clomipramine and the addition of low-dose neuroleptic medications. Other augmentation strategies have been explored for patients refractory to proven interventions, but they are not as of yet robustly supported by controlled studies. The combination of medication with psychotherapy is often used, though careful studies have not documented synergistic benefit in adult patients. OCD refractory to available treatments remains a profound clinical challenge. PMID:25150568

  19. Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: a pharmacological comparison.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2014-03-01

    The serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are a family of antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. While these drugs are traditionally considered a group of inter-related antidepressants based upon reuptake inhibition, they generally display different chemical structures as well as different pharmacological properties. In this article, we discuss these and other differences among the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including the year of approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration, generic availability, approved clinical indications, half-lives, metabolism and excretion, presence or not of active metabolites, dosing schedules, proportionate effects on serotonin and norepinephrine, and the timing of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). Again, while serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are grouped as a family of antidepressants, they exhibit a surprising number of differences- differences that may ultimately relate to clinical nuances in patient care. PMID:24800132

  20. Pharmacological repression of PPARγ promotes osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Marciano, David P; Kuruvilla, Dana S; Boregowda, Siddaraju V; Asteian, Alice; Hughes, Travis S; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A; Khan, Tanya M; Novick, Scott J; Park, HaJeung; Kojetin, Douglas J; Phinney, Donald G; Bruning, John B; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R

    2015-06-12

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is the master regulator of adipogenesis and the pharmacological target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of insulin sensitizers. Activation of PPARγ by TZDs promotes adipogenesis at the expense of osteoblast formation, contributing to their associated adverse effects on bone. Recently, we reported the development of PPARγ antagonist SR1664, designed to block the obesity-induced phosphorylation of serine 273 (S273) in the absence of classical agonism, to derive insulin-sensitizing efficacy with improved therapeutic index. Here we identify the structural mechanism by which SR1664 actively antagonizes PPARγ, and extend these findings to develop the inverse agonist SR2595. Treatment of isolated bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with SR2595 promotes induction of osteogenic differentiation. Together these results identify the structural determinants of ligand-mediated PPARγ repression, and suggest a therapeutic approach to promote bone formation.

  1. Pharmacological Repression of PPARγ Promotes Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, David P.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Boregowda, Siddaraju V.; Asteian, Alice; Hughes, Travis S.; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Corzo, Cesar A.; Khan, Tanya M.; Novick, Scott J.; Park, HaJeung; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Phinney, Donald G.; Bruning, John B.; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is the master regulator of adipogenesis and the pharmacological target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of insulin sensitizers. Activation of PPARγ by TZDs promotes adipogenesis at the expense of osteoblast formation, contributing to their associated adverse effects on bone. Recently we reported the development of PPARγ antagonist SR1664, designed to block the obesity induced phosphorylation of serine 273 (S273) in the absence of classical agonism, to derive insulin sensitizing efficacy with improved therapeutic index. Here we identify the structural mechanism by which SR1664 actively antagonizes PPARγ, and extend these findings to develop the inverse agonist SR2595. Treatment of isolated bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with SR2595 promotes induction of osteogenic differentiation. Together these results identify the structural determinants of ligand mediated PPARγ repression, and suggest a therapeutic approach to promote bone formation. PMID:26068133

  2. Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology of Etomidate

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the unique clinical and molecular pharmacology of etomidate. Among general anesthesia induction drugs, etomidate is the only imidazole, and it has the most favorable therapeutic index for single bolus administration. It also produces a unique toxicity among anesthetic drugs-- inhibition of adrenal steroid synthesis that far outlasts its hypnotic action and that may reduce survival of critically ill patients. The major molecular targets mediating anesthetic effects of etomidate in the central nervous system are specific γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subtypes. Amino acids forming etomidate binding sites have been identified in transmembrane domains of these proteins. Etomidate binding site structure models for the main enzyme mediating etomidate adrenotoxicity have also been developed. Based on this deepening understanding of molecular targets and actions, new etomidate derivatives are being investigated as potentially improved sedative-hypnotics or for use as highly selective inhibitors of adrenal steroid synthesis. PMID:21263301

  3. [Negative symptoms in schizophrenia: new pharmacological approaches].

    PubMed

    Lodovighi, M-A; Palomba, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    The management of negative symptoms appears to be a major challenge because of functional disability induced by these symptoms and their relative resistance to treatments currently on the market. The aim of this article is to review new approaches that may enable optimal management of these symptoms. First, we describe the methodological difficulties that hindered the development and evaluation of specific treatment, and objectives currently defined to enable the development of new pharmacological approaches. Then we present the monotherapy and adjuvant therapies that have been assessed, including first and second generation antipsychotics, psychostimulants, antidepressants, cholinergic and glutamatergic agents, the oxytocin, hormones and more invasive therapies such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Other molecules are under development and evaluation such alpha-7 nicotinic receptor agonists. PMID:26776392

  4. Chlorhexidine--pharmacology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, K-S; Kam, P C A

    2008-07-01

    Chlorhexidine is a widely used skin antisepsis preparation and is an ingredient in toothpaste and mouthwash. It is an especially effective antiseptic when combined with alcohol. Its antimicrobial effects persist because it is binds strongly to proteins in the skin and mucosa, making it an effective antiseptic ingredient for handwashing, skin preparation for surgery and the placement of intravascular access. Catheters impregnated with chlorhexidine and antimicrobial agents can reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections. Contact dermatitis related to chlorhexidine is not common in health care workers. The incidence of contact dermatitis to chlorhexidine in atopic patients is approximately 2.5 to 5.4%. Acute hypersensitivity reactions to chlorhexidine are often not recognised and therefore may be underreported. This review discusses the pharmacology, microbiology, clinical applications and adverse effects of chlorhexidine.

  5. Cefuroxime: antimicrobial activity, Pharmacology, and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Smith, B R; LeFrock, J L

    1983-06-01

    The antimicrobial activity, pharmacology, toxicity, and clinical efficacy of cefuroxime are reviewed. Cefuroxime has a second-generation cephalosporin spectrum of activity similar to cefamandole. Addition of a methoxyimino side chain has enhanced its beta-lactamase stability. Cefuroxime is active against certain cephalothin-, cefamandole-, and gentamicin-resistant bacteria. Cefuroxime has an extended half-life which allows dosing every 8 h. If penetrates into bodily tissues and fluids, including the cerebrospinal fluid, in therapeutic concentrations. Cefuroxime has been used successfully in the treatment of meningitis; sepsis; urinary tract, bone and joint, pulmonary, skin, and soft tissue infections; and gonorrhea. Competitive pricing of cefuroxime should provide a cost-effective substitute for cefamandole and, in certain situations, third-generation cephalosporins.

  6. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

  7. Biochemical Pharmacology of the Sigma-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Uyen B; Ruoho, Arnold E

    2016-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223 amino acid two transmembrane (TM) pass protein. It is a non-ATP-binding nonglycosylated ligand-regulated molecular chaperone of unknown three-dimensional structure. The S1R is resident to eukaryotic mitochondrial-associated endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes with broad functions that regulate cellular calcium homeostasis and reduce oxidative stress. Several multitasking functions of the S1R are underwritten by chaperone-mediated direct (and indirect) interactions with ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors and cell-signaling molecules involved in the regulation of cell growth. The S1R is a promising drug target for the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases related to cellular stress. In vitro and in vivo functional and molecular characteristics of the S1R and its interactions with endogenous and synthetic small molecules have been discovered by the use of pharmacologic, biochemical, biophysical, and molecular biology approaches. The S1R exists in monomer, dimer, tetramer, hexamer/octamer, and higher oligomeric forms that may be important determinants in defining the pharmacology and mechanism(s) of action of the S1R. A canonical GXXXG in putative TM2 is important for S1R oligomerization. The ligand-binding regions of S1R have been identified and include portions of TM2 and the TM proximal regions of the C terminus. Some client protein chaperone functions and interactions with the cochaperone 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (binding immunoglobulin protein) involve the C terminus. Based on its biochemical features and mechanisms of chaperone action the possibility that the S1R is a member of the small heat shock protein family is discussed.

  8. Pharmacological and dietary prevention for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality. People at higher risk are those individuals with a family history of CRC and familial adenomatous polyposis. Prevention and screening are two milestones for this disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the chemopreventive role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors, some micronutrients (folic acid, calcium, selenium, antioxidants) and probiotics. Discussion The studies on aspiring reported promising results, but it is debatable whether aspirin should be used as chemoprevention, because of its side effects and because of poor efficacy evident in subjects at high risk. Similar results were reported for other non-aspirin NSAIDs, such as sulindac and celecoxib, which the potential adverse effects limit their use. Selenium role in prevention of various types of cancer as well as in colon adenomas are often inconclusive or controversial. Several studies suggested that calcium may have a possible chemopreventive effect on colon adenomas and CRC, although contrasting results are reported for the latter. A recent meta-analysis including 13 randomized trial suggested that folic acid supplementation had not a chemiopreventive action on CRC. Several studies investigated the association between antioxidants, administered alone or in combination, and CRC risk, both among general and at risk population, but only few of them supported statistically significant results. Conclusion The results of this literature review showed an unclear role in CRC prevention of both pharmacological and dietary intervention. Despite several options are available to prevent colon cancer, it is challenging to identify a correct strategy to prevent CRC through pharmacological and dietary intervention due to the long latency of cancer promotion and development. Since some of the drugs investigated may have uncertain individual effects, it can be

  9. Pharmacology and physiology of gastrointestinal enteroendocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Mace, O J; Tehan, B; Marshall, F

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) polypeptides are secreted from enteroendocrine cells (EECs). Recent technical advances and the identification of endogenous and synthetic ligands have enabled exploration of the pharmacology and physiology of EECs. Enteroendocrine signaling pathways stimulating hormone secretion involve multiple nutrient transporters and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated simultaneously under prevailing nutrient conditions in the intestine following a meal. The majority of studies investigate hormone secretion from EECs in response to single ligands and although the mechanisms behind how individual signaling pathways generate a hormonal output have been well characterized, our understanding of how these signaling pathways converge to generate a single hormone secretory response is still in its infancy. However, a picture is beginning to emerge of how nutrients and full, partial, or allosteric GPCR ligands differentially regulate the enteroendocrine system and its interaction with the enteric and central nervous system. So far, activation of multiple pathways underlies drug discovery efforts to harness the therapeutic potential of the enteroendocrine system to mimic the phenotypic changes observed in patients who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric surgery. Typically obese patients exhibit ∼30% weight loss and greater than 80% of obese diabetics show remission of diabetes. Targeting combinations of enteroendocrine signaling pathways that work synergistically may manifest with significant, differentiated EEC secretory efficacy. Furthermore, allosteric modulators with their increased selectivity, self-limiting activity, and structural novelty may translate into more promising enteroendocrine drugs. Together with the potential to bias enteroendocrine GPCR signaling and/or to activate multiple divergent signaling pathways highlights the considerable range of therapeutic possibilities available. Here, we review the pharmacology and physiology of

  10. Histamine pharmacology and new CNS drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Chazot, Paul L; Passani, M Beatrice

    2011-12-01

    During the last decade, the identification of a number of novel drug targets led to the development of promising new compounds which are currently under evaluation for their therapeutic prospective in CNS related disorders. Besides the established pleiotropic regulatory functions in the periphery, the interest in the potential homeostatic role of histamine in the brain was revived following the identification of H(3) and H(4) receptors some years ago. Complementing classical CNS pharmacology, the development of selective histamine receptor agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists provides the lead for the potential exploitation of the histaminergic system in the treatment of brain pathologies. Although no CNS disease entity has been associated directly to brain histamine dysfunction until now, the H(3) receptor is recognized as a drug target for neuropathic pain, sleep-wake disorders, including narcolepsy, and cognitive impairment associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease, while the first H(3) receptor ligands have already entered phase I-III clinical trials. Interestingly, the localization of the immunomodulatory H(4) receptor in the nervous system exposes attractive perspectives for the therapeutic exploitation of this new drug target in neuroimmunopharmacology. This review focuses on a concise presentation of the current "translational research" approach that exploits the latest advances in histamine pharmacology for the development of beneficial drug targets for the treatment of neuronal disorders, such as neuropathic pain, cognitive, and sleep-wake pathologies. Furthermore, the role of the brain histaminergic system(s) in neuroprotection and neuroimmunology/inflammation remains a challenging research area that is currently under consideration.

  11. Investigation into stereoselective pharmacological activity of phenotropil.

    PubMed

    Zvejniece, Liga; Svalbe, Baiba; Veinberg, Grigory; Grinberga, Solveiga; Vorona, Maksims; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Dambrova, Maija

    2011-11-01

    Phenotropil [N-carbamoylmethyl-4-aryl-2-pyrrolidone (2-(2-oxo-4-phenyl-pyrrolidin-1-yl) acetamide; carphedon)] is clinically used in its racemic form as a nootropic drug that improves physical condition and cognition. The aim of this study was to compare the stereoselective pharmacological activity of R- and S-enantiomers of phenotropil in different behavioural tests. Racemic phenotropil and its enantiomers were tested for locomotor, antidepressant and memory-improving activity and influence on the central nervous system (CNS) using general pharmacological tests in mice. After a single administration, the amount of compound in brain tissue extracts was determined using an ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) method in a positive ion electrospray mode. In the open-field test, a significant increase in locomotor activity was observed after a single administration of R-phenotropil at doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg and S-phenotropil at a dose of 50 mg/kg. In the forced swim test, R-phenotropil induced an antidepressant effect at doses of 100 and 50 mg/kg, and S-phenotropil was active at a dose of 100 mg/kg. R-phenotropil significantly enhanced memory function in a passive avoidance response test at a dose of 1 mg/kg; the S-enantiomer did not show any activity in this test. However, the concentrations of R- and S-phenotropils in brain tissue were similar. In conclusion, the antidepressant and increased locomotor activity relies on both R- and S-phenotropils, but the memory-improving activity is only characteristic of R-phenotropil. These results may be important for the clinical use of optically pure isomers of phenotropil.

  12. Pharmacological versus non-pharmacological approaches to managing challenging behaviours for people with dementia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tony; Hungerford, Catherine; Cleary, Michelle

    2014-02-01

    When people with dementia demonstrate challenging behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, the levels of stress experienced by their carers increases. Furthermore, there is an increased likelihood that the person will be prematurely admitted to a residential care facility. The adverse side-effects that have been associated with the use of antipsychotic medications in older people with dementia have given rise to a renewed emphasis on the use of non-pharmacological approaches to manage challenging behaviours. This article describes the approaches taken by the multi-disciplinary team of a Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service in Australia to support people with dementia who have challenging behaviours by using non-pharmacological interventions.

  13. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    A novel functional‐genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in “big data” providing comprehensive information about the drugs’ targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In “process pharmacology”, drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high‐dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. PMID:27069773

  14. Pharmacology and clinical pharmacology of methylarginines used as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Kittel, Anja; Maas, Renke

    2014-01-01

    The methylarginines asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethylarginine (L-NMMA) are endogenously formed inhibitors of nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which have extensively been investigated as risk markers and used as pharmacological tools to study the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO) pathway in vitro and in vivo. It is the aim of the present review to summarize the clinical and experimental data on the pharmacological properties that are of relevance when planning and conducting experiments and clinical studies involving methylarginines. Key pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data including IC50 values of ADMA and L-NMMA for NOS isoforms and transport proteins, as well as metabolism by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAH1 and DDAH2) and alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase 2 (AGXT2) are discussed.

  15. [The pedagogical approach to pharmacology in nurse training institutes].

    PubMed

    Schweyer, Lucette

    2016-05-01

    Seen as daunting and stressful, pharmacology is often rejected by student nurses. This discipline requires and draws on multiple skills. When future nurses realise that their prescribing role goes beyond simple execution, they are able to appreciate the full scope of pharmacology. PMID:27155274

  16. Current concepts and pharmacologic treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2002-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common diagnoses and reason for hospitalization in the United States. Ace inhibitors, diuretics, beta-blockers and digitalis are the leading agents in pharmacologic management of heart failure. In order to improve patient outcomes, adult-health nurses need to understand the diagnosis, pathophysiology, nursing interventions, and pharmacologic treatment of this common disorder.

  17. A Survey of Predoctoral Dental Basic Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Lee T.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 51 of the 53 dental schools in the continental United States investigated pharmacology curriculum content and time allocation. Found that most schools offered a traditional didactic course in basic pharmacology, with half of the medical school-based and three-fourths of the dental school-based programs providing additional pharmacology…

  18. How Research in Behavioral Pharmacology Informs Behavioral Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, Marc N.

    2006-01-01

    Behavioral pharmacology is a maturing science that has made significant contributions to the study of drug effects on behavior, especially in the domain of drug-behavior interactions. Less appreciated is that research in behavioral pharmacology can have, and has had, implications for the experimental analysis of behavior, especially its…

  19. Blues for the Lecture Theatre--The Pharmacology Songbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Ewen; Saarti, Jarmo

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, we were able to digitally record the so-called pharmacology songbook; a set of songs with lyrics devoted to pharmacological topics. A CD was prepared entitled The Beta-blocker Blues and its contents are now all freely available in mp3 format from our web page (Ewen MacDonald & friends, 2005). The web page also contains the lyrics and…

  20. [The pedagogical approach to pharmacology in nurse training institutes].

    PubMed

    Schweyer, Lucette

    2016-05-01

    Seen as daunting and stressful, pharmacology is often rejected by student nurses. This discipline requires and draws on multiple skills. When future nurses realise that their prescribing role goes beyond simple execution, they are able to appreciate the full scope of pharmacology.

  1. Pharmacological Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, G. Scott; Ryan, Neal D.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that studies examining efficacy of pharmacological and psychosocial treatments of depressive and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents are relatively rare; that current clinical practice bases pharmacological treatment decisions on few existing studies, open clinical data on children and adolescents, and extrapolation from adult…

  2. Is There an Identity Crisis in Medical School Pharmacology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csaky, T. Z.

    1976-01-01

    Rudolf Buchheim's thesis on why and how to teach pharmacology to medical students is reexamined in view of the so-called identity crisis. It is suggested that the crisis is not one of identity but one of acceptance of medical school pharmacology by clinical colleagues and professional educators. (LBH)

  3. An Integrated Approach to Instruction in Pharmacology and Therapeutics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbert, Robert L.; Walton, Charles A.

    1976-01-01

    The impact of the clinical faculty on the content of the pharmacology course is described in a discussion of trends in pharmacology instruction. Interfaculty communication and development of course objectives are reviewed, and descriptions of two baccalaureate courses at the University of Texas College of Pharmacy are appended. (LBH)

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid pharmacology: an improved pharmacology approach for chinese herbal medicine research.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan-Qing; Zhou, Ying-Wu; Qin, Xiu-de; Hua, Sheng-Yu; Zhang, Yu-Lian; Kang, Li-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Despite many successful applications of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) in the treatment and prevention of neurological diseases (ND), the fully scientific understanding of CHM's action mechanisms had been hampered for lack of appropriate methods to explore the combinatorial rules, the synergistic mechanisms, and the molecular basis of CHM. As an improved pharmacology approach, cerebrospinal fluid pharmacology (CSFP), based on the fact that cerebrospinal fluid plays an important role in the health maintenance of specific survival environment for neurons and glial cells, has been constructed and applied to CHM research for treating ND. In the present review, the concept and advantages of CSFP are briefly introduced. The approaches and key technologies of CSFP in CHM research are also collated and analyzed. Furthermore, the developing tendency of CSFP is summarized, and its framework in CHM research is also proposed. In summary, CSFP provides a new strategy not only to eliminate some barriers of CHM research for treating ND, but also to broaden the pharmacology research for bridging the gap between CHM and modern medicine. Moreover, the advancements in CSFP will bring about a conceptual move in active ingredients discovery of CHM and make a significant contribution to CHM modernization and globalization.

  5. Non-pharmacological treatment of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Afton L; Williams, David A

    2011-04-01

    Individuals with chronic widespread pain, including those with fibromyalgia, pose a particular challenge to treatment, given the modest effectiveness of pharmacological agents for this condition. The growing consensus indicates that the best approach to treatment involves the combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Several non-pharmacological interventions, particularly exercise and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), have garnered good evidence of effectiveness as stand-alone, adjunctive treatments for patients with chronic pain. In this article, evidenced-based, non-pharmacological management techniques for chronic widespread pain are described by using two broad categories, exercise and CBT. The evidence for decreasing pain, improving functioning and changing secondary symptoms is highlighted. Lastly, the methods by which exercise and CBT can be combined for a multi-component approach, which is consistent with the current evidence-based guidelines of several American and European medical societies, are addressed.

