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Sample records for pre-employment chest radiographs

  1. The futility of universal pre-employment chest radiographs.

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Ghan-Shyam; Tan-Figueroa, Lilia; Lohiya, Piyush; Bui, De

    2006-01-01

    In a developmental center, a preemployment chest x-ray was required for all job applicants. We scrutinized the pros and cons of this practice through a review of the medical literature and our experience, and discussion with our colleagues. We concluded that such chest x-ray caused unwarranted radiation exposure, did not produce compliance with the tuberculosis laws, gave a false sense of security regarding workers' compensation risk management, was contrary to established occupational medicine practice guidelines, and was unnecessary and wasteful. We discontinued such chest x-rays. The purpose of the pre-employment examination should remain narrowly job related. Even long-established procedures require periodic utilization review. PMID:17225852

  2. The routine pre-employment screening chest radiograph: Should it be routine?

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, V John; Gibikote, Sridhar; Kirupakaran, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: A routine chest radiograph is mandatory in many institutions as a part of pre-employment screening. The usefulness of this has been studied over the years keeping in mind the added time, cost, and radiation concerns. Studies conducted outside India have shown different results, some for and some against it. To our knowledge, there is no published data from India on this issue. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of the reports of 4113 pre-employment chest radiographs done between 2007 and 2009 was conducted. Results: Out of 4113 radiographs, 24 (0.58%) candidates required further evaluation based on findings from the screening chest radiograph. Out of these, 7 (0.17%) candidates required appropriate further treatment. Interpretation and Conclusions: The percentage of significant abnormalities detected which needed further medical intervention was small (0.17%). Although the individual radiation exposure is very small, the large numbers done nation-wide would significantly add to the community radiation, with added significant cost and time implications. We believe that pre-employment chest radiographs should be restricted to candidates in whom there is relevant history and/or clinical findings suggestive of cardiopulmonary disease. PMID:27857470

  3. Unsupervised segmentation of lungs from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes our preliminary investigations for deriving and characterizing coarse-level textural regions present in the lung field on chest radiographs using unsupervised grow-cut (UGC), a cellular automaton based unsupervised segmentation technique. The segmentation has been performed on a publicly available data set of chest radiographs. The algorithm is useful for this application because it automatically converges to a natural segmentation of the image from random seed points using low-level image features such as pixel intensity values and texture features. Our goal is to develop a portable screening system for early detection of lung diseases for use in remote areas in developing countries. This involves developing automated algorithms for screening x-rays as normal/abnormal with a high degree of sensitivity, and identifying lung disease patterns on chest x-rays. Automatically deriving and quantitatively characterizing abnormal regions present in the lung field is the first step toward this goal. Therefore, region-based features such as geometrical and pixel-value measurements were derived from the segmented lung fields. In the future, feature selection and classification will be performed to identify pathological conditions such as pulmonary tuberculosis on chest radiographs. Shape-based features will also be incorporated to account for occlusions of the lung field and by other anatomical structures such as the heart and diaphragm.

  4. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  5. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, KPP; Mannam, PR; Rajendran, K; John, RA; Ramasami, P

    2016-01-01

    Background and Rationale: Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20–72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. Results: The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%), generalized myalgia (83%), headache (65%), dyspnea (54%), cough (24.3%), and altered sensorium (14%). Almost half of the patients (49.4%) had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%), airspace opacity (10.5%), reticulonodular opacities (10.3%), peribronchial thickening (5.8%), and pulmonary edema (2%). Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of <20,000 cells/cumm, and total serum bilirubin >2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89–33.16), invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42–50.88), inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35–17.62), higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; P < 0.001), and higher mortality (OR: 4.63; 95% CI: 1.54–13.85). Conclusion: Almost half of the patients with scrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe

  6. Segmentation of ribs in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Lin; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Ribs and clavicles in posterior-anterior (PA) digital chest radiographs often overlap with lung abnormalities such as nodules, and cause missing of these abnormalities, it is therefore necessary to remove or reduce the ribs in chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to develop a fully automated algorithm to segment ribs within lung area in digital radiography (DR) for removal of the ribs. The rib segmentation algorithm consists of three steps. Firstly, a radiograph was pre-processed for contrast adjustment and noise removal; second, generalized Hough transform was employed to localize the lower boundary of the ribs. In the third step, a novel bilateral dynamic programming algorithm was used to accurately segment the upper and lower boundaries of ribs simultaneously. The width of the ribs and the smoothness of the rib boundaries were incorporated in the cost function of the bilateral dynamic programming for obtaining consistent results for the upper and lower boundaries. Our database consisted of 93 DR images, including, respectively, 23 and 70 images acquired with a DR system from Shanghai United-Imaging Healthcare Co. and from GE Healthcare Co. The rib localization algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 98.2% with 0.1 false positives per image. The accuracy of the detected ribs was further evaluated subjectively in 3 levels: "1", good; "2", acceptable; "3", poor. The percentages of good, acceptable, and poor segmentation results were 91.1%, 7.2%, and 1.7%, respectively. Our algorithm can obtain good segmentation results for ribs in chest radiography and would be useful for rib reduction in our future study.

  7. Pulmonary embolism findings on chest radiographs and multislice spiral CT.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Verschuren, Franck; Hainaut, Philippe; Goncette, Louis

    2004-07-01

    Multislice spiral CT is becoming an increasingly important tool for diagnosing pulmonary embolism. However, in many instances, a chest radiograph is usually performed as a first-line examination. Many parenchymal, vascular, and other ancillary findings may be observed on both imaging modalities with a highly detailed depiction of abnormalities on multislice CT. A comprehensive review of chest radiograph findings is presented with side-by-side correlations of CT images reformatted mainly in the frontal plane.

  8. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P < .001) and positive smoking history (P = .001) were associated with increased likelihood of a recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in

  9. Usefulness of Chest Radiographs for Scoliosis Screening: A Comparison with Thoraco-Lumbar Standing Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Kim, Chan Gyu; Lee, Myoung Seok; Park, Hyeong-Chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of this study were to evaluate the usefulness and limitations of chest radiographs in scoliosis screening and to compare these results with those of thoraco-lumbar standing radiographs (TLSR). Materials and Methods During Korean conscription, 419 males were retrospectively examined using both chest radiographs and TLSR to confirm the scoliosis and Cobb angle at the Regional Military Manpower. We compared the types of spinal curves and Cobb angles as measured from different radiographs. Results In the pattern of spinal curves, the overall matching rate of chest radiographs using TLSR was about 58.2% (244 of 419 cases). Cobb angle differences between chest radiographs and TLSR with meaningful difference was observed in 156 cases (37.2%); a relatively high proportion (9.5%) of Cobb angle differences more than 10 degrees was also observed. The matching rate of both spinal curve types and Cobb angle accuracy between chest radiographs and TLSR was 27.9% (117 among 419 cases). Chest radiographs for scoliosis screening were observed with 93.94% of sensitivity and 61.67% of specificity in thoracic curves; however, less than 40% of sensitivity (38.27%, 20.00%, and 25.80%) and more than 95% of specificity (97.34%, 99.69%, and 98.45%) were observed in thoraco-lumbar, lumbar, and double major curves, respectively. Conclusion The accuracy of chest radiographs for scoliosis screening was low. The incidence of thoracic curve scoliosis was overestimated and lumbar curve scoliosis was easily missed by chest radiography. Scoliosis screening using chest radiography has limited values, nevertheless, it is useful method for detecting thoracic curve scoliosis. PMID:23074120

  10. [Lateral chest X-rays. Radiographic anatomy].

    PubMed

    García Villafañe, C; Pedrosa, C S

    2014-01-01

    Lateral chest views constitute an essential part of chest X-ray examinations, so it is fundamental to know the anatomy on these images and to be able to detect the variations manifested on these images in different diseases. The aim of this article is to review the normal anatomy and main normal variants seen on lateral chest views. For teaching purposes, we divide the thorax into different spaces and analyze each in an orderly way, especially emphasizing the anatomic details that are most helpful for locating lesions that have already been detected in the posteroanterior view or for detecting lesions that can be missed in the posteroanterior view.

  11. Computer-assisted diagnosis of chest radiographs for pneumoconioses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliz, Peter; Pattichis, Marios S.; Ramachandran, Janakiramanan; James, David S.

    2001-07-01

    A Computer-assisted Chest Radiograph Reader System (CARRS) was developed for the detection of pathological features in lungs presenting with pneumoconioses. CARRS applies novel techniques in automatic image segmentation, incorporates neural network-based pattern classification, and integrates these into a graphical user interface. The three aspects of CARRS are described: Chest radiograph digitization and display, rib and parenchyma characterization, and classification. The quantization of the chest radiograph film was optimized to maximize the information content of the digital images. Entropy was used as the benchmark for optimizing the quantization. From the rib-segmented images, regions of interest were selected by the pulmonologist. A feature vector composed of image characteristics such as entropy, textural statistics, etc. was calculated. A laterally primed adaptive resonance theory (LAPART) neural network was used as the classifier. LAPART classification accuracy averaged 86.8 %. Truth was determined by the two pulmonologists. The CARRS has demonstrated potential as a screening device. Today, 90% or more of the chest radiographs seen by the pulmonologist are normal. A computer-based system that can screen 50% or more of the chest radiographs represents a large savings in time and dollars.

  12. Automatic image hanging protocol for chest radiographs in PACS.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hui; Hao, Wei; Foos, David H; Cornelius, Craig W

    2006-04-01

    Chest radiography is one of the most widely used techniques in diagnostic imaging. It comprises at least one-third of all diagnostic radiographic procedures in hospitals. However, in the picture archive and communication system, images are often stored with the projection and orientation unknown or mislabeled, which causes inefficiency for radiologists' interpretation. To address this problem, an automatic hanging protocol for chest radiographs is presented. The method targets the most effective region in a chest radiograph, and extracts a set of size-, rotation-, and translation-invariant features from it. Then, a well-trained classifier is used to recognize the projection. The orientation of the radiograph is later identified by locating the neck, heart, and abdomen positions in the radiographs. Initial experiments are performed on the radiographs collected from daily routine chest exams in hospitals and show promising results. Using the presented protocol, 98.2% of all cases could be hung correctly on projection view (without protocol, 62%), and 96.1% had correct orientation (without protocol, 75%). A workflow study on the protocol also demonstrates a significant improvement in efficiency for image display.

  13. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations § 37.3... miner who is employed in or at any of its coal mines and who was employed in coal mining prior to... operator of each coal mine of a period within which the operator may provide examinations to each miner...

  14. Localized Fisher vector representation for pathology detection in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geva, Ofer; Lieberman, Sivan; Konen, Eli; Greenspan, Hayit

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we present a novel framework for automatic detection of abnormalities in chest radiographs. The representation model is based on the Fisher Vector encoding method. In the representation process, we encode each chest radiograph using a set of extracted local descriptors. These include localized texture features that address typical local texture abnormalities as well as spatial features. Using a Gaussian Mixture Model, a rich image descriptor is generated for each chest radiograph. An improved representation is obtained by selection of features that correspond to the relevant region of interest for each pathology. Categorization of the X-ray images is conducted using supervised learning and the SVM classifier. The proposed system was tested on a dataset of 636 chest radiographs taken from a real clinical environment. We measured the performance in terms of area (AUC) under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Results show an AUC value of 0.878 for abnormal mediastinum detection, and AUC values of 0.827 and 0.817 for detection of right and left lung opacities, respectively. These results improve upon the state-of-the-art as compared with two alternative representation models.

  15. Chest radiographic data acquisition and quality assurance in multicenter studies

    PubMed Central

    Schluchter, Mark; Wood, Beverly P.; Berdon, Walter E.; Boechat, M. Ines; Easley, Kirk A.; Meziane, Moulay; Mellins, Robert B.; Norton, Karen I.; Singleton, Edward; Trautwein, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Multicenter studies rely on data derived from different institutions. Forms can be designed to standardize the reporting process allowing reliable comparison of data. Objective The purpose of the report is to provide a standardized method, developed as a part of a multicenter study of vertically transmitted HIV, for assessing chest radiographic results. Materials and methods Eight hundred and five infants and children were studied at five centers; 3057 chest radiographs were scored. Data were entered using a forced-choice, graded response for 12 findings. Quality assurance measures and inter- rater agreement statistics are reported. Results The form used for reporting chest radiographic results is presented. Inter-rater agreement was moderate to high for most findings, with the best correlation reported for the presence of bronchovascular markings and/or reticular densities addressed as a composite question (kappa = 0.71). The presence of nodular densities (kappa = 0.56) and parenchymal consolidation (kappa = 0.57) had moderate agreement. Agreement for lung volume was low. Conclusion The current tool, developed for use in the pediatric population, is applicable to any study involving the assessment of pediatric chest radiographs for a large population, whether at one or many centers. PMID:9361051

  16. Fully automated calculation of cardiothoracic ratio in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Lin; Jiang, Luan; Chen, Gang; Li, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    The calculation of Cardiothoracic Ratio (CTR) in digital chest radiographs would be useful for cardiac anomaly assessment and heart enlargement related disease indication. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a fully automated scheme for calculation of CTR in digital chest radiographs. Our automated method consisted of three steps, i.e., lung region localization, lung segmentation, and CTR calculation. We manually annotated the lung boundary with 84 points in 100 digital chest radiographs, and calculated an average lung model for the subsequent work. Firstly, in order to localize the lung region, generalized Hough transform was employed to identify the upper, lower, and outer boundaries of lung by use of Sobel gradient information. The average lung model was aligned to the localized lung region to obtain the initial lung outline. Secondly, we separately applied dynamic programming method to detect the upper, lower, outer and inner boundaries of lungs, and then linked the four boundaries to segment the lungs. Based on the identified outer boundaries of left lung and right lung, we corrected the center and the declination of the original radiography. Finally, CTR was calculated as a ratio of the transverse diameter of the heart to the internal diameter of the chest, based on the segmented lungs. The preliminary results on 106 digital chest radiographs showed that the proposed method could obtain accurate segmentation of lung based on subjective observation, and achieved sensitivity of 88.9% (40 of 45 abnormalities), and specificity of 100% (i.e. 61 of 61 normal) for the identification of heart enlargements.

  17. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Radiographs § 37.50 Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—film. (a) Chest radiographs must...

  18. 42 CFR 37.60 - Submitting required chest radiograph classification and miner identification documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic Examinations Specifications for Interpretation, Classification, and Submission of Chest Radiographs § 37.60 Submitting required chest radiograph classification and miner... and miner identification documents. 37.60 Section 37.60 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...

  19. Chest radiographs after removal of chest drains in neonates: clinical benefit or common practice?

    PubMed Central

    van den Boom, J; Battin, M

    2007-01-01

    Background Chest drain insertion is a common procedure in neonatal care. Routine radiography after removal of chest drains increases radiation exposure, handling and cost, but there are few data proving clinical benefit. Objectives To review current practice and determine the yield of routinely obtained chest radiographs (CXR). Methods A retrospective chart review of all infants undergoing removal of chest tubes in a single tertiary neonatal unit in New Zealand between January 1998 and July 2004 was performed. Results In total, 119 infants were identified, from the database, to have a chest drainage performed. In 19 cases, the procedure was needle aspiration or the drain was removed outside of our unit, hence these were excluded. The remaining 100 patients with 110 episodes of chest drain removal after 174 chest tube insertions were analysed. In asymptomatic infants, routine radiography showed some reaccumulation of air in nine of 35 cases of pneumothorax or of fluid in two of the five cases of pleural effusion, but chest tube reinsertion was not required. In the 12 clinically symptomatic infants, chest tubes were reinserted in five cases (four reaccumulations of pneumothorax and one pleural effusion), and one infant had symptomatic right upper lobe collapse. In the remaining infants, there were no abnormalities on CXR accounting for deterioration. Conclusions Given the low yield for routine radiography after chest drain removal, we suggest that close observation is likely to detect clinically relevant recurrence of pneumothorax. PMID:16769712

  20. Detection of tuberculosis using hybrid features from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Ayesha; Akram, M. Usman; Akhtar, Mahmood; Shafique, Irrum

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease and becomes a major threat all over the world but still diagnosis of tuberculosis is a challenging task. In literature, chest radiographs are considered as most commonly used medical images in under developed countries for the diagnosis of TB. Different methods have been proposed but they are not helpful for radiologists due to cost and accuracy issues. Our paper presents a methodology in which different combinations of features are extracted based on intensities, shape and texture of chest radiograph and given to classifier for the detection of TB. The performance of our methodology is evaluated using publically available standard dataset Montgomery Country (MC) which contains 138 CXRs among which 80 CXRs are normal and 58 CXRs are abnormal including effusion and miliary patterns etc. The accuracy of 81.16% was achieved and the results show that proposed method have outperformed existing state of the art methods on MC dataset.

  1. Quantitative Measurement Method for Possible Rib Fractures in Chest Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeil; Kim, Sungjun; Kim, Young Jae

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This paper proposes a measurement method to quantify the abnormal characteristics of the broken parts of ribs using local texture and shape features in chest radiographs. Methods Our measurement method comprises two steps: a measurement area assignment and sampling step using a spline curve and sampling lines orthogonal to the spline curve, and a fracture-ness measurement step with three measures, asymmetry and gray-level co-occurrence matrix based measures (contrast and homogeneity). They were designed to quantify the regional shape and texture features of ribs along the centerline. The discriminating ability of our method was evaluated through region of interest (ROI) analysis and rib fracture classification test using support vector machine. Results The statistically significant difference was found between the measured values from fracture and normal ROIs; asymmetry (p < 0.0001), contrast (p < 0.001), and homogeneity (p = 0.022). The rib fracture classifier, trained with the measured values in ROI analysis, detected every rib fracture from chest radiographs used for ROI analysis, but it also classified some unbroken parts of ribs as abnormal parts (8 to 17 line sets; length of each line set, 2.998 ± 2.652 mm; length of centerlines, 131.067 ± 29.460 mm). Conclusions Our measurement method, which includes a flexible measurement technique for the curved shape of ribs and the proposed shape and texture measures, could discriminate the suspicious regions of ribs for possible rib fractures in chest radiographs. PMID:24175118

  2. 42 CFR 37.50 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-film. 37.50 Section 37.50 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—film. (a) Chest radiographs must be interpreted and...

  3. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-digital radiography systems. 37.51 Section 37.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... of Chest Radiographs § 37.51 Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—digital radiography systems. (a) For each chest radiograph obtained at an approved facility using a digital radiography...

  4. 42 CFR 37.51 - Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-digital radiography systems. 37.51 Section 37.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., and Submission of Chest Radiographs § 37.51 Interpreting and classifying chest radiographs—digital radiography systems. (a) For each chest radiograph obtained at an approved facility using a...

  5. Quality assurance: a comparison study of radiographic exposure for neonatal chest radiographs at 4 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mervyn D; Markowitz, Richard; Hill, Jeanne; Huda, Walter; Babyn, Paul; Apgar, Bruce

    2012-06-01

    Little is known about exposure differences among hospitals. Large differences might identify outliers using excessive exposure. We used the newly described exposure index and deviation index to compare the difference in existing radiographic exposures for neonatal portable chest radiographs among four academic children's hospitals. For each hospital we determined the mean exposure index. We also set target exposure indices and then measured the deviation from this target. There was not a large difference in exposure index among sites. No site had an exposure index mean that was more than twice or less than half that of any other site. For all four sites combined, 92% of exposures had a deviation index within the range from -3 to +3. Thus exposures at each hospital were consistently within a reasonable narrow spectrum. Mean exposure index differences are caused by operational differences with mean values that varied by less than 50% among four hospitals. Ninety-two percent of all exposures were between half and double the target exposure. Although only one vendor's equipment was used, these data establish a practical reference range of exposures for neonatal portable radiographs that can be recommended to other hospitals for neonatal chest radiographs.

  6. Usefulness of chest radiographs in first asthma attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Gershel, J.C.; Goldman, H.S.; Stein, R.E.K.; Shelov, S.P.; Ziprkowski, M.

    1983-08-11

    To assess the value of routine chest radiography during acute first attacks of asthma, we studied 371 consecutive children over one year of age who presented with an initial episode of wheezing. Three hundred fifty children (94.3%) had radiographic findings that were compatible with uncomplicated asthma and were considered negative. Twenty-one (5.7%) had positive findings: atelectasis and pneumonia were noted in seven, segmental atelectasis in six, pneumonia in five, multiple areas of subsegmental atelectasis in two, and pneumomediastinum in one. The patients with positive films were more likely to have a respiratory rate above 60 or a pulse rate above 160 (P < 0.001), localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds before treatment (P < 0.01), and localized rales (P < 0.005) and localized wheezing (P < 0.02) after treatment; also, these patients were admitted to the hospital more often (P < 0.001). Ninety-five percent (20 of 21) of the children with positive films could be identified before treatment on the basis of a combination of tachypnea, tachycardia, fever, and localized rales or localized decreased breath sounds. Most first-time wheezers will not have positive radiographs; careful clinical evaluation should reveal which patients will have abnormal radiographs and will therefore benefit from the procedure. 20 references, 3 tables.

  7. A level crossing enhancement scheme for chest radiograph images.

    PubMed

    Nagesha; Kumar, G Hemantha

    2007-10-01

    A new approach for contrast enhancement of chest radiograph image data is presented. Existing methods for image enhancement focus mainly on the properties of the image to be processed while excluding any consideration of the observer characteristics. In several applications, particularly in the medical imaging area, effective contrast enhancement for diagnostic purposes can be achieved by including certain basic human visual properties. In this paper we shall present a novel (recursive) algorithm that tailors the required amount of contrast enhancement based on a combination of the optimal phase representation and the theory of projection onto a convex set. Constraints of maximum bandwidth of the image data, appropriate knowledge of the amplitude value of the image data, heuristic limitations and level crossing measurements serve to impose additional information. So that, the enhanced image data may better converge to the good quality image.

  8. Evaluation of a low-dose neonatal chest radiographic system

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, E.M.; Kirks, D.R.; Strife, J.L.; Henry, G.C.; Kereiakes, J.G.

    1988-11-01

    A new low-dose chest radiographic system for use in the neonatal nursery was evaluated. This test system, composed of a Du Pont Kevlar fiber-front cassette, Quanta fast-detail screen, Cronex 4L film (wide latitude), and additional yttrium filtration (0.1 mm), reduced the radiation dose in neonatal chest radiography by 69% (0.9 vs 2.9 mrad (0.009 vs 0.029 mGy)) as compared with a conventional system without added yttrium filtration; the thyroid dose was reduced by 76% (0.9 vs 3.7 mrad (0.009 vs 0.037 mGy)). The cumulative dose reduction was achieved through a combination of factors, including (1) beam hardening by the added yttrium filter, (2) increased X-ray transmission through the Kevlar cassette, and (3) a fast film-screen combination. Scatter radiation at distances of 1 and 6 ft. (0.3 and 1.8 m) was negligible for both systems. Image sharpness was compared for the conventional system with and without added yttrium filtration and for the Kevlar system with yttrium. Although sharpness of bony detail was unchanged by adding yttrium filtration to the conventional system, a decrease in sharpness was noted with the Kevlar system. Because image sharpness was affected in the test system, we are not using the Kevlar-Cronex 4L system for mobile chest radiography in the neonatal intensive care unit, despite dose reductions. However, further study is recommended to determine if there is a slower film-screen combination with yttrium filtration that will not degrade image sharpness.

  9. Diagnostic value of the chest radiograph in asymptomatic neonates with a cardiac murmur.

    PubMed

    Oeppen, R S; Fairhurst, J J; Argent, J D

    2002-08-01

    To establish the diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic usefulness of the chest radiograph in asymptomatic neonates with cardiac murmurs. The chest radiographs of 68 asymptomatic neonates with cardiac murmurs were analysed retrospectively. The radiographs were anonymized and then evaluated for the presence or absence of cardiac disease by six radiologists, three who regularly interpret neonatal chest radiographs and three who do so infrequently. The eventual diagnosis for each neonate and the impact of the chest radiograph and original report on patient management were established by review of the clinical case notes. The results for each observer were expressed in 2 x 2 contingency tables and statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. The radiologists who were experienced in reporting neonatal chest radiographs achieved statistically significant results (P=0.003, P=0.002 and P=0.007) compared with those who were less experienced (P=0.13, P=0.16 and P=0.09). Review of the case notes established that the chest radiograph and original report did not influence clinical management in any of the 68 cases studied. Radiologists who frequently report neonatal chest radiographs achieve high accuracy in differentiating cardiac from non-cardiac disease. However, inaccuracies are unavoidable as radiological evidence of cardiac disease is often not present. A false-positive result could cause undue anxiety while a false-negative report could result in the omission of further investigations. Furthermore, a chest radiograph is unlikely to provide the definitive diagnosis. Chest radiographs did not appear to influence patient management in this study and cannot be recommended in the initial evaluation of the asymptomatic neonate with a heart murmur.

  10. Clinical predictors of chest radiographic abnormalities in young children hospitalized with bronchiolitis: a single center study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ga Ram; Na, Min Sun; Baek, Kyung Suk; Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Kyung Suk; Jung, Young Ho; Jee, Hye Mi; Kwon, Tae Hee; Han, Man Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chest radiography is often performed on patients hospitalized with typical clinical manifestations of bronchiolitis. We aimed to determine the proportion of subjects with pathologic chest radiographic findings and the clinical predictors associated with pathologic chest radiographic findings in young children admitted with the typical presentation of bronchiolitis. Methods We obtained the following data at admission: sex, age, neonatal history, past history of hospitalization for respiratory illnesses, heart rate, respiratory rate, the presence of fever, total duration of fever, oxygen saturation, laboratory parameters (i.e., complete blood cell count, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP], etc.), and chest radiography. Results The study comprised 279 young children. Of these, 26 had a chest radiograph revealing opacity (n=24) or atelectasis (n=2). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that after adjustment for confounding factors, the clinical predictors associated with pathologic chest radiographic findings in young children admitted with bronchiolitis were elevated hs-CRP level (>0.3 mg/dL) and past history of hospitalization for respiratory illnesses (all P<0.05). Conclusion The current study suggests that chest radiographs in young children with typical clinical manifestations of bronchiolitis have limited value. Nonetheless, young children with clinical factors such as high hs-CRP levels at admission or past history of hospitalization for respiratory illnesses may be more likely to have pathologic chest radiographic findings. PMID:28194212

  11. System for pathology categorization and retrieval in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avni, Uri; Greenspan, Hayit; Konen, Eli; Sharon, Michal; Goldberger, Jacob

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we present an overview of a system we have been developing for the past several years for efficient image categorization and retrieval in large radiograph archives. The methodology is based on local patch representation of the image content, using a bag of visual words approach and similarity-based categorization with a kernel based SVM classifier. We show an application to pathology-level categorization of chest x-ray data, the most popular examination in radiology. Our study deals with pathology detection and identification of individual pathologies including right and left pleural effusion, enlarged heart and cases of enlarged mediastinum. The input from a radiologist provided a global label for the entire image (healthy/pathology), and the categorization was conducted on the entire image, with no need for segmentation algorithms or any geometrical rules. An automatic diagnostic-level categorization, even on such an elementary level as healthy vs pathological, provides a useful tool for radiologists on this popular and important examination. This is a first step towards similarity-based categorization, which has a major clinical implications for computer-assisted diagnostics.

  12. On your toes: Detecting mediastinal air on the chest radiograph in ecstasy abusers.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Mergan; Govind, Mayuri

    2016-03-30

    Abnormal mediastinal air may be caused by inhalational illicit drug use subsequent to barotrauma resulting from coughing after deep inhalation and breath holding. It may also arise from oesophageal rupture due to retching after ingestion of the illicit drug. The history can alert the practitioner to this cause of chest pain. As chest radiographs are widely accessible and mediastinal air is easily recognisable, the chest radiograph should be included and carefully scrutinised in the diagnostic workup of chest pain in the recreational drug abuser. It is prudent to exclude oesophageal rupture, particularly in the setting of retching, before deciding on conservative and expectant management.

  13. 42 CFR 37.41 - Chest radiograph specifications-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specifications—film. (a) Miners must be disrobed from the waist up at the time the radiograph is given. The... which is at least 100 and does not exceed 300, that produces radiographs with spatial resolution...

  14. 42 CFR 37.41 - Chest radiograph specifications-film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Miners must be disrobed from the waist up at the time the radiograph is given. The facility must provide... which is at least 100 and does not exceed 300, that produces radiographs with spatial resolution...

  15. A novel online Variance Based Instance Selection (VBIS) method for efficient atypicality detection in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubaidi, Mohammad; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Patel, Ameet; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Black, John A., Jr.

    2012-02-01

    Chest radiographs are complex, heterogeneous medical images that depict many different types of tissues, and many different types of abnormalities. A radiologist develops a sense of what visual textures are typical for each anatomic region within chest radiographs by viewing a large set of "normal" radiographs over a period of years. As a result, an expert radiologist is able to readily detect atypical features. In our previous research, we modeled this type of learning by (1) collecting a large set of "normal" chest radiographs, (2) extracting local textural and contour features from anatomical regions within these radiographs, in the form of high-dimensional feature vectors, (3) using a distance-based transductive machine learning method to learn what it typical for each anatomical region, and (4) computing atypicality scores for the anatomical regions in test radiographs. That research demonstrated that the transductive One-Nearest-Neighbor (1NN) method was effective for identifying atypical regions in chest radiographs. However, the large set of training instances (and the need to compute a distance to each of these instances in a high dimensional space) made the transductive method computationally expensive. This paper discusses a novel online Variance Based Instance Selection (VBIS) method for use with the Nearest Neighbor classifier, that (1) substantially reduced the computational cost of the transductive 1NN method, while maintaining a high level of effectiveness in identifying regions of chest radiographs with atypical content, and (2) allowed the incremental incorporation of training data from new informative chest radiographs as they are encountered in day-to-day clinical work.

  16. Effective dose assessment for participants in the National Lung Screening Trial undergoing posteroanterior chest radiographic examinations.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Randell; Flynn, Michael J; Judy, Phillip F; Cagnon, Christopher H; Seibert, J Anthony

    2013-07-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) is a multicenter randomized controlled trial comparing low-dose helical CT with chest radiography in the screening of older current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004, when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites. The objective of this study was to determine the effective radiation dose associated with individual chest radiographic screening examinations. A total of 73,733 chest radiographic examinations were performed with 92 chest imaging systems. The entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) of participants' chest radiographic examinations was estimated and used in this analysis. The effective dose per ESAK for each examination was determined with a Monte Carlo-based program. The examination effective dose was calculated as the product of the examination ESAK and the Monte Carlo estimate of the ratio of effective dose per ESAK. This study showed that the mean effective dose assessed from 66,157 postero-anterior chest examinations was 0.052 mSv. Additional findings were a median effective dose of 0.038 mSv, a 95th percentile value of 0.136 mSv, and a fifth percentile value of 0.013 mSv. The effective dose for participant NLST chest radiographic examinations was determined and is of specific interest in relation to that associated with the previously published NLST low-dose CT examinations conducted during the trial.

  17. Chest radiographic findings in patients with acute pulmonary embolism: observations from the PIOPED Study.

    PubMed

    Worsley, D F; Alavi, A; Aronchick, J M; Chen, J T; Greenspan, R H; Ravin, C E

    1993-10-01

    To determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest radiographic findings in patients suspected of having acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Chest radiographs of 1,063 patients with suspected PE were reviewed. PE was confirmed angiographically in 383 patients and excluded in 680 patients. The chest radiograph was interpreted as normal in only 12% of patients with PE. The most common chest radiographic finding in patients with PE was atelectasis and/or parenchymal areas of increased opacity; however, the prevalence was not significantly different from that in patients without PE. Oligemia (the Westermark sign), prominent central pulmonary artery (the Fleischner sign), pleural-based area of increased opacity (the Hampton hump), vascular redistribution, pleural effusion, elevated diaphragm, and enlarged hilum were also poor predictors of PE. Although chest radiographs are essential in the investigation of suspected PE, their main value is to exclude diagnoses that clinically mimic PE and to aid in the interpretation of the ventilation-perfusion scan.

  18. Radiographers' performance in chest X-ray interpretation: the Nigerian experience

    PubMed Central

    Egbe, N O; Akpan, B E

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the performance of Nigerian radiographers in interpretation of plain chest radiographs and to assess whether age, years since qualification and sector of practice are associated with performance. Methods: A test set of 50 radiographs containing 23 cases with no pathology (normal) and 27 abnormal cases (cardiopulmonary conditions) independently confirmed by 3 radiologists were presented to 51 radiographers in a random order. Readers independently evaluated radiographs for absence or presence of disease and stated the location, radiographic features and diagnosis. Readers self-reported their age, years since qualification and sector of practice. Receiver operating characteristic was used to assess the performance. Mann–Whitney U test was used to assess whether age, years since qualification and sector of practice were associated with performance. Results: Mean location sensitivity was 88.9 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.787–0.980]. Mean sensitivity and specificity were 76.9 (95% CI, 0.658–0.864) and 79.8 (95% CI, 0.658–0.864), respectively. Age was not associated with performance (p = 0.07). Number of years qualified as radiographer (p = 0.005) and private practice (p = 0.004) were positively associated with performance. Conclusion: Nigerian radiographers can correctly report chest radiographs to a reasonable standard, and performance is associated with number of years since qualification and the sector of practice. Advances in knowledge: There are less than 300 radiologists serving a Nigerian population of about 170 million; therefore, X-ray interpretation by radiographers deserves consideration. Nigerian radiographers have potential to interpret chest X-ray in the clinical setting, and this may significantly improve radiology service delivery in this region. PMID:25966290

  19. Unilateral hypertransparency on chest radiograph: the congenital Poland Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tomos, Ioannis; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Vlami, Aikaterini; Apollonatou, Vasiliki; Manali, Effrosyni D; Papiris, Spyros A

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral hypertransparent hemithorax requires a particular diagnostic approach as it can be the result of diverse pulmonary diseases, including pneumothorax, large pulmonary embolus, unilateral large bullae, mucous plag, airway obstruction and contralateral pleural effusion. Congenital syndromes with chest wall abnormalities, are rare, but often underdiagnosed causes. Poland Syndrome consists of such a rare, congenital anomaly and is characterized by the absence of the pectoralis major muscle and upper limb ipsilateral abnormalities. We present a case of a patient with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a unilateral hypertransparency on chest radiology, attributed to the underlying Poland Syndrome.

  20. 42 CFR 37.3 - Chest radiographs required for miners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic... provide to each miner who is employed in or at any of its underground coal mines and who was employed in... may provide examinations to each miner employed at its coal mine. The period must begin no sooner than...

  1. Toward the detection of abnormal chest radiographs the way radiologists do it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubaidi, Mohammad; Patel, Ameet; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Black, John A., Jr.

    2011-03-01

    Computer Aided Detection (CADe) and Computer Aided Diagnosis (CADx) are relatively recent areas of research that attempt to employ feature extraction, pattern recognition, and machine learning algorithms to aid radiologists in detecting and diagnosing abnormalities in medical images. However, these computational methods are based on the assumption that there are distinct classes of abnormalities, and that each class has some distinguishing features that set it apart from other classes. However, abnormalities in chest radiographs tend to be very heterogeneous. The literature suggests that thoracic (chest) radiologists develop their ability to detect abnormalities by developing a sense of what is normal, so that anything that is abnormal attracts their attention. This paper discusses an approach to CADe that is based on a technique called anomaly detection (which aims to detect outliers in data sets) for the purpose of detecting atypical regions in chest radiographs. However, in order to apply anomaly detection to chest radiographs, it is necessary to develop a basis for extracting features from corresponding anatomical locations in different chest radiographs. This paper proposes a method for doing this, and describes how it can be used to support CADe.

  2. The necessity of routine post-thoracostomy tube chest radiographs in post-operative thoracic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, M R; Patel, A; Morgan, J A

    2009-04-01

    Chest radiographs are routinely performed post-operatively in thoracic surgery patients, in particular after the removal of thoracostomy tubes. From observation of our practice, we hypothesised that chest radiographs did not need to be performed routinely post-operatively and after removal of thoracostomy tubes. To determine whether routine chest radiographs post-operatively and post-thoracostomy tube removal directly influenced patient management. A five month prospective study was carried out to analyse our current practice at the Thoracic Surgery Unit, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, U.K. Demographic and clinico-pathological data were collected during admission. In the cohort of 74 patients, 66 (89%) patients had post-operative chest radiographs. Only three (5%) patients who had a chest radiograph had change in their management. Twenty-five (34%) patients had a chest radiograph post-thoracostomy tube removal. Only one (4%) patient in this group who had a chest radiograph after thoracostomy tube removal had a change of management. Interestingly, the decision to change patient management was not made on the basis of the chest radiographs alone; the clinical situation was the main determinant. Patients that did not have a chest radiograph postoperatively (eight patients, 11%) and post-thoracostomy tube removal (49 patients, 66%) did not suffer any adverse sequelae. We feel our data support the hypothesis that it is not necessary to perform routine chest radiographs in thoracic surgery patients post-operatively and after post-operative thoracostomy tube removal. It would be better to monitor these patients clinically and only request chest radiographs on the basis of deterioration in recorded observations or clinical findings.

  3. The Association of Positive Chest Radiograph and Laboratory Parameters with Community Acquired Pneumonia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lakhani, Dhairya; Muley, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Context: This study was designed to compare the sensitivities of different investigations for the diagnosis of Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP). A prospective study was carried out which compared the sensitivities of the chest radiographs, CRP, TLC, ESR and the blood cultures in sixty-six patients who were diagnosed with WHO defined CAP. Method and Material: The chest radiographs, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), total leucocyte count (TLC) and blood cultures were determined in sixty-six patients who were amongst the age group of one month to five years of age, who were diagnosed with WHO defined CAP. Statistical Analysis: It was carried out by calculating the proportion, mean, standard deviation (SD) and the sensitivity of the test/.able Results: The chest radiographs were found to be positive in 93.9% (n=62) patients, CRP was positive in 90.9% (n=60) patients, ESR was positive in 72.7% (n=42) patients, TLC was positive in 48.5% (n=38) patients and the blood cultures were positive in 6.1% (n=4) patients. Hence, the sensitivity of the chest radiograph, CRP, ESR, TLC and the blood culture in the diagnosis of CAP were 93.9%, 90.9%, 72.7%, 48.5% and 6.1%. Conclusion: In view of the high sensitivity of CRP, which is almost similar to that of chest X-Ray in detecting CAP, CRP can be used as an alternative test to the chest radiographs at peripheral centres, where X-ray machines are not available. PMID:24086859

  4. Effect of morphing between unenhanced and multiscale enhanced chest radiographs on pulmonary nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Zöhrer, Fabian; Harz, Markus T.; McEntee, Mark; Hahn, Horst K.; Haygood, Tamara; Evanoff, Michael G.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effectiveness of a novel image-processing algorithm for multi-scale enhancement of chest radiographs to improve detection and localization of real pulmonary nodules. Background: Our wavelet-based enhancement method interactively adjusts the contrast of medical images extracting the spatial frequency components at different scales, followed by a weighting procedure. This study aims to explore the usefulness of this novel procedure for chest image reporting. Method: Sixteen radiologists viewed 50 PA chest radiographs in order to localize pulmonary nodules. The databank contains 25 normal and 25 abnormal images, with multi-nodule cases. Subjects were allowed to mark unlimited number of locations followed by ranking confidence of nodule presence according to a 5-level scale. Subjects viewed all cases at least in two out of three conditions: unprocessed, enhanced and with morphing between these two. MCMR ROC and JAFROC analyses were conducted. Results: No significant differences were found in ROC AUC values across modalities and specialities. Only localization performance with morphing tool is significantly higher (F(1,8)=13.303, p=0.007) for chest expert (JAFROC FOM=0.6355) from non-chest (JAFROC FOM=0.4675) radiologists. Conclusion: Radiologists specialized in chest image interpretation performed consistently well in localizing pulmonary nodules, whereas non-chest radiologists were suffer from distracting effect of morphing tool.

  5. [Effects of image post-processing parameters on digital radiography chest radiograph for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Qiang; Jiang, Zhao-Qiang; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Qiang; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    To explore the effects of image post-processing parameters on DR chest radiograph for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis. Eighty three coal miners were examined with high-kV and DR chest radiographs at the same time. Image post-processing parameters (density, contrast and so on) were designed in a Philips Essenta DR machine were designed, then differences of image quality between high-kV and DR chest radiographs were compared. After regulating image and proceeding the parameters, the OD (optical density) values of high density areas in the upper-middle lung fields, subphrenic and direct exposure areas were 1.58 +/- 0.10, 0.23 +/- 0.02 and 2.80 +/- 0.21, respectively. The quality of chest films met the requirements of diagnostic criteria of pneumoconiosis. The rate of excellent chest films for DR chest radiograph was 95.18%, which was significantly higher than that (80.72%) for high-kV chest radiograph (P < 0.01). Appropriate parameters of image post-processing can make DR chest radiograph to meet the requirements of chest radiograph quality for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis.

  6. 42 CFR 37.4 - Chest radiographic examinations conducted by the Secretary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic... Study of Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis (an epidemiological study of respiratory diseases in coal miners... the locality where the miner resides, at the mine, or at a medical facility easily accessible to a...

  7. An improved automatic computer aided tube detection and labeling system on chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Bharath; Brown, Matthew; Goldin, Jonathan; Cagnon, Christopher; Enzmann, Dieter

    2012-03-01

    Tubes like Endotracheal (ET) tube used to maintain patient's airway and the Nasogastric (NG) tube used to feed the patient and drain contents of the stomach are very commonly used in Intensive Care Units (ICU). The placement of these tubes is critical for their proper functioning and improper tube placement can even be fatal. Bedside chest radiographs are considered the quickest and safest method to check the placement of these tubes. Tertiary ICU's typically generate over 250 chest radiographs per day to confirm tube placement. This paper develops a new fully automatic prototype computer-aided detection (CAD) system for tube detection on bedside chest radiographs. The core of the CAD system is the randomized algorithm which selects tubes based on their average repeatability from seed points. The CAD algorithm is designed as a 5 stage process: Preprocessing (removing borders, histogram equalization, anisotropic filtering), Anatomy Segmentation (to identify neck, esophagus, abdomen ROI's), Seed Generation, Region Growing and Tube Selection. The preliminary evaluation was carried out on 64 cases. The prototype CAD system was able to detect ET tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.93 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image and NG tubes with a True Positive Rate of 0.84 and False Positive Rate of 0.02/image respectively. The results from the prototype system show that it is feasible to automatically detect both tubes on chest radiographs, with the potential to significantly speed the delivery of imaging services while maintaining high accuracy.

