Science.gov

Sample records for pre-existing medical conditions

  1. Pre-existing condition insurance plan program. Amendment to interim final rule with request for comments.

    PubMed

    2012-08-30

    This document contains an amendment regarding program eligibility to the interim final regulation implementing the Pre-Existing Condition Plan program under provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. In light of a new process recently announced by the Department of Homeland Security, eligibility for the program is being amended so that the program does not inadvertently expand the scope of that process.

  2. Pre-existing cardiovascular conditions and high altitude travel. Consensus statement of the Medical Commission of the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme (UIAA MedCom) Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Donegani, Enrico; Hillebrandt, David; Windsor, Jeremy; Gieseler, Ulf; Rodway, George; Schöffl, Volker; Küpper, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The number of persons visiting high altitude regions for various purposes (recreation, business etc.), and the age of people who do so, increases. Therefore there are more and more patients who need specific and individual advice to prevent emergency situations at altitude and to deal with emergencies if the safety strategy should fail. Since literature concerning cardiocirculatory diseases at altitude is scarce and studies with a controlled setting and high evidence level are missing, UIAA MedCom has checked all available literature for specific information to enable physicians who are active in travel or high altitude medicine to advise the patients at the highest possible level of evidence. It must be pointed out that there are several other medical fields where such information is mandatory, e.g. in occupational medicine, when employees depart to high altitude destinations for business purposes. The recommendations are based on a detailed literature research (databases, handbooks and the respective references). For easier use the paper has been structured as follows: general information, cardiocirculatory system and ECG at altitude, several cardiocirculatory diseases and their specific recommendations. The commission concludes, that a general "don't go!" is no state-of-the-art advice for the patients. With the information presented here a safe trip to altitude should be possible for many patients.

  3. Sports Dermatology: Part 1 of 2 Traumatic or Mechanical Injuries, Inflammatory Conditions, and Exacerbations of Pre-existing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sivek, Rachel; Marciniak, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Competitive athletes endure extreme bodily stress when participating in sports-related activities. An athlete’s skin is particularly susceptible to a wide array of repetitive physical and environmental stressors that challenge the skin’s protective function. Many unique dermatoses are well-known to the serious athlete due to countless hours of intense physical training, but are frequently unrecognized by many healthcare professionals. Sports dermatology is a distinctive, budding field of dermatology that focuses on dermatoses frequently encountered in athletes. Athletic skin problems are notoriously infectious in nature due to the inherent environment of close-contact physical activity. Nonetheless, other skin conditions can manifest or worsen with recurring mechanical or traumatic injury or exposure to environmental hazards. Additionally, sports-related activities may exacerbate other pre-existing dermatological conditions that may possibly be unknown to the athlete or clinician. The objective of this two-part review is to arm the astute physician with the fundamental knowledge of the range of dermatological conditions distinct to the competitive athlete. Knowledge of these cutaneous conditions in the context of specific sporting events will permit the clinician to manage these unique patients most effectively. Part one will focus on traumatic or mechanical injuries, inflammatory conditions, and exacerbations of pre-existing conditions frequently seen in athletes. PMID:26060516

  4. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  5. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  6. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  7. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  8. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  9. Clinical prognosis, pre-existing conditions and the use of reperfusion therapy for patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrea B; Naylor, C David; Chong, Alice; Alter, David A

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Some evidence-based therapies are underused in patients with a poor prognosis despite the fact that the survival gains would be highest among such patient subgroups. The extent to which this applies for acute, life-saving therapies is unknown. The impact of prognostic characteristics and pre-existing conditions on the use of reperfusion therapy among eligible patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction is examined. METHODS Of 2829 acute myocardial infarction patients prospectively identified in 53 acute care hospitals across Ontario, 987 presented with ST segment elevation within 12 h of symptom onset and without any absolute contraindications to reperfusion therapy. The baseline prognosis for each patient was derived from a validated risk-adjustment model of 30-day mortality. Multiple logistical regression was used to examine the relationships among reperfusion therapy, prognosis and the number of pre-existing chronic conditions after adjusting for factors such as age, sex, time since symptom onset and socioeconomic status. RESULTS Of the 987 appropriate candidates, 725 (73.5%) received reperfusion therapy (70.8% fibrinolysis, 2.6% primary angioplasty). The adjusted odds ratio of reperfusion therapy fell 4% with each 1% increase in baseline risk of death (adjusted OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.92 to 1.00, P=0.04) and fell 18% with each additional pre-existing condition (adjusted OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.76 to 0.90, P<0.001). The number rather than the type of pre-existing conditions inversely correlated with the use of reperfusion therapy. While the impact of baseline risk and pre-existing conditions was additive, pre-existing conditions exerted a greater impact on the nonuse of reperfusion therapy than did baseline risk. CONCLUSIONS A treatment-risk paradox is demonstrable even within a cohort of lower risk patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. These findings are consistent with the view that these clinical decisions are more likely

  10. [Effect of indications and pre-existing conditions on the result of McDonald's cervix-closure surgery].

    PubMed

    Avar, Z; Tóth, B; Zacher, P

    1979-01-01

    Authors have performed the McDonald cerclage operation on 172 gravidae because of cervical incompetence. From these pregnancies 80.2 per cent of the infants have survived over the sixth day. While with operations performed on the basis of extended indications for surgery an effect of 56.5 per cent was achieved, it was in cases of classical ones 92.8 per cent. Two complicated cases are reported caused by blastospores or bacteria respectively, isolated also in the vaginal secretion which have ascended into the uterine cavity. Both cases resulted in fetal death and in a septic condition of the mother. It is emphasized that the normal vaginal bioflora is essential condition for the cervical suture. PMID:375620

  11. [HIGH ALTITUDE EXPOSURE IN TRAVELERS WITH PREEXISTING MEDICAL CONDITIONS].

    PubMed

    Mintzer, Dalya Navat; Leshem, Eyal; Chazan, Bibiana; Schwartz, Eli

    2015-11-01

    The number of travelers visiting high altitude regions is increasing. High altitude areas have become more accessible in recent years, and reaching areas at altitudes over 3000 meters above sea level has become more common than before. In many circumstances older travelers, who are more likely to have pre-existing chronic diseases and for whom altitude and hypoxic condition might be a risk, reach high altitudes in a fast and tight schedule, therefore having a shorter time for adaptation and acclimatization. Pre-travel consultation, including the discussion of chronic illnesses and medication use, is therefore crucial for the reduction of the risk of acute mountain sickness and preventing the deterioration of their pre-existing medical conditions.

  12. The effect of pre-existing mental health comorbidities on the stage at diagnosis and timeliness of care of solid tumor malignances in a Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center.

    PubMed

    Wadia, Roxanne J; Yao, Xiaopan; Deng, Yanhong; Li, Jia; Maron, Steven; Connery, Donna; Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Rose, Michal G

    2015-09-01

    There are limited data on the impact of mental health comorbidities (MHC) on stage at diagnosis and timeliness of cancer care. Axis I MHC affect approximately 30% of Veterans receiving care within the Veterans Affairs (VA) system. The purpose of this study was to compare stage at diagnosis and timeliness of care of solid tumor malignancies among Veterans with and without MHC. We performed a retrospective analysis of 408 charts of Veterans with colorectal, urothelial, and head/neck cancer diagnosed and treated at VA Connecticut Health Care System (VACHS) between 2008 and 2011. We collected demographic data, stage at diagnosis, medical and mental health co-morbidities, treatments received, key time intervals, and number of appointments missed. The study was powered to assess for stage migration of 15-20% from Stage I/II to Stage III/IV. There was no significant change in stage distribution for patients with and without MHC in the entire study group (p = 0.9442) and in each individual tumor type. There were no significant differences in the time intervals from onset of symptoms to initiation of treatment between patients with and without MHC (p = 0.1135, 0.2042 and 0.2352, respectively). We conclude that at VACHS, stage at diagnosis for patients with colorectal, urothelial and head and neck cancers did not differ significantly between patients with and without MHC. Patients with MHC did not experience significant delays in care. Our study indicates that in a medical system in which mental health is integrated into routine care, patients with Axis I MHC do not experience delays in cancer care.

  13. 15 CFR 922.47 - Pre-existing authorizations or rights and certifications of pre-existing authorizations or rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pre-existing authorizations or rights and certifications of pre-existing authorizations or rights. 922.47 Section 922.47 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC...

  14. 15 CFR 922.47 - Pre-existing authorizations or rights and certifications of pre-existing authorizations or rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pre-existing authorizations or rights and certifications of pre-existing authorizations or rights. 922.47 Section 922.47 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  15. 75 FR 45013 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... 2719A (regarding patient protections), published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2010 (75 FR 37188... of rape or incest, or where the life of the woman would be endangered. Exec. Order No. 13,535, 75...

  16. 77 FR 52614 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... posted on the Internet exactly as received, and can be retrieved by most Internet search engines. No...: http://www.regulations.gov . Follow the search instructions on that Web site to view public comments... 30, 2010 (75 FR 45014). For the reasons explained below, HHS is now issuing an amendment to...

  17. 78 FR 30218 - Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...'s out-of-pocket cost for the covered service as calculated by the plan. The PCIP program was... annual claims cost paid per enrollee was $32,108. This cost per enrollee exceeds even that of state high... enrollees are limited to people that were previously considered uninsurable due to high expected claims...

  18. Intercontinental travel and its effect on pre-existing illnesses.

    PubMed

    Steffen, R; van der Linde, F

    1981-01-01

    Over 12,000 European air passengers were interviewed as to whether the status of any pre-existing illness changed as a result of their vacation in the tropics or in North America (United States or Canada). Of the travelers to tropical destinations, 1.6% reported their disease had improved, which significantly exceeded the rate of 0.5% in visitors to North America, mainly due to a more favourable influence in chronic respiratory tract infections and chronic rheumatologic impairment. Aggravation of pre-existing disease occurred in 0.9 and 0.7%, respectively, of the travelers in the two groups and was only rarely severe. In the tropics, patients below the age of 30 and those who suffered from digestive problems were most frequently adversely affected.

  19. Mammalian heart renewal by pre-existing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Senyo, Samuel E; Steinhauser, Matthew L; Pizzimenti, Christie L; Yang, Vicky K; Cai, Lei; Wang, Mei; Wu, Ting-Di; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Lechene, Claude P; Lee, Richard T

    2013-01-17

    Although recent studies have revealed that heart cells are generated in adult mammals, the frequency of generation and the source of new heart cells are not yet known. Some studies suggest a high rate of stem cell activity with differentiation of progenitors to cardiomyocytes. Other studies suggest that new cardiomyocytes are born at a very low rate, and that they may be derived from the division of pre-existing cardiomyocytes. Here we show, by combining two different pulse-chase approaches--genetic fate-mapping with stable isotope labelling, and multi-isotope imaging mass spectrometry--that the genesis of cardiomyocytes occurs at a low rate by the division of pre-existing cardiomyocytes during normal ageing, a process that increases adjacent to areas of myocardial injury. We found that cell cycle activity during normal ageing and after injury led to polyploidy and multinucleation, but also to new diploid, mononucleate cardiomyocytes. These data reveal pre-existing cardiomyocytes as the dominant source of cardiomyocyte replacement in normal mammalian myocardial homeostasis as well as after myocardial injury.

  20. Gate dielectric degradation: Pre-existing vs. generated defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Dmitry; Bersuker, Gennadi

    2014-01-01

    We consider the possibility that degradation of the electrical characteristics of high-k gate stacks under low voltage stresses of practical interest is caused primarily by activation of pre-existing defects rather than generation of new ones. In nFETs in inversion, in particular, defect activation is suggested to be associated with the capture of an injected electron: in this charged state, defects can participate in a fast exchange of charge carriers with the carrier reservoir (substrate or gate electrode) that constitutes the physical process underlying a variety of electrical measurements. The degradation caused by the activation of pre-existing defects, as opposed to that of new defect generation, is both reversible and exhibits a tendency to saturate through the duration of stress. By using the multi-phonon assisted charge transport description, it is demonstrated that the trap activation concept allows reproducing a variety of experimental results including stress time dependency of the threshold voltage, leakage current, charge pumping current, and low frequency noise. Continuous, long-term degradation described by the power law time dependency is shown to be determined by the activation of defects located in the interfacial SiO2 layer of the high-k gate stacks. The findings of this study can direct process optimization efforts towards reduction of as-grown precursors of the charge trapping defects as the major factor affecting reliability.

  1. Pre-existing diabetes and breast cancer prognosis among elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Luo, J; Hendryx, M; Virnig, B; Wen, S; Chlebowski, R; Chen, C; Rohan, T; Tinker, L; Wactawski-Wende, J; Lessin, L; Margolis, K L

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of pre-existing diabetes on breast cancer prognosis. Methods: Women (n=2833) with centrally confirmed invasive breast cancer in the Women's Health Initiative, who were linked to Medicare claims data (CMS) were followed from the date of breast cancer diagnosis to date of death or 20 September 2013. Information on diabetes was identified through the CMS Chronic Condition Warehouse algorithm. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios for overall mortality. A competing risks model (proportional subdistribution) model was used to estimate hazard ratios for breast cancer-specific mortality. Results: Women with diabetes were more likely to have factors related to delayed diagnosis (less recent mammograms, and more advanced cancer stage) and were less likely to receive radiation therapy. Compared with women without diabetes, women with diabetes had significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.23–2.01) and had nonsignificantly increased risk for breast cancer-specific mortality (HR=1.36, 95% CI: 0.86–2.15) before adjustment for factors related to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Adjustment for these factors resulted in a little change in the association of diabetes with overall mortality risk, but further attenuated the point estimate for breast cancer-specific mortality. Conclusions: Our study provides additional evidence that pre-existing diabetes increases the risk of total mortality among women with breast cancer. Very large studies with data on breast cancer risk factors, screening and diagnostic delays, treatment choices, and the biological influence of diabetes on breast cancer will be needed to determine whether diabetes also increases the risk for breast cancer-specific mortality. PMID:26158425

  2. The Near Earth Asteroid Medical Conditions List

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element is one of six elements within NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) and is responsible for addressing the risk of "the inability to adequately recognize or treat an ill or injured crewmember" for exploration-class missions. The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Medical Conditions List, constructed by ExMC, is the first step in addressing the above-mentioned risk for the 13-month long NEA mission. The NEA mission is being designed by NASA's Human Space Flight Architecture Team (HAT). The purpose of the conditions list is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for determining which medical conditions could affect a crewmember during the NEA mission, which of those conditions would be of concern and require treatment, and for which conditions a gap in knowledge or technology development exists. This information is used to focus research efforts and technology development to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration-class missions. Scope and Approach: The NEA Medical Conditions List is part of a broader Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), which incorporates various exploration-class design reference missions (DRMs). The conditions list contains 85 medical conditions which could occur during space flight and which are derived from several sources: Long-Term Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) in-flight occurrence data, The Space Shuttle (STS) Medical Checklist, The International Space Station (ISS) Medical Checklist, and subject matter expert opinion. Each medical condition listed has been assigned a clinical priority and a clinical priority rationale based on incidence, consequence, and mitigation capability. Implementation: The conditions list is a "living document" and as such, new conditions can be added to the list, and the priority of conditions on the list can be adjusted as the DRM changes, and as screening, diagnosis, or treatment capabilities

  3. Medical and orthopedic conditions and sports participation.

    PubMed

    Diokno, Eugene; Rowe, Dale

    2010-06-01

    The presence of certain medical or orthopedic conditions need not preclude adolescents from being physically active and participating in sports. The benefits of continued physical activity far outweigh any concerns for potential complications for most such conditions. This article reviews sport participation guidelines for adolescents with conditions that include juvenile chronic arthritis, eye injures, solitary kidney, skin conditions, scoliosis, and spondylolysis.

  4. Mining FDA drug labels for medical conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) has built the initial Natural Language Processing (NLP) component to extract medications with their corresponding medical conditions (Indications, Contraindications, Overdosage, and Adverse Reactions) as triples of medication-related information ([(1) drug name]-[(2) medical condition]-[(3) LOINC section header]) for an intelligent database system, in order to improve patient safety and the quality of health care. The Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) drug labels are used to demonstrate the feasibility of building the triples as an intelligent database system task. Methods This paper discusses a hybrid NLP system, called AutoMCExtractor, to collect medical conditions (including disease/disorder and sign/symptom) from drug labels published by the FDA. Altogether, 6,611 medical conditions in a manually-annotated gold standard were used for the system evaluation. The pre-processing step extracted the plain text from XML file and detected eight related LOINC sections (e.g. Adverse Reactions, Warnings and Precautions) for medical condition extraction. Conditional Random Fields (CRF) classifiers, trained on token, linguistic, and semantic features, were then used for medical condition extraction. Lastly, dictionary-based post-processing corrected boundary-detection errors of the CRF step. We evaluated the AutoMCExtractor on manually-annotated FDA drug labels and report the results on both token and span levels. Results Precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.90, 0.81, and 0.85, respectively, for the span level exact match; for the token-level evaluation, precision, recall, and F-measure were 0.92, 0.73, and 0.82, respectively. Conclusions The results demonstrate that (1) medical conditions can be extracted from FDA drug labels with high performance; and (2) it is feasible to develop a framework for an intelligent database system. PMID:23617267

  5. Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Claims Travel Tips Travel Bulletin Travel Checklist FAQ Disabilities and Medical Conditions To ensure your security, all ... other questions or concerns about traveling with a disability please contact passenger support . If you are approved ...

  6. Solid particle impingement erosion characteristics of cylindrical surfaces, pre-existing holes and slits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The erosion characteristics of aluminum cylinders sand-blasted with both spherical and angular erodent particles were studied and compared with results from previously studied flat surfaces. The cylindrical results are discussed with respect to impact conditions. The relationship between erosion rate and pit morphology (width, depth, and width to depth ratio) is established. The aspects of (1) erosion rate versus time curves on cylindrical surfaces; (2) long-term exposures; and (3) erosion rate versus time curves with spherical and angular particles are presented. The erosion morphology and characteristics of aluminum surfaces with pre-existing circular cylindrical and conical holes of different sizes were examined using weight loss measurements, scanning electron microscopy, a profilometer, and a depth gage. The morphological features (radial and concentric rings) are discussed with reference to flat surfaces, and the erosion features with spherical microglass beads. The similarities and differences of erosion and morphological features are highlighted. The erosion versus time curves of various shapes of holes are discussed and are compared with those of a flat surface. The erosion process at slits is considered.

  7. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmi; Barr, Yael; Kerstman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA s Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the "Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember." This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this risk. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to define the set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur during exploration space flight missions. The list was derived from the International Space Station Medical Checklist, the Shuttle Medical Checklist, in-flight occurrence data from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, and NASA subject matter experts. The list of conditions was further prioritized for eight specific design reference missions with the assistance of the ExMC Advisory Group. The purpose of the SMEMCL is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for the conditions that could affect a crewmember during flight. This information is used to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration missions.

  8. Rapid selective sweep of pre-existing polymorphisms and slow fixation of new mutations in experimental evolution of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Aifen; Hillesland, Kristina L; He, Zhili; Schackwitz, Wendy; Tu, Qichao; Zane, Grant M; Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Stahl, David A; Wall, Judy D; Hazen, Terry C; Fields, Matthew W; Arkin, Adam P; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis of microbial evolutionary adaptation to salt (NaCl) stress, populations of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH), a sulfate-reducing bacterium important for the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, carbon and nitrogen, and potentially the bioremediation of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides, were propagated under salt stress or non-stress conditions for 1200 generations. Whole-genome sequencing revealed 11 mutations in salt stress-evolved clone ES9-11 and 14 mutations in non-stress-evolved clone EC3-10. Whole-population sequencing data suggested the rapid selective sweep of the pre-existing polymorphisms under salt stress within the first 100 generations and the slow fixation of new mutations. Population genotyping data demonstrated that the rapid selective sweep of pre-existing polymorphisms was common in salt stress-evolved populations. In contrast, the selection of pre-existing polymorphisms was largely random in EC populations. Consistently, at 100 generations, stress-evolved population ES9 showed improved salt tolerance, namely increased growth rate (2.0-fold), higher biomass yield (1.8-fold) and shorter lag phase (0.7-fold) under higher salinity conditions. The beneficial nature of several mutations was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. All four tested mutations contributed to the shortened lag phases under higher salinity condition. In particular, compared with the salt tolerance improvement in ES9-11, a mutation in a histidine kinase protein gene lytS contributed 27% of the growth rate increase and 23% of the biomass yield increase while a mutation in hypothetical gene DVU2472 contributed 24% of the biomass yield increase. Our results suggested that a few beneficial mutations could lead to dramatic improvements in salt tolerance. PMID:25848870

  9. Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; Schmitz, Gerd; John, Swen; Carrera-Bastos, Pedro; Lindeberg, Staffan; Cordain, Loren

    2013-01-01

    Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual's pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

  10. Metabolic effects of milk protein intake strongly depend on pre-existing metabolic and exercise status

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Milk protein intake has recently been suggested to improve metabolic health. This Perspective provides evidence that metabolic effects of milk protein intake have to be regarded in the context of the individual’s pre-existing metabolic and exercise status. Milk proteins provide abundant branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and glutamine. Plasma BCAAs and glutamine are increased in obesity and insulin resistance, but decrease after gastric bypass surgery resulting in weight loss and improved insulin sensitivity. Milk protein consumption results in postprandial hyperinsulinemia in obese subjects, increases body weight of overweight adolescents and may thus deteriorate pre-existing metabolic disturbances of obese, insulin resistant individuals. PMID:24225036

  11. When people with pre-existing disabilities age in place: implications for social work practice.

    PubMed

    Gilson, S F; Netting, F E

    1997-11-01

    We focus on a population of people with disabilities who are "aging in place," that is, individuals aging with pre-existing physical disabilities. We distinguish between those who experience prolonged aging and others who experience accelerated aging. A brief overview of people aging with disabilities and selected background information on the increasing linkages between the aging and disability communities is provided. Four case examples illustrate the practice implications faced by social workers in partnering with people with pre-existing disabilities and in being sensitive to their desires concerning aging in place.

  12. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  13. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... objective medical findings; (4) Current medication and treatment orders; and (5) Information about the medical management of any of the patient's conditions unrelated to the terminal illness. (c)...

  14. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... objective medical findings; (4) Current medication and treatment orders; and (5) Information about the medical management of any of the patient's conditions unrelated to the terminal illness. (c)...

  15. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... any; (3) Current subjective and objective medical findings; (4) Current medication and treatment orders; and (5) Information about the medical management of any of the patient's conditions unrelated...

  16. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... any; (3) Current subjective and objective medical findings; (4) Current medication and treatment orders; and (5) Information about the medical management of any of the patient's conditions unrelated...

  17. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... any; (3) Current subjective and objective medical findings; (4) Current medication and treatment orders; and (5) Information about the medical management of any of the patient's conditions unrelated...

  18. Condensational uptake of semivolatile organic compounds in gasoline engine exhaust onto pre-existing inorganic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.-M.; Liggio, J.; Graham, L.; Lu, G.; Brook, J.; Stroud, C.; Zhang, J.; Makar, P.; Moran, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory studies on the condensational uptake of gaseous organic compounds in the exhaust of a light-duty gasoline engine onto preexisting sulfate and nitrate seed particles. Significant condensation of the gaseous organic compounds in the exhaust occurs onto pre-existing inorganic particles on a time scale of 2-5 min. The amount of condensed organic mass (COM) is proportional to the seed particle mass, suggesting that the uptake is due to dissolution, not adsorption. The solubility decreases as a power function with increased dilution of the exhaust, ranging from 0.23 g/g at a dilution ratio of 81, to 0.025 g/g at a dilution ratio of 2230. The solubility increases nonlinearly with increasing concentration of the total hydrocarbons in the gas phase (THC), rising from 0.12 g/g to 0.26 g/g for a CTHC increase of 1 to 18 μg m-3, suggesting that more organics are partitioned into the particles at higher gas phase concentrations. In terms of gas-particle partitioning, the condensational uptake of THC gases in gasoline engine exhaust can account for up to 30% of the total gas+particle THC. By incorporating the present findings, regional air quality modelling results suggest that the condensational uptake of THC onto sulfate particles alone can be comparable to the primary particle mass under moderately polluted ambient conditions. These findings are important for modelling and regulating the air quality impacts of gasoline vehicular emissions.

  19. Contributions Made by a Strengths-Oriented Intervention to Trusting Relationships within Pre-Existing Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, W. Bernt

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study spotlighted a grounded theory regarding contributions to affect- and cognition-based trust by a strengths-oriented intervention in pre-existing teams. Using purposeful and convenience sampling, 18 participants in a strengths-oriented intervention from 2 different regions of the Pacific Northwest were selected. A…

  20. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  1. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  2. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  3. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  4. 26 CFR 20.2045-1 - Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Applicability to pre-existing transfers or interests. 20.2045-1 Section 20.2045-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Gross...

  5. Using an Electronic Highlighter to Eliminate the Negative Effects of Pre-Existing, Inappropriate Highlighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki; Kreiner, David; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Herring, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether using an active learning technique, electronic highlighting, can eliminate the negative effects of pre-existing, poor highlighting on reading comprehension. Participants read passages containing no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, or inappropriate highlighting. We hypothesized…

  6. Are There Pre-Existing Neural, Cognitive, or Motoric Markers for Musical Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Andrea; Winner, Ellen; Cronin, Karl; Overy, Katie; Lee, Dennis J.; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2005-01-01

    Adult musician's brains show structural enlargements, but it is not known whether these are inborn or a consequence of long-term training. In addition, music training in childhood has been shown to have positive effects on visual-spatial and verbal outcomes. However, it is not known whether pre-existing advantages in these skills are found in…

  7. When People with Pre-Existing Disabilities Age in Place: Implications for Social Work Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilson, Stephen French; Netting, F. Ellen

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on a population of disabled people who are aging with pre-existing physical disabilities. Distinguishes between those who experience prolonged aging and those who experience accelerated aging. Provides four case examples to illustrate the practice implications faced by social workers in partnering with people with pre-existing…

  8. Asperger Syndrome: Associated Psychiatric and Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the association of medical and psychiatric conditions with Asperger syndrome, based mainly on publications from the last two decades. It examines comorbidity of Asperger syndrome with mood disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, tic disorders, violence and aggression,…

  9. Induction of mixed chimerism depletes pre-existing and de novo-developed autoreactive B cells in autoimmune NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Racine, Jeremy J; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Mingfeng; Zeng, Defu

    2014-06-01

    Destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is mainly mediated by autoimmune T and B lymphocytes. We reported that induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched mixed chimerism reversed autoimmunity and reestablished thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells in NOD mice, but it is still unclear how mixed chimerism tolerizes autoreactive B cells. The current studies were designed to reveal the mechanisms on how mixed chimerism tolerizes autoreactive B cells in T1D. Accordingly, mixed chimerism was induced in NOD mice through radiation-free nonmyeloablative anti-CD3/CD8 conditioning and infusion of donor CD4(+) T cell-depleted spleen and whole bone marrow (BM) cells or through myeloablative total body irradiation conditioning and reconstitution with T cell-depleted BM cells from donor and host. Kinetic analysis of percentage and yield of preplasma and plasma B cells, newly developed B-cell subsets, and their apoptosis was performed 30-60 days after transplantation. Induction of MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism results in depleting host-type pre-existing preplasma and plasma B cells as well as augmenting apoptosis of immature transitional T1 B cells, including insulin-specific B cells in a donor B cell-dependent manner. Therefore, induction of MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism depletes pre-existing and de novo-developed autoreactive B cells.

  10. Normal fault growth above pre-existing structures: insights from discrete element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Thilo; Finch, Emma; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher; Gawthorpe, Robert; Phillips, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In extensional systems, pre-existing structures such as shear zones may affect the growth, geometry and location of normal faults. Recent seismic reflection-based observations from the North Sea suggest that shear zones not only localise deformation in the host rock, but also in the overlying sedimentary succession. While pre-existing weaknesses are known to localise deformation in the host rock, their effect on deformation in the overlying succession is less well understood. Here, we use 3-D discrete element modelling to determine if and how kilometre-scale shear zones affect normal fault growth in the overlying succession. Discrete element models use a large number of interacting particles to describe the dynamic evolution of complex systems. The technique has therefore been applied to describe fault and fracture growth in a variety of geological settings. We model normal faulting by extending a 60×60×30 km crustal rift-basin model including brittle and ductile interactions and gravitation and isostatic forces by 30%. An inclined plane of weakness which represents a pre-existing shear zone is introduced in the lower section of the upper brittle layer at the start of the experiment. The length, width, orientation and dip of the weak zone are systematically varied between experiments to test how these parameters control the geometric and kinematic development of overlying normal fault systems. Consistent with our seismic reflection-based observations, our results show that strain is indeed localised in and above these weak zones. In the lower brittle layer, normal faults nucleate, as expected, within the zone of weakness and control the initiation and propagation of neighbouring faults. Above this, normal faults nucleate throughout the overlying strata where their orientations are strongly influenced by the underlying zone of weakness. These results challenge the notion that overburden normal faults simply form due to reactivation and upwards propagation of pre-existing

  11. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  12. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  13. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  14. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  15. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  16. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.113 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.113 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  17. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  18. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.213 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.213 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  19. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General medical condition. 67.313 Section...) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.313 General medical condition. The general medical standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a)...

  20. Effects of pre-existing discontinuities on the residual strength of rock mass - Insight from a discrete element method simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F. Q.; Kang, H. P.

    2016-04-01

    When rock failure is unavoidable, the designer of engineering structures must know and account for the residual strength of the rock mass. This is particularly relevant in underground coal mine openings. Pre-existing discontinuities play an important role in the mechanical behavior of rock masses and thus it is important to understand the effects of such pre-existing discontinuities on the residual strength. For this purpose, the present study demonstrates a numerical analysis using a discrete element method simulation. The numerical results indicate that fracture intensity has no significant influence on the residual strength of jointed rock masses, independent of confining conditions. As confining pressures increase, both peak and residual strengths increase, with residual strength increasing at a faster rate. The finding was further demonstrated by analyzing documented laboratory compressive test data from a variety of rocks along with field data from coal pillars. A comprehensive interpretation of the finding was conducted using a cohesion-weakening-friction-strengthening (CWFS) model. The effect of rock bolts on rock mass strength was also evaluated by using a discrete element method model which suggested that rock bolts can significantly increases residual strength but have limited effect on increasing the peak strength of rock masses.

  1. U.S. Military Discharges and Pre-existing Personality Disorders: A Health Policy Review.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Todd C

    2015-11-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) is facing allegations service members were wrongfully discharged for pre-existing personality disorders. From 2001 to 2007, 26,000 enlisted service members were discharged for a pre-existing personality disorder (2.6 % of total discharges). With national media attention of the issue, personality disorder discharges were reduced by 31 % in 2008 with new discharge procedures issued by the DoD. Even with the reduction, a government review found the DoD did not adhere to its discharge protocols. The objective of this paper is to explore personality disorders in the military, analyze various costs to stakeholders, and identify potential policy alternatives. PMID:25378127

  2. Deterioration of pre-existing hemiparesis brought about by subsequent ipsilateral lacunar infarction.

    PubMed

    Ago, T; Kitazono, T; Ooboshi, H; Takada, J; Yoshiura, T; Mihara, F; Ibayashi, S; Iida, M

    2003-08-01

    Mechanisms of post-stroke recovery are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests that cortical reorganisation in the unaffected hemisphere plays an important role. A 59 year old man developed a small lacunar infarct in the left corona radiata, which then caused marked deterioration in a pre-existing left hemiparesis that had resulted from an earlier right putaminal haemorrhage. Functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that the paretic left hand grip activated the ipsilateral left motor areas, but not the right hemispheric motor areas. This suggests that partial recovery of the left hemiparesis had been brought about by cortical reorganisation of the left hemisphere and intensification of the uncrossed corticospinal tract. The subsequent small infarct may have damaged the uncrossed tract, thereby causing the pre-existing hemiparesis to deteriorate even further.

  3. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  4. Are there pre-existing neural, cognitive, or motoric markers for musical ability?

    PubMed

    Norton, Andrea; Winner, Ellen; Cronin, Karl; Overy, Katie; Lee, Dennis J; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2005-11-01

    Adult musician's brains show structural enlargements, but it is not known whether these are inborn or a consequence of long-term training. In addition, music training in childhood has been shown to have positive effects on visual-spatial and verbal outcomes. However, it is not known whether pre-existing advantages in these skills are found in children who choose to study a musical instrument nor is it known whether there are pre-existing associations between music and any of these outcome measures that could help explain the training effects. To answer these questions, we compared 5- to 7-year-olds beginning piano or string lessons (n=39) with 5- to 7-year-olds not beginning instrumental training (n=31). All children received a series of tests (visual-spatial, non-verbal reasoning, verbal, motor, and musical) and underwent magnetic resonance imaging. We found no pre-existing neural, cognitive, motor, or musical differences between groups and no correlations (after correction for multiple analyses) between music perceptual skills and any brain or visual-spatial measures. However, correlations were found between music perceptual skills and both non-verbal reasoning and phonemic awareness. Such pre-existing correlations suggest similarities in auditory and visual pattern recognition as well a sharing of the neural substrates for language and music processing, most likely due to innate abilities or implicit learning during early development. This baseline study lays the groundwork for an ongoing longitudinal study addressing the effects of intensive musical training on brain and cognitive development, and making it possible to look retroactively at the brain and cognitive development of those children who emerge showing exceptional musical talent. PMID:16054741

  5. Numerical Modelling of Extended Leak-Off Test with a Pre-Existing Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, A.; Larsen, I.; Bauer, A.

    2016-04-01

    Extended leak-off test (XLOT) is one of the few techniques available for stress measurements in oil and gas wells. Interpretation of the test is often difficult since the results depend on a multitude of factors, including the presence of natural or drilling-induced fractures in the near-well area. Coupled numerical modelling of XLOT has been performed to investigate the pressure behaviour during the flowback phase as well as the effect of a pre-existing fracture on the test results in a low-permeability formation. Essential features of XLOT known from field measurements are captured by the model, including the saw-tooth shape of the pressure vs injected volume curve, and the change of slope in the pressure vs time curve during flowback used by operators as an indicator of the bottomhole pressure reaching the minimum in situ stress. Simulations with a pre-existing fracture running from the borehole wall in the radial direction have revealed that the results of XLOT are quite sensitive to the orientation of the pre-existing fracture. In particular, the fracture initiation pressure and the formation breakdown pressure increase steadily with decreasing angle between the fracture and the minimum in situ stress. Our findings seem to invalidate the use of the fracture initiation pressure and the formation breakdown pressure for stress measurements or rock strength evaluation purposes.