  6. Problem-based learning and teaching of medical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Chiu-Yin

    2002-07-01

    In the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University, the traditional discipline-based boundaries dividing the teaching and learning of basic medical sciences, such as physiology and pharmacology, do not exist. For more than 3 decades, student-centered, self-directed problem-based learning (PBL) has been the main form of instruction for students learning pharmacology within the medical curriculum and the pharmacological issues are always embedded within a health-care problem, with consideration of many other relevant non-pharmacological issues. In PBL, pedagogic emphasis is placed on the process of learning via constructive inquiry rather than cumulative acquisition of factual knowledge. For the science students, typically in the Biology/Pharmacology cooperative courses, both student-centered learning and teacher-centered teaching approaches are being used. In this case, the PBL approach is adopted to complement the conventional lectures at the course level. For medical students, PBL continues to be the major form of instruction in a small-group tutorial setting at the curricular level. The PBL curriculum is integrated across organ systems (cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, neural, etc) and across the life cycle, spanning population- and behavior-related perspectives, rather than being recreated from discrete disciplinary areas (such as physiology, anatomy, biochemistry, pharmacology, and community medicine). Those students who lack a pharmacology background or wish to enhance their pharmacological knowledge can take a block elective or horizontal elective in pharmacology. Unlike science students, medical students need to sort out pharmacological principles from the overload of information, to integrate them into the clinically relevant situations, and to ultimately apply them to the management of patients' illness. This is most effectively achieved in a student-centered environment conducive to life-long learning. PMID:12107627

  7. Atrial-like cardiomyocytes from human pluripotent stem cells are a robust preclinical model for assessing atrial-selective pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Devalla, Harsha D; Schwach, Verena; Ford, John W; Milnes, James T; El-Haou, Said; Jackson, Claire; Gkatzis, Konstantinos; Elliott, David A; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M; Mummery, Christine L; Verkerk, Arie O; Passier, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Drugs targeting atrial-specific ion channels, Kv1.5 or Kir3.1/3.4, are being developed as new therapeutic strategies for atrial fibrillation. However, current preclinical studies carried out in non-cardiac cell lines or animal models may not accurately represent the physiology of a human cardiomyocyte (CM). In the current study, we tested whether human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived atrial CMs could predict atrial selectivity of pharmacological compounds. By modulating retinoic acid signaling during hESC differentiation, we generated atrial-like (hESC-atrial) and ventricular-like (hESC-ventricular) CMs. We found the expression of atrial-specific ion channel genes, KCNA5 (encoding Kv1.5) and KCNJ3 (encoding Kir 3.1), in hESC-atrial CMs and further demonstrated that these ion channel genes are regulated by COUP-TF transcription factors. Moreover, in response to multiple ion channel blocker, vernakalant, and Kv1.5 blocker, XEN-D0101, hESC-atrial but not hESC-ventricular CMs showed action potential (AP) prolongation due to a reduction in early repolarization. In hESC-atrial CMs, XEN-R0703, a novel Kir3.1/3.4 blocker restored the AP shortening caused by CCh. Neither CCh nor XEN-R0703 had an effect on hESC-ventricular CMs. In summary, we demonstrate that hESC-atrial CMs are a robust model for pre-clinical testing to assess atrial selectivity of novel antiarrhythmic drugs. PMID:25700171

  8. Pharmacological interventions for antisocial personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Najat; Duggan, Conor; Stoffers, Jutta; Huband, Nick; Völlm, Birgit A; Ferriter, Michael; Lieb, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Antisocial personality disorder (AsPD) is associated with a wide range of disturbance including persistent rule-breaking, criminality, substance misuse, unemployment, homelessness and relationship difficulties. Objectives To evaluate the potential beneficial and adverse effects of pharmacological interventions for people with AsPD. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1950 to September 2009), EMBASE (1980 to 2009, week 37), CINAHL (1982 to September 2009), PsycINFO (1872 to September 2009), ASSIA (1987 to September 2009), BIOSIS (1985 to September 2009), COPAC (September 2009), National Criminal Justice Reference Service Abstracts (1970 to July 2008), Sociological Abstracts (1963 to September 2009), ISI-Proceedings (1981 to September 2009), Science Citation Index (1981 to September 2009), Social Science Citation Index (1981 to September 2009), SIGLE (1980 to April 2006), Dissertation Abstracts (September 2009), ZETOC (September 2009) and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (September 2009). Selection criteria Controlled trials in which participants with AsPD were randomly allocated to a pharmacological intervention and a placebo control condition. Two trials comparing one drug against another without a placebo control are reported separately. Data collection and analysis Three review authors independently selected studies. Two review authors independently extracted data. We calculated mean differences, with odds ratios for dichotomous data. Main results Eight studies met the inclusion criteria involving 394 participants with AsPD. Data were available from four studies involving 274 participants with AsPD. No study set out to recruit participants solely on the basis of having AsPD, and in only one study was the sample entirely of AsPD participants. Eight different drugs were examined in eight studies. Study quality was relatively poor. Inadequate reporting meant the

  9. 76 FR 38668 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... April 13, 2010, Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology...

  10. 76 FR 3912 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... how to optimally utilize mechanistic biomarkers and apply clinical pharmacology tools, such...

  11. Pharmacology for sleep disturbance in PTSD.

    PubMed

    Lipinska, Gosia; Baldwin, David S; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2016-03-01

    Symptoms of sleep disturbance, particularly nightmares and insomnia, are a central feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emerging evidence suggests that specific treatment of PTSD-related sleep disturbance improves other symptoms of the disorder, which in turn suggests that such disturbance may be fundamental to development and maintenance of the disorder. This mini-review focuses on pharmacological treatment of sleep disturbance in adult PTSD (specifically, studies testing the efficacy of antidepressants, adrenergic inhibiting agents, antipsychotics and benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics). We conclude that only prazosin, an adrenergic inhibiting agent, has had its efficacy established by multiple randomised controlled trials. There is also high-level evidence supporting use of eszopiclone, as well as risperidone and olanzapine as adjunct therapy. Antidepressants such as sertraline, venlafaxine and mirtazapine, benzodiazepines such as alprazolam and clonazepam and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics such as zolpidem appear ineffective in treating PTSD-related sleep disturbance. Most studies that report reduced frequency of nightmares and insomnia also report decreases in overall symptom severity. Such findings suggest that (i) sleep disruption is central to PTSD; (ii) treating sleep disruption may be an effective way to address other symptoms of the disorder and (iii) PTSD symptoms tend to cluster together in predictable ways. PMID:26856810

  12. Emerging preclinical pharmacological targets for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-05-17

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological condition caused by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. It is the most prevalent form of Parkinsonism, categorized by cardinal features such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremors, and postural instability. Due to the multicentric pathology of PD involving inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis, and protein aggregation, it has become difficult to pin-point a single therapeutic target and evaluate its potential application. Currently available drugs for treating PD provide only symptomatic relief and do not decrease or avert disease progression resulting in poor patient satisfaction and compliance. Significant amount of understanding concerning the pathophysiology of PD has offered a range of potential targets for PD. Several emerging targets including AAV-hAADC gene therapy, phosphodiesterase-4, potassium channels, myeloperoxidase, acetylcholinesterase, MAO-B, dopamine, A2A, mGlu5, and 5-HT-1A/1B receptors are in different stages of clinical development. Additionally, alternative interventions such as deep brain stimulation, thalamotomy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and gamma knife surgery, are also being developed for patients with advanced PD. As much as these therapeutic targets hold potential to delay the onset and reverse the disease, more targets and alternative interventions need to be examined in different stages of PD. In this review, we discuss various emerging preclinical pharmacological targets that may serve as a new promising neuroprotective strategy that could actually help alleviate PD and its symptoms. PMID:26988916

  13. Safety pharmacology — Current and emerging concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdam, Junnat; Sethu, Swaminathan; Smith, Trevor; Alfirevic, Ana; Alhaidari, Mohammad; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Box, Helen; Cross, Michael; Delaunois, Annie; Dermody, Ailsa; Govindappa, Karthik; Guillon, Jean-Michel; Jenkins, Rosalind; Kenna, Gerry; Lemmer, Björn; Meecham, Ken; Olayanju, Adedamola; Pestel, Sabine; Rothfuss, Andreas; and others

    2013-12-01

    Safety pharmacology (SP) is an essential part of the drug development process that aims to identify and predict adverse effects prior to clinical trials. SP studies are described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7A and S7B guidelines. The core battery and supplemental SP studies evaluate effects of a new chemical entity (NCE) at both anticipated therapeutic and supra-therapeutic exposures on major organ systems, including cardiovascular, central nervous, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal. This review outlines the current practices and emerging concepts in SP studies including frontloading, parallel assessment of core battery studies, use of non-standard species, biomarkers, and combining toxicology and SP assessments. Integration of the newer approaches to routine SP studies may significantly enhance the scope of SP by refining and providing mechanistic insight to potential adverse effects associated with test compounds. - Highlights: • SP — mandatory non-clinical risk assessments performed during drug development. • SP organ system studies ensure the safety of clinical participants in FiH trials. • Frontloading in SP facilitates lead candidate drug selection. • Emerging trends: integrating SP-Toxicological endpoints; combined core battery tests.

  14. Clinical pharmacology of atypical antipsychotics: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, M.C.; Paletta, S.; Maffini, M.; Colasanti, A.; Dragogna, F.; Di Pace, C.; Altamura, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    This review will concentrate on the clinical pharmacology, in particular pharmacodynamic data, related to atypical antipsychotics, clozapine, risperidone, paliperidone, olanzapine, que¬tiapine, amisulpride, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, asenapine, iloperidone, lurasidone and cariprazine. A summary of their acute pharmacokinetics properties are also reported. Four new second-generation antipsychotics are available: iloperidone, asenapine, lurasidone and in the next future cariprazine. Similar to ziprasidone and aripiprazole, these new agents are advisable for the lower propensity to give weight gain and metabolic abnormalities in comparison with older second-generation antipsychotics such as olanzapine or clozapine. Actually lurasidone seems to be best in terms of minimizing unwanted alterations in body weight and metabolic variables. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not strictly necessary for all of the new antipsychotic drugs because there are no unequivocal data supporting a relationship between plasma drug levels and clinical outcomes or side effects. The exception can be represented by clozapine for which plasma levels of 350-420 ng/ml are reported to be associated with an increased probability of a good clinical response. Also for olanzapine an established therapeutic range (20-50 ng/ml) is proposed to yield an optimal response and minimize side effects. PMID:26417330

  15. Aldosterone blockade in CKD: emphasis on pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Michael H; Hirsch, Jamie S; Bomback, Andrew S

    2015-03-01

    Besides its epithelial effect on sodium retention and potassium excretion in the distal tubule, aldosterone promotes inflammation and fibrosis in the heart, kidneys, and blood vessels. As glomerular filtration rate falls, aldosterone is inappropriately elevated relative to extracellular fluid expansion. In addition, studies in CKD patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and/or direct renin inhibitors have shown that aldosterone levels paradoxically rise in approximately 30% to 40% of patients on these renin-angiotensin system-blocking drugs. Hence, there is interest in using mineralocorticoid receptor blockers that directly target the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of aldosterone in CKD patients. This interest, however, is tempered by a number of unresolved issues, including the safety of using such drugs in advanced CKD and ESRD populations, and the potential for differences in drug efficacy according to race and ethnicity of patient populations. A better understanding of mineralocorticoid receptor blocker pharmacology should help inform future research directions and clinical practice decisions as to how best to use these agents in CKD.

  16. Pharmacologic therapies aid treatment for autism.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Ronald L; Aman, Michael G

    2003-10-01

    In the absence of other guidelines, practitioners often prescribe by analogy with roles of psychotropic medicines in other psychiatric disorders (e.g., the ability of serotonergic antidepressants to reduce compulsive behavior). There is a slow but steady accumulation of data supporting the use of psychotropic medications to manage certain symptoms in children with autism. These data support the use of stimulant medications for attention/hyperactivity symptoms, with willingness to suspend such treatment if a trial is unsuccessful. Risperidone is supported for other disruptive behaviors, especially of an irritable/disruptive nature, but with attention to increases in appetite and weight. SSRIs and atypical antipsychotics may be helpful for a variety of perseverative behaviors, although one would seldom prescribe antipsychotic medication for mild perseverative behavior alone. SSRIs may be useful for anxiety. Again, there is no compelling evidence that existing pharmacologic treatments have a major role in treating the core symptoms of autism, especially the profound impairments in social interaction and communication. Further well-designed double-blind studies with significant numbers of subjects and defined target symptoms will provide the data that will guide therapeutic decisions in the future.

  17. Emerging preclinical pharmacological targets for Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological condition caused by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the basal ganglia. It is the most prevalent form of Parkinsonism, categorized by cardinal features such as bradykinesia, rigidity, tremors, and postural instability. Due to the multicentric pathology of PD involving inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis, and protein aggregation, it has become difficult to pin-point a single therapeutic target and evaluate its potential application. Currently available drugs for treating PD provide only symptomatic relief and do not decrease or avert disease progression resulting in poor patient satisfaction and compliance. Significant amount of understanding concerning the pathophysiology of PD has offered a range of potential targets for PD. Several emerging targets including AAV-hAADC gene therapy, phosphodiesterase-4, potassium channels, myeloperoxidase, acetylcholinesterase, MAO-B, dopamine, A2A, mGlu5, and 5-HT-1A/1B receptors are in different stages of clinical development. Additionally, alternative interventions such as deep brain stimulation, thalamotomy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and gamma knife surgery, are also being developed for patients with advanced PD. As much as these therapeutic targets hold potential to delay the onset and reverse the disease, more targets and alternative interventions need to be examined in different stages of PD. In this review, we discuss various emerging preclinical pharmacological targets that may serve as a new promising neuroprotective strategy that could actually help alleviate PD and its symptoms. PMID:26988916

  18. Compartmentalized Platforms for Neuro-pharmacological Research

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Amol D.; Wei, Li; Shi, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Dissociated primary neuronal cell culture remains an indispensable approach for neurobiology research in order to investigate basic mechanisms underlying diverse neuronal functions, drug screening and pharmacological investigation. Compartmentalization, a widely adopted technique since its emergence in 1970s enables spatial segregation of neuronal segments and detailed investigation that is otherwise limited with traditional culture methods. Although these compartmental chambers (e.g. Campenot chamber) have been proven valuable for the investigation of Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) neurons and to some extent within Central Nervous System (CNS) neurons, their utility has remained limited given the arduous manufacturing process, incompatibility with high-resolution optical imaging and limited throughput. The development in the area of microfabrication and microfluidics has enabled creation of next generation compartmentalized devices that are cheap, easy to manufacture, require reduced sample volumes, enable precise control over the cellular microenvironment both spatially as well as temporally, and permit highthroughput testing. In this review we briefly evaluate the various compartmentalization tools used for neurobiological research, and highlight application of the emerging microfluidic platforms towards in vitro single cell neurobiology. PMID:26813122

  19. [Opioid tolerance and dependence--pharmacological aspects].

    PubMed

    Jaba, I M; Luncanu, I; Mungiu, O C

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged opioids administration leads inevitably to tolerance and dependence, a phenomenon we meet more often in healthy people than in ill patients. Tolerance means a hypersensibility of neuronal membranes as well as changes in the number and affinity of opioid receptors, which implies intake of larger doses to obtain the initial effect. Physical dependence, quite different of the psychological one, is the appearance of abstinence syndrome on sudden interruption of opioid administration or on administration of an antagonist. There is usually cross-tolerance in opioids, but it can also be incomplete, when the initial opioid can be replaced with another one that produces a milder abstinence syndrome. Classically, metadone is used in long time therapy, after detoxification with an antagonist is performed (naloxon, naltrexon). Modern pharmacological alternatives are levo-alpha-acetyl-methadol (LAAM) and agonists-antagonists (butorphanol, buprenorphine, pentazocine, nalbuphine). An antagonist can also be used if associated with an alpha--stimulant (clonidine), in order to remove noradrenergic manifestations of abstinence syndrome. Now other therapeutical principles are being studied: enkephalinaze inhibitors to reduce the abstinence syndrome, NMDA receptor antagonists, NO sintetasis inhibitors, that facilitates opioid analgesia and hinders tolerance development; colecystokinin-receptors agonists or antagonists to reduce tolerance on morphine. A recent study showed that the concomitant administration of an opioid agonist (sufentanil) and a calcium channels blocker (nimodipine) not only prevents from tolerance development but also triggers hypersensibility to analgesic effects of the opioid. PMID:12092171

  20. Pharmacologic therapeutics for cardiac reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Gross, Eric R; Gross, Garrett J

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrial societies, with myocardial infarction as the primary assassin. Pharmacologic agents, including the myocardial cell membrane receptor agonists adenosine, bradykinin/angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, opioids and erythropoietin or the mixed cell membrane and intracellular agonists, glucose insulin potassium, and volatile anesthetics, either clinically or experimentally reduce the extent of myocardial injury when administered just prior to reperfusion. Agents that specifically target proteins, transcription factors or ion channels, including PKC agonists/antagonists, PPAR, Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase and the ATP-dependent potassium channel are also promising. However, no agent has been specifically approved to reduce reperfusion injury clinically. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and limitations of agents to combat reperfusion injury, their market development status and findings reported in both clinical and preclinical studies. The molecular pathways activated by these agents that preserve myocardium from reperfusion injury, which appear to commonly involve glycogen synthase kinase 3beta and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibition, are also described. PMID:17874967

  1. Beyond traditional pharmacology: new tools and approaches.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, E V; Gurevich, V V

    2015-07-01

    Traditional pharmacology is defined as the science that deals with drugs and their actions. While small molecule drugs have clear advantages, there are many cases where they have proved to be ineffective, prone to unacceptable side effects, or where due to a particular disease aetiology they cannot possibly be effective. A dominant feature of the small molecule drugs is their single mindedness: they provide either continuous inhibition or continuous activation of the target. Because of that, these drugs tend to engage compensatory mechanisms leading to drug tolerance, drug resistance or, in some cases, sensitization and consequent loss of therapeutic efficacy over time and/or unwanted side effects. Here we discuss new and emerging therapeutic tools and approaches that have potential for treating the majority of disorders for which small molecules are either failing or cannot be developed. These new tools include biologics, such as recombinant hormones and antibodies, as well as approaches involving gene transfer (gene therapy and genome editing) and the introduction of specially designed self-replicating cells. It is clear that no single method is going to be a 'silver bullet', but collectively, these novel approaches hold promise for curing practically every disorder.

  2. Echinacea purpurea: Pharmacology, phytochemistry and analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Manayi, Azadeh; Vazirian, Mahdi; Saeidnia, Soodabeh

    2015-01-01

    Echinacea purpurea (Asteraceae) is a perennial medicinal herb with important immunostimulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, especially the alleviation of cold symptoms. The plant also attracted scientists' attention to assess other aspects of its beneficial effects. For instance, antianxiety, antidepression, cytotoxicity, and antimutagenicity as induced by the plant have been revealed in various studies. The findings of the clinical trials are controversial in terms of side effects. While some studies revealed the beneficial effects of the plant on the patients and no severe adverse effects, some others have reported serious side effects including abdominal pain, angioedema, dyspnea, nausea, pruritus, rash, erythema, and urticaria. Other biological activities of the plant such as antioxidant, antibacterial, antiviral, and larvicidal activities have been reported in previous experimental studies. Different classes of secondary metabolites of the plant such as alkamides, caffeic acid derivatives, polysaccharides, and glycoproteins are believed to be biologically and pharmacologically active. Actually, concurrent determination and single analysis of cichoric acid and alkamides have been successfully developed mainly by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with different detectors including UV spectrophotometric, coulometric electrochemical, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detectors. The results of the studies which were controversial revealed that in spite of major experiments successfully accomplished using E. purpurea, many questions remain unanswered and future investigations may aim for complete recognition of the plant's mechanism of action using new, complementary methods. PMID:26009695

  3. Pharmacological potentials of Syzygium cumini: a review.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shalini; Chandra, Deepak

    2013-07-01

    In the last few years there has been an exponential growth in the field of herbal medicine, and these drugs are gaining popularity in both developing and developed countries because of their natural origin and lesser side effects. Syzygium cumini (syn. Eugenia jambolana, Syzygium jambolana, Eugenia cumini, Syzygium jambos), commonly known as jamun in India, is an evergreen tree distributed throughout the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia and East Africa. It is mainly utilised as a fruit producer and for its timber. Medicinally, the fruit is reported to have antidiabetic, antihyperlipidaemic, antioxidant, antiulcer, hepatoprotective, antiallergic, antiarthritic, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antifertility, antipyretic, antiplaque, radioprotective, neuropsychopharmacological, nephroprotective and antidiarrhoeal activities. Among these beneficial physiological effects, the antidiabetic property of S. cumini has the most promising nutraceutical value. The health-beneficial effects of S. cumini are mainly attributed to various phytoconstituents such as tannins, alkaloids, steroids, flavonoids, terpenoids, fatty acids, phenols, minerals, carbohydrates and vitamins present in the fruit. This review paper presents an overview of experimental evidence for the pharmacological potential of S. cumini.