  8. Pulmonary sarcoidosis with a diffuse ground glass pattern on the chest radiograph.

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, A.; Desfemmes-Baleyte, T.; Soler, P.; Valeyre, D.; Hance, A. J.; Battesti, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Several chest radiographic abnormalities have been described in pulmonary sarcoidosis, but a diffuse ground glass pattern is extremely rare. METHODS--The chest radiographs of more than 1600 patients with sarcoidosis evaluated in our service between 1976 and 1991 were reviewed to determine the prevalence of this pattern on chest radiography at presentation, and to assess the clinical characteristics of these patients. RESULTS--Ten patients (0.6%) were identified with diffuse ground glass abnormalities on the chest radiography (eight men); all had associated hilar or mediastinal adenopathy. All patients were white and nine were smokers or former smokers. Nine patients were symptomatic and six had inspiratory crackles on physical examination. As a group these patients were remarkable for the frequency and severity of physiological abnormalities and the presence of various findings typically associated with "active" disease. Nine patients were followed for more than three years. All were treated with oral corticosteroids because of significant symptoms or physiological abnormalities, or both. Symptoms and radiological abnormalities disappeared or improved in all patients, but recurred in a high proportion when steroids were tapered or discontinued. By December 1992 only three patients had been withdrawn from treatment. CONCLUSIONS--A diffuse ground glass pattern on the chest radiograph is unusual in patients with sarcoidosis and may occur more commonly in white subjects and cigarette smokers. Its presence suggests the existence of active disease of recent onset likely to require long term treatment with corticosteroids. Images PMID:8091326

  9. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela, Rene H.; Correa, Jose

    1976-01-01

    The article describes the development of a pre-employment laboratory training program in meat processing and its successful use in conjunction with a cooperative training program in a high school agriculture curriculum. (MS)

  10. Computer-aided Detection Fidelity of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest Radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Dellios, Nikolaos; Teichgraeber, Ulf; Chelaru, Robert; Malich, Ansgar; Papageorgiou, Ismini E

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The most ubiquitous chest diagnostic method is the chest radiograph. A common radiographic finding, quite often incidental, is the nodular pulmonary lesion. The detection of small lesions out of complex parenchymal structure is a daily clinical challenge. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of the computer-aided detection (CAD) software package SoftView™ 2.4A for bone suppression and OnGuard™ 5.2 (Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, OH, USA) for automated detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs. Subjects and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated a dataset of 100 posteroanterior chest radiographs with pulmonary nodular lesions ranging from 5 to 85 mm. All nodules were confirmed with a consecutive computed tomography scan and histologically classified as 75% malignant. The number of detected lesions by observation in unprocessed images was compared to the number and dignity of CAD-detected lesions in bone-suppressed images (BSIs). Results: SoftView™ BSI does not affect the objective lesion-to-background contrast. OnGuard™ has a stand-alone sensitivity of 62% and specificity of 58% for nodular lesion detection in chest radiographs. The false positive rate is 0.88/image and the false negative (FN) rate is 0.35/image. From the true positive lesions, 20% were proven benign and 80% were malignant. FN lesions were 47% benign and 53% malignant. Conclusion: We conclude that CAD does not qualify for a stand-alone standard of diagnosis. The use of CAD accompanied with a critical radiological assessment of the software suggested pattern appears more realistic. Accordingly, it is essential to focus on studies assessing the quality-time-cost profile of real-time (as opposed to retrospective) CAD implementation in clinical diagnostics. PMID:28299236

  11. Image-processing technique for suppressing ribs in chest radiographs by means of massive training artificial neural network (MTANN).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Abe, Hiroyuki; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2006-04-01

    When lung nodules overlap with ribs or clavicles in chest radiographs, it can be difficult for radiologists as well as computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes to detect these nodules. In this paper, we developed an image-processing technique for suppressing the contrast of ribs and clavicles in chest radiographs by means of a multiresolution massive training artificial neural network (MTANN). An MTANN is a highly nonlinear filter that can be trained by use of input chest radiographs and the corresponding "teaching" images. We employed "bone" images obtained by use of a dual-energy subtraction technique as the teaching images. For effective suppression of ribs having various spatial frequencies, we developed a multiresolution MTANN consisting of multiresolution decomposition/composition techniques and three MTANNs for three different-resolution images. After training with input chest radiographs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images, the multiresolution MTANN was able to provide "bone-image-like" images which were similar to the teaching bone images. By subtracting the bone-image-like images from the corresponding chest radiographs, we were able to produce "soft-tissue-image-like" images where ribs and clavicles were substantially suppressed. We used a validation test database consisting of 118 chest radiographs with pulmonary nodules and an independent test database consisting of 136 digitized screen-film chest radiographs with 136 solitary pulmonary nodules collected from 14 medical institutions in this study. When our technique was applied to nontraining chest radiographs, ribs and clavicles in the chest radiographs were suppressed substantially, while the visibility of nodules and lung vessels was maintained. Thus, our image-processing technique for rib suppression by means of a multiresolution MTANN would be potentially useful for radiologists as well as for CAD schemes in detection of lung nodules on chest radiographs.

  12. Automatic screening for tuberculosis in chest radiographs: a survey.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Stefan; Karargyris, Alexandros; Candemir, Sema; Siegelman, Jenifer; Folio, Les; Antani, Sameer; Thoma, George

    2013-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health threat. An estimated one-third of the world's population has a history of TB infection, and millions of new infections are occurring every year. The advent of new powerful hardware and software techniques has triggered attempts to develop computer-aided diagnostic systems for TB detection in support of inexpensive mass screening in developing countries. In this paper, we describe the medical background of TB detection in chest X-rays and present a survey of the recent approaches using computer-aided detection. After a thorough research of the computer science literature for such systems or related methods, we were able to identify 16 papers, including our own, written between 1996 and early 2013. These papers show that TB screening is a challenging task and an open research problem. We report on the progress to date and describe experimental screening systems that have been developed.

  13. Local-global classifier fusion for screening chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Meng; Antani, Sameer; Jaeger, Stefan; Xue, Zhiyun; Candemir, Sema; Kohli, Marc; Thoma, George

    2017-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a severe comorbidity of HIV and chest x-ray (CXR) analysis is a necessary step in screening for the infective disease. Automatic analysis of digital CXR images for detecting pulmonary abnormalities is critical for population screening, especially in medical resource constrained developing regions. In this article, we describe steps that improve previously reported performance of NLM's CXR screening algorithms and help advance the state of the art in the field. We propose a local-global classifier fusion method where two complementary classification systems are combined. The local classifier focuses on subtle and partial presentation of the disease leveraging information in radiology reports that roughly indicates locations of the abnormalities. In addition, the global classifier models the dominant spatial structure in the gestalt image using GIST descriptor for the semantic differentiation. Finally, the two complementary classifiers are combined using linear fusion, where the weight of each decision is calculated by the confidence probabilities from the two classifiers. We evaluated our method on three datasets in terms of the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The evaluation demonstrates the superiority of our proposed local-global fusion method over any single classifier.

  14. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme.

    PubMed

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation.

  15. Multi-scale Morphological Image Enhancement of Chest Radiographs by a Hybrid Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Alavijeh, Fatemeh Shahsavari; Mahdavi-Nasab, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Chest radiography is a common diagnostic imaging test, which contains an enormous amount of information about a patient. However, its interpretation is highly challenging. The accuracy of the diagnostic process is greatly influenced by image processing algorithms; hence enhancement of the images is indispensable in order to improve visibility of the details. This paper aims at improving radiograph parameters such as contrast, sharpness, noise level, and brightness to enhance chest radiographs, making use of a triangulation method. Here, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization technique and noise suppression are simultaneously performed in wavelet domain in a new scheme, followed by morphological top-hat and bottom-hat filtering. A unique implementation of morphological filters allows for adjustment of the image brightness and significant enhancement of the contrast. The proposed method is tested on chest radiographs from Japanese Society of Radiological Technology database. The results are compared with conventional enhancement techniques such as histogram equalization, contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization, Retinex, and some recently proposed methods to show its strengths. The experimental results reveal that the proposed method can remarkably improve the image contrast while keeping the sensitive chest tissue information so that radiologists might have a more precise interpretation. PMID:25709942

  16. Development of computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Nie, Yongkang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Several clinical trials indicated clearly that pharmacologic therapy for osteoporosis is effective for persons with vertebral fractures for preventing subsequent fractures. It is, therefore, important to diagnose vertebral fractures early. Although most vertebral fractures are asymptomatic, they can often be detected on lateral chest radiographs which may be obtained for other purposes. However, investigators have reported that vertebral fractures which were visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or underreported. Therefore, our purpose in this study was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs and to assist radiologists' image interpretation. Our computerized scheme is based on the detection of upper and lower edges of vertebrae on lateral chest images. A curved rectangular area which included a number of visible vertebrae was identified. This area was then straightened such that the upper and lower edges of the vertebrae were oriented horizontally. For detection of vertebral edges, line components were enhanced, and a multiple thresholding technique followed by image feature analysis was applied to the line enhanced image. Finally, vertebral heights determined from the detected vertebral edges were used for characterizing the shape of the vertebrae and for distinguishing fractured from normal vertebrae. Our preliminary results indicated that all of the severely fractured vertebrae in a small database were detected correctly by our computerized method.

  17. A novel semi-transductive learning framework for efficient atypicality detection in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubaidi, Mohammad; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Patel, Ameet; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Black, John A., Jr.

    2012-03-01

    Inductive learning refers to machine learning algorithms that learn a model from a set of training data instances. Any test instance is then classified by comparing it to the learned model. When the set of training instances lend themselves well to modeling, the use of a model substantially reduces the computation cost of classification. However, some training data sets are complex, and do not lend themselves well to modeling. Transductive learning refers to machine learning algorithms that classify test instances by comparing them to all of the training instances, without creating an explicit model. This can produce better classification performance, but at a much higher computational cost. Medical images vary greatly across human populations, constituting a data set that does not lend itself well to modeling. Our previous work showed that the wide variations seen across training sets of "normal" chest radiographs make it difficult to successfully classify test radiographs with an inductive (modeling) approach, and that a transductive approach leads to much better performance in detecting atypical regions. The problem with the transductive approach is its high computational cost. This paper develops and demonstrates a novel semi-transductive framework that can address the unique challenges of atypicality detection in chest radiographs. The proposed framework combines the superior performance of transductive methods with the reduced computational cost of inductive methods. Our results show that the proposed semitransductive approach provides both effective and efficient detection of atypical regions within a set of chest radiographs previously labeled by Mayo Clinic expert thoracic radiologists.

  18. [Effect of digital radiography processing parameters on digital chest radiograph for occupational exposed workers].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-hua; Liu, Dong-sheng; Xuan, Xiao; Kang, Han; Yuan, Hui-shu

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the effect of different processing parameters of digital radiography (DR) on the image quality of digital chest radiograph in dust-exposed workers. One hundred and five dust-exposed workers underwent both high-KV radiography and DR to obtain chest radiographs; the image processing parameters were set by the conventional processing method for digital chest radiograph (method A) and the processing method based on the special requirements of occupational diseases (method B). With the high-KV chest radiograph as the reference, the image qualities at 10 anatomic sites of DR image were graded. The images acquired by DR and high-KV radiography were compared, and the DR images acquired by methods A and B were also compared. For method A, the scores at the 10 anatomic sites of DR image were mostly 0 and +1, accounting for over 88%, and the mean score was 0.23 ∼ 0.65, there was a significant difference between the mean score of DR image and the score of high-KV image (P < 0.001). For method B, the scores at the 10 anatomic sites of DR image were mostly 0, accounting for over 65%, and the mean score was -0.01∼ +0.02 except at the pleura and chest wall; there was no significant difference between the mean score of DR image and the score of high-KV image (P > 0.05). There were significant differences in the scores at the 10 anatomic sites between the DR images acquired by methods A and B (P < 0.01). The DR images acquired based on different processing parameters are different. The quality of DR image acquired by the processing method based on the special requirements of occupational diseases is similar to that of high-KV image at the anatomic sites.

  19. Comparison of "B" readers' interpretations of chest radiographs for asbestos related changes.

    PubMed

    Gitlin, Joseph N; Cook, Leroy L; Linton, Otha W; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if chest radiographic interpretations by physicians retained by attorneys representing persons alleging respiratory changes from occupational exposure to asbestos would be confirmed by independent consultant readers. For 551 chest radiographs read as positive for lung changes by initial "B" readers retained by plaintiffs' attorneys, 492 matching interpretative reports were made available to the authors. Six consultants in chest radiology, also B readers, agreed to re-interpret the radiographs independently without knowledge of their provenance. The film source, patient name, and other identifiers on each film were masked. The International Labor Office 1980 Classification of Chest Radiographs(ILO 80) was used with forms designed by the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health to record the consult-ants' findings. The results were compared with initial readings for film quality, complete negativity, parenchymal abnormalities,small opacities profusion, and pleural abnormalities using chi-square tests and kappa statistics.Results. Initial readers interpreted study radiographs as positive for parenchymal abnormalities (ILO small opacity profusion category of 1/0 or higher) in 95.9% of 492 cases. Six consultants classified the films as 1/0 or higher in 4.5% of 2,952 readings. Statistical tests of these and other comparable data from the study showed highly significant differences between the interpretations of the initial readers and the findings of the consultants. The magnitude of the differences between the interpretations by initial readers and the six consultants is too great to be attributed to interobserver variability. There is no support in the literature on x-ray studies of workers exposed to asbestos and other mineral dusts for the high level of positive findings recorded by the initial readers in this report.

  20. Sickle cell crisis in the adult: chest radiographic findings and comparison with pediatric sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J. A.; Hinrichs, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    With the advent of improved therapy, an increasing proportion of individuals suffering from sickle cell disease (SCD) are surviving into adulthood. In contrast to children, little has been documented concerning the typical radiographic findings in adults presenting with sickle cell crises (SCC). We describe the chest radiographic (CXR) manifestations of adults with SCD presenting in SSC, correlated to hemoglobin (Hb) values, and compare them to those of the pediatric sickle cell population. The chest radiographs of 66 consecutive adults presenting to our emergency department complaining of symptoms consistent with acute SCC were retrospectively reviewed over a 12-month period. The radiographic findings were correlated with admission Hb values and compared with those of 50 children with known SCD presenting with SCC. Chi square analysis revealed no significant difference between the cardiovascular and bony findings in the adults and in those of the pediatric controls (p > 0.08-p > 1.0). However, one important difference in the two cohorts was that upper lobe infiltrates occurred exclusively in the pediatric group (p = 0.06). There was a statistically significant (p < 0.05) difference in cardiovascular and skeletal abnormalities between adults with Hb above and below the mean (8.2 g/dL). The radiographic features of adults presenting in acute SCCs are similar to those of children. Although the chest radiograph is often normal, in decreasing frequency, cardiovascular abnormalities, pneumonia sparing the upper lobes, and aseptic osteonecrosis of the shoulders and spine are not uncommon. There is a significant relationship, however, between cardiovascular abnormalities and Hb levels. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12653383

  1. Validation of the plain chest radiograph for epidemiologic studies of airflow obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The chest radiographs of 125 industrial workers from rural New South Wales were examined for overinflated lungs, with and without attenuated midzonal vessels. Although the mean values of a comprehensive range of pulmonary function tests in the whole group were within normal limits, the nine subjects whose radiographs showed overinflated lungs and attenuated vessels had significantly impaired pulmonary function in comparison with 85 subjects with normal radiographs. The mean values for these nine subjects, expressed as a percentage of the mean value for subjects with normal radiographs, were: forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 75%; total lung capacity, 107%; residual volume, 143%; transpulmonary pressure at maximum inspiration, 60%; static deflation compliance, 158%; lung volume at transpulmonary pressure 10 cm H/sub 2/O, 132%; transfer factor, 79%; and transfer factor/alveolar volume, 77%. Similar results were obtained by a second observer. Those subjects with overinflation but no vascular attenuation had significantly larger mean values for vital capacity and alveolar volume but no significant difference in total lung capacity or other tests of the mechanical properties of the lungs. Agreement on the presence of a positive sign between the two observers expressed as a percentage of those considered positive by either was 81% for overinflation and 62% for attenuated midzonal vessels. The results indicate that in groups of subjects with normal-average values of pulmonary function, the plain chest radiograph may provide information concerning pulmonary structure that is reflected in tests of function.

  2. Computer-Aided Detection of Malignant Lung Nodules on Chest Radiographs: Effect on Observers' Performance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jin, Kwang Nam

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of computer-aided detection (CAD) system on observer performance in the detection of malignant lung nodules on chest radiograph. Materials and Methods Two hundred chest radiographs (100 normal and 100 abnormal with malignant solitary lung nodules) were evaluated. With CT and histological confirmation serving as a reference, the mean nodule size was 15.4 mm (range, 7-20 mm). Five chest radiologists and five radiology residents independently interpreted both the original radiographs and CAD output images using the sequential testing method. The performances of the observers for the detection of malignant nodules with and without CAD were compared using the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results Fifty-nine nodules were detected by the CAD system with a false positive rate of 1.9 nodules per case. The detection of malignant lung nodules significantly increased from 0.90 to 0.92 for a group of observers, excluding one first-year resident (p = 0.04). When lowering the confidence score was not allowed, the average figure of merit also increased from 0.90 to 0.91 (p = 0.04) for all observers after a CAD review. On average, the sensitivities with and without CAD were 87% and 84%, respectively; the false positive rates per case with and without CAD were 0.19 and 0.17, respectively. The number of additional malignancies detected following true positive CAD marks ranged from zero to seven for the various observers. Conclusion The CAD system may help improve observer performance in detecting malignant lung nodules on chest radiographs and contribute to a decrease in missed lung cancer. PMID:22977323

  3. Foreign object detection and removal to improve automated analysis of chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogeweg, Laurens; Sanchez, Clara I.; Melendez, Jaime; Maduskar, Pragnya; Ginneken, Bram van; Story, Alistair; Hayward, Andrew

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Chest radiographs commonly contain projections of foreign objects, such as buttons, brassier clips, jewellery, or pacemakers and wires. The presence of these structures can substantially affect the output of computer analysis of these images. An automated method is presented to detect, segment, and remove foreign objects from chest radiographs.Methods: Detection is performed using supervised pixel classification with a kNN classifier, resulting in a probability estimate per pixel to belong to a projected foreign object. Segmentation is performed by grouping and post-processing pixels with a probability above a certain threshold. Next, the objects are replaced by texture inpainting.Results: The method is evaluated in experiments on 257 chest radiographs. The detection at pixel level is evaluated with receiver operating characteristic analysis on pixels within the unobscured lung fields and an A{sub z} value of 0.949 is achieved. Free response operator characteristic analysis is performed at the object level, and 95.6% of objects are detected with on average 0.25 false positive detections per image. To investigate the effect of removing the detected objects through inpainting, a texture analysis system for tuberculosis detection is applied to images with and without pathology and with and without foreign object removal. Unprocessed, the texture analysis abnormality score of normal images with foreign objects is comparable to those with pathology. After removing foreign objects, the texture score of normal images with and without foreign objects is similar, while abnormal images, whether they contain foreign objects or not, achieve on average higher scores.Conclusions: The authors conclude that removal of foreign objects from chest radiographs is feasible and beneficial for automated image analysis.

  4. Foreign object detection and removal to improve automated analysis of chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Hogeweg, Laurens; Sánchez, Clara I; Melendez, Jaime; Maduskar, Pragnya; Story, Alistair; Hayward, Andrew; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-07-01

    Chest radiographs commonly contain projections of foreign objects, such as buttons, brassier clips, jewellery, or pacemakers and wires. The presence of these structures can substantially affect the output of computer analysis of these images. An automated method is presented to detect, segment, and remove foreign objects from chest radiographs. Detection is performed using supervised pixel classification with a kNN classifier, resulting in a probability estimate per pixel to belong to a projected foreign object. Segmentation is performed by grouping and post-processing pixels with a probability above a certain threshold. Next, the objects are replaced by texture inpainting. The method is evaluated in experiments on 257 chest radiographs. The detection at pixel level is evaluated with receiver operating characteristic analysis on pixels within the unobscured lung fields and an Az value of 0.949 is achieved. Free response operator characteristic analysis is performed at the object level, and 95.6% of objects are detected with on average 0.25 false positive detections per image. To investigate the effect of removing the detected objects through inpainting, a texture analysis system for tuberculosis detection is applied to images with and without pathology and with and without foreign object removal. Unprocessed, the texture analysis abnormality score of normal images with foreign objects is comparable to those with pathology. After removing foreign objects, the texture score of normal images with and without foreign objects is similar, while abnormal images, whether they contain foreign objects or not, achieve on average higher scores. The authors conclude that removal of foreign objects from chest radiographs is feasible and beneficial for automated image analysis.

  5. Semi-automated location identification of catheters in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2007-03-01

    Localization of catheter tips is the most common task in intensive care unit imaging. In this work, catheters appearing in digital chest radiographs acquired by portable chest x-rays were tracked using a semi-automatic method. Due to the fact that catheters are synthetic objects, its profile does not vary drastically over its length. Therefore, we use forward looking registration with normalized cross-correlation in order to take advantage of a priori information of the catheter profile. The registration is accomplished with a two-dimensional template representative of the catheter to be tracked generated using two seed points given by the user. To validate catheter tracking with this method, we look at two metrics: accuracy and precision. The algorithms results are compared to a ground truth established by catheter midlines marked by expert radiologists. Using 12 objects of interest comprised of naso-gastric, endo-tracheal tubes, and chest tubes, and PICC and central venous catheters, we find that our algorithm can fully track 75% of the objects of interest, with a average tracking accuracy and precision of 85.0%, 93.6% respectively using the above metrics. Such a technique would be useful for physicians wishing to verify the positioning of catheter tips using chest radiographs.

  6. Computerized method to compensate for breathing body motion in dynamic chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, H.; Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic chest radiography combined with computer analysis allows quantitative analyses on pulmonary function and rib motion. The accuracy of kinematic analysis is directly linked to diagnostic accuracy, and thus body motion compensation is a major concern. Our purpose in this study was to develop a computerized method to reduce a breathing body motion in dynamic chest radiographs. Dynamic chest radiographs of 56 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector. The images were divided into a 1 cm-square and the squares on body counter were used to detect the body motion. Velocity vector was measured using cross-correlation method on the body counter and the body motion was then determined on the basis of the summation of motion vector. The body motion was then compensated by shifting the images based on the measured vector. By using our method, the body motion was accurately detected by the order of a few pixels in clinical cases, mean 82.5% in right and left directions. In addition, our method detected slight body motion which was not able to be identified by human observations. We confirmed our method effectively worked in kinetic analysis of rib motion. The present method would be useful for the reduction of a breathing body motion in dynamic chest radiography.

  7. Fully automatic lung segmentation and rib suppression methods to improve nodule detection in chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Soleymanpour, Elaheh; Pourreza, Hamid Reza; Ansaripour, Emad; Yazdi, Mehri Sadooghi

    2011-07-01

    Computer-aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems can assist radiologists in several diagnostic tasks. Lung segmentation is one of the mandatory steps for initial detection of lung cancer in Posterior-Anterior chest radiographs. On the other hand, many CAD schemes in projection chest radiography may benefit from the suppression of the bony structures that overlay the lung fields, e.g. ribs. The original images are enhanced by an adaptive contrast equalization and non-linear filtering. Then an initial estimation of lung area is obtained based on morphological operations and then it is improved by growing this region to find the accurate final contour, then for rib suppression, we use oriented spatial Gabor filter. The proposed method was tested on a publicly available database of 247 chest radiographs. Results show that this method outperformed greatly with accuracy of 96.25% for lung segmentation, also we will show improving the conspicuity of lung nodules by rib suppression with local nodule contrast measures. Because there is no additional radiation exposure or specialized equipment required, it could also be applied to bedside portable chest x-rays. In addition to simplicity of these fully automatic methods, lung segmentation and rib suppression algorithms are performed accurately with low computation time and robustness to noise because of the suitable enhancement procedure.

  8. Interpretation of chest radiographs in AIDS patients: usefulness of CD4 lymphocyte counts.

    PubMed

    Shah, R M; Kaji, A V; Ostrum, B J; Friedman, A C

    1997-01-01

    Specific infections and neoplasms that are complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occur within various CD4 lymphocyte count ranges. Knowledge of how these counts correlate with radiographic appearances of these entities can limit the differential diagnosis because certain conditions are uncommon above a specific count. In patients with CD4 lymphocyte counts above 200 cells/mm3 and radiographic findings of cavitary and noncavitary consolidation, bacterial pneumonia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are the major diagnostic considerations. As the CD4 lymphocyte count falls, these infections are still common; however, cavitation is seen less frequently with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and unusual bacterial infections, including those caused by Rhodococcus equi and Nocardia asteroides, should be considered. In patients with counts below 200 cells/mm3, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is the most common infection, usually manifesting radiographically as a reticular interstitial pattern. At CD4 lymphocyte counts of 50-200 cells/mm3, disseminated fungal infection and Kaposi sarcoma become prevalent. In patients with advanced AIDS and counts below 50 cells/mm3, radiographic nodular or reticular patterns may indicate AIDS-related lymphoma and cytomegalovirus and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infections. When CD4 lymphocyte counts are applied to interpretation of chest radiographs in AIDS patients, the working differential diagnosis of a radiographic pattern can be tailored to the clinical situation of a given patient.

  9. Bayesian latent class estimation of the incidence of chest radiograph-confirmed pneumonia in rural Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Baggett, H C; Rhodes, J; Thamthitiwat, S; Joseph, L; Gregory, C J

    2016-10-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide with radiographically confirmed pneumonia a key disease burden indicator. This is usually determined by a radiology panel which is assumed to be the best available standard; however, this assumption may introduce bias into pneumonia incidence estimates. To improve estimates of radiographic pneumonia incidence, we applied Bayesian latent class modelling (BLCM) to a large database of hospitalized patients with acute lower respiratory tract illness in Sa Kaeo and Nakhon Phanom provinces, Thailand from 2005 to 2010 with chest radiographs read by both a radiology panel and a clinician. We compared these estimates to those from conventional analysis. For children aged <5 years, estimated radiographically confirmed pneumonia incidence by BLCM was 2394/100 000 person-years (95% credible interval 2185-2574) vs. 1736/100 000 person-years (95% confidence interval 1706-1766) from conventional analysis. For persons aged ⩾5 years, estimated radiographically confirmed pneumonia incidence was similar between BLCM and conventional analysis (235 vs. 215/100 000 person-years). BLCM suggests the incidence of radiographically confirmed pneumonia in young children is substantially larger than estimated from the conventional approach using radiology panels as the reference standard.

  10. An image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Yuan; Luo Hui; Dobbins, James T. III; Page McAdams, H.; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and the exposure technique. While these elements form the basic underlying components of image quality, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the displayed patient images, further impacted by a particular image processing method applied, to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this paper, the authors developed a novel strategy to simulate radiologists' perceptual evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Methods: Ten regional based perceptual attributes of chest radiographs were determined through an observer study. Those included lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, rib-lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. Each attribute was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image algorithmically using an automated process. A pilot observer study was performed on 333 digital chest radiographs, which included 179 PA images with 10:1 ratio grids (set 1) and 154 AP images without grids (set 2), to ascertain the correlation between image perceptual attributes and physical quantitative measurements. To determine the acceptable range of each perceptual attribute, a preliminary quality consistency range was defined based on the preferred 80% of images in set 1. Mean value difference ({mu}{sub 1}-{mu}{sub 2}) and variance ratio ({sigma}{sub 1}{sup 2}/{sigma}{sub 2}{sup 2}) were investigated to further quantify the differences between the selected two image sets. Results: The pilot observer study demonstrated that our regional based physical quantity metrics of chest radiographs correlated very well with

  11. Impact of specific training in detecting osteoporotic vertebral fractures on routine chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Gruber, M; Dinges, J; Müller, D; Baum, T; Rummeny, E J; Bauer, J

    2013-11-01

    Vertebral fractures are the most common complication of osteoporosis. Routine chest radiographs are a potential screening method, but a significant under-reporting has been described previously. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a specific training on the detection rate of vertebral fractures of a radiology resident. 936 routine lateral chest radiographs of postmenopausal women were evaluated by a radiology resident (R1) during clinical routine. After the evaluation of 470 radiographs (pre-training group), R1 underwent a specific training based on the teaching initiative of the IOF/ESSR. Afterwards the remaining 466 radiographs were evaluated (post-training group). As a standard of reference, all radiographs were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus (R2 + 3). A semi-quantitative method (spinal fracture index, SFI) was used to assess vertebral fractures. Kappa-values as statistical measure of agreement between R1 and R2 + 3 for the detection of vertebral fractures (Genant Severity > 0) increased from κ = 0.311 (95 % CI: 0.217 - 0.405; "fair agreement") in the pre-training group to κ = 0,882 (95 % CI: 0,835 - 0,929; "almost perfect agreement") in the post-training group. Similar results were observed for severe fractures (Genant Severity > 1). Especially fractures with Genant Severity 1 were not detected by R1 before training. A brief training is essential to increase the awareness of radiologists to correctly report osteoporotic vertebral fractures and may help to initiate appropriate therapy in patients with vertebral fractures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Lung imaging during acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: computed tomography patterns and diagnostic accuracy of bedside chest radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Mekontso Dessap, Armand; Deux, Jean-François; Habibi, Anoosha; Abidi, Nour; Godeau, Bertrand; Adnot, Serge; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Rahmouni, Alain; Galacteros, Frederic; Maitre, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The lung computed tomography (CT) features of acute chest syndrome (ACS) in sickle cell disease patients is not well described and the diagnostic performance of bedside chest radiograph (CR) has not been tested. Our objectives were to describe CT features of ACS and evaluate the reproducibility and diagnostic performance of bedside CR. Methods We screened 127 consecutive patients during 166 ACS episodes and 145 CT scans (in 118 consecutive patients) were included in the study. Results Among the 145 CT scans, 139 (96%) exhibited a new pulmonary opacity and 84 (58%) exhibited at least one complete lung segment consolidation. Consolidations were predominant as compared to ground-glass opacities and atelectasis. Lung parenchyma was increasingly consolidated from apex to base; the right and left inferior lobes were almost always involved in patients with a new complete lung segment consolidation on CT scan (98% and 95% of cases respectively). Patients with a new complete lung segment consolidation on CT scan had a more severe presentation and course as compared to others. The sensitivity of bedside CR for the diagnosis of ACS using CT as a reference was good (>85%) whereas the specificity was weak (<60%). Conclusion ACS more frequently presented on CT as a consolidation pattern, predominating in lung bases. The reproducibility and diagnostic capacity of bedside CR were far from perfect. These findings may help improve the bedside imaging diagnosis of ACS. PMID:23925645

  13. Chest Radiographic Patterns and the Transmission of Tuberculosis: Implications for Automated Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Angela; Barrie, James; Winter, Christopher; Elamy, Abdel-Halim; Tyrrell, Gregory; Long, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background Computer-aided detection to identify and diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis is being explored. While both cavitation on chest radiograph and smear-positivity on microscopy are independent risk factors for the infectiousness of pulmonary tuberculosis it is unknown which radiographic pattern, were it detectable, would provide the greatest public health benefit; i.e. reduced transmission. Herein we provide that evidence. Objectives 1) to determine whether pulmonary tuberculosis in a high income, low incidence country is more likely to present with “typical” adult-type pulmonary tuberculosis radiographic features and 2) to determine whether those with “typical” radiographic features are more likely than those without such features to transmit the organism and/or cause secondary cases. Methods Over a three-year period beginning January 1, 2006 consecutive adults with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the Province of Alberta, Canada, were identified and their pre-treatment radiographs scored by three independent readers as “typical” (having an upper lung zone predominant infiltrate, with or without cavitation but no discernable adenopathy) or “atypical” (all others). Each patient’s pre-treatment bacillary burden was carefully documented and, during a 30-month transmission window, each patient’s transmission events were recorded. Mycobacteriology, radiology and transmission were compared in those with “typical” versus “atypical” radiographs. Findings A total of 97 smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases were identified, 69 (71.1%) with and 28 (28.9%) without “typical” chest radiographs. “Typical” cases were more likely to have high bacillary burdens and cavitation (Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals: 2.75 [1.04–7.31] and 9.10 [2.51–32.94], respectively). Typical cases were also responsible for most transmission events—78% of tuberculin skin test conversions (p<0.002) and 95% of secondary cases in reported

  14. Grids and high kilo-volt-peak-setting in bedside chest radiographic examinations.

    PubMed

    Grunert, J H; Boy, B; Busche, D; Groenewold, S K; Herrmann, H; Krahn-Peters, V; Maier, J; Meier, S; Penndorf-Wehner, F; Störl, C; Hendrickx, P

    2000-12-01

    Bedside chest radiographic examinations in intensive care units with grids are impaired by artefacts caused by angulation of the grid (grid cut-off). Two different grids--a grid with a high strip density of 70 lines per cm and the "InSight portable imaging system"--were examined in an intensive care unit with respect to their susceptibility to angulation, image quality and handling of the grid. Five radiologists compared 50 radiographs of each grid considering ten image quality criteria. Using the "InSight portable imaging system" major artefacts were undetectable even at an angulation of 10%; no adjustment of the grid was required, which reduced the amount of time needed to take the radiograph by 26%. The increase in dosage demanded by the employment of the grids at low kilovolt peak setting could be partially compensated by the use of high kilovolt peak setting. The image quality of the "InSight portable imaging system" together with a high kilovolt peak setting is satisfactory, and due to its simplified handling, the portable imaging system has proved to be suitable for bedside chest radiography in intensive care.

  15. Improved texture analysis for automatic detection of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs with bone suppression images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; Schalekamp, Steven; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is challenging due to over-lapping structures. Suppression of normal structures can reduce overprojection effects and can enhance the appearance of diffuse parenchymal abnormalities. In this work, we compare two CAD systems to detect textural abnormalities in chest radiographs of TB suspects. One CAD system was trained and tested on the original CXR and the other CAD system was trained and tested on bone suppression images (BSI). BSI were created using a commercially available software (ClearRead 2.4, Riverain Medical). The CAD system is trained with 431 normal and 434 abnormal images with manually outlined abnormal regions. Subtlety rating (1-3) is assigned to each abnormal region, where 3 refers to obvious and 1 refers to subtle abnormalities. Performance is evaluated on normal and abnormal regions from an independent dataset of 900 images. These contain in total 454 normal and 1127 abnormal regions, which are divided into 3 subtlety categories containing 280, 527 and 320 abnormal regions, respectively. For normal regions, original/BSI CAD has an average abnormality score of 0.094+/-0.027/0.085+/-0.032 (p - 5.6×10-19). For abnormal regions, subtlety 1, 2, 3 categories have average abnormality scores for original/BSI of 0.155+/-0.073/0.156+/-0.089 (p = 0.73), 0.194+/-0.086/0.207+/-0.101 (p = 5.7×10-7), 0.225+/-0.119/0.247+/-0.117 (p = 4.4×10-7), respectively. Thus for normal regions, CAD scores slightly decrease when using BSI instead of the original images, and for abnormal regions, the scores increase slightly. We therefore conclude that the use of bone suppression results in slightly but significantly improved automated detection of textural abnormalities in chest radiographs.

  16. Application of the Stephan et al. Chest Radiograph Comparison Method to Decomposed Human Remains.

    PubMed

    Isa, Mariyam I; Hefner, Joseph T; Markey, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    This manuscript describes the use of comparative radiography of the chest to facilitate positive identification of human remains in advanced stages of decomposition. The method reported by Stephan et al. for positive identification of dry, disarticulated skeletal elements was used on semifleshed, decomposing remains. Positive identification was established through multiple points of concordance observed in radiographs of the left and right clavicles and the C5-T1 vertebrae. This case study demonstrates the applicability of the Stephan et al.'s method in cases involving decomposing remains. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. The vanishing lung: an important cause of hyperlucency on chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, S; Varma, R

    2013-01-01

    Giant bullous emphysema is an uncommon condition characterised by large asymmetric bullae with upper lobe predominance. This condition is most frequent in young male smokers. Patients usually present with progressive breathlessness which is secondary to enlargement of the bullae leading to compression of the lung parenchyma. Large asymmetrical bullae may appear as a unilateral hyperlucency on a plain chest radiograph, and may mimic the appearances of pneumothorax. A computed tomography scan is needed to delineate the lung pathology. We describe two cases with this condition that presented acutely and discuss the management of bullous emphysema.

  18. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age {<=}1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  19. Automated localization of costophrenic recesses and costophrenic angle measurement on frontal chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduskar, Pragnya; Hogeweg, Laurens; Philipsen, Rick; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) of tuberculosis (TB) on chest radiographs (CXR) is difficult because the disease has varied manifestations, like opacification, hilar elevation, and pleural effusions. We have developed a CAD research prototype for TB (CAD4TB v1.08, Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Nijmegen, The Netherlands) which is trained to detect textural abnormalities inside unobscured lung fields. If the only abnormality visible on a CXR would be a blunt costophrenic angle, caused by pleural fluid in the costophrenic recess, this is likely to be missed by texture analysis in the lung fields. The goal of this work is therefore to detect the presence of blunt costophrenic (CP) angles caused by pleural effusion on chest radiographs. The CP angle is the angle formed by the hemidiaphragm and the chest wall. We define the intersection point of both as the CP angle point. We first detect the CP angle point automatically from a lung field segmentation by finding the foreground pixel of each lung with maximum y location. Patches are extracted around the CP angle point and boundary tracing is performed to detect 10 consecutive pixels along the hemidiaphragm and the chest wall and derive the CP angle from these. We evaluate the method on a data set of 250 normal CXRs, 200 CXRs with only one or two blunt CP angles and 200 CXRs with one or two blunt CP angles but also other abnormalities. For these three groups, the CP angle location and angle measurements were accurate in 91%, 88%, and 92% of all the cases, respectively. The average CP angles for the three groups are indeed different with 71.6° +/- 22.9, 87.5° +/- 25.7, and 87.7° +/- 25.3, respectively.

  20. Acute Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus: Temporal Lung Changes Observed on the Chest Radiographs of 55 Patients.

    PubMed

    Das, Karuna M; Lee, Edward Y; Al Jawder, Suhayla E; Enani, Mushira A; Singh, Rajvir; Skakni, Leila; Al-Nakshabandi, Nizar; AlDossari, Khalid; Larsson, Sven G

    2015-09-01

    The objective of our study was to describe lung changes on serial chest radiographs from patients infected with the acute Middle East respiratory syndrome corona-virus (MERS-CoV) and to compare the chest radiographic findings and final outcomes with those of health care workers (HCWs) infected with the same virus. Chest radiographic scores and comorbidities were also examined as indicators of a fatal outcome to determine their potential prognostic value. Chest radiographs of 33 patients and 22 HCWs infected with MERS-CoV were examined for radiologic features indicative of disease and for evidence of radiographic deterioration and progression. Chest radiographic scores were estimated after dividing each lung into three zones. The scores (1 [mild] to 4 [severe]) for all six zones per chest radiographic examination were summed to provide a cumulative chest radiographic score (range, 0-24). Serial radiographs were also examined to assess for radiographic deterioration and progression from type 1 (mild) to type 4 (severe) disease. Multivariate logistic regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival curve analysis, and the Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare data of deceased patients with those of individuals who recovered to identify prognostic radiographic features. Ground-glass opacity was the most common abnormality (66%) followed by consolidation (18%). Overall mortality was 35% (19/55). Mortality was higher in the patient group (55%, 18/33) than in the HCW group (5%, 1/22). The mean chest radiographic score for deceased patients was significantly higher than that for those who recovered (13 ± 2.6 [SD] vs 5.8 ± 5.6, respectively; p = 0.001); in addition, higher rates of pneumothorax (deceased patients vs patients who recovered, 47% vs 0%; p = 0.001), pleural effusion (63% vs 14%; p = 0.001), and type 4 radiographic progression (63% vs 6%; p = 0.001) were seen in the deceased patients compared with those who recovered. Univariate and logistic regression analyses

  1. Investigation of misfiled cases in the PACS environment and a solution to prevent filing errors for chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Junji; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Oda, Nobuhiro; Sukenobu, Yoshiharu; Okazaki, Hiroko; Nakata, Hajime; Doi, Kunio

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to survey misfiled cases in a picture archiving and communication system environment at two hospitals and to demonstrate the potential usefulness of an automated patient recognition method for posteroanterior chest radiographs based on a template-matching technique designed to prevent filing errors. We surveyed misfiled cases obtained from different modalities in one hospital for 25 months, and misfiled cases of chest radiographs in another hospital for 17 months. For investigating the usefulness of an automated patient recognition and identification method for chest radiographs, a prospective study has been completed in clinical settings at the latter hospital. The total numbers of misfiled cases for different modalities in one hospital and for chest radiographs in another hospital were 327 and 22, respectively. The misfiled cases in the two hospitals were mainly the result of human errors (eg, incorrect manual entries of patient information, incorrect usage of identification cards in which an identification card for the previous patient was used for the next patient's image acquisition). The prospective study indicated the usefulness of the computerized method for discovering misfiled cases with a high performance (ie, an 86.4% correct warning rate for different patients and 1.5% incorrect warning rate for the same patients). We confirmed the occurrence of misfiled cases in the two hospitals. The automated patient recognition and identification method for chest radiographs would be useful in preventing wrong images from being stored in the picture archiving and communication system environment.

  2. A Solitary Feature-based Lung Nodule Detection Approach for Chest X-Ray Radiographs.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuechen; Shen, Linlin; Luo, Suhuai

    2017-01-31

    Lung cancer is one of the most deadly diseases. It has a high death rate and its incidence rate has been increasing all over the world. Lung cancer appears as a solitary nodule in chest x-ray radiograph (CXR). Therefore, lung nodule detection in CXR could have a significant impact on early detection of lung cancer. Radiologists define a lung nodule in chest x-ray radiographs as "solitary white nodule-like blob". However, the solitary feature has not been employed for lung nodule detection before. In this paper, a solitary feature-based lung nodule detection method was proposed. We employed stationary wavelet transform and convergence index filter to extract the texture features and used AdaBoost to generate white nodule-likeness map. A solitary feature was defined to evaluate the isolation degree of candidates. Both the isolation degree and the white nodule-likeness were used as final evaluation of lung nodule candidates. The proposed method shows better performance and robustness than those reported in previous research. More than 80% and 93% of lung nodules in the lung field in the JSRT database were detected when the false positives per image was two and five, respectively. The proposed approach has the potential of being used in clinical practice.

  3. Automated characterization of perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs: validation and calibration to observer preference.

    PubMed

    Samei, Ehsan; Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R; McAdams, H Page

    2014-11-01

    The authors previously proposed an image-based technique [Y. Lin et al. Med. Phys. 39, 7019-7031 (2012)] to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this study, an observer study was designed and conducted to validate the output of the program against rankings by expert radiologists and to establish the ranges of the output values that reflect the acceptable image appearance so the program output can be used for image quality optimization and tracking. Using an IRB-approved protocol, 2500 clinical chest radiographs (PA/AP) were collected from our clinical operation. The images were processed through our perceptual quality assessment program to measure their appearance in terms of ten metrics of perceptual image quality: lung gray level, lung detail, lung noise, rib-lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. From the results, for each targeted appearance attribute/metric, 18 images were selected such that the images presented a relatively constant appearance with respect to all metrics except the targeted one. The images were then incorporated into a graphical user interface, which displayed them into three panels of six in a random order. Using a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions, each of five participating attending chest radiologists was tasked to spatially order the images based only on the targeted appearance attribute regardless of the other qualities. Once ordered, the observer also indicated the range of image appearances that he/she considered clinically acceptable. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer and algorithmic rankings and interobserver variability. An observer-averaged acceptable image appearance was also statistically derived for each quality attribute based on the collected individual acceptable ranges. The observer study

  4. Irreversible JPEG compression of digital chest radiographs for primary interpretation: assessment of visually lossless threshold.