  6. The association of medical conditions and presenteeism.

    PubMed

    Burton, Wayne N; Pransky, Glenn; Conti, Daniel J; Chen, Chin-Yu; Edington, Dee W

    2004-06-01

    A self-reported measure of four domains of work impairment based on the Work Limitations Questionnaire was completed by 16,651 employees of a large financial services corporation. Using a multivariate model to control for coexisting conditions, age, and gender, significant relationships were observed between medical conditions and patterns of impaired work performance. Depression was highly associated with work limitations in time management (odds ratio [OR] = 2.05), interpersonal/mental functioning (OR = 2.50), and overall output (OR = 2.24). Arthritis (OR = 1.56) and low back pain (OR = 1.32) were associated with physical function limitations. These same two conditions were associated with limitations in mental/interpersonal functioning but with low back pain having the higher odds ratio (OR = 1.54 vs. 1.22). These results suggest that worksite interventions (eg, disease management programs) should be tailored to the unique effects observed with specific medical conditions. More targeted programs could have important benefits for productivity in the workplace. PMID:15194894

  7. Exploring mucosal immunization with a recombinant influenza virus carrying an HIV-polyepitope in mice with pre-existing immunity to influenza.

    PubMed

    Garulli, Bruno; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Stillitano, Maria Giuseppina; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Castrucci, Maria Rita

    2014-05-01

    HIV-1 vaccines based on recombinant vectors have been developed to elicit immune responses; however, the failure of the STEP HIV-1 vaccine trial has caused concern regarding the impact on vaccine efficacy of pre-existing vector seropositivity in humans. By using a mouse model of infection, we evaluated the immune responses elicited by intranasal and vaginal immunization with the recombinant influenza virus WSN/CKG carrying the PCLUS3-P18 peptide and a Gag epitope in its hemagglutinin, and the impact of pre-existing vector immunity on protection against recombinant vaccinia virus challenge. We found that despite the protective immunity induced in naïve mice by the WSN/CKG virus via either route, the vaginal immunization of mice with pre-existing influenza immunity restricted vPE16 replication more significantly in the ovaries than intranasal immunization. Thus, successful vaccination strategies under limiting conditions, such as pre-existing vector immunity, require the local induction of mucosal immunity at the site of virus infection.

  8. Strain Accommodation and its Relationship to Pre-existing Structures along the Karonga Fault, Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, S.; Laó-Dávila, D. A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Clappe, B.; Johnson, T.; Hull, C. D.; Nyalugwe, V.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Salima, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Livingstone border fault, with its 7 km of total displacement, accommodates most of the strain in the northern portion of the Malawi Rift. Its hanging wall is also breaking up, as suggested by the 2009 earthquake sequence in Karonga. This hanging wall block is underlain in part by the NW- and N-striking Mughese Shear Zone. The superposition of new faults on the pre-existing structures makes this area an ideal location to study the effect of the orientation of pre-existing structures on the accommodation of strain in the hanging wall in the western flank of the northern Malawi Rift. We used gravity and aeromagnetic data and remote sensing to map the Precambrian macro-scale structural fabric of the greater Karonga region. Moreover, we mapped mesostructures within the Precambrian and younger rocks. In the northern portion of the Karonga fault, a single east-dipping fault zone with a mean strike of 32° and a 59° dip cuts the Precambrian foliation that has a mean strike of 301° and 79° dip, accommodating the majority of strain in this region. South of the city of Karonga, the Precambrian foliation assumes a NNW average strike that is steeply dipping. Here the Karonga fault disperses from a single fault with a 2 km damage zone to several distinct east- and west-dipping faults over 6 km that strike in the same overall direction as the foliation planes from the Mughese Shear Zone. Karoo rift structures (horsts and grabens) and their associated rock formations could also be reactivated in this area. These relationships suggest that within the Malawi Rift, strain can be accommodated differently based on the nature and orientation of pre-existing structures. The structural fabric surrounding the southern portion of the Karonga fault seems to favor reactivation and strain distribution, whereas strain is localized in the northern portion of the fault zone.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 434 - Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations B Appendix B to Part 434 Protection of.... B Appendix B to Part 434—Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing... per year. d. Accommodating Data Below the Maximum Daily Limit at subpart C of this part. In the...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 434 - Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations B Appendix B to Part 434 Protection of.... B Appendix B to Part 434—Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing... per year. d. Accommodating Data Below the Maximum Daily Limit at subpart C of this part. In the...

  11. Ionization-induced annealing of pre-existing defects in silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanwen; Sachan, Ritesh; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-01

    A long-standing objective in materials research is to effectively heal fabrication defects or to remove pre-existing or environmentally induced damage in materials. Silicon carbide (SiC) is a fascinating wide-band gap semiconductor for high-temperature, high-power and high-frequency applications. Its high corrosion and radiation resistance makes it a key refractory/structural material with great potential for extremely harsh radiation environments. Here we show that the energy transferred to the electron system of SiC by energetic ions via inelastic ionization can effectively anneal pre-existing defects and restore the structural order. The threshold determined for this recovery process reveals that it can be activated by 750 and 850 keV Si and C self-ions, respectively. The results conveyed here can contribute to SiC-based device fabrication by providing a room-temperature approach to repair atomic lattice structures, and to SiC performance prediction as either a functional material for device applications or a structural material for high-radiation environments. PMID:26264864

  12. Kinetic Dissection of the Pre-existing Conformational Equilibrium in the Trypsin Fold*

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Austin D.; Chakraborty, Pradipta; Di Cera, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Structural biology has recently documented the conformational plasticity of the trypsin fold for both the protease and zymogen in terms of a pre-existing equilibrium between closed (E*) and open (E) forms of the active site region. How such plasticity is manifested in solution and affects ligand recognition by the protease and zymogen is poorly understood in quantitative terms. Here we dissect the E*-E equilibrium with stopped-flow kinetics in the presence of excess ligand or macromolecule. Using the clotting protease thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 as relevant models we resolve the relative distribution of the E* and E forms and the underlying kinetic rates for their interconversion. In the case of thrombin, the E* and E forms are distributed in a 1:4 ratio and interconvert on a time scale of 45 ms. In the case of prethrombin-2, the equilibrium is shifted strongly (10:1 ratio) in favor of the closed E* form and unfolds over a faster time scale of 4.5 ms. The distribution of E* and E forms observed for thrombin and prethrombin-2 indicates that zymogen activation is linked to a significant shift in the pre-existing equilibrium between closed and open conformations that facilitates ligand binding to the active site. These findings broaden our mechanistic understanding of how conformational transitions control ligand recognition by thrombin and its zymogen precursor prethrombin-2 and have direct relevance to other members of the trypsin fold. PMID:26216877

  13. Numerical modeling of the seismic response of a large pre-existing landslide in the Marmara region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdeau, Céline; Lenti, Luca; Martino, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    Turkey is one of the geologically most active regions of Europe prone to natural hazards in particular earthquakes and landslides. Detailed seismological studies show that a catastrophic event is now expected in the Marmara region along the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). On the shores of the Marmara sea, about 30km East of Istanbul and 15km North from the NAFZ, urbanization is fastly growing despite the presence of pre-existing large landslides. Whether such landslides could be reactivated under seismic shaking is a key question. In the framework of the MARsite European project, we selected one of the most critical landslides namely the Büyükçekmece landslide in order to assess its local seismic response. Based on detailed geophysical and geotechnical field investigations, a high-resolution engineering-geological model of the landslide slope was reconstructed. A numerical modeling was carried out on a longitudinal cross section of this landslide with a 2D finite difference code FLAC in order to assess the local seismic response of the slope and to evaluate the consistency of conditions suitable for the earthquake-induced reactivation of the landslide. The obtained ground-motion amplification pattern along the slope surface is very complex and is strongly influenced by properties changes between the pre-existing landslide mass and the surrounding material. Further comparisons of 2D versus 1D ground-motion amplifications on the one hand and 2D versus topographic site effects on the other hand will shed light on the parameters controlling the spatial variations of ground-motion amplifications along the slope surface.

  14. 28 CFR 79.34 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of medical condition. 79.34 Section... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Onsite Participants § 79.34 Proof of medical condition. Proof of medical condition under this subpart will be made in the same manner and according to the...

  15. 28 CFR 79.34 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of medical condition. 79.34 Section... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Onsite Participants § 79.34 Proof of medical condition. Proof of medical condition under this subpart will be made in the same manner and according to the...

  16. 28 CFR 79.34 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of medical condition. 79.34 Section... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Onsite Participants § 79.34 Proof of medical condition. Proof of medical condition under this subpart will be made in the same manner and according to the...

  17. From Pre-Existing Renal Failure to Perioperative Renal Protection: The Anesthesiologist’s Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Huti, Gentian; Sula, Hektor; Baftiu, Nehat; Kaci, Myzafer; Bodeci, Artan; Pesha, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Context Pre-existing renal dysfunction presents specific features that anesthesiologists must deal with. Anesthesia and renal function are connected and can interfere with each other. Induced hypotension anesthesia and the toxic effects of anesthetic drugs can further deteriorate renal function. Evidence Acquisition Decreased renal function can prolong anesthetic drug effects by decreased elimination of these drugs. Anesthesia can deteriorate renal function and decreased renal function can interfere with drug elimination leading to their prolonged effect. The anesthesiologist must understand all the physiological aspects of the patient, renal protection, and the relationships between anesthetic drugs and renal function. This review article aims to summarize these aspects. Results Perioperative renal failure and renal protection is a crucial moment in clinical practice of every anesthesiologist. Conclusions Good knowledges for renal function remain a hallmark of daily practice of the anesthesiologist, considering renal function as an important determinant factor in anesthesia practice. PMID:27642570

  18. Severity of pre-existing psychiatric illness and response to the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Funayama, Michitaka; Mizushima, Jin

    2013-10-01

    Reports have described how psychiatric patients respond to disasters. However, previous reports on the response depending on diagnostic categories have provided no clear consensus. Here we analyzed response to the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011, among psychiatric patients in light of severity of pre-existing psychiatric illness. We studied psychiatric change among a population of psychiatric outpatients in Tochigi prefecture, located ~160 km (~100 miles) southeast of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, in an area that suffered moderate damage from the earthquake and radiation. A total of 294 psychiatric outpatients was assessed using the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF-F). A change of ≥10 points in the GAF-F score was counted as a change in symptoms. The data were stratified by disease category, gender, and GAF-F score and analyzed using the Fisher's exact test. In the 2 months after the earthquake, 5.4% of patients showed evidence of a change in symptoms, with 4.1% worsening and 1.4% improving. Compared with patients having a GAF-F score ≤50, significantly more patients with a score >50 showed evidence of worsening symptoms. No significant difference was found with respect to gender or diagnostic category for patients with worsened or improved symptoms. Our findings reveal that a relatively small percent of patients with pre-existing psychiatric diseases showed evidence of a change in symptoms and that patients with mild-to-moderate psychiatric illness are potentially vulnerable to the impacts of a natural disaster.

  19. Pre-existing astrocytes form functional perisynaptic processes on neurons generated in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Krzisch, Marine; Temprana, Silvio G; Mongiat, Lucas A; Armida, Jan; Schmutz, Valentin; Virtanen, Mari A; Kocher-Braissant, Jacqueline; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Vutskits, Laszlo; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Bergami, Matteo; Gage, Fred H; Schinder, Alejandro F; Toni, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    The adult dentate gyrus produces new neurons that morphologically and functionally integrate into the hippocampal network. In the adult brain, most excitatory synapses are ensheathed by astrocytic perisynaptic processes that regulate synaptic structure and function. However, these processes are formed during embryonic or early postnatal development and it is unknown whether astrocytes can also ensheathe synapses of neurons born during adulthood and, if so, whether they play a role in their synaptic transmission. Here, we used a combination of serial-section immuno-electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and electrophysiology to examine the formation of perisynaptic processes on adult-born neurons. We found that the afferent and efferent synapses of newborn neurons are ensheathed by astrocytic processes, irrespective of the age of the neurons or the size of their synapses. The quantification of gliogenesis and the distribution of astrocytic processes on synapses formed by adult-born neurons suggest that the majority of these processes are recruited from pre-existing astrocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of astrocytic glutamate re-uptake significantly reduced postsynaptic currents and increased paired-pulse facilitation in adult-born neurons, suggesting that perisynaptic processes modulate synaptic transmission on these cells. Finally, some processes were found intercalated between newly formed dendritic spines and potential presynaptic partners, suggesting that they may also play a structural role in the connectivity of new spines. Together, these results indicate that pre-existing astrocytes remodel their processes to ensheathe synapses of adult-born neurons and participate to the functional and structural integration of these cells into the hippocampal network.

  20. Effects of Pre-Existing Target Structure on the Formation of Large Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Cintala, M. J.; Crawford, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    The shapes of large-scale craters and the mechanics responsible for melt generation are influenced by broad and small-scale structures present in a target prior to impact. For example, well-developed systems of fractures often create craters that appear square in outline, good examples being Meteor Crater, AZ and the square craters of 433 Eros. Pre-broken target material also affects melt generation. Kieffer has shown how the shock wave generated in Coconino sandstone at Meteor crater created reverberations which, in combination with the natural target heterogeneity present, created peaks and troughs in pressure and compressed density as individual grains collided to produce a range of shock mineralogies and melts within neighboring samples. In this study, we further explore how pre-existing target structure influences various aspects of the cratering process. We combine experimental and numerical techniques to explore the connection between the scales of the impact generated shock wave and the pre-existing target structure. We focus on the propagation of shock waves in coarse, granular media, emphasizing its consequences on excavation, crater growth, ejecta production, cratering efficiency, melt generation, and crater shape. As a baseline, we present a first series of results for idealized targets where the particles are all identical in size and possess the same shock impedance. We will also present a few results, whereby we increase the complexities of the target properties by varying the grain size, strength, impedance and frictional properties. In addition, we investigate the origin and implications of reverberations that are created by the presence of physical and chemical heterogeneity in a target.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 434 - Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT... establishing effluent limitations for pre-existing discharges at coal remining operations, in accordance with the requirements set forth in Subpart G; Coal Remining. The requirements specify that...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 434 - Baseline Determination and Compliance Monitoring for Pre-existing Discharges at Remining Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT... establishing effluent limitations for pre-existing discharges at coal remining operations, in accordance with the requirements set forth in subpart G; Coal Remining. The requirements specify that...

  3. [Ways to optimize working conditions of medical personnel servicing modern hi-tech medical equipment].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, O K

    2007-01-01

    The author analyzed health state of medical personnel through various parameters. Hygienic characteristics of work conditions for medical personnel subjected to physical factors when servicing modern hi-tech medical equipment are presented. Occupational groups at high risk are defined. The article covers main directions in improving work conditions and preserving health for medical personnel in these groups.

  4. Gene Therapy for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI Is Effective in Cats Without Pre-Existing Immunity to AAV8

    PubMed Central

    Ferla, Rita; O'Malley, Thomas; Calcedo, Roberto; O'Donnell, Patricia; Wang, Ping; Cotugno, Gabriella; Claudiani, Pamela; Wilson, James M.; Haskins, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver gene transfer with adeno-associated viral (AAV) 2/8 vectors is being considered for therapy of systemic diseases like mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI), a lysosomal storage disease due to deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB). We have previously reported that liver gene transfer with AAV2/8 results in sustained yet variable expression of ARSB. We hypothesized that the variability we observed could be due to pre-existing immunity to wild-type AAV8. To test this, we compared the levels of AAV2/8-mediated transduction in MPS VI cats with and without pre-existing immunity to AAV8. In addition, since levels of lysosomal enzymes as low as 5% of normal are expected to be therapeutic, we evaluated the impact of pre-existing immunity on MPS VI phenotypic rescue. AAV2/8 administration to MPS VI cats without pre-existing neutralizing antibodies to AAV8 resulted in consistent and dose-dependent expression of ARSB, urinary glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction, and femur length amelioration. Conversely, animals with pre-existing immunity to AAV8 showed low levels of ARSB expression and limited phenotypic improvement. Our data support the use of AAV2/8-mediated gene transfer for MPS VI and other systemic diseases, and highlight that pre-existing immunity to AAV8 should be considered in determining subject eligibility for therapy. PMID:23194248

  5. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth.

  6. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  7. Mathematical Modelling of a Brain Tumour Initiation and Early Development: A Coupled Model of Glioblastoma Growth, Pre-Existing Vessel Co-Option, Angiogenesis and Blood Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yan; Wu, Jie; Li, Zhiyong; Long, Quan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a coupled mathematical modelling system to investigate glioblastoma growth in response to dynamic changes in chemical and haemodynamic microenvironments caused by pre-existing vessel co-option, remodelling, collapse and angiogenesis. A typical tree-like architecture network with different orders for vessel diameter is designed to model pre-existing vasculature in host tissue. The chemical substances including oxygen, vascular endothelial growth factor, extra-cellular matrix and matrix degradation enzymes are calculated based on the haemodynamic environment which is obtained by coupled modelling of intravascular blood flow with interstitial fluid flow. The haemodynamic changes, including vessel diameter and permeability, are introduced to reflect a series of pathological characteristics of abnormal tumour vessels including vessel dilation, leakage, angiogenesis, regression and collapse. Migrating cells are included as a new phenotype to describe the migration behaviour of malignant tumour cells. The simulation focuses on the avascular phase of tumour development and stops at an early phase of angiogenesis. The model is able to demonstrate the main features of glioblastoma growth in this phase such as the formation of pseudopalisades, cell migration along the host vessels, the pre-existing vasculature co-option, angiogenesis and remodelling. The model also enables us to examine the influence of initial conditions and local environment on the early phase of glioblastoma growth. PMID:26934465

  8. Pre-existing diseases of patients increase susceptibility to hypoxemia during gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Long, Yanhua; Liu, Hui-Hui; Yu, Changhong; Tian, Xia; Yang, Yi-Ran; Wang, Cheng; Pan, Yajuan

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxemia is the most common adverse event that happened during gastrointestinal endoscopy. To estimate risk of hypoxemia prior to endoscopy, American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) classification scores were used as a major predictive factor. But the accuracy of ASA scores for predicting hypoxemia incidence was doubted here, considering that the classification system ignores much information about general health status and fitness of patient that may contribute to hypoxemia. In this retrospective review of clinical data collected prospectively, the data on 4904 procedures were analyzed. The Pearson's chi-square test or the Fisher exact test was employed to analyze variance of categorical factors. Continuous variables were statistically evaluated using t-tests or Analysis of variance (ANOVA). As a result, only 245 (5.0%) of the enrolled 4904 patients were found to present hypoxemia during endoscopy. Multivariable logistic regressions revealed that independent risk factors for hypoxemia include high BMI (BMI 30 versus 20, Odd ratio: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.13-2.05; P = 0.0098), hypertension (Odd ratio: 2.28, 95% CI: 1.44-3.60; P = 0.0004), diabetes (Odd ratio: 2.37, 95% CI: 1.30-4.34; P = 0.005), gastrointestinal diseases (Odd ratio: 1.77, 95% CI: 1.21-2.60; P = 0.0033), heart diseases (Odd ratio: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.06-3.68; P = 0.0325) and the procedures that combined esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy (Odd ratio: 4.84, 95% CI: 1.61-15.51; P = 0.0292; EGD as reference). It is noteworthy that ASA classification scores were not included as an independent predictive factor, and susceptibility of youth to hypoxemia during endoscopy was as high as old subjects. In conclusion, some certain pre-existing diseases of patients were newly identified as independent risk factors for hypoxemia during GI endoscopy. High ASA scores are a confounding predictive factor of pre-existing diseases. We thus recommend that youth (≤18 yrs), obese patients and

  9. Pre-existing discontinuities and oblique rifting in the Kenya Rift: Comparisons with analogue models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolet, J.; Gloaguen, R.; Gloaguen, R.; Dooley, T.; McClay, K.

    2001-12-01

    Oblique rift structures such as the SSE-trending Aswa Transverse Zone in the Kenya rift are poorly understood and are rarely taken into account in geometric and kinematic models for the origin of this rift zone. However, remote sensing demonstrates that transverse structures are quite numerous and have a significant influence on the geometry and segmentation of the rift and the development of faults within or at the boundaries of the oblique zones. The importance of these transverse zones varies depending on their orientation and position with respect to the main rift. The origin of these oblique zones can be directly related to pre-existing fabrics and shear zones in the Precambrian basement and thus act as mechanically distinct structural domains during later extensional events. In order to assess the importance and role of these oblique structures we used optical (SPOT, LANDSAT) and microwave (RADARSAT, ERS) data combined with field observations and measurements. Collected structural data were then compared with scaled physical models of orthogonal and oblique rifting in order to refine the rift model. The data and comparison with physical models suggest that these transverse zones are best described as oblique rift zones where the rift border faults are parallel to the basement grain whereas intra-rift fault systems form orthogonal to the extension direction. This model also implies that the present day extension direction in Kenya is oriented E-W.

  10. Psychological distress in an earthquake-devastated area with pre-existing high rate of suicide.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Akira; Kitamura, Hideaki; Shindo, Masanobu; Honma, Hiroko; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2014-10-30

    On 12 March 2011 an earthquake devastated the Matsunoyama and Matsudai districts of Tōkamachi City, Niigata, Japan. These areas had high pre-existing suicide rates, especially among the elderly. We investigated whether mental health status became worse among the sufferers 5 months after the earthquake, and what kind of factors were implicated in any changes. A 15-item questionnaire that tapped earthquake-related variables and the Kessler 10 Psychological Distress Scale to measure psychological distress were distributed to 1923 residents aged over 40 years. The mean age (S.D.) of the total 1731 respondents (male, 805; female, 926) was 68.2 (13.1) years. Of these, we assessed K10 scores from 1346 respondents. The mean scores (S.D.) for K10 and K6 (six selected items from the K10) were 5.8 (6.3) and 3.4 (3.9), respectively. Among the respondents, 9.1% and 3.2% obtained a score of K10 ≥15 and K6 ≥13, respectively. These scores showed slightly higher psychological distress, especially among the elderly, in comparison with existing community-based data. Categorical regression analysis revealed significant and relatively strong effects of initial psychological impact, decrease in sleep hours, advanced age, and decrease in interpersonal relationships within the community on the K10 score. The last item suggests the importance of socio-environmental factors in post-disaster mental health.

  11. Pre-existing coronary stenoses in patients with first myocardial infarction are not necessarily severe.

    PubMed

    Hackett, D; Davies, G; Maseri, A

    1988-12-01

    The sudden, often unheralded, onset of symptoms in acute myocardial infarction suggests that pre-existing coronary stenoses susceptible to acute thrombosis in the infarct-related artery may not necessarily have been severe. We investigated the severity of residual coronary stenoses after successful thrombolytic recanalization and the relationship to previous symptoms, collateral vessels and the extent of coronary artery disease in 60 consecutive patients at the time of presentation of their first acute myocardial infarction by performing quantitative coronary arteriography before, during and after intracoronary thrombolytic therapy. Recanalization was achieved in 48 (80%) patients with a residual stenosis of 58.1 +/- 10.8% (mean +/- ISD; range 33-82%) obstruction diameter and a minimum lumen calibre of 1.10 +/- 0.3 mm (range 0.39-1.95 mm). A residual stenosis of less than 60% obstruction diameter was present in 28 (47%) patients. When residual stenoses were mild, no acute collateral filling of the occluded artery was observed. After thrombolysis, residual infarct-related coronary stenoses in patients with their first acute myocardial infarction are not necessarily severely obstructive. This raises the problem of identifying which non-obstructive coronary stenoses are likely to occlude suddenly and why they do so.

  12. "Stress" hyperglycaemia during acute myocardial infarction: an indicator of pre-existing diabetes?

    PubMed

    Husband, D J; Alberti, K G; Julian, D G

    1983-07-23

    Hyperglycaemia occurring at admission in patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction is generally held to represent stress hyperglycaemia. 26 patients, not previously known to be diabetic, had blood glucose values greater than or equal to 10 mmol/l on admission to a coronary care unit. 16 survived for 2 months at which time a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) showed diabetes in 10 (63%) and impaired glucose tolerance in 1 (WHO criteria). All those with abnormal glucose tolerance at 2 months had had raised glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1) (greater than 7.5%) on admission, indicating pre-existing diabetes. All those with a HbA1 level over 8% had abnormal glucose tolerance. 7 of the 10 who died or did not have an OGTT also had raised HbA1 at admission. An admission blood glucose greater than or equal to 10 mmol/l in patients with severe chest pain is more likely to indicate previously undiagnosed diabetes than "stress" hyperglycaemia. There is no evidence that myocardial infarction precipitates diabetes. The glycosylated haemoglobin concentration can be used to distinguish between stress hyperglycaemia and hyperglycaemia caused by diabetes.

  13. Flash-ionization of pre-existing circumstellar material around Nova Oph 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munari, U.; Walter, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained daily high-resolution Echelle spectroscopy of Nova Oph 2015 during its initial evolution. It reveals the presence of pre-existing circumstellar material around the nova, which can be interpreted as the wind of an evolved companion. On earliest observations, the emission line profiles of Nova Oph 2015 displayed a very narrow emission component (full width at half-maximum [FWHM] ˜ 60 km s-1), recombining over a time-scale of 5 days and showing constant low velocity (RV⊙ = -4.5 km s-1), that we interpret as coming from the wind of the secondary recombining after the ionization from the initial UV-flash of the nova. The underlying broad component underwent a marked reduction in both FWHM and width at zero intensity (the latter declining from 4000 to 2000 km s-1 in 10 days) while increasing by six times in flux, that we believe is the result of the high-velocity ejecta of the nova being slowed down while trying to expand within the surrounding wind of the companion. Nova Oph 2015 is possibly unique among novae with evolved companions in having displayed a long rise to maximum brightness and a slow decline from it, an Fe II-type classification, and a probable sub-giant luminosity class for the secondary.

  14. Phenolic acids in neem (Azadirachta indica): a major pre-existing secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Singh, U P; Maurya, S; Singh, D P

    2005-01-01

    High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) analyses of various parts (fresh and dry bark of stem, mature and tender leaves, flower and different parts of fruit, i.e., raw and ripe fruit epicarp, mesocarp and seed) of neem (Azadirachta indica), which occupies an important place in socio-cultural-religious life in Indian communities, indicate that neem is rich in pre-existing secondary metabolites (phenolic acids). Dry bark showed only tannic acid but in fresh bark three phenolic acids were observed, i.e., gallic, tannic, and ferulic acids. In tender leaves only gallic and ferulic acids were detected, but the levels of these phenolic acids in mature leaves were about three times and fifty times greater, respectively. Flowers had only two phenolic acids in which gallic acid was maximum followed by chlorogenic acid. The level of phenolic acid was maximum in seeds followed by epicarp and pulp. In raw and ripe fruit seeds four phenolic acids were detected. Raw fruit seeds were rich in phenolic acids than ripe fruit seeds. Fruit epicarp was relatively richer than seed, seed pulp and flowers of the plants. Neem flowers were also rich in gallic and chlorogenic acids. PMID:16093234

  15. The Influence of Pre-existing Deformation on GMA Welding Distortion in Thin Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, C. M.; Ahn, J.; Tsunori, M.; Dye, D.; Nikbin, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Weld distortion is particularly problematic for large thin structures that are used in the assembly of ships. The drive toward lighter ships and thinner plate is restricted by the significant increase in distortion as the plate thickness decreases. The influence of pre-existing deformation in the plates to be joined on the resultant distortion in gas metal arc welded structure has been studied. DH-36 steel plate surface profiles were measured before and after the butt welding of two plates 1000 × 500 × 4 mm in size. Three dimensional finite element models that incorporate the initial plate profile have been created to simulate the welding process and to examine the relationship between the final welded plate profiles and the initial deformation present in the plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric models were considered. A significant variation in the unwelded base plates' initial distortion was observed. Generally, it has been found that if an out-of-plane deformation exists in a plate prior to welding, the level of distortion further increases in the same direction following welding. The final distortions are strongly related to the initial plate profiles. The residual stress distributions in the plates are also to some extent affected by the level of distortion initially present.

  16. EVIDENCE FOR PRE-EXISTING DUST IN THE BRIGHT TYPE IIn SN 2010jl

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J. E.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Clem, J.; Landolt, A. E-mail: landolt@phys.lsu.edu E-mail: jclem@phys.lsu.edu

    2011-08-15

    SN 2010jl was an extremely bright, Type IIn supernova (SN) which showed a significant infrared (IR) excess no later than 90 days after explosion. We have obtained Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m and JHK observations of SN 2010jl {approx}90 days post-explosion. Little to no reddening in the host galaxy indicated that the circumstellar material lost from the progenitor must lie in a torus inclined out of the plane of the sky. The likely cause of the high mid-IR flux is the reprocessing of the initial flash of the SN by pre-existing circumstellar dust. Using a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code, we have estimated that between 0.03 and 0.35 M{sub sun} of dust exists in a circumstellar torus around the SN located 6 x 10{sup 17} cm away from the SN and inclined between 60 deg. and 80 deg. to the plane of the sky. On day 90, we are only seeing the illumination of approximately 5% of this torus, and expect to see an elevated IR flux from this material up until day {approx} 450. It is likely this dust was created in a luminous blue variable (LBV) like mass-loss event of more than 3 M{sub sun}, which is large but consistent with other LBV progenitors such as {eta} Carinae.

  17. A Model for Subglacial Flooding Along a Pre-Existing Hydrological Network during the Rapid Drainage of Supraglacial Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Tsai, V. C.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly large numbers of supraglacial lakes form and drain every summer on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Presently, about 15% of the lakes drain rapidly within the timescale of a few hours, and the vertical discharge of water during these events may find a pre-existing subglacial hydrological network, particularly late in the melt season. Here, we present a model for subglacial flooding applied specifically to such circumstances. Given the short timescale of events, we treat ice and bed as purely elastic and assume that the fluid flow in the subglacial conduit is fully turbulent. We evaluate the effect of initial conduit opening, wi, on the rate of flood propagation and along-flow profiles of field variables. We find that floods propagate much faster, particularly in early times, for larger wi. For wi = 10 and 1 cm, for example, floods travel about 68% and 50% farther than in the fully coupled ice/bed scenario after 2 hours of drainage, respectively. Irrespective of the magnitude of wi, we also find that there exists a region of positive pressure gradient. This reversal of pressure gradient draws water in from the farfield and causes the conduit to narrow, respecting mass continuity. While the general shape of the profiles appears similar, greater conduit opening is found for larger wi. For wi = 10 and 1 cm, for example, the elastostatic conduit opening at the point of injection is about 1.39 and 1.26 times that of the fully coupled ice/bed scenario after 2 hours of drainage. The hypothesis of a pre-existing thin film of water is consistent with the spirit of contemporary state-of-the-art continuum models for subglacial hydrology. This also results in avoiding the pressure singularity, which is inherent in classical hydro-fracture models applied to fully coupled ice/bed scenarios, thus opening an avenue for integrating the likes of our model within continuum hydrological models. Furthermore, we foresee that the theory presented can be used to potentially infer

  18. Discovery of a pre-existing molecular filament associated with supernova remnant G127.1+0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ji; Fang, Min; Su, Yang

    2014-08-20

    We performed millimeter observations in CO lines toward the supernova remnant (SNR) G127.1+0.5. We found a molecular filament at 4-13 km s{sup –1} consisting of two distinct parts: a straight part coming out of the remnant region and a curved part in the remnant region. The curved part is coincides well with the bright SNR shell detected in 1420 MHz radio continuum and mid-infrared observations in the northeastern region. In addition, redshifted line wing broadening is found only in the curved part of the molecular filament, which indicates a physical interaction. These provide strong evidences, for the first time, to confirm the association between an SNR and a pre-existing long molecular filament. Multi-band observations in the northeastern remnant shell could be explained by the interaction between the remnant shock and the dense molecular filament. RADEX radiative transfer modeling of the quiet and shocked components yield physical conditions consistent with the passage of a non-dissociative J-type shock. We argue that the curved part of the filament is fully engulfed by the remnant's forward shock. A spatial correlation between aggregated young stellar objects (YSOs) and the adjacent molecular filament close to the SNR is also found, which could be related to the progenitor's activity.

  19. Treating child obesity and associated medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Caprio, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most are ineffective in addressing it. Treatment should begin, Caprio explains, with a thorough medical exam, an assessment of nutrition and physical activity, an appraisal of the degree of obesity and associated health complications, a family history, and full information about current medications. Caprio also summarizes the current use of medications and surgery in treating child obesity and argues, that for severe forms of obesity, the future lies in developing new and more effective drugs. Caprio explains that today's most effective obesity treatment programs have been carried out in academic centers through an approach that combines a dietary component, behavioral modification, physical activity, and parental involvement. Such programs, however, have yet to be translated to primary pediatric care centers. Successfully treating obesity, she argues, will require a major shift in pediatric care that builds on the findings of these academic centers regarding structured intervention programs. To ensure that pediatricians are well trained in implementing such programs, the American Medical Association is working with federal agencies, medical specialty societies, and public health organizations to teach doctors how to prevent and manage obesity in both children and adults. Such training should be a part of undergraduate and graduate medical education and of continuing medical education programs. Caprio also addresses the problem of reimbursement for obesity treatment. Despite the health risks of obesity, patients get little support from health insurers, thus putting long-term weight-management programs beyond the reach of most

  20. Modulation of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium tunes adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ådén, Jörgen; Verma, Abhinav; Schug, Alexander; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2012-10-10

    Structural plasticity is often required for distinct microscopic steps during enzymatic reaction cycles. Adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli (AK(eco)) populates two major conformations in solution; the open (inactive) and closed (active) state, and the overall turnover rate is inversely proportional to the lifetime of the active conformation. Therefore, structural plasticity is intimately coupled to enzymatic turnover in AK(eco). Here, we probe the open to closed conformational equilibrium in the absence of bound substrate with NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational equilibrium in absence of substrate and, in turn, the turnover number can be modulated with mutational- and osmolyte-driven perturbations. Removal of one hydrogen bond between the ATP and AMP binding subdomains results in a population shift toward the open conformation and a resulting increase of k(cat). Addition of the osmolyte TMAO to AK(eco) results in population shift toward the closed conformation and a significant reduction of k(cat). The Michaelis constants (K(M)) scale with the change in k(cat), which follows from the influence of the population of the closed conformation for substrate binding affinity. Hence, k(cat) and K(M) are mutually dependent, and in the case of AK(eco), any perturbation that modulates k(cat) is mirrored with a proportional response in K(M). Thus, our results demonstrate that the equilibrium constant of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium directly affects enzymatic catalysis. From an evolutionary perspective, our findings suggest that, for AK(eco), there exists ample flexibility to obtain a specificity constant (k(cat)/K(M)) that commensurate with the exerted cellular selective pressure.

  1. Differentiation of pre-existing trapped methane from thermogenic methane in an igneous-intruded coal by hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dias, Robert F.; Lewan, Michael D.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Kotarba, Maciej J.