  4. Phytochemical and pharmacological potential of Acanthus ilicifolius.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharya; Aeri, Vidhu

    2013-01-01

    Acanthus ilicifolius (Acanthaceae) has received considerable attention due to its wide range of secondary metabolites and its traditional usage in Indian and Chinese system of medicine. This plant is reported to be a mangrove. Mangrove survives in the most hostile environment with fluctuating tidal and saline regime. Hence, these plants are considered to be rich sources of steroids, triterpenoids, saponins, flavonoids, alkaloids, and tannins. Present review article is an attempt to cover recent developments in phytochemical and pharmacological potential of drug. Traditionally, the plant has been used for dyspepsia, paralysis, asthsma, headache, rheumatism, and skin diseases. The plant is known as 'Krishnasaireyaka' or 'Karimkurunji', is one of the 9 plants equated to the drug 'Sahachara,' which is used in Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatic complaints. The plant has not been explored to its full potential. The review will be a good reference tool for investigators who wish to work on natural compounds with free radical scavenging activity to combat diseases associated with stress. PMID:23559819

  5. Development of pharmacological strategies for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Kanabus, M; Heales, S J; Rahman, S

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are an unusually genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders, which are extremely challenging to treat. Currently, apart from supportive therapy, there are no effective treatments for the vast majority of mitochondrial diseases. Huge scientific effort, however, is being put into understanding the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial disease pathology and developing potential treatments. To date, a variety of treatments have been evaluated by randomized clinical trials, but unfortunately, none of these has delivered breakthrough results. Increased understanding of mitochondrial pathways and the development of many animal models, some of which are accurate phenocopies of human diseases, are facilitating the discovery and evaluation of novel prospective treatments. Targeting reactive oxygen species has been a treatment of interest for many years; however, only in recent years has it been possible to direct antioxidant delivery specifically into the mitochondria. Increasing mitochondrial biogenesis, whether by pharmacological approaches, dietary manipulation or exercise therapy, is also currently an active area of research. Modulating mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy and the mitochondrial membrane lipid milieu have also emerged as possible treatment strategies. Recent technological advances in gene therapy, including allotopic and transkingdom gene expression and mitochondrially targeted transcription activator-like nucleases, have led to promising results in cell and animal models of mitochondrial diseases, but most of these techniques are still far from clinical application.

  6. Caffeine use in sports. A pharmacological review.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, C J; Geiger, J D

    2000-03-01

    Caffeine is the most widely ingested psychoactive drug in the world. As many know, chronic use of caffeine leads to dependence, tolerance, drug craving, and upon abrupt cessation unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Thus, caffeine fulfills pharmacological criteria by which agents are classified as drugs of abuse. Nevertheless, its use is legal and only at high, but readily attainable, levels is it banned from sport. Its use is widespread by athletes as young as 11 years of age who are seeking athletic advantage over fellow competitors. It is likely that its use will not decline any time soon because it is inexpensive, readily available, medically quite safe, socially acceptable, and by most measures legal. However, at levels allowed in sport, caffeine through its wide-ranging physiological and psychological effects increases endurance in well-trained athletes. If the goal of drug-testing and education programs in sport is to protect the health of athletes, prevent unfair advantage (cheating) and encourage ethical behavior then it seems obvious that the allowable levels of caffeine ingestion should be decreased. The alternative is to continue with policies designed largely to punish only those that get caught.

  7. Pharmacological Activities and Applications of Spicatoside A

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Mahesh; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Liriopogons (Liriope and Opiopogon) species are used as a main medicinal ingredient in several Asian countries. The Liriopes Radix (tuber, root of Liriope platyphylla) has to be a promising candidate due to their source of phytochemicals. Steroidal saponins and their glycosides, phenolic compounds, secondary metabolites are considered of active constituents in Liriopes Radix. Spicatoside A, a steroidal saponin, could be more efficacious drug candidate in future. In this review, we summarized the available knowledge on phytochemical and pharmacological activities for spicatoside A. It significantly suppressed the level of NF-κB, NO, iNOS, Cox-2, IL-1β, IL-6 and MAPKs in LPS-stimulated inflammation. The production of MUC5AC mucin was increased. MMP-13 expression was down-regulated in IL-1β-treated cells and reduced glycosaminoglycan release from IL-1α-treated cells. The neurite outgrowth activity, PI3K, Akt, ERK1/2, TrkA and CREB phosphorylation and neurotropic factors such as NGF and BDNF were upregulated with increased latency time. It also showed cell growth inhibitory activity on various carcinoma cells. From this, spicatoside A exerts anti-inflammation, anti-asthma, anti-osteoclastogenesis, neurite outgrowth, memory consolidation and anticancer activities. Further studies are needed on spicatoside A in order to understand mechanisms of action to treat various human diseases. PMID:27169821

  8. Demonstration of denervation supersensitivity: a pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Catapane, E J

    1982-01-01

    1. Although the phenomenon of denervation supersensitivity has been extensively studied in peripheral cholinergically and adrenergically innervated organs, the consequences of denervation have not been studied in as much detail in serotonergically innervated s stems. This may be due in part to the difficulties associated with producing specific lesions of serotonergic systems and with quantifying physiological responses of the CNS due to serotonin. 2. Because the lateral ciliated cells of the gill of the bivalve mollusc, Mytilus edulis, are innervated by serotonergic motor neurons which are responsible for accelerating the beating rate of the cilia we used this as a model system with which to study the effects of denervation by physical transections of the branchial nerve and by pharmacological treatments with 5,6 dihydroxytryptamine. 3. Both treatments produced a supersensitive response of the ciliated cells to the superfusion of serotonin. Two mechanisms with different time courses may be responsible. 4. The initial faster acting component may be due to changes in re-uptake mechanisms for serotonin, while the later slowly developing component may be due to other causes, including a hyperplasia of postjunctional serotonin receptors. PMID:6128156

  9. [Pharmacologic therapy of depression during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Bellantuono, Cesario; Migliarese, Giovanni; Imperadore, Giuseppe

    2006-02-01

    The pregnancy is considered to be relatively high risk period for depressive episodes in women, particularly for those with pre-existing affective disorders. Epidemiological studies indicate that between 10% to 16% of pregnant women fulfil the diagnostic criteria for major depression and on average 20% is affected by an anxiety disorder. Pharmacological treatment of depression during pregnancy, however, brings with it certainties and dilemmas. It has been reported that untreated depression is associated with impaired feto-placental function, premature delivery, miscarriage, low fetal growth and perinatal unwanted effects. On the other hand, the use of antidepressant drugs in pregnancy might be at risk of major malformations (teratogenesis), neonatal toxicity, especially withdrawal symptoms and neuropsychological-behavioural impairment. In addition, the abrupt discontinuation of antidepressants, because of fear for adverse fetal effects, exposes women to serious clinical problems, in particular the disease relapse. A number of reviews indicates that among antidepressant drugs, the older SSRIs (in particular fluoxetine, sertraline, citalopram) seem to be avoided of teratogenic risks; for these reasons such drugs are nowadays considered of choice for the treatment of depression during pregnancy. Less information is available for other drugs, including triciclycs, venlafaxine, mirtazapine, bupropion, escitalopram and duloxetine. Withdrawal symptoms have been reported for all antidepressants; these symptoms, however, were self-limiting in majority of cases and had a favourable outcome. Inconclusive findings emerge, so far, from the few longitudinal studies focusing on the long-term neurodevelopment outcome in children.

  10. New pharmacological approaches for obesity management.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Clausen, Christian F; Padwal, Raj S; Sharma, Arya M

    2013-08-01

    Obesity, which results from an imbalance between calorie intake and expenditure, now affects over 500 million individuals worldwide. Lifestyle and behavioural interventions aimed at reducing calorie intake and/or increasing energy expenditure have limited long-term effectiveness due to complex and persistent hormonal, metabolic and neurochemical adaptations that defend against weight loss and promote weight regain. Surgical treatments for obesity, although highly effective, are unavailable or unsuitable for the majority of individuals with excess adiposity. Accordingly, few effective treatment options are available to most individuals with obesity. In the past, the use of antiobesity drugs, seemingly the logical choice to fill this therapeutic gap, has been limited because of a lack of efficacy, poor long-term adherence rates and serious adverse effects. In 2012, the FDA approved two new medications-lorcaserin and phentermine-topiramate controlled release-and is currently reviewing the resubmission of naltrexone sustained release-bupropion sustained release. This Review presents the available data on the efficacy and safety of these three medications and discusses future perspectives and challenges related to pharmacological weight management. PMID:23752772

  11. Polyketides from dinoflagellates: origins, pharmacology and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rein, K S; Borrone, J

    1999-10-01

    Dinoflagellates, unicellular marine protists, produce some of the largest and most complex polyketides identified to date. The biological activities of these compounds are quite diverse. Compounds having potential therapeutic value as anti-cancer agents as well as deadly neurotoxins, whose production has resulted in severe public health hazards and economic hardships, are represented in this group of secondary metabolites. Stable isotope feeding experiments have firmly established the polyketide origins of representative compounds from each of the three structural classes, the polyether ladders, the macrocycles and the linear polyethers. Yet some unusual labeling patterns have been observed in each class. Pendant methyl groups are most often derived from C-2 of acetate and deletions of C-1 of acetate are common. Studies on the biosynthesis of dinoflagellate derived polyketides at the genomic level have not been reported, in part due to the peculiarities of the dinoflagellate nucleus and the lack of a dinoflagellate transformation system. Nevertheless, a fundamental understanding of the genetics of polyketide biosynthesis by dinoflagellates could be the catalyst for developing several fruitful avenues of research. Dinoflagellate derived polyketides are reviewed with special emphasis on pharmacology and biosynthesis.

  12. Pharmacological studies of cardamom oil in animals.

    PubMed

    al-Zuhair, H; el-Sayeh, B; Ameen, H A; al-Shoora, H

    1996-01-01

    Cardamom seeds are widely used for flavouring purposes in food and as carminative. Little information has been reported on their pharmacological and toxicological properties or, for their volatile oil which constitutes about 5% of the seed's total weight. A comparative study of the anti-inflammatory activity of the oil extracted from commercial Elettaria cardamomum seeds, in doses of 175 and 280 microliters/kg and indomethacin in a dose of 30 mg/kg against acute carrageenan-induced planter oedema in male albino rats was performed, which proved to be marked. Moreover, investigation of the analgesic activity using p-benzoquinone as a chemical stimulus proved that a dose of 233 microliters/kg of the oil produced 50% protection against the writhing (stretching syndrome) induced by intraperitoneal administration of a 0.02% solution of p-benzoquinone in mice. In addition the antispasmodic activity was determined on a rabbit intestine preparation using acetylcholine as agonist, the results proving that cardamom oil exerts its antispasmodic action through muscarinic receptor blockage.

  13. Echinacea purpurea: Pharmacology, phytochemistry and analysis methods

    PubMed Central

    Manayi, Azadeh; Vazirian, Mahdi; Saeidnia, Soodabeh

    2015-01-01

    Echinacea purpurea (Asteraceae) is a perennial medicinal herb with important immunostimulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, especially the alleviation of cold symptoms. The plant also attracted scientists’ attention to assess other aspects of its beneficial effects. For instance, antianxiety, antidepression, cytotoxicity, and antimutagenicity as induced by the plant have been revealed in various studies. The findings of the clinical trials are controversial in terms of side effects. While some studies revealed the beneficial effects of the plant on the patients and no severe adverse effects, some others have reported serious side effects including abdominal pain, angioedema, dyspnea, nausea, pruritus, rash, erythema, and urticaria. Other biological activities of the plant such as antioxidant, antibacterial, antiviral, and larvicidal activities have been reported in previous experimental studies. Different classes of secondary metabolites of the plant such as alkamides, caffeic acid derivatives, polysaccharides, and glycoproteins are believed to be biologically and pharmacologically active. Actually, concurrent determination and single analysis of cichoric acid and alkamides have been successfully developed mainly by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with different detectors including UV spectrophotometric, coulometric electrochemical, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detectors. The results of the studies which were controversial revealed that in spite of major experiments successfully accomplished using E. purpurea, many questions remain unanswered and future investigations may aim for complete recognition of the plant's mechanism of action using new, complementary methods. PMID:26009695

  14. Pharmacological pain management in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Søren S; Juel, Jacob; Graversen, Carina; Kolesnikov, Yuri; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2013-01-01

    Intense abdominal pain is a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis and its treatment remains a major clinical challenge. Basic studies of pancreatic nerves and experimental human pain research have provided evidence that pain processing is abnormal in these patients and in many cases resembles that seen in neuropathic and chronic pain disorders. An important ultimate outcome of such aberrant pain processing is that once the disease has advanced and the pathophysiological processes are firmly established, the generation of pain can become self-perpetuating and independent of the initial peripheral nociceptive drive. Consequently, the management of pain by traditional methods based on nociceptive deafferentation (e.g., surgery and visceral nerve blockade) becomes difficult and often ineffective. This novel and improved understanding of pain aetiology requires a paradigm shift in pain management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern mechanism based pain treatments taking into account altered pain processing are likely to increasingly replace invasive therapies targeting the nociceptive source, which should be reserved for special and carefully selected cases. In this review, we offer an overview of the current available pharmacological options for pain management in chronic pancreatitis. In addition, future options for pain management are discussed with special emphasis on personalized pain medicine and multidisciplinarity. PMID:24259960

  15. Tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis, utilization and pharmacological effects.

    PubMed

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Golderer, G; Werner, E R

    2002-04-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (H4-biopterin) is an essential cofactor of a set of enzymes that are of central metabolic importance, i.e. the hydroxylases of the three aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, of ether lipid oxidase, and of the three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes. As a consequence, H4-biopterin plays a key role in a vast number of biological processes and pathological states associated with neurotransmitter formation, vasorelaxation, and immune response. In mammals, its biosynthesis is controlled by hormones, cytokines and certain immune stimuli. This review aims to summarize recent developments concerning regulation of H4-biopterin biosynthetic and regulatory enzymes and pharmacological effects of H4-biopterin in various conditions, e.g. endothelial dysfunction or apoptosis of neuronal cells. Also, approaches towards gene therapy of diseases like the different forms of phenylketonuria or of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. Additional emphasis is given to H4-biopterin biosynthesis and function in non-mammalian species such as fruit fly, zebra fish, fungi, slime molds, the bacterium Nocardia as well as to the parasitic protozoan genus of Leishmania that is not capable of pteridine biosynthesis but has evolved a sophisticated salvage network for scavenging various pteridine compounds, notably folate and biopterin. PMID:12003348

  16. [Pharmacologic treatment of fibromyalgia: Towards chemical neuromodulation].

    PubMed

    Collado, Antonio; Conesa, Arantxa

    2009-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic pathology and its main symptom is pain which usually does not respond to traditional analgesia. Its clinical characteristics and the diverse neurophysiologic findings in these patients point to a central sensitization process of the nociceptive system as the central physiopathologic axis in this disease. The knowledge of the nociceptive system functioning and its behavior in this disease has led, in the past few years, to new possibilities for the therapeutic approach. In that way, drugs with a differential mechanism of action, allowing a modulation of the nociceptive system capable of producing analgesia where other medications have failed are being developed. Different drugs with the capacity increasing the activity of biologically active amines implicated in the nociceptive inhibition process and others which are destined to reduce the excitability of the system through ion channels, are being tested with some benefit in Fibromyalgia patients and may constitute a more rational neuromodulating drug profile for this disease. This article reviews the different pharmacological strategies supported by scientific evidence and points to some future research lines that fortifies the therapeutic change taking place in the treatment approach of these patients.

  17. Beyond traditional pharmacology: new tools and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Gurevich, E V; Gurevich, V V

    2015-01-01

    Traditional pharmacology is defined as the science that deals with drugs and their actions. While small molecule drugs have clear advantages, there are many cases where they have proved to be ineffective, prone to unacceptable side effects, or where due to a particular disease aetiology they cannot possibly be effective. A dominant feature of the small molecule drugs is their single mindedness: they provide either continuous inhibition or continuous activation of the target. Because of that, these drugs tend to engage compensatory mechanisms leading to drug tolerance, drug resistance or, in some cases, sensitization and consequent loss of therapeutic efficacy over time and/or unwanted side effects. Here we discuss new and emerging therapeutic tools and approaches that have potential for treating the majority of disorders for which small molecules are either failing or cannot be developed. These new tools include biologics, such as recombinant hormones and antibodies, as well as approaches involving gene transfer (gene therapy and genome editing) and the introduction of specially designed self-replicating cells. It is clear that no single method is going to be a ‘silver bullet’, but collectively, these novel approaches hold promise for curing practically every disorder. PMID:25572005

  18. Tinnitus: network pathophysiology-network pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Elgoyhen, Ana B.; Langguth, Berthold; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus, the phantom perception of sound, is a prevalent disorder. One in 10 adults has clinically significant subjective tinnitus, and for one in 100, tinnitus severely affects their quality of life. Despite the significant unmet clinical need for a safe and effective drug targeting tinnitus relief, there is currently not a single Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug on the market. The search for drugs that target tinnitus is hampered by the lack of a deep knowledge of the underlying neural substrates of this pathology. Recent studies are increasingly demonstrating that, as described for other central nervous system (CNS) disorders, tinnitus is a pathology of brain networks. The application of graph theoretical analysis to brain networks has recently provided new information concerning their topology, their robustness and their vulnerability to attacks. Moreover, the philosophy behind drug design and pharmacotherapy in CNS pathologies is changing from that of “magic bullets” that target individual chemoreceptors or “disease-causing genes” into that of “magic shotguns,” “promiscuous” or “dirty drugs” that target “disease-causing networks,” also known as network pharmacology. In the present work we provide some insight into how this knowledge could be applied to tinnitus pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy. PMID:22291622

  19. Clinical pharmacology in Russia-historical development and current state.

    PubMed

    Zagorodnikova Goryachkina, Ksenia; Burbello, Aleksandra; Sychev, Dmitry; Frolov, Maxim; Kukes, Vladimir; Petrov, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    Clinical pharmacology in Russia has long history and is currently active, but rather unrecognized internationally. It is governmentally approved as a teaching/scientific specialty since 1983 and as a medical specialty since 1997. Courses of clinical pharmacology are included in the undergraduate curricula in the 5th and/or 6th year of education at all medical schools in the Russian Federation. Postgraduate education includes initial specialization in internal medicine with further residency in clinical pharmacology. Governmental legislation recommends that every healthcare institution has either a department or a single position of clinical pharmacologist. Major routine duties include information about and monitoring of medication use, consultations in difficult clinical situations, pharmacogenetic counseling, therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacovigilance, and participation in drug and therapeutics (formulary) committees. There are official experts in clinical pharmacology in Russia responsible for coordinating relevant legislative issues. The chief expert clinical pharmacologist represents the discipline directly at the Ministry of Health. Research in clinical pharmacology in Russia is extensive and variable, but only some of it is published internationally. Russia is a participant of international societies of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics and collaboration is actively ongoing. There are still certain problems related to the development of the discipline in Russia-some healthcare institutions do not see the need for clinical pharmacology. However, the number of clinical pharmacologists in Russia is increasing as well as their role in physicians' education, national healthcare, and research.

  20. How research in behavioral pharmacology informs behavioral science.

    PubMed

    Branch, Marc N

    2006-05-01

    Behavioral pharmacology is a maturing science that has made significant contributions to the study of drug effects on behavior, especially in the domain of drug-behavior interactions. Less appreciated is that research in behavioral pharmacology can have, and has had, implications for the experimental analysis of behavior, especially its conceptualizations and theory. In this article, I outline three general strategies in behavioral pharmacology research that have been employed to increase understanding of behavioral processes. Examples are provided of the general characteristics of the strategies and of implications of previous research for behavior theory. Behavior analysis will advance as its theories are challenged.

  1. Eugenol: a natural compound with versatile pharmacological actions.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Kannissery; Ansari, Shahid H; Ali, Javed

    2010-12-01

    Eugenol, the major constituent of clove oil, has been widely used for its anesthetic and analgesic action in dentistry. Eugenol exhibits pharmacological effects on almost all systems and our aim is to review the research work that has identified these pharmacological actions. Eugenol possesses significant antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular properties, in addition to analgesic and local anesthetic activity. The metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the compound in humans have been studied. Eugenol has also been used as a penetration enhancer. The compound is a very promising candidate for versatile applications, and the design of new drugs based on the pharmacological effects of eugenol could be beneficial. PMID:21299140

  2. Molecular pharmacology of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Summers, R J

    2016-10-01

    This themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology stems from the eighth in the series of meetings on the Molecular Pharmacology of G protein coupled receptors (MPGPCR) held as part of a joint meeting with the Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists (ASCEPT) in Melbourne Australia from 7 to 11 December 2014. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc. PMID:27682321

  3. How Research in Behavioral Pharmacology Informs Behavioral Science

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Marc N

    2006-01-01

    Behavioral pharmacology is a maturing science that has made significant contributions to the study of drug effects on behavior, especially in the domain of drug-behavior interactions. Less appreciated is that research in behavioral pharmacology can have, and has had, implications for the experimental analysis of behavior, especially its conceptualizations and theory. In this article, I outline three general strategies in behavioral pharmacology research that have been employed to increase understanding of behavioral processes. Examples are provided of the general characteristics of the strategies and of implications of previous research for behavior theory. Behavior analysis will advance as its theories are challenged. PMID:16776059

  4. [Novelties in the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Nyolczas, Noémi

    2016-09-01

    Recently, results of several novel clinical trials on the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure have been published. In addition, the new European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure and a focused update by the ACC/AHA/HFSA on new pharmacological therapy for heart failure has been reported in 2016. This paper intends to provide an overview of the current state of the pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure in the light of the new guidelines which incorporate the results of the new clinical trials. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(38), 1517-1521. PMID:27640618

  5. Molecular pharmacology of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Summers, R J

    2016-10-01

    This themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology stems from the eighth in the series of meetings on the Molecular Pharmacology of G protein coupled receptors (MPGPCR) held as part of a joint meeting with the Australasian Society of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacologists and Toxicologists (ASCEPT) in Melbourne Australia from 7 to 11 December 2014. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc.

  6. 78 FR 58314 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  7. 75 FR 10488 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  8. 77 FR 42746 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  9. 78 FR 58315 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  10. 75 FR 11551 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  11. Citicoline: pharmacological and clinical review, 2006 update.