    PubMed

    Slone, Richard M; Muka, Edward; Pilgram, Thomas K

    2003-08-01

    To determine if digital chest images could be compressed in a primary interpretation context without perceived loss of fidelity (below the visually lossless threshold) at transilluminated film or cathode ray tube (CRT) display. One hundred forty-four posteroanterior radiographs were obtained with a digital chest radiography system. At both film and CRT display, an identified original image was presented side by side with a replicate, which was either an unaltered image or an image that had been Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) compressed to 10:1, 20:1, or 50:1 and reconstructed. Each of the 10 readers indicated whether the replicate was "indistinguishable from the original" or "degraded" at clinical reading distance and at close inspection. The readers' ability to detect compressed images was examined for patterns; 95% CIs were used for statistical testing. With transilluminated film at clinical reading distance, readers were as likely to rate originals (48 [20%] of 240 readings) as degraded as they were to rate 20:1 replicates (106 [22%] of 480 readings) as degraded, but they frequently identified 50:1 replicates (283 [59%] of 480 readings) as degraded. At close inspection, 20:1 replicates (163 [34%] of 480 readings) were often identified as degraded, but 10:1 replicates (19 [8%] of 240 readings) were not identified as degraded more often than originals (17 [7%] of 240 readings). With CRT display, the results were nearly identical. At reading distance for primary interpretation, full-size digital chest radiographs that have been JPEG compressed to 10:1 or 20:1 and reconstructed are visually lossless at film or CRT display. Images compressed to 10:1 remain visually lossless at close inspection. Copyright RSNA, 2003.

  5. REDUCE-PCP study: radiographs in the emergency department utilization criteria evaluation-pediatric chest pain.

    PubMed

    Neff, Justin; Anderson, Melanie; Stephenson, Trent; Young, Joe; Hennes, Halim; Suter, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Many emergency physicians order chest x-rays (CXRs) for pediatric patients who present with a chief complaint of chest pain despite a paucity of research to support this testing, which exposes patients to radiation, cost, and delays. This study aimed to begin development of a decision making tool that will allow emergency physicians to selectively obtain CXR films in pediatric patients presenting with chest pain. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 400 consecutive pediatric patients with a chief complaint of chest pain and reviewed charts to determine how many received a CXR and which clinical characteristics were present in all patients. Chest radiograph findings were graded for significance as follows: (1) no or minor clinical significance: normal result in the CXR film without effect on the immediate evaluation of a patient; (2) moderate clinical significance: only impact on plan for follow-up; and (3) major clinical significance: result in the CXR film directly affects immediate management. We then evaluated each chart for historical or examination findings that might identify criteria associated with positive radiographic findings to propose a set of criteria that could lead to the development of a decision rule that allows a reduced utilization while having a high sensitivity for clinically significant positive findings on CXR film. Of the 400 pediatric patients reviewed, 63.5% (n = 254) received a CXR in the emergency department (ED). Of those receiving a CXR, only 8.26% (n = 21) had a finding that affected either ED management or follow-up planning. The criteria that would have identified all patients with positive results in the CXR films were abnormal vital signs, shortness of breath, palpitations, presence of comorbidities, abnormal or unilateral breath sounds, history of trauma, murmur, or cough. This pilot study demonstrates the potential for a decision rule to eliminate both cost and radiation exposure by using defined criteria to determine

  6. The development and evaluation of a computerized diagnosis scheme for pneumoconiosis on digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Biyun; Luo, Wei; Li, Baoping; Chen, Budong; Yang, Qiuying; Xu, Yan; Wu, Xiaohua; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Kuan

    2014-10-02

    To diagnose pneumoconiosis using a computer-aided diagnosis system based on digital chest radiographs. Lung fields were first extracted by combining the traditional Otsu-threshold method with a morphological reconstruction on digital radiographs (DRs), and then subdivided into six non-overlapping regions (region (a-f)). Twenty-two wavelet-based energy texture features were calculated exclusively from each region and selected using a decision tree algorithm. A support vector machine (SVM) with a linear kernel was trained using samples with texture features to classify an individual region of a healthy subject or a pneumoconiosis patient. The final classification results were obtained by integrating these individual classifiers with the weighted voting method. All models were developed on a dataset of 85 healthy controls and 40 stage I or II pneumoconiosis patients and validated by using the bootstrap resampling with replacement method. The areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of regions (c) and (f) were 0.688 and 0.563, which were worse than those of the other four regions. Region (c) and (f) were both excluded from the individual classifiers that were going to be assembled further. When built on the selected texture features, each individual SVM showed a higher diagnostic performance for the training set and the test set. The classification performance after an ensemble was 0.997 and 0.961 of the AUC value for the training and test sets, respectively. The final results were 0.974 ± 0.018 for AUC value and 0.929 ± 0.018 for accuracy. The integrated SVM model built on the selected feature set showed the highest diagnostic performance among all individual SVM models. The model has good potential in diagnosing pneumoconiosis based on digital chest radiographs.

  7. Screening for chest disease in college students: policies of student health services regarding the use of routine screening chest radiographs and tuberculin skin tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fager, S.S.; Slap, G.B.; Kitz, D.S.; Eisenberg, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    A survey of college health services was conducted to determine their policies regarding the use of screening chest radiographs and tuberculin skin tests. Pre-enrollment chest radiographs are prescribed for all incoming students by 24% of the 531 respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 20%, 19%, and 6%, respectively. Periodic chest radiography is conducted for all students by 7% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 22%, 16%, and 8%, respectively. Pre-enrollment tuberculin skin tests are prescribed for all incoming students by 52% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 48%, 29%, and 9%, respectively. Periodic tuberculin skin testing is conducted for all students by 27% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 48%, 23%, and 16%, respectively. It is estimated from these data that 723,000 incoming students in the United States received screening chest radiographs in 1979 with estimated charges totaling between $7 million and $27 million. There may be 0.05 to 0.33 induced cases of lung cancer, leukemia, thyroid cancer, and female breast cancer over a 20-year period among this group of students exposed to ionizing radiation.

  8. Subjective evaluation of image enhancements in improving the visibility of pathology in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plessis, Brigitte; Goldberg, Morris; Belanger, Garry; Hickey, Nancy M.

    1991-06-01

    In this paper we report on an experiment to compare the relevance of various image enhancement methods for improving the visibility of pathologies on digitized chest radiographs. The five pathologies tested in our trial are pulmonary nodules, air bronchograms, paratracheal abnormalities, pneumothoraces, interstitial lung diseases. The first three are examples of situations where focus is put on shape, borders and content of the pathology, the next is an example of situations where the visualization of a subtle line is required and the last one is an example of diffuse disease where the perceivability of details is important. Eight image enhancements were tested and included both pixel based gray-level transformation such as, windowing, statistical differencing, polynomial transform, histogram equalization, histogram hyperbolization, and spatial enhancement such as, unsharp masking with different masks and a Sobel detector. For each pathology we recommend two or three acceptable transformations.

  9. Computer-aided diagnosis for detection of cardiomegaly in digital chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Takayuki; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Chida, Koichi; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2005-04-01

    The cardio-thoracic ratio (CTR) is commonly measured manually for the evaluation of cardiomegaly. To determine the CTR automatically, we have developed a computerized scheme based on gray-level histogram analysis and an edge detection technique with feature analysis. The database used in this study consisted of 392 chest radiographs, which included 304 normals and 88 abnormals with cardiomegaly. The pixel size and the quantization level of the image were 0.175 mm and 1024, respectively. We performed a nonlinear density correction to maintain consistency in the density and contrast of the image. Initial heart edge detection was performed by selection of a certain range of pixel values in the histogram of a rectangular area at the center of a low-resolution image. Feature analysis with use of an edge gradient and with the orientation obtained by a Sobel operator was applied for accurate identification of the heart edges, which tend to have large edge gradients in a certain range of orientations. In addition, to determine the CTR, we detected the ribcage edges automatically by using image profile analysis. In 94.9% of all of the cases, the heart edges were detected accurately by use of this scheme. The area under the ROC curve (Az value) in distinguishing between normals and abnormals with cardiomegaly based on the CTR was 0.912. Because the CTR is measured automatically and quickly (in less than 1 sec.), radiologists could save reading time. The computerized scheme will be useful for the assessment of cardiomegaly on chest radiographs.

  10. Cavity contour segmentation in chest radiographs using supervised learning and dynamic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Maduskar, Pragnya Hogeweg, Laurens; Sánchez, Clara I.; Ginneken, Bram van; Jong, Pim A. de; Peters-Bax, Liesbeth; Dawson, Rodney; Ayles, Helen

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) treatment is often monitored using chest radiography. Monitoring size of cavities in pulmonary tuberculosis is important as the size predicts severity of the disease and its persistence under therapy predicts relapse. The authors present a method for automatic cavity segmentation in chest radiographs. Methods: A two stage method is proposed to segment the cavity borders, given a user defined seed point close to the center of the cavity. First, a supervised learning approach is employed to train a pixel classifier using texture and radial features to identify the border pixels of the cavity. A likelihood value of belonging to the cavity border is assigned to each pixel by the classifier. The authors experimented with four different classifiers:k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), GentleBoost (GB), and random forest (RF). Next, the constructed likelihood map was used as an input cost image in the polar transformed image space for dynamic programming to trace the optimal maximum cost path. This constructed path corresponds to the segmented cavity contour in image space. Results: The method was evaluated on 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) containing 126 cavities. The reference segmentation was manually delineated by an experienced chest radiologist. An independent observer (a chest radiologist) also delineated all cavities to estimate interobserver variability. Jaccard overlap measure Ω was computed between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation; and between the reference segmentation and the independent observer's segmentation for all cavities. A median overlap Ω of 0.81 (0.76 ± 0.16), and 0.85 (0.82 ± 0.11) was achieved between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation, and between the segmentations by the two radiologists, respectively. The best reported mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance between the reference and the automatic segmentation were

  11. A method to produce and validate a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for optimisation of chest radiographs acquired with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a computer model to produce realistic simulated computed radiography (CR) chest images using CT data sets of real patients. Methods Anatomical noise, which is the limiting factor in determining pathology in chest radiography, is realistically simulated by the CT data, and frequency-dependent noise has been added post-digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation to simulate exposure reduction. Realistic scatter and scatter fractions were measured in images of a chest phantom acquired on the CR system simulated by the computer model and added post-DRR calculation. Results The model has been validated with a phantom and patients and shown to provide predictions of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), tissue-to-rib ratios (TRRs: a measure of soft tissue pixel value to that of rib) and pixel value histograms that lie within the range of values measured with patients and the phantom. The maximum difference in measured SNR to that calculated was 10%. TRR values differed by a maximum of 1.3%. Conclusion Experienced image evaluators have responded positively to the DRR images, are satisfied they contain adequate anatomical features and have deemed them clinically acceptable. Therefore, the computer model can be used by image evaluators to grade chest images presented at different tube potentials and doses in order to optimise image quality and patient dose for clinical CR chest radiographs without the need for repeat patient exposures. PMID:21933979

  12. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-03-21

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes.

  13. Accurate segmentation of lung fields on chest radiographs using deep convolutional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Dallal, Ahmed H.; Agarwal, Chirag; Patel, Aalpan; Moore, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Accurate segmentation of lung fields on chest radiographs is the primary step for computer-aided detection of various conditions such as lung cancer and tuberculosis. The size, shape and texture of lung fields are key parameters for chest X-ray (CXR) based lung disease diagnosis in which the lung field segmentation is a significant primary step. Although many methods have been proposed for this problem, lung field segmentation remains as a challenge. In recent years, deep learning has shown state of the art performance in many visual tasks such as object detection, image classification and semantic image segmentation. In this study, we propose a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) framework for segmentation of lung fields. The algorithm was developed and tested on 167 clinical posterior-anterior (PA) CXR images collected retrospectively from picture archiving and communication system (PACS) of Geisinger Health System. The proposed multi-scale network is composed of five convolutional and two fully connected layers. The framework achieved IOU (intersection over union) of 0.96 on the testing dataset as compared to manual segmentation. The suggested framework outperforms state of the art registration-based segmentation by a significant margin. To our knowledge, this is the first deep learning based study of lung field segmentation on CXR images developed on a heterogeneous clinical dataset. The results suggest that convolutional neural networks could be employed reliably for lung field segmentation.

  14. Enhancement of chest radiographs obtained in the intensive care unit through bone suppression and consistent processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Zhong, Sikai; Yao, Liping; Shang, Yanfeng; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Portable chest radiographs (CXRs) are commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU) to detect subtle pathological changes. However, exposure settings or patient and apparatus positioning deteriorate image quality in the ICU. Chest x-rays of patients in the ICU are often hazy and show low contrast and increased noise. To aid clinicians in detecting subtle pathological changes, we proposed a consistent processing and bone structure suppression method to decrease variations in image appearance and improve the diagnostic quality of images. We applied a region of interest-based look-up table to process original ICU CXRs such that they appeared consistent with each other and the standard CXRs. Then, an artificial neural network was trained by standard CXRs and the corresponding dual-energy bone images for the generation of a bone image. Once the neural network was trained, the real dual-energy image was no longer necessary, and the trained neural network was applied to the consistent processed ICU CXR to output the bone image. Finally, a gray level-based morphological method was applied to enhance the bone image by smoothing other structures on this image. This enhanced image was subtracted from the consistent, processed ICU CXR to produce a soft tissue image. This method was tested for 20 patients with a total of 87 CXRs. The findings indicated that our method suppressed bone structures on ICU CXRs and standard CXRs, simultaneously maintaining subtle pathological changes.

  15. Computer-aided detection of malpositioned endotracheal tubes in portable chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Mao, Hongda; Zhang, Jane; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Munn, Samson; Wandtke, John

    2014-03-01

    Portable chest radiographic images play a critical role in examining and monitoring the condition and progress of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs). For example, portable chest images are acquired to ensure that tubes inserted into the patients are properly positioned for effective treatment. In this paper, we present a system that automatically detects the position of an endotracheal tube (ETT), which is inserted into the trachea to assist patients who have difficulty breathing. The computer detection includes the detections of the lung field, spine line, and aortic arch. These detections lead to the identification of regions of interest (ROIs) used for the subsequent detection of the ETT and carina. The detection of the ETT and carina is performed within the ROIs. Our ETT and carina detection methods were trained and tested on a large number of images. The locations of the ETT and carina were confirmed by an experienced radiologist for the purpose of performance evaluation. Our ETT detection achieved an average sensitivity of 85% at less than 0.1 false-positive detections per image. The carina approach correctly identified the carina location within a 10 mm distance from the truth location for 81% of the 217 testing images. We expect our system will assist ICU clinicians to detect malpositioned ETTs and reposition malpositioned ETTs more effectively and efficiently.

  16. Relationship between the chest radiograph, regional lung function studies, exercise tolerance, and clinical condition in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, A L; Boyce, P; Shaw, D G; Godfrey, S; Mearns, M

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of the interpretation of the chest film in delineating localised abnormalities of ventilation and perfusion, as well as the overall severity of airways obstruction, exercise tolerance, and clinical condition in children with cystic fibrosis. Radiographic findings in various regions of the chest film were compared with the functional values obtained with regional lung function tests which evaluated the arrival and disappearance of boluses of radioactive nitrogen given by inhalation and infusion. While the more severely affected areas on the chest radiograph were found to correlate with similar regions on the lung function tests, as did overall scores, errors occurred in some cases if the x-ray film alone was used as a judge of regional physiological derangement. In addition the degree of airways obstruction, the exercise tolerance on a cycle ergometer, and clinical grading, each correlated significantly with the radiographic score. We conclude that the chest radiograph is a good indicator of the overall severity of the lung disease and that it correlates well with exercise tolerance and clinical condition in cystic fibrosis. PMID:7469460

  17. Suppression of the contrast of ribs in chest radiographs by means of massive training artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio

    2004-05-01

    We developed a method for suppression of the contrast of ribs in chest radiographs by means of a massive training artificial neural network (MTANN). The MTANN is a trainable highly nonlinear filter that can be trained by using input chest radiographs and the corresponding teacher images. We used either the soft-tissue image or the bone image obtained by use of a dual-energy subtraction technique as the teacher image for suppression of ribs in chest radiographs. When the soft-tissue images were used as the teacher images, the MTANN directly produced a "soft-tissue-image-like" image where the contrast of ribs was suppressed. When the bone images were used as the teacher images, the MTANN was able to produce a "bone-image-like" image, and then was subtracted from the corresponding chest radiograph to produce a bone-subtracted image where ribs are suppressed. Thus, the two kinds of rib-suppressed images, i.e., the soft-tissue-image-like image and the bone-subtracted image, could be produced by use of the MTANNs trained with two different teacher images. We applied each of the two trained MTANNs to non-training chest radiographs to investigate the difference between the processed images. The results showed that the contrast of ribs in chest radiographs almost disappeared, and was reduced to less than 10% in both processed images. The contrast of ribs was reduced slightly better in the soft-tissue-image-like images than in the bone-subtracted images, whereas soft-tissue opacities such as lung vessels and nodules were maintained better in the bone-subtracted images. Therefore, the use of the bone images as the teacher images for training the MTANN has produced better rib-suppressed images where soft-tissue opacities were substantially maintained. A method for rib suppression using the MTANN would be useful for radiologists as well as CAD schemes in detection of lung diseases such as nodules in chest radiographs.

  18. Automated characterization of perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs: Validation and calibration to observer preference

    SciTech Connect

    Samei, Ehsan; Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Page McAdams, H.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors previously proposed an image-based technique [Y. Lin et al. Med. Phys. 39, 7019–7031 (2012)] to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this study, an observer study was designed and conducted to validate the output of the program against rankings by expert radiologists and to establish the ranges of the output values that reflect the acceptable image appearance so the program output can be used for image quality optimization and tracking. Methods: Using an IRB-approved protocol, 2500 clinical chest radiographs (PA/AP) were collected from our clinical operation. The images were processed through our perceptual quality assessment program to measure their appearance in terms of ten metrics of perceptual image quality: lung gray level, lung detail, lung noise, rib–lung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm–lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. From the results, for each targeted appearance attribute/metric, 18 images were selected such that the images presented a relatively constant appearance with respect to all metrics except the targeted one. The images were then incorporated into a graphical user interface, which displayed them into three panels of six in a random order. Using a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions, each of five participating attending chest radiologists was tasked to spatially order the images based only on the targeted appearance attribute regardless of the other qualities. Once ordered, the observer also indicated the range of image appearances that he/she considered clinically acceptable. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer and algorithmic rankings and interobserver variability. An observer-averaged acceptable image appearance was also statistically derived for each quality attribute based on the collected individual acceptable ranges

  19. Computerized methods for determining respiratory phase on dynamic chest radiographs obtained by a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Matsui, Osamu

    2006-03-01

    Chest radiography using a dynamic flat-panel detector with a large field of view can provide sequential chest radiographs during respiration. These images provide information regarding respiratory kinetics, which is effective for diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. For valid analysis of respiratory kinetics in diagnosis of pulmonary diseases, it is crucial to determine the association between the kinetics and respiratory phase. We developed four methods to determine the respiratory phase based on image information associated with respiration and compared the results in dynamic chest radiographs of 37 subjects. Here, the properties of each method and future tasks are discussed. The method based on the change in size of the lung gave the most stable results, and that based on the change in distance from the lung apex to the diaphragm was the most promising method for determining the respiratory phase.

  20. Morphometric Comparison of Clavicle Outlines from 3D Bone Scans and 2D Chest Radiographs: A Short-listing Tool to Assist Radiographic Identification of Human Skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, Carl N.; Amidan, Brett G.; Trease, Harold E.; Guyomarch, Pierre; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Byrd, John E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes a computerized clavicle identification system, primarily designed to resolve the identities of unaccounted for US soldiers who fought in the Korean War. Elliptical Fourier analysis is used to quantify the clavicle outline shape from skeletons and postero-anterior antemortem chest radiographs to rank individuals in terms of metric distance. Similar to leading fingerprint identification systems, shortlists of the top matching candidates are extracted for subsequent human visual assessment. Two independent tests of the computerized system using 17 field-recovered skeletons and 409 chest radiographs demonstrate that true positive matches are captured within the top 5% of the sample 75% of the time. These results are outstanding given the eroded state of some field-recovered skeletons and the faintness of the 1950’s photoflurographs. These methods enhance the capability to resolve several hundred cold cases for which little circumstantial information exists and current DNA and dental record technologies cannot be applied.

  1. Use of a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for the optimisation of chest radiographic techniques for computed radiography imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Moore, C S; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Swift, A; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to derive an optimum radiographic technique for computed radiography (CR) chest imaging using a digitally reconstructed radiograph computer simulator. The simulator is capable of producing CR chest radiographs of adults with various tube potentials, receptor doses and scatter rejection. Methods Four experienced image evaluators graded images of average and obese adult patients at different potentials (average-sized, n=50; obese, n=20), receptor doses (n=10) and scatter rejection techniques (average-sized, n=20; obese, n=20). The quality of the images was evaluated using visually graded analysis. The influence of rib contrast was also assessed. Results For average-sized patients, image quality improved when tube potential was reduced compared with the reference (102 kVp). No scatter rejection was indicated. For obese patients, it has been shown that an antiscatter grid is indicated, and should be used in conjunction with as low a tube potential as possible (while allowing exposure times <20 ms). It is also possible to reduce receptor air kerma by 50% without adversely influencing image quality. Rib contrast did not interfere at any tube potential. Conclusions A virtual clinical trial has been performed with simulated chest CR images. Results indicate that low tube potentials (<102 kVp) are optimal for average and obese adults, the former acquired without scatter rejection, the latter with an anti-scatter grid. Lower receptor (and therefore patient doses) than those used clinically are possible while maintaining adequate image quality. PMID:22253349

  2. Use of a digitally reconstructed radiograph-based computer simulation for the optimisation of chest radiographic techniques for computed radiography imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Swift, A; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an optimum radiographic technique for computed radiography (CR) chest imaging using a digitally reconstructed radiograph computer simulator. The simulator is capable of producing CR chest radiographs of adults with various tube potentials, receptor doses and scatter rejection. Four experienced image evaluators graded images of average and obese adult patients at different potentials (average-sized, n=50; obese, n=20), receptor doses (n=10) and scatter rejection techniques (average-sized, n=20; obese, n=20). The quality of the images was evaluated using visually graded analysis. The influence of rib contrast was also assessed. For average-sized patients, image quality improved when tube potential was reduced compared with the reference (102 kVp). No scatter rejection was indicated. For obese patients, it has been shown that an antiscatter grid is indicated, and should be used in conjunction with as low a tube potential as possible (while allowing exposure times <20 ms). It is also possible to reduce receptor air kerma by 50% without adversely influencing image quality. Rib contrast did not interfere at any tube potential. A virtual clinical trial has been performed with simulated chest CR images. Results indicate that low tube potentials (<102 kVp) are optimal for average and obese adults, the former acquired without scatter rejection, the latter with an anti-scatter grid. Lower receptor (and therefore patient doses) than those used clinically are possible while maintaining adequate image quality.

  3. Are daily routine chest radiographs necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients?

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Jeremie; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Olland, Anne; Massard, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether daily routine (DR) chest radiographs (CXRs) are necessary after pulmonary surgery in adult patients. Of the 66 papers found using a report search, seven presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Four of these seven studies specifically addressed post-cardiothoracic adult patients. Three of these seven studies addressed intensive care unit (ICU) patients and included post-cardiothoracic adult patients in well-designed studies. Six of these seven studies compared the DR CXRs strategy to the clinically indicated, on-demand (OD) CXRs strategy. Another study analysed the clinical impact of ceasing to perform the DR, postoperative, post-chest tubes removal CXRs. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are given. We conclude that, on the whole, the seven studies are unanimously in favour of forgoing DR CXRs after lung resection and advocate OD CXRs. One study suggested that hypoxic patients could benefit from a DR CXRs strategy, while other studies failed to identify any subgroup for whom performing DR CXRs was beneficial. Indeed, DR CXRs, commonly taken after thoracic surgery, have poor diagnostic and therapeutic value. Eliminating them for adult patients having undergone thoracic surgery significantly decreases the number of CXRs per patient without increasing mortality rates, length of hospital stays (LOSs), readmission rates and adverse events. Hence, current evidence shows that DR CXRs could be forgone after lung resection because OD CXRs, recommended by clinical monitoring, have a better impact on management and have not been proved to negatively affect patient outcomes. Moreover, an OD CXRs strategy lowers the cost of care. Nevertheless, an OD CXRs strategy requires close clinical monitoring by experienced surgeons and dedicated intensivists. However

  4. The chest radiograph in critically ill surgical patients is inaccurate in predicting ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Butler, K L; Sinclair, K E; Henderson, V J; McKinney, G; Mesidor, D A; Katon-Benitez, I; Weaver, W L

    1999-09-01

    Chest radiographs (CXRs) are frequently obtained in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients when a diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is suspected. The purpose of this study was to determine if the interpretation of the CXR correlated with a diagnosis of VAP in SICU patients. Prospective evaluation of 20 SICU patients clinically suspected of VAP was performed from July 1997 through December 1998. All patients required mechanical ventilation for at least 48 hours, and antibiotic use was discontinued 24 hours before entry into the study. Bronchoscopy with protected specimen brush (PSB) sampling of secretions from the right and left lung was performed. A positive PSB was present if quantitative analysis yielded > or = 10(4) colony-forming units/mL of bacteria. VAP was diagnosed if either the right or left PSB was positive and ruled-out if both the right and left PSB yielded < 10(4) colony-forming units/mL. Twelve of 20 patients (60%) were diagnosed to have VAP by PSB criteria. Eight of 20 patients (40%) had CXRs interpreted as negative for infiltrates; four patients had VAP by PSB criteria. There were four patients with focal infiltrates; two patients had VAP. The remaining eight patients had radiographs interpreted as bilateral infiltrates (one) or pulmonary edema (seven); of these, six patients (75%) had VAP. The sensitivity of the CXR in determining the presence of VAP was 25 per cent, the specificity was 75 per cent, and the accuracy was 0.45. The CXR does not improve the clinician's ability to diagnose VAP: a normal CXR does not exclude the presence of VAP and the finding of a focal infiltrate does not confirm the diagnosis of VAP.

  5. Chest radiographic and CT findings in hyperleukocytic acute myeloid leukemia: A retrospective cohort study of 73 patients.

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Michael; Jamis-Dow, Carlos; Bayerl, Michael; Desai, Ruchi J; Claxton, David F; Van de Louw, Andry

    2016-11-01

    Hyperleukocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with pulmonary complications and high early mortality rate, but given its rarity, data on chest radiographic presentation are scarce.We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 73 AML patients admitted with white blood cell count >100 × 10/L between 2003 and 2014 in order to describe the chest radiographic and computed tomography (CT) findings and to correlate them with AML subtype and respiratory symptoms.Forty-two of the 73 patients (58%) overall and 36 of the 54 patients (67%) with clinical signs of pulmonary leukostasis had abnormal radiographs on admission. The presence of radiographic abnormalities was significantly associated with dyspnea and oxygen/ventilatory support requirements (P < 0.01) and with day 28 mortality (45% vs 13%, P = 0.005) but not with monocytic subtype of AML. Sixteen patients had isolated focal basilar airspace opacities, unilateral (n = 13) or bilateral (n = 3), while 16 patients had bilateral diffuse opacities, interstitial (n = 12) or airspace and interstitial (n = 4). Two patients had isolated pleural effusion, 2 patients had unilateral midlung airspace opacities, and 6 patients had a combination of focal airspace and diffuse interstitial opacities. Overall, 2 patterns accounted for 75% of abnormal findings: bilateral diffuse opacities tended to be associated with monocytic AML, whereas basilar focal airspace opacities were more frequent in nonmonocytic AML (P < 0.05). Eighteen patients had CT scans, revealing interlobular septal thickening (n = 12), airspace (n = 11) and ground-glass (n = 9) opacities, pleural effusions (n = 12), and acute pulmonary embolism (n = 2).Hyperleukocytic AML is frequently associated with abnormal chest radiographs, involving mostly focal basilar airspace opacities (more frequent in nonmonocytic AML) or diffuse bilateral opacities. CT scan should be considered broadly due to the suboptimal

  6. Association of Lung Function, Chest Radiographs and Clinical Features in Infants with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Farrell, Philip M.; Kloster, Margaret; Swanson, Jonathan O.; Vu, Thuy; Brumback, Lyndia; Acton, James D.; Castile, Robert G.; Colin, Andrew A.; Conrad, Carol K.; Hart, Meeghan A.; Kerby, Gwendolyn S.; Hiatt, Peter W.; Mogayzel, Peter J.; Johnson, Robin C.; Davis, Stephanie D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The optimal strategy for monitoring cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease in infancy remains unclear. Objective To describe longitudinal associations between infant pulmonary function tests (iPFTs), chest radiograph (CXR) scores and other characteristics. Methods CF patients ≤ 24 months old were enrolled in a 10-center study evaluating iPFTs 4 times over a year. CXRs ~1 year apart were scored with the Wisconsin and Brasfield systems. Associations of iPFT parameters with clinical characteristics were evaluated with mixed effects models. Results The 100 participants contributed 246 acceptable flow/volume (FEV0.5, FEF75) and 303 acceptable functional residual capacity (FRC) measurements and 171 CXRs. Both Brasfield and Wisconsin CXR scores worsened significantly over the 1 year interval. Worse Wisconsin CXR scores and S. aureus were both associated with hyperinflation (significantly increased FRC) but not with diminished FEV0.5 or FEF75. Parent-reported cough was associated with significantly diminished FEF75 but not with hyperinflation. Conclusions In this infant cohort in whom we previously reported worsening in average lung function, CXR scores also worsened over a year. The significant associations detected between both Wisconsin CXR score and S. aureus and hyperinflation, as well as between cough and diminished flows, reinforce the ability of iPFTs and CXRs to detect early CF lung disease. PMID:23722613

  7. Application of phase congruency for discriminating some lung diseases using chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Rijal, Omar Mohd; Ebrahimian, Hossein; Noor, Norliza Mohd; Hussin, Amran; Yunus, Ashari; Mahayiddin, Aziah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    A novel procedure using phase congruency is proposed for discriminating some lung disease using chest radiograph. Phase congruency provides information about transitions between adjacent pixels. Abrupt changes of phase congruency values between pixels may suggest a possible boundary or another feature that may be used for discrimination. This property of phase congruency may have potential for deciding between disease present and disease absent where the regions of infection on the images have no obvious shape, size, or configuration. Five texture measures calculated from phase congruency and Gabor were shown to be normally distributed. This gave good indicators of discrimination errors in the form of the probability of Type I Error (δ) and the probability of Type II Error (β). However, since 1 -  δ is the true positive fraction (TPF) and β is the false positive fraction (FPF), an ROC analysis was used to decide on the choice of texture measures. Given that features are normally distributed, for the discrimination between disease present and disease absent, energy, contrast, and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results compared to those using Gabor. Similarly, for the more difficult problem of discriminating lobar pneumonia and lung cancer, entropy and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results relative to Gabor.

  8. Application of Phase Congruency for Discriminating Some Lung Diseases Using Chest Radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Omar Mohd; Ebrahimian, Hossein; Noor, Norliza Mohd; Yunus, Ashari; Mahayiddin, Aziah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    A novel procedure using phase congruency is proposed for discriminating some lung disease using chest radiograph. Phase congruency provides information about transitions between adjacent pixels. Abrupt changes of phase congruency values between pixels may suggest a possible boundary or another feature that may be used for discrimination. This property of phase congruency may have potential for deciding between disease present and disease absent where the regions of infection on the images have no obvious shape, size, or configuration. Five texture measures calculated from phase congruency and Gabor were shown to be normally distributed. This gave good indicators of discrimination errors in the form of the probability of Type I Error (δ) and the probability of Type II Error (β). However, since 1 −  δ is the true positive fraction (TPF) and β is the false positive fraction (FPF), an ROC analysis was used to decide on the choice of texture measures. Given that features are normally distributed, for the discrimination between disease present and disease absent, energy, contrast, and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results compared to those using Gabor. Similarly, for the more difficult problem of discriminating lobar pneumonia and lung cancer, entropy and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results relative to Gabor. PMID:25918551

  9. Lung Field Segmentation in Chest Radiographs from Boundary Maps by a Structured Edge Detector.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Liu, Yunbi; Lin, Liyan; Yun, Zhaoqiang; Lu, Zhentai; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2017-03-27

    Lung field segmentation in chest radiographs (CXRs) is an essential preprocessing step in automatically analyzing such images. We present a method for lung field segmentation that is built on a high-quality boundary map detected by an efficient modern boundary detector, namely, a structured edge detector (SED). A SED is trained beforehand to detect lung boundaries in CXRs with manually outlined lung fields. Then, an ultrametric contour map (UCM) is transformed from the masked and marked boundary map. Finally, the contours with the highest confidence level in the UCM are extracted as lung contours. Our method is evaluated using the public JSRT database of scanned films. The average Jaccard index of our method is 95.2%, which is comparable with those of other state-of-the-art methods (95.4%). The computation time of our method is less than 0.1 s for a 256 × 256 CXR when executed on an ordinary laptop. Our method is also validated on CXRs acquired with different digital radiography units. The results demonstrate the generalization of the trained SED model and the usefulness of our method.

  10. Automatic tissue characterization of air trapping in chest radiographs using deep neural networks.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Awais; Perez, Geovanny; Nino, Gustavo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2016-08-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years for computer-aided diagnosis of abnormal pulmonary textures from computed tomography (CT) images. Similar initiatives in chest radiographs (CXR), the common modality for pulmonary diagnosis, are much less developed. CXR are fast, cost effective and low-radiation solution to diagnosis over CT. However, the subtlety of textures in CXR makes them hard to discern even by trained eye. We explore the performance of deep learning abnormal tissue characterization from CXR. Prior studies have used CT imaging to characterize air trapping in subjects with pulmonary disease; however, the use of CT in children is not recommended mainly due to concerns pertaining to radiation dosage. In this work, we present a stacked autoencoder (SAE) deep learning architecture for automated tissue characterization of air-trapping from CXR. To our best knowledge this is the first study applying deep learning framework for the specific problem on 51 CXRs, an F-score of ≈ 76.5% and a strong correlation with the expert visual scoring (R=0.93, p =<; 0.01) demonstrate the potential of the proposed method to characterization of air trapping.

  11. Spatially varying scatter compensation for chest radiographs using a hybrid Madaline artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Joseph Y.; Baydush, Alan H.; Floyd, Carey E., Jr.

    1994-05-01

    We developed a hybrid artificial neural network for scatter compensation in digital portable chest radiographs. The network inputs an image region of interest (ROI), and outputs the scatter estimate at the ROI's center. We segmented each image into four regions by relative detected exposure, then trained a separate Adaline (adaptive linear element) or adaptive filter for each region. We produced a spatially varying hybrid Madaline (mulitple Adaline) by combining outputs from weight matrices of different sizes trained for different durations. The network was trained with 20 patient or 1280 examples, then evaluated with another 5 patients or 320 examples. Scatter estimation errors were not very different, ranging from the Adaline's 6.9 percent to the hybrid Madaline's 5.5 percent. Primary errors (more relevant to quantitative radiography techniques like dual energy imaging) were 43 percent for the Adaline, reduced to 27 percent for the Madaline, and further reduced to 19 percent for the hybrid Madaline. The trained weight matrices, which act like convolution filters, resembled the shape and magnitude of scatter point spread functions. All networks outperformed conventional convolution-subraction techniques using analytical kernels. With its spatially varying neural network model, the hybrid Madaline provided the most accurate and robust estimation of scatter and primary exposures.

  12. Standardized Interpretation of Chest Radiographs in Cases of Pediatric Pneumonia From the PERCH Study

    PubMed Central

    Deloria Knoll, Maria; Barger-Kamate, Breanna; de Campo, John; de Campo, Margaret; Diallo, Mahamadou; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Feikin, Daniel R.; Gleeson, Fergus; Gong, Wenfeng; Hammitt, Laura L.; Izadnegahdar, Rasa; Kruatrachue, Anchalee; Madhi, Shabir A.; Manduku, Veronica; Matin, Fariha Bushra; Mahomed, Nasreen; Moore, David P.; Mwenechanya, Musaku; Nahar, Kamrun; Oluwalana, Claire; Ominde, Micah Silaba; Prosperi, Christine; Sande, Joyce; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; O’Brien, Katherine L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Chest radiographs (CXRs) are a valuable diagnostic tool in epidemiologic studies of pneumonia. The World Health Organization (WHO) methodology for the interpretation of pediatric CXRs has not been evaluated beyond its intended application as an endpoint measure for bacterial vaccine trials. Methods. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study enrolled children aged 1–59 months hospitalized with WHO-defined severe and very severe pneumonia from 7 low- and middle-income countries. An interpretation process categorized each CXR into 1 of 5 conclusions: consolidation, other infiltrate, both consolidation and other infiltrate, normal, or uninterpretable. Two members of a 14-person reading panel, who had undertaken training and standardization in CXR interpretation, interpreted each CXR. Two members of an arbitration panel provided additional independent reviews of CXRs with discordant interpretations at the primary reading, blinded to previous reports. Further discordance was resolved with consensus discussion. Results. A total of 4172 CXRs were obtained from 4232 cases. Observed agreement for detecting consolidation (with or without other infiltrate) between primary readers was 78% (κ = 0.50) and between arbitrators was 84% (κ = 0.61); agreement for primary readers and arbitrators across 5 conclusion categories was 43.5% (κ = 0.25) and 48.5% (κ = 0.32), respectively. Disagreement was most frequent between conclusions of other infiltrate and normal for both the reading panel and the arbitration panel (32% and 30% of discordant CXRs, respectively). Conclusions. Agreement was similar to that of previous evaluations using the WHO methodology for detecting consolidation, but poor for other infiltrates despite attempts at a rigorous standardization process. PMID:28575359

  13. The relation of exposure to asbestos and smoking habit with pulmonary function tests and chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Dave, S K; Ghodasara, N B; Mohanrao, N; Patel, G C; Patel, B D

    1997-01-01

    Environmental cum medical study was conducted in asbestos cement factory. The environment was evaluated for asbestos fiber by the methods recommended by BIS. Total 355 exposed and 312 suitably matched control workers were investigated by spirometer, Wright's peak flow meter and full sized postero-anterior chest radiograph. The levels of asbestos fiber were 2 to 3 times higher than TLV i.e. 2 f/ml in pipe cutting dept., crude fiber grinding inlet count was more than the ACGIH recommended limit i.e. 5 mpccf of air in pipe cutting dept. and silica mill. In the rest of the department, fiber level as well as dust particle count were below prescribed limit. The comparison of mean values of PFT parameters of workers with 16-20 years exposure history with control one was showing statistically significant decline in mean values of FVC only suggesting restrictive type of PFT impairment in this group of workers. But in workers with more than 20 years exposure, the mean values of all the parameters studied were reduced as compared to control one suggesting combined type of PFT impairment. When the mean values of PFT parameters of exposed smokers were compared with exposed non-smokers there was statistically no significant difference. This can be due to marginal contribution of smoking habit in impairment of PFT parameters of exposed smokers. The percentages of workers with parenchymal and pleural changes due to asbestos exposure were nearly two times more in more than 20 years exposure groups as compared to 11-20 years exposure groups. The parenchymal and pleural changes due to asbestos exposure were more common in exposed smokers as compared exposed non-smokers. However the detailed analysis revealed that if smoking contributes to the development of interstitial fibrosis, the contribution is a marginal one in comparison to the effect of asbestos dust exposure.

  14. Chest Radiograph Findings in Childhood Pneumonia Cases From the Multisite PERCH Study.

    PubMed

    Fancourt, Nicholas; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Hammitt, Laura L; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Awori, Juliet O; Barger-Kamate, Breanna; Chipeta, James; DeLuca, Andrea N; Diallo, Mahamadou; Driscoll, Amanda J; Ebruke, Bernard E; Higdon, Melissa M; Jahan, Yasmin; Karron, Ruth A; Mahomed, Nasreen; Moore, David P; Nahar, Kamrun; Naorat, Sathapana; Ominde, Micah Silaba; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Wa Somwe, Somwe; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Zaman, Syed M A; Zeger, Scott L; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2017-06-15

    Chest radiographs (CXRs) are frequently used to assess pneumonia cases. Variations in CXR appearances between epidemiological settings and their correlation with clinical signs are not well documented. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health project enrolled 4232 cases of hospitalized World Health Organization (WHO)-defined severe and very severe pneumonia from 9 sites in 7 countries (Bangladesh, the Gambia, Kenya, Mali, South Africa, Thailand, and Zambia). At admission, each case underwent a standardized assessment of clinical signs and pneumonia risk factors by trained health personnel, and a CXR was taken that was interpreted using the standardized WHO methodology. CXRs were categorized as abnormal (consolidation and/or other infiltrate), normal, or uninterpretable. CXRs were interpretable in 3587 (85%) cases, of which 1935 (54%) were abnormal (site range, 35%-64%). Cases with abnormal CXRs were more likely than those with normal CXRs to have hypoxemia (45% vs 26%), crackles (69% vs 62%), tachypnea (85% vs 80%), or fever (20% vs 16%) and less likely to have wheeze (30% vs 38%; all P < .05). CXR consolidation was associated with a higher case fatality ratio at 30-day follow-up (13.5%) compared to other infiltrate (4.7%) or normal (4.9%) CXRs. Clinically diagnosed pneumonia cases with abnormal CXRs were more likely to have signs typically associated with pneumonia. However, CXR-normal cases were common, and clinical signs considered indicative of pneumonia were present in substantial proportions of these cases. CXR-consolidation cases represent a group with an increased likelihood of death at 30 days post-discharge.