    2014-01-01

    So as to better understand how the gas generation potential of coal changes with increasing rank, same-seam samples of bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin that were naturally matured to varying degrees by the intrusion of an igneous dike were subjected to hydrous pyrolysis (HP) conditions of 360 °C for 72 h. The accumulated methane in the reactor headspace was analyzed for δ13C and δ2H, and mol percent composition. Maximum methane production (9.7 mg/g TOC) occurred in the most immature samples (0.5 %Ro), waning to minimal methane values at 2.44 %Ro (0.67 mg/g TOC), and rebounding to 3.6 mg/g TOC methane in the most mature sample (6.76 %Ro). Methane from coal with the highest initial thermal maturity (6.76 %Ro) shows no isotopic dependence on the reactor water and has a microbial δ13C value of −61‰. However, methane from coal of minimal initial thermal maturity (0.5 %Ro) shows hydrogen isotopic dependence on the reaction water and has a δ13C value of −37‰. The gas released from coals under hydrous pyrolysis conditions represents a quantifiable mixture of ancient (270 Ma) methane (likely microbial) that was generated in situ and trapped within the rock during the rapid heating by the dike, and modern (laboratory) thermogenic methane that was generated from the indigenous organic matter due to thermal maturation induced by hydrous pyrolysis conditions. These findings provide an analytical framework for better assessment of natural gas sources and for differentiating generated gas from pre-existing trapped gas in coals of various ranks.

  2. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept as proof of medical condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it possesses medical records... Cancer Institute can make a diagnosis of leukemia to a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i)...

  3. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept as proof of medical condition verification from the state cancer or tumor registry that it possesses medical records... Cancer Institute can make a diagnosis of leukemia to a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i)...

  4. Medical Conditions and Medication Use in Adults with Down Syndrome: A Descriptive Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerins, Gerard; Petrovic, Kimberly; Bruder, Mary Beth; Gruman, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Background: We examined the presence of medical conditions and medication use within a sample of adults with Down syndrome. Methods: Retrospective chart review using a sample of 141 adults with Down syndrome and age range of 30 to 65 years. Results: We identify 23 categories of commonly occurring medical conditions and 24 categories of medications…

  5. Co-option of pre-existing vascular beds in adipose tissue controls tumor growth rates and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sharon; Hosaka, Kayoko; Nakamura, Masaki; Cao, Yihai

    2016-06-21

    Many types of cancer develop in close association with highly vascularized adipose tissues. However, the role of adipose pre-existing vascular beds on tumor growth and angiogenesis is unknown. Here we report that pre-existing microvascular density in tissues where tumors originate is a crucial determinant for tumor growth and neovascularization. In three independent tumor types including breast cancer, melanoma, and fibrosarcoma, inoculation of tumor cells in the subcutaneous tissue, white adipose tissue (WAT), and brown adipose tissue (BAT) resulted in markedly differential tumor growth rates and angiogenesis, which were in concordance with the degree of pre-existing vascularization in these tissues. Relative to subcutaneous tumors, WAT and BAT tumors grew at accelerated rates along with improved neovascularization, blood perfusion, and decreased hypoxia. Tumor cells implanted in adipose tissues contained leaky microvessel with poor perivascular cell coverage. Thus, adipose vasculature predetermines the tumor microenvironment that eventually supports tumor growth.

  6. Evaluation of a pre-existing, 3-year household water treatment and handwashing intervention in rural Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Benjamin; Arana, Byron; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Hubbard, Alan; Colford, John M

    2009-01-01

    Background The promotion of household water treatment and handwashing with soap has led to large reductions in child diarrhoea in randomized efficacy trials. Currently, we know little about the health effectiveness of behaviour-based water and hygiene interventions after the conclusion of intervention activities. Methods We present an extension of previously published design (propensity score matching) and analysis (targeted maximum likelihood estimation) methods to evaluate the behavioural and health impacts of a pre-existing but non-randomized intervention (a 3-year, combined household water treatment and handwashing campaign in rural Guatemala). Six months after the intervention, we conducted a cross-sectional cohort study in 30 villages (15 intervention and 15 control) that included 600 households, and 929 children <5 years of age. Results The study design created a sample of intervention and control villages that were comparable across more than 30 potentially confounding characteristics. The intervention led to modest gains in confirmed water treatment behaviour [risk difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02–0.09]. We found, however, no difference between the intervention and control villages in self-reported handwashing behaviour, spot-check hygiene conditions, or the prevalence of child diarrhoea, clinical acute lower respiratory infections or child growth. Conclusions To our knowledge this is the first post-intervention follow-up study of a combined household water treatment and handwashing behaviour change intervention, and the first post-intervention follow-up of either intervention type to include child health measurement. The lack of child health impacts is consistent with unsustained behaviour adoption. Our findings highlight the difficulty of implementing behaviour-based household water treatment and handwashing outside of intensive efficacy trials. PMID:19574492

  7. Increased Susceptibility to Chemical Toxicity with (Pre-existing) Diseases: Case Studies with Particulate Matter, Cadmium, Mercury, Trichloroethylene and Dioxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest to risk assessors is the potential for chemicals to interact with pre-existing diseases and aging that may yield cumulative damage, altered chemical response, and increas...

  8. Increased Susceptibility to Chemical Toxicity with Pre-existing Diseases: Case Studies with Particulate Matter, Cadmium, Mercury, Trichloroethylene and Dioxin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest to risk assessors is the potential for chemicals to interact with pre-existing diseases and aging that may yield cumulative damage, altered chemical response, and increase...

  9. Parasitic folds with wrong vergence: How pre-existing geometrical asymmetries can be inherited during multilayer buckle folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Schmid, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Parasitic folds are typical structures in geological multilayer folds; they are characterized by a small wavelength and are situated within folds with larger wavelength. Parasitic folds exhibit a characteristic asymmetry (or vergence) reflecting their structural relationship to the larger-scale fold. Here we investigate if a pre-existing geometrical asymmetry (e.g., from sedimentary structures or folds from a previous tectonic event) can be inherited during buckle folding to form parasitic folds with wrong vergence. We conduct 2D finite-element simulations of multilayer folding using Newtonian materials. The applied model setup comprises a thin layer exhibiting the pre-existing geometrical asymmetry sandwiched between two thicker layers, all intercalated with a lower-viscosity matrix and subjected to layer-parallel shortening. When the two outer thick layers buckle and amplify, two processes work against the asymmetry: layer-perpendicular flattening between the two thick layers and the rotational component of flexural flow folding. Both processes promote de-amplification and unfolding of the pre-existing asymmetry. We discuss how the efficiency of de-amplification is controlled by the larger-scale fold amplification and conclude that pre-existing asymmetries that are open and/or exhibit low amplitude are prone to de-amplification and may disappear during buckling of the multilayer system. Large-amplitude and/or tight to isoclinal folds may be inherited and develop type 3 fold interference patterns.

  10. Caring for Kids With Medical Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... becomes dizzy, call the parents immediately. previous continue Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy (CP) is a long-term condition involving brain damage and muscle problems. CP can cause limitations in moving, learning, hearing, seeing, ...

  11. Spontaneous pre-existing hypoxia does not affect brain damage after global cerebral ischaemia in late-gestation fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joanne O; Yuill, Caroline A; Wassink, Guido; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a mild, non-injurious insult can protect (precondition) against a subsequent injurious insult. Typically, protection is seen when the gap between insults is several days to a week. However, the effect of mild but persistent hypoxia is unknown. In this study we examined the hypothesis that mild pre-existing hypoxia (PaO2<17 mm Hg) would reduce neural injury in chronically instrumented late-gestation (0.85 gestation) fetal sheep exposed to 30 min of global cerebral ischaemia induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion (normoxia: n=9 vs. pre-existing hypoxia: n=9) or normoxia plus sham ischaemia (sham controls: n=9). Histopathology was assessed after 7 days of recovery. Fetuses with pre-existing hypoxia had lower PaO2 values (16.1±0.6 vs. 26.0±1.1 mm Hg) and were lighter at post-mortem (4,033±412 vs. 5,261±238 g) compared to normoxic fetuses. Cerebral ischaemia was associated with secondary cortical oedema and seizures, reduced final EEG power, loss of sleep state cycling, and significant loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes, with no significant effect of pre-existing hypoxia. Pre-existing hypoxia was associated with a significantly attenuated rise in mean arterial pressure between 18 and 36 h and slower resolution of cortical oedema between 96 and 150 h after ischaemia. These data suggest that chronic hypoxia is not associated with a significant preconditioning effect.

  12. The effects of pre-existing discontinuities on the surface expression of normal faults: Insights from wet-clay analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Lorenzo; Basili, Roberto; Toscani, Giovanni; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Seno, Silvio; Valensise, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    We use wet-clay analog models to investigate how pre-existing discontinuities (i.e. structures inherited from previous tectonic phases) affect the evolution of a normal fault at the Earth's surface. To this end we first perform a series of three reference experiments driven by a 45° dipping master fault unaffected by pre-existing discontinuities to generate a mechanically isotropic learning set of models. We then replicate the experiment six times introducing a 60°-dipping precut in the clay cake, each time with a different attitude and orientation with respect to an initially-blind, 45°-dipping, master normal fault. In all experiments the precut intersects the vertical projection of the master fault halfway between the center and the right-hand lateral tip. All other conditions are identical for all seven models. By comparing the results obtained from the mechanically isotropic experiments with results from experiments with precuts we find that the surface evolution of the normal fault varies depending on the precut orientation. In most cases the parameters of newly-forming faults are strongly influenced. The largest influence is exerted by synthetic and antithetic discontinuities trending respectively at 30° and 45° from the strike of the master fault, whereas a synthetic discontinuity at 60° and an antithetic discontinuity at 30° show moderate influence. Little influence is exerted by a synthetic discontinuity at 45° and an antithetic discontinuity at 60° from the strike of the master fault. We provide a ranking chart to assess fault-to-discontinuity interactions with respect to essential surface fault descriptors, such as segmentation, vertical-displacement profile, maximum displacement, and length, often used as proxies to infer fault properties at depth. Considering a single descriptor, the amount of deviation induced by different precuts varies from case to case in a rather unpredictable fashion. Multiple observables should be taken into

  13. Medical physics personnel for medical imaging: requirements, conditions of involvement and staffing levels-French recommendations.

    PubMed

    Isambert, Aurélie; Le Du, Dominique; Valéro, Marc; Guilhem, Marie-Thérèse; Rousse, Carole; Dieudonné, Arnaud; Blanchard, Vincent; Pierrat, Noëlle; Salvat, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    The French regulations concerning the involvement of medical physicists in medical imaging procedures are relatively vague. In May 2013, the ASN and the SFPM issued recommendations regarding Medical Physics Personnel for Medical Imaging: Requirements, Conditions of Involvement and Staffing Levels. In these recommendations, the various areas of activity of medical physicists in radiology and nuclear medicine have been identified and described, and the time required to perform each task has been evaluated. Criteria for defining medical physics staffing levels are thus proposed. These criteria are defined according to the technical platform, the procedures and techniques practised on it, the number of patients treated and the number of persons in the medical and paramedical teams requiring periodic training. The result of this work is an aid available to each medical establishment to determine their own needs in terms of medical physics.

  14. The experience of altered states of consciousness in shamanic ritual: the role of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors.

    PubMed

    Polito, Vince; Langdon, Robyn; Brown, Jac

    2010-12-01

    Much attention has been paid recently to the role of anomalous experiences in the aetiology of certain types of psychopathology, e.g. in the formation of delusions. We examine, instead, the top-down influence of pre-existing beliefs and affective factors in shaping an individual's characterisation of anomalous sensory experiences. Specifically we investigated the effects of paranormal beliefs and alexithymia in determining the intensity and quality of an altered state of consciousness (ASC). Fifty five participants took part in a sweat lodge ceremony, a traditional shamanic ritual which was unfamiliar to them. Participants reported significant alterations in their state of consciousness, quantified using the 'APZ' questionnaire, a standardized measure of ASC experience. Participants endorsing paranormal beliefs compatible with shamanic mythology, and those showing difficulty identifying feelings scored higher on positive dimensions of ASC experience. Our findings demonstrate that variation in an individual's characterisation of anomalous experiences is nuanced by pre-existing beliefs and affective factors.

  15. Mechanical and microstructural development of Carrara marble with pre-existing strain variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruijn, Rolf H. C.; Kunze, Karsten; Mainprice, David; Burlini, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    A series of two-stage torsion experiments on Carrara marble were conducted to constrain the influence of known prior deformation on rheological response and microstructural evolution. Comparison with previous experimental data on Carrara marble flow and fabric evolution during single-stage torsion deformation experiments provided direct insights into the significance of initial deformation at various conditions. Our experiments were conducted at 727 °C temperature and 300 MPa confining pressure, while maintaining a constant strain rate of 3 × 10 - 4 s - 1 on the periphery of the cylindrical samples. Under these conditions, the marble is known to deform in power-law ( n = 6-10) ductile flow. All torsion experiments were performed with a Paterson type gas-medium testing machine equipped with a torsion actuator module. Prior (D1) and subsequent (D2) deformation are accomplished by two torsion experiments in sequence on same sample segments. The effect of D1 strain history is investigated during D2 by applying counter-clockwise torsion to a sandwich sample consisting of three segments with different D1 rotation sense. D2 samples experienced continued, first and reversed shearing deformation in top, centre and bottom segments, respectively. D2 bulk strain was chosen equal to D1 strain in top and bottom segments. D1 experiments followed the typical single-stage deformation behaviour of Carrara marble under the applied experimental conditions. Yielding was followed by strain hardening until a peak stress was reached at a shear strain around 1, after which work softening occurred. Weakening gradually evolved into a constant stress regime. During hardening, a shear microstructure and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) developed. Afterwards the volume fraction of smaller dynamic recrystallised grains increased continuously, resulting in a recrystallisation microstructure and CPO at shear strains of 5 and higher. The new D2 experiments displayed a strain variation

  16. 45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specified in § 155.320(c)(3). (g) Determination of eligibility for individuals submitting applications... initially received an application. (h) Standards for sharing information between the Exchange and the... affordability programs has been determined eligible for Medicaid, CHIP, or the BHP, as specified in §...

  17. 45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... individuals potentially eligible for Medicaid based on other information or through other coverage groups. For... filer's household income, as defined in 26 CFR 1.36B-1(e), is less than 100 percent of the FPL for the benefit year for which coverage is requested, determines that the tax filer is not eligible for...

  18. 45 CFR 155.345 - Coordination with Medicaid, CHIP, the Basic Health Program, and the Pre-existing Condition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individuals potentially eligible for Medicaid based on other information or through other coverage groups. For... filer's household income, as defined in 26 CFR 1.36B-1(e), is less than 100 percent of the FPL for the benefit year for which coverage is requested, determines that the tax filer is not eligible for...

  19. Individual Differences in Reading Comprehension Gains from Assisted Reading Practice: Pre Existing Conditions, Vocabulary Acquisition, and Amounts of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shany, Michal; Biemiller, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a study of the effects of assisted reading practice (Shany & Biemiller, 1995). In this paper we examined the original data to find factors affecting gains in reading comprehension. We contrasted 14 children who had below median gains in reading comprehension and 15 who had above median gains. There were no significant correlations…

  20. Pre-existing differences in motivation for food and sensitivity to cocaine-induced locomotion in obesity-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Nobile, Cameron W; Chadderdon, Aaron M; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a significant problem in the United States, with roughly one third of adults having a body mass index (BMI) over thirty. Recent evidence from human studies suggests that pre-existing differences in the function of mesolimbic circuits that mediate motivational processes may promote obesity and hamper weight loss. However, few preclinical studies have examined pre-existing neurobehavioral differences related to the function of mesolimbic systems in models of individual susceptibility to obesity. Here, we used selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats to examine 1) the effect of a novel "junk-food" diet on the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, 2) over-consumption of "junk-food" in a free access procedure, 3) motivation for food using instrumental procedures, and 4) cocaine-induced locomotor activity as an index of general mesolimbic function. As expected, eating a sugary, fatty, "junk-food" diet exacerbated weight gain and increased fasted insulin levels only in obesity-prone rats. In addition, obesity-prone rats continued to over-consume junk-food during discrete access testing, even when this same food was freely available in the home cage. Furthermore, when asked to press a lever to obtain food in an instrumental task, rates of responding were enhanced in obesity-prone versus obesity-resistant rats. Finally, obesity-prone rats showed a stronger locomotor response to 15 mg/kg cocaine compared to obesity-resistant rats prior to any diet manipulation. This enhanced sensitivity to this dose of cocaine is indicative of basal differences in the function of mesolimbic circuits in obesity-prone rats. We speculate that pre-existing differences in motivational systems may contribute to over-consumption and enhanced motivation in susceptible individuals. PMID:26423787

  1. Pre-existing differences in motivation for food and sensitivity to cocaine-induced locomotion in obesity-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Nobile, Cameron W; Chadderdon, Aaron M; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a significant problem in the United States, with roughly one third of adults having a body mass index (BMI) over thirty. Recent evidence from human studies suggests that pre-existing differences in the function of mesolimbic circuits that mediate motivational processes may promote obesity and hamper weight loss. However, few preclinical studies have examined pre-existing neurobehavioral differences related to the function of mesolimbic systems in models of individual susceptibility to obesity. Here, we used selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats to examine 1) the effect of a novel "junk-food" diet on the development of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, 2) over-consumption of "junk-food" in a free access procedure, 3) motivation for food using instrumental procedures, and 4) cocaine-induced locomotor activity as an index of general mesolimbic function. As expected, eating a sugary, fatty, "junk-food" diet exacerbated weight gain and increased fasted insulin levels only in obesity-prone rats. In addition, obesity-prone rats continued to over-consume junk-food during discrete access testing, even when this same food was freely available in the home cage. Furthermore, when asked to press a lever to obtain food in an instrumental task, rates of responding were enhanced in obesity-prone versus obesity-resistant rats. Finally, obesity-prone rats showed a stronger locomotor response to 15 mg/kg cocaine compared to obesity-resistant rats prior to any diet manipulation. This enhanced sensitivity to this dose of cocaine is indicative of basal differences in the function of mesolimbic circuits in obesity-prone rats. We speculate that pre-existing differences in motivational systems may contribute to over-consumption and enhanced motivation in susceptible individuals.

  2. Condensational uptake of semivolatile organic compounds in gasoline engine exhaust onto pre-existing inorganic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.-M.; Liggio, J.; Graham, L.; Lu, G.; Brook, J.; Stroud, C.; Zhang, J.; Makar, P.; Moran, M. D.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory studies on the condensational uptake of gaseous organic compounds in the exhaust of a light-duty gasoline engine onto preexisting sulfate and nitrate seed particles. Significant condensation of the gaseous organic compounds in the exhaust occurs onto these inorganic particles on a time scale of 2-5 min. The amount of condensed organic mass (COM) is proportional to the seed particle mass, suggesting that the uptake is due to dissolution determined by the equilibrium partitioning between gas phase and particles, not adsorption. The amount of dissolution in unit seed mass, S, decreases as a power function with increased dilution of the exhaust, ranging from 0.23 g g-1 at a dilution ratio of 81, to 0.025 g g-1 at a dilution ratio of 2230. It increases nonlinearly with increasing concentration of the total hydrocarbons in the gas phase (THC), rising from 0.12 g g-1 to 0.26 g g-1 for a CTHC increase of 1 to 18 μg m-3, suggesting that more organics are partitioned into the particles at higher gas phase concentrations. In terms of gas-particle partitioning, the condensational uptake of THC gases in gasoline engine exhaust can account for up to 30% of the total gas + particle THC. The organic mass spectrum of COM has the largest fragment at m/z 44, with mass ratios of mass fragments 43/44 and 57/44 at 0.59 and 2.91, much lower than those reported for gasoline engine primary organic aerosols. The mass fragment 44/total organic mass ratio of 0.097 indicates that COM contains large oxygenated components. By incorporating the present findings, regional air quality modelling results suggest that the condensational uptake of THC onto sulfate particles alone can be comparable to the primary particle mass under moderately polluted ambient conditions. These findings are important for modelling and regulating the air quality impacts of gasoline vehicular emissions.

  3. National health spending by medical condition, 1996-2005.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, Charles; Miller, George; Lake, Craig; Bryant, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    This study responds to recent calls for information about how personal health expenditures from the National Health Expenditure Accounts are distributed across medical conditions. It provides annual estimates from 1996 through 2005 for thirty-two conditions mapped into thirteen all-inclusive diagnostic categories. Circulatory system spending was highest among the diagnostic categories, accounting for 17 percent of spending in 2005. The most costly conditions were mental disorders and heart conditions. Spending growth rates were lowest for lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, coronary heart disease, and stroke, perhaps reflecting benefits of preventive care.

  4. Using conditioned place preference to identify relapse prevention medications.

    PubMed

    Napier, T Celeste; Herrold, Amy A; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-11-01

    Stimuli, including contexts, which predict the availability or onset of a drug effect, can acquire conditioned incentive motivational properties. These conditioned properties endure after withdrawal, and can promote drug-seeking which may result in relapse. Conditioned place preference (CPP) assesses the associations between drugs and the context in which they are experienced. Here, we review the potential utility of CPP procedures in rodents and humans to evaluate medications that target conditioned drug-seeking responses. We discuss the translational potential of the CPP procedure from rodents to humans, and review findings with FDA-approved treatments that support the use of CPP to develop relapse-reduction medications. We also discuss challenges and methodological questions in applying the CPP procedure to this purpose. We argue that an efficient and valid CPP procedure in humans may reduce the burden of full clinical trials with drug-abusing patients that are currently required for testing promising treatments.

  5. Using Conditioned Place Preference to Identify Relapse Prevention Medications

    PubMed Central

    Napier, T. Celeste; Herrold, Amy A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    Stimuli, including contexts, which predict the availability or onset of a drug effect, can acquire conditioned incentive motivational properties. These conditioned properties endure after withdrawal, and can promote drug-seeking which may result in relapse. Conditioned place preference (CPP) assesses the associations between drugs and the context in which they are experienced. Here, we review the potential utility of CPP procedures in rodents and humans to evaluate medications that target conditioned drug-seeking responses. We discuss the translational potential of the CPP procedure from rodents to humans, and review findings with FDA-approved treatments that support the use of CPP to develop relapse-reduction medications. We also discuss challenges and methodological questions in applying the CPP procedure to this purpose. We argue that an efficient and valid CPP procedure in humans may reduce the burden of full clinical trials with drug-abusing patients that are currently required for testing promising treatments. PMID:23680702

  6. Investigation on the Automatic Geo-Referencing of Archaeological UAV Photographs by Correlation with Pre-Existing Ortho-Photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, W.; Doneus, M.; Briese, C.; Verhoeven, G.; Pfeifer, N.

    2014-06-01

    We present a method for the automatic geo-referencing of archaeological photographs captured aboard unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), termed UPs. We do so by help of pre-existing ortho-photo maps (OPMs) and digital surface models (DSMs). Typically, these pre-existing data sets are based on data that were captured at a widely different point in time. This renders the detection (and hence the matching) of homologous feature points in the UPs and OPMs infeasible mainly due to temporal variations of vegetation and illumination. Facing this difficulty, we opt for the normalized cross correlation coefficient of perspectively transformed image patches as the measure of image similarity. Applying a threshold to this measure, we detect candidates for homologous image points, resulting in a distinctive, but computationally intensive method. In order to lower computation times, we reduce the dimensionality and extents of the search space by making use of a priori knowledge of the data sets. By assigning terrain heights interpolated in the DSM to the image points found in the OPM, we generate control points. We introduce respective observations into a bundle block, from which gross errors i.e. false matches are eliminated during its robust adjustment. A test of our approach on a UAV image data set demonstrates its potential and raises hope to successfully process large image archives.

  7. [Carcinoma in pre-existing Warthin tumors (cystadenolymphoma) of the parotid gland. Classification, pathogenesis and differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Seifert, G

    1997-09-01

    Malignant transformation of pre-existing Warthin tumours of the parotid gland in carcinomas is very rare compared with the development of carcinomas in pre-existing pleomorphic adenomas. Five cases examined in the Salivary Gland Register of Hamburg 1965-1996 were classified in 2 cases as mucoepidermoid carcinoma and in each of one case as oncocytic carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and acinic cell carcinoma. In the pathogenesis the benign oncocytic epithelial formations at the surface of the cystic spaces are restricted by malignant neoplastic epithelial cells in the course of which transitions of squamous cell metaplasia or goblet cell metaplasia can be observed. In the further course an infiltrating spread of the carcinoma takes place into the lymphoid stromal component of the Warthin tumour, sometimes also an infiltration of the surrounding tissue und rarely to cervical lymph node metastases. The own findings are analysed concerning the classification of the carcinomas and the differential diagnosis under consideration of the until now reported cases of the literature.

  8. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition. (a... leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the procedure outlined... section. (b) If a claimant was diagnosed as having leukemia in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico,...

  9. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition. (a... leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the procedure outlined... section. (b) If a claimant was diagnosed as having leukemia in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico,...

  10. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition. (a... leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the procedure outlined... section. (b) If a claimant was diagnosed as having leukemia in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico,...

  11. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... Administration § 494.170 Condition: Medical records. The dialysis facility must maintain complete, accurate, and accessible records on all patients, including home patients who elect to receive dialysis supplies...

  12. 28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... required in paragraph (c) of this section. (For claims relating to primary cancer of the liver, the... diagnosis, that authorizes the Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept as proof of medical condition verification from the state cancer or tumor...

  13. 28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... required in paragraph (c) of this section. (For claims relating to primary cancer of the liver, the... diagnosis, that authorizes the Program to contact the appropriate state cancer or tumor registry. The Program will accept as proof of medical condition verification from the state cancer or tumor...

  14. Pharmacotherapeutics knowledge of some nonemergency and emergency conditions among medical undergraduates in an Indian medical college

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sarfaraz Alam; Siddiqui, Nazeem Ishrat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess pharmacotherapeutics (PT) knowledge of second professional medical undergraduates. Materials and Methods: It is a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. The questionnaire was designed to objectively assess the current level of knowledge of PT acquired by the second MBBS students in a medical college in India. Thirty Type-A multiple choice questions (MCQs) related with the PT of common and important medical conditions and some emergency conditions were administered to 125 participants. Grading of knowledge was also done as poor, average, and good both subjectively and objectively. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses. Association of PT knowledge with respect to mode of admission in a medical college was analyzed with Chi-square test. Results: MCQs related with PT of nonemergency conditions were responded correctly by 9.8–77.7% of participants. MCQs related with PT of some emergency conditions were responded correctly by 17–66.1% of participants. No statistically significant association was observed in PT knowledge with respect to mode of admission. Conclusion: Gross deficiency in the PT knowledge can potentially and adversely affect future rational prescribing skills. PT knowledge about common medical conditions should be emphasized during undergraduate training program. PMID:27298493

  15. Block-based conditional entropy coding for medical image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath Kumar, Sriperumbudur V.; Nagaraj, Nithin; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Xu, Xiaofeng

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a block-based conditional entropy coding scheme for medical image compression using the 2-D integer Haar wavelet transform. The main motivation to pursue conditional entropy coding is that the first-order conditional entropy is always theoretically lesser than the first and second-order entropies. We propose a sub-optimal scan order and an optimum block size to perform conditional entropy coding for various modalities. We also propose that a similar scheme can be used to obtain a sub-optimal scan order and an optimum block size for other wavelets. The proposed approach is motivated by a desire to perform better than JPEG2000 in terms of compression ratio. We hint towards developing a block-based conditional entropy coder, which has the potential to perform better than JPEG2000. Though we don't indicate a method to achieve the first-order conditional entropy coder, the use of conditional adaptive arithmetic coder would achieve arbitrarily close to the theoretical conditional entropy. All the results in this paper are based on the medical image data set of various bit-depths and various modalities.

  16. Pre-existing Pulmonary Diseases and Survival in Patients With Stage-dependent Lung Adenocarcinoma: A STROBE-compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Jing-Yang; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chiu; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-03-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are common lung diseases associated with lung cancer mortality. This study evaluated sex disparities in pre-existing pulmonary diseases and stage-dependent lung adenocarcinoma survival.Patients newly diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma between 2003 and 2008 were identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database and Cancer Registry. Cases with lung adenocarcinoma were followed until the end of 2010. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of pre-existing asthma, COPD, and/or TB, and to estimate all-cause mortality risk in patients with different stages of lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 14,518 cases were identified with lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, among men, the HRs for TB were 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.58), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.14-1.93), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.49) for individuals with stage I + II, III, and IV diseases, respectively. The HRs for asthma were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.00-1.99) in women with stage I + II and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) in men with stage IV disease. For pulmonary disease combinations in men, the HRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.89) for asthma + COPD + TB, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.12-1.63) for COPD + TB, 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01-1.63) for TB, and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.04-1.27) for asthma + COPD, respectively. For women with stage I + II disease, the HR was 6.94 (95% CI, 2.72-17.71) for asthma + COPD + TB.Coexistence of pre-existing pulmonary diseases increased mortality risk in men with adenocarcinoma. TB is at elevated risk of mortality among men with different stages of adenocarcinoma. Asthmatic women with early-stage adenocarcinoma had increased risk of mortality.

  17. Pre-existing Pulmonary Diseases and Survival in Patients With Stage-dependent Lung Adenocarcinoma: A STROBE-compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhi-Hong; Huang, Jing-Yang; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Liang, Yu-Chiu; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-03-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are common lung diseases associated with lung cancer mortality. This study evaluated sex disparities in pre-existing pulmonary diseases and stage-dependent lung adenocarcinoma survival.Patients newly diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma between 2003 and 2008 were identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database and Cancer Registry. Cases with lung adenocarcinoma were followed until the end of 2010. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional-hazard regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of pre-existing asthma, COPD, and/or TB, and to estimate all-cause mortality risk in patients with different stages of lung adenocarcinoma.A total of 14,518 cases were identified with lung adenocarcinoma. Specifically, among men, the HRs for TB were 1.69 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-2.58), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.14-1.93), and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.08-1.49) for individuals with stage I + II, III, and IV diseases, respectively. The HRs for asthma were 1.41 (95% CI, 1.00-1.99) in women with stage I + II and 1.14 (95% CI, 1.04-1.26) in men with stage IV disease. For pulmonary disease combinations in men, the HRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.89) for asthma + COPD + TB, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.12-1.63) for COPD + TB, 1.28 (95% CI, 1.01-1.63) for TB, and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.04-1.27) for asthma + COPD, respectively. For women with stage I + II disease, the HR was 6.94 (95% CI, 2.72-17.71) for asthma + COPD + TB.Coexistence of pre-existing pulmonary diseases increased mortality risk in men with adenocarcinoma. TB is at elevated risk of mortality among men with different stages of adenocarcinoma. Asthmatic women with early-stage adenocarcinoma had increased risk of mortality. PMID:26962806

  18. The Association between Pre-existing Diabetes Mellitus and Pressure Ulcers in Patients Following Surgery: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Zhou-Qing; Zhai, Xiao-Jie

    2015-08-11

    Uncertainty exists about the role of diabetes in the development of surgery-related pressure ulcers. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to explore the association between pre-existing diabetes mellitus and pressure ulcers among patients after surgery. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects models. Thirteen eligible studies of 2367 patients in total and 12,053 controls were included in the final analysis. Compared with patients without diabetes, the pooled odds ratio (OR) of the incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients was 1.74 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.40-2.15, I(2 )= 51.1%]. Estimates by type of surgery suggested similar results in cardiac surgery [OR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.42-2.82, I(2 )= 0%], in general surgery [OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.42-2.15, I(2 )= 0%], and in major lower limb amputations [OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.01-2.68, I(2 )= 0%] for diabetic patients versus non-diabetic controls. We did not find an increased incidence of pressure ulcers in diabetic patients undergoing hip surgery compared with non-diabetic controls [OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 0.62-3.47, I(2 )= 93.1%]. The excess risk of pressure ulcers associated with pre-existing diabetes was significantly higher in patients undergoing surgery, specifically in patients receiving cardiac surgery. Further studies should be conducted to examine these associations in other types of surgery.

  19. Pre-existing immunity against swine-origin H1N1 influenza viruses in the general human population

    PubMed Central

    Greenbaum, Jason A.; Kotturi, Maya F.; Kim, Yohan; Oseroff, Carla; Vaughan, Kerrie; Salimi, Nima; Vita, Randi; Ponomarenko, Julia; Scheuermann, Richard H.; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2009-01-01

    A major concern about the ongoing swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus (S-OIV) outbreak is that the virus may be so different from seasonal H1N1 that little immune protection exists in the human population. In this study, we examined the molecular basis for pre-existing immunity against S-OIV, namely the recognition of viral immune epitopes by T cells or B cells/antibodies that have been previously primed by circulating influenza strains. Using data from the Immune Epitope Database, we found that only 31% (8/26) of B-cell epitopes present in recently circulating H1N1 strains are conserved in the S-OIV, with only 17% (1/6) conserved in the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) surface proteins. In contrast, 69% (54/78) of the epitopes recognized by CD8+ T cells are completely invariant. We further demonstrate experimentally that some memory T-cell immunity against S-OIV is present in the adult population and that such memory is of similar magnitude as the pre-existing memory against seasonal H1N1 influenza. Because protection from infection is antibody mediated, a new vaccine based on the specific S-OIV HA and NA proteins is likely to be required to prevent infection. However, T cells are known to blunt disease severity. Therefore, the conservation of a large fraction of T-cell epitopes suggests that the severity of an S-OIV infection, as far as it is determined by susceptibility of the virus to immune attack, would not differ much from that of seasonal flu. These results are consistent with reports about disease incidence, severity, and mortality rates associated with human S-OIV. PMID:19918065

  20. Medical Transport of Children with Complex Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Carlos F.; Kelly, Robert B.; Hamilton, Leslie J.; Klitzner, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most notable trends in child health has been the increase in the number of children with special health care needs, including those with complex chronic conditions. Care of these children accounts for a growing fraction of health care resources. We examine recent developments in health care, especially with regard to medical transport and prehospital care, that have emerged to adapt to this remarkable demographic trend. One such development is the focus on care coordination, including the dissemination of the patient-centered medical home concept. In the prehospital setting, the need for greater coordination has catalyzed the development of the emergency information form. Training programs for prehospital providers now incorporate specific modules for children with complex conditions. Another notable trend is the shift to a family-centered model of care. We explore efforts toward regionalization of care, including the development of specialized pediatric transport teams, and conclude with recommendations for a research agenda. PMID:22315689

  1. The Prescribed Pediatric Center: A Medical Day Treatment Program for Children with Complex Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppert, Elizabeth S.; Karst, Thomas O.; Brogan, Mark G.