    PubMed

    Secades, Julio J; Lorenzo, José Luis

    2006-09-01

    Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine, CDP-choline, or citicoline is an essential intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of structural phospholipids in cell membranes, particularly phosphatidylcholine. Following administration by both the oral and parenteral routes, citicoline releases its two main components, cytidine and choline. Absorption by the oral route is virtually complete, and bioavailability by the oral route is therefore approximately the same as by the intravenous route. Once absorbed, citicoline is widely distributed throughout the body, crosses the blood-brain barrier and reaches the central nervous system (CNS), where it is incorporated into the membrane and microsomal phospholipid fraction. Citicoline activates biosynthesis of structural phospholipids of neuronal membranes, increases brain metabolism, and acts upon the levels of different neurotransmitters. Thus, citicoline has been experimentally shown to increase norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the CNS. Owing to these pharmacological mechanisms, citicoline has a neuroprotective effect in hypoxic and ischemic conditions, decreasing the volume of ischemic lesion, and also improves learning and memory performance in animal models of brain aging. In addition, citicoline has been shown to restore the activity of mitochondrial ATPase and membrane Na+/K+ATPase, to inhibit activation of certain phospholipases, and to accelerate reabsorption of cerebral edema in various experimental models. Citicoline has also been shown to be able to inhibit mechanisms of apoptosis associated to cerebral ischemia and in certain neurodegeneration models, and to potentiate neuroplasticity mechanisms. Citicoline is a safe drug, as shown by the toxicological tests conducted, that has no significant systemic cholinergic effects and is a well tolerated product. These pharmacological characteristics and the action mechanisms of citicoline suggest that this product may be indicated for treatment of cerebral vascular disease, head

  12. Citicoline: pharmacological and clinical review, 2006 update.

    PubMed

    Secades, Julio J; Lorenzo, José Luis

    2006-09-01

    Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine, CDP-choline, or citicoline is an essential intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of structural phospholipids in cell membranes, particularly phosphatidylcholine. Following administration by both the oral and parenteral routes, citicoline releases its two main components, cytidine and choline. Absorption by the oral route is virtually complete, and bioavailability by the oral route is therefore approximately the same as by the intravenous route. Once absorbed, citicoline is widely distributed throughout the body, crosses the blood-brain barrier and reaches the central nervous system (CNS), where it is incorporated into the membrane and microsomal phospholipid fraction. Citicoline activates biosynthesis of structural phospholipids of neuronal membranes, increases brain metabolism, and acts upon the levels of different neurotransmitters. Thus, citicoline has been experimentally shown to increase norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the CNS. Owing to these pharmacological mechanisms, citicoline has a neuroprotective effect in hypoxic and ischemic conditions, decreasing the volume of ischemic lesion, and also improves learning and memory performance in animal models of brain aging. In addition, citicoline has been shown to restore the activity of mitochondrial ATPase and membrane Na+/K+ATPase, to inhibit activation of certain phospholipases, and to accelerate reabsorption of cerebral edema in various experimental models. Citicoline has also been shown to be able to inhibit mechanisms of apoptosis associated to cerebral ischemia and in certain neurodegeneration models, and to potentiate neuroplasticity mechanisms. Citicoline is a safe drug, as shown by the toxicological tests conducted, that has no significant systemic cholinergic effects and is a well tolerated product. These pharmacological characteristics and the action mechanisms of citicoline suggest that this product may be indicated for treatment of cerebral vascular disease, head

  13. Pharmacological applications of antioxidants: lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is linked with many pathologies ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative disorders and antioxidants have presumably therapeutic value in such diseases. In this review, we categorize different direct and indirect mechanisms by which antioxidants exert their action. These include scavenging and metal chelating effects, mimicking the antioxidant enzymes or upregulation of their expression, activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), increasing the activity of sirtuins and inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes among others. Recent findings on the most frequently investigated antioxidants including polyphenolics, thiolics, spin trapping agents, SOD mimetics, inducers of heme oxygenase-1 and nitric oxide synthase, activators of Nrf2, NADPH oxidase inhibitors and herbal supplements are summarized. Furthermore, the antioxidant effects of drugs that are clinically used for other pharmacological purposes including ACE inhibitors and statins are discussed. Cost-effectiveness and adverse effects of antioxidants are also evaluated. Since antioxidant therapy has failed in many instances, we have classified the reasons that may explain these shortcomings in different categories. Novel approaches to antioxidant therapy, that include mitochondria-targeting drugs, antioxidant gene therapy and approaches for improvement of cell uptake and alteration of subcellular compartment localization are also described. In the end, "shadows" that are shortcomings of antioxidant therapy as well as "lights" that include positive outcomes are addressed. It is concluded that if we learn from failures, invest on agents with higher potential and take advantage of novel emerging approaches, antioxidants could be an asset for the management of certain carefully chosen oxidative stress-related diseases.

  14. An agenda for UK clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jamie J; McDowell, Sarah E

    2012-01-01

    The internet and the World Wide Web have changed the ways that we function. As technologies grow and adapt, there is a huge potential for the internet to affect drug research and development, as well as many other aspects of clinical pharmacology. We review some of the areas of interest to date and discuss some of the potential areas in which internet-based technology can be exploited. Information retrieval from the web by health-care professionals is common, and bringing evidence-based medicine to the bedside affects the care of patients. As a primary research tool the web can provide a vast array of information in generating new ideas or exploring previous research findings. This has facilitated systematic reviewing, for example. The content of the web has become a subject of research in its own right. The web is also widely used as a research facilitator, including enhancement of communication between collaborators, provision of online research tools (such as questionnaires, management of large scale multicentre trials, registration of clinical trials) and distribution of information. Problems include information overload, ignorance of early data that are not indexed in databases, difficulties in keeping web sites up to date and assessing the validity of information retrieved. Some web-based activities are viewed with suspicion, including analysis by pharmaceutical companies of drug information to facilitate direct-to-consumer advertising of novel pharmaceuticals. Use of these technologies will continue to expand in often unexpected ways. Clinical pharmacologists must embrace internet technology and include it as a key priority in their research agenda. PMID:22360652

  15. Pharmacological treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Czobor, Pal

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment of negative symptoms is one of the most important unmet needs in schizophrenic disorders. Because the evidence on current psychopharmacological treatments is unclear, the authors reviewed the findings published to date by searching PubMed with the keywords negative symptoms, antipsychotics, antidepressants, glutamatergic compounds, monotherapy and add-on therapy and identifying additional articles in the reference lists of the resulting publications. The findings presented here predominantly focus on results of meta-analyses. Evidence for efficacy of current psychopharmacological medications is difficult to assess because of methodological problems and inconsistent results. In general, the second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) do not appear to have good efficacy in negative symptoms, although some show better efficacy than first-generation antipsychotics, some of which also demonstrated efficacy in negative symptoms. Specific trials on predominant persistent negative symptoms are rare and have been performed with only a few SGAs. More often, trials on somewhat persistent negative symptoms evaluate add-on strategies to ongoing antipsychotic treatment. Such trials, mostly on modern antidepressants, have demonstrated some efficacy. Several trials with small samples have evaluated add-on treatment with glutamatergic compounds, such as the naturally occurring amino acids glycine and D-serine and new pharmacological compounds. The results are highly inconsistent, although overall efficacy results appear to be positive. The unsatisfactory and inconsistent results can be partially explained by methodological problems. These problems need to be solved in the future, and the authors propose some possible solutions. Further research is required to identify effective treatment for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:25895634

  16. Characterization and pharmacology of the GHB receptor.

    PubMed

    Ticku, Maharaj K; Mehta, Ashok K

    2008-10-01

    Radioligand binding using [(3)H]NCS-382, an antagonist of the GHB receptor, revealed specific binding sites in the rat cerebrocortical and hippocampal membranes. Scatchard analysis of saturation isotherms revealed two different populations of binding sites. NCS-382 was about 10 times more potent than GHB in inhibiting [(3)H]NCS-382 binding. A variety of ligands for other receptors did not affect [(3)H]NCS-382 binding. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of [(3)H]NCS-382 binding revealed similar characteristics. Thus [(3)H]NCS-382, being more potent and selective, offers advantage over [(3)H]GHB as a radioligand. Unlike GHB, several analogues of GHB such as UMB68 (a tertiary alcohol analogue of GHB), UMB86 (4-hydroxy-4-napthylbutanoic acid, sodium salt), UMB72 [4-(3-phenylpropyloxy)butyric acid, sodium salt], UMB73 (4-benzyloxybutyric acid, sodium salt), UMB66 (3-chloropropanoic acid), gamma-hydroxyvaleric acid (that is, GHV, a 4-methyl-substituted analogue of GHB), 3-HPA (3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid), and ethers of 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (UMB108, UMB109, and UMB119) displaced [(3)H]NCS-382 without affecting [(3)H]GABA binding to GABA(B) receptor. Thus these compounds offer an advantage over GHB as an experimental tool. Our study, aimed at exploring the potential involvement of the GHB receptor in the pharmacology of ethanol, indicated that ethanol does not affect [(3)H]NCS-382 binding in the rat brain, thereby suggesting that ethanol does not interact directly with the GHB receptor. Our study, aimed at exploring the involvement of the GHB receptor in the pathology of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, which is known to cause elevation of GHB levels, revealed no change in the affinity, receptor density or displacement potency as determined by using [(3)H]NCS-382 as a radioligand in Aldh5a1(-/-) vs. Aldh5a1(+/+) mouse brain.

  17. Pharmacological potential of bioactive engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Fanny; De Nicola, Milena; Ghibelli, Lina

    2014-11-01

    In this study we present an overview of the recent results of a novel approach to antioxidant and anticancer therapies, consisting in the administration of intrinsically active nano-structured particles. Their particulate (as opposed to molecular) nature allows designing multifunctional platforms via the binding of molecular determinants, including targeting molecules and chemotherapy drugs, thereby facilitating their localization at the desired site. The intrinsic activity of nanomaterials with pharmacological potential include peculiar trans-excitation reactions that render them able to transform radiofrequency, UV, visible or infrared radiations into cytocidal reactive oxygen species or heat, thereby inducing local cytotoxity in selected areas. The use of such devices has been shown to improve the efficacy of antitumor chemo- and radio-therapies, increasing the selectivity of the cytocidal effects, and reducing systemic side effects. In addition, catalytic nanomaterials such as cerium oxide nanoparticles can perform energy-free antioxidant cycles that scavenge the most noxious reactive oxygen species via SOD- and catalase-mimetic activities. A vast body of in vivo and in vitro studies has demonstrated that they reduce the damage induced by environmental stress and ameliorate an impressive series of clinically relevant oxidation-related pathologies. Similar effects are reported for carbon-based materials such as fullerenes. Overall, great improvements are expected by this novel approach. However, caution must be posed due to the poor knowledge of possible adverse body reactions against these novel devices, thoroughly analyzing the biocompatibility of these nanomaterials, especially concerning the biokinetics and the problems potentially caused by long term retention of non-biodegradable inorganic nanomaterials. PMID:25175739

  18. Pharmacological and autoradiographic characterization of sigma receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of three types of opioid receptors - ..mu.., kappa, and sigma - was postulated to explain the effects of different opioids in the chronic spinal dog. Sigma receptors, named for the prototypic agonist SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine), were suggested to mediate the psychotomimetic-like effects of SKF 10,047 in the dog. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (3-PPP) has been proposed as a selective dopamine autoreceptor agonist. However, the drug specificity of (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding in brain is identical to that of sigma receptor binding sites which may mediate psychotomimetic effects of some opioids. Pharmacological and autoradiographic analyses reveal that (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047, the prototypic sigma agonist, labels two sites in brain. The drug specificity of the high affinity site for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 resembles that of putative sigma receptors labeled with (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP, being potently inhibited by (+)3-PPP, haloperidol, and (+/-)pentazocine, and demonstrating stereoselectivity for the (+) isomer of SKF 10,047. Autoradiographic localizations of high affinity (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites closely resemble those of (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP labeled sites with high levels of binding in the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer, hypothalamus, and pontine and cranial nerve nuclei. Thus, putative sigma receptors and PCP receptors represent distinct receptor populations in brain. This proposal is supported by the presence of sigma binding sites - and absence of PCP receptors - on NCB-20 cell membranes, a hybrid neurotumor cell line that provides a model system for the physiological and biochemical study of sigma receptors.

  19. Cough Suppressant and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cough-suppressant therapy, previously termed nonspecific antitussive therapy, incorporates the use of pharmacologic agents with mucolytic effects and/or inhibitory effects on the cough reflex itself. The intent of this type of therapy is to reduce the frequency and/or intensity of coughing on a short-term basis. Methods Data for this review were obtained from several National Library of Medicine (PubMed) searches (from 1960 to 2004), which were performed between May and September 2004, of the literature published in the English language, limited to human studies, using combinations of the search terms “cough,” “double-blind placebo-controlled,” “antitussive,” “mucolytic,” “cough clearance,” “common cold,” “protussive,” “guaifenesin,” “glycerol,” and “zinc.” Results Mucolytic agents are not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Peripheral and central antitussive agents can be useful in patients with chronic bronchitis, but can have little efficacy in patients with cough due to upper respiratory infection. Some protussive agents are effective in increasing cough clearance, but their long-term effectiveness has not been established. DNase is not effective as a protussive agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. Inhaled mannitol is acutely effective in this patient population, but its therapeutic potential must be investigated further. Conclusions These findings suggest that suppressant therapy is most effective when used for the short-term reduction of coughing. Relatively few drugs are effective as cough suppressants. PMID:16428717

  20. Students’ perceptions on feedback module in pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Varsha J.; Malhotra, Supriya D.; Rana, Devang A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Feedback is an integral part of formative assessment though underutilized in medical education. The objective of this study was to review our feedback module through students’ perceptions. Methodology: We have developed a feedback module which is practiced by us for last 10 years for term ending examination that gives collective feedback to the whole class, followed by individual student-teacher interactions. Students were also exposed to 6–7 multiple choice questions (MCQs) based assessment during the course of pharmacology. Immediately after each MCQ test the answer keys is displayed along with an explanation. Two classes of students were requested to give their perceptions about the feedback by responding on Likert scale for the statements in the questionnaire. All the 206 students who volunteered for the study were enrolled in the study. Mann–Whitney test was used to calculate the difference in perceptions. Results: Of 278 students of two classes, 206 responded (74%). Students’ agreement varied from 93% to 98% for 5 items in the questionnaire for the feedback after term ending examinations. Perception of students attending one or more than one feedback session did not differ significantly. For MCQs, tests agreement was 91% to 98% for the 4 items. There was no significant difference between two classes in their perceptions regarding feedback practices (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Students gave a favorable opinion for our feedback module. In the medical colleges with a large number of students, this module is feasible for feedback in formative assessment in the form of written tests. PMID:27500170

  1. Pharmacological maintenance treatments of opiate addiction.

    PubMed

    Bell, James

    2014-02-01

    For people seeking treatment, the course of heroin addiction tends to be chronic and relapsing, and longer duration of treatment is associated with better outcomes. Heroin addiction is strongly associated with deviant behaviour and crime, and the objectives in treating heroin addiction have been a blend of humane support, rehabilitation, public health intervention and crime control. Reduction in street heroin use is the foundation on which all these outcomes are based. The pharmacological basis of maintenance treatment of dependent individuals is to minimize withdrawal symptoms and attenuate the reinforcing effects of street heroin, leading to reduction or cessation of street heroin use. Opioid maintenance treatment can be moderately effective in suppressing heroin use, although deviations from evidence-based approaches, particularly the use of suboptimal doses, have meant that treatment as delivered in practice may have resulted in poorer outcomes than predicted by research. Methadone treatment has been 'programmatic', with a one-size-fits-all approach that in part reflects the perceived need to impose discipline on deviant individuals. However, differences in pharmacokinetics and in side-effects mean that many patients do not respond optimally to methadone. Injectable diamorphine (heroin) provides a more reinforcing medication for some 'nonresponders' and can be a valuable option in the rehabilitation of demoralized, socially excluded individuals. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist, is a less reinforcing medication with different side-effects and less risk of overdose. Not only is it a different medication, but also it can be used in a different paradigm of treatment, office-based opioid treatment, with less structure and offering greater patient autonomy.

  2. Pharmacological treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Czobor, Pal

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment of negative symptoms is one of the most important unmet needs in schizophrenic disorders. Because the evidence on current psychopharmacological treatments is unclear, the authors reviewed the findings published to date by searching PubMed with the keywords negative symptoms, antipsychotics, antidepressants, glutamatergic compounds, monotherapy and add-on therapy and identifying additional articles in the reference lists of the resulting publications. The findings presented here predominantly focus on results of meta-analyses. Evidence for efficacy of current psychopharmacological medications is difficult to assess because of methodological problems and inconsistent results. In general, the second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) do not appear to have good efficacy in negative symptoms, although some show better efficacy than first-generation antipsychotics, some of which also demonstrated efficacy in negative symptoms. Specific trials on predominant persistent negative symptoms are rare and have been performed with only a few SGAs. More often, trials on somewhat persistent negative symptoms evaluate add-on strategies to ongoing antipsychotic treatment. Such trials, mostly on modern antidepressants, have demonstrated some efficacy. Several trials with small samples have evaluated add-on treatment with glutamatergic compounds, such as the naturally occurring amino acids glycine and D-serine and new pharmacological compounds. The results are highly inconsistent, although overall efficacy results appear to be positive. The unsatisfactory and inconsistent results can be partially explained by methodological problems. These problems need to be solved in the future, and the authors propose some possible solutions. Further research is required to identify effective treatment for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  3. Biological and pharmacological roles of HCA receptors.

    PubMed

    Blad, Clara C; Ahmed, Kashan; IJzerman, Ad P; Offermanns, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxy-carboxylic acid (HCA) receptors HCA(1), HCA(2), and HCA(3) were previously known as GPR81, GPR109A, and GPR109B, respectively, or as the nicotinic acid receptor family. They form a cluster of G protein-coupled receptors with high sequence homology. Recently, intermediates of energy metabolism, all HCAs, have been reported as endogenous ligands for each of these receptors. The HCA receptors are predominantly expressed on adipocytes and mediate the inhibition of lipolysis by coupling to G(i)-type proteins. HCA(1) is activated by lactate, HCA(2) by the ketone body 3-hydroxy-butyrate, and HCA(3) by hydroxylated β-oxidation intermediates, especially 3-hydroxy-octanoic acid. Both HCA(2) and HCA(3) are part of a negative feedback loop which keeps the release of fat stores in check under starvation conditions, whereas HCA(1) plays a role in the antilipolytic (fat-conserving) effect of insulin. HCA(2) was first discovered as the molecular target of the antidyslipidemic drug nicotinic acid (or niacin). Many synthetic agonists have since been designed for HCA(2) and HCA(3), but the development of a new, improved HCA-targeted drug has not been successful so far, despite a number of clinical studies. Recently, it has been shown that the major side effect of nicotinic acid, skin flushing, is mediated by HCA(2) receptors on keratinocytes, as well as on Langerhans cells in the skin. In this chapter, we summarize the latest developments in the field of HCA receptor research, with emphasis on (patho)physiology, receptor pharmacology, major ligand classes, and the therapeutic potential of HCA ligands.

  4. Artemisinins: pharmacological actions beyond anti-malarial.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wanxing Eugene; Peh, Hong Yong; Chan, Tze Khee; Wong, W S Fred

    2014-04-01

    Artemisinins are a family of sesquiterpene trioxane lactone anti-malarial agents originally derived from Artemisia annua L. The anti-malarial action of artemisinins involves the formation of free radicals via cleavage of the endoperoxide bond in its structure, which mediate eradication of the Plasmodium species. With its established safety record in millions of malarial patients, artemisinins are also being investigated in diseases like infections, cancers and inflammation. Artemisinins have been reported to possess robust inhibitory effects against viruses (e.g. Human cytomegalovirus), protozoa (e.g. Toxoplasma gondii), helminths (e.g. Schistosoma species and Fasciola hepatica) and fungi (e.g. Cryptococcus neoformans). Artemisinins have demonstrated cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancer cells by inducing cell cycle arrest, promoting apoptosis, preventing angiogenesis, and abrogating cancer invasion and metastasis. Artemisinins have been evaluated in animal models of autoimmune diseases, allergic disorders and septic inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of artemisinins have been attributed to the inhibition of Toll-like receptors, Syk tyrosine kinase, phospholipase Cγ, PI3K/Akt, MAPK, STAT-1/3/5, NF-κB, Sp1 and Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. This review provides a comprehensive update on non-malarial use of artemisinins, modes of action of artemisinins in different disease conditions, and drug development of artemisinins beyond anti-malarial. With the concerted efforts in the novel synthesis of artemisinin analogs and clinical pharmacology of artemisinins, it is likely that artemisinin drugs will become a major armamentarium combating a variety of human diseases beyond malaria. PMID:24316259

  5. Pharmacological maintenance treatments of opiate addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bell, James

    2014-01-01

    For people seeking treatment, the course of heroin addiction tends to be chronic and relapsing, and longer duration of treatment is associated with better outcomes. Heroin addiction is strongly associated with deviant behaviour and crime, and the objectives in treating heroin addiction have been a blend of humane support, rehabilitation, public health intervention and crime control. Reduction in street heroin use is the foundation on which all these outcomes are based. The pharmacological basis of maintenance treatment of dependent individuals is to minimize withdrawal symptoms and attenuate the reinforcing effects of street heroin, leading to reduction or cessation of street heroin use. Opioid maintenance treatment can be moderately effective in suppressing heroin use, although deviations from evidence-based approaches, particularly the use of suboptimal doses, have meant that treatment as delivered in practice may have resulted in poorer outcomes than predicted by research. Methadone treatment has been ‘programmatic’, with a one-size-fits-all approach that in part reflects the perceived need to impose discipline on deviant individuals. However, differences in pharmacokinetics and in side-effects mean that many patients do not respond optimally to methadone. Injectable diamorphine (heroin) provides a more reinforcing medication for some ‘nonresponders’ and can be a valuable option in the rehabilitation of demoralized, socially excluded individuals. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist, is a less reinforcing medication with different side-effects and less risk of overdose. Not only is it a different medication, but also it can be used in a different paradigm of treatment, office-based opioid treatment, with less structure and offering greater patient autonomy. PMID:23210630

  6. Effects of non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions on cognition and brain plasticity of aging individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pieramico, Valentina; Esposito, Roberto; Cesinaro, Stefano; Frazzini, Valerio; Sensi, Stefano L.