  15. Computerized detection of vertebral compression fractures on lateral chest radiographs: Preliminary results with a tool for early detection of osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-12-15

    Vertebral fracture (or vertebral deformity) is a very common outcome of osteoporosis, which is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Early detection of vertebral fractures is important because timely pharmacologic intervention can reduce the risk of subsequent additional fractures. Chest radiographs are used routinely for detection of lung and heart diseases, and vertebral fractures can be visible on lateral chest radiographs. However, investigators noted that about 50% of vertebral fractures visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or under-reported, even when the fractures were severe. Therefore, our goal was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation and thus allow the early diagnosis of osteoporosis. The cases used in this study were 20 patients with severe vertebral fractures and 118 patients without fractures, as confirmed by the consensus of two radiologists. Radiologists identified the locations of fractured vertebrae, and they provided morphometric data on the vertebral shape for evaluation of the accuracy of detecting vertebral end plates by computer. In our computerized method, a curved search area, which included a number of vertebral end plates, was first extracted automatically, and was straightened so that vertebral end plates became oriented horizontally. Edge candidates were enhanced by use of a horizontal line-enhancement filter in the straightened image, and a multiple thresholding technique, followed by feature analysis, was used for identification of the vertebral end plates. The height of each vertebra was determined from locations of identified vertebral end plates, and fractured vertebrae were detected by comparison of the measured vertebral height with the expected height. The sensitivity of our computerized method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20), with 1.03 (139/135) false

  16. Relationships between Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles and chest radiographic manifestations in childhood Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiu-ling; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yu-shui

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) is one of the most common childhood community-acquired pneumonias, and the chest radiograph usually shows bronchial pneumonia, segmental/lobar pneumonia, or segmental/lobar pneumonia with pleural effusion. The imbalance of Th1/Th2 function after Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is an important immunological mechanism of MPP. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the correlations between Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles and chest radiographic manifestations in MPP children. Patients and methods A total of 87 children with MPP were retrospectively reviewed in this study. According to the chest radiographic manifestations, they were divided into the following three groups: bronchial MPP group, segmental/lobar MPP group, and segmental/lobar MPP with pleural effusion group. Clinical features and changes in Th1/Th2 cytokines were further analyzed. Results The incidence of tachypnea and cyanosis was higher in children with segmental/lobar MPP with pleural effusion than in those with segmental/lobar or bronchial MPP. The peak body temperature of segmental/lobar MPP was higher than that of bronchial MPP, and the duration of fever and hospitalization was positively correlated with the severity of MPP. MPP children’s chest radiograph showed a relationship with the changes in Th1/Th2 cytokines. Serum interleukin-4, interleukin-10 (IL-10), interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) of segmental/lobar MPP were significantly higher than those of bronchial MPP, and serum IL-10 (cutoff value: 27.25 pg/mL) can be used as a diagnostic predictor for segmental/lobar MPP. Serum TNF-α and interleukin-6 of segmental/lobar MPP with pleural effusion were significantly higher than those of segmental/lobar MPP without pleural effusion. Serum TNF-α (cutoff value: 60.25 pg/mL) can be used as a diagnostic predictor for segmental/lobar MPP with pleural effusion. Conclusion There were significant correlations between Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles

  17. Computerized detection of vertebral compression fractures on lateral chest radiographs: preliminary results with a tool for early detection of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li, Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-12-01

    Vertebral fracture (or vertebral deformity) is a very common outcome of osteoporosis, which is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Early detection of vertebral fractures is important because timely pharmacologic intervention can reduce the risk of subsequent additional fractures. Chest radiographs are used routinely for detection of lung and heart diseases, and vertebral fractures can be visible on lateral chest radiographs. However, investigators noted that about 50% of vertebral fractures visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or under-reported, even when the fractures were severe. Therefore, our goal was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation and thus allow the early diagnosis of osteoporosis. The cases used in this study were 20 patients with severe vertebral fractures and 118 patients without fractures, as confirmed by the consensus of two radiologists. Radiologists identified the locations of fractured vertebrae, and they provided morphometric data on the vertebral shape for evaluation of the accuracy of detecting vertebral end plates by computer. In our computerized method, a curved search area, which included a number of vertebral end plates, was first extracted automatically, and was straightened so that vertebral end plates became oriented horizontally. Edge candidates were enhanced by use of a horizontal line-enhancement filter in the straightened image, and a multiple thresholding technique, followed by feature analysis, was used for identification of the vertebral end plates. The height of each vertebra was determined from locations of identified vertebral end plates, and fractured vertebrae were detected by comparison of the measured vertebral height with the expected height. The sensitivity of our computerized method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20), with 1.03 (139/135) false

  18. [Welders' siderosis: a retrospective cohort study on welder's pneumoconiosis patients with small round opacities on chest radiograph].

    PubMed

    Mao, Ling; Shi, Jin; Chen, Zidan; Zhang, Jingbo

    2014-11-01

    To study the radiographycal changes and prognosis of welders' pneumoconiosis patients diagnosed within the last few years. Occupational hygienics data (including years on welding work, welding materials exposed to and work environment), symptoms, lung function test results and follow-up data of 136 welders' pneumoconiosis patients were collected retrospectively. The follow-up lasted up till June 30, 2014, with follow-up interval being one year. Chest radiographs were read/reviewed together by 3 senior experts experienced in pneumoconiosis diagnosing and shape and size of small opacity, overall profusion, affected lung zones and pneumoconiosis stages were all logged. Of all 136 pneumoconiosis cases, five were of stage II and 131 were stage I, and they had been engaged in welding work for 9.2±6.34 years. All patients were present with slight symptoms including coughing, chest distress and dyspnea, while their lung function remained normal. Small round opacities were found on chest radiographs of 88.9% of the 136 cases. Years of follow-up on 131 cases of stage I Welder's pneumoconiosis showed that irregular small opacities remained fundamentally unchanged, while small round opacities tended to gradually lessen instead of coalescence. Two years after primary diagnosing, the total affected lung zones of follow-up objects were noticed to start lessening, and reduced by 0.02 per patient among the 48 follow-up subjects. Of the 48 cases followed up up to six years after primary diagnosing, the affected lung zone number was reduced by 0.54 per patient while 4 cases (8%) went down to below stage I. As of the 36 patients followed up 10 years after after primary diagnosis, the number of affected lung areas decreased by 1.14, and 22% (8 cases) appeared less than stage I on chest radiograph. It seemed that the so-called welders' pneumoconiosis featuring small round opacities tended to get improved over time, which suggested the diagnosis of siderosis.

  19. Validation of an image-based technique to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs with an observer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; McAdams, H. Page; Foos, David H.; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed a novel image-based quality assessment technique1 to assess the perceptual quality of clinical chest radiographs. In this paper, an observer study was designed and conducted to systematically validate this technique. Ten metrics were involved in the observer study, i.e., lung grey level, lung detail, lung noise, riblung contrast, rib sharpness, mediastinum detail, mediastinum noise, mediastinum alignment, subdiaphragm-lung contrast, and subdiaphragm area. For each metric, three tasks were successively presented to the observers. In each task, six ROI images were randomly presented in a row and observers were asked to rank the images only based on a designated quality and disregard the other qualities. A range slider on the top of the images was used for observers to indicate the acceptable range based on the corresponding perceptual attribute. Five boardcertificated radiologists from Duke participated in this observer study on a DICOM calibrated diagnostic display workstation and under low ambient lighting conditions. The observer data were analyzed in terms of the correlations between the observer ranking orders and the algorithmic ranking orders. Based on the collected acceptable ranges, quality consistency ranges were statistically derived. The observer study showed that, for each metric, the averaged ranking orders of the participated observers were strongly correlated with the algorithmic orders. For the lung grey level, the observer ranking orders completely accorded with the algorithmic ranking orders. The quality consistency ranges derived from this observer study were close to these derived from our previous study. The observer study indicates that the proposed image-based quality assessment technique provides a robust reflection of the perceptual image quality of the clinical chest radiographs. The derived quality consistency ranges can be used to automatically predict the acceptability of a clinical chest radiograph.

  20. The Effect Of Pixel Size On The Detection Rate Of Early Pulmonary Sarcoidosis In Digital Chest Radiographic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, Heber; Vyborny, Carl; Powell, Gregory; Doi, Kunio; Metz, Charles E.

    1984-08-01

    In digital radiography the pixel size used determines the potential spatial resolution of the system. The need for spatial resolution varies depending on the subject matter imaged. In many areas, including the chest, the minimum spatial resolution requirements have not been determined. Sarcoidosis is a disease which frequently causes subtle interstitial infiltrates in the lungs. As the initial step in an investigation designed to determine the minimum pixel size required in digital chest radiographic systems, we have studied 1 mm pixel digitized images on patients with early pulmonary sarcoidosis. The results of this preliminary study suggest that neither mild interstitial pulmonary infiltrates nor other abnormalities such as pneumothoraces may be detected reliably with 1 mm pixel digital images.

  1. Risk and significance of chest radiograph and pulmonary function abnormalities in an elderly cohort of former nuclear weapons workers.

    PubMed

    Mikulski, Marek A; Hartley, Patrick G; Sprince, Nancy L; Sanderson, Wayne T; Lourens, Spencer; Worden, Nicole E; Wang, Kai; Fuortes, Laurence J

    2011-09-01

    To estimate prevalence and risk factors for International Labour Organization radiographic abnormalities, and assess relationship of these abnormalities with spirometry results in former Department of Energy nuclear weapons workers. Participants were offered chest x-ray (CXR) and lung function testing. Three occupational medicine physicians read CXRs. Forty-five (5.9%) of 757 screened workers were found to have isolated parenchymal abnormalities on CXR and this rate is higher than that in many Department of Energy studies. Parenchymal and pleural and isolated pleural abnormalities were found in 19 (2.5%) and 37 (4.9%) workers, respectively, and these rates are lower than those in other Department of Energy studies to date. Lung function impairment was associated with radiographic abnormalities. This study found an elevated rate of parenchymal abnormalities compared to other DoE populations but the effect of age or other causes could not be ruled out. (C)2011The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

  2. Abnormal distribution of pulmonary blood flow in aortic valve disease. Relation between pulmonary function and chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Goodenday, L S; Simon, G; Craig, H; Dalby, L

    1970-05-01

    Wasted ventilatory volume (V(D)) and its ratio to tidal volume (V(D)/V(T)) were measured at rest and during exertion in 17 patients with aortic valve disease. We considered V(D)/V(T) to indicate abnormal ventilation: perfusion relations if it did not decrease on exertion, or if the exercising value was greater than 40 per cent. Plain chest radiographs were independently examined for evidence of diversion of pulmonary blood to the upper lobes. There was significant agreement (p<0.05) between radiographic and pulmonary function estimations of abnormality. This suggests that the raised pulmonary venous pressure associated with left ventricular failure creates an abnormal pattern of blood flow through the lung, which is responsible for causing inadequate perfusion with respect to ventilation.

  3. Tuberculosis screening in immigrants from high-prevalence countries: interview first or chest radiograph first? A pro/con debate.

    PubMed

    Mor, Zohar; Leventhal, Alex; Diacon, Andreas H; Finger, Rebekka; Schoch, Otto D

    2013-04-01

    Immigration from high tuberculosis (TB) prevalence countries has a substantial impact on the epidemiology of TB in receiving countries with low TB incidence. Cross-border migration offers an ideal opportunity for active case finding that will result in a lower caseload in the host country and a reduced spread of disease to both the indigenous and migrant populations. Screening strategies can start 'offshore', thereby indirectly assisting and empowering public health systems in the source countries, or be performed at ports of entry with or without long-term engagement of 'onshore' facilities and systems to provide either preventive therapy or surveillance for reactivation of latent TB. The chest radiograph seems to be playing a key role in this process, but questions remain regarding when, where and in whom radiographs are best done for optimal yield and cost-effectiveness, and with what other tests they might best be combined to further increase the usefulness of transborder TB control.

  4. Super-resolution convolutional neural network for the improvement of the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umehara, Kensuke; Ota, Junko; Ishimaru, Naoki; Ohno, Shunsuke; Okamoto, Kentaro; Suzuki, Takanori; Shirai, Naoki; Ishida, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    Single image super-resolution (SR) method can generate a high-resolution (HR) image from a low-resolution (LR) image by enhancing image resolution. In medical imaging, HR images are expected to have a potential to provide a more accurate diagnosis with the practical application of HR displays. In recent years, the super-resolution convolutional neural network (SRCNN), which is one of the state-of-the-art deep learning based SR methods, has proposed in computer vision. In this study, we applied and evaluated the SRCNN scheme to improve the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs. For evaluation, a total of 247 chest X-rays were sampled from the JSRT database. The 247 chest X-rays were divided into 93 training cases with non-nodules and 152 test cases with lung nodules. The SRCNN was trained using the training dataset. With the trained SRCNN, the HR image was reconstructed from the LR one. We compared the image quality of the SRCNN and conventional image interpolation methods, nearest neighbor, bilinear and bicubic interpolations. For quantitative evaluation, we measured two image quality metrics, peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and structural similarity (SSIM). In the SRCNN scheme, PSNR and SSIM were significantly higher than those of three interpolation methods (p<0.001). Visual assessment confirmed that the SRCNN produced much sharper edge than conventional interpolation methods without any obvious artifacts. These preliminary results indicate that the SRCNN scheme significantly outperforms conventional interpolation algorithms for enhancing image resolution and that the use of the SRCNN can yield substantial improvement of the image quality of magnified images in chest radiographs.

  5. Radiographer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of radiographer, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of radiographer. The following skill areas are covered in the…

  6. A chest radiograph scoring system in patients with severe acute respiratory infection: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Emma; Haven, Kathryn; Reed, Peter; Bissielo, Ange; Harvey, Dave; McArthur, Colin; Bringans, Cameron; Freundlich, Simone; Ingram, R Joan H; Perry, David; Wilson, Francessa; Milne, David; Modahl, Lucy; Huang, Q Sue; Gross, Diane; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Grant, Cameron C

    2015-12-29

    The term severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) encompasses a heterogeneous group of respiratory illnesses. Grading the severity of SARI is currently reliant on indirect disease severity measures such as respiratory and heart rate, and the need for oxygen or intensive care. With the lungs being the primary organ system involved in SARI, chest radiographs (CXRs) are potentially useful for describing disease severity. Our objective was to develop and validate a SARI CXR severity scoring system. We completed validation within an active SARI surveillance project, with SARI defined using the World Health Organization case definition of an acute respiratory infection with a history of fever, or measured fever of ≥ 38 °C; and cough; and with onset within the last 10 days; and requiring hospital admission. We randomly selected 250 SARI cases. Admission CXR findings were categorized as: 1 = normal; 2 = patchy atelectasis and/or hyperinflation and/or bronchial wall thickening; 3 = focal consolidation; 4 = multifocal consolidation; and 5 = diffuse alveolar changes. Initially, four radiologists scored CXRs independently. Subsequently, a pediatrician, physician, two residents, two medical students, and a research nurse independently scored CXR reports. Inter-observer reliability was determined using a weighted Kappa (κ) for comparisons between radiologists; radiologists and clinicians; and clinicians. Agreement was defined as moderate (κ > 0.4-0.6), good (κ > 0.6-0.8) and very good (κ > 0.8-1.0). Agreement between the two pediatric radiologists was very good (κ = 0.83, 95% CI 0.65-1.00) and between the two adult radiologists was good (κ = 0.75, 95% CI 0.57-0. 93). Agreement of the clinicians with the radiologists was moderate-to-good (pediatrician:κ = 0.65; pediatric resident:κ = 0.69; physician:κ = 0.68; resident:κ = 0.67; research nurse:κ = 0.49, medical students: κ = 0.53 and κ = 0.56). Agreement between clinicians was good-to-very good (pediatrician vs

  7. 42 CFR 37.42 - Chest radiograph specifications-digital radiography systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... radiograph specifications—digital radiography systems. (a) Miners must be disrobed from the waist up at the... maximum pixel pitch of 200µm, with a minimum bit depth of 10. Spatial resolution must be at least 2.5 line...

  8. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  9. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  10. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  11. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  12. 38 CFR 23.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries... Prohibited § 23.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  13. 34 CFR 106.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 106.60 Section 106.60... Prohibited § 106.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment... or Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  14. 34 CFR 106.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 106.60 Section 106.60... Prohibited § 106.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment... or Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  15. 49 CFR 219.502 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 219.502 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.502 Pre-employment alcohol testing. (a) A railroad may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment...

  16. 38 CFR 23.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries... Prohibited § 23.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  17. 34 CFR 106.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 106.60 Section 106.60... Prohibited § 106.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment... or Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  18. Radiographic evaluation of the patient with chest pain of suspected myocardial origin

    SciTech Connect

    Green, C.E.; Satler, L.F.; Elliott, L.P.

    1984-11-01

    The evaluation of the patient with suspected angina pectoris is discussed and an approach presented which makes use of radiologic tests in conjunction with exercise testing to quickly and efficiently determine the likelihood and severity of coronary artery disease. The relative merits and limitations of chest radiography, cardiac fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and coronary arteriography are discussed.

  19. 78 FR 53645 - Black Lung Benefits Act: Standards for Chest Radiographs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office... final rule; withdrawal. SUMMARY: The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) published a direct... providing parallel standards for submission of digital radiographs in connection with claims filed under...

  20. A computer-aided diagnosis system to detect pathologies in temporal subtraction images of chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, Jared; Harrison, Melanie; Armato, Samuel G.

    2016-03-01

    Radiologists often compare sequential radiographs to identify areas of pathologic change; however, this process is prone to error, as human anatomy can obscure the regions of change, causing the radiologists to overlook pathology. Temporal subtraction (TS) images can provide enhanced visualization of regions of change in sequential radiographs and allow radiologists to better detect areas of change in radiographs. Not all areas of change shown in TS images, however, are actual pathology. The purpose of this study was to create a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that identifies which regions of change are caused by pathology and which are caused by misregistration of the radiographs used to create the TS image. The dataset used in this study contained 120 images with 74 pathologic regions on 54 images outlined by an experienced radiologist. High and low ("light" and "dark") gray-level candidate regions were extracted from the images using gray-level thresholding. Then, sampling techniques were used to address the class imbalance problem between "true" and "false" candidate regions. Next, the datasets of light candidate regions, dark candidate regions, and the combined set of light and dark candidate regions were used as training and testing data for classifiers by using five-fold cross validation. Of the classifiers tested (support vector machines, discriminant analyses, logistic regression, and k-nearest neighbors), the support vector machine on the combined candidates using synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE) performed best with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve value of 0.85, a sensitivity of 85%, and a specificity of 84%.

  1. A parameterized logarithmic image processing method with Laplacian of Gaussian filtering for lung nodule enhancement in chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Yao, Liping; Chen, Bao

    2016-11-01

    The enhancement of lung nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) plays an important role in the manual as well as computer-aided detection (CADe) lung cancer. In this paper, we proposed a parameterized logarithmic image processing (PLIP) method combined with the Laplacian of a Gaussian (LoG) filter to enhance lung nodules in CXRs. We first applied several LoG filters with varying parameters to an original CXR to enhance the nodule-like structures as well as the edges in the image. We then applied the PLIP model, which can enhance lung nodule images with high contrast and was beneficial in extracting effective features for nodule detection in the CADe scheme. Our method combined the advantages of both the PLIP algorithm and the LoG algorithm, which can enhance lung nodules in chest radiographs with high contrast. To test our nodule enhancement method, we tested a CADe scheme, with a relatively high performance in nodule detection, using a publically available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs enhanced through our nodule enhancement method. The CADe scheme attained a sensitivity of 81 and 70 % with an average of 5.0 frame rate (FP) and 2.0 FP, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test. By contrast, the CADe scheme based on the original image recorded a sensitivity of 77 and 63 % at 5.0 FP and 2.0 FP, respectively. We introduced the measurement of enhancement by entropy evaluation to objectively assess our method. Experimental results show that the proposed method obtains an effective enhancement of lung nodules in CXRs for both radiologists and CADe schemes.

  2. Organ dose and effective dose estimation in paediatric chest radiographic examinations by using pin silicon photodiode dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Toshio; Aoyama, Takahiko; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Fujii, Keisuke; Koyama, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Organ and effective doses during paediatric chest radiographic examination were investigated for various tube voltages between 60 and 110 kV at a constant milliampere-second value and focus-to-film distance by using an in-phantom dose measuring system and a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (PCXMC), where the former was composed of 32 photodiode dosemeters embedded in various tissue and organ sites within a 6-y-old child anthropomorphic phantom. Lung doses obtained ranged from 0.010 to 0.066 mGy and effective doses from 0.004 to 0.025 mSv, where these doses varied by a factor of 6 with the change in the tube voltage. Effective doses obtained using the MC simulation software agreed with those obtained using the dose measuring system within 23 %, revealing the usefulness of PCXMC software for evaluating effective doses. The present study would provide helpful dose data for the selection of technical parameters in paediatric chest radiography in Japan.

  3. Impact of bone suppression imaging on the detection of lung nodules in chest radiographs: analysis of multiple reading sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schalekamp, S.; van Ginneken, B.; Schaefer-Prokop, C. M.; Karssemeijer, N.

    2013-03-01

    Observer studies are frequently performed to test new modalities. Correct study design is important to generate reliable results. Two most frequently used observer study designs are the sequential and the independent reading design. We investigated the effect of different observer study designs on reader performance results and statistical power. The study included multiple assessments of chest radiographs (CXR) with bone suppression images (BSI) for the detection of lung nodules. In a fully crossed study design 8 observers assessed first radiographs without and with BSI sequentially. Secondly they scored radiographs independently having BSI available from the beginning. Five months later, the same readers scored the same cases again in an independent reading session, completing the three scorings for CXRs with BSI. Observer performance was compared using multi reader multi case (MRMC) receiver operating characteristics (ROC). To estimate reader variance, Dorfman, Berbaum, Metz (DBM) variance component estimates were calculated. No significant difference between the sequential and the independent reading sessions could be found (p=0.51; p=0.61). Both reading designs showed increased performance with BSI, with a significant increase for the sequential and the independent reading session after five months (p=0.002; p=0.007). Total observer variance between sequential and independent reading design remained the same. A strong increase of uncorrelated components was found in the independent reading sessions, masking the ability to demonstrate differences in observer performance across modalities. In conclusion, results of the sequential and the independent study design did not show a significant difference. The independent study design had less power compared to the sequential study design due to a strong increase of uncorrelated variance components.

  4. Chest radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.H.M.

    1982-01-01

    This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

  5. 24 CFR 3.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 3.545... Prohibited § 3.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  6. 32 CFR 196.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 196.545 Section 196... Prohibited § 196.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  7. 32 CFR 196.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 196.545 Section 196... Prohibited § 196.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  8. 24 CFR 3.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 3.545... Prohibited § 3.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  9. 32 CFR 196.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 196.545 Section 196... Prohibited § 196.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  10. 32 CFR 196.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 196.545 Section 196... Prohibited § 196.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  11. 24 CFR 3.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 3.545... Prohibited § 3.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment...” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of an applicant...

  12. A comparative study for chest radiograph image retrieval using binary texture and deep learning classification.

    PubMed

    Anavi, Yaron; Kogan, Ilya; Gelbart, Elad; Geva, Ofer; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    In this work various approaches are investigated for X-ray image retrieval and specifically chest pathology retrieval. Given a query image taken from a data set of 443 images, the objective is to rank images according to similarity. Different features, including binary features, texture features, and deep learning (CNN) features are examined. In addition, two approaches are investigated for the retrieval task. One approach is based on the distance of image descriptors using the above features (hereon termed the "descriptor"-based approach); the second approach ("classification"-based approach) is based on a probability descriptor, generated by a pair-wise classification of each two classes (pathologies) and their decision values using an SVM classifier. Best results are achieved using deep learning features in a classification scheme.

  13. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.501 Pre-employment drug testing. (a) Prior to the first time a covered employee performs covered service for...

  14. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.501 Pre-employment drug testing. (a) Prior to the first time a covered employee performs covered service for...

  15. 22 CFR 229.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 229.545 Section 229... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  16. 45 CFR 618.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 618.545 Section 618.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 618.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  17. 49 CFR 25.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 25.545 Section 25.545... Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant...

  18. 10 CFR 1042.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 1042.545 Section 1042.545 Energy... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  19. 43 CFR 17.213 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Pre-employment inquiries. 17.213 Section 17... ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap § 17.213 Pre... conduct a pre-employment medical examination or make a pre-employment inquiry as to whether the...

  20. 10 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section 5.545 Energy... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for employment,...

  1. 44 CFR 19.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 19... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 19.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  2. 28 CFR 97.11 - Pre-employment screening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pre-employment screening. 97.11 Section... PROVIDING PRISONER OR DETAINEE SERVICES § 97.11 Pre-employment screening. Private prisoner transport companies must adopt pre-employment screening measures for all potential employees. The...

  3. 28 CFR 54.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 54.545 Section... Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 54.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  4. 40 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  5. 6 CFR 17.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 17.545 Section 17.545... the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  6. 28 CFR 54.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 54.545 Section... Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 54.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  7. 36 CFR 1211.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries... Activities Prohibited § 1211.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre... is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of...

  8. 6 CFR 17.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 17.545 Section 17.545... the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  9. 22 CFR 146.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 146.545 Section 146... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  10. 49 CFR 25.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 25.545 Section 25.545... Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant...

  11. 10 CFR 1042.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 1042.545 Section 1042.545 Energy... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  12. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.42 Pre-employment alcohol testing. An employer may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment alcohol testing under this part. If an employer chooses to conduct...

  13. 10 CFR 1042.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 1042.545 Section 1042.545 Energy... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  14. 10 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section 5.545 Energy... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for employment,...

  15. 45 CFR 618.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 618.545 Section 618.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 618.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  16. 36 CFR 1211.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries... Activities Prohibited § 1211.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre... is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of...

  17. 13 CFR 113.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 113.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs Or Activities Prohibited § 113.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  18. 22 CFR 146.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 146.545 Section 146... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  19. 44 CFR 19.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Pre-employment inquiries. 19... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 19.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  20. 43 CFR 41.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 41.545 Section... the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 41.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  1. 45 CFR 86.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 86.60 Section 86.60... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  2. 49 CFR 382.301 - Pre-employment testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment testing. 382.301 Section 382.301... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.301 Pre-employment testing. (a) Prior to the first time a... 40 of this title, the employer shall conduct a pre-employment controlled substances test. (d)...

  3. 22 CFR 146.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 146.545 Section 146... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  4. 22 CFR 229.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 229.545 Section 229... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  5. 45 CFR 618.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 618.545 Section 618.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 618.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  6. 28 CFR 54.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 54.545 Section... Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 54.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  7. 44 CFR 19.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 19... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 19.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  8. 45 CFR 86.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 86.60 Section 86.60... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  9. 45 CFR 86.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 86.60 Section 86.60... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  10. 40 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  11. 29 CFR 36.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 36.545 Section 36.545 Labor... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 36.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  12. 7 CFR 15a.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 15a.60 Section 15a.60... Programs and Activities Prohibited § 15a.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for employment,...

  13. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pre-employment... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1317.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  14. 45 CFR 618.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 618.545 Section 618.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 618.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  15. 41 CFR 101-4.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Pre-employment inquiries... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 101-4.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  16. 43 CFR 41.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Pre-employment inquiries. 41.545 Section 41... Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 41.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  17. 6 CFR 17.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 17.545 Section 17.545... the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  18. 15 CFR 8a.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 8a.545... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 8a.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  19. 22 CFR 146.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 146.545 Section 146... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  20. 10 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section 5.545 Energy... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for employment,...

  1. 40 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  2. 43 CFR 17.213 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 17.213 Section... ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap § 17.213 Pre... conduct a pre-employment medical examination or make a pre-employment inquiry as to whether the...

  3. 29 CFR 36.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 36.545 Section 36.545 Labor... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 36.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  4. 36 CFR 1211.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries... Activities Prohibited § 1211.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre... is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of...

  5. 28 CFR 97.11 - Pre-employment screening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pre-employment screening. 97.11 Section... PROVIDING PRISONER OR DETAINEE SERVICES § 97.11 Pre-employment screening. Private prisoner transport companies must adopt pre-employment screening measures for all potential employees. The...

  6. 41 CFR 101-4.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Pre-employment inquiries... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 101-4.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  7. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.42 Pre-employment alcohol testing. An employer may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment alcohol testing under this part. If an employer chooses to conduct...

  8. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.42 Pre-employment alcohol testing. An employer may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment alcohol testing under this part. If an employer chooses to conduct...

  9. 14 CFR 1253.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Pre-employment inquiries. 1253.545 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1253.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  10. 15 CFR 8a.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 8a.545... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 8a.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  11. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.42 Pre-employment alcohol testing. An employer may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment alcohol testing under this part. If an employer chooses to conduct...

  12. 13 CFR 113.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 113.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs Or Activities Prohibited § 113.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  13. 22 CFR 229.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 229.545 Section 229... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  14. 6 CFR 17.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 17.545 Section 17.545... the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  15. 31 CFR 28.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 28.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 28.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  16. 45 CFR 86.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 86.60 Section 86.60... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  17. 45 CFR 618.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 618.545 Section 618.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 618.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  18. 44 CFR 19.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 19... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 19.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  19. 43 CFR 17.213 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 17.213 Section... ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap § 17.213 Pre... conduct a pre-employment medical examination or make a pre-employment inquiry as to whether the...

  20. 43 CFR 41.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 41.545 Section... the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 41.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status...

  1. 29 CFR 36.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 36.545 Section 36.545 Labor... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 36.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for...

  2. 40 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  3. 46 CFR 16.210 - Pre-employment testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment testing requirements. 16.210 Section 16... TESTING Required Chemical Testing § 16.210 Pre-employment testing requirements. (a) No marine employer... test for dangerous drugs for that employer. (b) An employer may waive a pre-employment test...

  4. 49 CFR 382.301 - Pre-employment testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment testing. 382.301 Section 382.301... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.301 Pre-employment testing. (a) Prior to the first time a... 40 of this title, the employer shall conduct a pre-employment controlled substances test. (d)...

  5. 14 CFR 1253.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 1253.545 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1253.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  6. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pre-employment... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1317.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  7. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pre-employment... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1317.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  8. 7 CFR 15a.60 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 15a.60 Section 15a.60... Programs and Activities Prohibited § 15a.60 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an applicant for employment,...

  9. 28 CFR 97.11 - Pre-employment screening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-employment screening. 97.11 Section... PROVIDING PRISONER OR DETAINEE SERVICES § 97.11 Pre-employment screening. Private prisoner transport companies must adopt pre-employment screening measures for all potential employees. The...

  10. 22 CFR 229.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 229.545 Section 229... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  11. 13 CFR 113.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 113.545... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs Or Activities Prohibited § 113.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  12. 40 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  13. 14 CFR 1253.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 1253.545 Section... on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1253.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the...

  14. 41 CFR 101-4.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Pre-employment inquiries... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 101-4.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre-employment inquiry as to the marital status of an...

  15. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Pre-Employment Tests § 219.501 Pre-employment drug testing. (a) Prior to the first time a covered employee performs covered service for a...

  16. Low Yield of Chest Radiography in a Large Tuberculosis Screening Program1

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Nira R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and spectrum of abnormalities on routine screening chest radiographs in the pre-employment evaluation of health care workers with positive tuberculin skin test (TST) results. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study and waived the need for written informed patient consent. Chest radiographic reports of all 2586 asymptomatic individuals with positive TST results who underwent pre-employment evaluation between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2007, were evaluated to determine the frequency of detection of evidence of active tuberculosis (TB) or latent TB infection (LTBI) and the spectrum of imaging findings. All chest radiographs interpreted as positive were reviewed by an experienced board-certified radiologist. If there was a discrepancy between the two readings, a second experienced radiologist served as an independent and final arbiter. Any follow-up chest radiographs or computed tomographic images that had been acquired by employee health services or by the employee’s private physician as a result of a suspected abnormality detected at initial screening were also evaluated. Results: Of the 159 (6.1%) chest radiographic examinations that yielded abnormal results, there were no findings that were consistent with active TB. There were 92 cases of calcified granulomas, calcified lymph nodes, or both; 25 cases of apical pleural thickening; 16 cases of fibrous scarring; and 31 cases of noncalcified nodules. All cases of fibrous scarring involved an area smaller than 2 cm2. All noncalcified nodules were 4 mm in diameter or smaller, with the exception of one primary lung malignancy and one necrotizing granuloma (negative for acid-fast bacilli) that grew Mycobacterium kansasii on culture. Conclusion: Universal chest radiography in a large pre-employment TB screening program was of low yield in the detection of active TB or increased LTBI reactivation risk, and it provided

  17. Preliminary validation of a new methodology for estimating dose reduction protocols in neonatal chest computed radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Don, Steven; Whiting, Bruce R.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Sehnert, W. James; Ellinwood, Jacquelyn S.; Töpfer, Karin; Masoumzadeh, Parinaz; Kraus, Richard A.; Kronemer, Keith A.; Herman, Thomas; McAlister, William H.

    2006-03-01

    The risk of radiation exposure is greatest for pediatric patients and, thus, there is a great incentive to reduce the radiation dose used in diagnostic procedures for children to "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA). Testing of low-dose protocols presents a dilemma, as it is unethical to repeatedly expose patients to ionizing radiation in order to determine optimum protocols. To overcome this problem, we have developed a computed-radiography (CR) dose-reduction simulation tool that takes existing images and adds synthetic noise to create realistic images that correspond to images generated with lower doses. The objective of our study was to determine the extent to which simulated, low-dose images corresponded with original (non-simulated) low-dose images. To make this determination, we created pneumothoraces of known volumes in five neonate cadavers and obtained images of the neonates at 10 mR, 1 mR and 0.1 mR (as measured at the cassette plate). The 10-mR exposures were considered "relatively-noise-free" images. We used these 10 mR-images and our simulation tool to create simulated 0.1- and 1-mR images. For the simulated and original images, we identified regions of interest (ROI) of the entire chest, free-in-air region, and liver. We compared the means and standard deviations of the ROI grey-scale values of the simulated and original images with paired t tests. We also had observers rate simulated and original images for image quality and for the presence or absence of pneumothoraces. There was no statistically significant difference in grey-scale-value means nor standard deviations between simulated and original entire chest ROI regions. The observer performance suggests that an exposure >=0.2 mR is required to detect the presence or absence of pneumothoraces. These preliminary results indicate that the use of the simulation tool is promising for achieving ALARA exposures in children.

  18. Application of artificial neural networks for reduction of false-positive detections in digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Lin, J S; Ligomenides, P A; Freedman, M T; Mun, S K

    1993-01-01

    A methodology based on the fuzzy set theory and the convolution neural network (CNN) architecture is proposed to tackle the problem of reducing false-positive rate in automatic lung nodule detection. The CNN which simulates human visual mechanism was trained by a supervised back-propagation algorithm based on fuzzy membership functions. The training and testing database consists of image blocks (each 32 x 32 pixels) of suspected lung nodule areas (nodule candidates) which were generated from our pre-scanning program [1]. A linguistic label was assigned to each nodule candidate of the training set, then the label was converted to a membership value through a pre-defined membership function and used as teaching signal (desired outputs) during the network learning. Before the nodule candidate was fed to the network input, it was pre-processed to reduce the complex background noise and the contrast discrepancy resulted from film development. During the network testing phase, a defuzzification process was applied to decipher the trained network's output triggered by the nodule candidate in the testing set. Finally, a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the CNN's performance based on the defuzzified output of the testing database. Preliminary results showed an average Az (the performance index) of 0.84 which is equivalent to 0.80 true-positive detection (sensitivity) with an average 2-3 false-positive detections per chest image.

  19. Application of artificial neural networks for reduction of false-positive detections in digital chest radiographs.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J. S.; Ligomenides, P. A.; Freedman, M. T.; Mun, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    A methodology based on the fuzzy set theory and the convolution neural network (CNN) architecture is proposed to tackle the problem of reducing false-positive rate in automatic lung nodule detection. The CNN which simulates human visual mechanism was trained by a supervised back-propagation algorithm based on fuzzy membership functions. The training and testing database consists of image blocks (each 32 x 32 pixels) of suspected lung nodule areas (nodule candidates) which were generated from our pre-scanning program [1]. A linguistic label was assigned to each nodule candidate of the training set, then the label was converted to a membership value through a pre-defined membership function and used as teaching signal (desired outputs) during the network learning. Before the nodule candidate was fed to the network input, it was pre-processed to reduce the complex background noise and the contrast discrepancy resulted from film development. During the network testing phase, a defuzzification process was applied to decipher the trained network's output triggered by the nodule candidate in the testing set. Finally, a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the CNN's performance based on the defuzzified output of the testing database. Preliminary results showed an average Az (the performance index) of 0.84 which is equivalent to 0.80 true-positive detection (sensitivity) with an average 2-3 false-positive detections per chest image. PMID:8130511

  20. Evaluation of a new phosphor plate technology for neonatal portable chest radiographs.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mervyn; Corea, Donald; Wanner, Matthew; Karmazyn, Boaz; Gunderman, Richard; Applegate, Kimberly; Jennings, Samuel G

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new thick-needle phosphor plate for computed radiography. Two studies were performed. Patients acted as their own controls. In the first study, old powder and new needle phosphor plate technologies were compared. Twenty infants were identified who had undergone chest x-rays with both systems within 3 days of each other. Exposure factors were constant. In the second study, standard and reduced exposure techniques (tube current-time product reduced by 20%) using the needle phosphor technology were compared. Twenty babies who had been imaged with both standard and reduced exposures within 3 days of each other were evaluated. There was a significant preference for images obtained with the new needle phosphor technology compared with the older powder technology (P < .01). Using the new needle phosphor plates, a dose reduction of 20% could be achieved without a significant detectable difference between the high-dose and low-dose images (P < .19). For the study comparing old and new phosphor plate technology at fixed exposure, images were better with the new technology. Using the new plate technology, dose can be decreased by ≥20%. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of two methods for evaluating image quality of chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, C.; Sund, P.; Tingberg, A.; Keddache, S.; Mansson, L. G.; Almen, A.; Mattsson, S.

    2000-04-01

    The Imix radiography system (Oy Imix Ab, Finland) consists of an intensifying screen, optics, and a CCD camera. An upgrade of this system (Imix 2000) with a red-emitting screen and new optics has recently been released. The image quality of Imix (original version), Imix 2000, and two storage-phosphor systems, Fuji FCR 9501 and Agfa ADC70 was evaluated in physical terms (DQE) and with visual grading of the visibility of anatomical structures in clinical images (141 kV). PA chest images of 50 healthy volunteers were evaluated by experienced radiologists. All images were evaluated on Siemens Simomed monitors, using the European Quality Criteria. The maximum DQE values for Imix, Imix 2000 Agfa and Fuji were 11%, 14%, 17% and 19%, respectively (141 kV, 5 (mu) Gy). Using the visual grading, the observers rated the systems in the following descending order: Fuji, Imix 2000, Agfa, and Imix. Thus, the upgrade to Imix 2000 resulted in higher DQE values and a significant improvement in clinical image quality. The visual grading agrees reasonably well with the DQE results; however, Imix 2000 received a better score than what could be expected from the DQE measurements.

  2. Routine chest radiographs in the surgical intensive care unit: can we change clinical habits with no proven benefit?

    PubMed

    Velicković, Jelena V; Hajdarević, Sanela A; Palibrk, Ivan G; Janić, Natasa R; Djukanović, Marija; Miljković, Bojana; Velicković, Dejan M; Bumbasirević, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Daily routine chest radiographs (CR) are commonly performed in surgical ICU. Unnecessary CR increase costs and expose the staff and the patients to radiation risk. The goal of our study was to estimate the value of daily routine CR in the ICU and to determine the correlation between CR and physical findings in surgical ICU patients. Prospective observational study was conducted during period of two months at the ICU department at the Clinic for Digestive Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade. It included 97 consecutive patients who underwent digestive surgery and stayed at the ICU for at least two days. During their ICU stay, CRs were obtained as a clinical routine or to monitor lung pathology. Patients were followed daily, and CRs (as the proportion of positive findings) were compared with physical examination and clinical presentation. A total of 717 CRs were obtained, median number per patient was 4.0 (2.0-7.0). Proportion of positive findings was significantly higher comparing to auscultation until the sixth day of ICU stay. There was no difference in CR findings from day to day after the sixth day. Therapeutic efficacy of CRs was low as only 56 (7.8%) resulted in a change of patient management. We conclude that daily routine CRs are justified in the first six days of ICU stay, and after that time they show no advantages over clinical examination.

  3. False-positive reduction in computer-aided diagnostic scheme for detecting nodules in chest radiographs by means of massive training artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shiraishi, Junji; Abe, Hiroyuki; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio

    2005-02-01

    We developed a technique that uses a multiple massive-training artificial neural network (multi-MTANN) to reduce the number of false-positive results in a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for detecting nodules in chest radiographs. Our database consisted of 91 solitary pulmonary nodules, including 64 malignant nodules and 27 benign nodules, in 91 chest radiographs. With our current CAD scheme based on a difference-image technique and linear discriminant analysis, we achieved a sensitivity of 82.4%, with 4.5 false positives per image. We developed the multi-MTANN for further reduction of the false positive rate. An MTANN is a highly nonlinear filter that can be trained with input images and corresponding teaching images. To reduce the effects of background levels in chest radiographs, we applied a background-trend-correction technique, followed by contrast normalization, to the input images for the MTANN. For enhancement of nodules, the teaching image was designed to contain the distribution for a "likelihood of being a nodule." Six MTANNs in the multi-MTANN were trained by using typical nodules and six different types of non-nodules (false positives). Use of the trained multi-MTANN eliminated 68.3% of false-positive findings with a reduction of one true-positive result. The false-positive rate of our original CAD scheme was improved from 4.5 to 1.4 false positives per image, at an overall sensitivity of 81.3%. Use of a multi-MTANN substantially reduced the false-positive rate of our CAD scheme for lung nodule detection on chest radiographs, while maintaining a level of sensitivity.

  4. 45 CFR 2555.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 2555.545 Section 2555... Activities Prohibited § 2555.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre... is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of...

  5. 45 CFR 2555.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 2555.545 Section 2555... Activities Prohibited § 2555.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre... is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of...

  6. 45 CFR 2555.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 2555.545 Section 2555... Activities Prohibited § 2555.545 Pre-employment inquiries. (a) Marital status. A recipient shall not make pre... is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry as to the sex of...

  7. Using Standardized Interpretation of Chest Radiographs to Identify Adults with Bacterial Pneumonia--Guatemala, 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Wortham, Jonathan M; Gray, Jennifer; Verani, Jennifer; Contreras, Carmen Lucia; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Moir, Juan Carlos; Reyes Marroquin, Emma Lissette; Castellan, Rigoberto; Arvelo, Wences; Lindblade, Kim; McCracken, John P

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a leading cause of illness and death worldwide, but quantifying its burden is difficult due to insensitive diagnostics. Although World Health Organization (WHO) protocol standardizes pediatric chest radiograph (CXR) interpretation for epidemiologic studies of bacterial pneumonia, its validity in adults is unknown. Patients (age ≥ 15 years) admitted with respiratory infections to two Guatemalan hospitals between November 2007 and March 2012 had urine and nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs collected; blood cultures and CXR were also performed at physician clinical discretion. 'Any bacterial infection' was defined as a positive urine pneumococcal antigen test, isolation of a bacterial pneumonia pathogen from blood culture, or detection of an atypical bacterial pathogen by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) specimens. 'Viral infection' was defined as detection of viral pathogens by PCR of NP/OP specimens. CXRs were interpreted according to the WHO protocol as having 'endpoint consolidation', 'other infiltrate', or 'normal' findings. We examined associations between bacterial and viral infections and endpoint consolidation. Urine antigen and/or blood culture results were available for 721 patients with CXR interpretations; of these, 385 (53%) had endpoint consolidation and 253 (35%) had other infiltrate. Any bacterial infection was detected in 119 (17%) patients, including 106 (89%) pneumococcal infections. Any bacterial infection (Diagnostic Odds Ratio [DOR] = 2.9; 95% confidence Interval (CI): 1.3-7.9) and pneumococcal infection (DOR = 3.4; 95% CI: 1.5-10.0) were associated with 'endpoint consolidation', but not 'other infiltrate' (DOR = 1.7; 95% CI: 0.7-4.9, and 1.7; 95% CI: 0.7-4.9 respectively). Viral infection was not significantly associated with 'endpoint consolidation', 'other infiltrate,' or 'normal' findings. 'Endpoint consolidation' was associated with 'any bacterial infection

  8. Improved computerized detection of lung nodules in chest radiographs by means of 'virtual dual-energy' radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Suzuki, K.; MacMahon, H.