    1998-01-01

    The Prescribed Pediatric Center (Toledo, Ohio) is a community-based, multidisciplinary program for infants and children with chronic, complex medical conditions. This article describes program beginnings; the planning process; and the program's growth, development, and components. Initial program evaluation indicates positive effects on some…

  2. The effects of aerobic- versus strength-training on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns.

    PubMed

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Strong, Heather A; Arent, Shawn M; Bray, Steven R; Bassett-Gunter, Rebecca L

    2014-06-01

    This experiment compared the effects of aerobic-training (AT) versus strength-training (ST) on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns. Theory-based correlates of body image change were also examined. Participants were 46 women (M age=21.5 years), randomly assigned to an 8-week AT or ST intervention consisting of supervised exercise 3 days/week. Multidimensional measures of body image were administered pre- and post-intervention, along with measures of physical fitness, perceived fitness, and exercise self-efficacy. Women in the AT condition reported greater reductions in social physique anxiety (p=.001) and tended to report greater improvements in appearance evaluation (p=.06) than women in the ST condition. Changes in perceived fatness, perceived aerobic endurance and aerobic self-efficacy were significantly correlated with body image change (ps<.003). Results provide direction for prescribing exercise to improve body image and advancing theory to account for the effects of exercise. PMID:24958656

  3. The effects of aerobic- versus strength-training on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns.

    PubMed

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Strong, Heather A; Arent, Shawn M; Bray, Steven R; Bassett-Gunter, Rebecca L

    2014-06-01

    This experiment compared the effects of aerobic-training (AT) versus strength-training (ST) on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns. Theory-based correlates of body image change were also examined. Participants were 46 women (M age=21.5 years), randomly assigned to an 8-week AT or ST intervention consisting of supervised exercise 3 days/week. Multidimensional measures of body image were administered pre- and post-intervention, along with measures of physical fitness, perceived fitness, and exercise self-efficacy. Women in the AT condition reported greater reductions in social physique anxiety (p=.001) and tended to report greater improvements in appearance evaluation (p=.06) than women in the ST condition. Changes in perceived fatness, perceived aerobic endurance and aerobic self-efficacy were significantly correlated with body image change (ps<.003). Results provide direction for prescribing exercise to improve body image and advancing theory to account for the effects of exercise.

  4. Retargeting pre-existing human antibodies to a bacterial pathogen with an alpha-Gal conjugated aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Kristian, Sascha A.; Hwang, John H.; Hall, Bradley; Leire, Emma; Iacomini, John; Old, Robert; Galili, Uri; Roberts, Charles; Mullis, Kary B.; Westby, Mike; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The ever-increasing threat of multi-drug resistant bacterial infections has spurred renewed interest in alternative approaches to classical antibiotic therapy. In contrast to other mammals, humans do not express the galactose-α-1,3-galactosyl-β-1,4-N-acetyl-glucosamine (α-Gal) epitope. As a result of exposure of humans to α-Gal in the environment, a large proportion of circulating antibodies are specific for the trisaccharide. In this study, we examine whether these anti-Gal antibodies can be recruited and redirected to exert anti-bacterial activity. We show that a specific DNA aptamer conjugated to an α-Gal epitope at its 5′ end, herein termed an alphamer, can bind to group A Streptococcus (GAS) bacteria by recognition of a conserved region of the surface-anchored M protein. The anti-GAS alphamer was shown to recruit anti-Gal antibodies to the streptococcal surface in an α-Gal-specific manner, elicit uptake and killing of the bacteria by human phagocytes, and slow growth of invasive GAS in human whole blood. These studies provide a first in vitro proof of concept that alphamers have the potential to redirect pre-existing antibodies to bacteria in a specific manner and trigger an immediate antibacterial immune response. Further validation of this novel therapeutic approach of applying α-Gal technology in in vivo models of bacterial infection is warranted. PMID:25940316

  5. Pre-existing interleukin 10 in cerebral arteries attenuates subsequent brain injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiu-Juan; Jiang, Mei; Wang, Xin-Hong; Le, Li-Li; Xiang, Meng; Sun, Ning; Meng, Dan; Chen, Si-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent stroke is difficult to treat and life threatening. Transfer of anti-inflammatory gene is a potential gene therapy strategy for ischemic stroke. Using recombinant adeno-associated viral vector 1 (rAAV1)-mediated interleukin 10 (IL-10), we investigated whether transfer of beneficial gene into the rat cerebral vessels during interventional treatment for initial stroke could attenuate brain injury caused by recurrent stroke. Male Wistar rats were administered rAAV1-IL-10, rAAV1-YFP, or saline into the left cerebral artery. Three weeks after gene transfer, rats were subjected to occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCAO) for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. IL-10 levels in serum were significantly elevated 3 weeks after rAAV1-IL-10 injection, and virus in the cerebral vessels was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Pre-existing IL-10 but not YFP decreased the neurological dysfunction scores, brain infarction volume, and the number of injured neuronal cells. AAV1-IL-10 transduction increased heme oxygenase (HO-1) mRNA and protein levels in the infarct boundary zone of the brain. Thus, transduction of the IL-10 gene in the cerebral artery prior to ischemia attenuates brain injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion in rats. This preventive approach for recurrent stroke can be achieved during interventional treatment for initial stroke.

  6. Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Erin M.; Smith, Robin A.; Simonich, Cassandra A.; Niyonzima, Nixon; Carter, Joseph J.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide near complete protection against the types of HPV that most commonly cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (HPV 16 and 18) when administered to individuals naive to these types. These vaccines, like most other prophylactic vaccines, appear to protect by generating antibodies. However, almost nothing is known about the immunological memory that forms following HPV vaccination, which is required for long-term immunity. Here, we have identified and isolated HPV 16-specific memory B cells from female adolescents and young women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in the absence of pre-existing immunity, using fluorescently conjugated HPV 16 pseudoviruses to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells. Antibodies cloned and expressed from these singly sorted HPV 16-pseudovirus labeled memory B cells were predominantly IgG (>IgA>IgM), utilized diverse variable genes, and potently neutralized HPV 16 pseudoviruses in vitro despite possessing only average levels of somatic mutation. These findings suggest that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine provides an excellent model for studying the development of B cell memory; and, in the context of what is known about memory B cells elicited by influenza vaccination/infection, HIV-1 infection, or tetanus toxoid vaccination, indicates that extensive somatic hypermutation is not required to achieve potent vaccine-specific neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:25330199

  7. Multi-epitope Models Explain How Pre-existing Antibodies Affect the Generation of Broadly Protective Responses to Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Lavine, Jennie; Ellebedy, Ali; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation influenza vaccines that elicit strain-transcendent immunity against both seasonal and pandemic viruses is a key public health goal. Targeting the evolutionarily conserved epitopes on the stem of influenza’s major surface molecule, hemagglutinin, is an appealing prospect, and novel vaccine formulations show promising results in animal model systems. However, studies in humans indicate that natural infection and vaccination result in limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA, and the level of stem-specific antibody elicited is insufficient to provide broad strain-transcendent immunity. Here, we use mathematical models of the humoral immune response to explore how pre-existing immunity affects the ability of vaccines to boost antibodies to the head and stem of HA in humans, and, in particular, how it leads to the apparent lack of boosting of broadly cross-reactive antibodies to the stem epitopes. We consider hypotheses where binding of antibody to an epitope: (i) results in more rapid clearance of the antigen; (ii) leads to the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which inhibit B cell activation through Fcγ receptor-mediated mechanism; and (iii) masks the epitope and prevents the stimulation and proliferation of specific B cells. We find that only epitope masking but not the former two mechanisms to be key in recapitulating patterns in data. We discuss the ramifications of our findings for the development of vaccines against both seasonal and pandemic influenza. PMID:27336297

  8. Influence of pre-existing topography on downflow lava discharge rates estimated from thermal infrared airborne data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, V.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing thermal data of active lava flows allow the evaluation of effusion rates. This is made possible by a simple formula relating the lava effusion rate to the heat flux radiated per unit time from the surface of the flow. Due to the assumptions of the model, this formula implies that heat flux, surface temperature and lava temperature vary as a function of the flow thickness. These relationships, never verified or validated before, have been used by several authors as a proof of the weakness of the model. Here, multispectral infrared and visible imaging spectrometer (MIVIS) high spatial resolution (5-10 m) thermal data acquired during Etna's 2001 eruption were used to investigate downflow heat flux variations in the lava flow emitted from a vent located at 2100 m a.s.l. A high correlation between the downflow heat flux and the lava flow thickness (measured from a pre-existing digital elevation model) was found. Topography beneath the flow appears to play an important role both in lava emplacement mechanisms and flow dynamics. MIVIS-derived downflow effusion rates are consistent with the law of conservation of mass assessing the reliability of remote sensing techniques.

  9. Cross-reactive and pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies--Effects on treatment and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    van Schie, Karin A; Wolbink, Gerrit-Jan; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The potential for immunogenicity is an ever-present concern during the development of biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutic antibodies occasionally elicit an antibody response in patients, which can result in loss of response or adverse effects. However, antibodies that bind a drug are sometimes found in pre-treatment serum samples, with the amount depending on drug, assay, and patient population. This review summarizes published data on pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies, including rheumatoid factors, anti-allotype antibodies, anti-hinge antibodies, and anti-glycan antibodies. Unlike anti-idiotype antibodies elicited by the drug, pre-formed antibodies in general appear to have little consequences during treatment. In the few cases where (potential) clinical consequences were encountered, antibodies were characterized and found to bind a distinct, unusual epitope of the therapeutic. Immunogenicity testing strategies should therefore always include a proper level of antibody characterization, especially when pre-formed antibodies are present. This minimizes false-positives, particularly due to rheumatoid factors, and helps to judge the potential threat in case a genuine pre-dose antibody reactivity is identified.

  10. Combinatorial RNA Interference Therapy Prevents Selection of Pre-existing HBV Variants in Human Liver Chimeric Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yao-Ming; Sun, Cheng-Pu; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wu, Ping-Yi; Enya Chen, Yu-Chen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Selection of escape mutants with mutations within the target sequence could abolish the antiviral RNA interference activity. Here, we investigated the impact of a pre-existing shRNA-resistant HBV variant on the efficacy of shRNA therapy. We previously identified a highly potent shRNA, S1, which, when delivered by an adeno-associated viral vector, effectively inhibits HBV replication in HBV transgenic mice. We applied the "PICKY" software to systemically screen the HBV genome, then used hydrodynamic transfection and HBV transgenic mice to identify additional six highly potent shRNAs. Human liver chimeric mice were infected with a mixture of wild-type and T472C HBV, a S1-resistant HBV variant, and then treated with a single or combined shRNAs. The presence of T472C mutant compromised the therapeutic efficacy of S1 and resulted in replacement of serum wild-type HBV by T472C HBV. In contrast, combinatorial therapy using S1 and P28, one of six potent shRNAs, markedly reduced titers for both wild-type and T472C HBV. Interestingly, treatment with P28 alone led to the emergence of escape mutants with mutations in the P28 target region. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial RNAi therapy can minimize the escape of resistant viral mutants in chronic HBV patients.

  11. The role of pre-existing disturbances in the effect of marine reserves on coastal ecosystems: a modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Savina, Marie; Condie, Scott A; Fulton, Elizabeth A

    2013-01-01

    We have used an end-to-end ecosystem model to explore responses over 30 years to coastal no-take reserves covering up to 6% of the fifty thousand square kilometres of continental shelf and slope off the coast of New South Wales (Australia). The model is based on the Atlantis framework, which includes a deterministic, spatially resolved three-dimensional biophysical model that tracks nutrient flows through key biological groups, as well as extraction by a range of fisheries. The model results support previous empirical studies in finding clear benefits of reserves to top predators such as sharks and rays throughout the region, while also showing how many of their major prey groups (including commercial species) experienced significant declines. It was found that the net impact of marine reserves was dependent on the pre-existing levels of disturbance (i.e. fishing pressure), and to a lesser extent on the size of the marine reserves. The high fishing scenario resulted in a strongly perturbed system, where the introduction of marine reserves had clear and mostly direct effects on biomass and functional biodiversity. However, under the lower fishing pressure scenario, the introduction of marine reserves caused both direct positive effects, mainly on shark groups, and indirect negative effects through trophic cascades. Our study illustrates the need to carefully align the design and implementation of marine reserves with policy and management objectives. Trade-offs may exist not only between fisheries and conservation objectives, but also among conservation objectives. PMID:23593432

  12. Evolution of a fold-thrust belt deforming a unit with pre-existing linear asperities: Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burberry, Caroline M.; Swiatlowski, Jerlyn L.

    2016-06-01

    Heterogeneity, whether geometric or rheologic, in crustal material undergoing compression affects the geometry of the structures produced. This study documents the thrust fault geometries produced when discrete linear asperities are introduced into an analog model, scaled to represent bulk upper crustal properties, and compressed. Varying obliquities of the asperities are used, relative to the imposed compression, and the resultant development of thrust fault traces and branch lines in map view is tracked. Once the model runs are completed, cross-sections are created and analyzed. The models show that asperities confined to the base layer promote the clustering of branch lines in the surface thrusts. Strong clustering in branch lines is also noted where several asperities are in close proximity or cross. Slight reverse-sense reactivation of asperities cut through the sedimentary sequence is noted in cross-section, where the asperity and the subsequent thrust belt interact. The model results are comparable to the situation in the Dinaric Alps, where pre-existing faults to the SW of the NE Adriatic Fault Zone contribute to the clustering of branch lines developed in the surface fold-thrust belt. These results can therefore be used to evaluate the evolution of other basement-involved fold-thrust belts worldwide.

  13. Cross-reactive and pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies—Effects on treatment and immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    van Schie, Karin A; Wolbink, Gerrit-Jan; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The potential for immunogenicity is an ever-present concern during the development of biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutic antibodies occasionally elicit an antibody response in patients, which can result in loss of response or adverse effects. However, antibodies that bind a drug are sometimes found in pre-treatment serum samples, with the amount depending on drug, assay, and patient population. This review summarizes published data on pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies, including rheumatoid factors, anti-allotype antibodies, anti-hinge antibodies, and anti-glycan antibodies. Unlike anti-idiotype antibodies elicited by the drug, pre-formed antibodies in general appear to have little consequences during treatment. In the few cases where (potential) clinical consequences were encountered, antibodies were characterized and found to bind a distinct, unusual epitope of the therapeutic. Immunogenicity testing strategies should therefore always include a proper level of antibody characterization, especially when pre-formed antibodies are present. This minimizes false-positives, particularly due to rheumatoid factors, and helps to judge the potential threat in case a genuine pre-dose antibody reactivity is identified. PMID:25962087

  14. An Analytical Model for Assessing Stability of Pre-Existing Faults in Caprock Caused by Fluid Injection and Extraction in a Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Bai, Bing; Li, Xiaochun; Liu, Mingze; Wu, Haiqing; Hu, Shaobin

    2016-07-01

    Induced seismicity and fault reactivation associated with fluid injection and depletion were reported in hydrocarbon, geothermal, and waste fluid injection fields worldwide. Here, we establish an analytical model to assess fault reactivation surrounding a reservoir during fluid injection and extraction that considers the stress concentrations at the fault tips and the effects of fault length. In this model, induced stress analysis in a full-space under the plane strain condition is implemented based on Eshelby's theory of inclusions in terms of a homogeneous, isotropic, and poroelastic medium. The stress intensity factor concept in linear elastic fracture mechanics is adopted as an instability criterion for pre-existing faults in surrounding rocks. To characterize the fault reactivation caused by fluid injection and extraction, we define a new index, the "fault reactivation factor" η, which can be interpreted as an index of fault stability in response to fluid pressure changes per unit within a reservoir resulting from injection or extraction. The critical fluid pressure change within a reservoir is also determined by the superposition principle using the in situ stress surrounding a fault. Our parameter sensitivity analyses show that the fault reactivation tendency is strongly sensitive to fault location, fault length, fault dip angle, and Poisson's ratio of the surrounding rock. Our case study demonstrates that the proposed model focuses on the mechanical behavior of the whole fault, unlike the conventional methodologies. The proposed method can be applied to engineering cases related to injection and depletion within a reservoir owing to its efficient computational codes implementation.

  15. Allergy Medications During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrada, Alexei; Geraci, Stephen A

    2016-09-01

    Allergic diseases are common in women of childbearing age. Both asthma and atopic conditions may worsen, improve or remain the same during pregnancy. Primary care physicians commonly encounter women receiving multiple medications for pre-existing atopic conditions, who then become pregnant and require medication changes to avoid potential fetal injury or congenital malformations. Each medication should be evaluated; intranasal and inhaled steroids are relatively safe to continue during pregnancy (budesonide is the drug of choice), second-generation antihistamines of choice are cetirizine and loratadine, leukotriene receptor antagonists are safe, sparing use of oral decongestants during the first trimester and omalizumab may be used for both uncontrolled asthma and for antihistamine-resistant urticaria. Medications to avoid during pregnancy include intranasal antihistamines, first-generation antihistamines, mycophenolate mofetil, methotrexate, cyclosporine, azathioprine and zilueton. Common allergic diseases may develop de novo during pregnancy, such as anaphylaxis. PMID:27650241

  16. The effect of pre-existing affect on the sexual responses of women with and without a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Rellini, Alessandra H; Elinson, Samantha; Janssen, Erick; Meston, Cindy M

    2012-04-01

    Women with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are at greater risk for experiencing sexual problems in their adult lives. Yet, little is known about the possible role of cognitive and affective mechanisms in the development of sexual arousal difficulties in this population. This study investigated the role of pre-existing affect (affect prior to exposure to sexual stimuli) on genital responses, subjective sexual arousal, and affect elicited during the presentation of erotic film excerpts in a community sample of 25 women with and 25 women without a history of CSA. The CSA group showed greater pre-existing negative affect and smaller genital responses to the erotic film stimuli compared to the NSA group. Findings support a moderating effect of CSA, in that pre-existing negative affect was associated with strength of genital responses in the NSA but not in the CSA group. The results did not support a mediation model of pre-existing negative affect as an explanation for smaller physiological sexual responses in the CSA group. Taken together, the findings suggest that pre-existing affect may be more relevant for women with no history of CSA and call for more research on factors implicated in impaired sexual responses in women with a history of CSA. PMID:21667233

  17. The effect of pre-existing affect on the sexual responses of women with and without a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Rellini, Alessandra H; Elinson, Samantha; Janssen, Erick; Meston, Cindy M

    2012-04-01

    Women with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are at greater risk for experiencing sexual problems in their adult lives. Yet, little is known about the possible role of cognitive and affective mechanisms in the development of sexual arousal difficulties in this population. This study investigated the role of pre-existing affect (affect prior to exposure to sexual stimuli) on genital responses, subjective sexual arousal, and affect elicited during the presentation of erotic film excerpts in a community sample of 25 women with and 25 women without a history of CSA. The CSA group showed greater pre-existing negative affect and smaller genital responses to the erotic film stimuli compared to the NSA group. Findings support a moderating effect of CSA, in that pre-existing negative affect was associated with strength of genital responses in the NSA but not in the CSA group. The results did not support a mediation model of pre-existing negative affect as an explanation for smaller physiological sexual responses in the CSA group. Taken together, the findings suggest that pre-existing affect may be more relevant for women with no history of CSA and call for more research on factors implicated in impaired sexual responses in women with a history of CSA.

  18. Pre-existing adversity, level of child protection involvement, and school attendance predict educational outcomes in a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Maclean, Miriam J; Taylor, Catherine L; O'Donnell, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Maltreatment largely occurs in a multiple-risk context. The few large studies adjusting for confounding factors have raised doubts about whether low educational achievement results from maltreatment or co-occurring risk factors. This study examined prevalence, risk and protective factors for low educational achievement among children involved with the child protection system compared to other children. We conducted a population-based record-linkage study of children born in Western Australia who sat national Year 3 reading achievement tests between 2008 and 2010 (N=46,838). The longitudinal study linked data from the Western Australian Department of Education, Department of Child Protection and Family Support, Department of Health, and the Disability Services Commission. Children with histories of child protection involvement (unsubstantiated maltreatment reports, substantiations or out-of-home care placement) were at three-fold increased risk of low reading scores. Adjusting for socio-demographic adversity partially attenuated the increased risk, however risk remained elevated overall and for substantiated (OR=1.68) and unsubstantiated maltreatment (OR=1.55). Risk of low reading scores in the out-of-home care group was fully attenuated after adjusting for socio-demographic adversity (OR=1.16). Attendance was significantly higher in the out-of-home care group and served a protective role. Neglect, sexual abuse, and physical abuse were associated with low reading scores. Pre-existing adversity was also significantly associated with achievement. Results support policies and practices to engage children and families in regular school attendance, and highlight a need for further strategies to prevent maltreatment and disadvantage from restricting children's opportunities for success.

  19. Recrystallization fabrics of sheared quartz veins with a strong pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientation from a seismogenic shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Nancy A.; Song, Won Joon; Johnson, Scott E.; Gerbi, Christopher C.; Beane, Rachel J.; West, David P.

    2016-07-01

    Microstructural investigations were carried out on quartz veins in schist, protomylonite, and mylonite samples from an ancient seismogenic strike-slip shear zone (Sandhill Corner shear zone, Norumbega fault system, Maine, USA). We interpret complexities in the microstructural record to show that: (1) pre-existing crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in the host rock may persist in the new CPO patterns of the shear zone and (2) the inner and outer parts of the shear zone followed diverging paths of fabric development. The host rocks bounding the shear zone contain asymmetrically-folded quartz veins with a strong CPO. These veins are increasingly deformed and recrystallized with proximity to the shear zone core. Matrix-accommodated rotation and recrystallization may position an inherited c-axis maximum in an orientation coincident with rhomb < a > or basal < a > slip. This inherited CPO likely persists in the shear zone fabric as a higher concentration of poles in one hemisphere of the c-axis pole figure, leading to asymmetric crossed girdle or paired maxima c-axis patterns about the foliation plane. Three observed quartz grain types indicate a general trend of localization with decreasing temperature: (1) large (> 100 μm), low aspect ratio (<~5) and (2) high aspect ratio (~ 5-20) grains overprinted by (3) smaller (<~80 μm), low aspect ratio (<~4) grains through subgrain rotation-dominated recrystallization. In the outer shear zone, subgrain rotation recrystallization led to a well-developed c-axis crossed girdle pattern. In the inner shear zone, the larger grains are completely overprinted by smaller grains, but the CPO patterns are relatively poorly developed and are associated with distinctively different misorientation angle histogram profiles ("flat" neighbor-pair profile with similar number fraction for angles from 10 to 90°). This may reflect the preferential activation of grain size sensitive deformation processes in the inner-most part of the

  20. Programmed death ligand 1 as an indicator of pre-existing adaptive immune responses in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qian-Kun; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Pan, Tao; Lyu, Ning; Mu, Lu-Wen; Li, Shao-Long; Shi, Mu-De; Zhang, Zhen-Feng; Zhou, Peng-Hui; Zhao, Ming

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the aberrant expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on tumor cells impairs antitumor immunity. To date, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the relationship between PD-L1 expression and host-tumor immunity is not well defined. Here, the expression levels of PD-L1 and CD8(+) T cell infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens from 167 HCC patients undergoing resection. A significant positive association was found between PD-L1 expression and the presence of CD8(+) T cell (p < 0.0001). Moreover, constitutive PD-L1 protein expression was not detected by western blot in HepG2, Hep3B, and 7402 HCC cancer cell lines; but co-cultured these cell lines with INFγ, a cytokine produced by activated CD8(+) T cells, remarkably upregulated PD-L1 expression. In fresh frozen HCC specimens, INFγ was found to be significantly correlated with PD-L1 and CD8(+) gene expression, as evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These findings indicate that increased PD-L1 level may represent an adaptive immune resistance mechanism exerted by tumor cells in response to endogenous antitumor activity. Both increased intratumoral PD-L1 and CD8(+) were significantly associated with superior DFS (CD8(+): p = 0.03; PD-L1: p = 0.023) and OS (CD8(+): p = 0.001 and PD-L1: p = 0.059), but PD-L1 expression was not independently prognostic. In conclusions, PD-L1 upregulation is mainly induced by activated CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells pre-existing in HCC milieu rather than be constitutively expressed by the tumor cells, and it is a favorable prognostic factor for HCC. PMID:27622038

  1. Towards ethical guidelines for dealing with unsolicited patient emails and giving teleadvice in the absence of a pre-existing patient-physician relationship — systematic review and expert survey

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Background Many health information providers on the Internet and doctors with email accounts are confronted with the phenomenon of receiving unsolicited emails from patients asking for medical advice. Also, a growing number of websites offer "ask-the-doctor" services, where patients can ask questions to health professionals via email or other means of telecommunication. It is unclear whether these types of interactions constitute medical practice, and whether physicians have the ethical obligation to respond to unsolicited patient emails. Objective To improve the quality of online communication between patients and health professionals (physicians, experts) in the absence of a pre-existing patient-physician relationship or face-to-face communication, by preparing a set of guiding ethical principles applicable to this kind of interaction. Methods Systematic review of the literature, professional, and ethical codes; and consultation with experts. Results Two different types of patient-physician encounters have to be distinguished. "Traditional" clinical encounters or telemedicine applications are called "Type B" interactions here (Bona fide relationship). In comparison, online interactions lack many of the characteristics of bona fide interactions; most notably there is no pre-existing relationship and the information available to the physician is limited if, for example, a physician responds to the email of a patient who he has never seen before. I call these "Type A" consultations (Absence of pre-existing patient-physician relationship). While guidelines for Type B interactions on the Internet exist (Kane, 1998), this is not the case for Type A interactions. The following principles are suggested: Physicians responding to patients' requests on the Internet should act within the limitations of telecommunication services and keep the global nature of the Internet in mind; not every aspect of medicine requires face-to-face communication; requests for help, including

  2. Medical Signal-Conditioning and Data-Interface System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Jeffrey; Jacobus, charles; Booth, Scott; Suarez, Michael; Smith, Derek; Hartnagle, Jeffrey; LePrell, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    A general-purpose portable, wearable electronic signal-conditioning and data-interface system is being developed for medical applications. The system can acquire multiple physiological signals (e.g., electrocardiographic, electroencephalographic, and electromyographic signals) from sensors on the wearer s body, digitize those signals that are received in analog form, preprocess the resulting data, and transmit the data to one or more remote location(s) via a radiocommunication link and/or the Internet. The system includes a computer running data-object-oriented software that can be programmed to configure the system to accept almost any analog or digital input signals from medical devices. The computing hardware and software implement a general-purpose data-routing-and-encapsulation architecture that supports tagging of input data and routing the data in a standardized way through the Internet and other modern packet-switching networks to one or more computer(s) for review by physicians. The architecture supports multiple-site buffering of data for redundancy and reliability, and supports both real-time and slower-than-real-time collection, routing, and viewing of signal data. Routing and viewing stations support insertion of automated analysis routines to aid in encoding, analysis, viewing, and diagnosis.

  3. Dioxins from medical waste incineration: Normal operation and transient conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-xiu; Yan, Mi; Fu, Jian-ying; Lu, Sheng-yong; Li, Xiao-dong; Yan, Jian-hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are key pollutants in waste incineration. At present, incinerator managers and official supervisors focus only on emissions evolving during steady-state operation. Yet, these emissions may considerably be raised during periods of poor combustion, plant shutdown, and especially when starting-up from cold. Until now there were no data on transient emissions from medical (or hospital) waste incineration (MWI). However, MWI is reputed to engender higher emissions than those from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). The emission levels in this study recorded for shutdown and start-up, however, were significantly higher: 483 ± 184 ng Nm(-3) (1.47 ± 0.17 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for shutdown and 735 ng Nm(-3) (7.73 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for start-up conditions, respectively. Thus, the average (I-TEQ) concentration during shutdown is 2.6 (3.8) times higher than the average concentration during normal operation, and the average (I-TEQ) concentration during start-up is 4.0 (almost 20) times higher. So monitoring should cover the entire incineration cycle, including start-up, operation and shutdown, rather than optimised operation only. This suggestion is important for medical waste incinerators, as these facilities frequently start up and shut down, because of their small size, or of lacking waste supply. Forthcoming operation should shift towards much longer operating cycles, i.e., a single weekly start-up and shutdown.

  4. Contraception choices in women with underlying medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonnema, Rachel A; McNamara, Megan C; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-09-15

    Primary care physicians often prescribe contraceptives to women of reproductive age with comorbidities. Novel delivery systems (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring, single-rod implantable device) may change traditional risk and benefit profiles in women with comorbidities. Effective contraceptive counseling requires an understanding of a woman's preferences and medical history, as well as the risks, benefits, adverse effects, and contraindications of each method. Noncontraceptive benefits of combined hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptive pills, include regulated menses, decreased dysmenorrhea, and diminished premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Oral contraceptive pills may be used safely in women with a range of medical conditions, including well-controlled hypertension, uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, depression, and uncomplicated valvular heart disease. However, women older than 35 years who smoke should avoid oral contraceptive pills. Contraceptives containing estrogen, which can increase thrombotic risk, should be avoided in women with a history of venous thromboembolism, stroke, cardiovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Progestin-only contraceptives are recommended for women with contraindications to estrogen. Depo-Provera, a long-acting injectable contraceptive, may be preferred in women with sickle cell disease because it reduces the frequency of painful crises. Because of the interaction between antiepileptics and oral contraceptive pills, Depo-Provera may also be considered in women with epilepsy. Implanon, the single-rod implantable contraceptive device, may reduce symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Mirena, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine contraceptive system, is an option for women with menorrhagia, endometriosis, or chronic pelvic pain. PMID:20842989

  5. Contraception choices in women with underlying medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bonnema, Rachel A; McNamara, Megan C; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-09-15

    Primary care physicians often prescribe contraceptives to women of reproductive age with comorbidities. Novel delivery systems (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring, single-rod implantable device) may change traditional risk and benefit profiles in women with comorbidities. Effective contraceptive counseling requires an understanding of a woman's preferences and medical history, as well as the risks, benefits, adverse effects, and contraindications of each method. Noncontraceptive benefits of combined hormonal contraceptives, such as oral contraceptive pills, include regulated menses, decreased dysmenorrhea, and diminished premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Oral contraceptive pills may be used safely in women with a range of medical conditions, including well-controlled hypertension, uncomplicated diabetes mellitus, depression, and uncomplicated valvular heart disease. However, women older than 35 years who smoke should avoid oral contraceptive pills. Contraceptives containing estrogen, which can increase thrombotic risk, should be avoided in women with a history of venous thromboembolism, stroke, cardiovascular disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Progestin-only contraceptives are recommended for women with contraindications to estrogen. Depo-Provera, a long-acting injectable contraceptive, may be preferred in women with sickle cell disease because it reduces the frequency of painful crises. Because of the interaction between antiepileptics and oral contraceptive pills, Depo-Provera may also be considered in women with epilepsy. Implanon, the single-rod implantable contraceptive device, may reduce symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Mirena, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine contraceptive system, is an option for women with menorrhagia, endometriosis, or chronic pelvic pain.

  6. The role of pre-existing Precambrian structures in rift evolution: The Albertine and Rhino grabens, Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katumwehe, Andrew B.; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Atekwana, Estella A.

    2015-04-01

    We integrated Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Models (DEM), airborne magnetic, radiometric and three-dimensional Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometry (3D-FTG) data to investigate the role of Precambrian structures in the evolution of the largely amagmatic Miocene-Recent aged Albertine and Rhino grabens in Uganda. These grabens represent the northern segment of the Western Branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). The two NE-trending grabens are connected by a right-stepping transfer zone and they extend within the Archean-Paleoproterozoic Northeast Congo block which represents the northeastern extension of the Congo craton. Our results show the following and highlight the importance of pre-existing structures in the evolution of continental rift systems: (1) The NE-extent of the Albertine full-graben is controlled by NE-trending Precambrian fabric and the graben terminates at its northeastern end when it encounters a multiply folded Precambrian basement terrain with poorly-developed NW-trending structural grain. Additionally, the northeastern termination of the Albertine graben coincides with the presence of NW-trending right-stepping high-density bodies within the Precambrian terrain. (2) The transfer zone between the Albertine and Rhino grabens is controlled by NE-trending Precambrian structures which might have facilitated the development of relay ramp faults. (3) Strain localization within the better-developed southeastern border fault of the Rhino half-graben is facilitated by the presence of Precambrian structures better aligned in a NE-direction in the southeastern part of the basin compared to its northwestern part. (4) Further to the northeast, the Rhino graben is segmented and transitions into a narrower ENE-trending half-graben with a better-developed border fault on its northwestern side. This segmentation coincides with the presence of N-trending Precambrian structures. (5) The Rhino graben terminates farther northeast against

  7. Effects of Mining-Induced Stress Perturbations on Pre-Existing Faults Near a Deep South African Gold Mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucier, A. M.; Heesakkers, V.; Zoback, M. D.; Reches, Z.

    2007-12-01

    For over a century, mining-induced earthquakes have been recorded in the deep underground mining region of Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa. The TauTona gold mine experiences an appreciable number of mining- induced earthquakes and is the site of the Natural Earthquake Laboratory in South African Mines (NELSAM) project. In this work, we constrain the virgin (i.e. unperturbed) state of stress near the TauTona gold mine using an iterative forward modeling approach that combines observations of drilling induced borehole failures in borehole images, boundary element modeling of the mining-induced stress perturbations, and forward modeling of borehole failures based on the results of the boundary element modeling. We find that the state of stress is a normal faulting regime with principal stress orientations that are slightly deviated from vertical and horizontal and therefore denoted with a (*). The maximum principal stress, Sv*, is deviated 0° to 20° from vertical towards the NNW and has a magnitude gradient of 27 ± 0.3 MPa/km. The intermediate principal stress, SHmax*, is inclined 0° to 20° from horizontal with an azimuth of 145° to 168° and has a magnitude gradient of 21.5 to 26 MPa/km. The least principal stress, Shmin*, is inclined 0° to 10° from horizontal with an azimuth of 235° to 258° and has a magnitude gradient of 13 to 15.5 MPa/km. Using this constrained stress state, we investigate the likelihood of faulting to occur both on pre-existing fault planes that are optimally-oriented to the virgin stress state and on faults affected by the mining-perturbed stress field, the latter of which is calculated with boundary element modeling. The far-field stress state indicates that the crust is in a state of frictional faulting equilibrium, such that normal faulting is likely to occur on faults striking SSE and NNW and have a dip angle of approximately 45° to 80°. The mining-induced stress perturbation affects faults relatively closer to the mining

  8. The impact of pre-existing antibody on subsequent immune responses to meningococcal A-containing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Idoko, Olubukola T; Okolo, Seline N; Plikaytis, Brian; Akinsola, Adebayo; Viviani, Simonetta; Borrow, Ray; Carlone, George; Findlow, Helen; Elie, Cheryl; Kulkarni, Prasad S; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Ota, Martin; Kampmann, Beate

    2014-07-16

    -vaccination titers attained ≥4-fold responses as compared to 76% with high titers where study vaccine was received. Our data confirm the presence of high pre-vaccination Men A antibody concentrations/titers within the African meningitis belt, with significantly higher concentrations in older individuals. Although all participants had significant increase in antibody levels following vaccination, the four-fold or greater response in antibody titers were significantly higher in individuals with lower pre-existing antibody titers, especially after receiving PsA-TT. This finding may have some implications for vaccination strategies adopted in the future. PMID:24863486

  9. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... unable to perform those duties or exercise those privileges. (c) No medication or other treatment that... relating to the medication or other treatment involved, finds— (1) Makes the person unable to...