    2014-01-01

    Brain aging and aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are major health challenges faced by modern societies. Brain aging is associated with cognitive and functional decline and represents the favourable background for the onset and development of dementia. Brain aging is associated with early and subtle anatomo-functional physiological changes that often precede the appearance of clinical signs of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging approaches unveiled the functional correlates of these alterations and helped in the identification of therapeutic targets that can be potentially useful in counteracting age-dependent cognitive decline. A growing body of evidence supports the notion that cognitive stimulation and aerobic training can preserve and enhance operational skills in elderly individuals as well as reduce the incidence of dementia. This review aims at providing an extensive and critical overview of the most recent data that support the efficacy of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions aimed at enhancing cognition and brain plasticity in healthy elderly individuals as well as delaying the cognitive decline associated with dementia. PMID:25228860

  7. Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy: A Current Update on Non-Conventional Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun Kumar; Rani, Ekta; Waheed, Abdul; Rajput, Satyendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled seizure or epilepsy is intricately related with an increase risk of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The failure to achieve seizure control with the first or second drug trial of an anticonvulsant medication given at the appropriate daily dosage is termed as pharmacoresistance, despite the fact that these drugs possess different modes of action. It is one of the devastating neurological disorders act as major culprit of mortality in developed as well as developing countries with towering prevalence. Indeed, the presence of several anti-epileptic drug including carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproate, gabapentin etc. But no promising therapeutic remedies available to manage pharmacoresistance in the present clinical scenario. Hence, utility of alternative strategies in management of resistance epilepsy is increased which further possible by continuing developing of promising therapeutic interventions to manage this insidious condition adequately. Strategies include add on therapy with adenosine, verapamil etc or ketogenic diet, vagus nerve stimulation, focal cooling or standard drugs in combinations have shown some promising results. In this review we will shed light on the current pharmacological and non pharmacological mediator with their potential pleiotropic action on pharmacoresistant epilepsy. PMID:26157666

  8. Phyto - chemistry and pharmacology of shankapushpi - four varieties.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, G S; Narayanan, S; Mahadevan, G

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacognosy, Pharmacology, Clinical studies and photochemistry of the four plants, viz., Convolvulus pluricaulis, Evolvulus alsinoides, Canscora decussate and Clitoria ternatea commonly used as the drug Shankapushphi have been reviewed here. PMID:22557606

  9. Non-pharmacological approaches to alleviate distress in dementia care.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary; Agnelli, Joanne

    2015-11-25

    Distress is one of the most common clinical manifestations associated with dementia. Pharmacological intervention may be appropriate in managing distress in some people. However, best practice guidelines advocate non-pharmacological interventions as the preferred first-line treatment. The use of non-pharmacological interventions encourages healthcare professionals to be more person-centred in their approach, while considering the causes of distress. This article provides healthcare professionals with an overview of some of the non-pharmacological approaches that can assist in alleviating distress for people living with dementia including: reminiscence therapy, reality orientation, validation therapy, music therapy, horticultural therapy, doll therapy and pet therapy. It provides a summary of their use in clinical practice and links to the relevant literature. PMID:26602678

  10. The pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient

    SciTech Connect

    Chernow, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers addressing the pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient. Chapter topics include: Radiation injury; Red cell substitutes: a current appraisal; and Psychopharmacology in the ICU.

  11. [The mechanism of rosiglitazone compound based on network pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Fan, Xue-mei; Sun, Han; Wang, Yi-ming; Liang, Qiong-lin; Luo, Guo-an

    2015-03-01

    Applications of network pharmacology are increasingly widespread and methods abound in the field of drug development and pharmacological research. In this study, we choose rosiglitazone compound as the object to predict the targets and to discuss the mechanism based on three kinds of prediction methods of network pharmacology. Comparison of the prediction result has identified that the three kinds of prediction methods had their own characteristics: targets and pathways predicted were not in accordance with each other. However, the calcium signaling pathway could be predicted in the three kinds of methods, which associated with diabetes and cognitive impairment caused by diabetes by bioinformatics analysis. The above conclusion indicates that the calcium signaling pathway is important in signal pathway regulation of rosiglitazone compound, which provides a clue to further explain the mechanism of the compound and also provides a reference for the selection and application of methods of network pharmacology in the actual research.

  12. The potential of translational bioinformatics approaches for pharmacology research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lang

    2015-01-01

    The field of bioinformatics has allowed the interpretation of massive amounts of biological data, ushering in the era of ‘omics’ to biomedical research. Its potential impact on pharmacology research is enormous and it has shown some emerging successes. A full realization of this potential, however, requires standardized data annotation for large health record databases and molecular data resources. Improved standardization will further stimulate the development of system pharmacology models, using translational bioinformatics methods. This new translational bioinformatics paradigm is highly complementary to current pharmacological research fields, such as personalized medicine, pharmacoepidemiology and drug discovery. In this review, I illustrate the application of transformational bioinformatics to research in numerous pharmacology subdisciplines. PMID:25753093

  13. Strains of Rodents and the Pharmacology of Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Castellano, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    Mendelian genetic tools have extensively been used to improve the description of the pharmacological mechanisms involved in learning and memory. The first part of this short review describes experiments involving the bidirectional selection of rats or mice for extreme behavioral characteristics or for sensitivity to pharmacological treatments. The second part focuses specifically on inbreeding. In conclusion, the advantages and the limits of a Mendelian pharmacogenetic approach of learning and memory are discussed. PMID:15656269

  14. SACRED TULSI (OCIMUM SANCTUM L.) IN TRADITIONAL MEDICINE AND PHARMACOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Scared Tulasi (Ocimum sanctum L.) of family Lamiaceae is a wonder ayurvedic herb which is known for its tremendous medicinal properties both in traditional folklore as well as pharmacological system of medicines. Every part of the plant finds its use in one form or the other. Keeping in view the importance of the plant, an attempt has been made to review the various studies carried out in traditional system of medicine as well as modern pharmacological investigations. PMID:22556721

  15. [Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Vlak, Tonko; Aljinović, Jure

    2014-01-01

    Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis is a mandatory part of all algorithms and recommendations for dealing with this disease. However, the belief that pharmacological therapy is much more superior to treating osteoporosis than non-pharmacological treatment is still common in the medical community. The probable reason is that pharmacological treatment can be measured and statistically analyzed, and that's why the abundance of data from controlled randomized trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews are available. Non-pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis is not so much represented in evidence based medicine (EBM) because there are a lot of different exercise protocols, different machines with different setups for applying the same models of physical therapy. So the main problem are inclusion criteria in meta-analyses or systematic reviews of patients whose data is collected using different protocols. Non-pharmacological treatment ofosteoporosis: myth or reality? Maybe we did not answer this question in fullness, but by analyzing data from the scientifically relevant data bases we can conclude that non-pharmacological treatment is an important factor in prevention of osteoporosis and part of all treatment protocols available today--almost as equally significant as pharmacological treatment. Cochrane library database and PEDro database provide EBM information that can help to identify the best types of ex- ercises and physical procedures for bone mineral density and prevention of falls. The best result in non-pharmaco- logical treatment of osteoporosis showed a combination of exercise programs that include muscle strengthening exercises, aerobic exercises, exercises with progressive resistance increase, and high-impact exercises. As for individual exercises, a non-weight-bearing high force exercise showed small but statistically significant increase in bone mineral density in femoral neck, in some scientific papers. Exercises for balance and

  16. Network pharmacology: a Rosetta Stone for traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Hao, Da Cheng; Xiao, Pei Gen

    2014-08-01

    Network pharmacology, based on the theory of systems biology, is a new discipline that analyzes the biological network and screens out the nodes of particular interest, with the aim of designing poly-target drug molecule. It emphasizes maximizing drug efficacy and minimizing adverse effect via the multiple regulation of the signaling pathway. Coincidentally, almost all traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and worldwide ethnomedicine exert therapeutic effect by targeting multiple molecules of the human body. In this overview, we offer a critique on the present perception of TCM and network pharmacology; illustrate the utility of network pharmacology in the study of single herb, medicine pair, and TCM formula; and summarize the recent progress of TCM-based drug discovery inspired by network pharmacology. Network pharmacology could be of great help in decreasing drug attrition rate and thus is essential in rational and cost-effective drug development. We also pinpoint the current TCM issues that could be tackled by the flexible combined use of network pharmacology and relevant disciplines.

  17. Constellation Pharmacology: A new paradigm for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Eric W.; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2015-01-01

    Constellation Pharmacology is a cell-based high-content phenotypic-screening platform that utilizes subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate the cell-specific combinations (“constellations”) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types. Heterogeneous populations of native cells, in which the different individual cell types have been identified and characterized, are the foundation for this screening platform. Constellation Pharmacology is useful for screening small molecules or for deconvoluting complex mixtures of biologically-active natural products. This platform has been used to purify natural products and discover their molecular mechanisms. In the on-going development of Constellation Pharmacology, there is a positive-feedback loop between the pharmacological characterization of cell types and screening for new drug candidates. As Constellation Pharmacology is used to discover compounds with novel targeting-selectivity profiles, those new compounds then further help to elucidate the constellations of specific cell types, thereby increasing the content of this high-content platform. PMID:25562646

  18. Pills or Push-Ups? Effectiveness and Public Perception of Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Caviola, Lucius; Faber, Nadira S.

    2015-01-01

    We review work on the effectiveness of different forms of cognitive enhancement, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological. We consider caffeine, methylphenidate, and modafinil for pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) and computer training, physical exercise, and sleep for non-pharmacological cognitive enhancement (NPCE). We find that all of the techniques described can produce significant beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, effect sizes are moderate, and consistently dependent on individual and situational factors as well as the cognitive domain in question. Although meta-analyses allowing a quantitative comparison of effectiveness across techniques are lacking to date, we can conclude that PCE is not more effective than NPCE. We discuss the physiological reasons for this limited effectiveness. We then propose that even though their actual effectiveness seems similar, in the general public PCE is perceived as fundamentally different from NPCE, in terms of effectiveness, but also in terms of acceptability. We illustrate the potential consequences such a misperception of PCE can have. PMID:26696922

  19. Pharmacological characterization of TMEM16A currents.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Eamonn; Fedigan, Stephen; Webb, Timothy; Hollywood, Mark A; Thornbury, Keith D; McHale, Noel G; Sergeant, Gerard P

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that transmembrane protein 16 A (TMEM16A) is a subunit of calcium-activated chloride channels (CACCs). Pharmacological agents have been used to probe the functional role of CACCs, however their effect on TMEM16A currents has not been systematically investigated. In the present study, we characterized the voltage and concentration-dependent effects of 2 traditional CACC inhibitors (niflumic acid and anthracene-9-carboxcylic acid) and 2 novel CACC / TMEM16A inhibitors (CACC(inh)A01 and T16A(inh)A01) on TMEM16A currents. The whole cell patch clamp technique was used to record TMEM16A currents from HE K 293 cells that stably expressed human TMEM16A. Niflumic acid, A-9-C, CACC(inh)A01 and T16A(inh)A01 inhibited TMEM16A currents with IC50 values of 12, 58, 1.7 and 1.5 μM, respectively, however, A-9-C and niflumic acid were less efficacious at negative membrane potentials. A-9-C and niflumic acid reduced the rate of TMEM16A tail current deactivation at negative membrane potentials and A-9-C (1 mM) enhanced peak TMEM16A tail current amplitude. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of CACC(inh)A01 and T16A(inh)A01 were independent of voltage and they did not prolong the rate of TMEM16A tail current deactivation. The effects of niflumic acid and A-9-C on TMEM16A currents were similar to previous observations on CACCs in vascular smooth muscle, strengthening the hypothesis that they are encoded by TMEM16A. However, CACC(inh)A01 and T16A(inh)A01 were more potent inhibitors of TMEM16A channels and their effects were not diminished at negative membrane potentials making them attractive candidates to interrogate the functional role of TMEM16A channels in future studies.

  20. Arrhythmogenic liability screening in cardiovascular safety pharmacology: commonality between non-clinical safety pharmacology and clinical thorough QT (TQT) studies.

    PubMed

    Authier, Simon; Pugsley, Michael K; Troncy, Eric; Curtis, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Multiple ECG analysis strategies are used in safety pharmacology in a framework focused on accurate ECG complex interval quantification and arrhythmia detection. Automated arrhythmia detection is commonly used in the clinic and adapted tools may be used to facilitate analysis of large non-clinical datasets in safety pharmacology. The ICH E14 guideline (for Thorough QT Studies (TQT) conducted in healthy volunteers) supports manual and semi-automated ECG evaluation by skilled readers with a single operator analyzing all the ECG recordings from a given subject to minimize observer bias. Both fully automated and semi-automated ECG analysis programs may be used in safety pharmacology studies. Based on power analysis, a group size of approximately n=18 per study arm is the minimal requirement in TQT studies to provide the sensitivity to detect a 5 ms QT interval prolongation. This sample size differs markedly from common safety pharmacology non-clinical study designs. New technologies such as the jacketed external telemetry (JET) ECG system may facilitate achievement of a smaller group size in integrated cardiovascular safety pharmacology risk assessment. TQT and cardiovascular safety pharmacology studies share several common experimental and scientific limitations which may benefit from technological advances. Sensitivity expectations in non-clinical studies should be commensurate with sample size and further investigations including power analyses and comparison between fully automated and semi-automated ECG analysis may help better characterize detection thresholds. Reducing overall variability, increasing reproducibility of ECG interval measurements and enhancing arrhythmia detection strategies are the cornerstones of data analysis in cardiovascular safety pharmacology and will likely continue to attract considerable attention in the safety pharmacology community.

  1. A Network Pharmacology Approach to Uncover the Pharmacological Mechanism of XuanHuSuo Powder on Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huaqi; He, Shuaibing; Zhang, Xinyue; Luo, Shilin; Zhang, Baixia; Duan, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhiqian; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Yun; Sun, Yikun

    2016-01-01

    As the most familiar type of arthritis and a chronic illness of the joints, Osteoarthritis (OA) affects a great number of people on the global scale. XuanHuSuo powder (XHSP), a conventional herbal formula from China, has been extensively applied in OA treatment. Nonetheless, its pharmacological mechanism has not been completely expounded. In this research, a network pharmacology approach has been chosen to study the pharmacological mechanism of XHSP on OA, and the pharmacology networks were established based on the relationship between four herbs found in XHSP, compound targets, and OA targets. The pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the significant bioprocess networks of XHSP on OA were regulation of inflammation, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and nitric oxide (NO) biosynthetic process, response to cytokine or estrogen stimuli, and antiapoptosis. These effects have not been reported previously. The comprehensive network pharmacology approach developed by our research has revealed, for the first time, a connection between four herbs found in XHSP, corresponding compound targets, and OA pathway systems that are conducive to expanding the clinical application of XHSP. The proposed network pharmacology approach could be a promising complementary method by which researchers might better evaluate multitarget or multicomponent drugs on a systematic level. PMID:27110264

  2. A Network Pharmacology Approach to Uncover the Pharmacological Mechanism of XuanHuSuo Powder on Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyue; Luo, Shilin; Zhang, Baixia; Duan, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhiqian; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Yun; Sun, Yikun

    2016-01-01

    As the most familiar type of arthritis and a chronic illness of the joints, Osteoarthritis (OA) affects a great number of people on the global scale. XuanHuSuo powder (XHSP), a conventional herbal formula from China, has been extensively applied in OA treatment. Nonetheless, its pharmacological mechanism has not been completely expounded. In this research, a network pharmacology approach has been chosen to study the pharmacological mechanism of XHSP on OA, and the pharmacology networks were established based on the relationship between four herbs found in XHSP, compound targets, and OA targets. The pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the significant bioprocess networks of XHSP on OA were regulation of inflammation, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and nitric oxide (NO) biosynthetic process, response to cytokine or estrogen stimuli, and antiapoptosis. These effects have not been reported previously. The comprehensive network pharmacology approach developed by our research has revealed, for the first time, a connection between four herbs found in XHSP, corresponding compound targets, and OA pathway systems that are conducive to expanding the clinical application of XHSP. The proposed network pharmacology approach could be a promising complementary method by which researchers might better evaluate multitarget or multicomponent drugs on a systematic level. PMID:27110264

  3. The shifting landscape of safety pharmacology in 2015.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, Michael K; Authier, Simon; Stonerook, Michael; Curtis, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the discipline of safety pharmacology (which integrates physiology, pharmacologyand toxicology) has evolved since the incorporation of the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) as an entity on August 10, 2000. Safety pharmacology (SP), as a synthesis of these other fields of knowledge, is concerned with characterizing the safety profile (or potential undesirable pharmacodynamic effects) of new chemical entities (NCEs) and biologicals. Initially focused on the issue of drug-induced QT prolongation it has developed into an important discipline over the past 15years with expertise beyond its initial focus on torsades de pointes (TdP). It has become a repository for interrogation of models for drug safety studies and innovative non-clinical model development, validation and implementation. Thus, while safety pharmacology consists of the triumvirate obligatory cardiovascular, central nervous system (CNS) and respiratory system core battery studies it also involves assessing drug effects on numerous other physiological systems (e.g., ocular, auditory, renal, gastrointestinal, blood, immune) leveraging emerging new technologies in a wide range of non-clinical drug safety testing models. As with previous editorials that preface the themed issue on safety pharmacology methods published in the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM), we highlight here the content derived from the most recent (2014) SPS meeting held in Washington, DC. The dynamics of the discipline remain fervent and method development, extension and refinement are reflected in the content. This issue of the JPTM continues the tradition of providing a publication summary of articles (reviews, commentaries and methods) with impact on the discipline of safety pharmacology.

  4. Perception of medical students about pharmacology and scope of improvement.

    PubMed

    Prasad, A; Datta, P P; Pattanayak, C; Panda, P

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacology is a subject taught in the medical curriculum in India over a period of one and half years along with pathology, microbiology and forensic medicine. The present study was planned to know the opinion of medical students regarding pharmacology and to assess the proposed teaching schedule and methods of teaching pharmacology. The study was conducted in a private medical college in eastern India among the medical undergraduate students in 5th semester. Total 74 students participated in the study. A pre-designed, pre-tested, semi-structured questionnaire was given to the students and data was collected after one hour. Collected data was compiled, tabulated and analyzed in SPSS (version 16.0). The subject was perceived as interesting and useful by majority of students and most of them were in opinion to integrate pharmacology with the clinical subjects. Lecture in whole class was the most preferred teaching method according to the students and teaching with chalk and board they preferred most. Rational use of medicine, clinical trial, pediatric and geriatric pharmacology are the important topics the students felt to be included in the curriculum. Regular assessment of teaching methods by the students and taking suggestions from the students about improving the teaching method and redesigning the curriculum can help a lot in improving the learning capacity of the medical students and that will give benefit for the society as a whole.

  5. Recent Pharmacology Studies on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    The environment on the International Space Station (ISS) includes a variety of potential stressors including the absence of Earth's gravity, elevated exposure to radiation, confined living and working quarters, a heavy workload, and high public visibility. The effects of this extreme environment on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and even on stored medication doses, are not yet understood. Dr. Wotring will discuss recent analyses of medication doses that experienced long duration storage on the ISS and a recent retrospective examination of medication use during long-duration spaceflights. She will also describe new pharmacology experiments that are scheduled for upcoming ISS missions. Dr. Virginia E. Wotring is a Senior Scientist in the Division of Space Life Sciences in the Universities Space Research Association, and Pharmacology Discipline Lead at NASA's Johnson Space Center, Human Heath and Countermeasures Division. She received her doctorate in Pharmacological and Physiological Science from Saint Louis University after earning a B.S. in Chemistry at Florida State University. She has published multiple studies on ligand gated ion channels in the brain and spinal cord. Her research experience includes drug mechanisms of action, drug receptor structure/function relationships and gene & protein expression. She joined USRA (and spaceflight research) in 2009. In 2012, her book reviewing pharmacology in spaceflight was published by Springer: Space Pharmacology, Space Development Series.

  6. A Review of Pharmacologic Treatment for Compulsive Buying Disorder.

    PubMed

    Soares, Célia; Fernandes, Natália; Morgado, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    At present, no treatment recommendations can be made for compulsive buying disorder. Recent studies have found evidence for the efficacy of psychotherapeutic options, but less is known regarding the best pharmacologic treatment. The purpose of this review is to present and analyze the available published evidence on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying disorder. To achieve this, we conducted a review of studies focusing on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying by searching the PubMed/MEDLINE database. Selection criteria were applied, and 21 studies were identified. Pharmacological classes reported included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, opioid antagonists, second-generation antipsychotics, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. We found only placebo-controlled trials for fluvoxamine; none showed effectiveness against placebo. Three open-label trials reported clinical improvement with citalopram; one was followed by a double-blind discontinuation. Escitalopram was effective in an open-label trial but did not show efficacy in the double-blind phase. Memantine was identified as effective in a pilot open-label study. Fluoxetine, bupropion, nortriptyline, clomipramine, topiramate and naltrexone were only reported to be effective in clinical cases. According to the available literature, there is no evidence to propose a specific pharmacologic agent for compulsive buying disorder. Future research is required for a better understanding of both pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder.