    2011-03-01

    Major challenges in current computer-aided detection (CADe) of nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) are to detect nodules that overlap with ribs and to reduce the frequent false positives (FPs) caused by ribs. Our purpose was to develop a CADe scheme with improved sensitivity and specificity by use of "virtual dual-energy" (VDE) CXRs where ribs are suppressed with a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN). To reduce rib-induced FPs and detect nodules overlapping with ribs, we incorporated VDE technology in our CADe scheme. VDE technology suppressed ribs in CXR while maintaining soft-tissue opacity by use of an MTANN that had been trained with real DE imaging. Our scheme detected nodule candidates on VDE images by use of a morphologic filtering technique. Sixty-four morphologic and gray-level-based features were extracted from each candidate from both original and VDE CXRs. A nonlinear support vector classifier was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. A publicly available database containing 126 nodules in 126 CXRs was used for testing of our CADe scheme. Twenty nine percent (36/126) of the nodules were rated "extremely subtle" or "very subtle" by a radiologist. With the original scheme, a sensitivity of 76.2 (96/126) with 5 (630/126) FPs per image was achieved. By use of VDE images, more nodules overlapping with ribs were detected and the sensitivity was improved substantially to 84.1% (106/126) at the same FP rate in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the literature shows that other CADe schemes achieved sensitivities of 66.0% and 72.0% at the same FP rate.

  9. Establishing the Cardiothoracic Ratio Using Chest Radiographs in an Indigenous Ghanaian Population: A Simple Tool for Cardiomegaly Screening.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Y B; Mensah, K; Asiamah, S; Gbadamosi, H; Idun, E A; Brakohiapa, W; Oddoye, A

    2015-09-01

    Cardiothoracic ratio is a simple and cheap tool in the estimation of heart size. It is a useful index of cardiac size evaluation, and a value of 50% is generally considered to indicate the upper limit of normal. This study is to ascertain the normal mean value in cardiothoracic ratio of Ghanaians using chest radiography to serve as baseline for screening for cardiomegaly. Standard postero-anterior radiographs of the -clients/patients were used in the study. The cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) was obtained by dividing the transverse cardiac diameter [sum of the horizontal distances from the right and left lateral-most margins of the heart to the midline (spinous processes of the vertebral bodies)] by the maximum internal thoracic diameter. Systematic sampling with appropriate inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to obtain a sample size of 1989. The mean transverse cardiac diameter and cardiothoracic ratio increased with age. The transverse thoracic diameter increased with age until the sixth decade when it reduced with age. The mean CTR increased gradually with age with females having greater values than males. The mean CTR of the study population were 0.459, 0.467 and 0.452 for the general population, females and males respectively. This study has been able to establish 0.459 as the mean CTR values for Ghanaians. It has also shown the relationship between age and clients/patient's cardiothoracic ratio which compares favourably with findings of a similar study in Nigeria, a neighbouring country in the West African sub region with similar ethnic and social structure.

  10. Assessment of Cardiac Device Position on Supine Chest Radiograph in the ICU: Introduction and Applicability of the Aortic Valve Location Ratio.

    PubMed

    Ouweneel, Dagmar M; Sjauw, Krischan D; Wiegerinck, Esther M A; Hirsch, Alexander; Baan, Jan; de Mol, Bas A J M; Lagrand, Wim K; Planken, R Nils; Henriques, José P S

    2016-10-01

    The use of intracardiac assist devices is expanding, and correct position of these devices is required for optimal functioning. The aortic valve is an important landmark for positioning of those devices. It would be of great value if the device position could be easily monitored on plain supine chest radiograph in the ICU. We introduce a ratio-based tool for determination of the aortic valve location on plain supine chest radiograph images, which can be used to evaluate intracardiac device position. Retrospective observational study. Large academic medical center. Patients admitted to the ICU and supported by an intracardiac assist device. We developed a ratio to determine the aortic valve location on supine chest radiograph images. This ratio is used to assess the position of a cardiac assist device and is compared with echocardiographic findings. Supine anterior-posterior chest radiographs of patients with an aortic valve prosthesis (n = 473) were analyzed to determine the location of the aortic valve. We calculated several ratios with the potential to determine the position of the aortic valve. The aortic valve location ratio, defined as the distance between the carina and the aortic valve, divided by the thoracic width, was found to be the best performing ratio. The aortic valve location ratio determines the location of the aortic valve caudal to the carina, at a distance of 0.25 ± 0.05 times the thoracic width for male patients and 0.28 ± 0.05 times the thoracic width for female patients. The aortic valve location ratio was validated using CT images of patients with angina pectoris without known valvular disease (n = 95). There was a good correlation between cardiac device position (Impella) assessed with the aortic valve location ratio and with echocardiography (n = 53). The aortic valve location ratio enables accurate and reproducible localization of the aortic valve on supine chest radiograph. This tool is easily applicable and can be used for

  11. Pre-Employment Course: A Partnership for Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Ian K.; McGrath, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the benefits of pre-employment education and training and its impact on the students' choice of career paths. It focuses on a programme delivered in partnership between Teesside University and a North East Police Force, and provides a model for future pre-employment education and training.…

  12. 28 CFR 54.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 54.545 Pre-employment... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 54.545...

  13. 43 CFR 17.213 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this section as to the medical condition or history of the applicant shall be collected and maintained... conduct a pre-employment medical examination or make a pre-employment inquiry as to whether the applicant... recipient is taking remedial action to correct the effects of past discrimination pursuant to § 17.205(a...

  14. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  15. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  16. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  17. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee...

  18. 49 CFR 655.42 - Pre-employment alcohol testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-employment alcohol testing. 655.42 Section 655... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.42 Pre-employment alcohol testing. An employer may, but is not required...

  19. 49 CFR 382.301 - Pre-employment testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.301 Pre-employment testing. (a) Prior to the first time a... exercises the exception in paragraph (b) of this section shall contact the controlled substances testing... employer may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment alcohol testing under this part. If an...

  20. 49 CFR 382.301 - Pre-employment testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.301 Pre-employment testing. (a) Prior to the first time a... exercises the exception in paragraph (b) of this section shall contact the controlled substances testing... employer may, but is not required to, conduct pre-employment alcohol testing under this part. If an...

  1. 49 CFR 655.41 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 655.41 Section 655.41..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT OPERATIONS Types of Testing § 655.41 Pre-employment drug testing. (a)(1) Before allowing a covered employee or...

  2. A segmental analysis of thoracic shape in chest radiographs of children. Changes related to spinal level, age, sex, side and significance for lung growth and scoliosis.

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, T B; Burwell, R G; Purdue, M; Webb, J K; Moulton, A

    1991-01-01

    Thoracic ratios (TRs) were measured segmentally (T1-12) in the chest radiographs of 412 children aged 0-17 years attending hospital with minimal disorder or diseases (boys 193, girls 219). A new method for measuring TRs was used which calculates the width of the left hemithorax, the right hemithorax and the total thorax relative to T1-T12 distance. The data were analysed in 3 age groups--infancy, childhood and puberty, after the classification of Karlberg (1989). The findings are as follows. 1. The chest broadens from T1 to about T10-11. 2. Between infancy and childhood, relative to its length the chest narrows from above downwards and particularly in the lower chest (T5-12 average diminution, boys 9.5%, girls 9.8%). In the upper chest, the narrowing is more marked in girls than boys (T1-4 average diminution, boys 5.1%, girls 8.2%). 3. Between childhood and puberty, the girl's but not the boy's chest narrows further in its lower half (below T6 average diminution 3.3%). At T6 and above there is no detectable change in the relative width of the chest in either boys or girls. 4. The relative narrowing of the chest during growth appears to result from several mechanisms: (1) elevation of upper rib-vertebra angles (above 90 degrees); (2) drooping of lower rib-vertebra angles (below 90 degrees); and (3) linear rib growth being impaired relative to thoracic spinal growth in the lower ribcage (T6-12) of girls between childhood and puberty (Grivas et al. 1991 d). 5. The hypothesis is suggested that the relative narrowing of the lower chest with increasing age reduces the rotational inertia of the thorax in gait. There is a greater need for such reduction in girls because of the greater rotational inertia generated by the mass of their larger pelves. This hypothesis provides a mechanical explanation for the proportionate change in the girl's lung in the later stages of growth (Simon et al. 1972). 6. Developmentally, the left hemithorax is ahead of the right hemithorax in

  3. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; Dubois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M

    2013-09-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p < 0.0002). Four hundred eighty-nine patients had knee films. Six of these patients had AC joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p = 0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p = 0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition.

  4. Ossification of the Medial Clavicular Epiphysis on Chest Radiographs: Utility and Diagnostic Accuracy in Identifying Korean Adolescents and Young Adults under the Age of Majority

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility and diagnostic accuracy of the ossification grade of medial clavicular epiphysis on chest radiographs for identifying Korean adolescents and young adults under the age of majority. Overall, 1,151 patients (age, 16-30) without any systemic disease and who underwent chest radiography were included for ossification grading. Two radiologists independently classified the ossification of the medial clavicular epiphysis from chest radiographs into five grades. The age distribution and inter-observer agreement on the ossification grade were assessed. The diagnostic accuracy of the averaged ossification grades for determining whether the patient is under the age of majority was analyzed by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Two separate inexperienced radiologists assessed the ossification grade in a subgroup of the patients after reviewing the detailed descriptions and image atlases developed for ossification grading. The median value of the ossification grades increased with increasing age (from 16 to 30 years), and the trend was best fitted by a quadratic function (R-square, 0.978). The inter-observer agreements on the ossification grade were 0.420 (right) and 0.404 (left). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.922 (95% CI, 0.902-0.942). The averaged ossification scores of 2.62 and 4.37 provided 95% specificity for a person < 19 years of age and a person ≥ 19 years of age, respectively. A preliminary assessment by inexperienced radiologists resulted in an AUC of 0.860 (95% CI, 0.740-0.981). The age of majority in Korean adolescents and young adults can be estimated using chest radiographs. PMID:27550480

  5. Time-series analysis of lung texture on bone-suppressed dynamic chest radiograph for the evaluation of pulmonary function: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Matsuda, Hiroaki; Sanada, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    The density of lung tissue changes as demonstrated on imagery is dependent on the relative increases and decreases in the volume of air and lung vessels per unit volume of lung. Therefore, a time-series analysis of lung texture can be used to evaluate relative pulmonary function. This study was performed to assess a time-series analysis of lung texture on dynamic chest radiographs during respiration, and to demonstrate its usefulness in the diagnosis of pulmonary impairments. Sequential chest radiographs of 30 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD; 100 kV, 0.2 mAs/pulse, 15 frames/s, SID = 2.0 m; Prototype, Konica Minolta). Imaging was performed during respiration, and 210 images were obtained over 14 seconds. Commercial bone suppression image-processing software (Clear Read Bone Suppression; Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, Ohio, USA) was applied to the sequential chest radiographs to create corresponding bone suppression images. Average pixel values, standard deviation (SD), kurtosis, and skewness were calculated based on a density histogram analysis in lung regions. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually located in the lungs, and the same ROIs were traced by the template matching technique during respiration. Average pixel value effectively differentiated regions with ventilatory defects and normal lung tissue. The average pixel values in normal areas changed dynamically in synchronization with the respiratory phase, whereas those in regions of ventilatory defects indicated reduced variations in pixel value. There were no significant differences between ventilatory defects and normal lung tissue in the other parameters. We confirmed that time-series analysis of lung texture was useful for the evaluation of pulmonary function in dynamic chest radiography during respiration. Pulmonary impairments were detected as reduced changes in pixel value. This technique is a simple, cost-effective diagnostic tool for the evaluation of regional

  6. Ossification of the Medial Clavicular Epiphysis on Chest Radiographs: Utility and Diagnostic Accuracy in Identifying Korean Adolescents and Young Adults under the Age of Majority.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soon Ho; Yoo, Hye Jin; Yoo, Roh Eul; Lim, Hyun Ju; Yoon, Jeong Hwa; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Sang Seob; Yoo, Seong Ho

    2016-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility and diagnostic accuracy of the ossification grade of medial clavicular epiphysis on chest radiographs for identifying Korean adolescents and young adults under the age of majority. Overall, 1,151 patients (age, 16-30) without any systemic disease and who underwent chest radiography were included for ossification grading. Two radiologists independently classified the ossification of the medial clavicular epiphysis from chest radiographs into five grades. The age distribution and inter-observer agreement on the ossification grade were assessed. The diagnostic accuracy of the averaged ossification grades for determining whether the patient is under the age of majority was analyzed by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Two separate inexperienced radiologists assessed the ossification grade in a subgroup of the patients after reviewing the detailed descriptions and image atlases developed for ossification grading. The median value of the ossification grades increased with increasing age (from 16 to 30 years), and the trend was best fitted by a quadratic function (R-square, 0.978). The inter-observer agreements on the ossification grade were 0.420 (right) and 0.404 (left). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.922 (95% CI, 0.902-0.942). The averaged ossification scores of 2.62 and 4.37 provided 95% specificity for a person < 19 years of age and a person ≥ 19 years of age, respectively. A preliminary assessment by inexperienced radiologists resulted in an AUC of 0.860 (95% CI, 0.740-0.981). The age of majority in Korean adolescents and young adults can be estimated using chest radiographs.

  7. Using Standardized Interpretation of Chest Radiographs to Identify Adults with Bacterial Pneumonia—Guatemala, 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Wortham, Jonathan M.; Gray, Jennifer; Verani, Jennifer; Contreras, Carmen Lucia; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Moir, Juan Carlos; Reyes Marroquin, Emma Lissette; Castellan, Rigoberto; Arvelo, Wences; Lindblade, Kim; McCracken, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial pneumonia is a leading cause of illness and death worldwide, but quantifying its burden is difficult due to insensitive diagnostics. Although World Health Organization (WHO) protocol standardizes pediatric chest radiograph (CXR) interpretation for epidemiologic studies of bacterial pneumonia, its validity in adults is unknown. Methods Patients (age ≥15 years) admitted with respiratory infections to two Guatemalan hospitals between November 2007 and March 2012 had urine and nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs collected; blood cultures and CXR were also performed at physician clinical discretion. ‘Any bacterial infection’ was defined as a positive urine pneumococcal antigen test, isolation of a bacterial pneumonia pathogen from blood culture, or detection of an atypical bacterial pathogen by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) specimens. ‘Viral infection’ was defined as detection of viral pathogens by PCR of NP/OP specimens. CXRs were interpreted according to the WHO protocol as having ‘endpoint consolidation’, ‘other infiltrate’, or ‘normal’ findings. We examined associations between bacterial and viral infections and endpoint consolidation. Findings Urine antigen and/or blood culture results were available for 721 patients with CXR interpretations; of these, 385 (53%) had endpoint consolidation and 253 (35%) had other infiltrate. Any bacterial infection was detected in 119 (17%) patients, including 106 (89%) pneumococcal infections. Any bacterial infection (Diagnostic Odds Ratio [DOR] = 2.9; 95% confidence Interval (CI): 1.3–7.9) and pneumococcal infection (DOR = 3.4; 95% CI: 1.5–10.0) were associated with ‘endpoint consolidation’, but not ‘other infiltrate’ (DOR = 1.7; 95% CI: 0.7–4.9, and 1.7; 95% CI: 0.7–4.9 respectively). Viral infection was not significantly associated with ‘endpoint consolidation’, ‘other infiltrate,’ or ‘normal’ findings

  8. Computerized image-searching method for finding correct patients for misfiled chest radiographs in a PACS server by use of biological fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Toge, Risa; Morishita, Junji; Sasaki, Yasuo; Doi, Kunio

    2013-07-01

    We have developed an automated image-searching method based on biological fingerprints for identifying correct patients in misfiled chest radiographs in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) server. We used five biological fingerprints including distinctive anatomic structures in a misfiled chest radiograph of an unknown patient to find another image of the same patient stored with correct patient information in a PACS server. The correlation values were determined for the corresponding biological fingerprints in all images in the image server. The correlation indices as a measure of the overall similarity of the two images were determined from the summation of five correlation values and the combination of correlation values with the weighting factors. Finally, the correct patient was identified automatically by the image with the highest correlation index. By use of the summation of five correlation values as the correlation index, 78.0% (156/200) of the 200 patients for misfiled images were correctly identified in the database. When we applied the weighting factors for each biological fingerprint to determine the correlation index, the performance in identifying the correct patient was improved to 87.5% (175/200). An additional 5.0% (10/200) of images were included in the Top 10 ranking of the correlation index in the database. These cases could be identified manually by radiology personnel. We conclude that the automated image-searching method based on biological fingerprints with weighting factors would be useful for identification of the correct patient in the case of misfiled chest radiographs in a PACS server.

  9. The Development of Expertise in Radiology: In Chest Radiograph Interpretation, "Expert" Search Pattern May Predate "Expert" Levels of Diagnostic Accuracy for Pneumothorax Identification.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brendan S; Rainford, Louise A; Darcy, Sarah P; Kavanagh, Eoin C; Toomey, Rachel J

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To investigate the development of chest radiograph interpretation skill through medical training by measuring both diagnostic accuracy and eye movements during visual search. Materials and Methods An institutional exemption from full ethical review was granted for the study. Five consultant radiologists were deemed the reference expert group, and four radiology registrars, five senior house officers (SHOs), and six interns formed four clinician groups. Participants were shown 30 chest radiographs, 14 of which had a pneumothorax, and were asked to give their level of confidence as to whether a pneumothorax was present. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out on diagnostic decisions. Eye movements were recorded with a Tobii TX300 (Tobii Technology, Stockholm, Sweden) eye tracker. Four eye-tracking metrics were analyzed. Variables were compared to identify any differences between groups. All data were compared by using the Friedman nonparametric method. Results The average area under the ROC curve for the groups increased with experience (0.947 for consultants, 0.792 for registrars, 0.693 for SHOs, and 0.659 for interns; P = .009). A significant difference in diagnostic accuracy was found between consultants and registrars (P = .046). All four eye-tracking metrics decreased with experience, and there were significant differences between registrars and SHOs. Total reading time decreased with experience; it was significantly lower for registrars compared with SHOs (P = .046) and for SHOs compared with interns (P = .025). Conclusion Chest radiograph interpretation skill increased with experience, both in terms of diagnostic accuracy and visual search. The observed level of experience at which there was a significant difference was higher for diagnostic accuracy than for eye-tracking metrics. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  10. Development of CAD based on ANN analysis of power spectra for pneumoconiosis in chest radiographs: effect of three new enhancement methods.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Eiichiro; Kawashita, Ikuo; Ishida, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    We have been developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme for pneumoconiosis based on a rule-based plus artificial neural network (ANN) analysis of power spectra. In this study, we have developed three enhancement methods for the abnormal patterns to reduce false-positive and false-negative values. The image database consisted of 2 normal and 15 abnormal chest radiographs. The International Labour Organization standard chest radiographs with pneumoconiosis were categorized as subcategory, size, and shape of pneumoconiosis. Regions of interest (ROIs) with a matrix size of 32 × 32 were selected from normal and abnormal lungs. Three new enhanced methods were obtained by window function, top-hat transformation, and gray-level co-occurrence matrix analysis. We calculated the power spectrum (PS) of all ROIs by Fourier transform. For the classification between normal and abnormal ROIs, we applied a combined analysis using the ruled-based plus the ANN method. To evaluate the overall performance of this CAD scheme, we employed ROC analysis for distinguishing between normal and abnormal ROIs. On the chest radiographs of the highest categories (severe pneumoconiosis) and the lowest categories (early pneumoconiosis), this CAD scheme achieved area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.93 ± 0.02 and 0.72 ± 0.03. The combined rule-based plus ANN method with the three new enhanced methods obtained the highest classification performance for distinguishing between abnormal and normal ROIs. Our CAD system based on the three new enhanced methods would be useful in assisting radiologists in the classification of pneumoconiosis.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of computer-aided detection of pulmonary tuberculosis in chest radiographs: a validation study from sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Breuninger, Marianne; van Ginneken, Bram; Philipsen, Rick H H M; Mhimbira, Francis; Hella, Jerry J; Lwilla, Fred; van den Hombergh, Jan; Ross, Amanda; Jugheli, Levan; Wagner, Dirk; Reither, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Chest radiography to diagnose and screen for pulmonary tuberculosis has limitations, especially due to inter-reader variability. Automating the interpretation has the potential to overcome this drawback and to deliver objective and reproducible results. The CAD4TB software is a computer-aided detection system that has shown promising preliminary findings. Evaluation studies in different settings are needed to assess diagnostic accuracy and practicability of use. CAD4TB was evaluated on chest radiographs of patients with symptoms suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis enrolled in two cohort studies in Tanzania. All patients were characterized by sputum smear microscopy and culture including subsequent antigen or molecular confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) to determine the reference standard. Chest radiographs were read by the software and two human readers, one expert reader and one clinical officer. The sensitivity and specificity of CAD4TB was depicted using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, the area under the curve calculated and the performance of the software compared to the results of human readers. Of 861 study participants, 194 (23%) were culture-positive for M.tb. The area under the ROC curve of CAD4TB for the detection of culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 0.84 (95% CI 0.80-0.88). CAD4TB was significantly more accurate for the discrimination of smear-positive cases against non TB patients than for smear-negative cases (p-value<0.01). It differentiated better between TB cases and non TB patients among HIV-negative compared to HIV-positive individuals (p<0.01). CAD4TB significantly outperformed the clinical officer, but did not reach the accuracy of the expert reader (p = 0.02), for a tuberculosis specific reading threshold. CAD4TB accurately distinguished between the chest radiographs of culture-positive TB cases and controls. Further studies on cost-effectiveness, operational and ethical aspects should determine its

  12. WE-G-204-07: Automated Characterization of Perceptual Quality of Clinical Chest Radiographs: Improvements in Lung, Spine, and Hardware Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J; Zhang, L; Samei, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate more robust methods for automated lung, spine, and hardware detection in AP/PA chest images. This work is part of a continuing effort to automatically characterize the perceptual image quality of clinical radiographs. [Y. Lin et al. Med. Phys. 39, 7019–7031 (2012)] Methods: Our previous implementation of lung/spine identification was applicable to only one vendor. A more generalized routine was devised based on three primary components: lung boundary detection, fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering, and a clinically-derived lung pixel probability map. Boundary detection was used to constrain the lung segmentations. FCM clustering produced grayscale- and neighborhood-based pixel classification probabilities which are weighted by the clinically-derived probability maps to generate a final lung segmentation. Lung centerlines were set along the left-right lung midpoints. Spine centerlines were estimated as a weighted average of body contour, lateral lung contour, and intensity-based centerline estimates. Centerline estimation was tested on 900 clinical AP/PA chest radiographs which included inpatient/outpatient, upright/bedside, men/women, and adult/pediatric images from multiple imaging systems. Our previous implementation further did not account for the presence of medical hardware (pacemakers, wires, implants, staples, stents, etc.) potentially biasing image quality analysis. A hardware detection algorithm was developed using a gradient-based thresholding method. The training and testing paradigm used a set of 48 images from which 1920 51×51 pixel{sup 2} ROIs with and 1920 ROIs without hardware were manually selected. Results: Acceptable lung centerlines were generated in 98.7% of radiographs while spine centerlines were acceptable in 99.1% of radiographs. Following threshold optimization, the hardware detection software yielded average true positive and true negative rates of 92.7% and 96.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Updated

  13. Evaluation of the image quality of ink-jet printed paper copies of digital chest radiographs as compared with film: a receiver operating characteristic study.

    PubMed

    Lyttkens, K; Kirkhorn, T; Kehler, M; Andersson, B; Ebbesen, A; Hochbergs, P; Jarlman, O; Lindberg, C G; Holmer, N G

    1994-05-01

    Paper copies of digital radiographs printed with the continuous ink-jet technique have proved to be of a high enough quality for demonstration purposes. We present a study on the image quality of ink-jet printed paper copies of digital chest radiographs, based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Eighty-three digital radiographs of a chest phantom with simulated tumors in the mediastinum and right lung, derived from a computed radiography (CR) system were presented in two series of hard copies as ink-jet printed paper copies and as laser recorded film. The images, with a matrix of 1,760 x 2,140 pixels, were printed with a spatial resolution of 10 pixels/mm in the CR film recorder as well as in the ink-jet printer. On film, every image was recorded in two versions, one optimized for the mediastinum and one for the lungs. On paper, only one image was printed; this constituted an effort to optimize both the mediastinum and the lungs. The ink-jet printed images, printed on a matt coated paper, were viewed as on-sight images with reflected light. The examinations were reviewed by six radiologists, and ROC curves were constructed. No significant difference was found between the performance of film and that of ink-jet paper prints. Because the cost for a paper copy is only a tenth of that of film, remarkable cost reductions can be achieved by using the ink jet technique instead. Our results show that further quality studies of ink-jet printed images are worthwhile.

  14. The pre-employment medical--ethical dilemmas for GPs.

    PubMed

    Thuraisingham, Chandramani; Nalliah, Sivalingam

    2013-04-01

    In many workplaces, employment is conditional on a successful pre-employment medical examination. This examination is usually conducted by a general practitioner on the employers' panel of approved clinics or by an in-house company doctor. This article uses a case study to illustrate some of the ethical dilemmas that may be faced by GPs in the course of performing a pre-employment medical examination. Ethical issues discussed in this article include: Is it ethical for employers (based on physicians' reports) to select workers based on 'absence of illness' rather than 'fitness for work'? Should physicians divulge the illness of potential workers to third parties? What are the boundaries of a clinician's duty of care in the pre-employment medical examination setting?

  15. An 81-year-old man with an abnormal right-sided heart shadow on chest radiograph.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rahman; Khan, M Rehan; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Ruff, Genina; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B

    2015-02-01

    An 81-year-old man presented with a 1-week history of dry cough. He also complained of mild dyspnea, wheezing, and low-grade fever. He denied hemoptysis, fever, rashes, or chest pain. The patient's medical history included coronary artery bypass surgery, hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and COPD. The patient was a retired welder and an ex-smoker.

  16. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219...-employment drug testing. (a) Prior to the first time a covered employee performs covered service for a railroad, the employee must undergo testing for drugs. No railroad may allow a covered employee to perform...

  17. 49 CFR 219.501 - Pre-employment drug testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pre-employment drug testing. 219.501 Section 219...-employment drug testing. (a) Prior to the first time a covered employee performs covered service for a railroad, the employee must undergo testing for drugs. No railroad may allow a covered employee to perform...

  18. 10 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section 5.545 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in...

  19. 10 CFR 5.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 5.545 Section 5.545 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in...

  20. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pre-employment inquiries. 1317.545 Section 1317.545 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  1. 18 CFR 1317.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Pre-employment inquiries. 1317.545 Section 1317.545 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  2. Handbook for Home Economics Pre-Employment Laboratory Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    This handbook for home economics pre-employment laboratory education (PELE) teachers is divided into ten chapters. The first chapter provides detailed descriptions of each PELE program and possible career opportunities related to each program. Chapter 2 expounds upon the importance of the advisory council to the program. The third chapter…

  3. 10 CFR 1042.545 - Pre-employment inquiries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Employment in..., including whether such applicant is “Miss” or “Mrs.” (b) Sex. A recipient may make pre-employment inquiry...

  4. Development of a computerized scheme for detection of very subtle lung nodules located in opaque areas on chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    The detection of lung nodules located in opaque areas including the mediastinum, retrocardiac lung, and lung projected below or on the diaphragm has been very difficult, because the contrast of these nodules is usually extremely low, and sometimes radiologists may not pay attention to these locations. In this study, we have developed a new computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme designed specifically for the detection of these difficult-to-detect lung nodules located in opaque areas. We used 1,000 chest images with 1,076 lung nodules, which included 73 very difficult lung nodules in these opaque areas. In this new computerized scheme, opaque areas within a chest image were segmented by use of an adaptive multi-thresholding method based on edge-gradient values, and then the gray level and contrast of the chest image were adjusted for the opaque areas. Initial candidates were identified by use of the nodule-enhanced image obtained with the average radial-gradient (ARG) filtering technique based on radial gradient values. We employed a total of 35 image features for sequential application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to reduce the number of false-positive candidates. The ANNs were trained and tested by use of a k-fold cross-validation test method (k=100), in which each of 100 different combinations of training and test image data sets included 990 and 10 chest images, respectively. The overall performance determined from the results of 100 test data sets indicated that the average sensitivity in detecting lung nodules was 52.1% with 1.89 false positives per image, which was considered "acceptable", because these nodules were very subtle and difficult to detect. By combination of this advanced CAD scheme with our standard CAD scheme for lung-nodule detection, the clinical usefulness of the CAD scheme would be improved significantly.

  5. The x-ray light valve: a potentially low-cost, digital radiographic imaging system--a liquid crystal cell design for chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Timothy C; Webster, Christie Ann; Koprinarov, Ivaylo; Rowlands, J A

    2008-03-01

    Digital x-ray radiographic systems are desirable as they offer high quality images which can be processed, transferred, and stored without secondary steps. However, current clinical systems are extraordinarily expensive in comparison to film-based systems. Thus, there is a need for an economical digital imaging system for general radiology. The x-ray light valve (XLV) is a novel digital x-ray detector concept with the potential for high image quality and low cost. The XLV is comprised of a photoconductive detector layer and liquid crystal (LC) cell physically coupled in a sandwich structure. Upon exposure to x rays, charge is collected at the surface of the photoconductor, causing a change in the reflective properties of the LC cell. The visible image so formed can subsequently be digitized with an optical scanner. By choosing the properties of the LC cell in combination with the appropriate photoconductor thickness and bias potentials, the XLV can be optimized for various diagnostic imaging tasks. Specifically for chest radiography, we identified three potentially practical reflective cell designs by selecting from those commonly used in LC display technology. The relationship between reflectance and x-ray exposure (i.e., the characteristic curve) was determined for all three cells using a theoretical model. The results indicate that the reflective electrically controlled birefringence (r-ECB) cell is the preferred choice for chest radiography, provided that the characteristic curve can be shifted towards lower exposures. The feasibility of the shift of the characteristic curve is shown experimentally. The experimental results thus demonstrate that an XLV based on the r-ECB cell design exhibits a characteristic curve suitable for chest radiography.

  6. Computer-aided diagnostic scheme for the detection of lung nodules on chest radiographs: Localized search method based on anatomical classification

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Engelmann, Roger; Doi, Kunio

    2006-07-15

    We developed an advanced computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for the detection of various types of lung nodules on chest radiographs intended for implementation in clinical situations. We used 924 digitized chest images (992 noncalcified nodules) which had a 500x500 matrix size with a 1024 gray scale. The images were divided randomly into two sets which were used for training and testing of the computerized scheme. In this scheme, the lung field was first segmented by use of a ribcage detection technique, and then a large search area (448x448 matrix size) within the chest image was automatically determined by taking into account the locations of a midline and a top edge of the segmented ribcage. In order to detect lung nodule candidates based on a localized search method, we divided the entire search area into 7x7 regions of interest (ROIs: 64x64 matrix size). In the next step, each ROI was classified anatomically into apical, peripheral, hilar, and diaphragm/heart regions by use of its image features. Identification of lung nodule candidates and extraction of image features were applied for each localized region (128x128 matrix size), each having its central part (64x64 matrix size) located at a position corresponding to a ROI that was classified anatomically in the previous step. Initial candidates were identified by use of the nodule-enhanced image obtained with the average radial-gradient filtering technique, in which the filter size was varied adaptively depending on the location and the anatomical classification of the ROI. We extracted 57 image features from the original and nodule-enhanced images based on geometric, gray-level, background structure, and edge-gradient features. In addition, 14 image features were obtained from the corresponding locations in the contralateral subtraction image. A total of 71 image features were employed for three sequential artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to reduce the number of false-positive candidates. All

  7. Computer-aided diagnostic scheme for the detection of lung nodules on chest radiographs: localized search method based on anatomical classification.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Suzuki, Kenji; Engelmann, Roger; Doi, Kunio

    2006-07-01

    We developed an advanced computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for the detection of various types of lung nodules on chest radiographs intended for implementation in clinical situations. We used 924 digitized chest images (992 noncalcified nodules) which had a 500 x 500 matrix size with a 1024 gray scale. The images were divided randomly into two sets which were used for training and testing of the computerized scheme. In this scheme, the lung field was first segmented by use of a ribcage detection technique, and then a large search area (448 x 448 matrix size) within the chest image was automatically determined by taking into account the locations of a midline and a top edge of the segmented ribcage. In order to detect lung nodule candidates based on a localized search method, we divided the entire search area into 7 x 7 regions of interest (ROIs: 64 x 64 matrix size). In the next step, each ROI was classified anatomically into apical, peripheral, hilar, and diaphragm/heart regions by use of its image features. Identification of lung nodule candidates and extraction of image features were applied for each localized region (128 x 128 matrix size), each having its central part (64 x 64 matrix size) located at a position corresponding to a ROI that was classified anatomically in the previous step. Initial candidates were identified by use of the nodule-enhanced image obtained with the average radial-gradient filtering technique, in which the filter size was varied adaptively depending on the location and the anatomical classification of the ROI. We extracted 57 image features from the original and nodule-enhanced images based on geometric, gray-level, background structure, and edge-gradient features. In addition, 14 image features were obtained from the corresponding locations in the contralateral subtraction image. A total of 71 image features were employed for three sequential artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to reduce the number of false

  8. Effect of Picture Archiving and Communication System Image Manipulation on the Agreement of Chest Radiograph Interpretation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Castro, Denise A; Naqvi, Asad Ahmed; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Flavin, Michael P; Manson, David; Soboleski, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Variability in image interpretation has been attributed to differences in the interpreters' knowledge base, experience level, and access to the clinical scenario. Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has allowed the user to manipulate the images while developing their impression of the radiograph. The aim of this study was to determine the agreement of chest radiograph (CXR) impressions among radiologists and neonatologists and help determine the effect of image manipulation with PACS on report impression. Prospective cohort study included 60 patients from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit undergoing CXRs. Three radiologists and three neonatologists reviewed two consecutive frontal CXRs of each patient. Each physician was allowed manipulation of images as needed to provide a decision of "improved," "unchanged," or "disease progression" lung disease for each patient. Each physician repeated the process once more; this time, they were not allowed to individually manipulate the images, but an independent radiologist presets the image brightness and contrast to best optimize the CXR appearance. Percent agreement and opposing reporting views were calculated between all six physicians for each of the two methods (allowing and not allowing image manipulation). One hundred percent agreement in image impression between all six observers was only seen in 5% of cases when allowing image manipulation; 100% agreement was seen in 13% of the cases when there was no manipulation of the images. Agreement in CXR interpretation is poor; the ability to manipulate the images on PACS results in a decrease in agreement in the interpretation of these studies. New methods to standardize image appearance and allow improved comparison with previous studies should be sought to improve clinician agreement in interpretation consistency and advance patient care.

  9. Effect of Picture Archiving and Communication System Image Manipulation on the Agreement of Chest Radiograph Interpretation in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Denise A.; Naqvi, Asad Ahmed; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Flavin, Michael P.; Manson, David; Soboleski, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Variability in image interpretation has been attributed to differences in the interpreters’ knowledge base, experience level, and access to the clinical scenario. Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has allowed the user to manipulate the images while developing their impression of the radiograph. The aim of this study was to determine the agreement of chest radiograph (CXR) impressions among radiologists and neonatologists and help determine the effect of image manipulation with PACS on report impression. Materials and Methods: Prospective cohort study included 60 patients from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit undergoing CXRs. Three radiologists and three neonatologists reviewed two consecutive frontal CXRs of each patient. Each physician was allowed manipulation of images as needed to provide a decision of “improved,” “unchanged,” or “disease progression” lung disease for each patient. Each physician repeated the process once more; this time, they were not allowed to individually manipulate the images, but an independent radiologist presets the image brightness and contrast to best optimize the CXR appearance. Percent agreement and opposing reporting views were calculated between all six physicians for each of the two methods (allowing and not allowing image manipulation). Results: One hundred percent agreement in image impression between all six observers was only seen in 5% of cases when allowing image manipulation; 100% agreement was seen in 13% of the cases when there was no manipulation of the images. Conclusion: Agreement in CXR interpretation is poor; the ability to manipulate the images on PACS results in a decrease in agreement in the interpretation of these studies. New methods to standardize image appearance and allow improved comparison with previous studies should be sought to improve clinician agreement in interpretation consistency and advance patient care. PMID:27274414

  10. Do sanitary ceramic workers have a worse presentation of chest radiographs or pulmonary function tests than other ceramic workers?

    PubMed

    Tsao, Yu-Chung; Liu, Su-Hsun; Tzeng, I-Shiang; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Chen, Jau-Yuan; Luo, Jiin-Chyuan John

    2017-03-01

    Silicosis remains the most prevalent occupational disease worldwide. There have been no specific studies focusing on the association between exposure settings at work and the clinical severity in silicosis patients. In this study, we describe and compare the clinical characteristics and silicosis-associated exposure history at work among workers from several types of ceramic production facilities in Taiwan. We reviewed the medical records of 221 patients who were first diagnosed with silicosis at the Occupational Medicine Clinic of Northern Taiwan in 2012. For each patient, we collected data on demographic characteristics, smoking habits, working history, duration of exposure, and years on the first relevant job. We also retrieved clinical reports of the pulmonary function test and the baseline chest radiography used for silicosis staging. As compared to other ceramic workers, sanitary ceramic workers had a worse X-ray type (p=0.044), more advanced age (p<0.001), longer working duration (p=0.029), and a higher proportion of starting the first relevant job prior to the year 1975 (p=0.003). However, after adjusting for age, work duration, and an initial occupational exposure prior to 1975, sanitary ceramic workers showed a comparable risk for worse X-ray findings to other ceramic workers (adjusted odds ratio=1.18, p=0.704). Results of multivariable regression models on individual lung function parameter also suggested comparably impaired lung function tests between sanitary and other ceramic workers (p>0.05). In this study, we found that sanitary ceramic workers were at a similar risk to other ceramic workers for moderate to severe silicosis when older age and longer working duration were accounted for. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. 78 FR 38452 - Agency Information Collection (VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist) Activities... ``OMB Control No. 2900-0524.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: VA Police Officer Pre-Employment... collection. Abstract: VA personnel use the form to document pre-employment history and conduct...

  12. 78 FR 18425 - Proposed Information Collection VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist); Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist); Comment... information technology. Title: VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist, VA Form 0120. OMB Control... complete VA Form 0120 to document pre- employment history and conduct background checks on...

  13. Classification of radiological errors in chest radiographs, using support vector machine on the spatial frequency features of false- negative and false-positive regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Donovan, Tim; Brennan, Patrick C.; Dix, Alan; Manning, David J.

    2011-03-01

    Aim: To optimize automated classification of radiological errors during lung nodule detection from chest radiographs (CxR) using a support vector machine (SVM) run on the spatial frequency features extracted from the local background of selected regions. Background: The majority of the unreported pulmonary nodules are visually detected but not recognized; shown by the prolonged dwell time values at false-negative regions. Similarly, overestimated nodule locations are capturing substantial amounts of foveal attention. Spatial frequency properties of selected local backgrounds are correlated with human observer responses either in terms of accuracy in indicating abnormality position or in the precision of visual sampling the medical images. Methods: Seven radiologists participated in the eye tracking experiments conducted under conditions of pulmonary nodule detection from a set of 20 postero-anterior CxR. The most dwelled locations have been identified and subjected to spatial frequency (SF) analysis. The image-based features of selected ROI were extracted with un-decimated Wavelet Packet Transform. An analysis of variance was run to select SF features and a SVM schema was implemented to classify False-Negative and False-Positive from all ROI. Results: A relative high overall accuracy was obtained for each individually developed Wavelet-SVM algorithm, with over 90% average correct ratio for errors recognition from all prolonged dwell locations. Conclusion: The preliminary results show that combined eye-tracking and image-based features can be used for automated detection of radiological error with SVM. The work is still in progress and not all analytical procedures have been completed, which might have an effect on the specificity of the algorithm.

  14. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  15. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  16. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  17. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  18. 29 CFR 1604.7 - Pre-employment inquiries as to sex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. 1604.7 Section 1604.7... DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF SEX § 1604.7 Pre-employment inquiries as to sex. A pre-employment inquiry may ask “Male... directly or indirectly any limitation, specification, or discrimination as to sex shall be unlawful...

  19. 41 CFR 301-75.101 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay? 301-75.101 Section 301-75.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  20. 41 CFR 301-75.2 - May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.2 Section 301-75.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL General Rules §...

  1. 41 CFR 301-75.101 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay? 301-75.101 Section 301-75.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  2. 41 CFR 301-75.2 - May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.2 Section 301-75.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL General Rules §...

  3. 41 CFR 301-75.101 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay? 301-75.101 Section 301-75.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL Travel...

  4. 41 CFR 301-75.102 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable? 301-75.102 Section 301-75.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  5. 41 CFR 301-75.2 - May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.2 Section 301-75.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL General Rules §...

  6. 41 CFR 301-75.101 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay? 301-75.101 Section 301-75.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  7. 41 CFR 301-75.102 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable? 301-75.102 Section 301-75.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  8. 41 CFR 301-75.2 - May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.2 Section 301-75.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL General Rules §...

  9. 41 CFR 301-75.102 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable? 301-75.102 Section 301-75.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  10. 41 CFR 301-75.2 - May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May we pay pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.2 Section 301-75.2 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL General Rules §...

  11. 41 CFR 301-75.102 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable? 301-75.102 Section 301-75.102 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  12. 41 CFR 301-75.101 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What pre-employment interview travel expenses may we pay? 301-75.101 Section 301-75.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  13. Intracardiac (superior vena cava/right atrial) ECGs using saline solution as the conductive medium for the proper positioning of the Shiley hemodialysis catheter: is it not time to forego [correction of forgo] the postinsertion chest radiograph?