  10. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... unable to perform those duties or exercise those privileges. (c) No medication or other treatment that... relating to the medication or other treatment involved, finds— (1) Makes the person unable to...

  11. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment... the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical...

  12. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment... the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical...

  13. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment... the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical...

  14. Dioxins from medical waste incineration: Normal operation and transient conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-xiu; Yan, Mi; Fu, Jian-ying; Lu, Sheng-yong; Li, Xiao-dong; Yan, Jian-hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are key pollutants in waste incineration. At present, incinerator managers and official supervisors focus only on emissions evolving during steady-state operation. Yet, these emissions may considerably be raised during periods of poor combustion, plant shutdown, and especially when starting-up from cold. Until now there were no data on transient emissions from medical (or hospital) waste incineration (MWI). However, MWI is reputed to engender higher emissions than those from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). The emission levels in this study recorded for shutdown and start-up, however, were significantly higher: 483 ± 184 ng Nm(-3) (1.47 ± 0.17 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for shutdown and 735 ng Nm(-3) (7.73 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for start-up conditions, respectively. Thus, the average (I-TEQ) concentration during shutdown is 2.6 (3.8) times higher than the average concentration during normal operation, and the average (I-TEQ) concentration during start-up is 4.0 (almost 20) times higher. So monitoring should cover the entire incineration cycle, including start-up, operation and shutdown, rather than optimised operation only. This suggestion is important for medical waste incinerators, as these facilities frequently start up and shut down, because of their small size, or of lacking waste supply. Forthcoming operation should shift towards much longer operating cycles, i.e., a single weekly start-up and shutdown. PMID:26159561

  15. Effect of the pre-existing carbides on the grain boundary network during grain boundary engineering in a nickel based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tingguang; Xia, Shuang; Li, Hui; Zhou, Bangxin; Bai, Qin

    2014-05-01

    Grain boundary engineering was carried out on an aging-treated nickel based Alloy 690, which has precipitated carbides at grain boundaries. Electron backscatter diffraction technique was used to investigate the grain boundary networks. Results show that, compared with the solution-annealed samples, the aging-treated samples with pre-existing carbides at grain boundaries need longer duration or higher temperature during annealing after low-strain tensile deformation for forming high proportion of low-Σ coincidence site lattice grain boundaries (more than 75%). The reason is that the primary recrystallization is inhibited or retarded owing to that the pre-existing carbides are barriers to grain boundaries migration. - Highlights: • Study of GBE as function of pre-existing GB carbides, tensile strain and annealing • Recrystallization of GBE is inhibited or retarded by the pre-existing carbides. • Retained carbides after annealing show the original GB positions. • More than 80% of special GBs were formed after the modification of GBE processing. • Multiple twinning during recrystallization is the key process of GBE.

  16. A dairy-based high calcium diet improves glucose homeostasis and reduces steatosis in the context of pre-existing obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High dietary calcium (Ca) in the context of a dairy food matrix has been shown to reduce obesity development and associated inflammation in diet-induced obese (DIO) rodents. The influence of Ca and dairy on these phenotypes in the context of pre-existing obesity is not known. Furthermore, interpre...

  17. A dairy-based high calcium diet improves glucose homeostasis and reduces further weight gain in high fat fed mice in the context of pre-existing obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: High dietary calcium (Ca) in the context of a dairy food matrix has been shown to reduce obesity development and associated inflammation in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. However, the influence of Ca and dairy on these phenotypes in the context of pre-existing obesity is not known. Met...

  18. An immunoinhibition approach to overcome the impact of pre-existing antibodies on cut point establishment for immunogenicity assessment of moxetumomab pasudotox.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Amy K; Vainshtein, Inna; Roskos, Lorin K; Chavez, Carlos; Sun, Bo; Liang, Meina

    2016-08-01

    Immunogenicity can impact PK, PD, efficacy and safety of biopharmaceuticals, and is often evaluated as a secondary objective in clinical studies. Methods to detect anti-drug antibodies (ADA) and neutralizing ADA (NAb) are semi-quantitative and utilize cut points to determine positive or negative samples. Assay cut points are established by the statistical analysis of treatment-naïve subject specimens that are assumed ADA and NAb-negative. Pre-existing antibodies to various biopharmaceuticals have been observed in treatment-naïve subjects and may artificially elevate the cut point, resulting in compromised assay sensitivities, inaccuracy in immunogenicity reporting and ultimately misleading assessment of the impact of immunogenicity on clinical outcomes. Although several approaches such as removal of pre-existing antibody samples or increasing the sample dilution could be used for cut point establishment to mitigate impact of pre-existing antibodies, they each have limitations, especially when a high prevalence of pre-existing antibodies is observed. Here we describe an innovative approach used to establish cut points for ADA and NAb assays of moxetumomab pasudotox (moxetumomab), a recombinant anti-CD22 immunotoxin, to which a high prevalence of pre-existing antibodies was observed. In order to overcome the challenges associated with this high prevalence and prevent establishment of an artificially elevated cut point, we developed an immunoinhibition approach that allowed generation of pseudo ADA and NAb-negative populations for cut point determination. Immunoinhibition was performed by adding excess moxetumomab (for ADA) or a non-CD22 binding PE38-containing immunotoxin, CAT-5001 (for NAb), to treatment-naive samples prior to evaluating samples for cut point establishment. This approach successfully eliminated pre-existing antibody activity in treatment-naive samples, enabling establishment of more accurate ADA and NAb assay cut points. A comparative analysis of

  19. Lateral propagation of active normal faults throughout pre-existing fault zones: an example from the Southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, Fabrizio; Prosser, Giacomo; Ivo Giano, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    top, unconformably covered by Miocene clastic deposits. The lower thrust sheet is made up of deep-sea deposits of late Triassic to Eocene age, which include pelagic limestones, radiolarites, marls and turbiditic calcarenites. The relay ramp area is comprised of two main fault sets, which are NW-trending (N120-140E) and NE-trending (N60-70E). Minor E-trending (N90-100E) and NNW-trending (N160-170E) faults are also present. Maximum throws of the most developed faults, which are also characterized by the longest traces, are in the order of 300-400 m. Crosscutting relationships and morphotectonic analyses generally show that the NW-trending faults are the most recent, as also shown by the involvement of Quaternary breccias and near surface fault rocks. Our data indicate that propagation of NW-trending normal faults in the relay ramp area took place thanks to the breaking of a pre-existing structural grain made up, mainly, of NE-trending normal faults. This process determined the different multi-scale properties to the two fault sets, and somehow inhibited the lateral growth of the NW-trending normal faults.

  20. The Effects of Pre-Existing Hyponatremia and Subsequent-Developing Acute Kidney Injury on In-Hospital Mortality: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Woo; Baek, Seon Ha; Ahn, Shin Young; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Chin, Ho Jun; Kim, Sejoong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Both hyponatremia and acute kidney injury (AKI) are common and harmful in hospitalized patients. However, their combined effects on patient mortality have been little studied. Methods We retrospectively enrolled 19191 adult patients who were admitted for 1 year. Pre-existing hyponatremia was defined as a serum sodium level < 135 mmol/L on the first measurement of their admission. AKI was defined as a rise in serum creatinine by ≥ 26.5 μmol/L or ≥ 1.5 times of the baseline value of creatinine during the hospital stay. Results The prevalence of pre-existing hyponatremia was 8.2%. During a median 6.0 days of hospital stay, the incidence rates of AKI and in-hospital patient mortality were 5.1% and 0.9%, respectively. Pre-existing hyponatremia independently predicted AKI development and in-hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.300, P = 0.004; HR 2.481, P = 0.002, respectively). Pre-existing hyponatremia and subsequent development of AKI increased in-hospital mortality by 85 times, compared to the patients with normonatremia and no AKI. In subgroup analysis, the AKI group showed higher rates of de novo hypernatremia than the non-AKI group during the admission. De novo hypernatremia, which might be associated with over-correction of hyponatremia, increased in-hospital mortality (HR 3.297, P <0.001), and patients with AKI showed significantly higher rates of de novo hypernatremia than patients without AKI (16.2% vs. 1.4%, P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion Pre-existing hyponatremia may be associated with the development of AKI in hospitalized patients, and both hyponatremia and hospital-acquired AKI could have a detrimental effect on short term patient mortality, which might be related to the inappropriate correction of hyponatremia in AKI patients. PMID:27622451

  1. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social...

  2. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social...

  3. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work assistant... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social...

  4. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social services....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work...

  5. 42 CFR 484.34 - Condition of participation: Medical social services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Medical social services....34 Condition of participation: Medical social services. If the agency furnishes medical social services, those services are given by a qualified social worker or by a qualified social work...

  6. Pre-existing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality and Progression in Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vavallo, Antonio; Simone, Simona; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Rutigliano, Monica; Galleggiante, Vanessa; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto; Campagna, Marcello; Cariello, Marica; Ranieri, Elena; Pertosa, Giovanni; Lastilla, Gaetano; Selvaggi, Francesco Paolo; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Malignancies are one of the main causes of mortality in diabetic patients; however, to date, very limited data have been reported on the specific influence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present long-term retrospective study, we investigated whether T2DM may influence the overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with surgically treated RCC. Medical records of 924 patients treated by radical or partial nephrectomy for sporadic, unilateral RCC were reviewed. Patients with type-1 DM and with T2 DM receiving insulin treatment were excluded. Survival estimates were calculated according to the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox regression model. Of the 924 RCC patients, 152 (16.5%) had T2DM. Mean follow-up was 68.5 months. Mean OS was 41.3 and 96.3 months in T2DM and non-T2DM patients, respectively (P < 0.0001). The estimated CSS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in T2DM versus non-T2DM patients were 63.4% versus 76.7%, 30.4% versus 56.6%, and 16.3% versus 48.6%, respectively (P = 0.001). Mean PFS was significantly lower (31.5 vs 96.3 months; P < 0.0001) in the T2DM group. At multivariate analysis, T2DM was an independent adverse prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]:2.40–4.92), CSS (HR = 6.39; 95% CI: 3.78–10.79), and PFS (HR = 4.71; 95% CI: 3.11–7.15). In conclusion, our findings suggest that patients with RCC and pre-existing T2DM have a shorter OS, increased risk of recurrence, and higher risk for kidney cancer mortality than those without diabetes. PMID:25501064

  7. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, the medical staff may also include other... candidates in accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, and the medical staff bylaws... for use in the periodic appraisal of the distant-site physician or practitioner. At a minimum,...

  8. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy...

  9. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to medical staff. The medical staff must include doctors of medicine or osteopathy. In accordance... majority of the members of the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility...) An individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy. (ii) A doctor of dental surgery or dental...

  10. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy or, when permitted by State law of...

  11. Medication adherence in people dually treated for HIV infection and mental health conditions: test of the medications beliefs framework.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Pellowski, Jennifer; Kegler, Christopher; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O

    2015-08-01

    Beliefs about medication necessity and concerns predict treatment adherence in people with a wide-array of medical conditions, including HIV infection. However, medication beliefs have not been examined in people dually treated with psychotropic medications and antiretroviral therapy. In the current study, we used a prospective design to investigate the factors associated with adherence to psychotropic medications and antiretrovirals among 123 dually treated persons living with HIV. We used unannounced phone-based pill counts to monitor adherence to psychiatric and antiretroviral medications over a 6-week period. Hierarchical regression models included demographic, health and psychosocial characteristics as predictors of adherence followed by medication necessity and concerns beliefs. Results showed that medication necessity beliefs predicted both antiretroviral and psychiatric medication adherence over and above established predictors of adherence. Medication concerns also predicted psychotropic adherence, but not antiretroviral adherence. These models accounted for 31 and 22 % of the variance in antiretroviral and psychotropic adherence, respectively. Findings suggest that the necessity-concerns medication beliefs framework has utility in understanding adherence to multiple medications and addressing these beliefs should be integrated into adherence interventions.

  12. The 1970 yellow fever epidemic in Okwoga District, Benue Plateau State, Nigeria. 3. Serological responses in persons with and without pre-existing heterologous group B immunity.

    PubMed

    Monath, T P; Wilson, D C; Casals, J

    1973-01-01

    Serological studies of persons infected with yellow fever (YF) during the 1970 epidemic in Okwoga District, Nigeria, indicated that epidemic YF occurred despite a high prevalence of pre-existing group B arbovirus immunity, which increased with age. The viruses involved were primarily dengue, Zika, and Wesselsbron. Patterns of responses of haemagglutination-inhibiting, complement-fixing, and neutralizing antibodies in primary YF and in superinfections are defined in this paper.

  13. Medical issues associated with commercial flights.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Danielle; Gendreau, Mark

    2009-06-13

    Almost 2 billion people travel aboard commercial airlines every year. Health-care providers and travellers need to be aware of the potential health risks associated with air travel. Environmental and physiological changes that occur during routine commercial flights lead to mild hypoxia and gas expansion, which can exacerbate chronic medical conditions or incite acute in-flight medical events. The association between venous thromboembolism and long-haul flights, cosmic-radiation exposure, jet lag, and cabin-air quality are growing health-care issues associated with air travel. In-flight medical events are increasingly frequent because a growing number of individuals with pre-existing medical conditions travel by air. Resources including basic and advanced medical kits, automated external defibrillators, and telemedical ground support are available onboard to assist flight crew and volunteering physicians in the management of in-flight medical emergencies. PMID:19232708

  14. Medical issues associated with commercial flights.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Danielle; Gendreau, Mark

    2009-06-13

    Almost 2 billion people travel aboard commercial airlines every year. Health-care providers and travellers need to be aware of the potential health risks associated with air travel. Environmental and physiological changes that occur during routine commercial flights lead to mild hypoxia and gas expansion, which can exacerbate chronic medical conditions or incite acute in-flight medical events. The association between venous thromboembolism and long-haul flights, cosmic-radiation exposure, jet lag, and cabin-air quality are growing health-care issues associated with air travel. In-flight medical events are increasingly frequent because a growing number of individuals with pre-existing medical conditions travel by air. Resources including basic and advanced medical kits, automated external defibrillators, and telemedical ground support are available onboard to assist flight crew and volunteering physicians in the management of in-flight medical emergencies.

  15. [Global aspects of medical ethics: conditions and possibilities].

    PubMed

    Neitzke, G

    2001-01-01

    A global or universal code of medical ethics seems paradoxical in the era of pluralism and postmodernism. A different conception of globalisation will be developed in terms of a "procedural universality". According to this philosophical concept, a code of medical ethics does not oblige physicians to accept certain specific, preset, universal values and rules. It rather obliges every culture and society to start a culture-sensitive, continuous, and active discourse on specific issues, mentioned in the codex. This procedure might result in regional, intra-cultural consensus, which should be presented to an inter-cultural dialogue. To exemplify this procedure, current topics of medical ethics (spiritual foundations of medicine, autonomy, definitions concerning life and death, physicians' duties, conduct within therapeutic teams) will be discussed from the point of view of western medicine.

  16. Medical conditions affecting well-accommodated travelers in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Saab, Bassem; Musharrafieh, Umayya

    2005-01-01

    There are no data on the prevalence of common diseases affecting travelers to Lebanon. Between 2001 and 2002, one among nine physicians was consulted on guests who needed medical attention in a five-star Beirut hotel. Physicians were consulted 114 times. The mean age of the patients was 36.6 years. Gastroenteritis (50.9%) followed by respiratory problems (25.4%) were the leading causes for consultation. PMID:15996447

  17. Pre-existing hyperlipidaemia increased the risk of new-onset anxiety disorders after traumatic brain injury: a 14-year population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Han; Hsieh, Kuang-Yang; Liang, Fu-Wen; Li, Chia-Jung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chio, Chung-Ching; Chang, Chin-Hung; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Anxiety disorders (ADs) are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the risk factors of new-onset ADs remain unclear. This study was aimed at evaluating the incidence and risk factors for new-onset ADs, including pre-existing hyperlipidaemia and three major comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiovascular disease), in patients with TBI. Setting A matched cohort study was conducted using the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database between January 1997 and December 2010. Participants A total of 3822 participants (1274 patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia and 2548 age-matched and gender-matched patients with TBI without hyperlipidaemia). Outcome measures The incidence and HRs for the development of new-onset ADs after TBI were compared between the two groups. Results The overall incidence rate of new-onset ADs for patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia is 142.03/10 000 person-years (PYs). Patients with TBI with hyperlipidaemia have a 1.60-fold incidence rate ratio (p<0.0001) and increased HR of ADs (1.58, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.02) compared with those without hyperlipidaemia. The incidence rates of ADs for males and females with hyperlipidaemia, respectively, were 142.12 and 292.32/10 000 PYs, which were higher than those without hyperlipidaemia (93.03 and 171.68/10 000 PYs, respectively). Stratified by age group, hyperlipidaemia is a risk factor of ADs for patients with TBI aged 65 years or younger. Conclusions Pre-existing hyperlipidaemia is an independent predictor of new-onset ADs in patients with TBI, even when controlling for other demographic and clinical variables. Female patients with pre-existing hyperlipidaemia had significantly higher risk of new-onset ADs than males, especially between the ages of 35 and 65 years. PMID:25034630

  18. Pre-existing Epithelial Diversity in Normal Human Livers: A Tissue-tethered Cytometric Analysis in Portal/Periportal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Isse, Kumiko; Lesniak, Andrew; Grama, Kedar; Maier, John; Specht, Susan; Castillo-Rama, Marcela; Lunz, John; Roysam, Badrinath; Michalopoulos, George; Demetris, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Routine light microscopy identifies two distinct epithelial cell populations in normal human livers: hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells (BEC). Considerable epithelial diversity, however, arises during disease states when a variety of hepatocyte-BEC hybrid cells appear. This has been attributed to activation and differentiation of putative hepatic progenitor cells (HPC) residing in the Canals of Hering and/or metaplasia of pre-existing mature epithelial cells. A novel analytic approach consisting of multiplex labeling, high resolution whole slide imaging (WSI), and automated image analysis was used to determine if more complex epithelial cell phenotypes pre-existed in normal adult human livers, which might provide an alternative explanation for disease-induced epithelial diversity. “Virtually digested” WSI enabled quantitative cytometric analyses of individual cells displayed in a variety of formats (e.g. scatter plots) while still tethered to the WSI and tissue structure. We employed biomarkers specifically-associated with mature epithelial forms (HNF4α for hepatocytes, CK19 and HNF1β for BEC) and explored for the presence of cells with hybrid biomarker phenotypes. Results showed abundant hybrid cells in portal bile duct BEC, canals of Hering, and immediate periportal hepatocytes. These bi-potential cells likely serve as a reservoir for the epithelial diversity of ductular reactions, appearance of hepatocytes in bile ducts, and the rapid and fluid transition of BEC to hepatocytes, and vice versa. Conclusion Novel imaging and computational tools enable increased information extraction from tissue samples and quantify the considerable pre-existent hybrid epithelial diversity in normal human liver. This computationally-enabled tissue analysis approach offers much broader potential beyond the results presented here. PMID:23150208

  19. Investigating the Influence of Pre-Existing Basement Structures on the Propagation of the Malawi Rift using SRTM, RADARSAT, and Aeromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, K.; Atekwana, E. A.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Laó-Dávila, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Malawi rift is a Neogene, amagmatic rift located where the Western Branch of the East Africa Rift System (EARS) terminates. In more mature rifts, magmatism is frequently recognized as a driving factor in rift propagation; however, the amagmatic nature of the Malawi rift permits investigation into the relationship between pre-existing structures and current rift propagation, without the influence of magmatism. To map surface structures, we used Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and RADARSAT imagery over southern Malawi. To process the SRTM data, we applied edge enhancing filters and derivatives, and extracted topographic profiles to examine scarp height and minimum vertical exposed displacement. We mapped morphologically-defined structures by filtering the RADARSAT imagery using an enhanced lee filter to reduce noise and a Laplacian filter for edge enhancement. To examine Precambrian basement structures, we filtered aeromagnetic data using vertical and horizontal derivatives, tilt derivative, and analytic signal to create magnetic anomaly maps. Surface mapping indicated three primary trends in the southern Malawi rift: NW-SE (dominant), NE-SW, both of which are most likely the remnants of Mesozoic Karoo rifting, and a NNE-SSW trend seen in Neogene rifting. The Precambrian basement structural mapping also reveals three primary trends: WNW-ESE, NE-SW, and NW-SE. Ductile deformation causes the dominant basement fabric to change, switching polarity as the rift propagated southward from NE-SW orientation to NW-SE and WNW-ESE orientations, and back to a NE-SW orientation. In general, the surficial structures follow this trend. In some areas, however, the more recent rifting cut across pre-existing basement structures, possibly due to rheological heterogeneities or selective strain partitioning. Nonetheless, pre-existing basement structures played a critical role in strain localization and fault propagation in Malawi. However

  20. Platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome in a patient with a pre-existing patent foramen ovale successfully treated with an atrial septal occluder

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting-Ting; Cheng, Ge-Sheng; Wang, Jun; Wang, Xing-Ye; Xie, Xue-Gang; Du, Ya-Juan; Zhang, Yu-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Platypnea orthodeoxia syndrome is associated with dyspnea and arterial oxygen desaturation accentuated by an upright posture. It can be secondary to an intracardiac shunt. We report a case of platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome (POS) in a 58-year old male patient who had a pre-existing patent foramen ovale (PFO) and substantial pulmonary pathologies. He was successfully treated by percutaneous transcatheter closure of the PFO. Our case highlights the importance of recognition of this rare syndrome in patients who present with unexplained hypoxia for whom transcatheter closure of the interatrial shunt can be safely carried out. PMID:26089859

  1. Chronic medical conditions among jail detainees in residential psychiatric treatment: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Swartz, James A

    2011-08-01

    Studies of incarcerates with serious mental illnesses have found elevated rates of chronic medical conditions such as asthma and diabetes, and of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis compared with general population rates. This study explored the pattern of chronic medical conditions in a sample of adult detainees in psychiatric treatment in a large urban jail to develop a clinical profile encompassing the full range of medical conditions. A total of 431 male and female detainees were sampled with certainty from admissions to a residential psychiatric treatment program (overall recruitment rate = 67%). Interviews used the World Mental Health version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to assess psychiatric and substance use disorders per DSM-IV criteria and chronic medical conditions. Latent class analysis was conducted using 17 medical conditions as class indicators, yielding a 3-class model composed of: a latent class with a high to intermediate probability of multiple medical conditions (HMC; 12.5% of the sample); an intermediate class with a lower probability of having a smaller number of medical conditions (MMC; 43.2%); and a class with a low probability of any medical condition (44.3%). Those in the HMC class were more likely to report respiratory problems, severe headaches, musculoskeletal pain, hypertension, and arthritis, have greater functional impairment, and have a higher number of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Being older (50+ years) and female were associated with higher odds of being in the HMC or MMC classes. The policy implications for providing medical care to incarcerates with complex mixtures of medical conditions and psychiatric disorders are considered.

  2. Chronic medical conditions among jail detainees in residential psychiatric treatment: a latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Swartz, James A

    2011-08-01

    Studies of incarcerates with serious mental illnesses have found elevated rates of chronic medical conditions such as asthma and diabetes, and of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis compared with general population rates. This study explored the pattern of chronic medical conditions in a sample of adult detainees in psychiatric treatment in a large urban jail to develop a clinical profile encompassing the full range of medical conditions. A total of 431 male and female detainees were sampled with certainty from admissions to a residential psychiatric treatment program (overall recruitment rate = 67%). Interviews used the World Mental Health version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to assess psychiatric and substance use disorders per DSM-IV criteria and chronic medical conditions. Latent class analysis was conducted using 17 medical conditions as class indicators, yielding a 3-class model composed of: a latent class with a high to intermediate probability of multiple medical conditions (HMC; 12.5% of the sample); an intermediate class with a lower probability of having a smaller number of medical conditions (MMC; 43.2%); and a class with a low probability of any medical condition (44.3%). Those in the HMC class were more likely to report respiratory problems, severe headaches, musculoskeletal pain, hypertension, and arthritis, have greater functional impairment, and have a higher number of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Being older (50+ years) and female were associated with higher odds of being in the HMC or MMC classes. The policy implications for providing medical care to incarcerates with complex mixtures of medical conditions and psychiatric disorders are considered. PMID:21394659

  3. 42 CFR 494.170 - Condition: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Standard: Record retention and preservation. In accordance with 45 CFR § 164.530(j)(2), all patient records... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE...

  4. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms.

  5. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (<50% of control) to polystyrene. Treatment of established 72h biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with <25% biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. PMID:25043896

  6. Tests and Medical Conditions Associated with Dementia Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Diana B.; Primeaux-Hart, Sharon; Loveland, Katherine A.; Cleveland, Lynne A.; Lewis, Kay R.; Lesser, Jary; Pearson, Pamela L.

    2005-01-01

    Diagnosis of dementia in adults with intellectual disabilities requires documentation of clinically significant declines in memory and other cognitive skills, as well as changes in everyday and emotional functioning. To improve diagnostic accuracy in adults with Down syndrome, the authors examined conditions often associated with dementia, as well…

  7. A Comparison of Expedition Medical Condition List Treatment Directives with Integrated Medical Model Simulation Data Presentation and Briefing Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This aerospace medicine clerkship project is under the direction of Dr. Sharmila Watkins and is in cooperation with Dr. Eric Kerstman and Dr. Ronak Shah. The questions of the research project are: 1. What are the main drivers of evacuation and loss of crew life (LOCL) on three Design Reference Missions (DRMs): Near Earth Asteroid (NEA), Lunar Sortie and Lunar Outpost using an inexhaustible International Space Station medical kit 2. What are the treatment designations for these driving medical conditions as listed in Expedition Medical Condition List (EMCL) 3. Do the drivers make sense in the context of the given Design Reference Mission (DRM) 4. Do any EMCL treatment designations need re-assessing.

  8. Lack of efficacy of pre bronchoscopy inhaled salbutamol on symptoms and lung functions in patients with pre-existing airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Anant; Momin, Indrajit; Poulose, Rosemary; Mohan, Charu; Madan, Karan; Hadda, Vijay; Guleria, Randeep; Pandey, RM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) may exaggerate symptoms and lung functions in patients with pre-existing airway obstruction. Interventions which can alleviate or minimize this procedure-related bronchospasm, especially in this high-risk group are, therefore, required. Methods: A double-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of 400 μg of inhaled salbutamol on patients with spirometric evidence of airflow obstruction planned for FOB. Patient's dyspnea, procedure tolerability, and change in spirometry were assessed before and after the procedure. Results: A total of 50 patients were enrolled (78% males), with a mean (standard deviation) age of 49.8 (6.2) years. There was a significant fall in % predicted FEV1 within each group compared to their respective pre-bronchoscopy values. However, no significant difference in the % predicted or absolute FEV1 level was observed between the two groups. Similarly, although both groups experienced increased dyspnea immediately following FOB, this difference was not significant between the two groups either on the Borg or visual analog scale scales. Pre-FOB anxiety levels and the tolerability of the procedure as assessed by the bronchoscopist were similar in both groups. Conclusion: FOB in patients with pre-existing airway obstruction aggravates cough and dyspnea, with a concomitant decline in FEV1 and FVC. The administration of pre-FOB inhaled salbutamol does not have any significant beneficial effect on procedure-related outcomes. PMID:27578926

  9. Reduction in noise-induced functional loss of the cochleae in mice with pre-existing cochlear dysfunction due to genetic interference of prestin.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qunfeng; Wang, Bo; Coling, Donald; Zuo, Jian; Fang, Jie; Yang, Shiming; Vera, Krystal; Hu, Bo Hua

    2014-01-01

    Various cochlear pathologies, such as acoustic trauma, ototoxicity and age-related degeneration, cause hearing loss. These pre-existing hearing losses can alter cochlear responses to subsequent acoustic overstimulation. So far, the knowledge on the impacts of pre-existing hearing loss caused by genetic alteration of cochlear genes is limited. Prestin is the motor protein expressed exclusively in outer hair cells in the mammalian cochlea. This motor protein contributes to outer hair cell motility. At present, it is not clear how the interference of prestin function affects cochlear responses to acoustic overstimulation. To address this question, a genetic model of prestin dysfunction in mice was created by inserting an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-CreERT2-FRT-Neo-FRT cassette into the prestin locus after the stop codon. Homozygous mice exhibit a threshold elevation of auditory brainstem responses with large individual variation. These mice also display a threshold elevation and a shift of the input/output function of the distortion product otoacoustic emission, suggesting a reduction in outer hair cell function. The disruption of prestin function reduces the threshold shifts caused by exposure to a loud noise at 120 dB (sound pressure level) for 1 h. This reduction is positively correlated with the level of pre-noise cochlear dysfunction and is accompanied by a reduced change in Cdh1 expression, suggesting a reduction in molecular responses to the acoustic overstimulation. Together, these results suggest that prestin interference reduces cochlear stress responses to acoustic overstimulation.

  10. Cladodes, leaf-like organs in Asparagus, show the significance of co-option of pre-existing genetic regulatory circuit for morphological diversity of plants.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hokuto; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2012-08-01

    Plants in the genus Asparagus have determinate leaf-like organs called cladodes in the position of leaf axils. Because of their leaf-like morphology, axillary position, and morphological variation, it has been unclear how this unusual organ has evolved and diversified. In the previous study, we have shown that cladodes in the genus Asparagus are modified axillary shoots and proposed a model that cladodes have arisen by co-option and deployment of genetic regulatory circuit (GRC) involved in leaf development. Moreover, we proposed that the alteration of the expression pattern of genes involved in establishment of adaxial/abaxial polarity has led to the morphological diversification from leaf-like to rod-like form of cladodes in the genus. Thus, these results indicated that the co-option and alteration of pre-existing GRC play an important role in acquisition and subsequent morphological diversification. Here, we present data of further expression analysis of A. asparagoides. The results suggested that only a part of the GRC involved in leaf development appears to have been co-opted into cladode development. Based on our study and several examples of the morphological diversification, we briefly discuss the importance of co-option of pre-existing GRC and its genetic modularity in the morphological diversity of plants during evolution.

  11. Pre-existing oblique transfer zones and transfer/transform relationships in continental margins: New insights from the southeastern Gulf of Aden, Socotra Island, Yemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellahsen, N.; Leroy, S.; Autin, J.; Razin, P.; d'Acremont, E.; Sloan, H.; Pik, R.; Ahmed, A.; Khanbari, K.

    2013-11-01

    Transfer zones are ubiquitous features in continental rifts and margins, as are transform faults in oceanic lithosphere. Here, we present a structural study of the Hadibo Transfer Zone (HTZ), located in Socotra Island (Yemen) in the southeastern Gulf of Aden. There, we interpret this continental transfer fault zone to represent a reactivated pre-existing structure. Its trend is oblique to the direction of divergence and it has been active from the early up to the latest stages of rifting. One of the main oceanic fracture zones (FZ), the Hadibo-Sharbithat FZ, is aligned with and appears to be an extension of the HTZ and is probably genetically linked to it. Comparing this setting with observations from other Afro-Arabian rifts as well as with passive margins worldwide, it appears that many continental transfer zones are reactivated pre-existing structures, oblique to divergence. We therefore establish a classification system for oceanic FZ based upon their relationship with syn-rift structures. Type 1 FZ form at syn-rift structures and are late syn-rift to early syn-OCT. Type 2 FZ form during the OCT formation and Type 3 FZ form within the oceanic domain, after the oceanic spreading onset. The latter are controlled by far-field forces, magmatic processes, spreading rates, and oceanic crust rheology.

  12. The Prevalence of Medical Conditions Among U.S. Chinese Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruijia; Simon, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The burden of medical conditions is increasing among U.S. older adults, yet we have very limited knowledge about medical conditions among Chinese older adults in the United States. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of medical conditions and its sociodemographic and health-related correlates within the context of a population-based cohort study of U.S. Chinese older adults. Method. Using a community-based participatory research approach, community-dwelling Chinese older adults aged 60 years and older in the Greater Chicago area were interviewed between 2011 and 2013. Results. Of the 3,159 participants interviewed, 58.9% were female and the mean age was 72.8 years. In total, 84.3% of older adults had one or more medical condition, 24.6% reported two conditions, 19.5% had three conditions, and 17.0% reported four or more conditions. A sizeable percentage of older adults had never been screened for dyslipidemia (24.4%) or had never been screened for diabetes mellitus (35.7%).For those who reported high cholesterol, 73.0% were taking medications when compared with 76.1% of those who reported having diabetes and 88.3% of those who reported having high blood pressure. Various sociodemographic and health-related characteristics were correlated with medical conditions. Conclusion. Medical conditions were common among U.S. Chinese older adults, yet screening and treatment rates were fairly low. Future longitudinal studies should be conducted to better understand the risk and protective factors associated with medical conditions. PMID:25378445

  13. [Medical activities under adverse conditions. Memisa Medicus Mundi].

    PubMed

    Spanjer, J M

    1992-05-01

    The largest medical missionary organization in the Netherlands is Memisa Medicus Mundi. It has been in operation since 1984 when the organization Memisa, founded in 1925 by 2 doctors from Rotterdam and a priest, merged with Medicus Mundi Nederland. 130 of its doctors work in 80 programs mostly in English-speaking Third World countries. The regional representative for East Africa, worst affected by AIDS, related that a number of doctors work in hospitals where more than 1/2 of patients suffer from AIDS. Many doctors do not want to go to Africa because of the AIDS stigma and the lack of professional challenge of caring mainly for victims of 1 disease. Yet increasingly more foreign doctors are needed, as native doctors are often infected themselves. 1992 World Health Organizations data indicate that 1 out of 40 adult Africans is infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In major East African cities the proportion reaches 30% of the adult population. A 1991 visit to Uganda, Tanzania, and Malawi revealed the spectacle of empty villages or inhabited only by children and old people. In Malawi there is 1 doctor for 40,000 people and 1 bed for 600 inhabitants whose average age is 49.3 years for men and 57.2 years for women. The doctors working there stressed prevention, and 1 of them got embroiled in a conflict with the Catholic archbishop because of handing out condoms. Nonetheless, sensitive topics such as sterilization, caesarean section, abortion, euthanasia, and contraception have been addressed to educate the people, since prevention takes precedence over treatment.

  14. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS Requirements for Specialty Hospitals § 482.61 Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. The medical records maintained by a...