  7. Systems pharmacology modeling: an approach to improving drug safety.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jane P F; Fontana, Robert J; Price, Nathan D; Sangar, Vineet

    2014-01-01

    Advances in systems biology in conjunction with the expansion in knowledge of drug effects and diseases present an unprecedented opportunity to extend traditional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling/analysis to conduct systems pharmacology modeling. Many drugs that cause liver injury and myopathies have been studied extensively. Mitochondrion-centric systems pharmacology modeling is important since drug toxicity across a large number of pharmacological classes converges to mitochondrial injury and death. Approaches to systems pharmacology modeling of drug effects need to consider drug exposure, organelle and cellular phenotypes across all key cell types of human organs, organ-specific clinical biomarkers/phenotypes, gene-drug interaction and immune responses. Systems modeling approaches, that leverage the knowledge base constructed from curating a selected list of drugs across a wide range of pharmacological classes, will provide a critically needed blueprint for making informed decisions to reduce the rate of attrition for drugs in development and increase the number of drugs with an acceptable benefit/risk ratio.

  8. Pharmacological interventions to modulate attentional bias in addiction.

    PubMed

    Luijten, Maartje; Field, Matt; Franken, Ingmar H A

    2014-06-01

    Attentional bias in substance-dependent patients is the tendency to automatically direct attention to substance-related cues in the environment. Preclinical models suggest that attentional bias emerges as a consequence of dopaminergic activity evoked by substance-related cues. The aim of the current review is to describe pharmacological mechanisms underlying attentional bias in humans and to critically review empirical studies that aimed to modulate attentional bias in substance-dependent patients by using pharmacological agents. The findings of the reviewed studies suggest that attentional bias and related brain activation may be modulated by dopamine. All of the reviewed studies investigated acute effects of pharmacological agents, while measurements of chronic pharmacological treatments on attentional bias and clinically relevant measures such as relapse are yet lacking. Therefore, the current findings should be interpreted as a proof of principle concerning the role of dopamine in attentional bias. At the moment, there is too little evidence for clinical applications. While the literature search was not limited to dopamine, there is a lack of studies investigating the role of non-dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems in substance-related attentional bias. A focus on neurotransmitter systems such as acetylcholine and noradrenaline could provide new insights regarding the pharmacology of substance-related attentional bias.

  9. Classifying neuronal subclasses of the cerebellum through constellation pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Curtice, Kigen J; Leavitt, Lee S; Chase, Kevin; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Horvath, Martin P; Olivera, Baldomero M; Teichert, Russell W

    2016-02-01

    A pressing need in neurobiology is the comprehensive identification and characterization of neuronal subclasses within the mammalian nervous system. To this end, we used constellation pharmacology as a method to interrogate the neuronal and glial subclasses of the mouse cerebellum individually and simultaneously. We then evaluated the data obtained from constellation-pharmacology experiments by cluster analysis to classify cells into neuronal and glial subclasses, based on their functional expression of glutamate, acetylcholine, and GABA receptors, among other ion channels. Conantokin peptides were used to identify N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtypes, which revealed that neurons of the young mouse cerebellum expressed NR2A and NR2B NMDA receptor subunits. Additional pharmacological tools disclosed differential expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazloepropionic, nicotinic acetylcholine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in different neuronal and glial subclasses. Certain cell subclasses correlated with known attributes of granule cells, and we combined constellation pharmacology with genetically labeled neurons to identify and characterize Purkinje cells. This study illustrates the utility of applying constellation pharmacology to classify neuronal and glial subclasses in specific anatomical regions of the brain.

  10. A Review of Pharmacologic Treatment for Compulsive Buying Disorder.

    PubMed

    Soares, Célia; Fernandes, Natália; Morgado, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    At present, no treatment recommendations can be made for compulsive buying disorder. Recent studies have found evidence for the efficacy of psychotherapeutic options, but less is known regarding the best pharmacologic treatment. The purpose of this review is to present and analyze the available published evidence on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying disorder. To achieve this, we conducted a review of studies focusing on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying by searching the PubMed/MEDLINE database. Selection criteria were applied, and 21 studies were identified. Pharmacological classes reported included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, opioid antagonists, second-generation antipsychotics, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. We found only placebo-controlled trials for fluvoxamine; none showed effectiveness against placebo. Three open-label trials reported clinical improvement with citalopram; one was followed by a double-blind discontinuation. Escitalopram was effective in an open-label trial but did not show efficacy in the double-blind phase. Memantine was identified as effective in a pilot open-label study. Fluoxetine, bupropion, nortriptyline, clomipramine, topiramate and naltrexone were only reported to be effective in clinical cases. According to the available literature, there is no evidence to propose a specific pharmacologic agent for compulsive buying disorder. Future research is required for a better understanding of both pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder. PMID:27067344

  11. Structural and pharmacological profile of generic enoxaparins used in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marcelo A; de Farias, Eduardo H C; Gray, Angel; Sadeghi, Nasir; Gesteira, Tarsis F; Cavalheiro, Renan P; Hoppensteadt, Debra; Fareed, Jawed; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Nader, Helena B

    2012-07-01

    Generic active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) have been commonly used in Brazil, since 1999, but most of them are synthetic and small molecules. Recently, a large number of generic enoxaparins were introduced into the market raising concerns related to product-to-product interchangeability, efficiency, and drug counterfeiting. These drugs are produced from biological sources and their production involves complex procedures and purification processes. The present article evaluates several generic enoxaparins, structurally and pharmacologically, and compares them with the branded products. Structural analysis showed that the generic products are, indeed, quite similar to the branded products, however, this similarity cannot be extended to their pharmacological activities. The results showed that generic products must go through extensive structural, pharmacological, and clinical evaluation in order to assess their quality, efficacy and, ultimately, avoid drug counterfeiting before clinical use. Variation was also observed between the branded products, showing that such drugs must be at constant surveillance.

  12. Modeling and Validating Chronic Pharmacological Manipulation of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J K; Forger, D B; Marconi, M; Wood, D; Doran, A; Wager, T; Chang, C; Walton, K M

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms can be entrained by a light-dark (LD) cycle and can also be reset pharmacologically, for example, by the CK1δ/ε inhibitor PF-670462. Here, we determine how these two independent signals affect circadian timekeeping from the molecular to the behavioral level. By developing a systems pharmacology model, we predict and experimentally validate that chronic CK1δ/ε inhibition during the earlier hours of a LD cycle can produce a constant stable delay of rhythm. However, chronic dosing later during the day, or in the presence of longer light intervals, is not predicted to yield an entrained rhythm. We also propose a simple method based on phase response curves (PRCs) that predicts the effects of a LD cycle and chronic dosing of a circadian drug. This work indicates that dosing timing and environmental signals must be carefully considered for accurate pharmacological manipulation of circadian phase. PMID:23863866

  13. Human pharmacology for addiction medicine: From evidence to clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Quednow, Boris B; Herdener, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUD) are complex and often chronic diseases with negative health outcomes and social consequences. Pharmacological treatment options for SUD can be separated in medications for (i) intoxication, (ii) withdrawal, and (iii) reduction of use together with relapse prevention. This chapter will focus on approved or clinically established pharmacological strategies suited to manage symptoms of withdrawal, and to reduce substance use or to promote abstinence. Hereby SUD involving alcohol, nicotine, stimulants, and opioids are primarily discussed as these substances are considered most harmful for both the individual and the society. Moreover, the pharmacotherapy of SUD related to the use of cannabis, benzodiazepines, and gamma-hydroxybutyrate is also briefly reviewed. Since most approved pharmacological treatment options show only moderate effect sizes especially in the long term, the development of new treatment strategies including new drugs, new combinations of available compounds, and biomarkers for response prediction is still warranted. PMID:26822361

  14. Phytochemistry, Pharmacology and Toxicology of Spilanthes acmella: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Suchita; Maity, Siddhartha; Singh, Mahendra; Saraf, Shubhini A; Saha, Sudipta

    2013-01-01

    Spilanthes acmella is an important medicinal plant, found in tropical and subtropical countries mainly India and South America. Popularly, it is known as toothache plant which reduces the pain associated with toothaches and can induce saliva secretion. Various extracts and active metabolites from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. Literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions, which include antifungal, antipyretic, local anaesthetic, bioinsecticide, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, aphrodisiac, analgesic, pancreatic lipase inhibitor, antimicrobial, antinociception, diuretic, vasorelaxant, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, toothache relieve and anti-inflammatory effects. This review is elaborately describing the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. This review would assist researchers to search scientific information in the future. PMID:24371437

  15. Pharmacoprophylaxis of alcohol dependence: Review and update Part I: Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Bhateja, Gaurav; Basu, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is a major problem in India. The pharmacological armamentarium for relapse prevention of alcohol has widened with the addition of new drugs. In this article, we review the pharmacology and efficacy of the four most important such drugs: disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate and topiramate. The first part of this two-part review series concerns the comparative pharmacology and the second part concerns the efficacy studies. Overall, all four of these drugs have modest but clinically significant usefulness as pharmacoprophylactic agents for relapse prevention or minimization of alcohol dependence. Combinations might be helpful, especially for naltrexone and acamprosate. The issue of supervision and compliance remains important, especially for such drugs as disulfiram and naltrexone. Topiramate is a promising new agent and requires further study. Disulfiram, while very effective in compliant patients, presents challenges in terms of patient selection and side effects. For patients with hepatic impairment, acamprosate is a good choice. PMID:20640061

  16. Putting clinical pharmacology in context: the use of popular movies.

    PubMed

    Farré, Magí; Bosch, Fèlix; Roset, Pere N; Baños, Josep-E

    2004-01-01

    The usefulness of movies to illustrate the psychological and sociological conflicts of medical practice is widely recognized. However, the use of popular movies to teach less oriented medical sciences, such as pharmacology is not so common. In the present review, we report the use of three films (Awakenings, Lorenzo's Oil, and Miss Evers' Boys) as a teaching tool to allow students to better understand some conflicts which appear in the domain of clinical pharmacology. These movies may help to introduce some relevant topics such as the difficulties of planning and performing clinical research with new drugs, the need of considering bioethical principles when doing research with human beings, and the social and psychological aspects of drug therapy. The films may increase the motivation of students to understand clinical pharmacology principles and may become a driving force for an increased desire to learn.

  17. Phytochemistry, Pharmacology and Toxicology of Spilanthes acmella: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mahendra; Saraf, Shubhini A.

    2013-01-01

    Spilanthes acmella is an important medicinal plant, found in tropical and subtropical countries mainly India and South America. Popularly, it is known as toothache plant which reduces the pain associated with toothaches and can induce saliva secretion. Various extracts and active metabolites from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. Literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions, which include antifungal, antipyretic, local anaesthetic, bioinsecticide, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, aphrodisiac, analgesic, pancreatic lipase inhibitor, antimicrobial, antinociception, diuretic, vasorelaxant, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, toothache relieve and anti-inflammatory effects. This review is elaborately describing the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. This review would assist researchers to search scientific information in the future. PMID:24371437

  18. Systems Pharmacology Links GPCRs with Retinal Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    In most biological systems, second messengers and their key regulatory and effector proteins form links between multiple cellular signaling pathways. Such signaling nodes can integrate the deleterious effects of genetic aberrations, environmental stressors, or both in complex diseases, leading to cell death by various mechanisms. Here we present a systems (network) pharmacology approach that, together with transcriptomics analyses, was used to identify different G protein–coupled receptors that experimentally protected against cellular stress and death caused by linked signaling mechanisms. We describe the application of this concept to degenerative and diabetic retinopathies in appropriate mouse models as an example. Systems pharmacology also provides an attractive framework for devising strategies to combat complex diseases by using (repurposing) US Food and Drug Administration–approved pharmacological agents. PMID:25839098

  19. Rehmannia glutinosa: review of botany, chemistry and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru-Xue; Li, Mao-Xing; Jia, Zheng-Ping

    2008-05-01

    Rehmannia glutinosa, a widely used traditional Chinese herb, belongs to the family of Scrophulariaceae, and is taken to nourish Yin and invigorate the kidney in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and has a very high medicinal value. In recent decades, a great number of chemical and pharmacological studies have been done on Rehmannia glutinosa. More than 70 compounds including iridoids, saccharides, amino acid, inorganic ions, as well as other trace elements have been found in the herb. Studies show that Rehmannia glutinosa and its active principles possess wide pharmacological actions on the blood system, immune system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system and the nervous system. Currently, the effective monomeric compounds or active parts have been screened for the pharmacological activity of Rehmannia glutinosa and the highest quality scientific data is delivered to support the further application and exploitation for new drug development.

  20. Acanthopanax senticosus: review of botany, chemistry and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Linzhang; Zhao, Hongfang; Huang, Baokang; Zheng, Chengjian; Peng, Wei; Qin, Luping

    2011-02-01

    Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim) Harms (Araliaceae), also called Siberian Ginseng, Eleutherococcus senticosus, and Ciwujia in Chinese, is a widely used traditional Chinese herb that could invigorate qi, strengthen the spleen, and nourish kidney in the theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine. With high medicinal value, Acanthopanax senticosus (AS, thereafter) is popularly used as an "adaptogen" like Panax ginseng. In recent decades, a great number of chemical, pharmacological, and clinical studies on AS have been carried out worldwide. Several kinds of chemical compounds have been reported, including triterpenoid saponins, lignans, coumarins, and flavones, among which, phenolic compounds such as syringin and eleutheroside E, were considered to be the most active components. Considerable pharmacological experiments both in vitro and in vivo have persuasively demonstrated that AS possessed anti-stress, antiulcer, anti-irradiation, anticancer, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities, etc. The present review is an up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of the botany, chemistry, pharmacology, toxicity and clinical trials of AS.

  1. Ethnobotany, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Biophytum sensitivum DC.

    PubMed

    Bharati, Abinash C; Sahu, Alakh N

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants are widely being used by the traditional medical practitioners for curing various diseases in their day-to-day practice. Biophytum sensitivum DC (Oxalidaceae) is used as a traditional folk medicine in ailments such as inflammation, arthritis, wounds, tumors and burns, gonorrhea, stomach ache, asthma, cough, degenerative joint disease, urinary calculi, diabetes, snake bite, amenorrhea and dysmenorrhea. It is a small, flowering, annual herb with sensitive leaves. It grows throughout tropical Africa and Asia, especially in Philippines and the hotter parts of India and Nepal. Phytochemical studies have shown that the major pharmacologically active constituents are amentoflavone and a polysaccharide fraction, BP100 III. Recent pharmacological study shows that it has antioxidant, immunomodulatory, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, chemoprotective, antidiabetic and wound healing potential. This review attempts to describe the ethnobotany, pharmacognosy, traditional uses, chemical constituents, and various pharmacologic activities and other aspects of B. sensitivum. PMID:22654407

  2. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical trial of Ficus racemosa

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rajnish Kumar; Nandy, Bankim Chandra; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Ficus racemosa is an important medicinal plant, found in India, Australia, and Southeast Asia. It is popularly known as ‘gular.’ It reduces blood glucose concentration due to the presence of β-sitosterol. Many active constituents that have been isolated from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. The literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions that include antidiabetic, antioxidant, antidiarrhoeal, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antifungal, antibacterial, hypolipidemic, antifilarial, and hepatoprotection. This review article elaborately describes the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. We also provide useful structures of the secondary metabolites along with their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. Some clinical trial data have also been provided in this review. This review would assist researchers to gather scientific information in future. PMID:26009696

  3. Ethnobotany, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Biophytum sensitivum DC

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Abinash C.; Sahu, Alakh N.

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants are widely being used by the traditional medical practitioners for curing various diseases in their day-to-day practice. Biophytum sensitivum DC (Oxalidaceae) is used as a traditional folk medicine in ailments such as inflammation, arthritis, wounds, tumors and burns, gonorrhea, stomach ache, asthma, cough, degenerative joint disease, urinary calculi, diabetes, snake bite, amenorrhea and dysmenorrhea. It is a small, flowering, annual herb with sensitive leaves. It grows throughout tropical Africa and Asia, especially in Philippines and the hotter parts of India and Nepal. Phytochemical studies have shown that the major pharmacologically active constituents are amentoflavone and a polysaccharide fraction, BP100 III. Recent pharmacological study shows that it has antioxidant, immunomodulatory, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, chemoprotective, antidiabetic and wound healing potential. This review attempts to describe the ethnobotany, pharmacognosy, traditional uses, chemical constituents, and various pharmacologic activities and other aspects of B. sensitivum. PMID:22654407

  4. The role of clinical pharmacology in molecular genetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM: Discovering the causes of unusual phenotypes in human subjects is an important aspect of patient-oriented research. MATERIAL: The tools of clinical pharmacology are uniquely useful in addressing these problems. PATIENTS, SUBJECTS, OR CASE HISTORIES: We evaluated a 42-year-old patient with lifelong orthostatic hypotension and ptosis of the eyelids. He underwent a series of biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological tests outlined in this article. RESULTS: These studies indicated that sympathetic innervation was intact but that the sympathetic neurotransmitter was dopamine rather than norepinephrine. These results demonstrated that dopamine-beta-hydroxylase deficiency underlies the clinical abnormalities of this patient. CONCLUSION: In selected individuals with unusual phenotypes, the techniques of clinical chemistry and clinical pharmacology can define the nature of the defect at almost the resolution of the human genome.

  5. Ethnobotany, phytochemistry and pharmacology of Biophytum sensitivum DC.

    PubMed

    Bharati, Abinash C; Sahu, Alakh N

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants are widely being used by the traditional medical practitioners for curing various diseases in their day-to-day practice. Biophytum sensitivum DC (Oxalidaceae) is used as a traditional folk medicine in ailments such as inflammation, arthritis, wounds, tumors and burns, gonorrhea, stomach ache, asthma, cough, degenerative joint disease, urinary calculi, diabetes, snake bite, amenorrhea and dysmenorrhea. It is a small, flowering, annual herb with sensitive leaves. It grows throughout tropical Africa and Asia, especially in Philippines and the hotter parts of India and Nepal. Phytochemical studies have shown that the major pharmacologically active constituents are amentoflavone and a polysaccharide fraction, BP100 III. Recent pharmacological study shows that it has antioxidant, immunomodulatory, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, chemoprotective, antidiabetic and wound healing potential. This review attempts to describe the ethnobotany, pharmacognosy, traditional uses, chemical constituents, and various pharmacologic activities and other aspects of B. sensitivum.

  6. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical trial of Ficus racemosa.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rajnish Kumar; Nandy, Bankim Chandra; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Ficus racemosa is an important medicinal plant, found in India, Australia, and Southeast Asia. It is popularly known as 'gular.' It reduces blood glucose concentration due to the presence of β-sitosterol. Many active constituents that have been isolated from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. The literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions that include antidiabetic, antioxidant, antidiarrhoeal, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antifungal, antibacterial, hypolipidemic, antifilarial, and hepatoprotection. This review article elaborately describes the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. We also provide useful structures of the secondary metabolites along with their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. Some clinical trial data have also been provided in this review. This review would assist researchers to gather scientific information in future.