    PubMed

    Madias, John E

    2003-12-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) is often administered in critical care areas to patients with chronic renal failure as a continuation of the HD they are receiving on an ambulatory basis, and to patients who develop such a need for the first time or may require HD only transiently. The double-lumen Shiley central venous catheter (SCVC), inserted via the brachiocephalic veins, is often employed for HD, and it is customary to obtain a chest radiograph to ensure proper positioning of the tip of the SCVC within the superior vena cava (SVC) or high right atrium (RA). This practice is implemented to evaluate for complications stemming from the insertion of the SCVC and subsequent mishaps due to low positioning of the tip of the catheter in the RA or right ventricle. Intracardiac ECGs obtained via a saline solution-filled SCVC as the conductive medium can be easily recorded serially and periprocedurally to ensure proper positioning of the tip of the SCVC in the SVC or high RA based on the evaluation of the appearance and amplitude of atrial depolarization, thus rendering chest radiographs redundant.

  14. Mediastinal evaluation utilizing the reverse Trendelenburg radiograph.

    PubMed

    Barker, D E; Crabtree, J D; White, J E; Somberg, L B; Burns, R P

    1999-05-01

    When thoracic aortic rupture is suspected, a 45-degree reverse Trendelenburg (RT) anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph should place the mediastinal structures in a more appropriate position and allow a more accurate evaluation than a supine AP radiograph. One hundred ninety-one consecutive hemodynamically stable adult patients with major blunt thoracic trauma were initially evaluated for mediastinal abnormalities associated with aortic disruption by both supine AP chest radiograph and an AP chest radiograph with the patient in 45-degree RT position. One hundred four patients underwent contrast aortography based on mediastinal abnormalities detected on the supine AP chest radiograph. Twenty of these patients had abnormal aortograms demonstrating traumatic aortic disruption confirmed at surgery. Supine and RT chest radiographs were retrospectively compared in a blinded fashion to evaluate their specificity and positive predictive value for detection of traumatic thoracic aortic rupture. If RT chest radiographic findings had been used to determine the need for further assessment, 29 angiograms (26%) would have been eliminated, specificity would have increased from 52 per cent to 69 per cent, and positive predictive value would have increased from 19 per cent to 27 per cent. Both supine and RT chest radiographs demonstrated mediastinal widening in all 20 patients with abnormal aortograms, with no missed thoracic aortic disruptions (100% sensitivity). This study indicated that the RT chest radiograph may be used instead of the standard supine radiograph as the initial screen for mediastinal evaluation, maintaining a high sensitivity and eliminating the cost and morbidity of many unnecessary aortograms.

  15. An investigation of the chest radiographs in a controlled trial of busulphan, cyclophosphamide, and a placebo after resection for carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Stott, H; Stephens, R; Fox, W; Simon, G; Roy, D C

    1976-01-01

    A standard series of radiographs of 588 patients allocated at random to treatment with busulphan (B patients), cyclophosphamide (C patients), or a placebo (P patients) for two years after surgery for bronchial carcinoma were viewed in three stages (following procedures which avoided bias) by an independent assessor, unaware of the allocated treatment of any patient, with a view to identifying pulmonary changes due to busulphan. Radiographic appearances consistent with busulphan lung were not reported in any of the 195 B patients (receiving a mean dosage of 464 mg of busulphan over 301 days) or of the 192 C patients but were present in one of the 201 patients receiving placebo. PMID:781905

  16. The diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasound for CT-detected radiographic consolidation in hospitalised adults with acute respiratory failure: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hew, Mark; Corcoran, John P; Harriss, Elinor K; Rahman, Najib M; Mallett, Susan

    2015-05-19

    (1) Summarise chest ultrasound accuracy to diagnose radiological consolidation, referenced to chest CT in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). (2) Directly compared ultrasound with chest X-ray. Hospitalised patients. Studies were eligible if adult participants in respiratory failure underwent chest ultrasound to diagnose consolidation referenced to CT. Exclusion: (1) not primary study, (2) not respiratory failure, (3) not chest ultrasound, (4) not consolidation, (5) translation unobtainable, (6) unable to extract data, (7) unable to obtain paper. 4 studies comprising 224 participants met inclusion. As planned, paired forest plots display 95% CIs of sensitivity and specificity for ultrasound and chest X-ray. Sensitivity and specificity from each study are plotted in receiver operator characteristics space. Meta-analysis was planned if studies were sufficiently homogeneous and numerous (≥4). Although this numerical requirement was met, meta-analysis was prevented by heterogeneous units of analysis between studies. All studies were in intensive care, with either a high risk of selection bias or high applicability concerns. Studies had unclear or high risk of bias related to use of ultrasound. Only 1 study clearly performed ultrasound within 24 h of respiratory failure diagnosis. Ultrasound sensitivity ranged from 0.91 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.97) to 1.00 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.00). Specificity ranged from 0.78 (95% CI 0.52 to 0.94) to 1.00 (0.99 to 1.00). In two studies, chest X-ray had lower sensitivity than ultrasound, but there were insufficient patients to compare specificity. Four small studies suggest ultrasound is highly sensitive and specific for consolidation in ARF, but high risk of bias and concerns about applicability in all studies may have inflated diagnostic accuracy. Further robustly designed studies are needed to define the role of ultrasound in this setting. http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/ (CRD42013006472). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  17. Diagnostic value of abdominal free air detection on a plain chest radiograph in the early postoperative period: a prospective study in 648 consecutive patients who have undergone abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Milone, Marco; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Maietta, Paola; Sosa Fernandez, Loredana Maria; Musella, Mario; Iaccarino, Vittorio; Buccelli, Claudio; Nappi, Carmine; Milone, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the predictive value of free air (on a plain radiograph) for bowel perforation in a large prospective cohort of surgical patients. All consecutive patients undergoing abdominal surgery between January 2011 and June 2012 were screened for this study. We performed an upright chest radiograph on the second and third postoperative day. Thereafter, additional radiographic evaluations were performed every 2 days until the disappearance of abdominal free air. Of the 648 subjects enrolled in our study, free abdominal air was found in 65 subjects on the first radiographic evaluation (2 days after surgery), 51 on the second (3 days after surgery), three on the third (5 days after surgery), and none on the fourth (7 days after surgery). The presence of free abdominal air was associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal perforation. The presence of free air was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 21.54 (95% CI 9.66-48.01, p<0.001) and a HR of 23.87 (95% CI 10.68-53.34, p<0.001) at 2 and 3 days after surgery, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 70, 93, 33, and 98%, respectively, at 2 days after surgery, and similar results were confirmed at 3 days after surgery. We believe that the presence of free air at 3 days after surgery should not be considered a common finding. Here, we demonstrate that the detection of free air has a remarkable predictive value for gastrointestinal perforation, which has been overestimated in previous experience.

  18. Interpretations of the chest roentgenogram

    SciTech Connect

    Landay, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sixteen brief chapters cover basic principles, techniques, and normal appearance of the lungs, hili, mediastinum, pleura, thoracic cage, and extrathoracic structures as seen in chest radiographs. Common pathologic findings are described and copiously illustrated. Four brief concluding chapters highlight findings in the neck, intensive care radiographs with special reference to tubes and catheters, clues to indicate site of disease, and a brief summary.

  19. Computer aided detection of lung cancer in the absence of the cancer on chest radiographs: effect of the computer-aided detection on radiologists' performance on cancer-free cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osicka, Teresa; Freedman, Matthew T.; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Lure, Fleming; Xu, Xin-Wei; Lin, Jesse; Zhang, Ron; Zhao, Hui

    2005-04-01

    Using data from a clinical trial of a commercial CAD system for lung cancer detection we separately analyzed the location, if any, selected on each film by 15 radiologists as they interpreted chest radiographs, 160 of which did not contain cancers. On the cancer-free cases, the radiologists showed statistically significant difference in decisions while using the CAD (p-value 0.002). Average specificity without computer assistance was 78%, and with computer assistance 73%. In a clinical trial with CAD for lung cancer detection there are multiple machine false positives. On chest radiographs of older current or former smokers, there are many scars that can appear like cancer to the interpreting radiologists. We are reporting on the radiologists' false positives and on the effect of machine false positive detections on observer performance on cancer-free cases. The only difference between radiologists occurred when they changed their initial true negative decision to false positive (p-value less than 0.0001), average confidence level increased, on the scale from 0.0 to 100.0, from 16.9 (high confidence of non-cancer) to 53.5 (moderate confidence cancer was present). We are reporting on the consistency of misinterpretation by multiple radiologists when they interpret cancer-free radiographs of smokers in the absence of CAD prompts. When multiple radiologists selected the same false positive location, there was usually a definite abnormality that triggered this response. The CAD identifies areas that are of sufficient concern for cancer that the radiologists will switch from a correct decision of no cancer to mark a false positive, previously overlooked, but suspicious appearing cancer-free area; one that has often been marked by another radiologist without the use of the CAD prompt. This work has implications on what should be accepted as ground truth in ROC studies: One might ask, "What a false positive response means?" when the finding, clinically, looks like cancer

  20. Basic imaging properties of an indirect flat-panel detector system employing irradiation side sampling (ISS) technology for chest radiography: comparison with a computed radiographic system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobukazu; Yano, Yuki; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Akasaka, Tsutomu; Sasaki, Masayuki; Ohki, Masafumi; Morishita, Junji

    2013-01-01

    The image quality and potential usefulness for patient skin-dose reduction of a newly developed flat-panel detector (FPD) system employing irradiation side sampling (ISS) were investigated and compared to a conventional computed radiography (CR) system. We used the X-ray beam quality of RQA 9 as noted in the standard evaluation method by the International Electrotechnical Commission 62220-1 to evaluate the image quality of the detector for chest radiography. The presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) of the ISS-FPD system was slightly higher than that of the CR system in the horizontal direction at more than 2.2 cycles/mm. However, the presampled MTF of the ISS-FPD system was slightly lower than that of the CR system in the vertical direction. The Wiener spectrum of the ISS-FPD system showed a 50-65 % lesser noise level than that of the CR system under the same exposure condition. The detective quantum efficiency of the ISS-FPD system was at least twice as great as that of the CR system. We conclude that the ISS-FPD system has the potential to reduce the patient skin dose compared to a conventional CR system for chest radiography.

  1. Pre-employment urine drug testing of hospital employees: future questions and review of current literature

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M; Rennie, W

    2004-01-01

    Background: Patient safety and optimisation of worker performance are high current priorities. Arguments over employee drug testing have been debated over the past two decades. Aims: To review prior information to reveal how current principles and practices regarding pre-employment drug testing of health care workers evolved, and to explore pressing current and future issues. Methods: A literature search of Medline from 1980 to 1999 was performed. This yielded seven citations that reported results of pre-employment drug testing of health care workers, which we critically reviewed. Results: The process by which a rational testing process was developed for pre-employment urine drug screening in the health care field is illustrated. Also depicted are some important principles, inequities, and shortcomings of the system. The range of positive tests was wide, from 0.25% to 12%. Testing was not always applied uniformly to all health care workers. It became apparent that positive tests also require medical review to determine if they were truly due to illicit substance use. Conclusions: Although pre-employment drug testing programmes in the health care industry have been firmly in place for many years, it is unclear whether such strategies have achieved their stated purposes. The next step is to study whether such programmes are effective at accomplishing specific goals, such as decreasing absenteeism, turnover, accidents, and medical errors, in order to justify continuing pre-employment testing versus changing to an alternative testing strategy. PMID:15031389

  2. Reductions in turnover, accidents, and absenteeism: the contribution of a pre-employment screening inventory.

    PubMed

    Borofsky, G L; Smith, M

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the rates of turnover, work-related accidents, and unauthorized absence among two contrasted groups of employees in a mid-sized manufacturing environment. For the calendar year 1989, comparative rates on each variable were obtained for a group hired prior to the inclusion of a pre-employment inventory in the Company's selection process and a group hired subsequently. Results indicate that rates of turnover, accidents, and unauthorized absence were all significantly lower in the group hired subsequent to inclusion of the pre-employment screening inventory. Some possible design artifacts and cost-benefit implications are discussed.

  3. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume I. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the first volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the 12 lessons included in this volume are selecting tractors and engines, diagnosing engine conditions, servicing electrical systems, servicing cooling systems, servicing fuel and…

  4. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume II. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the second volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the eight lessons included in this volume are cold metal work, soldering, agricultural safety programs, farm shops, farm structures, farm and ranch electrification, soil and water…

  5. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume I. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the first volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the 12 lessons included in this volume are selecting tractors and engines, diagnosing engine conditions, servicing electrical systems, servicing cooling systems, servicing fuel and…

  6. Pre-Employment Laboratory Training. General Agricultural Mechanics Volume II. Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    This course outline, the second volume of a two-volume set, consists of lesson plans for pre-employment laboratory training in general agricultural mechanics. Covered in the eight lessons included in this volume are cold metal work, soldering, agricultural safety programs, farm shops, farm structures, farm and ranch electrification, soil and water…

  7. A Basis for Choice. Report of a Study Group on Post-16 Pre-Employment Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Curriculum Review and Development Unit, London (England).

    This report presents the findings of a study group that examined full-time pre-employment courses available in England and Wales for young people over 16 years of age. Part 1 sets forth the group's objectives. Part 2 focuses on the procedures used to fulfill the study group's task of examining existing courses to determine whether they enhance…

  8. 41 CFR 301-75.102 - What pre-employment interview travel expenses are not payable?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What pre-employment... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75... of a room at a hotel or other place to transact official business. ...

  9. New developed DR detector performs radiographs of hand, pelvic and premature chest anatomies at a lower radiation dose and/or a higher image quality.

    PubMed

    Precht, Helle; Tingberg, Anders; Waaler, Dag; Outzen, Claus Bjørn

    2014-02-01

    A newly developed Digital Radiography (DR) detector has smaller pixel size and higher fill factor than earlier detector models. These technical advantages should theoretically lead to higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution, thus making dose reduction possible without scarifying image quality compared to previous DR detector versions. To examine whether the newly developed Canon CXDI-70C DR detector provides an improved image quality and/or allows for dose reductions in hand and pelvic bone examinations as well as premature chest examinations, compared to the previous (CXDI-55C) DR detector version. A total of 450 images of a technical Contrast-Detail phantom were imaged on a DR system employing various kVp and mAs settings, providing an objective image quality assessment. In addition, 450 images of anthropomorphic phantoms were taken and analyzed by three specialized radiologists using Visual Grading Analysis (VGA). The results from the technical phantom studies showed that the image quality expressed as IQFINV values was on average approximately 45 % higher with the CXDI-70C detector compared to the CXDI-55C detector. Consistently, the VGA results from the anatomical phantom studies indicated that by using the CXDI-70C detector, diagnostic image quality could be maintained at a dose reduction of in average 30 %, depending on anatomy and kVp level. This indicates that the CXDI-70C detector is significantly more sensitive than the previous model, and supports a better clinical image quality. By using the newly developed DR detector a significant dose reduction is possible while maintaining image quality.

  10. Survey of Aviation Medical Examiners: Information and Attitudes about the Pre-Employment and Pre-Appointment Drug Testing Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    urine specimens fbr pre - employment or pre -appointment drug testing for FAA employees’? A...Federal guidelines for the FAA pre - employment / pre -appointment drug testing program. A B C D E A3 SOME AMES HAVE EXPERIENCED PROBLEMS WITH LAB ...COMMENTS BY ITEM 1. ARE YOU AN AVIATION MEDICAL EXAMINER WHO COLLECTS URINE SPECIMENS FOR PRE - EMPLOYMENT OR PRE -APPOINTMENT DRUG TESTING FOR FAA

  11. Survey of Aviation Medical Examiners: Information and Attitudes about the Pre-Employment and Pre-Appointment Drug Testing Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    urine specimens for pre - employment or pre -appointment drug testing for FAA...BY ITEM 1. ARE YOU AN AVIATION MEDICAL EXAMINER WHO COLLECTS URINE SPECIMENS FOR PRE - EMPLOYMENT OR PRE -APPOINTMENT DRUG TESTING FOR FAA EMPLOYEES? I...believe I have done more than one pre - employment in the past year. My comments are of little or no value to your survey. We have done so few drug screening

  12. 41 CFR 301-75.100 - Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.100 Section 301-75.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  13. 41 CFR 301-75.4 - What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.4 Section 301-75.4 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  14. 41 CFR 301-75.100 - Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.100 Section 301-75.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  15. 41 CFR 301-75.4 - What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.4 Section 301-75.4 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  16. 41 CFR 301-75.1 - What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.1 Section 301-75.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  17. 41 CFR 301-75.1 - What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.1 Section 301-75.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  18. 41 CFR 301-75.1 - What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.1 Section 301-75.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  19. 41 CFR 301-75.4 - What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.4 Section 301-75.4 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  20. 41 CFR 301-75.4 - What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.4 Section 301-75.4 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  1. 41 CFR 301-75.100 - Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.100 Section 301-75.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  2. 41 CFR 301-75.200 - How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses? 301-75.200 Section 301-75.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  3. 41 CFR 301-75.1 - What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.1 Section 301-75.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  4. 41 CFR 301-75.200 - How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses? 301-75.200 Section 301-75.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  5. 41 CFR 301-75.100 - Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.100 Section 301-75.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  6. 41 CFR 301-75.4 - What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What other responsibilities do we have for pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.4 Section 301-75.4 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  7. 41 CFR 301-75.200 - How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses? 301-75.200 Section 301-75.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  8. 41 CFR 301-75.200 - How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses? 301-75.200 Section 301-75.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW...

  9. 41 CFR 301-75.1 - What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the purpose of the allowance for pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.1 Section 301-75.1 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  10. 41 CFR 301-75.200 - How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How will we pay for pre-employment interviewee travel expenses? 301-75.200 Section 301-75.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW TRAVEL...

  11. 41 CFR 301-75.100 - Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Must we pay all of the interviewee's pre-employment interview travel expenses? 301-75.100 Section 301-75.100 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 75-PRE-EMPLOYMENT...

  12. Psychogenic Dyspnea and Therapeutic Chest Radiograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Kenneth R.; Endres, Jennifer K.; Kaufman, Nathaniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Conversion disorders, the physical expression of unresolved psychological pain, can be associated with mourning. This case report is third in a series of articles by the authors on childhood mourning reflecting the effects of multiple losses (K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2005; K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2006). In this case report, perception…

  13. Psychogenic Dyspnea and Therapeutic Chest Radiograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Kenneth R.; Endres, Jennifer K.; Kaufman, Nathaniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Conversion disorders, the physical expression of unresolved psychological pain, can be associated with mourning. This case report is third in a series of articles by the authors on childhood mourning reflecting the effects of multiple losses (K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2005; K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2006). In this case report, perception…

  14. Enhancement of chest radiographs with gradient operators.

    PubMed

    Daponte, J S; Fox, M D

    1988-01-01

    Reference is made to the Sobel and Roberts gradient operators used to enhance image edges. Overall, the Sobel operator was found to be superior to the Roberts operator in edge enhancement. A theoretical explanation for the superior performance of the Sobel operator was developed based on the concept of analyzing the x and y Sobel masks as linear filters. By applying pill-box, Gaussian, or median filtering prior to applying a gradient operator, noise was reduced. The pill-box and Gaussian filters were more computationally efficient than the median filter with approximately equal effectiveness in noise reduction.

  15. Development and evaluation of a computer-aided diagnostic scheme for lung nodule detection in chest radiographs by means of two-stage nodule enhancement with support vector classification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Sheng; Suzuki, Kenji; MacMahon, Heber

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) scheme for nodules in chest radiographs (CXRs) with a high sensitivity and a low false-positive (FP) rate. Methods: The authors developed a CADe scheme consisting of five major steps, which were developed for improving the overall performance of CADe schemes. First, to segment the lung fields accurately, the authors developed a multisegment active shape model. Then, a two-stage nodule-enhancement technique was developed for improving the conspicuity of nodules. Initial nodule candidates were detected and segmented by using the clustering watershed algorithm. Thirty-one shape-, gray-level-, surface-, and gradient-based features were extracted from each segmented candidate for determining the feature space, including one of the new features based on the Canny edge detector to eliminate a major FP source caused by rib crossings. Finally, a nonlinear support vector machine (SVM) with a Gaussian kernel was employed for classification of the nodule candidates. Results: To evaluate and compare the scheme to other published CADe schemes, the authors used a publicly available database containing 140 nodules in 140 CXRs and 93 normal CXRs. The CADe scheme based on the SVM classifier achieved sensitivities of 78.6% (110/140) and 71.4% (100/140) with averages of 5.0 (1165/233) FPs/image and 2.0 (466/233) FPs/image, respectively, in a leave-one-out cross-validation test, whereas the CADe scheme based on a linear discriminant analysis classifier had a sensitivity of 60.7% (85/140) at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. For nodules classified as ''very subtle'' and ''extremely subtle,'' a sensitivity of 57.1% (24/42) was achieved at an FP rate of 5.0 FPs/image. When the authors used a database developed at the University of Chicago, the sensitivities was 83.3% (40/48) and 77.1% (37/48) at an FP rate of 5.0 (240/48) FPs/image and 2.0 (96/48) FPs /image, respectively. Conclusions: These results compare favorably to those described for

  16. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a fever or a cough that produces yellow-green phlegm. You have chest pain that is severe and does not go away. You are having problems swallowing. Chest pain lasts longer than 3 to 5 days. What to Expect at Your Office Visit ...

  17. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability.

  18. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    SciTech Connect

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes a chapter on chest radiographs. A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. The chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph.

  19. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes Chest pain can also be caused by: Panic attack. If you have periods of intense fear accompanied ... fear of dying, you may be experiencing a panic attack. Shingles. Caused by a reactivation of the chickenpox ...

  20. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  1. Training therapists to perform Pre-Employment Functional Assessments: A telerehabilitation approach.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Zoë; Russell, Trevor; Johnston, Venerina; Legge, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Pre-Employment Functional Assessments (PEFA) are increasingly used in an attempt to obtain objective information on a potential employee's functional capabilities. In rural and remote communities, there is typically reduced access to qualified therapists to perform these assessments, in part attributable to the time and costs associated with travelling to training courses. One potential method of providing the relevant training to conduct PEFAs is through the use of technologies such as videoconferencing or internet-based modules. The purpose of this project is to investigate the effectiveness of training therapists and therapy students in performing JobFit System PEFAs via technology when compared with a face-to-face control group. Fifty-three participants, consisting of 28 professional physiotherapists and occupational therapists, and 25 final year University of Queensland (UQ) physiotherapy and occupational therapy students, underwent JobFit Systems International PEFA training via one of four intervention groups: face-to-face, realtime videoconferencing, group-based online module and individual online module. Of the 53 participants, 49 achieved the minimum competency level of 75% in post-training competency assessments. No significant difference was found in training levels between intervention groups. The results of this study suggest that technology, such as real-time videoconference and online learning modules, can be used to train both therapists and students in how to perform JobFit System PEFAs.

  2. Is the chest x-ray an appropriate screening exam for ER patients with AMS?

    PubMed

    Birkemeier, Krista L; Nipper, Michael L; Williams, Jonathan M

    2008-11-01

    Emergency department patients with altered mental status (AMS) regularly undergo a routine chest radiograph at our institution. While there are many causes of chest pathology seen on the chest radiograph that may cause an altered mental status, it is not clear that a routine chest radiograph for these patients affects management. The goal of this study is to determine if a chest radiograph is an appropriate screening examination for AMS. This is a retrospective review of 100 consecutive patients who underwent head computed tomography for altered mental status in the emergency department and had a chest radiograph during the same visit. Of 100 patients undergoing a routine chest radiograph for AMS, 17 had findings which altered patient care, 15 of those had signs/symptoms which clearly indicated that a chest radiograph was needed, and the other two had leukocytosis. The routine performance of a chest radiograph in the setting of a patient presenting to the emergency department with altered mental status affected medical management in 17%, a modest benefit. The positive predictive value of a chest x-ray in these patients may be improved if certain symptomatologies are present.

  3. Chest Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Balmes, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following inventory of items of progress in chest diseases. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and important clinical significance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, or scholars to stay abreast of these items of progress in chest diseases that have recently achieved a substantial degree of authoritative acceptance, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The items of progress listed below were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Chest Diseases of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under its direction. PMID:1441468

  4. Chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Budassi, S A

    1978-09-01

    For any patient with obvious or suspected chest trauma, one must first assure an adequate airway and adequate ventilation. One should never hesitate to administer oxygen to a victim with a chest injury. The nurse should be concerned with adequate circulation--this may mean the administration of intravenous fluids, specifically volume expanders, via large-bore cannulae. Any obvious open chest wound should be sealed, and any fractures should be splinted. These patients should be rapidly transported to the nearest Emergency Department capable of handling this type of injury. The majority of patients who arrive in the Emergency Department following blunt or penetrating trauma should be considered to be in critical condition until proven otherwise. On presentation, it is essential to recognize those signs, symptoms, and laboratory values that identify the patient's condition as life-threatening. Simple recognition of these signs and symptoms and early appropriate intervention may alter an otherwise fatal outcome.

  5. Male Pectoral Implants: Radiographic Appearance of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Damitz, Lynn; Burke, Rachael; Hwang, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There has been a significant surge in aesthetic chest surgery for men in the last several years. Male chest enhancement is performed with surgical placement of a solid silicone pectoral implant. In the past, male chest correction and implantation were limited to the treatment of men who had congenital absence or atrophy of the pectoralis muscle and pectus excavatum deformity. But today, the popularization of increased chest and pectoral size fostered by body builders has more men desiring chest correction with implantation for non-medical reasons. We present a case of a 44-year-old, male with a displaced left pectoral implant with near extrusion and with an associated peri-implant soft tissue mass and fluid collection. While the imaging of these patients is uncommon, our case study presents the radiographic findings of male chest enhancement with associated complications. PMID:27200162

  6. Re-engineering pre-employment check-up systems: a model for improving health services.

    PubMed

    Rateb, Said Abdel Hakim; El Nouman, Azza Abdel Razek; Rateb, Moshira Abdel Hakim; Asar, Mohamed Naguib; El Amin, Ayman Mohammed; Gad, Saad abdel Aziz; Mohamed, Mohamed Salah Eldin

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for improving health services provided by the pre-employment medical fitness check-up system affiliated to Egypt's Health Insurance Organization (HIO). Operations research, notably system re-engineering, is used in six randomly selected centers and findings before and after re-engineering are compared. The re-engineering model follows a systems approach, focusing on three areas: structure, process and outcome. The model is based on six main components: electronic booking, standardized check-up processes, protected medical documents, advanced archiving through an electronic content management (ECM) system, infrastructure development, and capacity building. The model originates mainly from customer needs and expectations. The centers' monthly customer flow increased significantly after re-engineering. The mean time spent per customer cycle improved after re-engineering--18.3 +/- 5.5 minutes as compared to 48.8 +/- 14.5 minutes before. Appointment delay was also significantly decreased from an average 18 to 6.2 days. Both beneficiaries and service providers were significantly more satisfied with the services after re-engineering. The model proves that re-engineering program costs are exceeded by increased revenue. Re-engineering in this study involved multiple structure and process elements. The literature review did not reveal similar re-engineering healthcare packages. Therefore, each element was compared separately. This model is highly recommended for improving service effectiveness and efficiency. This research is the first in Egypt to apply the re-engineering approach to public health systems. Developing user-friendly models for service improvement is an added value.

  7. Frequency of color blindness in pre-employment screening in a tertiary health care center in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Chhipa, Shaukat Ali; Hashmi, Farzeen K; Ali, Shehreen; Kamal, Mustafa; Ahmad, Khabir

    2017-01-01

    To describe the frequency of color vision deficiency among Pakistani adults presenting for pre-employment health screening in a tertiary care hospital. The cross-sectional study was carried out at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and the data was collected for color vision deficiency, age, gender, and job applied for from pre-employment examination during 2013-2014. IBM SPSS 20 was used for statistical analysis. Three thousand four hundred and thirty seven persons underwent pre-employment screening during 2013 and 2014; 1837 (53.44%) were males and 1600 (46.65%) females. The mean age was 29.01 (±6.53) years. A total of 0.9% (32/3437) persons had color vision deficiency with male being 1.4% and female 0.4%. Color vision deficiency was observed in 0.9% of candidates screened for pre-employment health check up in a tertiary care hospital. The color vision deficiency was predominantly present in male individuals.

  8. Frequency of color blindness in pre-employment screening in a tertiary health care center in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Chhipa, Shaukat Ali; Hashmi, Farzeen K.; Ali, Shehreen; Kamal, Mustafa; Ahmad, Khabir

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe the frequency of color vision deficiency among Pakistani adults presenting for pre-employment health screening in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The cross-sectional study was carried out at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and the data was collected for color vision deficiency, age, gender, and job applied for from pre-employment examination during 2013-2014. IBM SPSS 20 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Three thousand four hundred and thirty seven persons underwent pre-employment screening during 2013 and 2014; 1837 (53.44%) were males and 1600 (46.65%) females. The mean age was 29.01 (±6.53) years. A total of 0.9% (32/3437) persons had color vision deficiency with male being 1.4% and female 0.4%. Conclusion: Color vision deficiency was observed in 0.9% of candidates screened for pre-employment health check up in a tertiary care hospital. The color vision deficiency was predominantly present in male individuals. PMID:28523050

  9. An Assessment of Selected Aspects of the Pre-Employment Program in Farm Machinery Service and Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Earl S.; Kruse, Robert F.

    In an effort to evaluate certain aspects of the pre-employment program in farm machinery service and repair, questionnaires were sent to 39 Texas teachers of the programs. Based on 30 responses (76.92%), the major conclusions were: a majority of the teachers felt they did not have adequate training in farm machinery mechanics; no uniform selection…

  10. Work Values, Cognitive Strategies, and Applicant Reactions in a Structured Pre-Employment Interview for Ethical Integrity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawlowski, Donna R.; Hollwitz, John

    2000-01-01

    Notes that companies emphasize ethical behavior, and schools and professional groups devote many resources to applied ethics training. Describes initial construct validation of a structured ethical integrity pre-employment interview. Reviews evidence relating to cognitive and impression management strategies used when college students encounter an…

  11. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  12. Diagnosing pulmonary edema: lung ultrasound versus chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Jennifer L; Noble, Vicki E; Liteplo, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Diagnosing the underlying cause of acute dyspnea can be challenging. Lung ultrasound may help to identify pulmonary edema as a possible cause. To evaluate the ability of residents to recognize pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound using chest radiographs as a comparison standard. This is a prospective, blinded, observational study of a convenience sample of resident physicians in the Departments of Emergency Medicine (EM), Internal Medicine (IM), and Radiology. Residents were given a tutorial on interpreting pulmonary edema on both chest radiograph and lung ultrasound. They were then shown both ultrasounds and chest radiographs from 20 patients who had presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, 10 with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary edema, and 10 with alternative diagnoses. Cohen's κ values were calculated to describe the strength of the correlation between resident and gold standard interpretations. Participants included 20 EM, 20 IM, and 20 Radiology residents. The overall agreement with gold standard interpretation of pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound (74%, κ = 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.55) was superior to chest radiographs (58%, κ = 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.30) (P < 0.0001). EM residents interpreted lung ultrasounds more accurately than IM residents. Radiology residents interpreted chest radiographs more accurately than did EM and IM residents. Residents were able to more accurately identify pulmonary edema with lung ultrasound than with chest radiograph. Physicians with minimal exposure to lung ultrasound may be able to correctly recognize pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound.

  13. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Interpretation of the neonatal chest X-ray.

    PubMed

    Barnes, N; Pilling, D W

    1999-11-01

    Most neonatal X-rays are seen initially by a paediatrician without formal training in interpretation of chest X-rays. This article aims to help improve the information obtained from these X-rays which are often complex. Many factors affect accurate interpretation of the neonatal chest X-ray, including good quality radiographs, appropriate viewing conditions and thorough education.

  15. Pre-employment examination for low back risk in workers exposed to manual handling of loads: French guidelines.

    PubMed

    Petit, A; Rousseau, S; Huez, J F; Mairiaux, Ph; Roquelaure, Y

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a major cause of sickness absence and disability in the working population, and the pre-employment examination should insure that worker's state of health is compatible with the requirements of proposed job. This paper summarizes the main recommendations of the good practice guidelines of the French Society of Occupational Medicine for pre-employment examination in workers exposed to manual handling of loads apart from pre-employment test. The recommendations were developed according to the Clinical Practice Guidelines proposed by the French National Health Authority and based on a systematic search of the literature 1990-2012 in several databases. The guidelines were written and reviewed by two multidisciplinary committees. On the basis of the level of evidence in the literature, the proposed guidelines are classified as grade A, B, C or expert consensus. The main recommendations of these guidelines are as follows: (1) medical contraindications alone should not exclude employment in a job associated with a low back risk on the basis of a history of "simple" nonspecific LBP; (2) the relevance of examining a previous history of LBP, which is the best predictor of future LBP due to the recurrent nature of LBP. These guidelines correspond to a constant concern with prevention of occupational risk. Primarily intended for occupational physicians, they are also intended for general practitioners who carry out pre-employment examinations in many countries and are likely to be increasingly faced with this type of situation because of the combination of increasing work constraints with ageing of the workforce.

  16. 42 CFR 37.8 - Radiographic examination at miner's expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest Roentgenographic Examinations § 37.8 Radiographic examination at miner's expense. Any miner who wishes to obtain an examination... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radiographic examination at miner's expense. 37.8...

  17. 42 CFR 37.80 - Availability of records for radiographs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic... information and radiographs on miners will be released by NIOSH only with the written consent from the miner, or if the miner is deceased, written consent from the miner's widow or widower, next of kin, or legal...

  18. 42 CFR 37.60 - Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner identification documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner... Chest Radiographs § 37.60 Submitting required chest roentgenograms and miner identification documents...

  19. Chest tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... When your chest tube is inserted, you will lie on your side or sit partly upright, with one arm over your head. Sometimes, ...

  20. Chest X Ray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test that ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are working ...

  1. Chest Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside of the chest cavity. Chest injuries and disorders include Heart diseases Lung diseases and collapsed lung Pleural disorders Esophagus disorders Broken ribs Thoracic aortic aneurysms Disorders ...

  2. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  3. The role of postoperative chest radiography in pediatric tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J S; Sulek, M; de Jong, A; Friedman, E M

    2001-07-30

    A postoperative chest radiograph has traditionally been obtained after tracheotomies to evaluate for the presence of a pneumothorax and to assess tube position. Several recent studies in adults have questioned the usefulness of routine postoperative chest radiography in uncomplicated cases, but the role of post-operative chest radiography in pediatric patients has not been previously reviewed. We performed this study to examine the clinical utility of post-tracheotomy chest radiography in pediatric patients and determine if this routine practice impacts patient management enough to merit continued usage. A retrospective review was performed of 200 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent tracheotomies by the otolaryngology service in a tertiary care pediatric hospital from January 1994 to June 1999. All patients received postoperative chest radiographs. Five of 200 patients had a new postoperative radiographic finding, with three requiring interventions. Two patients required chest tube placement for pneumothorax, and one patient required tracheostomy tube change for repositioning. Fifty-one patients, including both pneumothoraces, exhibited clinical signs of pneumothorax (decreased breath sounds or oxygen saturation) in the immediate postoperative period. Chest X-ray ruled out a pneumothorax in the remaining 49 patients. The majority of these 51 patients were less than 2 years old (94%, P=0.002) or weighed less than 17 kg (89%, P=0.004). Postoperative chest X-rays yielded clinically relevant information in 168 patients that fell into one or more of four high risk categories: age less than 2, weight less than 17 kg, emergent procedures, or concomitant central line placement. Avoiding chest X-rays in the remaining 32 patients would have resulted in potential savings of $5000, which does not reflect the actuarial cost of a missed complication. Since the majority of our patients (84%) fell into a high-risk category, we feel it would be prudent to continue

  4. GI Radiographic Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic / Radiographic Tests in GI Radiographic Tests in GI Basics Commonly Performed Radiographic Tests in Gastroenterology Gastroenterologists ... January 2009. Updated December 2012. Return to Top GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel ...

  5. Interpretation of dental radiographs.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Interpretation of dental radiographs is fairly straightforward, with a handful of common patterns making up the majority of pathology. This article covers normal radiographic anatomy, endodontic disease, periodontal disease, neoplastic changes, tooth resorption, caries, and radiographic signs of oral trauma.

  6. Colon in the Chest: An Incidental Dextrocardia

    PubMed Central

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Shehab, Abdullah; Elnour, Asim A.; Al Nuaimi, Saif K.; Baghdady, Shazly

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diaphragmatic injury is an uncommon traumatic injury (<1%). Although most diaphragmatic injuries can be obvious (eg, herniation of abdominal contents on chest radiograph), some injuries may be subtle and imaging studies can be nondiagnostic in many situations. Patients with diaphragmatic hernia either traumatic or nontraumatic may initially have no symptoms or signs to suggest an injury to the diaphragm. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old woman diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome –associated dominant constipation, presented with shortness of breath, cough, expectoration, tachycardia, and chest pain. Dextrocardia was an incidental finding, diagnosed by electrocardiography, chest radiograph, and CT chest. Parts of the colon, small intestine, and stomach were within the thorax in the left side due to left diaphragmatic hernia of a nontraumatic cause. Acquired incidental dextrocardia was the main problem due to displacement of the heart to contralateral side by the GI (gastrointestinal) viscera (left diaphragmatic hernia). The patient was prepared for the laparoscopic surgical repair, using a polyethylene mesh 20 cm to close the defect, and the patient recovered with accepted general condition. However, 5 days postoperative, the patient passed away suddenly due to unexplained cardiac arrest. Intrathoracic herniation of abdominal viscera should be considered in patients presented with sudden chest pain concomitant with a history of increased intra-abdominal pressure. PMID:25674744

  7. Cough in Ambulatory Immunocompromised Adults: CHEST Expert Panel Report.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Mark J; Ireland, Belinda; Narasimhan, Mangala; French, Cynthia; Irwin, Richard S

    2017-08-19

    Cough is a common symptom prompting patients to seek medical care. Like patients in the general population, patients with compromised immune systems also seek care for cough. However, it is unclear whether the causes of cough in immunocompromised patients who are deemed unlikely to have a life-threating condition and a normal or unchanged chest radiograph are similar to those in persons with cough and normal immune systems. We conducted a systematic review to answer the question: What are the most common causes of cough in ambulatory immunodeficient adults with normal chest radiographs? Studies of patients ≥ 18 years of age with immune deficiency, cough of any duration, and normal or unchanged chest radiographs were included and assessed for relevance and quality. Based on the systematic review, suggestions were developed and voted on using the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) methodology framework. The results of the systematic review revealed no high-quality evidence to guide the clinician in determining the likely causes of cough specifically in immunocompromised ambulatory patients with normal chest radiographs. Based on a systematic review, we found no evidence to assess whether or not the proper initial evaluation of cough in immunocompromised patients is different from that in immunocompetent persons. A consensus of the panel suggested that the initial diagnostic algorithm should be similar to that for immunocompetent persons but that the context of the type and severity of the immune defect, geographic location, and social determinants be considered. The major modifications to the 2006 CHEST Cough Guidelines are the suggestions that tuberculosis should be part of the initial evaluation of patients with cough and HIV infection who reside in regions with a high prevalence of TB, regardless of the radiographic findings, and that specific causes and immune defects be considered in all patients in whom the initial evaluation is unrevealing

  8. [Development of breathing chest radiography: study of exposure timing].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Matsui, Takeshi; Inoue, Hitoshi

    2003-08-01

    The flat-panel detector (FPD) has been introduced into clinical practice. A modified FPD, which has the ability to obtain dynamic chest radiographs, was introduced into our hospital, and clinical testing is ongoing. Both the inspiratory and expiratory phases have to be included in dynamic chest radiographs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the most appropriate chest radiography signal for observation of the respiratory process. We prepared ten protocol patterns that differed in terms of respiratory phase at X-ray exposure, exposure duration, and signal multiplicity. We also performed preliminary experiments and administered several questionnaires to ten volunteers. The volunteers breathed according to vocal and visual signals, and their respiratory waves were recorded by spirometer. The most appropriate protocol was similar to the method used for conventional chest radiography.

  9. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  10. A New Pre-employment Functional Capacity Evaluation Predicts Longer-Term Risk of Musculoskeletal Injury in Healthy Workers

    PubMed Central

    Burgess-Limerick, Robin; Peeters, Geeske

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Prospective cohort study. Objective. To determine if a job-specific pre-employment functional assessment (PEFA) predicts musculoskeletal injury risk in healthy mineworkers. Summary of Background Data. Traditional methods of pre-employment screening, including radiography and medical screenings, are not valid predictors of occupational musculoskeletal injury risk. Short-form job-specific functional capacity evaluations are increasing in popularity, despite limited evidence of their ability to predict injury risk in healthy workers. Methods. Participants were recruited from an Australian coal mine between 2002 and 2009 as part of the hiring process. At baseline, participants were screened with the JobFit System PEFA, and classified as PEFA 1 if they met job demands and PEFA>1, if not. Males who completed the PEFA and were employed were included. Injury data from company records were coded for body part, mechanism, and severity. The relationship between PEFA classification and time to first injury was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression with adjustments for department and post hoc stratification for time (0–1.3 yr, 1.3–6 yr). Results. Of the 600 participants (median age, 37 yr, range, 17.0–62.6 yr), 427 scored PEFA 1. One hundred ninety-six sprain/strain injuries were reported by 121 workers, including 35 back injuries from manual handling. Significant differences between PEFA groups were found in time to first injury for all injury types during the long term (any injury: adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–3.9; manual handling injury: HR = 3.3, CI = 1.6–7.2; any back injury: HR = 3.3, CI = 1.6–6.6; back injuries from manual handling HR = 5.8, CI = 2.0–16.7), but not during the short term. An area under the receiver operator curve value of 0.73 (CI = 0.61–0.86) demonstrated acceptable predictive ability for back injuries from manual handling during the long term. Conclusion. JobFit System

  11. Blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Adegboye, V O; Ladipo, J K; Brimmo, I A; Adebo, A O

    2002-12-01

    A retrospective study was conducted at the cardiothoracic surgical unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan on all consecutive, blunt chest injury patients treated between May 1975 and April 1999. The period of study was divided into 2 periods: May 1975-April 1987, May 1987-April 1999. The aim was to determine the pattern of injury, the management and complications of the injury among the treated. Blunt chest trauma patients were 69% (1331 patients) of all chest injury patients (1928 patients) treated. Mean age for the 2 periods was 38.3 +/- 15 years and 56.4 +/- 6.2 years, the male:female ratio was 4:1 and 2:1 respectively. The incidence of blunt chest trauma tripled in the second period. Blunt chest trauma was classified as involving bony chest wall or without the involvement of bony chest wall. Majority of the blunt chest injuries were minor chest wall injuries (68%, 905 patients), 7.6% (101 patients) had major but stable chest wall injuries, 10.8% (144 patients) had flail chest injuries. Thoracic injuries without fractures of bony chest wall occurred in 181 patients (13.6%). Seven hundred and eighty-seven patients (59.1%) had associated extra-thoracic injuries, in 426 patients (54.1%) two or more extra-thoracic systems were involved. While orthopaedic injury was the most frequent extra-thoracic injury (69.5%) associated with blunt chest trauma, craniospinal injury (31.9%) was more common injury among the patients with severe or life threatening chest trauma. The most common extra-thoracic operation was laparotomy (221 patients). Nine hundred and seventy patients (72.9%) had either closed thoracostomy drainage or clinical observation, 361 patients (27.1%) had major thoracic surgical intervention (emergent in 134 patients, late in 227 patients). Most of the severe lung contusion that needed ventilatory care (85 patients) featured among patients with bony chest wall injury, 15 were without chest wall injury. Majority of patients 63.2% (835 patients) had no

  12. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    PubMed

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P < .001). Adding nodules did not affect inspection time (P = .58) so the reluctance to report was not associated with reduced search. Reanalysis revealed a similar decision threshold shift that had not been recognized in the early studies of SOS in chest radiography (P < .01) in addition to reduced detection accuracy (P < .01). The nature of SOS in chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of patient photos on visual search during radiograph interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Applegate, Kimberly; DeSimone, Ariadne; Chung, Alex; Tridandanpani, Srini

    2016-03-01

    To increase detection of mislabeled medical imaging studies evidence shows it may be useful to include patient photographs during interpretation. This study examined how inclusion of photos impacts visual search. Ten radiologists viewed 21 chest radiographs with and without a photo of the patient while search was recorded. Their task was to note tube/line placement. Eye-tracking data revealed that presence of the photo reduced the number of fixations and total dwell on the chest image as a result of periodically looking at the photo. Average preference for having photos was 6.10 on 0-10 scale and neck and chest were preferred areas.