  15. The Impact of Medical Conditions on the Support of Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zijlstra, H. P.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of medical conditions of children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities on the professional support they receive in centres for special education. Method: The medical files, the daily records and daily communication records between parents and professionals were reviewed…

  16. 42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations. 410.12 Section 410.12 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI)...

  17. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

  18. Efficacy of Suvaxyn CSF Marker (CP7_E2alf) in the presence of pre-existing antibodies against Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Dräger, Carolin; Schröder, Charlotte; König, Patricia; Tegtmeyer, Birthe; Beer, Martin; Blome, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is still one of the most important viral diseases of pigs worldwide and outbreaks are notifiable to the OIE. The different control options also include (emergency) vaccination, preferably with a vaccine that allows differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA principle). Recently, the chimeric pestivirus "CP7_E2alf" (Suvaxyn® CSF Marker, Zoetis) was licensed as live attenuated marker vaccine by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). In the context of risk assessments for an emergency vaccination scenario, the question has been raised whether pre-existing anti-pestivirus antibodies, especially against the vaccine backbone Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 (BVDV-1), would interfere with "CP7_E2alf" vaccination and the accompanying DIVA diagnostics. To answer this question, a vaccination-challenge-trial was conducted with Suvaxyn® CSF Marker and the "gold-standard" of live-modified CSF vaccines C-strain (RIEMSER® Schweinepestvakzine) as comparator. Pre-existing antibodies against BVDV-1 were provoked in a subset of animals through intramuscular inoculation of a recent field isolate from Germany (two injections with an interval of 2weeks). Twenty-seven days after the first injection, intramuscular vaccination of pre-exposed and naïve animals with either "CP7_E2alf" or C-strain "Riems" was performed. Seven days later, all vaccinated animals and two additional controls were oro-nasally challenged with highly virulent CSF virus (CSFV) strain Koslov. It was demonstrated that pre-existing BVDV-1 antibodies do not impact on the efficacy of live attenuated vaccines against CSF. Both C-strain "Riems" and marker vaccine "CP7_E2alf" were able to confer full protection against highly virulent challenge seven days after vaccination. However, slight interference was seen with serological DIVA diagnostics accompanying the vaccination with CP7_E2alf. Amended sample preparation and combination of test systems was able to resolve most cases

  19. Manganese [III] Tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-Benzoic Acid Porphyrin Reduces Adiposity and Improves Insulin Action in Mice with Pre-Existing Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brestoff, Jonathan R.; Brodsky, Tim; Sosinsky, Alexandra Z.; McLoughlin, Ryan; Stansky, Elena; Fussell, Leila; Sheppard, Aaron; DiSanto-Rose, Maria; Kershaw, Erin E.; Reynolds, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The superoxide dismutase mimetic manganese [III] tetrakis [5,10,15,20]-benzoic acid porphyrin (MnTBAP) is a potent antioxidant compound that has been shown to limit weight gain during short-term high fat feeding without preventing insulin resistance. However, whether MnTBAP has therapeutic potential to treat pre-existing obesity and insulin resistance remains unknown. To investigate this, mice were treated with MnTBAP or vehicle during the last five weeks of a 24-week high fat diet (HFD) regimen. MnTBAP treatment significantly decreased body weight and reduced white adipose tissue (WAT) mass in mice fed a HFD and a low fat diet (LFD). The reduction in adiposity was associated with decreased caloric intake without significantly altering energy expenditure, indicating that MnTBAP decreases adiposity in part by modulating energy balance. MnTBAP treatment also improved insulin action in HFD-fed mice, a physiologic response that was associated with increased protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation and expression in muscle and WAT. Since MnTBAP is a metalloporphyrin molecule, we hypothesized that its ability to promote weight loss and improve insulin sensitivity was regulated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in a similar fashion as cobalt protoporphyrins. Despite MnTBAP treatment increasing HO-1 expression, administration of the potent HO-1 inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) did not block the ability of MnTBAP to alter caloric intake, adiposity, or insulin action, suggesting that MnTBAP influences these metabolic processes independent of HO-1. These data demonstrate that MnTBAP can ameliorate pre-existing obesity and improve insulin action by reducing caloric intake and increasing PKB phosphorylation and expression. PMID:26397111

  20. Early colonoscopy confers survival benefits on colon cancer patients with pre-existing iron deficiency anemia: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chieh-Lin Jerry; Yu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Yi-Huei; Lin, Ching-Heng; Hwang, Wen-Li

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the prognostic significance of pre-existing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and the benefits of early colonoscopy in patients with colon cancer, since these have not been clearly established to date. Using the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, we retrieved and retrospectively reviewed the records of patients aged ≥ 55 years who were diagnosed with colon cancer between 2000 and 2005. The patient cohort was divided into two groups: patients with (n = 1,260) or without (n = 15,912) an IDA diagnosis during ≤ 18 months preceding the date of colon cancer diagnosis. We found that diabetes (27.9% vs. 20.3%, p<0.0001), cardiovascular disease (61.6% vs. 54.7%, p<0.001), and chronic kidney disease (4.6% vs. 2.2%, p<0.0001) were more common among patients with IDA than among those without IDA. The median overall survival times for patients with IDA and those without IDA were 4.6 and 5.7 years, respectively (p = 0.002). Patients who underwent colonoscopy ≤ 30 days, 31-90, and ≥ 91 days after IDA diagnosis showed median overall survival times of 5.79, 4.43, and 4.04 years, respectively (p = 0.003). Delayed colonoscopy was an independent factor associated with poor overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.53; p = 0.01). In conclusion, colon cancer patients with IDA were more likely to experience comorbidities than were those without IDA. Pre-existing IDA was a poor prognostic factor in adult men and postmenopausal women who had colon cancer. Early colonoscopy could improve overall survival possibly by facilitating early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24466209

  1. Enhancing the performance of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic module by encapsulating high efficient Eu3+ complex into its pre-existing EVA layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongxin; Yu, Bo; Hu, Zhijia; Wang, Xin; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin

    2013-03-01

    Luminescent down shifting (LDS) technique is one effective way to improve the poor response of multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules at short wavelength less than 400 nm. Eu3+ complexes are effective LDS species for PV modules due to their large stokes' shift and high luminescent quantum efficiency (LQE). Although Eu3+ complexes have been utilized in PV modules as LDS species widely, they have not been encapsulated into the pre-existing poly-ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) layer of modules between glass and solar cell by now. The aim of our work is to enhance the performance of mc-Si PV modules by encapsulating high efficient Eu3+ complexes into their pre-existing EVA layers which would not modify the well-established manufacturing process for PV modules. In this work, two Eu3+ complexes with different absorption spectrum were encapsulated into the commercial EVA layer by soaking method for the first time and used in the encapsulation of mc-Si PV modules. Hereinto, Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 (TTA = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, TPPO = triphenylphosphine oxide) (EuTT) with absorption spectrum less than 400 nm and high LQE (0.73) improves the external quantum efficiency of mc-Si PV module from 0.05 to 0.20, which produces a 0.42% increases in its power conversion efficiency. In addition, it is found that the enhancement brought by Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 can reduce cost of power generated by mc-Si devices from US1/Wp to US0.98/Wp according to the calculation. Therefore, Eu(TTA)3(TPPO)2 as LDS species with high LQE and low cost is promising for enhancing the performance of mc-Si PV modules in practical application.

  2. Myocardial infarction worsens glomerular injury and microalbuminuria in rats with pre-existing renal impairment accompanied by the activation of ER stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhifeng; Wu, Penglong; Li, Yongguang; Shen, Yuan; Xin, Ping; Li, Shuai; Wang, Zhihua; Dai, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Wei; Wei, Meng

    2014-12-01

    Deterioration of renal function occurs after chronic heart failure in approximately one-third of patients, particularly in those with pre-existing renal impairment such as diabetic nephropathy. Impaired renal function in these patients is always associated with a worse prognosis. However, the mechanisms underlying such deterioration of renal function are still largely unknown. In three separate protocols, we compared 1) sham operation (Ctr, n = 10) with surgically induced myocardial infarction (MI, n = 10); 2) unilateral nephrectomy (UNX, n = 10) with UNX + MI (n = 10); and 3) STZ-induced type 1 diabetes (DB, n = 10) with DB + MI (n = 10). The differences between combined injury models (UNX + MI, DB + MI) and simple MI were also examined. Renal remodeling, function, ER stress (CHOP and GRP78) and inflammation (infiltration of inflammatory cells, NF-κB p65) were evaluated 12 weeks after MI. In common SD rats, MI activated less glomerular ER stress and inflammation, resulting in a minor change of glomerular remodeling and microalbuminuria. However, MI significantly increased the glomerular expression of GRP78 and CHOP in UNX and DB rats. In addition, it also promoted the infiltration of CD4+ T cells, particularly inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-4)-producing CD4+ T cells, and the expression of NF-κB p65 in the glomeruli. By contrast, significant glomerular fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis, podocyte injury and microalbuminuria were found in rats with UNX + MI and DB + MI. MI significantly increased chronic glomerular injury and microalbuminuria at 12 weeks in rats with pre-existing renal impairment, i.e., UNX and DB, but not common SD rats. These changes were accompanied by increased glomerular ER stress and immune-associated inflammation.

  3. Bovine adenoviral vector-based H5N1 influenza vaccine overcomes exceptionally high levels of pre-existing immunity against human adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Pandey, Aseem; Jayashankar, Lakshmi; Mittal, Suresh K

    2008-05-01

    Because of the high prevalence of adenovirus (Ad) infections in humans, it is believed that pre-existing Ad-neutralizing antibodies (vector immunity) may negatively impact the immune response to vaccine antigens when delivered by human Ad (HAd) vectors. In order to evaluate whether bovine Ad subtype 3 (BAd3), a non-HAd vector, can effectively elude high levels of pre-existing vector immunity, naïve and HAd serotype 5 (HAd)-primed mice were immunized with BAd-H5HA [BAd3 vector expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H5N1 influenza virus]. Even in the presence of very high levels of HAd-specific neutralizing antibody, no significant reductions in HA-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were observed in HAd-primed mice immunized with BAd-H5HA. In naïve mice immunized with HAd-H5HA (HAd5 vector expressing H5N1 HA) and boosted with BAd-H5HA, the humoral responses elicited were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than with either HAd-H5HA or BAd-H5HA alone, while the CMI responses were comparable in the groups. This finding underlines the importance of a heterologous prime-boost approach for achieving an enhanced immune response. The immunization of naïve or HAd-primed mice with BAd-H5HA bestowed full protection from morbidity and mortality following a potentially lethal challenge with A/Hong Kong/483/97. These results demonstrate the importance of BAd vectors as an alternate or supplement to HAd vectors for influenza pandemic preparedness.

  4. A distinct pre-existing inflammatory tumour microenvironment is associated with chemotherapy resistance in high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koti, M; Siu, A; Clément, I; Bidarimath, M; Turashvili, G; Edwards, A; Rahimi, K; Masson, A-M M; Squire, J A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy resistance is a major determinant of poor overall survival rates in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). We have previously shown that gene expression alterations affecting the NF-κB pathway characterise chemotherapy resistance in HGSC, suggesting that the regulation of an immune response may be associated with this phenotype. Methods: Given that intrinsic drug resistance pre-exists and is governed by both tumour and host factors, the current study was performed to examine the cross-talk between tumour inflammatory microenvironment and cancer cells, and their roles in mediating differential chemotherapy response in HGSC patients. Expression profiling of a panel of 184 inflammation-related genes was performed in 15 chemoresistant and 19 chemosensitive HGSC tumours using the NanoString nCounter platform. Results: A total of 11 significantly differentially expressed genes were found to distinguish the two groups. As STAT1 was the most significantly differentially expressed gene (P=0.003), we validated the expression of STAT1 protein by immunohistochemistry using an independent cohort of 183 (52 resistant and 131 sensitive) HGSC cases on a primary tumour tissue microarray. Relative expression levels were subjected to Kaplan–Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression models. Conclusions: This study confirms that higher STAT1 expression is significantly associated with increased progression-free survival and that this protein together with other mediators of tumour–host microenvironment can be applied as a novel response predictive biomarker in HGSC. Furthermore, an overall underactive immune microenvironment suggests that the pre-existing state of the tumour immune microenvironment could determine response to chemotherapy in HGSC. PMID:25826225

  5. Vaccines expressing the innate immune modulator EAT-2 elicit potent effector memory T lymphocyte responses despite pre-existing vaccine immunity.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser Ali; Seregin, Sergey S; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Rastall, David P W; Liu, Chyong-Jy J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The mixed results from recent vaccine clinical trials targeting HIV-1 justify the need to enhance the potency of HIV-1 vaccine platforms in general. Use of first-generation recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) platforms failed to protect vaccinees from HIV-1 infection. One hypothesis is that the rAd5-based vaccine failed due to the presence of pre-existing Ad5 immunity in many vaccines. We recently confirmed that EAT-2-expressing rAd5 vectors uniquely activate the innate immune system and improve cellular immune responses against rAd5-expressed Ags, inclusive of HIV/Gag. In this study, we report that use of the rAd5-EAT-2 vaccine can also induce potent cellular immune responses to HIV-1 Ags despite the presence of Ad5-specific immunity. Compared to controls expressing a mutant SH2 domain form of EAT-2, Ad5 immune mice vaccinated with an rAd5-wild-type EAT-2 HIV/Gag-specific vaccine formulation significantly facilitated the induction of several arms of the innate immune system. These responses positively correlated with an improved ability of the vaccine to induce stronger effector memory T cell-biased, cellular immune responses to a coexpressed Ag despite pre-existing anti-Ad5 immunity. Moreover, inclusion of EAT-2 in the vaccine mixture improves the generation of polyfunctional cytolytic CD8(+) T cell responses as characterized by enhanced production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, cytotoxic degranulation, and increased in vivo cytolytic activity. These data suggest a new approach whereby inclusion of EAT-2 expression in stringent human vaccination applications can provide a more effective vaccine against HIV-1 specifically in Ad5 immune subjects.

  6. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director. 494.150 Section 494.150 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE FOR END-STAGE...

  7. Factors associated with a patient-centered medical home among children with behavioral health conditions.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Woodworth, Lindsey; Fernandez-Baca, Daniel; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Thompson, Lindsay; Hinojosa, Melanie

    2013-11-01

    At some point in their lives, nearly one-half of all American children will have a behavioral health condition. Many will not receive the care they need from a fragmented health delivery system. The patient-centered medical home is a promising model to improve their care; however, little evidence exists. Our study aim was to examine the association between several behavioral health indicators and having a patient-centered medical home. 91,642 children's parents or guardians completed the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. An indicator for patient-centered medical home was included in the dataset. Descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, and multivariate regression models were used in the analyses. Children in the sample were mostly Male (52 %), White (78 %), non-Hispanic (87 %), and did not have a special health care need (80 %). 6.2 % of the sample had at least one behavioral health condition. Conditions ranged from ADHD (6 %) to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (1 %). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home also varied for children with a behavioral health condition (49 % of children with ADHD and 33 % of children with ASD). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home decreased with multiple behavioral health conditions. Higher severity of depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder were associated with a decreased likelihood of a patient-centered medical home. Results from our study can be used to target patient-centered medical home interventions toward children with one or more behavioral health conditions and consider that children with depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder are more vulnerable to these disparities.

  8. Self-Medication of Somatic and Psychiatric Conditions Using Botanical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Lauritsen, Kirstin J; Cross, Nicole; Davis, Alan K; Rosenberg, Harold; Bonadio, Francis; Lang, Brent

    2015-01-01

    As a complement to research evaluating botanical marijuana as a medical therapy for various somatic and psychiatric conditions, there is a growing body of research assessing marijuana users' self-reports of the symptoms and conditions for which they use marijuana without a physician's recommendation. As part of two larger web-based surveys and one in-situ survey at an outdoor marijuana festival, we asked regular marijuana users if they consumed the drug without a physician's recommendation and, if so, to describe (or select from a checklist) the conditions for which they used marijuana as a medication. Participants reported using marijuana to self-medicate a wide variety of both somatic conditions (such as pain, diabetes, and irritable bowel syndrome) and psychiatric conditions (such as depression, anxiety, and insomnia). Because fewer than half of the American states, and only a few countries, allow physicians to recommend medicinal marijuana, these findings may be of interest to clinicians as they treat patients, to lawmakers and policymakers as they consider legislation allowing physicians to recommend botanical marijuana for somatic and psychiatric conditions, and to researchers evaluating conditions that individuals elect to self-medicate using botanical marijuana.

  9. [The main ways of improvement of medical support of the Air Forces in modern conditions].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Grebeniuk, A N; Lizogub, I N

    2014-02-01

    Blaginin A.A., Grebenyuk A.N., Lizogub LN. - The main ways of improvement of medical support of the Air Forces in modern conditions. Aircrew conducting active hostilities suffers from the whole spectrum of factors and conditions of the combat situation. The main task for the medical service of the Air Force is to carry out preventive and curative action for aviation specialists who are responsible for the combat capability of aircraft formations. The medical service of the Air Force must have forces and facilities for planning, organization and implementation of the treatment of lightly wounded and sick aviation professionals with short periods of recovery, medical rehabilitation of aircrew qfter suffering injuries, diseases, sanatorium therapy of aircrew with partial failure of health, outpatient and inpatient medical examination aircrew - flight commissions, preventive rest of aviation specialists with symptoms of chronic fatigue. Should be trained aviation physicians, including both basic military medical education and in-depth study of the medical aspects of various fields of personnel of the Air Force. PMID:25046924

  10. An Integral Effects Test in a zion-like geometry to investigate the effects of pre-existing hydrogen on direct containment heating in the Surtsey Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M. ); Nichols, R.T. )

    1993-01-01

    The sixth experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-6) series was conducted to investigate the effects of high pressure melt ejection on direct containment heating. Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limitor plate with a 4-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The cavity contained 3.48 kg of water, which corresponds to condensate levels in the Zion plant, and the containment basement floor was dry. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten thermite was ejected by steam at an initial pressure of 6.3 MPa into the reactor cavity. The Surtsey vessel atmosphere contained pre-existing hydrogen to represent partial oxidation of the zirconium in the Zion core. The initial composition of the vessel atmosphere was 87.1 mol.% N[sub 2], 9.79 mol.% O[sub 2], and 2.59 mol.% H[sub 2], and the initial absolute pressure was 198 kPa. A partial hydrogen burn occurred in the Surtsey vessel. The peak vessel pressure increase was 279 kPa in IET-6, compared to 246 kPa in the IET-3 test. The total debris mass ejected into the Surtsey vessel in IET-6 was 42.5 kg. The gas grab sample analysis indicated that there were 180 g[center dot] moles of pre-existing hydrogen, and that 308[center dot]moles of hydrogen were produced by steam/metal reactions. About 335 g[center dot]moles of hydrogen burned, and 153 g[center dot]moles remained unreacted.

  11. Modelling Estimates of Norovirus Disease in Patients with Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Thomas; Jiang, Baoguo; Weil, John G.; Lin, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The burden of disease due to norovirus infection has been well described in the general United States population, but studies of norovirus occurrence among persons with chronic medical conditions have been limited mostly to the immunocompromised. We assessed the impact of norovirus gastroenteritis on health care utilization in US subjects with a range of chronic medical conditions. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using MarketScan data from July 2002 to December 2013, comparing the rates of emergency department visits, outpatient visits and hospitalizations among patients with chronic conditions (renal, cardiovascular, respiratory, immunocompromising, gastrointestinal, hepatic/pancreatic and neurological conditions and diabetes) with those in a healthy population. We estimated the rates of these outcomes due to norovirus gastroenteritis using an indirect modelling approach whereby cases of gastroenteritis of unknown cause and not attributed to a range of other causes were assumed to be due to norovirus. Results Hospitalization rates for norovirus gastroenteritis were higher in all of the risk groups analyzed compared with data in otherwise healthy subjects, ranging from 3.2 per 10,000 person-years in persons with chronic respiratory conditions, to 23.1 per 10,000 person-years in persons with chronic renal conditions, compared to 2.1 per 10,000 among persons without chronic conditions. Over 51% of all norovirus hospitalizations occurred in the 37% of the population with some form of chronic medical condition. Outpatient visits for norovirus gastroenteritis were also increased in persons with chronic gastrointestinal or immunocompromising conditions. Conclusion Norovirus gastroenteritis leads to significantly higher rates of healthcare utilization in patients with a chronic medical condition compared to patients without any such condition. PMID:27438335

  12. Prevalence of chronic medical conditions among inmates in the Texas prison system.

    PubMed

    Harzke, Amy J; Baillargeon, Jacques G; Pruitt, Sandi L; Pulvino, John S; Paar, David P; Kelley, Michael F

    2010-05-01

    Given the rapid growth and aging of the US prison population in recent years, the disease profile and health care needs of inmates portend to have far-reaching public health implications. Although numerous studies have examined infectious disease prevalence and treatment in incarcerated populations, little is known about the prevalence of non-infectious chronic medical conditions in US prison populations. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of selected non-infectious chronic medical conditions among inmates in the Texas prison system. The study population consisted of the total census of inmates who were incarcerated in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice for any duration from September 1, 2006 through August 31, 2007 (N=234,031). Information on medical diagnoses was obtained from a system-wide electronic medical record system. Overall crude prevalence estimates for the selected conditions were as follows: hypertension, 18.8%; asthma, 5.4%; diabetes, 4.2%; ischemic heart disease, 1.7%; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 0.96%; and cerebrovascular disease, 0.23%. Nearly one quarter (24.5%) of the study population had at least one of the selected conditions. Except for asthma, crude prevalence estimates of the selected conditions increased monotonically with age. Nearly two thirds (64.6%) of inmates who were >or=55 years of age had at least one of the selected conditions. Except for diabetes, crude prevalence estimates for the selected conditions were lower among Hispanic inmates than among non-Hispanic White inmates and African American inmates. Although age-standardized prevalence estimates for the selected conditions did not appear to exceed age-standardized estimates from the US general population, a large number of inmates were affected by one or more of these conditions. As the prison population continues to grow and to age, the burden of these conditions on correctional and community health care systems can be expected to increase

  13. Effects of blending of desalinated and conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and its release from corroding surfaces and pre-existing scales.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Schonberger, Kenneth D; Peng, Ching-Yu; Ferguson, John F; Desormeaux, Erik; Meyerhofer, Paul; Luckenbach, Heidi; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-07-01

    This study examined effects of blending desalinated water with conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and release from corroding metal surfaces and pre-existing scales exposed to waters having varying fractions of desalinated water, alkalinities, pH values and orthophosphate levels. The presence of desalinated water resulted in markedly decreased 0.45 μm-filtered soluble iron concentrations. However, higher fractions of desalinated water in the blends were also associated with more fragile corroding surfaces, lower retention of iron oxidation products and release of larger iron particles in the bulk water. SEM, XRD and XANES data showed that in surface water, a dense layer of amorphous ferrihydrite phase predominated in the corrosion products. More crystalline surface phases developed in the presence of desalinated water. These solid phases transformed from goethite to lepidocrocite with increased fraction of desalinated water. These effects are likely to result from a combination of chemical parameters, notably variations of the concentrations of natural organic matter, calcium, chloride and sulfate when desalinated and conventionally treated waters are blended.

  14. A critical shock mach number for particle acceleration in the absence of pre-existing cosmic rays: M=√5

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2014-01-10

    It is shown that, under some generic assumptions, shocks cannot accelerate particles unless the overall shock Mach number exceeds a critical value M>√5. The reason is that for M≤√5 the work done to compress the flow in a particle precursor requires more enthalpy flux than the system can sustain. This lower limit applies to situations without significant magnetic field pressure. In case that the magnetic field pressure dominates the pressure in the unshocked medium, i.e., for low plasma beta, the resistivity of the magnetic field makes it even more difficult to fulfill the energetic requirements for the formation of shock with an accelerated particle precursor and associated compression of the upstream plasma. We illustrate the effects of magnetic fields for the extreme situation of a purely perpendicular magnetic field configuration with plasma beta β = 0, which gives a minimum Mach number of M = 5/2. The situation becomes more complex, if we incorporate the effects of pre-existing cosmic rays, indicating that the additional degree of freedom allows for less strict Mach number limits on acceleration. We discuss the implications of this result for low Mach number shock acceleration as found in solar system shocks, and shocks in clusters of galaxies.

  15. Lack of variant specific CD8+ T-cell response against mutant and pre-existing variants leads to outgrowth of particular clones in acute hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CTL escape mutations have been described during acute hepatitis C in patients who developed chronic disease later on. Our aim was to investigate the mutual relationship between HCV specific CD8+ T cells and evolution of the viral sequence during early acute HCV infection. Results We sequenced multiple clones of NS3 1406 epitope in 4 HLA-A*02 patients with acute hepatitis C genotype 1b infection. Pentamers specific for the variants were used to monitor the corresponding CD8+ T cell response. We observed outgrowth of mutations, which induced only a weak and thus potentially insufficient CD8+ T cell response. In one patient we observed outgrowth of variant epitopes with similarities to a different genotype rather than de novo mutations most probably due to a lack of responsiveness to these likely pre-existing variants. We could show that in acute hepatitis C CTL escape mutations occur much earlier than demonstrated in previous studies. Conclusions The adaption of the virus to a new host is characterized by a high and rapid variability in epitopes under CD8+ T cell immune pressure. This adaption takes place during the very early phase of acute infection and strikingly some sequences were reduced below the limit of detection at some time points but were detected at high frequency again at later time points. Independent of the observed variability, HCV-specific CD8+ T cell responses decline and no adaption to different or new antigens during the course of infection could be detected. PMID:24073713

  16. Pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies to avian influenza H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 in US military personnel.

    PubMed

    Pichyangkul, Sathit; Krasaesub, Somporn; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Thitithanyanont, Arunee; Wiboon-Ut, Suwimon; Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Khemnu, Nuanpan; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Garcia, Jean-Michel; Mason, Carl J; Walsh, Douglas S; Saunders, David L

    2014-01-01

    We studied cross-reactive antibodies against avian influenza H5N1 and 2009 pandemic (p) H1N1 in 200 serum samples from US military personnel collected before the H1N1 pandemic. Assays used to measure antibodies against viral proteins involved in protection included a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay and a neuraminidase inhibition (NI) assay. Viral neutralization by antibodies against avian influenza H5N1 and 2009 pH1N1 was assessed by influenza (H5) pseudotyped lentiviral particle-based and H1N1 microneutralization assays. Some US military personnel had cross-neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 (14%) and 2009 pH1N1 (16.5%). The odds of having cross-neutralizing antibodies against 2009 pH1N1 were 4.4 times higher in subjects receiving more than five inactivated whole influenza virus vaccinations than those subjects with no record of vaccination. Although unclear if the result of prior vaccination or disease exposure, these pre-existing antibodies may prevent or reduce disease severity.

  17. Immunogenicity and Safety of Trivalent Split Influenza Vaccine in Healthy Korean Adults with Low Pre-Existing Antibody Levels: An Open Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kyuri; Han, Seunghoon; Hong, Taegon; Jeon, Sangil; Paek, Jeongki; Kang, Jin Han

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A phase I clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of newly developed egg-cultivated trivalent inactivated split influenza vaccine (TIV) in Korea. Materials and Methods The TIV was administered to 43 healthy male adults. Subjects with high pre-existing titers were excluded in a screening step. Immune response was measured by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Results The seroprotection rates against A/California/7/2009 (H1N1), A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2) and B/Brisbane/60/2009 were 74.42% [95% confidence interval (CI): 61.38–87.46], 72.09% (95% CI: 58.69–85.50), and 86.05% (95% CI: 75.69–96.40), respectively. Calculated seroconversion rates were 74.42% (95% CI: 61.38–87.46), 74.42% (95% CI: 61.38–87.46), and 79.07% (95% CI: 66.91–91.23), respectively. There were 25 episodes of solicited local adverse events in 21 subjects (47.73%), 21 episodes of solicited general adverse events in 16 subjects (36.36%) and 5 episodes of unsolicited adverse events in 5 subjects (11.36%). All adverse events were grade 1 or 2 and disappeared within three days. Conclusion The immunogenicity and safety of TIV established in this phase I trial are sufficient to plan a larger scale clinical trial. PMID:27593862

  18. Effects of blending of desalinated and conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and its release from corroding surfaces and pre-existing scales.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Schonberger, Kenneth D; Peng, Ching-Yu; Ferguson, John F; Desormeaux, Erik; Meyerhofer, Paul; Luckenbach, Heidi; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-07-01

    This study examined effects of blending desalinated water with conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and release from corroding metal surfaces and pre-existing scales exposed to waters having varying fractions of desalinated water, alkalinities, pH values and orthophosphate levels. The presence of desalinated water resulted in markedly decreased 0.45 μm-filtered soluble iron concentrations. However, higher fractions of desalinated water in the blends were also associated with more fragile corroding surfaces, lower retention of iron oxidation products and release of larger iron particles in the bulk water. SEM, XRD and XANES data showed that in surface water, a dense layer of amorphous ferrihydrite phase predominated in the corrosion products. More crystalline surface phases developed in the presence of desalinated water. These solid phases transformed from goethite to lepidocrocite with increased fraction of desalinated water. These effects are likely to result from a combination of chemical parameters, notably variations of the concentrations of natural organic matter, calcium, chloride and sulfate when desalinated and conventionally treated waters are blended. PMID:23651514

  19. Temporary Increases in Problem Behavior and Sleep Disruption Following Decreases in Medication: A Descriptive Analysis of Conditional Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John T.; Swanson, Greg; Dornbusch, Kaitlin

    2007-01-01

    Conditional rates of problem behavior for weeks that followed medication decreases and no medication changes were compared for 12 individuals who exhibited severe problem behavior (e.g., self-injury, aggression). The results indicate that conditional rates of problem behavior were higher following medication decreases than following no changes in…

  20. Exploring Knowledge and Attitudes Related to Pregnancy and Preconception Health in Women with Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Velott, Diana L.; Weisman, Carol S.

    2010-01-01

    Women with chronic medical conditions are at increased risk for pregnancy-related complications, yet little research has addressed how women with diabetes, hypertension, and obesity perceive their pregnancy-associated risks or make reproductive health decisions. Focus groups were conducted with 72 non-pregnant women stratified by chronic condition (diabetes, hypertension, obesity) and by previous live birth. Participants discussed their intention for future pregnancy, preconception health optimization, perceived risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, and contraceptive beliefs. Four major themes were identified, with some variation across medical conditions and parity: (1) Knowledge about pregnancy risks related to chronic medical conditions was limited; (2) Pregnancy intentions were affected by diabetes and hypertension, (3) Knowledge about optimizing preconception health was limited; and (4) Lack of control over ability to avoid unintended pregnancy, including limited knowledge about how medical conditions might affect contraceptive choices. Women with diabetes and hypertension, but not obesity, were generally aware of increased risk for pregnancy complications, and often expressed less intention for future pregnancy as a result. However, diabetic and hypertensive women had little knowledge about the specific complications they were at risk for, even among those who had previously experienced pregnancy complications. Neither chronic condition nor perceived risk ensured intent to engage in preconception health promotion. We observed knowledge deficits about pregnancy-related risks in women with diabetes, hypertension, and obesity, as well as lack of intent to engage in preconception health promotion and pregnancy planning. These findings have important implications for the development of preconception care for women with chronic medical conditions. PMID:19760164

  1. Assessing health conditions and medication use among the homeless community in Long Beach, California

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Mok Thoong; Yamaki, Jason; Harwood, Megan; d'Assalenaux, Richard; Rosenberg, Ettie; Aruoma, Okezie; Bishayee, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Persons experiencing homelessness are a vulnerable population and are at increased risk for morbidity and all-cause mortality compared to the general population. This study sought to evaluate medication use, regular physician visits, and identify health conditions among the homeless population of Long Beach, California. Methods: Two “brown bag” medication review events were held at homeless shelters in the Long Beach area. Demographic information, medication use, and comorbid disease states were obtained through surveys. Findings: Three-fourths of the cohort (95 participants) consisted of males, and the average age of participants was 48 years. Psychiatric disorders and cardiovascular disease were the most common disease states reported at 32% and 46%, respectively and so were medications used in treating these chronic diseases. Medication adherence was found to be a significant problem in this population, where more than 30% of patients were nonadherent to medications for chronic diseases. Furthermore, foot problems, hearing and vision difficulties constitute the most commonly overlooked health problems within the homeless population. Conclusion: Based on this and other similar finding, we must accept that the homeless represent a vulnerable population, and that because of this fact, more programs should be focused at improving availability and access to health care among the homeless. Regarding the high number of reported health problems in the study, more studies are needed and more studies should incorporate screening for foot, hearing, and vision issues, both to increase awareness and to provide an opportunity for devising possible solutions to these highly preventable conditions. PMID:25114938

  2. The professional medical ethics model of decision making under conditions of clinical uncertainty.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Laurence B

    2013-02-01

    The professional medical ethics model of decision making may be applied to decisions clinicians and patients make under the conditions of clinical uncertainty that exist when evidence is low or very low. This model uses the ethical concepts of medicine as a profession, the professional virtues of integrity and candor and the patient's virtue of prudence, the moral management of medical uncertainty, and trial of intervention. These features combine to justifiably constrain clinicians' and patients' autonomy with the goal of preventing nondeliberative decisions of patients and clinicians. To prevent biased recommendations by the clinician that promote such nondeliberative decisions, medically reasonable alternatives supported by low or very low evidence should be offered but not recommended. The professional medical ethics model of decision making aims to improve the quality of decisions by reducing the unacceptable variation that can result from nondeliberative decision making by patients and clinicians when evidence is low or very low.

  3. Enabling the Education of Pupils with Medical Conditions. SCRE Spotlights 75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Closs, Alison; Norris, Claire

    The duties and responsibilities of education authorities and schools in Scotland with regard to pupils who are absent for health reasons are unclear in comparison to other UK countries. This study examined in-school and out-of-school learning contexts for Scottish pupils, ages 5 through 18 years, with medical conditions of sufficient severity and…

  4. Academic and Family Conditions Associated with Intrinsic Academic Motivation in Japanese Medical Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabea, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Intrinsic academic motivation is one of the most important psychological concepts in education, and it is related to academic outcomes in medical students. This study examined the relationships between academic and family conditions and intrinsic academic motivation. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: The study group consisted of…

  5. Coping and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents with a Chronic Medical Condition: A Search for Intervention Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to find relevant coping factors for the development of psychological intervention programs for adolescents with a chronic medical condition. A wide range of coping techniques were studied, including cognitive coping, behavioral coping and goal adjustment coping. A total of 176 adolescents participated. They were…

  6. Coping with Teasing: A Program for Children Teased Due to Their Medical Condition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ruanna MacDougall; Young, Loretta; Williams, Margaret; Bagley-Young, Abigail

    2001-01-01

    Describes a day-long group program to help children with medical conditions deal with teasing and to increase self-confidence. Reports preliminary program evaluation results, indicating that most children retained the knowledge skills acquired in the program and appeared to be using these effectively in coping with teasing 12 to 16 weeks later.…

  7. Epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Portugal: Prevalence, Clinical Characterization, and Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Guiomar; Ataide, Assuncao; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa S.; Coutinho, Ana Margarida; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Goncalves, Esmeralda; Lopes, Nazare Mendes; Rodrigues, Vitor; Carmona da Mota, Henrique; Vicente, Astrid Moura

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identify its clinical characterization, and medical conditions in a paediatric population in Portugal. A school survey was conducted in elementary schools, targeting 332 808 school-aged children in the mainland and 10 910 in the Azores islands.…

  8. Evaluation of treatment effects in obese children with co-morbid medical or psychiatric conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for effective treatments for pediatric overweight is well known. We evaluated the applicability of an evidence-based treatment in an applied clinic setting that includes children with severe obesity and comorbid medical or psychiatric conditions. Forty-eight overweight children and their fa...