  7. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to improve cognitive dysfunction and functional ability in clinical depression--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baune, Bernhard T; Renger, Lisa

    2014-09-30

    Cognitive dysfunction is of clinical significance and exerts longstanding implication on patients׳ function. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of cognitive dysfunction are emerging. This review evaluates pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of cognitive impairment primarily in the domains of memory, attention, processing speed and executive function in clinical depression. A total of 35 studies were retrieved from Pubmed, PsycInfo and Scopus after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results show that various classes of antidepressants exert improving effects on cognitive function across several cognitive domains. Specifically, studies suggest that SSRIs, the SSRE tianeptine, the SNRI duloxetine, vortioxetine and other antidepressants such as bupropion and moclobemide may exert certain improving effects on cognitive function in depression, such as in learning and memory and executive function. Class-specific cognitive domains or specific dose-response relationships were not identified yet. The few non-pharmacological studies conducted employing cognitive orientated treatments and cognitive remediation therapy show promising results for the improvement of cognitive impairment in depression. However, several methodological constraints of studies limit generalizability of the results and caution the interpretation. Future direction should consider the development of a neuropsychological consensus cognitive battery to support the discovery, clinical assessment, comparison of studies and registration of new agents in clinical depression. PMID:24863864

  8. Ecological and Pharmacological Activities of Antarctic Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Avila, Conxita

    2016-06-01

    Antarctic benthic communities are regulated by abundant interactions of different types among organisms, such as predation, competition, etc. Predators are usually sea stars, with omnivorous habits, as well as other invertebrates. Against this strong predation pressure, many organisms have developed all sorts of defensive strategies, including chemical defenses. Natural products are thus quite common in Antarctic organisms with an important ecological and pharmacological potential. In this paper, the chemical defenses of the Antarctic organisms studied during the ECOQUIM and ACTIQUIM projects, as well as their pharmacological potential, are reviewed. For the ecological defenses, predation against the sea star Odontaster validus is analyzed and evaluated along depth gradients as well as considering the lifestyle of the organisms. For the pharmacological activity, the anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial activities tested are evaluated here. Very often, only crude extracts or fractions have been tested so far, and therefore, the natural products responsible for such activities remain yet to be identified. Even if the sampling efforts are not uniform along depth, most ecologically active organisms are found between 200 and 500 m depth. Also, from the samples studied, about four times more sessile organisms possess chemical defenses against the sea star than the vagile ones; these represent 50 % of sessile organisms and 35 % of the vagile ones, out of the total tested, being active. Pharmacological activity has not been tested uniformly in all groups, but the results show that relevant activity is found in different phyla, especially in Porifera, Cnidaria, Bryozoa, and Tunicata, but also in others. No relationship between depth and pharmacological activity can be established with the samples tested so far. More studies are needed in order to better understand the ecological relationships among Antarctic invertebrates mediated by natural products and

  9. Ecological and Pharmacological Activities of Antarctic Marine Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Avila, Conxita

    2016-06-01

    Antarctic benthic communities are regulated by abundant interactions of different types among organisms, such as predation, competition, etc. Predators are usually sea stars, with omnivorous habits, as well as other invertebrates. Against this strong predation pressure, many organisms have developed all sorts of defensive strategies, including chemical defenses. Natural products are thus quite common in Antarctic organisms with an important ecological and pharmacological potential. In this paper, the chemical defenses of the Antarctic organisms studied during the ECOQUIM and ACTIQUIM projects, as well as their pharmacological potential, are reviewed. For the ecological defenses, predation against the sea star Odontaster validus is analyzed and evaluated along depth gradients as well as considering the lifestyle of the organisms. For the pharmacological activity, the anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial activities tested are evaluated here. Very often, only crude extracts or fractions have been tested so far, and therefore, the natural products responsible for such activities remain yet to be identified. Even if the sampling efforts are not uniform along depth, most ecologically active organisms are found between 200 and 500 m depth. Also, from the samples studied, about four times more sessile organisms possess chemical defenses against the sea star than the vagile ones; these represent 50 % of sessile organisms and 35 % of the vagile ones, out of the total tested, being active. Pharmacological activity has not been tested uniformly in all groups, but the results show that relevant activity is found in different phyla, especially in Porifera, Cnidaria, Bryozoa, and Tunicata, but also in others. No relationship between depth and pharmacological activity can be established with the samples tested so far. More studies are needed in order to better understand the ecological relationships among Antarctic invertebrates mediated by natural products and

  10. [Research progress studies on pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of ligustilide].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ai-Hua; Wang, Li; Xiao, Hong-Bin

    2012-11-01

    Ligustilide is contained highly or around 1% in such umbelliferous plants as Angelica sinensis and Ligusticum chuanxiong, is one of main bioactive constituents. It shows many pharmacological activities related to their efficacy. At present, ligustilide has attracted extensive attention and more and more studies have been reported, indicating that it is a promising compound. This essay summarizes the progress of pharmacological effects of ligustilide on neuroprotection, vasodilatation, anti-caner and anti-tumor, analgesia and anti-inflammation, and pharmacokinetics including absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, providing basis for further studies and development of ligustilide. PMID:23373200

  11. Neuroscience of behavioral and pharmacological treatments for addictions

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Marc N.; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Although substantial advances have been made in behavioral and pharmacological treatments for addictions, moving treatment development to the next stage may require novel ways of approaching addictions, particularly those derived from new findings regarding of the neurobiological underpinnings of addictions, while assimilating and incorporating relevant information from earlier approaches. In this review, we first briefly review theoretical and biological models of addiction and then describe existing behavioral and pharmacologic therapies for the addictions within this framework. We then propose new directions for treatment development and targets that are informed by recent evidence regarding the heterogeneity of addictions and the neurobiological contributions to these disorders. PMID:21338880

  12. The internet as a tool in clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Castel, Josep-Maria; Figueras, Albert; Vigo, Joan-Miquel

    2006-06-01

    The invention of the internet and the world-wide web was a landmark that has affected many aspects of everyday life, but is so recent and dynamic that many of its potential uses are still being explored. Aside from its purely commercial use as a virtual pharmacy (e-commerce), the internet is useful in at least three aspects related to clinical pharmacology: communication, training and research. In this paper we briefly review several internet applications related to clinical pharmacology and describe, as an example, the logistics of a multicentre research collaboration related to the promotion of rational drug use in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage. PMID:16722847

  13. The Genus Phyllanthus: An Ethnopharmacological, Phytochemical, and Pharmacological Review

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xin; Wu, Ling-Fang; Guo, Hong-Ling; Chen, Wen-Jing; Cui, Ya-Ping; Qi, Qi; Li, Shi; Liang, Wen-Yi; Yang, Guang-Hui; Shao, Yan-Yan; Zhu, Dan; She, Gai-Mei; You, Yun; Zhang, Lan-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The plants of the genus Phyllanthus (Euphorbiaceae) have been used as traditional medicinal materials for a long time in China, India, Brazil, and the Southeast Asian countries. They can be used for the treatment of digestive disease, jaundice, and renal calculus. This review discusses the ethnopharmacological, phytochemical, and pharmacological studies of Phyllanthus over the past few decades. More than 510 compounds have been isolated, the majority of which are lignins, triterpenoids, flavonoids, and tannins. The researches of their remarkable antiviral, antioxidant, antidiabetic, and anticancer activities have become hot topics. More pharmacological screenings and phytochemical investigations are required to support the traditional uses and develop leading compounds. PMID:27200104

  14. Pharmacological characterisation of cardiovascular histamine receptors in man in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boyce, M J

    1982-09-01

    Data from pharmacological studies carried out in healthy subjects using systemic histamine or impromidine and their antagonists are reviewed. Exogenous histamine by rapid injection appears to stimulate only H1-receptors. Chlorpheniramine alone antagonised the responses to histamine. The effects of cardiovascular H2-receptor stimulation are demonstrated best by a sustained and large dose of histamine given by infusion. If it be considered desirable to antagonise all the cardiovascular responses to endogenous histamine, the available pharmacological data in man suggest this would be achieved best by a combination of an H1-and H2-receptor antagonist.

  15. Pharmacologic biomarkers in the development of stratified cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    Figg, William Douglas; Newell, David R

    2014-05-15

    Clinical pharmacologic research plays a vital role in cancer drug development. In recent years, biomarker studies have become integral to this process, specifically the use of pharmacologic biomarkers in the development of targeted therapies and their translation to clinical practice. In this overview, we discuss the validation of pharmacodynamics (PD) biomarkers and highlight the circulating tumor DNA as a promising cancer biomarker to illustrate how PD biomarkers can be powerful tools for guiding treatment strategies. We provide insights into PD biomarker approaches for future development of novel therapies and their role in cancer medicine. See all articles in this CCR focus section, "Progress in pharmacodynamic endpoints."

  16. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-12-10

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents.

  17. [Pharmacological treatment of COPD. Where are we now?].

    PubMed

    Calle Rubio, Myriam; Pinedo Sierra, Celia; Rodríguez Hermosa, Juan Luis

    2010-12-01

    Current clinical guidelines recommend a step-wise approach to the pharmacological treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with drugs being added according to the severity of airflow obstruction, symptoms, and the number of acute exacerbations in patients with severe disease. However, greater knowledge of the physiopathogenesis of this disease has led to COPD being considered a heterogeneous process in which therapeutic decisions should not be based exclusively on the results of spirometry. Treatment is increasingly individualized according to the patient's characteristics. The present article reviews the scientific evidence on the aims of treatment in COPD and the benefits achieved by the various pharmacological options available. PMID:21316549

  18. The ethnobotanical, phytochemical and pharmacological profile of the genus Pinellia.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiao; Huang, Baokang; Wang, Guowei; Zhang, Chunyan

    2014-03-01

    The genus Pinellia (Araceae), consisting of nine species, is mainly distributed in Eastern Asia. In traditional medicine, some Pinellia species have long been used for the treatment of various ailments, such as cough, vomiting, inflammation, epilepsy, cervical cancer and traumatic injury. Pharmacological studies revealed that Pinellia species possess a wide range of biological activities including cytotoxic, anti-tumor, antiemetic, insecticidal, antitussive, antimicrobial and anticonvulsant activities. However, some species also showed significant toxicity such as reproductive toxicity, mucosal irritation and hepatotoxicity. Most of these bioactivities and toxicity can be explained by the presence of various alkaloids and lectins. This review summarizes the ethnopharmacological uses, phytochemical constituents, pharmacological activities and toxicity of Pinellia species.

  19. The Chemical Constituents and Pharmacological Actions of Cordyceps sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jihui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hanyue; Zhang, Xuelan; Han, Chunchao

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis, also called DongChongXiaCao (winter worm, summer grass) in Chinese, is becoming increasingly popular and important in the public and scientific communities. This study summarizes the chemical constituents and their corresponding pharmacological actions of Cordyceps sinensis. Many bioactive components of Cordyceps sinensis have been extracted including nucleoside, polysaccharide, sterol, protein, amino acid, and polypeptide. In addition, these constituents' corresponding pharmacological actions were also shown in the study such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumour, antiapoptosis, and immunomodulatory actions. Therefore can use different effects of C. sinensis against different diseases and provide reference for the study of Cordyceps sinensis in the future. PMID:25960753

  20. Creating a virtual pharmacology curriculum in a problem-based learning environment: one medical school's experience.

    PubMed

    Karpa, Kelly Dowhower; Vrana, Kent E

    2013-02-01

    Integrating pharmacology education into a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum has proven challenging for many medical schools, including the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine (Penn State COM). In response to pharmacology content gaps in its PBL-intensive curriculum, Penn State COM in 2003 hired a director of medical pharmacology instruction to oversee efforts to improve the structure of pharmacology education in the absence of a stand-alone course. In this article, the authors describe the ongoing development of the virtual pharmacology curriculum, which weaves pharmacology instruction through the entire medical school curriculum with particular emphasis on the organ-based second year. Pharmacology is taught in a spiraling manner designed to add to and build upon students' knowledge and competency. Key aspects of the virtual curriculum (as of 2011) include clearly stated and behaviorally oriented pharmacology learning objectives, pharmacology study guides that correspond to each PBL case, pharmacology review sessions that feature discussions of United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE)-type questions, and pharmacology questions for each PBL case on course examinations to increase student accountability. The authors report a trend toward improved USMLE Step 1 scores since these initiatives were introduced. Furthermore, graduates' ratings of their pharmacology education have improved on the Medical School Graduation Questionnaire. The authors suggest that the initiatives they describe for enhancing pharmacology medical education are relevant to other medical schools that are also seeking ways to better integrate pharmacology into PBL-based curricula.

  1. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Catalytic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Catalytic receptors are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528241

  2. [New drugs--chemical, pharmacological, metabolical, analytical and legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Ewald, Andreas H

    2015-03-01

    The characterisation of new psychoactive drugs which were identified in the last years in continuously increasing numbers is a challenge for different academic institutions. This paper gives an overview on new psychoactive drugs in regard of their chemistry, pharmacology, metabolism, analytics and legal aspects in Germany.

  3. [Specialist pharmacist training from the viewpoint of sports pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Kasashi, Kumiko

    2012-01-01

    When athletes consult sports outpatient or orthopedic clinics it is possible to undergo drug treatment with the medical staff having prior knowledge of that patient being an athlete. However, if athletes seek any other diagnosis and treatment as an ordinary patient, the possibility of medical staff realizing the potential for imposing a doping issue on the athlete is extremely low. As a result, if the athlete fails to provide medical staff with information regarding anti-doping regulations when receiving clinical treatment, drug treatment administered as part of medical practices could be viewed as doping, resulting in the athlete being disciplined. In order to avoid this, pharmacist should participate in training in order to be able to provide information for anti-doping purposes. It is my personal opinion that knowledge regarding anti-doping is something that should be shared by all pharmacists, as pharmacists are educated in the fields of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics during the pharmacy education process, and sports pharmacology is a part of this. However, in order for pharmacists to understand sports pharmacology, it is necessary to provide education not only on the benefits and adverse effects of pharmaceutical products, but also on the concept of banned substances. It can be considered one of the pharmacist's duties to protect athletes who purchase drugs at a pharmacy or consult medical institutions as patients. With this, I would like to propose considering the potential for introducing sports pharmacology to pharmaceutical education, and specialist pharmacist training in the sports spectrum.

  4. Achieving the World Health Organization's vision for clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jennifer H; Henry, David; Gray, Jean; Day, Richard; Bochner, Felix; Ferro, Albert; Pirmohamed, Munir; Mörike, Klaus; Schwab, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Clinical pharmacology is a medical specialty whose practitioners teach, undertake research, frame policy, give information and advice about the actions and proper uses of medicines in humans and implement that knowledge in clinical practice. It involves a combination of several activities: drug discovery and development, training safe prescribers, providing objective and evidence-based therapeutic information to ethics, regulatory and pricing bodies, supporting patient care in an increasingly subspecialized arena where co-morbidities, polypharmacy, altered pharmacokinetics and drug interactions are common and developing and contributing to medicines policies for Governments. Clinical pharmacologists must advocate drug quality and they must also advocate for sustainability of the Discipline. However for this they need appropriate clinical service and training support. This Commentary discusses strategies to ensure the Discipline is supported by teaching, training and policy organizations, to communicate the full benefits of clinical pharmacology services, put a monetary value on clinical pharmacology services and to grow the clinical pharmacology workforce to support a growing clinical, academic and regulatory need. PMID:26466826

  5. Beyond reverse pharmacology: Mechanism-based screening of Ayurvedic drugs.

    PubMed

    Lele, R D

    2010-10-01

    This paper reviews the pharmacology of Indian medicinal plants, starting with the historical background of European work on the subject beginning as early as the 17th century, and tracing its history through the work of Sen and Bose in the 1930's, and Vakhil's historic 1949 paper on Sarpaghanda. The often crucial role of patient feedback in early discoveries is highlighted, as is the time lag between proof of pharmacological action and identification of the active principle, and subsequent elucidation of mechanism of action. In the case of Indian plants in the 20th century this process sometimes took almost 50 years. Reserpine and its mechanisms are given in detail, and its current relevance to public health discussed. The foundation of present day methods of pharmacology is briefly presented so the complexity of methods used to identify properties of Ayurveda derived drugs like forskolin and baicalein, and their bioavailability, may be better appreciated. Ayurveda derived anti-oxidants and their levels of action, immuno-modulators, particularly with respect to the NF-kB pathway and its implications for cancer control, are all considered. The example of curcumin derived from turmeric is explained in more detail, because of its role in cancer prevention. Finally, the paper emphasizes the importance of Ayurveda's concepts of rasayana as a form of dietary chemo-prevention; the significance of ahar, diet, in Ayurveda's aspiration to prevent disease and restore health thus becomes clear. Understood in this light, Ayurveda may transcend pharmacology as a treatment paradigm. PMID:21731372

  6. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  7. Pioneer in Behavioral Pharmacology: A Tribute to Joseph V. Brady

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The contributions of Joseph V. Brady to behavioral pharmacology span more than 50 years and range from early studies using the Estes-Skinner ("conditioned emotional response") procedure to examine drug effects and various physiological processes in experimental animals to the implementation of mobile methadone treatment services and to small group…

  8. Trends in utilization of the pharmacological potential of chalcones.

    PubMed

    Batovska, Daniela Ilieva; Todorova, Iva Todorova

    2010-02-01

    Chalcones (1,3-diaryl-2-propen-1-ones) are open chain flavonoids that are widely biosynthesized in plants. They are important for the pigmentation of flowers and, hence, act as attractants to the pollinators. As flavonoids, chalcones also play an important role in defense against pathogens and insects. A longstanding scientific research has shown that chalcones also display other interesting biological properties such as antioxidant, cytotoxic, anticancer, antimicrobial, antiprotozoal, antiulcer, antihistaminic and anti-inflammatory activities. Some lead compounds with various pharmacological properties have been developed based on the chalcone skeleton. Clinical trials have shown that these compounds reached reasonable plasma concentrations and did not cause toxicity. For these reasons, chalcones became an object of continued interest in both academia and industry. Nowadays, several chalcones are used for treatment of viral disorders, cardiovascular diseases, parasitic infections, pain, gastritis, and stomach cancer, as well as like food additives and cosmetic formulation ingredients. However, much of the pharmacological potential of chalcones is still not utilized. The purpose of this review is to describe the recent efforts of scientists in pharmacological screening of natural and synthetic chalcones, studying the mechanisms of chalcone action and relevant structure-activity relationships. Put together, these activities aimed at synthesis of pharmacologically active chalcones and their analogs. PMID:19891604

  9. Navigating Traditional Chinese Medicine Network Pharmacology and Computational Tools

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Lei; Xu, Li-Wen

    2013-01-01

    The concept of “network target” has ushered in a new era in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). As a new research approach, network pharmacology is based on the analysis of network models and systems biology. Taking advantage of advancements in systems biology, a high degree of integration data analysis strategy and interpretable visualization provides deeper insights into the underlying mechanisms of TCM theories, including the principles of herb combination, biological foundations of herb or herbal formulae action, and molecular basis of TCM syndromes. In this study, we review several recent developments in TCM network pharmacology research and discuss their potential for bridging the gap between traditional and modern medicine. We briefly summarize the two main functional applications of TCM network models: understanding/uncovering and predicting/discovering. In particular, we focus on how TCM network pharmacology research is conducted and highlight different computational tools, such as network-based and machine learning algorithms, and sources that have been proposed and applied to the different steps involved in the research process. To make network pharmacology research commonplace, some basic network definitions and analysis methods are presented. PMID:23983798

  10. The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14: overview.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stephen P H; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; McGrath, John C; Catterall, William A; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J; Abul-Hasn, N; Anderson, C M; Anderson, C M H; Araiksinen, M S; Arita, M; Arthofer, E; Barker, E L; Barratt, C; Barnes, N M; Bathgate, R; Beart, P M; Belelli, D; Bennett, A J; Birdsall, N J M; Boison, D; Bonner, T I; Brailsford, L; Bröer, S; Brown, P; Calo, G; Carter, W G; Catterall, W A; Chan, S L F; Chao, M V; Chiang, N; Christopoulos, A; Chun, J J; Cidlowski, J; Clapham, D E; Cockcroft, S; Connor, M A; Cox, H M; Cuthbert, A; Dautzenberg, F M; Davenport, A P; Dawson, P A; Dent, G; Dijksterhuis, J P; Dollery, C T; Dolphin, A C; Donowitz, M; Dubocovich, M L; Eiden, L; Eidne, K; Evans, B A; Fabbro, D; Fahlke, C; Farndale, R; Fitzgerald, G A; Fong, T M; Fowler, C J; Fry, J R; Funk, C D; Futerman, A H; Ganapathy, V; Gaisnier, B; Gershengorn, M A; Goldin, A; Goldman, I D; Gundlach, A L; Hagenbuch, B; Hales, T G; Hammond, J R; Hamon, M; Hancox, J C; Hauger, R L; Hay, D L; Hobbs, A J; Hollenberg, M D; Holliday, N D; Hoyer, D; Hynes, N A; Inui, K-I; Ishii, S; Jacobson, K A; Jarvis, G E; Jarvis, M F; Jensen, R; Jones, C E; Jones, R L; Kaibuchi, K; Kanai, Y; Kennedy, C; Kerr, I D; Khan, A A; Klienz, M J; Kukkonen, J P; Lapoint, J Y; Leurs, R; Lingueglia, E; Lippiat, J; Lolait, S J; Lummis, S C R; Lynch, J W; MacEwan, D; Maguire, J J; Marshall, I L; May, J M; McArdle, C A; McGrath, J C; Michel, M C; Millar, N S; Miller, L J; Mitolo, V; Monk, P N; Moore, P K; Moorhouse, A J; Mouillac, B; Murphy, P M; Neubig, R R; Neumaier, J; Niesler, B; Obaidat, A; Offermanns, S; Ohlstein, E; Panaro, M A; Parsons, S; Pwrtwee, R G; Petersen, J; Pin, J-P; Poyner, D R; Prigent, S; Prossnitz, E R; Pyne, N J; Pyne, S; Quigley, J G; Ramachandran, R; Richelson, E L; Roberts, R E; Roskoski, R; Ross, R A; Roth, M; Rudnick, G; Ryan, R M; Said, S I; Schild, L; Sanger, G J; Scholich, K; Schousboe, A; Schulte, G; Schulz, S; Serhan, C N; Sexton, P M; Sibley, D R; Siegel, J M; Singh, G; Sitsapesan, R; Smart, T G; Smith, D M; Soga, T; Stahl, A; Stewart, G; Stoddart, L A; Summers, R J; Thorens, B; Thwaites, D T; Toll, L; Traynor, J R; Usdin, T B; Vandenberg, R J; Villalon, C; Vore, M; Waldman, S A; Ward, D T; Willars, G B; Wonnacott, S J; Wright, E; Ye, R D; Yonezawa, A; Zimmermann, M

    2013-12-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties from the IUPHAR database. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. This compilation of the major pharmacological targets is divided into seven areas of focus: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors & Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528237

  11. PHARMAVIRTUA: Educational Software for Teaching and Learning Basic Pharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidalgo-Neto, Antonio Augusto; Alberto, Anael Viana Pinto; Bonavita, André Gustavo Calvano; Bezerra, Rômulo José Soares; Berçot, Felipe Faria; Lopes, Renato Matos; Alves, Luiz Anastacio

    2014-01-01

    Information and communication technologies have become important tools for teaching scientific subjects such as anatomy and histology as well as other, nondescriptive subjects like physiology and pharmacology. Software has been used to facilitate the learning of specific concepts at the cellular and molecular levels in the biological and health…

  12. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Transporters are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528242

  13. Current status and future directions of pharmacological therapy for acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Moisés; Espinosa, Etual; Ramírez, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Acromegaly is a chronic systemic disorder caused in the vast majority of cases by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma and resulting in significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. The treatment of choice is the trans-sphenoidal resection of the adenoma, and although 80% of patients with microadenomas or confined macroadenomas achieve biochemical remission, the surgical success rate for patients harboring tumors with extrasellar extension is below 50%. Thus, a considerable proportion of patients will require some form of adjuvant treatment. Acromegaly can be approached pharmacologically by inhibiting GH secretion by the tumor (somatostatin analogues, dopamine agonists) or by antagonizing GH actions at its target tissues (GH receptor antagonists). The primary pharmacological treatment of acromegaly is increasingly gaining acceptance by both physicians and patients. The decision to use primary pharmacological treatment has to take into account the clinical characteristics of the patient (presence of comorbidities that significantly increase the surgical risk) and the biological nature of the adenoma (tumor size and location), as well as other aspects such as the availability of a pituitary surgeon and the cost of medications. This review provides a critical summary and update of the pharmacological treatment of acromegaly focusing both, on well-established agents and strategies as well as on novel compounds that are currently being developed.