  14. The efficacy of X-rays after chest tube removal.

    PubMed

    Palesty, J A; McKelvey, A A; Dudrick, S J

    2000-01-01

    The insertion and subsequent removal of chest tubes are frequently performed procedures. We hypothesize that routine chest radiographs obtained after chest tube removal to confirm the absence of any post-procedure complications have little impact on clinical management. A 5-year retrospective study of 73 patients with tube thoracotomies was performed in a level II trauma center's intensive care unit. Patients were identified from billing records for chest tube placement. Medical records and official chest x-ray film reports, both before and after removal, were reviewed, and demographic data were collected. Of the 73 patients examined, only 8 had postprocedure reports that differed from the preprocedure reports. Two of these 8 patients required reinsertion of a chest tube to treat the recurrence of a significant pneumothorax. However, the decision to reinsert the chest tube was based on the patient's clinical appearance rather than on the x-ray findings. Chest radiography following the removal of chest tubes should not be a routinely performed procedure, but should preferably be based on the good clinical judgement and discrimination of the surgeon.

  15. Resolution of lung collapse in a preterm neonate following chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Yesha Subhashchandra; Shetye, Jaimala; Nanavati, Ruchi; Mehta, Amita

    2011-09-01

    Preterm neonates are prone to lung collapse because of many reasons. Chest physiotherapy can be used successfully in such cases with lung collapse in order to facilitate removal of secretions and re-expansion of the lung. With the help of a chest radiograph, improvement can be noted as in this case.

  16. Assisting in Providing Pre-Employment and In-Plant Training. Self-Paced Instructional Module, Module Number X-A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Kenneth L.; Brooks, Kent

    One of 33 self-paced instructional modules for training industry services leaders, this module contains three sequential learning activities on assisting in providing pre-employment and inplant training in an industry services program. (Industry services are manpower services provided by public agencies to new or expanding private industries.) The…

  17. Developing a Plan for Placing Graduates of a Pre-Employment Training Program. Self-Paced Instructional Module. Module Number XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Kenneth L.; And Others

    One of 33 self-paced instructional modules for training industry services leaders, this module contains three sequential learning activities on developing a plan for placing graduates of a pre-employment training program. (Industry services are manpower services provided by public agencies to new or expanding private industries.) The first…

  18. An Assessment of the Impact of Pre-Employment Training on the Safety Experience of Miners and Off-Highway Vehicle Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, L. G.; And Others

    The purpose of the research project described in the report was to determine whether an improvement in the safety experience of miners could be identified as attributable to pre-employment training programs presented at Butte, Montana, and Casa Grande, Arizona. (NTIS)

  19. An Assessment of the Impact of Pre-Employment Training on the Safety Experience of Miners and Off-Highway Vehicle Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, L. G.; And Others

    The purpose of the research project described in the report was to determine whether an improvement in the safety experience of miners could be identified as attributable to pre-employment training programs presented at Butte, Montana, and Casa Grande, Arizona. (NTIS)

  20. 41 CFR 301-75.3 - What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.3 Section 301-75.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  1. 41 CFR 301-75.3 - What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.3 Section 301-75.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  2. 41 CFR 301-75.3 - What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.3 Section 301-75.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  3. 41 CFR 301-75.3 - What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.3 Section 301-75.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  4. 41 CFR 301-75.3 - What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What governing policies and procedures must we establish related to pre-employment interview travel? 301-75.3 Section 301-75.3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  5. 42 CFR 37.41 - Chest roentgenogram specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Miners shall be disrobed from the waist up at the time the roentgenogram is given. The facility shall... least 100 and does not exceed 300, which produces roentgenograms with spatial resolution, contrast... Chest radiograph specifications—film. (a) Miners must be disrobed from the waist up at the time the...

  6. Chest Wall Trauma.

    PubMed

    Majercik, Sarah; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall trauma is common, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of trauma patients. Early identification of major chest wall and concomitant intrathoracic injuries is critical. Generalized management of multiple rib fractures and flail chest consists of adequate pain control (including locoregional modalities); management of pulmonary dysfunction by invasive and noninvasive means; and, in some cases, surgical fixation. Multiple studies have shown that patients with flail chest have substantial benefit (decreased ventilator and intensive care unit days, improved pulmonary function, and improved long-term functional outcome) when they undergo surgery compared with nonoperative management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Chest pain in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Raiola, G; Galati, M C; De Sanctis, V; Salerno, D; Arcuri, V M; Mussari, A

    2002-12-01

    In children and in adolescents, chest pain is relatively common and self-limiting. The close association between chest pain, cardiopathies and sudden death is the cause of intense anxiety in boys and their parents and even doctors. The most frequent causes of chest pain, the diagnosis and the eventual treatment are examined. Finally, the causes of chest pain due to drug abuse (in particular cocaine) and to CO poisoning are also examined. Good knowledge of the problem, an accurate anamnesis and a careful objective exam are useful to choose the most suitable treatment.

  8. Pre-employment physical capacity testing as a predictor for musculoskeletal injury in paramedics: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Natasha; Smith, Gavin; Stewart, Scott; Kamphuis, Catherine

    2016-11-22

    Workplace injuries place a significant physical, social and financial burden on organisations globally. Paramedics provide emergency management of workplace injuries, and are subjected to heightened injury risk as a direct consequence of providing such care. This review aims to identify the current evidence reporting workplace musculoskeletal injury generally, and to relate this to pre-employment physical capacity testing within the paramedic industry specifically. A search of the electronic databases (Ovid Medline, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, NIOSHTIC-2, RILOSH, CISDOC and HSELINE) was completed using the keywords musculoskeletal, workplace, injury, industrial, accident, pre-employment physical capacity testing, paramedic, emergency service employee, firefighter, and police. Articles were excluded if they did not describe pre-employment physical capacity testing, musculoskeletal injuries, or were not available in English. The electronic literature search identified 765 articles, following application of exclusion criteria: based on title/abstract of article (669); no relevance (62) or unavailable in English (4), 30 articles were included in this review.The review identified that physical fitness, gender, age, equipment and demographic variables were key factors in the current high rate of paramedic workplace injury. However, there is little evidence available to quantify the relationship between pre-employment physical capacity testing and subsequent injury amongst the paramedic cohort. Despite evidence suggesting that pre-employment physical capacity testing scores may be predictive of subsequent musculoskeletal injury in paramedics, there are currently no studies in this area. Quantifying the potential association between factors affecting the conduct of paramedic work and the type of injuries that result requires examination through future research.

  9. 42 CFR 37.80 - Availability of records for radiographs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINERS Chest.... (a) Medical information and radiographs on miners will be released by NIOSH only with the written consent from the miner, or if the miner is deceased, written consent from the miner's widow or widower...

  10. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology().

    PubMed

    De Luca, C; Valentino, M; Rimondi, M R; Branchini, M; Baleni, M Casadio; Barozzi, L

    2008-12-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care.The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography - as an adjunct to chest radiography - on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs.

  11. Gallium-67 scans of the chest in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J.; Garay, S.M.; Greene, J.B.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.; McCauley, D.I.

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-six (/sup 67/Ga)citrate chest scans were performed in 71 adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Forty-five of these patients also had Kaposi's sarcoma. Only 29 of 57 abnormal scans were correlated with abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiographs were negative for 27 scans and unavailable for one. Several scan patterns were seen. Diffusely increased lung uptake was seen most commonly with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, but also other infections and noninfectious inflammatory conditions. Focal uptake corresponding to regional lymph node groups occurred most often with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare but aslo with lymphoma. Localized intrapulmonary uptake was seen in bacterial pneumonias. Perihilar activity occurred in two cases. When chest radiographs were abnormal and /sup 67/Ga scans negative, the most common diagnosis was pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

  12. Visual simulation of radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, G.

    1985-01-18

    A method for computer simulation of radiographs has been added to the LLNL version of the solid modeler TIPS-1 (Technical Information Processing System-1). This new tool will enable an engineer to compare an actual radiograph of a solid to its computer-generated counterpart. The appearance of discrepancies between the two can be an indication of flaws in the solid object. Simulated radiographs can also be used to preview the placement of x-ray sources to focus on areas of concern before actual radiographs are made.

  13. Radiographic appearance of nosocomial legionnaires' disease after erythromycin treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, C; Roig, J; Planas, F; Bechini, J; Tenesa, M; Morera, J

    1991-01-01

    Radiographic features of 71 patients (48 men, 23 women) with nosocomial Legionella pneumophila pneumonia were assessed and compared with those of other nosocomial series of L pneumophila pneumonia. Sixteen patients were assessed retrospectively and 55 prospectively. Chest radiographs were assessed at the onset of the illness, 10 days later, and at 3 months. Erythromycin was given to 67 patients at the time of the diagnosis and to the remaining four at a later stage. Forty eight patients were over the age of 60. On the initial chest radiograph 53 of the 71 patients had unilateral shadowing (23 of them in the right lung); 35 had unilobar shadowing and the remaining 36 had more than one affected lobe. Pleural effusion was present in 24 cases and cavitation in 2. One patient had evidence of a pericardial effusion. At 10 days 21 patients had evidence of radiographic progression (14 ipsilateral), but 28 had improved. At 3 months 36 patients had an abnormal radiograph, 30 showing residual scarring, 15 loss of volume, six pleural shadows and two cavitation. Our series shows a lesser incidence of unilateral shadowing and pleural effusion than other nosocomial series and a lesser tendency to progression, but more patients had radiographic abnormalities at long term follow up. PMID:1948796

  14. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum: an important differential in acute chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Francesca; McCullough, Chris; Rahman, Asif

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with pleuritic chest pain that was present on waking and localised to the left costal margin with no radiation. He was otherwise asymptomatic and denied preceding trauma, heavy lifting, coughing or recent vomiting. Observations and examination were unremarkable; however, a chest radiograph showed a pneumomediastinum. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) is a rare condition that tends to follow a benign clinical course. A CT of the chest is generally only indicated if the chest X-ray fails to show an SPM in patients for whom there is a high index of clinical suspicion. A contrast-enhanced swallow study is only indicated if there is suspicion of an oesophageal tear or rupture. Evidence suggests that patients with SPM can be managed conservatively and observed for 24 h. PMID:25432910

  15. Applied pathology for radiographers

    SciTech Connect

    Laudicina, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents a basic text for the student of radiologic sciences. It includes most of the pathology recommended by the ASRT Curriculum Guide. Radiographic technique and positioning are examined when relevant to obtaining quality radiographs of specific disease conditions. Brief overviews of these conditions include background etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Many illustrations are included to enhance understanding.

  16. Radiographic film package

    SciTech Connect

    Muylle, W. E.

    1985-08-27

    A radiographic film package for non-destructive testing, comprising a radiographic film sheet, an intensifying screen with a layer of lead bonded to a paper foil, and a vacuum heat-sealed wrapper with a layer of aluminum and a heat-sealed easy-peelable thermoplastic layer.

  17. Chest Pain: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition. Seek emergency medical assistance immediately. Pneumonia with pleurisy Frequent signs and symptoms of pneumonia are chest ... a breath or coughing. This condition is called pleurisy. One sign of pleurisy is that the pain ...

  18. Chest CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside the scanner. For some diagnoses, a contrast dye, often iodine-based, may be injected into a ... your arm before the imaging test. This contrast dye highlights areas inside your chest and creates clearer ...

  19. Chest tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Chest Injuries and Disorders Collapsed Lung Critical Care Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders A.D.A. ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map ...

  20. [Chest injuries (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Elert, O; Satter, P

    1979-04-01

    The mortality rate of chest injuries sustained during work or in road accidents stands now at 15-20%. The considerable force of the impact in road accidents is, in 60-80% of the cases, responsible for chest injuries which involve not only the chest wall but also the lungs. The extent and course of the lung damage must be assessed by repeated X-ray examinations, blood gas analyses and clinical observations. The decision to intubate and apply artificial ventilation should be made at an early stage. Fracture of a single rib needs only pain killers. If a rib is broken in several places or if several ribs are fractured instability of the chest wall is apt to develop in 15-20% of the cases. It manifests itself in paradoxical breathing and ensuing increase in the dead space. These cases require prompt "internal pneumatic splinting" in the form of positive pressure respiration and intubation. In recent years surgical stabilization of the chest wall has regained favour. Plate osteosynthesis, screw-less rib plates, self-gripping steel plates and steel splints are being used (Brunner, Hofmeister, Koncz). Primary osteosynthetic stabilization of the chest wall is indicated only if artificial ventilation has proved inadequate and there are other reasons for performing a thoracotomy. In these circumstances surgical intervention ensures that prolonged artificial ventilation and its attendent risks and complications and the demands made on the nursing staff are reduced to a minimum.

  1. Pleuritic Chest Pain: Sorting Through the Differential Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Reamy, Brian V; Williams, Pamela M; Odom, Michael Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A validated clinical decision rule for pulmonary embolism should be employed to guide the use of additional tests such as d-dimer assays, ventilation-perfusion scans, or computed tomography angiography. Myocardial infarction, pericarditis, aortic dissection, pneumonia, and pneumothorax are other serious causes that should be ruled out using history and physical examination, electrocardiography, troponin assays, and chest radiography before another diagnosis is made. Validated clinical decision rules are available to help exclude coronary artery disease. Viruses are common causative agents of pleuritic chest pain. Coxsackieviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are likely pathogens. Treatment is guided by the underlying diagnosis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are appropriate for pain management in those with virally triggered or nonspecific pleuritic chest pain. In patients with persistent symptoms, persons who smoke, and those older than 50 years with pneumonia, it is important to document radiographic resolution with repeat chest radiography six weeks after initial treatment.

  2. Repeat rates in digital chest radiography and strategies for improvement.

    PubMed

    Fintelmann, Florian; Pulli, Benjamin; Abedi-Tari, Faezeh; Trombley, Maureen; Shore, Mary-Theresa; Shepard, Jo-Anne; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2012-05-01

    To determine the repeat rate (RR) of chest radiographs acquired with portable computed radiography (CR) and installed direct radiography (DR) and to develop and assess strategies designed to decrease the RR. The RR and reasons for repeated digital chest radiographs were documented over the course of 16 months while a task force of thoracic radiologists, technologist supervisors, technologists, and information technology specialists continued to examine the workflow for underlying causes. Interventions decreasing the RR were designed and implemented. The initial RR of digital chest radiographs was 3.6% (138/3818) for portable CR and 13.3% (476/3575) for installed DR systems. By combining RR measurement with workflow analysis, targets for technical and teaching interventions were identified. The interventions decreased the RR to 1.8% (81/4476) for portable CR and to 8.2% (306/3748) for installed DR. We found the RR of direct digital chest radiography to be significantly higher than that of computed chest radiography. We believe this is due to the ease with which repeat images can be obtained and discarded, and it suggests the need for ongoing surveillance of RR. We were able to demonstrate that strategies to lower the RR, which had been developed in the era of film-based imaging, can be adapted to the digital environment. On the basis of our findings, we encourage radiologists to assess their own departmental RRs for direct digital chest radiography and to consider similar interventions if necessary to achieve acceptable RRs for this modality.

  3. [Chest pain evaluation project].

    PubMed

    Filippo, Ottani; Nicola, Binetti; Casagranda, Ivo; Cassin, Matteo; Cavazza, Mario; Grifoni, Stefano; Lenzi, Tiziano; Lorenzoni, Roberto; Sbrojavacca, Rodolfo; Tanzi, Pietro; Vergara, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of acute chest pain remains challenging, despite many insights and innovations over the past two decades. The percentage of patients presenting at the emergency department with acute chest pain who are subsequently admitted to the hospital appears to be increasing. Patients with acute coronary syndromes who are inadvertently discharged from the emergency department have an adverse short-term prognosis. However, the admission of a patient with chest pain who is at low risk for acute coronary syndrome can lead to unnecessary tests and procedures, with their burden of costs and complications. Therefore, with increasing economic pressures on health care, physicians and administrators are interested in improving the efficiency of care for patients with acute chest pain. Since the emergency department organization (i.e. the availability of an intensive observational area) and integration of care and treatment between emergency physicians and cardiologists greatly differ over the national territory, the purpose of the present position paper is two-fold: first, to review the evidence-based efficacy and utility of various diagnostic tools, and, second, to delineate the basic critical pathways (describing key steps for care and treatment) that need to be implemented in order to standardize and expedite the evaluation of chest pain patients, making their diagnosis and treatment as uniform as possible across the country.

  4. Reader characteristics linked to detection of pulmonary nodules on radiographs: ROC vs. JAFROC analyses of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Akshay; Robinson, John W.; Ryan, John; McEntee, Mark F.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore whether reader characteristics are linked to heightened levels of diagnostic performance in chest radiology using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and jackknife free response ROC (JAFROC) methodologies. A set of 40 postero-anterior chest radiographs was developed, of which 20 were abnormal containing one or more simulated nodules, of varying subtlety. Images were independently reviewed by 12 boardcertified radiologists including six chest specialists. The observer performance was measured in terms of ROC and JAFROC scores. For the ROC analysis, readers were asked to rate their degree of suspicion for the presence of nodules by using a confidence rating scale (1-6). JAFROC analysis required the readers to locate and rate as many suspicious areas as they wished using the same scale and resultant data were used to generate Az and FOM scores for ROC and JAFROC analyses respectively. Using Pearson methods, scores of performance were correlated with 7 reader characteristics recorded using a questionnaire. JAFROC analysis showed that improved reader performance was significantly (p<=0.05) linked with chest specialty (p<0.03), hours per week reading chest radiographs (p<0.03) and chest readings per year (p<0.04). ROC analyses demonstrated only one significant relationship, hours per week reading chest radiographs (p<0.02).The results of this study have shown that radiologist's performance in the detection of pulmonary nodules on radiographs is significantly linked to chest specialty, hours reading per week and number of radiographs read per year. Also, JAFROC is a more powerful predictor of performance as compared to ROC.

  5. A systematic review of the usefulness of pre-employment and pre-duty screening in predicting mental health outcomes amongst emergency workers.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Ruth E; Milligan-Saville, Josie S; Mitchell, Philip B; Bryant, Richard A; Harvey, Samuel B

    2017-03-30

    Despite a lack of proven efficacy, pre-employment or pre-duty screening, which alleges to test for vulnerability to PTSD and other mental health disorders, remains common amongst emergency services. This systematic review aimed to determine the usefulness of different factors in predicting mental disorder amongst emergency workers and to inform practice regarding screening procedures. Systematic searches were conducted in MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE to identify cohort studies linking pre-employment or pre-duty measures in first responders with later mental health outcomes. Possible predictors of poor mental health were grouped into six categories and their overall level of evidence was assessed. Twenty-one prospective cohort studies were identified. Dynamic measures including physiological responses to simulated trauma and maladaptive coping styles (e.g. negative self-appraisal) had stronger evidence as predictors of vulnerability in first responders than more traditional static factors (e.g. pre-existing psychopathology). Personality factors (e.g. trait anger) had moderate evidence for predictive power. Based on the evidence reviewed, however, we are unable to provide emergency services with specific information to enhance their current personnel selection. The results indicate that pre-duty screening protocols that include personality assessments and dynamic measures of physiological and psychological coping strategies may be able to identify some personnel at increased risk of mental health problems. However, further longitudinal research is required in order to provide meaningful guidance to employers on the overall utility of either pre-employment or pre-duty screening. In particular, research examining the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values of various screening measures is urgently needed.

  6. Radiographic abnormalities among construction workers exposed to quartz containing dust

    PubMed Central

    Tjoe, N; Burdorf, A; Parker, J; Attfield, M; van Duivenbooden, C; Heederik, D

    2003-01-01

    Background: Construction workers are exposed to quartz containing respirable dust, at levels that may cause fibrosis in the lungs. Studies so far have not established a dose-response relation for radiographic abnormalities for this occupational group. Aims: To measure the extent of radiographic abnormalities among construction workers primarily exposed to quartz containing respirable dust. Methods: A cross sectional study on radiographic abnormalities indicative of pneumoconiosis was conducted among 1339 construction workers mainly involved in grinding, (jack)-hammering, drilling, cutting, sawing, and polishing. Radiological abnormalities were determined by median results of the 1980 International Labour Organisation system of three certified "B" readers. Questionnaires were used for assessment of occupational history, presence of respiratory diseases, and symptoms and smoking habits. Results: An abnormality of ILO profusion category 1/0 and greater was observed on 10.2% of the chest radiographs, and profusion category of 1/1 or greater on 2.9% of the radiographs. The average duration of exposure of this group was 19 years and the average age was 42. The predominant type of small opacities (irregularly shaped) is presumably indicative of mixed dust pneumoconiosis. The prevalence of early signs of nodular silicosis (small rounded opacities of category 1/0 or greater) was low (0.8%). Conclusions: The study suggests an elevated risk of radiographic abnormalities among these workers with expected high exposure. An association between radiographic abnormalities and cumulative exposure to quartz containing dust from construction sites was observed, after correction for potentially confounding variables. PMID:12771392

  7. Chest Tomosynthesis: Technical Principles and Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, James T.; McAdams, H. Page

    2009-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a radiographic technique that can produce an arbitrary number of section images of a patient from a single pass of the x-ray tube. It utilizes a conventional x-ray tube, a flat-panel detector, a computer-controlled tube mover, and special reconstruction algorithms to produce section images. While it does not have the depth resolution of computed tomography (CT), tomosynthesis provides some of the tomographic benefits of CT but at lower cost and radiation dose than CT. Compared to conventional chest radiography, chest tomosynthesis results in improved visibility of normal structures such as vessels, airway and spine. By reducing visual clutter from overlying normal anatomy, it also enhances detection of small lung nodules. This review article outlines the components of a tomosynthesis system, discusses results regarding improved lung nodule detection from the recent literature, and presents examples of nodule detection from a clinical trial in human subjects. Possible implementation strategies for use in clinical chest imaging are discussed. PMID:19616909

  8. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  9. Restrictive chest wall disorders.

    PubMed

    Donath, Joseph; Miller, Albert

    2009-06-01

    Hypoventilation can be caused by diseases of the chest wall. Any anatomical or functional abnormality of the bony thorax increases dead space ventilation and the work of breathing, whether congenital or acquired, acute or chronic, and whether its cause is infectious, traumatic, environmental, iatrogenic, or unknown. In this article, we discuss these heterogeneous disorders from the viewpoint of the practicing nonpediatric pulmonary physician, only briefly touching on surgical, pediatric, rheumatologic, and other nonpulmonary ramifications. Emphasis is on the most common and the best researched forms of chest wall restriction, including kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, flail chest, and ankylosing spondylitis. Other diseases such as osteoporosis with its less well known pulmonary effects, and some rarely seen entities, are briefly discussed.

  10. A Rare Case of Hamartoma Chest Wall Following Trauma in a 42-year-old Man

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Mojtaba; Pour, Asghar Alie; Hosseini, Peyman Khadem; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Ahmadi, Koorosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma (CWH) is a distinct and extremely rare tumor-like lesion of the thorax. It usually presents in the neonatal period or in infancy. The common presentation is in the form of a visible chest wall mass with or without respiratory distress. Case presentation: A 42-year-old man with a history of chest wall trauma since 5 years ago was admitted with a swelling of the anterior of the chest wall and during this period has grown slowly. Physical examination showed a left anterior chest wall deformity. Chest radiographs and chest CT showed a left anterolateral chest wall mass involving the fourth and fifth ribs. Thoracotomy was performed. The tumor and involved ribs were resected with a 5cm safe margin. The histopathologic examination showed hamartoma. The patient has been fallowed up since 60 month ago, and has not had any complaints in this time. Result: Despite the rarity of chest wall hematoma, this side effect must always be taken into consideration while studying the chest wall injuries especially in the case of trauma history due to other differential diagnosis and her side effects such as respiratory problems. Conclusion: Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with hamartoma Chest wall following trauma in order to avoid its complications such as respiratory problems. Surgical excision is usually curative in combination with conservative therapy if possible. PMID:27994306

  11. Aspects of chest imaging in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cascade, P N; Kazerooni, E A

    1994-04-01

    Timely performance and accurate interpretation of portable chest radiographs in the ICU setting are fundamental components of quality care. Teamwork between intensive care clinicians and radiologists is necessary to assure that the appropriate studies, of high technical quality, are obtained. By working together to integrate available clinical information with systematic comprehensive analysis of images, accurate diagnoses can be made, optimal treatment instituted, and successful outcomes optimized.

  12. A comparison between two systems for pre-employment medical assessment in the Royal Netherlands Army by a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    de Raad, John; Redekop, W Ken

    2004-06-01

    In 1998, the basic medical requirements for the Royal Netherlands Army were introduced as a standard for the assessment of the medical suitability of military personnel, consisting of 43 dichotomized points of judgment. This system replaced the old physical capacity, upper limbs, locomotion, hearing, eyesight, and emotional and mental state system, based on the detection of diseases and infirmities. We compared the two different examination systems for their ability to identify suitable recruits. For the latter purpose, we used the two operational measures of availability and health care costs. We performed a randomized, controlled study in which 352 soldiers were monitored for 2 years after being declared fit by one of the pre-employment medical assessment systems in question and having passed their general military training. We found that the pre-employment medical assessment system was the dominant factor for predicting the number of days fit-for-duty, as well as for the health care costs incurred. Those declared fit by the new system showed a statistically significant higher mean number of days fit-for-duty (648 compared with 612) and incurred significantly lower mean health care costs (6396 compared with 746 Euro). In this study, we were not able to uncover the mechanism by which the "basic medical requirements" examination system led to an improvement in outcome. For the present, this mechanism is interpreted because of differences between the two systems.

  13. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Site Index A-Z Spotlight Recently posted: Anal Cancer Facet Joint Block Video: Lung Cancer Screening Video: Upper GI Tract X-ray Video: ... of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray requires no special preparation. ...

  14. Weld radiograph enigmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1986-01-01

    Weld radiograph enigmas are features observed on X-ray radiographs of welds. Some of these features resemble indications of weld defects, although their origin is different. Since they are not understood, they are a source of concern. There is a need to identify their causes and especially to measure their effect on weld mechanical properties. A method is proposed whereby the enigmas can be evaluated and rated, in relation to the full spectrum of weld radiograph indications. Thie method involves a signature and a magnitude that can be used as a quantitive parameter. The signature is generated as the diference between the microdensitometer trace across the radiograph and the computed film intensity derived from a thickness scan along the corresponding region of the sample. The magnitude is the measured difference in intensity between the peak and base line values of the signature. The procedure is demonstated by comparing traces across radiographs of a weld sample before and after the introduction of a hole and by a system based on a MacIntosh mouse used for surface profiling.

  15. Radiographic total lung capacity determination aided by a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Bencowitz, H A; Shigeoka, J W

    1980-11-01

    This report describes a method that was used to determine total lung capacity from routine chest radiographs, using a programmable calculator to facilitate computation. The results correlated closely with those obtained by a computerized method. The technique was rapid, inexpensive (the necessary equipment cost less than $400), and could be used in any pulmonary laboratory or office. The program is listed, and an example provided.

  16. Chest radiography in dust-exposed miners: Promise and problems, potential and imperfections

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.R.; Attfield, M.D.; Parker, J.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Since the early 1900s, it was recognized that many dust-exposed workers developed abnormal radiographs during life. Chest radiography remains the primary means of determining the presence and extent of dust-induced pneumoconiosis, although it is ineffective for detecting airways obstructions from mine dust exposure. This chapter reviews the uses and limitations of chest radiography in the study, surveillance, screening, clinical diagnosis, and disability determinations of occupational lung diseases in dust-exposed workers. 70 refs.

  17. Clinical predictors of radiographic abnormalities among infants with bronchiolitis in a paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute viral respiratory exacerbation is one of the most common conditions encountered in a paediatric emergency department (PED) during winter months. We aimed at defining clinical predictors of chest radiography prescription and radiographic abnormalities, among infants with bronchiolitis in a paediatric emergency department. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children less than 2 years of age with clinical bronchiolitis, who presented for evaluation at the paediatric emergency department of an urban general hospital in France. Detailed information regarding historical features, examination findings, and management were collected. Clinical predictors of interest were explored in multivariate logistic regression models. Results Among 410 chest radiographs blindly interpreted by two experts, 40 (9.7%) were considered as abnormal. Clinical predictors of chest radiography achievement were age (under three months), feeding difficulties, fever over 38°C, hypoxia under than 95% of oxygen saturation, respiratory distress, crackles, and bronchitis rales. Clinical predictors of radiographic abnormalities were fever and close to significance hypoxia and conjunctivitis. Conclusion Our study provides arguments for reducing chest radiographs in infants with bronchiolitis. For infants with clinical factors such as age less than three months, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress without hypoxia, isolated crackles or bronchitis rales, careful clinical follow-up should be provided instead of chest radiography. PMID:24906343

  18. Role of Cross Sectional Imaging in Isolated Chest Wall Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Sharma, Barun K.; Prakash, Arjun; Dhingani, Dhabal D.; Bora, Karobi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Isolated chest wall tuberculosis though a rare entity, the incidence of it has been on rise among immunocompromised population making it an important challenging diagnosis for the physicians. Its clinical presentation may resemble pyogenic chest wall abscess or chest wall soft tissue tumour. Sometimes it is difficult to detect clinically or on plain radiograph. Aim The present study was conducted with an aim to evaluate the common sites and varying appearances of isolated chest wall tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A hospital based cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in Assam Medical College and Hospital, a tertiary care centre in North East India. The study group comprise of 21 patients (n=15 male and n=6 females) with isolated chest wall tuberculosis without associated pulmonary or spinal involvement who were subjected to Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CT/MRI) of the thorax following initial Ultrasonogram (USG) evaluation of the local site. Pathological correlation was done from imaging guided sampling of the aspirate or surgery. Results Variable sites of involvement were seen in the chest wall in our patients (n=21), with chest wall abscess formation being the most common presentation and rib being the most common bony site affected in the thoracic cage. Bony sclerosis was noted in 11 patients (52.4%), periosteal reaction in 10 patients (47.6%) and sequestration in five patients (23.8%). CT/MRI not only localized the exact site and extent of the abscesses which facilitated guided aspirations, but also helped in detecting typical bony lesions thereby, differentiating from pyogenic osteomyelitis besides ruling out associated pulmonary or pleural involvement in such patients. Conclusion Cross-sectional imaging plays an important role by giving a wholesome picture of both soft tissue and bony pathology. It is important to have adequate understanding of the radiologic manifestations of the chest wall involvement and

  19. A comparison of conventional and grid techniques for chest radiography in field surveys

    PubMed Central

    Washington, J. S.; Dick, J. A.; Jacobsen, M.; Prentice, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Washington, J. S., Dick, J. A., Jacobsen, M., and Prentice, W. M. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 365-374. A comparison of conventional and grid techniques for chest radiography in field surveys. The effect on the quality of chest radiographs using a reciprocating grid with a moderately high kilovoltage (96 to 105 kV) has been studied. A total of 1 710 mineworkers had two postero-anterior chest radiographs taken at the same visit to a linked pair of mobile ϰ-ray units. One film was taken with conventional exposure factors and the other with moderately high kilovoltage and a reciprocating grid. The grid was exchanged between the two units according to a randomized plan so that the first radiograph was not always taken with the same technique. The 3 420 films so produced were subsequently assessed for quality by five doctors experienced in reading chest films. The films were examined singly in random order and the reader did not know which technique had been used for a given film. Four of the readers recorded improved quality using the grid technique for films from men whose antero-posterior chest measurements exceeded 254 mm (10 in), but they preferred the conventional exposure technique for films from men whose chest measurements were less than 254 mm. Results from all film pairs where a difference in quality was recorded showed no overall advantage for either technique. PMID:4753720

  20. Angina - when you have chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain; ACS - chest pain; Heart attack - chest pain; Myocardial infarction - chest pain; MI - chest pain ... AHA guideline for the management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction: executive summary: a report of the American College ...

  1. Comparison Of Digital Radiographic Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yen

    1986-06-01

    A total PACS will be inevitable for radiology practice within several years. To achieve a total PACS for radiology, a satisfactory digital radiographic unit is required, because approximately 65% of digital data for PACS comes from digital radiographs. There are several possibilities for producing digital radiographs, and 3 - 4 companies have been marketing digital radiographic devices. Some data regarding the digital radiographic units on the market are compared. It will aid in assessing the current status and availability of this aspect of development, as well as providing a summary of further development of digital radiographic technology.

  2. Which Disposable Chest Electrode?

    PubMed Central

    Hubner, P. J. B.

    1969-01-01

    Chest electrodes are preferred to limb electrodes for cardiac monitoring, as limb movements are not restricted and produce less interference of the E.C.G. trace. Eight types of disposable chest electrodes were investigated to compare their performance, skin reactions, cost, ease of application, size, and skin–electrode impedance. Elema-Schonander electrodes were found to be the most efficient and the most expensive. In their application care was required to avoid severe skin reactions. Dracard electrodes were simple to attach, worked well without severe skin reactions, and were cheap. They are recommended for routine use. Smith and Nephew electrodes, a type of “multipoint electrodes” which do not require electrode jelly, frequently produced severe skin reactions, making them unsuitable for monitoring for periods exceeding 12 hours. PMID:5801347

  3. Neutron radiographic viewing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leysath, W.; Brown, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Neutron radiographic viewing system consisting of camera head and control processor is developed for use in nondestructive testing applications. Camera head consists of neutron-sensitive image intensifier system, power supply, and SEC vidicon camera head. Both systems, with their optics, are housed on test mount.

  4. [Chest pain in pediatric emergency departments: a usually benign process].

    PubMed

    Gastesi Larrañaga, M; Fernández Landaluce, A; Mintegi Raso, S; Vázquez Ronco, M; Benito Fernández, J

    2003-09-01

    To describe the characteristics and management of the children aged less than 14 years presenting to the pediatric emergency department with chest pain. Retrospective review of all the patients who presented to the pediatric emergency department with chest pain from 15 January 2001 to 14 January 2002. Families received a follow-up telephone call inquiring about the patient's outcome. The Mann-Whitney U test was used for non-parametric data and the Chi-square test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test were used for categorical data. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. In 2001, 161 children presented with chest pain, representing 0.34% of the total number of consultations. Less than half of these patients (48%) had associated symptoms. Physical examination revealed abnormalities in 63% of the patients (39.1%). The most common finding was pain on palpation of the chest wall. Additional diagnostic tests were performed in 129 patients (80%). These included 116 radiographs, 62 electrocardiograms and nine miscellaneous tests. Abnormalities were found in seven chest radiographs. Only one child was admitted to hospital with pneumonia. The most common discharge diagnoses were idiopathic and/or musculoskeletal chest pain in 139 patients, pain of respiratory origin in 14 patients, gastrointestinal disorders in one patient, cardiac problems in one patient and other morbid processes in nine patients. Children with associated symptoms were more likely to receive a diagnosis other than nonspecific chest pain (28% vs 3.2% in children without other symptoms; relative risk: 8.66). Outpatient treatment included analgesics in 105 patients (65.2%). Only two children (1.2%) returned for reevaluation and no important findings were detected. Telephone follow-up was carried out in 117 children (72.6%). The pain lasted for less than 24 hours in 52 patients (32.2%). Thirty percent of the patients missed at least one day of school because of chest pain. Chest pain is an

  5. Suppression of translucent elongated structures: applications in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Hogeweg, Laurens; Sanchez, Clara I; van Ginneken, Bram

    2013-11-01

    Projection images, such as those routinely acquired in radiological practice, are difficult to analyze because multiple 3-D structures superimpose at a single point in the 2-D image. Removal of particular superimposed structures may improve interpretation of these images, both by humans and by computers. This work therefore presents a general method to isolate and suppress structures in 2-D projection images. The focus is on elongated structures, which allows an intensity model of a structure of interest to be extracted using local information only. The model is created from profiles sampled perpendicular to the structure. Profiles containing other structures are detected and removed to reduce the influence on the model. Subspace filtering, using blind source separation techniques, is applied to separate the structure to be suppressed from other structures. By subtracting the modeled structure from the original image a structure suppressed image is created. The method is evaluated in four experiments. In the first experiment ribs are suppressed in 20 artificial radiographs simulated from 3-D lung computed tomography (CT) images. The proposed method with blind source separation and outlier detection shows superior suppression of ribs in simulated radiographs, compared to a simplified approach without these techniques. Additionally, the ability of three observers to discriminate between patches containing ribs and containing no ribs, as measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), reduced from 0.99-1.00 on original images to 0.75-0.84 on suppressed images. In the second experiment clavicles are suppressed in 253 chest radiographs. The effect of suppression on clavicle visibility is evaluated using the clavicle contrast and border response, showing a reduction of 78% and 34%, respectively. In the third experiment nodules extracted from CT were simulated close to the clavicles in 100 chest radiographs. It was found that after

  6. Clinical and Radiologic Predictive Factors of Rib Fractures in Outpatients With Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; McMahon, Colm J; Shah, Samir; Wu, Jim S; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Kung, Justin W

    2017-05-30

    To identify the clinical and radiologic predictive factors of rib fractures in stable adult outpatients presenting with chest pain and to determine the utility of dedicated rib radiographs in this population of patients. Following Institutional Review Board approval, we performed a retrospective review of 339 consecutive cases in which a frontal chest radiograph and dedicated rib series had been obtained for chest pain in the outpatient setting. The frontal chest radiograph and dedicated rib series were sequentially reviewed in consensus by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the initial report. The consensus interpretation of the dedicated rib series was used as the gold standard. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis assessed clinical and radiological factors associated with rib fractures. Fisher exact test was used to assess differences in medical treatment between the 2 groups. Of the 339 patients, 53 (15.6%) had at least 1 rib fracture. Only 20 of the 53 (37.7%) patients' fractures could be identified on the frontal chest radiograph. The frontal chest radiograph had a sensitivity of 38% and specificity of 100% when using the rib series as the reference standard. No pneumothorax, new mediastinal widening or pulmonary contusion was identified. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis of clinical factors associated with the presence of rib fractures revealed a significant association of trauma history (odds ratio 5.7 [p < 0.05]) and age ≥40 (odds radio 3.1 [p < 0.05]). Multiple variable logistic regression analysis of radiographic factors associated with rib fractures in this population demonstrated a significant association of pleural effusion with rib fractures (odds ratio 18.9 [p < 0.05]). Patients with rib fractures received narcotic analgesia in 47.2% of the cases, significantly more than those without rib fractures (21.3%, p < 0.05). None of the patients required hospitalization. In the stable outpatient setting

  7. Neutron radiographic viewing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The design, development and application of a neutron radiographic viewing system for use in nondestructive testing applications is considered. The system consists of a SEC vidicon camera, neutron image intensifier system, disc recorder, and TV readout. Neutron bombardment of the subject is recorded by an image converter and passed through an optical system into the SEC vidicon. The vidicon output may be stored, or processed for visual readout.

  8. Outpatient radiographic exposure in the first five years of life

    SciTech Connect

    Fosarelli, P.D.; DeAngelis, C.

    1987-06-01

    Young children receive a variety of diagnostic radiographs over time. In some cases the exposure to radiation may be unwarranted because the films may yield confusing results, or may also need to be repeated because of poor technical quality. Even when the results are clearly negative, the subsequent treatment may proceed as if the film had been positive because of the child's clinical condition. The cumulative effect of such low-dose radiation on infants and children over time is unknown. The number and types of outpatient radiographs received by a cohort of poor children from a hospital-based continuity clinic during their first 5 years of life were reviewed. Also noted were the reason for obtaining the film, whether it was positive for that reason or another, whether the child had a chronic condition that prompted the use of radiograph, and the child's sex, race, and age when the film was obtained. Of the 218 children, 132 (60.6%) received 349 sets of films in their first 5 years. There was no difference in the number of films by race or sex. Chest and posttrauma bone or joint films accounted for 315 sets of films or 90.3% of the total. Overall, 25.8% of the 267 chest films were positive; this varied by age. Only 15% of the chest films were positive in the first year compared with 29 to 49% in the second through fifth years (p less than 0.001). Cough was the respiratory symptom most reliably associated with a positive chest film, both for the cohort (p less than 0.0001) and for children in the first year of life (p less than 0.01).

  9. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. Rohrer; Lacey Stewart; M. D. Wilke; N. S. King; S. A Baker; Wilfred Lewis

    1999-08-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics.

  10. DARHT Radiographic Grid Scale Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Warthen, Barry J.

    2015-02-13

    Recently it became apparent that the radiographic grid which has been used to calibrate the dimensional scale of DARHT radiographs was not centered at the location where the objects have been centered. This offset produced an error of 0.188% in the dimensional scaling of the radiographic images processed using the assumption that the grid and objects had the same center. This paper will show the derivation of the scaling correction, explain how new radiographs are being processed to account for the difference in location, and provide the details of how to correct radiographic image processed with the erroneous scale factor.

  11. Viewing Another Person's Eye Movements Improves Identification of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest X-Ray Inspection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchfield, Damien; Ball, Linden J.; Donovan, Tim; Manning, David J.; Crawford, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Double reading of chest x-rays is often used to ensure that fewer abnormalities are missed, but very little is known about how the search behavior of others affects observer performance. A series of experiments investigated whether radiographers benefit from knowing where another person looked for pulmonary nodules, and whether the expertise of…

  12. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Chest Radiography in the Detection of Rib Fractures in Abused Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Walton, John W.; Rosas, Angela J.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Rogers, Kristen K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs (CXR) are the standard method for evaluating rib fractures in abused infants. Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive method to detect rib fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare CT and CXR in the evaluation of rib fractures in abused infants. Methods: This retrospective study included all 12 abused infants…

  13. Viewing Another Person's Eye Movements Improves Identification of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest X-Ray Inspection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchfield, Damien; Ball, Linden J.; Donovan, Tim; Manning, David J.; Crawford, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Double reading of chest x-rays is often used to ensure that fewer abnormalities are missed, but very little is known about how the search behavior of others affects observer performance. A series of experiments investigated whether radiographers benefit from knowing where another person looked for pulmonary nodules, and whether the expertise of…

  14. Comparison of Computed Tomography and Chest Radiography in the Detection of Rib Fractures in Abused Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Walton, John W.; Rosas, Angela J.; Coulter, Kevin P.; Rogers, Kristen K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs (CXR) are the standard method for evaluating rib fractures in abused infants. Computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive method to detect rib fractures. The purpose of this study was to compare CT and CXR in the evaluation of rib fractures in abused infants. Methods: This retrospective study included all 12 abused infants…

  15. [History of chest percussion].