  9. Comorbid conditions are associated with healthcare utilization, medical charges and mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang-Ming; Han, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to examine the associations between comorbid conditions and healthcare utilization, medical charges, or mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nebraska state emergency department (ED) discharge, hospital discharge, and death certificate data from 2007 to 2012 were used to study the comorbid conditions of patients with RA. RA was defined using the standard International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM 714 or ICD-10-CM M05, M06, and M08). There were more comorbid conditions in patients with RA than in patients without RA. Comorbid conditions were majorly related to healthcare utilization and mortality of patients with RA. In addition to injury, fracture, sprains, and strains, symptoms of cardiovascular and digestive systems, respiratory infection, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were common comorbid conditions for ED visits. In addition to joint replacement and fracture, infections, COPD and cardiovascular comorbidities were common comorbid conditions for hospitalizations. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory comorbidities, dementia, malignant neoplasm, and diabetes mellitus were common comorbid conditions for deaths of patients with RA. In addition, the numbers of comorbid conditions were significantly associated with the length of hospital stay and hospital charges for patients with RA. The findings in this study indicated that comorbid conditions are associated with healthcare utilization, medical charges, and mortality of patients with RA. PMID:27106546

  10. Medical and Obstetric Complications among Pregnant Women Aged 45 and Older

    PubMed Central

    Grotegut, Chad A.; Chisholm, Christian A.; Johnson, Lauren N. C.; Brown, Haywood L.; Heine, R. Phillips; James, Andra H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The number of women aged 45 and older who become pregnant is increasing. The objective of this study was to estimate the risk of medical and obstetric complications among women aged 45 and older. Methods The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify pregnant woman during admission for delivery. Deliveries were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9-CM) codes. Using ICD-9-CM codes, pre-existing medical conditions and medical and obstetric complications were identified in women at the time of delivery and were compared for women aged 45 years and older to women under age 35. Outcomes among women aged 35–44 were also compared to women under age 35 to determine if women in this group demonstrated intermediate risk between the older and younger groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for pre-existing medical conditions and medical and obstetric complications for both older groups relative to women under 35. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were also developed for outcomes at delivery among older women, while controlling for pre-existing medical conditions, multiple gestation, and insurance status, to determine the effect of age on the studied outcomes. Results Women aged 45 and older had higher adjusted odds for death, transfusion, myocardial infarction/ischemia, cardiac arrest, acute heart failure, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, acute renal failure, cesarean delivery, gestational diabetes, fetal demise, fetal chromosomal anomaly, and placenta previa compared to women under 35. Conclusion Pregnant women aged 45 and older experience significantly more medical and obstetric complications and are more likely to die at the time of a delivery than women under age 35, though the absolute risks are low and these events are rare. Further research is needed to determine what associated factors among pregnant women aged 45 and older may

  11. Reservoir Stimulation Experiments at the Grimsel Test Site: Stress Measurements using Hydraulic fracturing, Hydraulic Tests on Pre-existing Fractures and Overcoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetsch, J.; Gischig, V.; Amann, F.; Madonna, C.; Jalali, M.; Valley, B.; Evans, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    A decameter-scale in-situ hydraulic stimulation and circulation experiment has been planned in the Deep Underground rock Laboratory (DUG Lab) at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland. The general objective of this experiment is to improve our understanding of the pressure, temperature and stress changes in the rock mass due to hydraulic stimulation. In this context, the main goal is to investigate the effect of hydro-shearing on the local stress variation as well as transient and permanent permeability changes with comprehensive thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and acoustic emission monitoring. This experiment is designed such that stimulation processes are recorded in a dataset that is unique in THM coupled processes and induced seismicity research. In preparation to the hydro-shearing experiments, the experimental rock volume has been studied in detail using geological tunnel mapping, optical televiewer in existing boreholes, hydraulic tests, geophysical imaging and review of the extensive literature on experiments at the Grimsel Test Site. The geophysical investigations include reflection and transmission ground penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic measurements between the tunnels to image shear zones and reveal heterogeneity of the rock mass. The orientation and magnitude of the principal stresses of the rock volume and its surroundings has been analyzed using hydraulic fracturing, hydraulic tests on pre-existing fractures and overcoring. The hydraulic fracturing tests for stress measurements were monitored using a 32-channel acoustic emission monitoring system and a regional seismic monitoring network. Here, we present the results of the pre-investigations and stress measurements, and give an outlook for the hydro-shearing experiments planned for spring 2016.

  12. Mechanical Behavior of Brittle Rock-Like Specimens with Pre-existing Fissures Under Uniaxial Loading: Experimental Studies and Particle Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ri-hong; Cao, Ping; Lin, Hang; Pu, Cheng-zhi; Ou, Ke

    2016-03-01

    Joints and fissures with similar orientation or characteristics are common in natural rocks; the inclination and density of the fissures affect the mechanical properties and failure mechanism of the rock mass. However, the strength, crack coalescence pattern, and failure mode of rock specimens containing multi-fissures have not been studied comprehensively. In this paper, combining similar material testing and discrete element numerical method (PFC2D), the peak strength and failure characteristics of rock-like materials with multi-fissures are explored. Rock-like specimens were made of cement and sand and pre-existing fissures created by inserting steel shims into cement mortar paste and removing them during curing. The peak strength of multi-fissure specimens depends on the fissure angle α (which is measured counterclockwise from horizontal) and fissure number ( N f). Under uniaxial compressional loading, the peak strength increased with increasing α. The material strength was lowest for α = 25°, and highest for α = 90°. The influence of N f on the peak strength depended on α. For α = 25° and 45°, N f had a strong effect on the peak strength, while for higher α values, especially for the 90° sample, there were no obvious changes in peak strength with different N f. Under uniaxial compression, the coalescence modes between the fissures can be classified into three categories: S-mode, T-mode, and M-mode. Moreover, the failure mode can be classified into four categories: mixed failure, shear failure, stepped path failure, and intact failure. The failure mode of the specimen depends on α and N f. The peak strength and failure modes in the numerically simulated and experimental results are in good agreement.

  13. Paraoxonase 1 gene transfer lowers vascular oxidative stress and improves vasomotor function in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice with pre-existing atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Guns, P-J; Van Assche, T; Verreth, W; Fransen, P; Mackness, B; Mackness, M; Holvoet, P; Bult, H

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Transgenesis of human paraoxonase 1 (PON1), a HDL-associated enzyme that destroys lipid peroxides, has been reported to reduce early atherogenesis in mice. The present study explored the therapeutic potential of human PON1 gene transfer in old apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice with advanced atherosclerosis. Experimental approach: ApoE−/− mice (18 months, regular chow) were transfected with PON1 adenovirus (AdPON1, n=10) or control adenovirus (AdRR5, n=10). Non-transfected apoE−/− (n=9) and C57Bl/6J (WT, n=6) mice served as controls. Three weeks later, plaque size and composition, and endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) function were assessed in the aorta. Key results: PON1 gene transfer raised total PON1 serum activity 13-15 fold during the 3-week study period, without affecting hypercholesterolaemia or lesion size. However, PON1 decreased the oxLDL content of the plaque. Plaque-free thoracic aorta rings from apoE−/− mice displayed, like rings from WT mice, complete relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh, 86±2%), ATP (90±2%) or UTP (83±3%). In contrast, in plaque-bearing segments amplitude (55±7%, 68±8%, 52±8% respectively) and sensitivity were decreased. EC function was completely (ATP, UTP) or largely (ACh) restored by AdPON1. Furthermore, apoE−/− SMCs released less intracellular calcium than WT upon sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) inhibition by cyclopiazonic acid. This defect was also restored by AdPON1 transfection. Conclusions and implications: These data indicate that AdPON1 gene transfer improved vascular wall oxidative stress, EC function, and SMC Ca2+ homeostasis in segments with pre-existing atherosclerosis, independently of an effect on plaque size. PMID:18059326

  14. Career preferences under conditions of medical unemployment. The case of interns in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Frenk, J

    1985-04-01

    This article presents a multivariate analysis of the career preferences of 923 Mexican interns. Such preferences were operationalized along two dimensions: type of activity (general/family practice, primary specialties, or subspecialties) and type of institution (public assistance, social security, or private). There were six independent variables: father's occupation, father's education, type of medical school, place of internship, assimilation to the internship hospital, and perception of the medical labor market. The appearance in recent years of unemployment and underemployment among Mexican physicians made labor market issues particularly salient. Thus the study offered an appropriate occasion to test the relative strengths of alternative explanations of career choice that are based on social mobility, professional socialization, or responses to labor market signals. Results obtained through multiple regression revealed that the most important variable in the determination of activity preference was medical school, although the two social origin variables retained the important role of directing students into different schools. With regard to institution preference, the most important factor was shown to be place of internship, as it interacted with the level of assimilation to the hospital. Although perception of the medical labor market was a significant predictor of both dimensions of career preference, the greater importance of the other variables indicated that, even under extreme conditions of medical unemployment, explanations of career choice must go beyond simple models of rational decisionmaking to include the experiences that socialize future physicians into dominant paradigms about medical practice. PMID:3990388

  15. Twenty-five additional cases of trisomy 9 mosaic: Birth information, medical conditions, and developmental status.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Deborah A; Campbell, Emily

    2015-05-01

    Limited literature exists on children and adults diagnosed with the mosaic form of trisomy 9. Data from the Tracking Rare Incidence Syndromes (TRIS) project has provided physical characteristics and medical conditions for 14 individuals. This article provides TRIS Survey results of 25 additional cases at two data points (birth and survey completion) as well as developmental status. Results confirmed a number of phenotypic features and medical conditions. In addition, a number of cardiac anomalies were reported along with feeding and respiratory difficulties in the immediate postnatal period. In addition, developmental status data indicated a range in functioning level up to skills in the 36 and 48-month range. Strengths were also noted across the sample in language and communication, fine motor and social-emotional development. Implications for professionals caring for children with this genetic condition are offered. PMID:25755087

  16. Knowledge of disease condition and medications among hypertension patients in Lesotho.

    PubMed

    Mugomeri, Eltony; Ramathebane, Maseabata V; Maja, Lineo; Chatanga, Peter; Moletsane, Lipalesa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the levels of knowledge of hypertension and the associated medications among hypertension patients in Lesotho and assessed the significance of these indicators on hypertension treatment outcomes. About 81% (n = 212) of the patients had hypertension monocondition while the remaining had multiple chronic conditions. Seventy-six percent of the patients had uncontrolled hypertension. Nearly 36% had inadequate knowledge about hypertension while 44% had inadequate knowledge about their medicines. In total, 52.4% of the patients defaulted appointment dates while 64.6% failed to take their medications as prescribed at least once. Inadequate knowledge of antihypertensive medicines was significantly associated (P = .028) with having uncontrolled hypertension. Inadequate knowledge of antihypertensive medicines is an important determinant of uncontrolled hypertension. Improving the knowledge of hypertension and the associated medications is an important intervention required in this population. PMID:26775548

  17. Elevated neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio predicts mortality in medical inpatients with multiple chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Vivian; Wu, Chia-Yi; Huang, Chun-Ta; Baune, Bernhard T.; Tseng, Chia-Lin; McLachlan, Craig S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is an easy measurable laboratory marker used to evaluate systemic inflammation. Elevated NLR is associated with poor survival and increased morbidity in cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, the usefulness of NLR to predict morbidity and mortality in a hospital setting for patients with multiple chronic conditions has not been previously examined. In this study, we investigate the association between NLR and mortality in multimorbid medical inpatients. Two hundred thirty medical in-patients with chronic conditions were selected from a single academic medical center in Taiwan. Retrospective NLRs were calculated from routine full blood counts previously obtained during the initial hospital admission and at the time of discharge. Self-rated health (using a single-item question), medical disorders, depressive symptoms, and medical service utilization over a 1-year period were included in the analyses. Mortality outcomes were ascertained by reviewing electronic medical records and follow-up. The mortality rate at 2-year follow-up was 23%. Depression (odds ratio [OR] 1.9 [95% CI 1.0–3.7]), poor self-rated health (OR 2.1 [95% CI 1.1–3.9]), being hospitalized 2 or more times in the previous year (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.2–4.6]), metastatic cancer (OR 4.7 [95% CI 2.3–9.7]), and chronic liver disease (OR 4.3 [95% CI 1.5–12.1]) were associated with 2-year mortality. The median (interquartile range) NLR at admission and discharge were 4.47 (2.4–8.7) and 3.65 (2.1–6.5), respectively. Two-year mortality rates were higher in patients with an elevated NLR at admission (NLR <3 = 15.5%, NLR >3 = 27.6%) and discharge (NLR < 3 = 14.7%, NLR >3 = 29.1%). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that an elevated NLR >3.0 at admission (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.0–5.2]) and discharge (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.1–5.0]) were associated with mortality independent of baseline age, sex, education, metastatic cancer, liver disease

  18. Elevated neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio predicts mortality in medical inpatients with multiple chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Vivian; Wu, Chia-Yi; Huang, Chun-Ta; Baune, Bernhard T; Tseng, Chia-Lin; McLachlan, Craig S

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is an easy measurable laboratory marker used to evaluate systemic inflammation. Elevated NLR is associated with poor survival and increased morbidity in cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, the usefulness of NLR to predict morbidity and mortality in a hospital setting for patients with multiple chronic conditions has not been previously examined. In this study, we investigate the association between NLR and mortality in multimorbid medical inpatients. Two hundred thirty medical in-patients with chronic conditions were selected from a single academic medical center in Taiwan. Retrospective NLRs were calculated from routine full blood counts previously obtained during the initial hospital admission and at the time of discharge. Self-rated health (using a single-item question), medical disorders, depressive symptoms, and medical service utilization over a 1-year period were included in the analyses. Mortality outcomes were ascertained by reviewing electronic medical records and follow-up. The mortality rate at 2-year follow-up was 23%. Depression (odds ratio [OR] 1.9 [95% CI 1.0-3.7]), poor self-rated health (OR 2.1 [95% CI 1.1-3.9]), being hospitalized 2 or more times in the previous year (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.2-4.6]), metastatic cancer (OR 4.7 [95% CI 2.3-9.7]), and chronic liver disease (OR 4.3 [95% CI 1.5-12.1]) were associated with 2-year mortality. The median (interquartile range) NLR at admission and discharge were 4.47 (2.4-8.7) and 3.65 (2.1-6.5), respectively. Two-year mortality rates were higher in patients with an elevated NLR at admission (NLR <3 = 15.5%, NLR >3 = 27.6%) and discharge (NLR < 3 = 14.7%, NLR >3 = 29.1%). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that an elevated NLR >3.0 at admission (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.0-5.2]) and discharge (OR 2.3 [95% CI 1.1-5.0]) were associated with mortality independent of baseline age, sex, education, metastatic cancer, liver disease, depression, and previous

  19. Outpatient Visits and Medication Prescribing for US Children With Mental Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, L. Elizabeth; Chen, Minghua L.; Perrin, James M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the mental health care US children receive from primary care providers (PCPs) and other mental health care providers. METHODS: Using nationally representative data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) from 2008 to 2011, we determined whether children and youth aged 2 to 21 years with outpatient visits for mental health problems in the past year saw PCPs, psychiatrists, and/or psychologists/social workers for these conditions. We compared the proportion of children prescribed psychotropic medications by provider type. Using logistic regression, we examined associations of provider type seen and medication prescribing with race/ethnicity, household income, insurance status, geographical area, and language at home. RESULTS: One-third (34.8%) of children receiving outpatient care for mental health conditions saw PCPs only, 26.2% saw psychiatrists only, and 15.2% saw psychologists/social workers only. Nearly a quarter (23.8%) of children saw multiple providers. A greater proportion of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) versus children with anxiety/mood disorders saw a PCP only (41.8% vs 17.2%). PCPs prescribed medications to a higher percentage of children than did psychiatrists. Children seeing a PCP for ADHD were more likely to receive stimulants or α-agonists than children with ADHD seeing psychiatrists (73.7% vs 61.4%). We found only limited associations of sociodemographic characteristics with provider type or medication use. CONCLUSIONS: PCPs appear to be sole physician managers for care of 4 in 10 US children with ADHD, and one-third with mental health conditions overall. Efforts supporting mental health in primary care will reach a substantial portion of children receiving mental health services. PMID:26459647

  20. Photosynthetic traits around budbreak in pre-existing needles of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii) seedlings grown under elevated CO2 concentration assessed by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Kitao, Mitsutoshi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Utsugi, Hajime; Komatsu, Masabumi; Kitaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Yutaka; Koike, Takayoshi

    2012-08-01

    To assess the effects of elevated CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) on the photosynthetic properties around spring budbreak, we monitored the total leaf sugar and starch content, and chlorophyll fluorescence in 1-year-old needles of Sakhalin spruce (Picea glehnii Masters) seedlings in relation to the timing of budbreak, grown in a phytotron under natural daylight at two [CO(2)] levels (ambient: 360 μmol mol(-1) and elevated: 720 μmol mol(-1)). Budbreak was accelerated by elevated [CO(2)] accompanied with earlier temporal declines in the quantum yield of PSII electron transport (Φ(PSII)) and photochemical quenching (q(L)). Plants grown under elevated [CO(2)] showed pre-budbreak leaf starch content twice as high with no significant difference in Φ(PSII) from ambient-CO(2)-grown plants when compared at the same measurement [CO(2)], i.e., 360 or 720 μmol mol(-1), suggesting that the enhanced pre-budbreak leaf starch accumulation might not cause down-regulation of photosynthesis in pre-existing needles under elevated [CO(2)]. Conversely, lower excitation pressure adjusted for the efficiency of PSII photochemistry ((1 - q(P)) F(v)'/F(m)') was observed in plants grown under elevated [CO(2)] around budbreak when compared at their growth [CO(2)] (i.e., comparing (1 - q(P)) F(v)'/F(m)' measured at 720 μmol mol(-1) in elevated-CO(2)-grown plants with that at 360 μmol mol(-1) in ambient-CO(2)-grown plants), which suggests lower rate of photoinactivation of PSII in the elevated-CO(2)-grown plants around spring budbreak. The degree of photoinhibition, as indicated by the overnight-dark-adapted F(v)/F(m), however, showed no difference between CO(2) treatments, thereby suggesting that photoprotection during the daytime or the repair of PSII at night was sufficient to alleviate differences in the rate of photoinactivation.

  1. I-type granitoids associated with the early Paleozoic intracontinental orogenic collapse along pre-existing block boundary in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Huang, Xiao-Long; He, Peng-Li; Li, Jie

    2016-04-01

    the block boundary by mantle-derived melt during the orogenic collapse. The pre-existing block boundary might have promoted asthenosphere upwelling and basaltic underplating during the intracontinental orogenic collapse.

  2. Specific Medical Conditions Are Associated with Unique Behavioral Profiles in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zachor, Ditza A.; Ben-Itzchak, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous group of disorders which occurs with numerous medical conditions. In previous research, subtyping in ASD has been based mostly on cognitive ability and ASD symptom severity. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether specific medical conditions in ASD are associated with unique behavioral profiles. The medical conditions included in the study were macrocephaly, microcephaly, developmental regression, food selectivity, and sleep problems. The behavioral profile was composed of cognitive ability, adaptive skills, and autism severity, and was examined in each of the aforementioned medical conditions. The study population included 1224 participants, 1043 males and 181 females (M:F ratio = 5.8:1) with a mean age of 49.9 m (SD = 29.4) diagnosed with ASD using standardized tests. Groups with and without the specific medical conditions were compared on the behavioral measures. Developmental regression was present in 19% of the population and showed a more severe clinical presentation, with lower cognitive abilities, more severe ASD symptoms, and more impaired adaptive functioning. Microcephaly was observed in 6.3% of the population and was characterized by a lower cognitive ability and more impaired adaptive functioning in comparison to the normative head circumference (HC) group. Severe food selectivity was found in 9.8% and severe sleep problems in 5.1% of the ASD population. The food selectivity and sleep problem subgroups, both showed more severe autism symptoms only as described by the parents, but not per the professional assessment, and more impaired adaptive skills. Macrocephaly was observed in 7.9% of the ASD population and did not differ from the normative HC group in any of the examined behavioral measures. Based on these findings, two unique medical-behavioral subtypes in ASD that affect inherited traits of cognition and/or autism severity were suggested. The microcephaly phenotype occurred with

  3. New strategies in the assessment of psychological factors affecting medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sirri, Laura; Fabbri, Stefania; Fava, Giovanni A; Sonino, Nicoletta

    2007-12-01

    In this article, we examine research that may lead to a better assessment of psychological factors affecting medical conditions. We performed a review of the psychosomatic literature using both Medline and manual searches. We selected papers that were judged to be relevant to new strategies of assessment, with particular reference to the use of the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research. We assessed 8 areas concerned with the assessment of psychological factors in the setting of medical disease: hypochondriasis, disease phobia, persistent somatization, conversion symptoms, illness denial, demoralization, irritable mood, and Type A behavior. A new subclassification of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-V]; not yet published) category of psychological factors affecting physical conditions appears to be feasible and may provide the clinician with better tools for identifying psychological distress.

  4. Coping and depressive symptoms in adolescents with a chronic medical condition: a search for intervention targets.

    PubMed

    Kraaij, Vivian; Garnefski, Nadia

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to find relevant coping factors for the development of psychological intervention programs for adolescents with a chronic medical condition. A wide range of coping techniques were studied, including cognitive coping, behavioral coping and goal adjustment coping. A total of 176 adolescents participated. They were contacted through social networking websites or Internet forums and through schools for children with a physical disability. Several cognitive and behavioral coping strategies and goal adjustment were found to be related to symptoms of depression. The cognitive coping strategies had the strongest influence on depressive symptoms. Especially self-blame, rumination and catastrophizing seemed to be important factors. If these findings can be confirmed, they could contribute to the focus and content of intervention programs for adolescents with a chronic medical condition. PMID:22771158

  5. Adverse childhood experiences and mental health, chronic medical conditions, and development in young children

    PubMed Central

    Kerker, Bonnie D.; Zhang, Jinjin; Nadeem, Erum; Stein, Ruth E. K.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Heneghan, Amy; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the relationships between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and mental health, chronic medical conditions and social development among young children in the child welfare system. Methods This was a cross-sectional study, using a nationally representative sample of children investigated by child welfare (National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II) from 2008–2009. Our analysis included caregiver interviews and caseworker reports about children age 18–71 months who were not in out-of-home care (N=912). We examined the associations between ACEs and mental health (measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL)), reported chronic medical conditions, and social development (measured by the Vineland Socialization Scale), in bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Nearly all children (98.1%) were reported to have had an ACE in their lifetime; the average number of ACEs was 3.6. For every additional reported ACE there was a 32% increased odds of having a problem score on the CBCL (Odds Ratio (OR)=1.32, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.14, 1.53), and a 21% increased odds of having a chronic medical condition (OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.40). Among children 36–71 months, for every additional reported ACE there was a 77% increased odds of a low Vineland Socialization score (OR=1.77, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.78). Conclusion and Relevance ACEs were associated with poor early childhood mental health and chronic medical conditions, and, among children age 3–5, social development. Efforts are needed to examine whether providing early intervention to families with multiple stressors mitigates the impact of ACEs on children’s outcomes. PMID:26183001

  6. Estimating the Impact of Workplace Bullying: Humanistic and Economic Burden among Workers with Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fattori, A.; Neri, L.; Aguglia, E.; Bellomo, A.; Bisogno, A.; Camerino, D.; Carpiniello, B.; Cassin, A.; Costa, G.; De Fazio, P.; Di Sciascio, G.; Favaretto, G.; Fraticelli, C.; Giannelli, R.; Leone, S.; Maniscalco, T.; Marchesi, C.; Mauri, M.; Mencacci, C.; Polselli, G.; Quartesan, R.; Risso, F.; Sciaretta, A.; Vaggi, M.; Vender, S.; Viora, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although the prevalence of work-limiting diseases is increasing, the interplay between occupational exposures and chronic medical conditions remains largely uncharacterized. Research has shown the detrimental effects of workplace bullying but very little is known about the humanistic and productivity cost in victims with chronic illnesses. We sought to assess work productivity losses and health disutility associated with bullying among subjects with chronic medical conditions. Methods. Participants (N = 1717) with chronic diseases answered a self-administered survey including sociodemographic and clinical data, workplace bullying experience, the SF-12 questionnaire, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment questionnaire. Results. The prevalence of significant impairment was higher among victims of workplace bullying as compared to nonvictims (SF-12 PCS: 55.5% versus 67.9%, p < 0.01; SF-12 MCS: 59.4% versus 74.3%, p < 0.01). The adjusted marginal overall productivity cost of workplace bullying ranged from 13.9% to 17.4%, corresponding to Italian Purchase Power Parity (PPP) 2010 US$ 4182–5236 yearly. Association estimates were independent and not moderated by concurrent medical conditions. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that the burden on workers' quality of life and productivity associated with workplace bullying is substantial. This study provides key data to inform policy-making and prioritize occupational health interventions. PMID:26557692

  7. Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R.; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. |; Perhac, R.M. Jr. |

    1998-10-01

    This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

  8. Concomitant dietary supplement and prescription medication use is prevalent among US adults with doctor-informed medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Farina, Emily K; Austin, Krista G; Lieberman, Harris R

    2014-11-01

    Information on patterns of concomitant dietary supplement (DS) and prescription medication (PM) use among US adults is limited. Thus, the prevalence of concomitant DS and PM use as a function of doctor-informed medical conditions (DIMC) was determined in a cross-sectional, observational study of a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized, civilian adults aged ≥20 years in the United States (N=9,950) from the 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Data were weighted for the complex, multistage, probability sampling design. Approximately one third (34.3%) of all US adults reported concomitant DS and PM use (approximately one in three adults). The prevalence of use was significantly higher among those with vs without a DIMC (47.3% vs 17.3%). Adults with a DIMC were more than two and a half times more likely to concomitantly use DS and PM than adults without a DIMC, after adjustment for sex, age, education, and household income. Multivitamin plus other ingredient(s), followed by antacids and multivitamin plus botanical ingredient(s), were the most prevalent DS categories used with a PM among those with and without a DIMC. The most prevalent PM categories used with a DS were cardiovascular agents (among those with a DIMC) and hormones (among those without a DIMC). These findings demonstrate that presence of a DIMC may be a risk factor for concomitant DS and PM use among US adults. Multivitamins containing nonvitamin or mineral ingredients are more commonly used than standard multivitamins with PM by US adults. This may be an emerging trend that warrants further consideration.

  9. Use of an emergency medical pictorial communication book during simulated disaster conditions.

    PubMed

    Behar, Solomon; Benson Ii, Richard; Kurzweil, Ami; Azen, Colleen; Nager, Alan L

    2013-10-01

    During disasters, the needs of victims outstrip available resources. Rapid assessment of patients must be performed; however, language barriers can be an impediment to efficient patient assessment, especially if interpreter resources are limited. Dependency on interpretive services requiring technology such a telephones, cell phones, and video conferencing may be inefficient, as they may be unavailable during disaster conditions. A low-tech, portable tool that aids in communication with non-English speakers would be beneficial. The medical emergency communication (MEC) book, developed at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has the potential to be a useful tool in this capacity. The goal of this pilot study was to compare the accuracy of a newly developed disaster-focused medical history obtained from Spanish-speaking patients or caregivers using the MEC book, compared to a control group with whom no book was used. Our hypothesis was that use of the MEC book improves accuracy of medical history taking between English-only speaking health care workers and Spanish-speaking patients better than a monolingual clinician trying to take a medical history without it. We anticipated a higher overall score in the group of subjects whose histories were taken using the MEC book than in the control group. Patient satisfaction with the MEC book also was measured.

  10. Medical Treatment of Aortic Aneurysms in Marfan Syndrome and other Heritable Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Christine H. Attenhofer; Greutmann, Matthias; Connolly, Heidi M.; Weber, Roland; Rohrbach, Marianne; Oxenius, Angela; Kretschmar, Oliver; Luscher, Thomas F.; Matyas, Gabor

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms can be triggered by genetic disorders such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) and related aortic diseases as well as by inflammatory disorders such as giant cell arteritis or atherosclerosis. In all these conditions, cardiovascular risk factors, such as systemic arterial hypertension, may contribute to faster rate of aneurysm progression. Optimal medical management to prevent progressive aortic dilatation and aortic dissection is unknown. β-blockers have been the mainstay of medical treatment for many years despite limited evidence of beneficial effects. Recently, losartan, an angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist (ARB), has shown promising results in a mouse model of MFS and subsequently in humans with MFS and hence is increasingly used. Several ongoing trials comparing losartan to β-blockers and/or placebo will better define the role of ARBs in the near future. In addition, other medications, such as statins and tetracyclines have demonstrated potential benefit in experimental aortic aneurysm studies. Given the advances in our understanding of molecular mechanisms triggering aortic dilatation and dissection, individualized management tailored to the underlying genetic defect may be on the horizon of individualized medicine. We anticipate that ongoing research will address the question whether such genotype/pathogenesis-driven treatments can replace current phenotype/syndrome-driven strategies and whether other forms of aortopathies should be treated similarly. In this work, we review currently used and promising medical treatment options for patients with heritable aortic aneurysmal disorders. PMID:24527681

  11. Use of an emergency medical pictorial communication book during simulated disaster conditions.

    PubMed

    Behar, Solomon; Benson Ii, Richard; Kurzweil, Ami; Azen, Colleen; Nager, Alan L

    2013-10-01

    During disasters, the needs of victims outstrip available resources. Rapid assessment of patients must be performed; however, language barriers can be an impediment to efficient patient assessment, especially if interpreter resources are limited. Dependency on interpretive services requiring technology such a telephones, cell phones, and video conferencing may be inefficient, as they may be unavailable during disaster conditions. A low-tech, portable tool that aids in communication with non-English speakers would be beneficial. The medical emergency communication (MEC) book, developed at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has the potential to be a useful tool in this capacity. The goal of this pilot study was to compare the accuracy of a newly developed disaster-focused medical history obtained from Spanish-speaking patients or caregivers using the MEC book, compared to a control group with whom no book was used. Our hypothesis was that use of the MEC book improves accuracy of medical history taking between English-only speaking health care workers and Spanish-speaking patients better than a monolingual clinician trying to take a medical history without it. We anticipated a higher overall score in the group of subjects whose histories were taken using the MEC book than in the control group. Patient satisfaction with the MEC book also was measured. PMID:24274127

  12. Origin of the Ciomadul Dacite, Carpathian-Pannonian Region, Eastern-Central Europe: Rejuvenation of a Pre-Existing Crystal Mush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, B.; Harangi, S.; Molnar, K.; Jankovics, E. M.; Lukacs, R.; Ntaflos, T.