  14. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Enzymes are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, nuclear hormone receptors, catalytic receptors and transporters. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528243

  15. High-Throughput Screening of Ototoxic and Otoprotective Pharmacological Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinec, Federico

    2005-01-01

    Drug ototoxicity research has relied traditionally on animal models for the discovery and development of therapeutic interventions. More than 50 years of research, however, has delivered few--if any--successful clinical strategies for preventing or ameliorating the ototoxic effects of common pharmacological drugs such as aminoglycoside…

  16. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Wei-Chiang; Lye, Phui-Yan; Wong, Siu-Kuin

    2016-01-01

    The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive summary on the botany, utility, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba (mulberry or sang shu). The mulberry foliage has remained the primary food for silkworms for centuries. Its leaves have also been used as animal feed for livestock and its fruits have been made into a variety of food products. With flavonoids as major constituents, mulberry leaves possess various biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-diabetic, glucosidase inhibition, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, cardioprotective, and cognitive enhancement activities. Rich in anthocyanins and alkaloids, mulberry fruits have pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, and hepatoprotective activities. The root bark of mulberry, containing flavonoids, alkaloids and stilbenoids, has antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-hyperlipidemic properties. Other pharmacological properties of M. alba include anti-platelet, anxiolytic, anti-asthmatic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, cardioprotective, and immunomodulatory activities. Clinical trials on the efficiency of M. alba extracts in reducing blood glucose and cholesterol levels and enhancing cognitive ability have been conducted. The phytochemistry and pharmacology of the different parts of the mulberry tree confer its traditional and current uses as fodder, food, cosmetics, and medicine. Overall, M. alba is a multi-functional plant with promising medicinal properties. PMID:26850343

  17. EEG Markers for Attention Deficit Disorder: Pharmacological and Neurofeedback Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterman, M. Barry

    2000-01-01

    Examined contribution of EEG findings in the classification and treatment of attention deficit and related behavioral problems in children. Found that quantitative EEG methods disclosed patterns of abnormality in children with ADD, suggested improved guidelines for pharmacological treatment, and introduced neurofeedback, a behavioral treatment for…

  18. Pharmacological Management of Bipolar Disorder in a Youth with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelBello, Melissa P.; Correll, Christoph U.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Carlson, Harold E.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, four clinicians respond to the following case vignette: A 12-year-old girl with insulin-dependent diabetes presents for treatment of her newly diagnosed bipolar disorder. How would you address the bipolar disorder pharmacologically, and how would the presence of diabetes affect your selection of medication and clinical management?

  19. Hard Core Pharmacology: How Much Is Taught in Pharmacy Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachmann, Kenneth A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A survey was sent to eighty-five American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy-member schools and affiliates to learn how many lectures are accorded to core sequences in pharmacology. The data were intended to provide a frame of reference for the University of Toledo College of Pharmacy. (Author/MLW)

  20. [Contribution to the history of pharmacology (the early Roman empire)].

    PubMed

    Tesařová, Drahomíra

    2014-01-01

    This article is a contribution to the history of pharmacology in the early Roman empire. It contains texts mainly written in Latin: the works of Aulus Cornelius Celsus, Scribonius Largus and Plinius Maior (Pliny the Elder). It describes their structure and contributions to the history of medicine and gives examples of some prescriptions and drugs in the original language and in Czech.

  1. Computer Technology Can Enhance Presentation of Pharmacological Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffee, William H.

    1991-01-01

    The use of liquid crystal display (LCD) techniques for projection of computer monitor images onto a large screen for classroom viewing is discussed and illustrated with a pharmacology class presentation on drug/neurotransmitter-receptor interactions. The method is seen as a way of bringing a new dynamic to visual instruction. (MSE)

  2. In silico methods for drug repurposing and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Hodos, Rachel A; Kidd, Brian A; Shameer, Khader; Readhead, Ben P; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-05-01

    Data in the biological, chemical, and clinical domains are accumulating at ever-increasing rates and have the potential to accelerate and inform drug development in new ways. Challenges and opportunities now lie in developing analytic tools to transform these often complex and heterogeneous data into testable hypotheses and actionable insights. This is the aim of computational pharmacology, which uses in silico techniques to better understand and predict how drugs affect biological systems, which can in turn improve clinical use, avoid unwanted side effects, and guide selection and development of better treatments. One exciting application of computational pharmacology is drug repurposing-finding new uses for existing drugs. Already yielding many promising candidates, this strategy has the potential to improve the efficiency of the drug development process and reach patient populations with previously unmet needs such as those with rare diseases. While current techniques in computational pharmacology and drug repurposing often focus on just a single data modality such as gene expression or drug-target interactions, we argue that methods such as matrix factorization that can integrate data within and across diverse data types have the potential to improve predictive performance and provide a fuller picture of a drug's pharmacological action. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:186-210. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1337 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27080087

  3. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; McGrath, John C; Catterall, William A; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties from the IUPHAR database. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. This compilation of the major pharmacological targets is divided into seven areas of focus: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors & Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and GRAC and provides a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528237

  4. In silico methods for drug repurposing and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Hodos, Rachel A; Kidd, Brian A; Shameer, Khader; Readhead, Ben P; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-05-01

    Data in the biological, chemical, and clinical domains are accumulating at ever-increasing rates and have the potential to accelerate and inform drug development in new ways. Challenges and opportunities now lie in developing analytic tools to transform these often complex and heterogeneous data into testable hypotheses and actionable insights. This is the aim of computational pharmacology, which uses in silico techniques to better understand and predict how drugs affect biological systems, which can in turn improve clinical use, avoid unwanted side effects, and guide selection and development of better treatments. One exciting application of computational pharmacology is drug repurposing-finding new uses for existing drugs. Already yielding many promising candidates, this strategy has the potential to improve the efficiency of the drug development process and reach patient populations with previously unmet needs such as those with rare diseases. While current techniques in computational pharmacology and drug repurposing often focus on just a single data modality such as gene expression or drug-target interactions, we argue that methods such as matrix factorization that can integrate data within and across diverse data types have the potential to improve predictive performance and provide a fuller picture of a drug's pharmacological action. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:186-210. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1337 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. Non-pharmacological intervention for posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Weill-Chounlamountry, Agnès; Alves, Jorge; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive visual-perceptual deficits. Although the neurocognitive profile of PCA is a growing and relatively well-established field, non-pharmacological care remains understudied and to be widely established in clinical practice. In the present work we review the available literature on non-pharmacological approaches for PCA, such as cognitive rehabilitation including individual cognitive exercises and compensatory techniques to improve autonomy in daily life, and psycho-education aiming to inform people with PCA about the nature of their visual deficits and limits of cognitive rehabilitation. The reviewed studies represented a total of 7 patients. There is a scarcity of the number of studies, and mostly consisting of case studies. Results suggest non-pharmacological intervention to be a potentially beneficial approach for the partial compensation of deficits, improvement of daily functionality and improvement of quality of life. Clinical implications and future directions are also highlighted for the advancement of the field, in order to clarify the possible role of non-pharmacological interventions, and its extent, in PCA. PMID:27574605

  6. EFFECTS OF TUMORS ON INHALED PHARMACOLOGIC DRUGS: I. FLOW PATTTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Lung carcinomas are now the most common form of cancer. Clinical data suggest that tumors are found preferentially in upper airways, perhaps specifically at carina within bifurcations. The disease can be treated by aerosolized pharmacologic drugs. To enhance their...

  7. The pharmacology of lysergic acid diethylamide: a review.

    PubMed

    Passie, Torsten; Halpern, John H; Stichtenoth, Dirk O; Emrich, Hinderk M; Hintzen, Annelie

    2008-01-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) was synthesized in 1938 and its psychoactive effects discovered in 1943. It was used during the 1950s and 1960s as an experimental drug in psychiatric research for producing so-called "experimental psychosis" by altering neurotransmitter system and in psychotherapeutic procedures ("psycholytic" and "psychedelic" therapy). From the mid 1960s, it became an illegal drug of abuse with widespread use that continues today. With the entry of new methods of research and better study oversight, scientific interest in LSD has resumed for brain research and experimental treatments. Due to the lack of any comprehensive review since the 1950s and the widely dispersed experimental literature, the present review focuses on all aspects of the pharmacology and psychopharmacology of LSD. A thorough search of the experimental literature regarding the pharmacology of LSD was performed and the extracted results are given in this review. (Psycho-) pharmacological research on LSD was extensive and produced nearly 10,000 scientific papers. The pharmacology of LSD is complex and its mechanisms of action are still not completely understood. LSD is physiologically well tolerated and psychological reactions can be controlled in a medically supervised setting, but complications may easily result from uncontrolled use by layman. Actually there is new interest in LSD as an experimental tool for elucidating neural mechanisms of (states of) consciousness and there are recently discovered treatment options with LSD in cluster headache and with the terminally ill.

  8. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Wei-Chiang; Lye, Phui-Yan; Wong, Siu-Kuin

    2016-01-01

    The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive summary on the botany, utility, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba (mulberry or sang shu). The mulberry foliage has remained the primary food for silkworms for centuries. Its leaves have also been used as animal feed for livestock and its fruits have been made into a variety of food products. With flavonoids as major constituents, mulberry leaves possess various biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-diabetic, glucosidase inhibition, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, cardioprotective, and cognitive enhancement activities. Rich in anthocyanins and alkaloids, mulberry fruits have pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, and hepatoprotective activities. The root bark of mulberry, containing flavonoids, alkaloids and stilbenoids, has antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-hyperlipidemic properties. Other pharmacological properties of M. alba include anti-platelet, anxiolytic, anti-asthmatic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, cardioprotective, and immunomodulatory activities. Clinical trials on the efficiency of M. alba extracts in reducing blood glucose and cholesterol levels and enhancing cognitive ability have been conducted. The phytochemistry and pharmacology of the different parts of the mulberry tree confer its traditional and current uses as fodder, food, cosmetics, and medicine. Overall, M. alba is a multi-functional plant with promising medicinal properties.

  9. The Concise Guide to Pharmacology 2013/14: Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen PH; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Catterall, William A; Spedding, Michael; Peters, John A; Harmar, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2013/14 provides concise overviews of the key properties of over 2000 human drug targets with their pharmacology, plus links to an open access knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands (www.guidetopharmacology.org), which provides more detailed views of target and ligand properties. The full contents can be found at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.12444/full. Ion channels are one of the seven major pharmacological targets into which the Guide is divided, with the others being G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear hormone receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside key references and suggestions for further reading. A new landscape format has easy to use tables comparing related targets. It is a condensed version of material contemporary to late 2013, which is presented in greater detail and constantly updated on the website www.guidetopharmacology.org, superseding data presented in previous Guides to Receptors and Channels. It is produced in conjunction with NC-IUPHAR and provides the official IUPHAR classification and nomenclature for human drug targets, where appropriate. It consolidates information previously curated and displayed separately in IUPHAR-DB and the Guide to Receptors and Channels, providing a permanent, citable, point-in-time record that will survive database updates. PMID:24528239

  10. Pharmacological evidence of neuro-pharmacological activity of Acacia tortilis leaves in mice.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Waheeb D M; Azmat, Aisha

    2016-08-01

    Acacia tortilis is abundantly present in Saudi Arabia but its neuro-pharmacological activity has not yet been evaluated. In this study, the antidepressant by Forced swim test, Anxiolytic (Light and Dark box) and sedative effects (by using Open Field) of Acacia leaves extract were evaluated in mice. Aqueous extracts of the Acacia tortilis leaves were prepared. Two different doses (400 and 800 mg/kg) of the extracts were administered to the mice orally (p.o.). In exploratory behavior, Acacia leave extract (800 mg/kg) produced a significant reduction (Veh, 91.00 ± 5.26; Acacia 800 mg/kg, 46.33 ± 3.24 p < 0.05) similar to the effect observed with chlorpromazine (CPZ) (Veh, 91.00 ± 5.26; CPZ 1.0 mg/kg, 24.20 ± 3.40 p < 0.05). A dose-dependent significant decrease in immobility time was also observed in mice and this effect was comparable to its positive control (Imipramine). However, In light-dark box test, mice treated with high dose (800 mg/kg/day) spent significant (p < 0.05) time on the light side of the light-dark box similar to positive control DZP. (Veh, 114.40 ± 6.30 s; Acacia 800 mg/kg, 162.2 ± 14.9; DZP 1.0 mg/kg, 184.20 ± 9.24 p < 0.05). The present research propounded that Acacia tortilis leave extract contains some active ingredients with potential anxiolytic activity at low doses and antidepressant and sedative activity at high doses.

  11. Pharmacological evidence of neuro-pharmacological activity of Acacia tortilis leaves in mice.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Waheeb D M; Azmat, Aisha

    2016-08-01

    Acacia tortilis is abundantly present in Saudi Arabia but its neuro-pharmacological activity has not yet been evaluated. In this study, the antidepressant by Forced swim test, Anxiolytic (Light and Dark box) and sedative effects (by using Open Field) of Acacia leaves extract were evaluated in mice. Aqueous extracts of the Acacia tortilis leaves were prepared. Two different doses (400 and 800 mg/kg) of the extracts were administered to the mice orally (p.o.). In exploratory behavior, Acacia leave extract (800 mg/kg) produced a significant reduction (Veh, 91.00 ± 5.26; Acacia 800 mg/kg, 46.33 ± 3.24 p < 0.05) similar to the effect observed with chlorpromazine (CPZ) (Veh, 91.00 ± 5.26; CPZ 1.0 mg/kg, 24.20 ± 3.40 p < 0.05). A dose-dependent significant decrease in immobility time was also observed in mice and this effect was comparable to its positive control (Imipramine). However, In light-dark box test, mice treated with high dose (800 mg/kg/day) spent significant (p < 0.05) time on the light side of the light-dark box similar to positive control DZP. (Veh, 114.40 ± 6.30 s; Acacia 800 mg/kg, 162.2 ± 14.9; DZP 1.0 mg/kg, 184.20 ± 9.24 p < 0.05). The present research propounded that Acacia tortilis leave extract contains some active ingredients with potential anxiolytic activity at low doses and antidepressant and sedative activity at high doses. PMID:27025511

  12. Characterization of two neuronal subclasses through constellation pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Russell W; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Memon, Tosifa; Cox, Jeffrey L; Foulkes, Tucker; Rivier, Jean E; Olivera, Baldomero M

    2012-07-31

    Different types of neurons diverge in function because they express their own unique set or constellation of signaling molecules, including receptors and ion channels that work in concert. We describe an approach to identify functionally divergent neurons within a large, heterogeneous neuronal population while simultaneously investigating specific isoforms of signaling molecules expressed in each. In this study we characterized two subclasses of menthol-sensitive neurons from cultures of dissociated mouse dorsal-root ganglia. Although these neurons represent a small fraction of the dorsal-root ganglia neuronal population, we were able to identify them and investigate the cell-specific constellations of ion channels and receptors functionally expressed in each subclass, using a panel of selective pharmacological tools. Differences were found in the functional expression of ATP receptors, TRPA1 channels, voltage-gated calcium-, potassium-, and sodium channels, and responses to physiologically relevant cold temperatures. Furthermore, the cell-specific responses to various stimuli could be altered through pharmacological interventions targeted to the cell-specific constellation of ion channels expressed in each menthol-sensitive subclass. In fact, the normal responses to cold temperature could be reversed in the two neuronal subclasses by the coapplication of the appropriate combination of pharmacological agents. This result suggests that the functionally integrated constellation of signaling molecules in a particular type of cell is a more appropriate target for effective pharmacological intervention than a single signaling molecule. This shift from molecular to cellular targets has important implications for basic research and drug discovery. We refer to this paradigm as "constellation pharmacology."

  13. Human Behavioral Pharmacology, Past, Present, and Future: Symposium Presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the Behavioral Pharmacology Society

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D.; Bickel, Warren K.; Yi, Richard; de Wit, Harriet; Higgins, Stephen T.; Wenger, Galen R.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    A symposium held at the 50th annual meeting of the Behavioral Pharmacology Society in May 2007 reviewed progress in the human behavioral pharmacology of drug abuse. Studies on drug self-administration in humans are reviewed that assessed reinforcing and subjective effects of drugs of abuse. The close parallels observed between studies in humans and laboratory animals using similar behavioral techniques have broadened our understanding of the complex nature of the pharmacological and behavioral factors controlling drug self-administration. The symposium also addressed the role that individual differences, such as gender, personality, and genotype play in determining the extent of self-administration of illicit drugs in human populations. Knowledge of how these factors influence human drug self-administration has helped validate similar differences observed in laboratory animals. In recognition that drug self-administration is but one of many choices available in the lives of humans, the symposium addressed the ways in which choice behavior can be studied in humans. These choice studies in human drug abusers have opened up new and exciting avenues of research in laboratory animals. Finally, the symposium reviewed behavioral pharmacology studies conducted in drug abuse treatment settings and the therapeutic benefits that have emerged from these studies. PMID:20664330

  14. Clinical pharmacology education and training at the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Lertora, J J L; Atkinson, A J

    2007-06-01

    In 1965, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) established the intramural Pharmacology Research Associate Training (PRAT) program with the primary goals of providing postdoctoral training in pharmacology for individuals with or without previous pharmacology graduate training, and allowing individuals with doctoral degrees in pharmacology to obtain advanced training in other areas of science at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The program utilized research preceptors drawn from laboratories that were conducting pharmacology-related research at the NIH campus. Although primary emphasis was placed on training laboratory scientists, a number of PRAT fellows obtained training that enabled them to pursue successful careers in clinical pharmacology. A partial listing of these individuals is shown in Table 1. Eventually, a clinical pharmacology training option was formalized within the PRAT program by the appointment of a Clinical Pharmacology Program Director, but this was subsequently suspended when this individual left NIH for a position in the pharmaceutical industry.

  15. A Survey of State Boards of Optometry Concerning Educational Requirements in Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesher, Gary A.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a survey of state optometry licensing requirements for coursework in pharmacology, intended as a tool for optometry curriculum development, suggest a need for training in pharmacology in both the college curriculum and continuing education. (MSE)

  16. "How and when Chilean Pharmacology started to be experimental and became a science".

    PubMed

    Bustos, Gonzalo; Renard, Georgina M; Noriega, Viviana; Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacology in Chile has about 75 years of history and from its beginning until today has grown exponentially. Today, pharmacology is taught in the biomedical careers of the main Chilean universities and research centers in pharmacology are in the north, central and south of Chile. This editorial offers an overview of the main milestones that have led to the consolidation of Chilean pharmacology in Latin America and the world.

  17. Status of Undergraduate Pharmacology Laboratories in Colleges of Pharmacy in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Norman L.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    U.S. colleges of pharmacy were surveyed in 1976 to determine whether a trend exists in continuing, discontinuing, or restructuring laboratory time in pharmaceutical education. Data regarding core undergraduate pharmacology courses, undergraduate pharmacology laboratory status, and pharmacology faculty are presented. (LBH)

  18. 77 FR 1696 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... pharmacology aspects of pediatric clinical trial design and dosing to optimize pediatric drug development....

  19. 75 FR 8368 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice... Science and Clinical Pharmacology. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... certain drugs; (2) a new patient-centric clinical pharmacology approach to drug safety; (3) the design...

  20. [Pharmacological therapies for alcohol use disorder in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Yosuke; Higuchi, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed the available pharmacological therapies for alcohol use disorder in Japan. For treatment of withdrawal delirium, therapists prefer to use antipsychotic drugs rather than benzodiazepines, which is different from other countries. Japan does not have any substantial treatment guidelines for withdrawal delirium. Therefore, so treatment strategies matching the environment of each facility need to be formulated. Moreover, current choices for prescribing anti-alcoholic drugs to cope with alcohol craving are limited to drugs such as cyanamide and disulfiram. However, the use of acamprosate has recently begun and a clinical trial for nalmefene is starting soon. We anticipate that these newer pharmacological therapies will contribute to better treatment of alcohol use disorder also in Japan.