    PubMed

    Chrobák, L

    2001-01-01

    Although percussion of the abdomen was already known to the Greek physician Galenos (2nd century A. D.) who used it to distinguish between ascites and meteorism, the Viennese physician Leopold Auenbrugger (1722-1809) started to use, the percussion of the chest as a diagnostic tool. In 1761 he published his experience in a treatise called "New Method for Detecting Hidden Ailments of the Chest by Percussion of the Thorax" (Inventum novum ex percussione thoracis hummani ut signo abstruso interni pectoris morbos detergendi). However, this method was introduced into practice only 50 years later by Jean Nicolas Corvisart, who translated Auenbrugger's book in 1808 into French. The famous Vinnese internist of Czech origin Joseph Skoda (1805-1881) set the teaching about percussion and auscultation on a firm physical basis. Skoda confronted the physical findings with dissection materials in close cooperation with the renowned Vinnese pathologist Karl Rokitansky (1804-1878), who was born in Hradec Králové. The Medical School in Prague became famous for its excellent command of methods based on physical examination and surpassed even the Viennese School.

  16. Radiologists remember mountains better than radiographs, or do they?

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Karla K.; Marom, Edith M.; Godoy, Myrna C. B.; Palacio, Diana; Sagebiel, Tara; Cuellar, Sonia Betancourt; McEntee, Mark; Tian, Charles; Brennan, Patrick C.; Haygood, Tamara Miner

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Expertise with encoding material has been shown to aid long-term memory for that material. It is not clear how relevant this expertise is for image memorability (e.g., radiologists’ memory for radiographs), and how robust over time. In two studies, we tested scene memory using a standard long-term memory paradigm. One compared the performance of radiologists to naïve observers on two image sets, chest radiographs and everyday scenes, and the other radiologists’ memory with immediate as opposed to delayed recognition tests using musculoskeletal radiographs and forest scenes. Radiologists’ memory was better than novices for images of expertise but no different for everyday scenes. With the heterogeneity of image sets equated, radiologists’ expertise with radiographs afforded them better memory for the musculoskeletal radiographs than forest scenes. Enhanced memory for images of expertise disappeared over time, resulting in chance level performance for both image sets after weeks of delay. Expertise with the material is important for visual memorability but not to the same extent as idiosyncratic detail and variability of the image set. Similar memory decline with time for images of expertise as for everyday scenes further suggests that extended familiarity with an image is not a robust factor for visual memorability. PMID:26870748

  17. Radiologists remember mountains better than radiographs, or do they?

    PubMed

    Evans, Karla K; Marom, Edith M; Godoy, Myrna C B; Palacio, Diana; Sagebiel, Tara; Cuellar, Sonia Betancourt; McEntee, Mark; Tian, Charles; Brennan, Patrick C; Haygood, Tamara Miner

    2016-01-01

    Expertise with encoding material has been shown to aid long-term memory for that material. It is not clear how relevant this expertise is for image memorability (e.g., radiologists' memory for radiographs), and how robust over time. In two studies, we tested scene memory using a standard long-term memory paradigm. One compared the performance of radiologists to naïve observers on two image sets, chest radiographs and everyday scenes, and the other radiologists' memory with immediate as opposed to delayed recognition tests using musculoskeletal radiographs and forest scenes. Radiologists' memory was better than novices for images of expertise but no different for everyday scenes. With the heterogeneity of image sets equated, radiologists' expertise with radiographs afforded them better memory for the musculoskeletal radiographs than forest scenes. Enhanced memory for images of expertise disappeared over time, resulting in chance level performance for both image sets after weeks of delay. Expertise with the material is important for visual memorability but not to the same extent as idiosyncratic detail and variability of the image set. Similar memory decline with time for images of expertise as for everyday scenes further suggests that extended familiarity with an image is not a robust factor for visual memorability.

  18. 42 CFR 37.43 - Approval of radiographic facilities that use film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR MEDICAL EXAMINATIONS OF COAL MINERS Chest Radiographic.... The form must include: (1) The date of the last radiation safety inspection by an appropriate... have been corrected; and (4) The date of acquisition of the X-ray unit. To be acceptable, the radiation...

  19. Computer enhancement of radiographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekaney, A.; Keane, J.; Desautels, J.

    1973-01-01

    Examination of three relevant noise processes and the image degradation associated with Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) X-ray/scanning system was conducted for application to computer enhancement of radiographs using MSFC's digital filtering techniques. Graininess of type M, R single coat and R double coat X-ray films was quantified as a function of density level using root-mean-square (RMS) granularity. Quantum mottle (including film grain) was quantified as a function of the above film types, exposure level, specimen material and thickness, and film density using RMS granularity and power spectral density (PSD). For various neutral-density levels the scanning device used in digital conversion of radiographs was examined for noise characteristics which were quantified by RMS granularity and PSD. Image degradation of the entire pre-enhancement system (MG-150 X-ray device; film; and optronics scanner) was measured using edge targets to generate modulation transfer functions (MTF). The four parameters were examined as a function of scanning aperture sizes of approximately 12.5 25 and 50 microns.

  20. [Musculoskeletal-related chest pain].

    PubMed

    Sturm, C; Witte, T

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 10-50% of chest pains are caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The association is twice as frequent in primary care as in emergency admissions. This article provides an overview of the most important musculoskeletal causes of chest pain and on the diagnostics and therapy. A selective search and analysis of the literature related to the topic of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain were carried out. Non-inflammatory diseases, such as costochondritis and fibromyalgia are frequent causes of chest pain. Inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are much less common but are more severe conditions and therefore have to be diagnosed and treated. The diagnostics and treatment often necessitate interdisciplinary approaches. Chest pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases always represents a diagnosis by exclusion of other severe diseases of the heart, lungs and stomach. Physiotherapeutic and physical treatment measures are particularly important, including manual therapy, transcutaneous electrical stimulation and stabilization exercises, especially for functional myofascial disorders.

  1. Respiratory distress in newborn: evaluation of chest X-rays.

    PubMed

    Roggini, M; Pepino, D; D'Avanzo, M; Andreoli, G M; Ceccanti, S; Capocaccia, P

    2010-06-01

    We discuss the anatomic and pathophysiological patterns of preterm and term newborn. Particular attention is directed to technical artefacts relating to the interpretation of chest radiography. We analyze the reading of chest X-Ray of preterm with low birth weight and poor lung maturation. Are also taken into account X-Ray features relating to alveolar "recruitment" and radiographic changes after surfactant's administration. We highlight the most important paintings of bruncopulmonary dysplasia and its evolution. The most frequent neonatal pulmonary inflammation and thoraco-pulmonary malformation, that may affect more the neonatologist, are mentioned. We discuss the new diagnostic approach with non invasive techniques (ultrasound) in the neonatal distress. Some easily recognizable congenital heart disease are finally describes.

  2. Chest imaging features of patients afflicted with Influenza A (H1N1) in a Malaysian tertiary referral centre

    PubMed Central

    Bux, SI; Mohd. Ramli, N; Ahmad Sarji, S; Kamarulzaman, A

    2010-01-01

    This is a retrospective descriptive study of the chest imaging findings of 118 patients with confirmed A(H1N1) in a tertiary referral centre. About 42% of the patients had positive initial chest radiographic (CXR) findings. The common findings were bi-basal air-space opacities and perihilar reticular and alveolar infiltrates. In select cases, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging showed ground-glass change with some widespread reticular changes and atelectasis. PMID:21611071

  3. Impact of chest X-ray before discharge in asymptomatic children after cardiac surgery--prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Daniel; Knirsch, Walter; Niesse, Oliver; Schraner, Thomas; Dave, Hitendu; Kretschmar, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    In many paediatric cardiac units chest radiographs are performed routinely before discharge after cardiac surgery. These radiographs contribute to radiation exposure. To evaluate the diagnostic impact of routine chest X-rays before discharge in children undergoing open heart surgery and to analyze certain risk factors predicting pathologic findings. This was a prospective (6 months) single-centre observational clinical study. One hundred twenty-eight consecutive children undergoing heart surgery underwent biplane chest X-ray at a mean of 13 days after surgery. Pathologic findings on chest X-rays were defined as infiltrate, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, or signs of fluid overload. One hundred nine asymptomatic children were included in the final analysis. Risk factors, such as age, corrective versus palliative surgery, reoperation, sternotomy versus lateral thoracotomy, and relevant pulmonary events during postoperative paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) stay, were analysed. In only 5.5 % (6 of 109) of these asymptomatic patients were pathologic findings on routine chest X-ray before discharge found. In only three of these cases (50 %), subsequent noninvasive medical intervention (increasing diuretics) was needed. All six patients had relevant pulmonary events during their PICU stay. Risk factor analysis showed only pulmonary complications during PICU stay to be significantly associated (p = 0.005) with pathologic X-ray findings. Routine chest radiographs before discharge after cardiac surgery can be omitted in asymptomatic children with an uneventful and straightforward perioperative course. Chest radiographs before discharge are warrantable if pulmonary complications did occur during their PICU stay, as this is a risk factor for pathologic findings in chest X-rays before discharge.

  4. Dynamic Radiographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, A.; Turley, D.; Veeser, L.; Lukyanov, N.; Yegorov, N.; Baker, S.A.; Mirenko, V.; Lewis, W.; Kuropatkin, Y.

    1999-06-01

    A radiographic system recently developed by American and Russian collaborators is designed to capture multiple images of a dynamic event lasting less than 10 microseconds. Various optical and electro-optical components were considered and their performance compared. The final system employed a solid crystal of lutetium oxyorthosilicate doped with cerium (LSO:Ce or LSO) for X-ray-to-light conversion with a coherent fiber optic bundle to relay the scintillator image to a streak camera with charge coupled device (CCD) readout. Resolution and sensitivity studies were carried out for this system on two different sources of X-rays: a 20 MeV microtron and a 70 MeV betatron.

  5. Textbook of radiographic science

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, H.B.

    1987-01-01

    This book has been written to provide an outline of scientific background of specialized radiologic procedures for candidates studying for the higher examination of the College of Radiographers (United Kingdom). The book contains nine chapters on various areas such as emergency/trauma; pediatrics; neurologic, angiographic, and urodynamic studies; and a final chapter on research. An index concludes the book. Information on historical and scientific procedural background, equipment, anatomic and pathologic correlates, and positioning of the patient is organized and presented. Scientific data are inserted in the text where appropriate. Metrizamide is given an extensive write-up as the contrast medium of choice for imaging of the spinal cord and is said to be ''less toxic than other forms of water-soluble contrast.''

  6. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Infection : The Relationship of the Radiographic Appearance to CD4 T-Lymphocytes Count

    PubMed Central

    San, Kooi Eng; Muhamad, Mahayidin

    2001-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in the AIDS population has a variable chest radiographic presentation. The association between the chest radiographic presentation of pulmonary TB and CD4 T-lymphocyte count in the HIV-infected patient was investigated in order to provide an empirical approach for early diagnosis, treatment, and isolation of these patients. A retrospective analysis of chest radiographs, CD4 T-lymphocyte counts, and clinical history of 80 patients from Hospital Kota Bharu, was performed. All patients were HIV-seropositive and had culture and /or cytology-proven pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographs were evaluated for the presence of atypical or typical patterns of pulmonary TB. Thirteen (16.2%) patients had typical postprimary pattern, where opacities were distributed at the upper zones, with or without cavitation. Sixty-seven (83.8%) patients had atypical patterns, consisting of normal chest radiograph, middle and/or lower zones parenchymal opacities, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pleural effusion and miliary TB. Of these, 18 (22.5%) patients demonstrated normal chest radiographs, 36 (45%) patients showed parenchymal opacities at the middle and/or lower zones of the lungs, 30 (37.5%) had mediastinal lymphadenopathy, 18 (22.5%) revealed pleural effusion and 6 (7.5%) presented with miliary TB. Sixty-two (77.5%) patients had CD4 T-lymphocytes count less than 200 cells/ul. Of these patients, only 1 (1.6%) had typical pattern. Eighteen (22.5%) patients had CD4 T-lymphocyte count more than 200 cells/ul, where 12 (66.7%) of them showed typical pattern. Patients with CD4 T-lymphocytes count of less than 200 cells/ul, were more likely to produce normal chest radiographs, middle and /or lower zones parenchymal opacities and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The mean CD4 T-lymphocytes count were also found significantly lower. AIDS patients with pulmonary TB can present with both typical and atypical chest radiograph patterns. An AIDS patient who had CD4 T

  7. Incentive spirometry versus routine chest physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hall, J C; Tarala, R; Harris, J; Tapper, J; Christiansen, K

    1991-04-20

    We entered 876 patients into a clinical trial aimed at preventing pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. Patients either received conventional chest physiotherapy or were encouraged to perform maximal inspiratory manoeuvres for 5 min during each hour while awake, using an incentive spirometer. The incidence of pulmonary complications did not differ significantly between the groups: incentive spirometry 68 of 431 (15.8%, 95% CI 14.0-17.6%), and chest physiotherapy 68 of 445 (15.3%, CI 13.6-17.0%). Nor was there a difference between the groups in the incidence of positive clinical signs, pyrexia, abnormal chest radiographs, pathogens in sputum, respiratory failure (PO2 less than 60 mm Hg), or length of stay in hospital. We conclude that prophylactic incentive spirometry and chest physiotherapy are of equivalent clinical efficacy in the general management of patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  8. Inflammation and Rupture of a Congenital Pericardial Cyst Manifesting Itself as an Acute Chest Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Benjamin Y.C.; Lufschanowski, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a remote history of supraventricular tachycardia and hyperlipidemia, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute-onset chest pain. An electrocardiogram showed no evidence of acute coronary syndrome. A chest radiograph revealed a prominent right-sided heart border. A suspected congenital pericardial cyst was identified on a computed tomographic chest scan, and stranding was noted around the cyst. The patient was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and the pain initially abated. Another flare-up was treated similarly. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was then performed after symptoms had resolved, and no evidence of the cyst was seen. The suspected cause of the patient's chest pain was acute inflammation of a congenital pericardial cyst with subsequent rupture and resolution of symptoms. PMID:28100978

  9. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries.

  10. Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... When Should I get an X-ray for Low Back Pain? Other Reasons for Having an X-ray What ... rays? What are Radiographic Assessments? Radiographic assessments for low back pain involve the use of X-rays to determine ...

  11. Oral tuberculosis: unusual radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sansare, K; Gupta, A; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-05-01

    Oral tuberculosis and its radiographic findings are not commonly encountered in an oral and maxillofacial radiology practice. Literature has occasional mention of the radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis, which are still ambiguous. When affected, it is manifested majorly in the oral mucosa and rarely in the jaw bones. Here, we report certain unusual radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis which have been rarely mentioned in the literature. Four illustrative cases describe bony resorption, condylar resorption, resorption of the inferior border of the mandible and rarefaction of the alveolar bone as radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis. Follow up of the first case demonstrated regeneration of the condylar head after anti-Kochs therapy was completed, a hitherto unreported phenomenon. The importance of including tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of some of the unusual radiographic manifestations is emphasized.

  12. A radiographic survey of monumental masonry workers in Aberdeen

    PubMed Central

    Davies, T. A. Lloyd; Doig, A. T.; Fox, A. J.; Greenberg, M.

    1973-01-01

    Lloyd Davies, T. A., Doig, A. T., Fox, A. J., and Greenberg, M. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 227-231. A radiographic survey of monumental masonry workers in Aberdeen. A survey of radiographic appearances of the lungs of monumental masonry workers in Aberdeen was carried out to determine the present prevalence of abnormalities and to serve as a standard for future comparisons in view of changes in methods of working. No major change could be detected in the status of these granite workers in Aberdeen over the past 20 years but the different methods of survey used by Mair in 1951 and by the present study did not allow of strict comparison. Chest radiographs were reported on by three readers independently using the National Coal Board elaboration of the ILO classification and a score was given to each film using Oldham's method. Multiple regression analysis showed that ϰ-ray changes were related to years in granite but progression was slow in comparison with foundry workers. The prevalence of radiographic appearances of category 1 or greater was 3·0% overall and 4·6% for workers in dusty jobs. Evidence of pneumoconiosis was not observed in workers exposed for less than 20 years. With the environmental control attained the threshold limit values for respirable dust were not often much exceeded. PMID:4353240

  13. Chest drainage systems in use

    PubMed Central

    Zisis, Charalambos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Lazaridis, George; Lampaki, Sofia; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    A chest tube is a flexible plastic tube that is inserted through the chest wall and into the pleural space or mediastinum. It is used to remove air in the case of pneumothorax or fluid such as in the case of pleural effusion, blood, chyle, or pus when empyema occurs from the intrathoracic space. It is also known as a Bülau drain or an intercostal catheter. Insertion of chest tubes is widely performed by radiologists, pulmonary physicians and thoracic surgeons. Large catheters or small catheters are used based on each situation that the medical doctor encounters. In the current review we will focus on the chest drain systems that are in use. PMID:25815304

  14. Radiographic abnormalities and duration of employment in Western Australian iron-ore miners.

    PubMed

    Musk, A W; de Klerk, N H; Cookson, W O; Morgan, W K

    1988-04-04

    Plain chest radiographs of 788 Pilbara iron-ore miners from Western Australia have been examined by two independent observers for evidence of pneumoconiosis. The prevalence of any radiographic abnormality (a profusion grade of 0/1 or greater on the International Labour Office [ILO] scale) was 6.7% for Reader 1 and 9.9% for Reader 2. The prevalence of a definite radiographic abnormality (a profusion grade of 1/0 or greater on the ILO scale) was 1.9% for Reader 1 and 2.8% for Reader 2. The prevalence of any abnormality, as identified by either or by both observers, was significantly related to age. The relationship between a radiographic abnormality and the duration of employment was less clear. The results indicate a need for more detailed and comprehensive studies of the effects of iron-ore dust in this industry.

  15. Complications of tube thoracostomy using Advanced Trauma Life Support technique in chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Iribhogbe, P E; Uwuigbe, O

    2011-01-01

    Tube thoracostomy (TT) is central in the management of chest trauma sufficing in over 80% of cases. As a result the procedure is commonly performed in most emergency departments. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and complications of TT using Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) technique in chest trauma. This prospective study was done at the Trauma Unit of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital in Nigeria. All patients with chest trauma who needed tube thoracostomy between February 2006 and February 2009 were studied. Data recorded for each patient included injury, mechanism of injury, Glasgow Coma score, revised trauma score, and indications for tube thoracostomy. Chest radiographs were obtained preinsertion, post insertion and post extubation for all the cases. Patients were monitored for tube thoracostomy complications. Of 9415 trauma patients seen during the period 105 patients had tube thoracostomy but only 70 (56 male, 14 female) had adequate data for analysis. Seventy-four tubes were passed in the 70 patients with unilateral tubes in 66 (94.3%) and bilateral tubes in 4 (5.7%). Blunt chest trauma occurred in 32 (45.7%) and penetrating chest trauma in 38 (54.3%) of the patients. Simple haemothorax and haemopneumothorax were the commonest indications for tube thoracostomy. Complications recorded include four cases of kinked tubes, four of superficial wound infection and 10 cases of residual haemothorax. Tube thoracostomy in the emergency department using advanced trauma life support principles is effective in chest trauma and associated with few complications.

  16. Radiographic evaluation of hip implants.

    PubMed

    Chang, Connie Y; Huang, Ambrose J; Palmer, William E

    2015-02-01

    Serial radiographs are the mainstay in the longitudinal assessment of hip implants. The prosthesis, periprosthetic bone, and juxta-articular soft tissues are inspected for fracture, periosteal reaction, stress shielding, calcar resorption, osteolysis, bony remodeling, metallic debris, and heterotopic ossification. Comparison radiographs best confirm implant migration, subsidence, and aseptic loosening. Infection, particle disease, reaction to metal, and mechanical impingement are important causes of postsurgical pain, but in their earliest stages they may be difficult to diagnose using radiographs. This article addresses the role of radiography following hip arthroplasty. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. [Technical quality control of chest x-rays for the health surveillance of workers exposed to the risk of pneumoconiosis: proposal for a qualitative screening method].

    PubMed

    Manzari, Giovanna; Valenti, E; D'Epifanio, F; Quercia, A; Cardona, E

    2003-01-01

    The necessity of a qualitative screening has arisen from the fact that good technical quality is of fundamental importance for evaluating initial pneumoconiosis, for reducing inter- and intra-reader variability, for effective secondary prevention and for forensic medicine purposes. The authors report experience in use of a method to evaluate the quality of chest radiographs performed in health surveillance programs for workers at risk for development of pneumoconiosis. 747 postero-anterior chest radiographs concerning employees of 21 ceramic factories in the Province of Viterbo were examined. A standardized pattern was created for this evaluation. The pattern considers the main factors that can influence the quality of chest radiographs and assigns points for each of them. That factors are: 1) reproduced image of the lung's vascular structure, chiefly in the peripheral portions; 2) reproduced image of heart border, aorta, diaphragm; 3) deep inspiration; 4) symmetric image of the chest; 5) position of the scapulae; 6) visualization of the costal-phrenic angles; 7) technical impairments. The application of the method revealed that half of the chest radiographs examined had poor image quality for a suitable reading, in conformity with the ILO 1980 guidelines. The critical points are poor visualization of the lung's vascular structure due to overexposure or underexposure, technical impairments, non-correct scapulae position. The authors believe that the suggested method can be a useful instrument for self-testing the quality of chest radiographs performed in radiology centers and for the National Health Service to test the quality of chest radiographs performed in health surveillance programs.

  18. Progressive dyspnea associated with a crazy-paving appearance on a chest computed tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Maimon, Nimrod; Paul, Narinder; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    A ‘crazy-paving’ appearance of the lungs on computed tomography scanning of the chest was first described nearly 20 years ago in patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and was thought to be characteristic of this condition. However, this pattern has subsequently been reported in a variety of pulmonary diseases and is now considered to be nonspecific. The present report describes a case of a 74-year-old man in whom congestive heart failure presented with a crazy-paving appearance of the lungs on a chest computed tomography scan. This uncommon association illustrates the importance of the correlation of clinical and radiographic information. PMID:16896429

  19. Newer imaging methods in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, J C

    1990-01-01

    In recent years the application of computers to chest radiography has resulted in a wide variety of innovative research. Major research efforts have resulted in the development of new types of x-ray detectors, such as storage phosphor technology, for use with computers. Storage phosphor imaging is one of the most promising new techniques, and almost 100 systems have been installed worldwide. Radiologists are quickly evaluating the image quality provided by this new detector system, which has the potential to improve image quality. It has wide latitude and is coupled with a computer to perform image processing. Another promising technology, originally studied in the form of scan equalization radiography, is now commercially available in the form of advanced multiple-beam equalization radiography. This film technique uses computers to modulate the x-ray exposure to take maximum advantage of the imaging capabilities of radiographic film. Digital solid-state detectors have been studied in conjunction with computerized image enhancement systems. These currently show improvement in nodule detection and quantification of the calcium content of a lesion. Application of large image intensifiers to a digital image system is being studied, but there are currently limitations on spatial resolution.

  20. Validation of a clinical decision rule: chest X-ray in patients with chest pain and possible acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goldschlager, Romi; Roth, Hedley; Solomon, Jarryd; Robson, Scott; Green, Jessica; Green, Sarah; Spanger, Manfred; Gunn, Robyn; Cameron, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Current literature suggests that a large proportion of chest X-rays (CXRs) performed in emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain and suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are unnecessary. The Canadian ACS Guidelines aim to guide clinicians in the appropriate use of CXR within this patient population. This study determined the prevalence of clinically significant CXR abnormalities and assessed the utility of the guidelines in a population of ED patients with chest pain and suspected ACS. Included in the study were participants over the age of 18 who presented to an Australian metropolitan ED, over a 1-year period, with a primary complaint of chest pain and who had a CXR and troponin level ordered in the ED (N = 760). We retrospectively compared their radiographic findings with their recommendations for CXR according to the ACS Guidelines. We found that 12 % of the participants had a clinically significant chest X-ray. The guidelines had a sensitivity of 80 % (95 % CI 0.70-0.87) and specificity of 50 % (95 % CI 0.47-0.54). The positive predictive value was 18 % (95 % CI 0.15-0.22) with a 95 % negative predictive value (95 % CI 0.92-0.97). Had the ACS guidelines been applied to our patient population, the number of CXR performed would have been reduced by 47 %. This study suggests that the ACS Guidelines has the potential to reduce the numbers of unnecessary CXR performed in ED patients. However, this would come at the expense of missing a minority of significant CXR abnormalities.

  1. Scanning radiographic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, R.D.

    1980-04-01

    Visual display of dental, medical or other radiographic images is realized with an x-ray tube in which an electron beam is scanned through an x-y raster pattern on a broad anode plate, the scanning being synchronized with the x-y sweep signals of a cathode ray tube display and the intensity signal for the display being derived from a small x-ray detector which receives x-rays that have passed through the subject to be imaged. Positioning and support of the detector are provided for by disposing the detector in a probe which may be attached to the x-ray tube at any of a plurality of different locations and by providing a plurality of such probes of different configuration in order to change focal length, to accommodate to different detector placements relative to the subject, to enhance patient comfort and to enable production of both periapical images and wider angle pantomographic images. High image definition with reduced radiation dosage is provided for by a lead glass collimator situated between the x-ray tube and subject and having a large number of spaced-apart minute radiation transmissive passages convergent on the position of the detector. Releasable mounting means enable changes of collimator in conjunction with changes of the probe to change focal length. A control circuit modifies the x-y sweep signals applied to the x-ray tube and modulates electron beam energy and current in order to correct for image distortions and other undesirable effects which can otherwise be present in a scanning x-ray system.

  2. Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... in which he or she suspects congenital defects, degenerative disease, trauma, metastatic cancer or bone deformity as a ... ENGLISH Related Conditions/Treatments Exercise/Cervical Exercise Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease NSAIDs Radiographic Assessment of Spinal Disorders Scoliosis Spinal ...

  3. Lung Ultrasound in Early Diagnosis of Neonatal Ventilator Associated Pneumonia before Any Radiographic or Laboratory Changes

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ibrahim, Mostafa; Bioumy, Nouran; El-Sharkawy, Sonya

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal pneumonia is reported to be the primary cause of neonatal respiratory failure and one of the common causes of neonatal hospitalization and death in developing countries. Chest X-ray was considered the gold standard for diagnosis of neonatal pneumonia. Lung ultrasonography has been described as a valuable noninvasive tool for the diagnosis of many neonatal pulmonary diseases. We report a case of ventilation associated neonatal pneumonia with very early diagnosis using lung ultrasound before any significant radiographic changes in chest X-ray or laboratory findings suggestive of infection. PMID:27891280

  4. Radiographic findings in liveborn triploidy.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K G; Houston, C S; Newman, D E; Wood, B J

    1989-01-01

    The detailed radiographic features of triploidy, a fatal congenital disorder with 69 chromosomes, have not previously been reported. Radiographs of ten liveborn infants with chromosomally confirmed triploidy showed six findings highly suggestive of this diagnosis: harlequin orbits, small anterior fontanelle, gracile ribs, diaphyseal overtubulation of long bones, upswept clavicles and antimongoloid pelvis. Sixteen other less specific findings showed many similarities to those found in trisomy 18.

  5. Film holder for radiographing tubing

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Earl V.; Foster, Billy E.

    1976-01-01

    A film cassette is provided which may be easily placed about tubing or piping and readily held in place while radiographic inspection is performed. A pair of precurved light-impervious semi-rigid plastic sheets, hinged at one edge, enclose sheet film together with any metallic foils or screens. Other edges are made light-tight with removable caps, and the entire unit is held securely about the object to be radiographed with a releasable fastener such as a strip of Velcro.

  6. Factors affecting radiographers' organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Akroyd, Duane; Jackowski, Melissa B; Legg, Jeffrey S

    2007-01-01

    A variety of factors influence employees' attitudes toward their workplace and commitment to the organization that employs them. However, these factors have not been well documented among radiologic technologists. To determine the predictive ability of selected organizational, leadership, work-role and demographic variables on organizational commitment for a national sample of radiographers. Three thousand radiographers registered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists working full time in clinical settings were surveyed by mail regarding their commitment to their employers, leadership within the organization that employs them, employer support and demographic information. Overall, radiographers were found to have only a moderate level of commitment to their employers. Among the factors that significantly affected commitment were the radiographer's educational level, perceived level of organizational support, role clarity and organizational leadership. The results of this study could provide managers and supervisors with insights on how to empower and challenge radiographers and offer opportunities that will enhance radiographers' commitment to the organization, thus reducing costly turnover and improving employee performance.

  7. Filmless digital chest radiography within the radiology department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiker, Gregory G.; Blume, Hartwig R.; Slone, Richard M.; Woodard, Pamela K.; Gierada, David S.; Sagel, Stuart S.; Jost, R. Gilbert; Blaine, G. James

    1997-05-01

    The technical purposes of this work were to develop improvements in the methodology for assessing the physical performance of CRT monitors and display controller systems and to explore image processing techniques to make soft- and hard-copy image quality visually similar. The clinical purpose was to determine whether, with proper image processing, soft-copy presentations of digital chest radiographs could become equivalent to hard-copy for visualizing normal and pathological features. The luminance characteristic curve, luminance uniformity, modulation transfer function, and noise power spectra of the CRT monitors as well as video waveforms of a display controller were measured. Posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs were acquired by a dedicated thorax imaging system with a selenium detector and processed using a previously optimized algorithm for printing on film. A Laplacian pyramid filter was employed to compensate for the mid- to high-frequency contrast losses in the soft-copy presentation. Five chest radiologists directly compared the soft- and hard-copy presentations in eighteen patients with CT-proven pathologies. Based on 99 percent confidence intervals, the soft-copy images were preferred for seven of the fourteen anatomic categories and image contrast, and the hard-copy images were preferred for brightness and image granularity. There were no preferences for the depiction of pathologies, spatial resolution, and the remaining anatomic categories. After determining the physical properties of the CRT monitors, image processing operations can be defined to produce soft-copy renditions of soft-copy displays for primary diagnosis to make digital radiography more cost- effective and to encourage additional development of filmless image interpretation and management in a PACS.

  8. Radiation dose in computed tomography of the chest.

    PubMed

    Tack, D; Gevenois, P A

    2004-01-01

    Since the beginning of the eighties, computed tomography (CT) has been more and more widely used as this technique provides precise anatomical details on the lungs, the mediastinum, and the chest wall. However, CT requires the use of ionizing radiations. The collective radiation from CT is therefore in constant increase. As evaluated on atomic bomb survivors, ionizing radiations increase the mortality by cancer. The risk is proportional to the dose and the dose related to CT is much higher than that related to a chest radiograph, both being in the field "of low-level radiations" a range of radiation dose from which no increase in cancer mortality could be demonstrated. This article outlines the risk estimation in the field of low-level radiations, the various methods to measure and estimate the radiation dose, the CT parameters influencing the radiation dose, dose comparisons between CT and most other imaging techniques of the chest, the newly developed so called "Low-Dose" CT techniques and highlights some of the unresolved questions related to radiation dose in clinical CT practice.

  9. [Aspects of radiation protection during chest X-radiography].

    PubMed

    Seidenbusch, M C; Schneider, K

    2015-07-01

    Radiation safety in conventional X-ray diagnostics is based on the concepts of justification, optimization of an X-ray examination and limitation of the radiation exposure achieved during the examination. Optimization of an X-ray examination has to be considered as a multimodal process in which all technical components of the X-ray equipment have to be adapted to each other and also have to be adapted to the anthropometric characteristics of patients and the clinical indications. In this article the technical components of a conventional pediatric chest X-radiograph are presented, and recommendations for optimizing chest X-rays in children are provided. The following measures are of prime importance: correct x-ray beam limitation, using the posteroanterior projection when possible and not using anti-scatter grids in children under approximately 8 years old. In pediatric radiology chest x-rays that are taken not at the peak of inspiration can also be of some diagnostic significance. Optimization of an X-ray examination inevitably results in the limitation of radiation exposure.

  10. Heimlich valve for chest drainage.

    PubMed

    Heimlich, H J

    1983-01-01

    The Heimlich chest drainage valve was developed so that the process of draining the pleural cavity could be accomplished in a safe, relatively simple, and efficient manner. Replacing the cumbersome underwater drainage bottle system, the Heimlich valve connects to chest tubing and allows fluid and air to pass in one direction only. The valve, which functions in any position, need never be clamped, and regulated suction can be attached to it if necessary. The valve drains into a plastic bag that can be held at any level, allowing the patient undergoing chest drainage to be ambulatory simply by carrying the bag. The construction and function of the valve is easily understood by medical and nursing staffs. It is presterilized, stored in a sterile package, and readily utilized on emergency vehicles and in the operating room.

  11. [Chest ultrasonography in pleurapulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gallego Gómez, M P; García Benedito, P; Pereira Boo, D; Sánchez Pérez, M

    2014-01-01

    Although the initial diagnosis and follow-up of pleuropulmonary disease are normally done with plain chest films and the gold standard for chest disease is computed tomography, diverse studies have established the usefulness of chest ultrasonography in the diagnosis of different pleuropulmonary diseases like pleural effusion and lung consolidation, among others. In this article, we show the different ultrasonographic patterns for pleuropulmonary disease. The availability of ultrasonography in different areas (ICU, recovery areas) makes this technique especially important for critical patients because it obviates the need to transfer the patient. Moreover, ultrasonography is noninvasive and easy to repeat. On the other hand, it enables the direct visualization of pleuropulmonary disease that is necessary for interventional procedures. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of low-contrast detectability for compressed digital chest images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Larry T.; Insana, Michael F.; McFadden, Michael A.; Hall, Timothy J.; Cox, Glendon G.

    1994-04-01

    The ability of human observers to detect low-contrast targets in screen-film (SF) images, computed radiographic (CR) images, and compressed CR images was measured using contrast detail (CD) analysis. The results of these studies were used to design a two- alternative forced-choice (2AFC) experiment to investigate the detectability of nodules in adult chest radiographs. CD curves for a common screen-film system were compared with CR images compressed up to 125:1. Data from clinical chest exams were used to define a CD region of clinical interest that sufficiently challenged the observer. From that data, simulated lesions were introduced into 100 normal CR chest films, and forced-choice observer performance studies were performed. CR images were compressed using a full-frame discrete cosine transform (FDCT) technique, where the 2D Fourier space was divided into four areas of different quantization depending on the cumulative power spectrum (energy) of each image. The characteristic curve of the CR images was adjusted so that optical densities matched those of the SF system. The CD curves for SF and uncompressed CR systems were statistically equivalent. The slope of the CD curve for each was - 1.0 as predicted by the Rose model. There was a significant degradation in detection found for CR images compressed to 125:1. Furthermore, contrast-detail analysis demonstrated that many pulmonary nodules encountered in clinical practice are significantly above the average observer threshold for detection. We designed a 2AFC observer study using simulated 1-cm lesions introduced into normal CR chest radiographs. Detectability was reduced for all compressed CR radiographs.

  13. Development of functional chest imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Fujimura, Masaki; Yasui, Masahide; Nakayama, Kazuya; Matsui, Takeshi; Hayashi, Norio; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic FPD permits the acquisition of distortion-free radiographs with a large field of view and high image quality. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of functional imaging for evaluating the pulmonary sequential blood distribution with an FPD, based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. Dynamic chest radiographs of seven normal subjects were obtained in the expiratory phase by use of an FPD system. We measured the average pixel value in each region of interest that was located manually in the heart and lung areas. Subsequently, inter-frame differences and differences from a minimum-intensity projection image, which was created from one cardiac cycle, were calculated. These difference values were then superimposed on dynamic chest radiographs in the form of a color display, and sequential blood distribution images and a blood distribution map were created. The results were compared to typical data on normal cardiac physiology. The clinical effectiveness of our method was evaluated in a patient who had abnormal pulmonary blood flow. In normal cases, there was a strong correlation between the cardiac cycle and changes in pixel value. Sequential blood distribution images showed a normal pattern at determined by the physiology of pulmonary blood flow, with a symmetric distribution and no blood flow defects throughout the entire lung region. These findings indicated that pulmonary blood flow was reflected on dynamic chest radiographs. In an abnormal case, a defect in blood flow was shown as defective in color in a blood distribution map. The present method has the potential for evaluation of local blood flow as an optional application in general chest radiography.

  14. Catheters, wires, tubes and drains on postoperative radiographs of pediatric cardiac patients: the whys and wherefores.

    PubMed

    Teele, Sarah A; Emani, Sitaram M; Thiagarajan, Ravi R; Teele, Rita L

    2008-10-01

    Surgical treatment of congenital heart disease has advanced dramatically since the first intracardiac repairs in the mid-20th century. Previously inoperable lesions have become the focus of routine surgery and patients are managed successfully in intensive care units around the world. As a result, increasing numbers of postoperative images are processed by departments of radiology in children's hospitals. It is important that the radiologist accurately documents and describes the catheters, wires, tubes and drains that are present on the chest radiograph. This article reviews the reasons for the placement and positioning of perioperative equipment in children who have surgical repair of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect or transposition of the great arteries. Also included are a brief synopsis of each cardiac anomaly, the surgical procedure for its correction, and an in-depth discussion of the postoperative chest radiograph including illustrations of catheters, wires, tubes and drains.

  15. Radiographically Severe but Clinically Mild Reexpansion Pulmonary Edema following Decompression of a Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Harner, William E.; Crawley, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    The case is a 48-year-old female who presented with mild dyspnea on exertion and cough with unremarkable vital signs and was found to have a large right sided pneumothorax. She underwent small bore chest tube decompression with immediate reexpansion of the collapsed lung. However, she rapidly developed moderate hypoxemia and radiographic evidence of reexpansion pulmonary edema (REPE) on both the treated and contralateral sides. Within a week, she had a normal chest X-ray and was asymptomatic. This case describes a rare complication of spontaneous pneumothorax and highlights the lack of correlation between symptoms, sequelae, and radiographic severity of pneumothorax and reexpansion pulmonary edema. Proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms include increased production of reactive oxygen species with subsequent loss of surfactant and increased vascular permeability, and loss of vasoregulatory tone. PMID:25165607

  16. Radiographic testing at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.

    1982-04-21

    Radiographic testing is a nondestructive inspection technique which uses penetrating radiation. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a broad spectrum of equipment and techniques for radiographic testing. These resources include low-energy vacuum systems, low- and mid-energy cabinet and cell radiographic systems, high-energy linear accelerators, portable x-ray machines and radioisotopes for radiographic inspections. For diagnostic testing the NDE Section also has real-time and flash radiographic equipment.

  17. Cleidocranial Dysplasia: A Clinico-radiographic Spectrum with Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Purva Prakash; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the clavicles, characteristic craniofacial malformations, and the presence of numerous supernumerary and unerupted teeth. It affects bones derived from both intra-membranous and endochondral ossification. Incidence has been reported as 1 in 10,00,000. It is caused by mutation in the gene encoding transcription factor Core Binding Factor Subunit Alpha l (CBFAl) or Runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). Case Report: This presentation discusses the clinical and radiographic features of a familial case of cleidocranial dysplasia occurring in a father and a child. All the clinical and radiographic features, except that of the chest x-ray, were more prominent in the child than the father. This supports the fact that CCD is transmitted by an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance with high penetrance and variable expressivity. It is sporadic in about 40% of cases. Each child of an individual with CCD has a 50% chance of in heriting the mutation. Conclusion: Diagnosis is mostly made on the basis of clinical and radiographic features. Molecular genetic testing such as sequence analysis or deletion analysis can be used in cleidocranial dysplasia. Some cases are diagnosed through incidental findings by physicians, treating patients for unrelated conditions. Treatment of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach which includes orthopaedic and dental corrections along with management of any complications of cleidocranial dysplasia. PMID:27299035

  18. Radiographic prevalence of scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Scordino, Laura E; Bernstein, Jenna; Nakashian, Michael; McIntosh, Masai; Cote, Mark P; Rodner, Craig M; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Wolf, Jennifer Moraitis

    2014-09-01

    To define the radiographic prevalence of scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) osteoarthrosis (OA) in a cohort of patients presenting to a hand surgeon for any complaint. The secondary purpose was to evaluate coexisting thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint OA. Seven hundred radiographs were evaluated for presence and degree of STT and thumb CMC arthritic changes in consecutive patients presenting to a hand clinic for any chief complaint over the study period. OA was noted at the STT joint in 111 of the 700 (16%) radiographs reviewed. Increased age, female sex, presence of a scapholunate (SL) ligament gap greater than 3 mm, and presence of radiographic thumb CMC joint OA were all significantly correlated with presence of STT joint OA. However, logistical regression analysis demonstrated that only increasing age, presence of an SL ligament gap greater than 3 mm, and presence of thumb CMC joint OA were strong predictors of STT joint OA. STT joint OA is a common finding on hand radiographs of patients presenting to a hand clinic. Its prevalence increases with age, the presence of an SL ligament gap greater than 3 mm, and with the presence of CMC joint OA. Diagnostic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Automating measurement from standard radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Adam I.; Dori, Dov; Sheinkop, Mitchell; Berkson, Eric; Haralick, Robert M.

    1993-04-01

    An obligatory portion of orthopaedic examination is a radiographic examination. Techniques, such as computed tomography easily lend themselves to computerized analysis. Both expense and hazards from radiation prohibit their routine use in orthopaedic practice. Standard radiographs provide a significant amount of information for the orthopaedic surgeon. From the radiographs, surgeons will make many measurements and assessments. A major problem is that measurements are performed by hand and most often by the operating surgeon who may not be completely objective. To overcome this as well as to alleviate the burden of manual measurements which must be made by trained professionals, we have initiated a program to automate certain radiographic measurements. The technique involves digitizing standard radiographs from which features are extracted and identified. This poses a challenge. Structures, such as soft tissues (muscle, and bowel) markedly decrease the signal to noise ratio of the image. The work discusses modeling of the soft tissue structures in order to enhance detection and identification of bone landmarks. These are the anchors for standard measurements which in turn have clinical utility.

  20. Chest physiotherapy in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, A; Shivbalan, So; Thangavelu, S

    2005-06-01

    Chest physiotherapy (CPT) in children is generally considered as a separate and specialized treatment modality that should be rendered only by a physiotherapist. Actually this is not difficult if one has a proper understanding of the basic concept and principle behind the maneuver. This article aims at making CPT simple, so that it could be incorporated in routine pediatric practice for managing respiratory ailments.