    2012-12-01

    Dacitic composite volcanoes and calderas worldwide have many common specific characters. Notably, their activities are fairly unpredictable since the repose time between the active phases could be rather long, i.e. even several tens or hundreds ka. This nature might be related to the origin of such magmas. Petrological observations indicate that relatively old, cool, highly crystalline magma body (i.e., a crystal mush) could be present beneath the seemingly inactive dacitic volcanoes before reawakening. Reactivation of such locked magma chambers could occur due to the upwelling and intrusion of mafic magma and recent calculations suggest that this process takes place rather fast. Understanding the nature and time-scale of such remobilization events is crucial to explain the reason of the change in volcanic behaviour from dormant to active phase (i.e., the reawakening of the volcano). In this study, we show the role and the character of a pre-existing near-solidus granodioritic crystal mush to generate the eruptible dacitic magma in the Ciomadul volcano. The Ciomadul dacite is a crystal-rich rock with ubiquitous plagioclases and amphiboles. They form viscous lava domes and pumices generated by sub-plinian explosive eruptions. Combined, mineral-scale textural and geochemical investigations indicate a complex origin of these minerals, formed partly in a low temperature dioritic-granodioritic crystal mush body, partly in higher temperature hybrid magma. In addition, biotite, titanite, apatite, allanite, zircon, K-feldspar and quartz occur in various amounts and are interpreted also as antecrysts derived from the remobilized mushy body. High-Mg olivines and clinopyroxenes represent basaltic magma intruded into the mush. The nature of the crystal mush was closely investigated through the detailed analysis of the crystal clots found often in the Ciomadul dacites. Their texture resembles plutonic rocks, but they contain interstitial vesiculated glasses. The glass could

  13. Gains in medication affordability following Medicare Part D are eroding among elderly with multiple chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Naci, Huseyin; Soumerai, Stephen B; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Zhang, Fang; Briesacher, Becky A; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Madden, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    Elderly Americans, especially those with multiple chronic conditions, face difficulties paying for prescriptions, resulting in worse adherence and discontinuation of therapy (“cost-related medication nonadherence” or CRN). We investigated whether the gains in medication affordability attributable to Medicare Part D implementation in January 2006 persisted during the six years that followed. Overall, we found continued incremental improvements in medication affordability in the early years of Part D (2007–2009), which then eroded during more recent years (2009–2011). Among elderly beneficiaries with four or more chronic conditions, we observed an increase in the prevalence of CRN from 14.4% in 2009 to 17.0% in 2011, reversing previous downward trends. Similarly, the prevalence of forgoing basic needs in order to purchase medicines among the sickest elderly decreased from 8.7% in 2007 to 6.8% in 2009, then rose to 10.2% in 2011. Our findings highlight the need for targeted policy efforts to alleviate the persistent burden of drug treatment costs in this vulnerable population. PMID:25092846

  14. Leisure Engagement: Medical Conditions, Mobility Difficulties, and Activity Limitations—A Later Life Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Ingeborg; Nyqvist, Fredrica; Gustafson, Yngve; Nygård, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aims to investigate the impact of medical conditions, mobility difficulties, and activity limitations on older people's engagement in leisure activities. Methods. The analyses are based on a cross regional survey carried out in 2010 in the Bothnia region (Northern Sweden and Western Finland). A posted questionnaire, which included questions on different aspects of leisure engagement, medical history, and health, was sent out to older persons in the region. The final sample consisted of 5435 persons aged 65, 70, 75, and 80 years. The data was analyzed by using ordinary least squares (OLS) multivariate regression. Results. The most important predictor of leisure engagement abstention among older people is the prevalence of activity limitations, whereas mobility difficulties and medical conditions play less important roles. The strong negative association between activity limitations and leisure engagement remains significant even after we control for individual, sociodemographic characteristics, and country. Discussion. This study provides a window into leisure engagement in later life and factors influencing the magnitude of engagement in leisure activities. PMID:26346706

  15. Long-term risk of medical conditions associated with breast cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Deirdre A.; Horick, Nora K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Domchek, Susan M.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Lowery, Jan T.; Kinney, Anita Y.; Berg, Jonathan S.; Edwards, Karen L.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Plon, Sharon E.; Strong, Louise C.; Ziogas, Argyrois; Griffin, Constance A.; Kasten, Carol H.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Early and late effects of cancer treatment are of increasing concern with growing survivor populations, but relevant data are sparse. We sought to determine the prevalence and hazard ratio of such effects in breast cancer cases. Patients and Methods Women with invasive breast cancer and women with no cancer history recruited for a cancer research cohort completed a mailed questionnaire at a median of 10 years post-diagnosis or matched reference year (for the women without cancer). Reported medical conditions including lymphedema, osteopenia, osteoporosis, or heart disease (congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease) were assessed in relation to breast cancer therapy and time since diagnosis using Cox regression. The proportion of women currently receiving treatment for these conditions was calculated. Results Study participants included 2535 women with breast cancer and 2428 women without cancer (response rates 66.0% and 50.4%, respectively) Women with breast cancer had an increased risk of lymphedema (Hazard ratio (HR) 8.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 6.3-11.6), osteopenia (HR 2.1; 95% CI 1.8-2.4), and osteoporosis (HR 1.5; 95% CI 1.2-1.9) but not heart disease, as compared to women without cancer Hazard ratios varied by treatment and time since diagnosis. Overall, 49.3% of breast cancer cases reported at least one medical condition, and at 10 or more years post-diagnosis, 37.7% were currently receiving condition-related treatment. Conclusions Responses from survivors a decade following cancer diagnosis demonstrate substantial treatment-related morbidity, and emphasize the need for continued medical surveillance and follow-up care into the second decade post diagnosis. PMID:24696430

  16. 3-D numerical modelling of the influence of reactivated pre-existing faults on the distribution of deformation: example of North-Western Ghana around 2.15-2.00 Ga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FENG, Xiaojun; Gerbault, Muriel; Martin, Roland; Ganne, Jérôme; Jessell, Mark

    2015-04-01

    High strain zones appear to play a significant role in feeding the upper crust with fluids and partially molten material from lower crust sources. The Bole-Bulenga terrain (North-Western Ghana) is located in between two subvertical shear zones, and mainly consists of high-grade orthogneisses, paragneisses and metabasites intruded by partially molten lower crustal material with monzogranites and orthogneisses (Eburnean orogeny, around 2.1 Ga). In order to understand the location of these high grade rocks at the edges and in between these two shear zones, a three dimensional numerical model was built to test the influence of different orientations of a system of branched strike-slip faults on visco-plastic deformation, under compressional and simple shear boundary conditions. Our models indicate domains of tensile vs. compressional strain as well as shear zones, and show that not only internal fault zones but also the host rock in between the faults behave relatively softer than external regions. Under both applied compressive and simple shear boundary conditions, these softened domains constitute preferential zones of tensile strain accommodation (dilation) in the upper crust, which may favor infilling by deeper partially molten rocks. Our modeled pre-existing faults zones are assumed to have formed during an early D1 stage of deformation, and they are shown to passively migrate and rotate together with the solid matrix under applied external boundary conditions (corresponding to a post D1 - early D2 phase of deformation). We suggest that in the Bole-Bulenga terrain, fluids or partially molten material stored in deeper crustal domains, preferentially intruded the upper crust within these highly (shear and tensile) strained domains, thanks to this D2 shearing deformation phase. Building relief at the surface is primarily controlled by fault orientations, together with mechanical parameters and external boundary conditions. In particular, greatest magnitudes of relief

  17. Patterns of Risk for Multiple Co‐Occurring Medical Conditions Replicate Across Distinct Cohorts of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Aldinger, Kimberly A.; Lane, Christianne J.; Veenstra‐VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may present with multiple medical conditions in addition to ASD symptoms. This study investigated whether there are predictive patterns of medical conditions that co‐occur with ASD, which could inform medical evaluation and treatment in ASD, as well as potentially identify etiologically meaningful subgroups. Medical history data were queried in the multiplex family Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE). Fourteen medical conditions were analyzed. Replication in the Simons Simplex Collection (SSC) was attempted using available medical condition data on gastrointestinal disturbances (GID), sleep problems, allergy and epilepsy. In the AGRE cohort, no discrete clusters emerged among 14 medical conditions. GID and seizures were enriched in unaffected family members, and together with sleep problems, were represented in both AGRE and SSC. Further analysis of these medical conditions identified predictive co‐occurring patterns in both samples. For a child with ASD, the presence of GID predicts sleep problems and vice versa, with an approximately 2‐fold odds ratio in each direction. These risk patterns were replicated in the SSC sample, and in addition, there was increased risk for seizures and sleep problems to co‐occur with GID. In these cohorts, seizure alone was not predictive of the other conditions co‐occurring, but behavioral impairments were more severe as the number of co‐occurring medical symptoms increased. These findings indicate that interdisciplinary clinical care for children with ASD will benefit from evaluation for specific patterns of medical conditions in the affected child and their family members. Autism Res 2015, 8: 771–781. © 015 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research. PMID:26011086

  18. Waivers for disqualifying medical conditions in U.S. Naval aviation personnel.

    PubMed

    Bailey, D A; Gilleran, L G; Merchant, P G

    1995-05-01

    In the United States Navy, many diagnoses are considered disqualifying for aviation duty, but aircrew may be "waived" to return to flight duties after resolution of the disease or appropriate treatment of the condition. Personnel with waivers are usually subject to more frequent physical examinations and/or special diagnostic procedures. Although the Naval Aerospace and Operational Medical Institute promulgates written aeromedical guidelines as to which diseases may be waived and which may not, waivers are granted on a case-by-case basis considering not only the diagnosis, but the age, experience, and type of aviation duty of the individual in question. This study was undertaken to determine which conditions were most and least likely to be waived. We reviewed all records of aviators entered into the Naval Aviation Medical Data Retrieval System who had been diagnosed with a condition considered disqualifying for aviation duty, totaling over 39,000 records. Cases were stratified by diagnosis and aviation duty, and the percentage waived was calculated for major diagnostic groups. Among designated aviation personnel, approximately 68% of all aviators with a disqualifying diagnosis were recommended for a waiver. Otolaryngologic, musculoskeletal, and cardiovascular disorders accounted for nearly 50% of diagnoses in personnel recommended for a waiver. Fear of flying, personality disorders, and adjustment disorders were the three diagnoses least likely to be granted a waiver. The most frequently occurring disqualifying diagnoses were allergic rhinitis, obesity, disorders of refraction and accommodation, urolithiasis, and alcohol dependence. PMID:7619031

  19. Race and Ethnic Group Differences in Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Chronic Medical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Daphne C; Assari, Shervin; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki

    2015-09-01

    This study tested whether race and ethnic group differences exist for lifetime major depressive disorder and/or general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions. Data from the National Survey of American Life, which included 3570 African American, 1438 Caribbean Black, and 891 non-Hispanic White adults were analyzed. Outcomes included at least one and multiple chronic medical conditions, from a list of 14 medical conditions (e.g., arthritis, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, stroke, heart disease, etc.). Logistic regressions were fitted to data to determine how the association between major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder, and one or more chronic medical conditions vary across race and ethnicity. Lifetime major depressive disorder (but not lifetime general anxiety disorder) was associated with at least one chronic medical condition among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks, but not non-Hispanic Whites. Lifetime major depressive disorder was similarly associated with multiple chronic medical conditions among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites. For Caribbean Blacks, stronger associations were found between major depressive disorder and general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions compared to African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. Findings suggest that race and ethnicity may shape the links between comorbid psychiatric disorders and chronic medical conditions. Mental health screening of individuals with chronic medical conditions in primary health-care settings may benefit from tailoring based on race and ethnicity. More research is needed to understand why associations between physical and mental health vary among race and ethnic groups. PMID:26863467

  20. Race and Ethnic Group Differences in Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Chronic Medical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Daphne C; Assari, Shervin; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki

    2015-09-01

    This study tested whether race and ethnic group differences exist for lifetime major depressive disorder and/or general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions. Data from the National Survey of American Life, which included 3570 African American, 1438 Caribbean Black, and 891 non-Hispanic White adults were analyzed. Outcomes included at least one and multiple chronic medical conditions, from a list of 14 medical conditions (e.g., arthritis, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, stroke, heart disease, etc.). Logistic regressions were fitted to data to determine how the association between major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder, and one or more chronic medical conditions vary across race and ethnicity. Lifetime major depressive disorder (but not lifetime general anxiety disorder) was associated with at least one chronic medical condition among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks, but not non-Hispanic Whites. Lifetime major depressive disorder was similarly associated with multiple chronic medical conditions among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites. For Caribbean Blacks, stronger associations were found between major depressive disorder and general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions compared to African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. Findings suggest that race and ethnicity may shape the links between comorbid psychiatric disorders and chronic medical conditions. Mental health screening of individuals with chronic medical conditions in primary health-care settings may benefit from tailoring based on race and ethnicity. More research is needed to understand why associations between physical and mental health vary among race and ethnic groups.

  1. The Influence of Safety, Efficacy, and Medical Condition Severity on Natural versus Synthetic Drug Preference.

    PubMed

    Meier, Brian P; Lappas, Courtney M

    2016-11-01

    Research indicates that there is a preference for natural v. synthetic products, but the influence of this preference on drug choice in the medical domain is largely unknown. We present 5 studies in which participants were asked to consider a hypothetical situation in which they had a medical issue requiring pharmacological therapy. Participants ( N = 1223) were asked to select a natural, plant-derived, or synthetic drug. In studies 1a and 1b, approximately 79% of participants selected the natural v. synthetic drug, even though the safety and efficacy of the drugs were identical. Furthermore, participants rated the natural drug as safer than the synthetic drug, and as that difference increased, the odds of choosing the natural over synthetic drug increased. In studies 2 and 3, approximately 20% of participants selected the natural drug even when they were informed that it was less safe (study 2) or less effective (study 3) than the synthetic drug. Finally, in study 4, approximately 65% of participants chose a natural over synthetic drug regardless of the severity of a specific medical condition (mild v. severe hypertension), and this choice was predicted by perceived safety and efficacy differences. Overall, these data indicate that there is a bias for natural over synthetic drugs. This bias could have implications for drug choice and usage. PMID:26683247

  2. Empathy as a necessary condition of phronesis: a line of thought for medical ethics.

    PubMed

    Svenaeus, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    Empathy is a thing constantly asked for and stressed as a central skill and character trait of the good physician and nurse. To be a good doctor or a good nurse one needs to be empathic-one needs to be able to feel and understand the needs and wishes of patients in order to help them in the best possible way, in a medical, as well as in an ethical sense. The problem with most studies of empathy in medicine is that empathy is poorly defined and tends to overlap with other related things, such as emotional contagion, sympathy, or a caring personality in general. It is far from clear how empathy fits into the general picture of medical ethics and the framework of norms that are most often stressed there, such as respect for autonomy and beneficience. How are we to look upon the role and importance of empathy in medical ethics? Is empathy an affective and/or cognitive phenomenon only, or does it carry moral significance in itself as a skill and/or virtue? How does empathy attain moral importance for medicine? In this paper I will attempt to show that a comparison with the Aristotelian concept of phronesis makes it easier to see what empathy is and how it fits into the general picture of medical ethics. I will argue that empathy is a basic condition and source of moral knowledge by being the feeling component of phronesis, and, by the same power, it is also a motivation for acting in a good way.

  3. Veterinary homeopathy: systematic review of medical conditions studied by randomised placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Robert T; Clausen, Jürgen

    2014-10-18

    A systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of veterinary homeopathy has not previously been undertaken. Using Cochrane methods, this review aims to assess risk of bias and to quantify the effect size of homeopathic intervention compared with placebo for each eligible peer-reviewed trial. Judgement in seven assessment domains enabled a trial's risk of bias to be designated as low, unclear or high. A trial was judged to comprise reliable evidence if its risk of bias was low or was unclear in specified domains. A trial was considered to be free of vested interest if it was not funded by a homeopathic pharmacy. The 18 eligible RCTs were disparate in nature, representing four species and 11 different medical conditions. Reliable evidence, free from vested interest, was identified in two trials: homeopathic Coli had a prophylactic effect on porcine diarrhoea (odds ratio 3.89, 95 per cent confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 12.68, P=0.02); and individualised homeopathic treatment did not have a more beneficial effect on bovine mastitis than placebo intervention (standardised mean difference -0.31, 95 per cent CI, -0.97 to 0.34, P=0.35). Mixed findings from the only two placebo-controlled RCTs that had suitably reliable evidence precluded generalisable conclusions about the efficacy of any particular homeopathic medicine or the impact of individualised homeopathic intervention on any given medical condition in animals.

  4. The State of Health in Older Adults in Japan: Trends in Disability, Chronic Medical Conditions and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shinya; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Both life expectancy and healthy life expectancy in Japan have been increasing and are among the highest in the world, but the gap between them has also been widening. To examine the recent trends in old age disability, chronic medical conditions and mortality in Japan, we retrospectively analyzed three nationally representative datasets: Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions (2001–2013), Patient Survey (1996–2011) and Vital Statistics (1995–2010). We obtained the sex- and age-stratified trends in disability rate, treatment rates of nine selected chronic medical conditions (cerebrovascular diseases, joint disorders, fractures, osteoporosis, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pneumonia and malignant neoplasms), total mortality rate and mortality rates from specific causes (cerebrovascular diseases, heart diseases, pneumonia and malignant neoplasms) in both sexes in four age strata (65–69, 70–74, 75–79, 80–84 years). Disability rates declined significantly in both sexes. Treatment rates of all selected medical conditions also decreased significantly, except for fractures in women and pneumonia. Both total mortality rate and cause-specific mortality rates decreased in both sexes. We concluded that the recent decline in disability rates, treatment rates of chronic medical conditions and mortality rates points toward overall improvement in health conditions in adults over the age of 65 years in Japan. Nonetheless, considering the increase in the number of older adults, the absolute number of older adults with disability or chronic medical conditions will continue to increase and challenge medical and long-term care systems. PMID:26431468

  5. [History of mandatory (set by decree) preliminary and periodic medical examinations of workers in hazardous work conditions].

    PubMed

    Retnev, V M

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with over a hunderd years history of foundation and pregress in organization and process of mandatory preliminary and periodic medical examinations of workers exposed to hazardous work conditions.

  6. [History of mandatory (set by decree) preliminary and periodic medical examinations of workers in hazardous work conditions].

    PubMed

    Retnev, V M

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with over a hunderd years history of foundation and pregress in organization and process of mandatory preliminary and periodic medical examinations of workers exposed to hazardous work conditions. PMID:27164754

  7. Maternal recall versus medical records of metabolic conditions from the prenatal period: A validation study

    PubMed Central

    Krakowiak, Paula; Walker, Cheryl K.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess validity of maternally-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders, and reliability of BMI measurements during periconception and pregnancy compared with medical records when mothers are interviewed 2-5 years after delivery. To investigate whether reporting accuracy differed by child's case status (autism, delays, typical development). Methods Participants were mothers of 2-5 year old children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders from the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment) Study who had both prenatal/delivery records and telephone interviews. Sensitivity and specificity of self-report in telephone interview was assessed by comparison with medical records; agreement was evaluated by kappa statistics. Deviations in reported BMI were evaluated with Bland-Altman plots and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). Results Mothers of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (autism or developmental delay) reported metabolic conditions slightly more accurately than control mothers. For diabetes, sensitivity ranged from 73% to 87% and specificity was ≥98% across groups. For hypertensive disorders, sensitivity ranged from 57% to 77% and specificity from 93% to 98%. Reliability of BMI was high (CCC=0.930); when grouped into BMI categories, a higher proportion of mothers of delayed children were correctly classified (κwt=0.93) compared with the autism group and controls (κwt=0.85 and κwt=0.84, respectively; P=0.05). Multiparity was associated with higher discrepancies in BMI and misreporting of hypertensive disorders. Conclusions For purposes of etiologic studies, self-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders during periconception and pregnancy show high validity among mothers irrespective of child's case status. Recall of pre-pregnancy BMI is reliable compared with self-reported values in medical records. PMID:25656730

  8. Effect of Chronic Medical Conditions in Veterans with Multiple Sclerosis on Long-Term Disability

    PubMed Central

    Rabadi, Meheroz H.; Aston, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this observational study was to examine the effect of common chronic medical conditions (CMCs) on long-term disability (activity limitation) in veterans already diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Material/Methods We retrospectively reviewed the electronic charts of 124 veterans with MS who have been regularly followed in our MS clinic for 10 or more years. General linear model analysis examined whether MS-related severity as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the presence of CMCs affected long-term disability as measured by the total score on the Functional Independence Measure (TFIM). Results Commonly encountered CMCs were increased BMI (61%), hyperlipidemia (78%), hypertension (65%), current smokers (47%), and arthritis/arthralgia (24%). Results suggest that the number of CMCs was not predictive of final TFIM scores; of the variables examined, only initial EDSS score was predictive of final TFIM scores. Conclusions The presence of CMCs did not affect the long-term disability in veterans diagnosed with MS, this was due mainly to CMCs being closely monitored and co-treated with other medical specialties. PMID:27494787

  9. Dental Erosion and Medical Conditions An Overview of Aetiology, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Paryag, A; Rafeek, R

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tooth wear or tooth surface loss is a normal physiological process and occurs throughout life but is considered pathological when the degree of destruction is excessive or the rate of loss is rapid, causing functional, aesthetic or sensitivity problems. The importance of tooth wear as a dental problem has been increasingly recognized. The findings of a study in Trinidad indicate that the prevalence of tooth wear in a Trinidadian population is comparable to the United Kingdom (UK) and, indeed, that the level of moderate and severe wear is nearly twice as high. The aetiology of tooth wear is attributed to four causes: erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is generally considered to be the most prevalent cause of tooth wear in the UK and Europe. Acids that cause dental erosion originate mainly from the diet or the stomach and, to a lesser extent, the environment. Underlying medical problems can contribute to influence the progress of tooth wear due to erosion and the patient may not be aware of these conditions. Moderate to severe tooth wear poses a significant clinical challenge to dental practitioners and may result in treatment that is more complex and costly to the patient, both in terms of finances and time spent in the dental chair. This paper provides an overview of aetiology and diagnosis of tooth wear, in particular tooth wear due to erosion, so that medical and dental practitioners may recognize tooth wear early, institute preventive measures and manage patients appropriately. PMID:25781289

  10. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    PubMed

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training. PMID:25989840

  11. Highlighting differences between conditional and unconditional quantile regression approaches through an application to assess medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Borah, Bijan J; Basu, Anirban

    2013-09-01

    The quantile regression (QR) framework provides a pragmatic approach in understanding the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of an outcome. However, the QR framework that has pervaded the applied economics literature is based on the conditional quantile regression method. It is used to assess the impact of a covariate on a quantile of the outcome conditional on specific values of other covariates. In most cases, conditional quantile regression may generate results that are often not generalizable or interpretable in a policy or population context. In contrast, the unconditional quantile regression method provides more interpretable results as it marginalizes the effect over the distributions of other covariates in the model. In this paper, the differences between these two regression frameworks are highlighted, both conceptually and econometrically. Additionally, using real-world claims data from a large US health insurer, alternative QR frameworks are implemented to assess the differential impacts of covariates along the distribution of medication adherence among elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  12. The absence of attenuating effect of red light exposure on pre-existing melanopsin-driven post-illumination pupil response.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaobo; Goltz, Herbert C; Sklar, Jaime C; Wong, Agnes M F

    2016-07-01

    It has been proposed that after activation by blue light, activated melanopsin is converted back to its resting state by long wavelength red light exposure, a putative mechanism of melanopsin chromophore recovery in vivo. We tested this hypothesis by investigating whether red light attenuates the ongoing post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) induced by melanopsin-activating blue light. Pupillary light responses were tested using "Blue+Red" double flashes and "Blue Only" single flash stimuli in 10 visually normal subjects. For "Blue+Red" conditions, PIPR was induced with an intense blue flash, followed by experimental red light exposure of variable intensity and duration (Experiment 1) immediately or 9s after the offset of the blue flash (Experiment 2). For "Blue Only" conditions, only the PIPR-inducing blue stimuli were presented (reference condition). PIPR was defined as the mean pupil size from 10 to 30s (Experiment 1) and from 25 to 60s (Experiment 2) after the offset of blue light stimuli. The results showed that PIPR from "Blue+Red" conditions did not differ significantly from those of "Blue Only" conditions (p=0.55) in Experiment 1. The two stimulation conditions also did not differ in Experiment 2 (p=0.38). We therefore conclude that red light exposure does not alter the time course of PIPR induced by blue light. This finding does not support the hypothesis that long wavelength red light reverses activated melanopsin; rather it lends support to the hypothesis that the wavelengths of stimuli driving both the forward and backward reactions of melanopsin may be similar.

  13. The absence of attenuating effect of red light exposure on pre-existing melanopsin-driven post-illumination pupil response.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shaobo; Goltz, Herbert C; Sklar, Jaime C; Wong, Agnes M F

    2016-07-01

    It has been proposed that after activation by blue light, activated melanopsin is converted back to its resting state by long wavelength red light exposure, a putative mechanism of melanopsin chromophore recovery in vivo. We tested this hypothesis by investigating whether red light attenuates the ongoing post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) induced by melanopsin-activating blue light. Pupillary light responses were tested using "Blue+Red" double flashes and "Blue Only" single flash stimuli in 10 visually normal subjects. For "Blue+Red" conditions, PIPR was induced with an intense blue flash, followed by experimental red light exposure of variable intensity and duration (Experiment 1) immediately or 9s after the offset of the blue flash (Experiment 2). For "Blue Only" conditions, only the PIPR-inducing blue stimuli were presented (reference condition). PIPR was defined as the mean pupil size from 10 to 30s (Experiment 1) and from 25 to 60s (Experiment 2) after the offset of blue light stimuli. The results showed that PIPR from "Blue+Red" conditions did not differ significantly from those of "Blue Only" conditions (p=0.55) in Experiment 1. The two stimulation conditions also did not differ in Experiment 2 (p=0.38). We therefore conclude that red light exposure does not alter the time course of PIPR induced by blue light. This finding does not support the hypothesis that long wavelength red light reverses activated melanopsin; rather it lends support to the hypothesis that the wavelengths of stimuli driving both the forward and backward reactions of melanopsin may be similar. PMID:27371765

  14. Vaccination of adolescents with chronic medical conditions: Special considerations and strategies for enhancing uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Annika M; LaRussa, Philip; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with chronic medical conditions (CMCs), a growing population worldwide, possess a wide array of preventive health care needs. Vaccination is strongly recommended for the vast majority of these adolescents given their increased risk of vaccine preventable infection and associated complications. Not only should they receive routine vaccines, but some also require additional vaccines. Despite these guidelines, evidence suggests that adolescents with CMCs often fail to receive needed vaccines. Many factors contribute to this under-immunization, including lack of knowledge among parents and providers and suboptimal coordination of primary and subspecialty care. This review describes current vaccination recommendations for these adolescents as well as recent data related to infection risk, vaccine efficacy and safety, vaccination coverage, and the unique multilevel factors impacting uptake in this population. It also discusses strategies for improving coverage levels and reducing missed vaccination opportunities, with a particular focus on technology-based interventions. PMID:26212313

  15. Comorbid Medical Conditions in Friedreich Ataxia: Association With Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shinnick, Julianna E; Schadt, Kimberly; Strawser, Cassandra; Wilcox, Nicholas; Perlman, Susan L; Wilmot, George R; Gomez, Christopher M; Mathews, Katherine D; Yoon, Grace; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Hoyle, Chad; Subramony, S H; Yiu, Eppie M; Delatycki, Martin B; Brocht, Alicia F; Farmer, Jennifer M; Lynch, David R

    2016-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia is a progressive degenerative disease with neurologic and cardiac involvement. This study characterizes comorbid medical conditions in a large cohort of patients with Friedreich ataxia. Patient diagnoses were collected in a large natural history study of 641 subjects. Prevalence of diagnoses in the cohort with Friedreich ataxia was compared with prevalence in the population without Friedreich ataxia. Ten patients (1.6%) had inflammatory bowel disease, 3.5 times more common in this cohort of individuals with Friedreich ataxia than in the general population. Four subjects were growth hormone deficient, reflecting a prevalence in Friedreich ataxia that is 28 times greater than the general population. The present study identifies specific diagnoses not traditionally associated with Friedreich ataxia that are found at higher frequency in this disease. These associations could represent coincidence, shared genetic background, or potentially interactive disease mechanisms with Friedreich ataxia.

  16. The Integrated Medical Model: A Probabilistic Simulation Model for Predicting In-Flight Medical Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, Alexandra; Young, Millennia; Saile, Lynn; Boley, Lynn; Walton, Marlei; Kerstman, Eric; Shah, Ronak; Goodenow, Debra A.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that uses simulation to predict mission medical risk. Given a specific mission and crew scenario, medical events are simulated using Monte Carlo methodology to provide estimates of resource utilization, probability of evacuation, probability of loss of crew, and the amount of mission time lost due to illness. Mission and crew scenarios are defined by mission length, extravehicular activity (EVA) schedule, and crew characteristics including: sex, coronary artery calcium score, contacts, dental crowns, history of abdominal surgery, and EVA eligibility. The Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) houses the model inputs for one hundred medical conditions using in-flight, analog, and terrestrial medical data. Inputs include incidence, event durations, resource utilization, and crew functional impairment. Severity of conditions is addressed by defining statistical distributions on the dichotomized best and worst-case scenarios for each condition. The outcome distributions for conditions are bounded by the treatment extremes of the fully treated scenario in which all required resources are available and the untreated scenario in which no required resources are available. Upon occurrence of a simulated medical event, treatment availability is assessed, and outcomes are generated depending on the status of the affected crewmember at the time of onset, including any pre-existing functional impairments or ongoing treatment of concurrent conditions. The main IMM outcomes, including probability of evacuation and loss of crew life, time lost due to medical events, and resource utilization, are useful in informing mission planning decisions. To date, the IMM has been used to assess mission-specific risks with and without certain crewmember characteristics, to determine the impact of eliminating certain resources from the mission medical kit, and to design medical kits that maximally benefit crew health while meeting

  17. The Integrated Medical Model: A Probabilistic Simulation Model Predicting In-Flight Medical Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, Alexandra; Young, Millennia; Saile, Lynn; Boley, Lynn; Walton, Marlei; Kerstman, Eric; Shah, Ronak; Goodenow, Debra A.; Myers, Jerry G., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic model that uses simulation to predict mission medical risk. Given a specific mission and crew scenario, medical events are simulated using Monte Carlo methodology to provide estimates of resource utilization, probability of evacuation, probability of loss of crew, and the amount of mission time lost due to illness. Mission and crew scenarios are defined by mission length, extravehicular activity (EVA) schedule, and crew characteristics including: sex, coronary artery calcium score, contacts, dental crowns, history of abdominal surgery, and EVA eligibility. The Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) houses the model inputs for one hundred medical conditions using in-flight, analog, and terrestrial medical data. Inputs include incidence, event durations, resource utilization, and crew functional impairment. Severity of conditions is addressed by defining statistical distributions on the dichotomized best and worst-case scenarios for each condition. The outcome distributions for conditions are bounded by the treatment extremes of the fully treated scenario in which all required resources are available and the untreated scenario in which no required resources are available. Upon occurrence of a simulated medical event, treatment availability is assessed, and outcomes are generated depending on the status of the affected crewmember at the time of onset, including any pre-existing functional impairments or ongoing treatment of concurrent conditions. The main IMM outcomes, including probability of evacuation and loss of crew life, time lost due to medical events, and resource utilization, are useful in informing mission planning decisions. To date, the IMM has been used to assess mission-specific risks with and without certain crewmember characteristics, to determine the impact of eliminating certain resources from the mission medical kit, and to design medical kits that maximally benefit crew health while meeting

  18. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... chapter; and drugs and biologicals related to the palliation and management of the terminal illness and... management as defined in hospice policies and procedures and State law, who is an employee of or under... provided pharmacist services must include evaluation of a patient's response to medication...

  19. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... chapter; and drugs and biologicals related to the palliation and management of the terminal illness and... management as defined in hospice policies and procedures and State law, who is an employee of or under... provided pharmacist services must include evaluation of a patient's response to medication...

  20. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this chapter; and drugs and biologicals related to the palliation and management of the terminal... drug management as defined in hospice policies and procedures and State law, who is an employee of or... provided pharmacist services must include evaluation of a patient's response to medication...

  1. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... this chapter; and drugs and biologicals related to the palliation and management of the terminal... drug management as defined in hospice policies and procedures and State law, who is an employee of or... provided pharmacist services must include evaluation of a patient's response to medication...

  2. Feasibility of Remote Ischemic Peri-conditioning during Air Medical Transport of STEMI Patients.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Wayne, Max; Guyette, Francis X; Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Toma, Catalin

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic peri-conditioning (RIPC) has gained interest as a means of reducing ischemic injury in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who are undergoing emergent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). We aimed to evaluate the feasibility, process, and patient-related factors related to the delivery of RIPC during air medical transport of STEMI patients to tertiary pPCI centers. We performed a retrospective review of procedural outcomes of a cohort of STEMI patients who received RIPC as part of a clinical protocol in a multi-state air medical service over 16 months (March 2013 to June 2014). Eligible patients were transported to two tertiary PCI centers and received up to four cycles of RIPC by inflating a blood pressure cuff on an upper arm to 200 mmHg for 5 minutes and subsequently deflating the cuff for 5 minutes. Data regarding feasibility, process variables, patient comfort, and occurrence of hypotension were obtained from prehospital records and prospectively completed quality improvement surveys. The primary outcome was whether at least 3 cycles of RIPC were completed by air medical transport crews prior to pPCI. Secondary outcomes included the number of cycles completed prior to pPCI, time spent with the patient prior to transport (bedside time), patient discomfort level, and incidence of hypotension (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg) during the procedure. RIPC was initiated in 99 patients (91 interfacility, 8 scene transports) and 83 (83.3%) received 3 or 4 cycles of RIPC, delivered over 25-35 minutes. Median bedside time for interfacility transfers was 8 minutes (IQR 7, 10). More than half of patients reported no pain related to the procedure (N = 53, 53.3%), whereas 5 (5.1%) patients reported discomfort greater than 5 out of 10. Two patients developed hypotension while receiving RIPC and both had experienced hypotension prior to initiation of RIPC. RIPC is feasible and safe to implement for STEMI patients

  3. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  4. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  5. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  6. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  7. 20 CFR 10.719 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single FECA claim... received for more than one wound or medical condition, can the refundable disbursements paid on a single... to the United States? (a) All wounds, diseases or other medical conditions accepted by OWCP...

  8. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients... HEALTH SERVICES Administration § 484.18 Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care... that the patient's medical, nursing, and social needs can be met adequately by the agency in...

  9. Which common clinical conditions should medical students be able to manage by graduation? A perspective from Australian interns.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, I E; Pearson, S-A; Sanson-Fisher, R W; Ringland, C; Bayley, S; Hart, A; Kelly, S

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to report the development of a core curriculum that details the clinical conditions medical students should be able to manage upon graduation; and to canvass the opinion of interns (first-year postgraduate doctors) regarding their perceptions of the level of skill required to manage each condition. Literature relating to core curriculum development and training of junior medical officers was reviewed and stakeholders in the education and training of medical students and junior doctors in the state of New South Wales, Australia (intern supervisors, academics, registrars, nurses and interns) were consulted. The final curriculum spanned 106 conditions, 77 'differentiated' and 29 'undifferentiated'. Four levels of skill at which conditions should potentially be managed were also identified: 'Theoretical knowledge only'; 'Recognize symptoms and signs without supervision'; Initiate preliminary investigations, management and/or treatment without supervision'; and 'Total investigation, management and/or treatment without supervision'. The list of conditions in the curriculum was converted to a survey format and a one-in-two random sample of interns (n = 193) practising in New South Wales who graduated from the state's three medical schools were surveyed regarding the level of skill required for managing each clinical condition at graduation. A total of 51.3% of interns responded to the survey. Interns felt they should be able to initiate preliminary investigation, management and/or treatment for most conditions in the curriculum, with more than half acknowledging this level of management for 53 of the differentiated and 28 of the undifferentiated conditions. It is concluded that developing core curricula in medical education can involve multiple stakeholders, including junior doctors as the consumers of educational experiences. The data gathered may be useful to medical schools revising their curricula.

  10. Six new examples of the bipartite trapezoid bone: morphology, significant population variation, and an examination of pre-existing criteria to identify bipartition of individual carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Scott E; Stojanowski, Christopher M; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk

    2015-03-01

    Carpal bone bipartition is a developmental variant resulting in the division of a normally singular carpal into two distinct segments. Cases involving the scaphoid are best known, though many other carpals can be affected, including the trapezoid. Six new examples of bipartite trapezoids, identified in African and Asian anatomical and archeological samples, are reported here and compared with the eight previously known. While the site of bipartition is consistent, the resulting segments exhibit variability in their articulations with neighboring carpals. Five of the six affected trapezoids were identified in African or African-derived samples, yielding a significantly higher frequency (0.323%) of bipartite trapezoid than seen in anatomical or archeological series of European origin. Bilateral bipartite trapezoids in archeological remains from the Mid Holocene site of Gobero (Niger) are potentially the oldest bipartite carpals yet identified in humans. Their discovery may indicate that trapezoid bipartition is a condition that has been present in African populations since prehistoric times, though more data are needed. Because bipartite carpals may be symptomatic and can occur as part of syndromes, the significant population variation in frequency identified here has potential utility in both anatomical and clinical contexts. However, a comparison of the morphological appearance of bipartite trapezoids with the suggested criteria for bipartite scaphoid diagnosis indicates that these criteria are not equally applicable to other carpals. Fortunately, due to the rarity of fracture, identification of the bipartite trapezoid and separating it from pathological conditions is considerably easier than diagnosing a bipartite scaphoid.

  11. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided to patients. Medical director... admissions, patient care, infection control, and safety are adhered to by all individuals who treat...

  12. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided to patients. Medical director... admissions, patient care, infection control, and safety are adhered to by all individuals who treat...

  13. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided to patients. Medical director... admissions, patient care, infection control, and safety are adhered to by all individuals who treat...

  14. 42 CFR 494.150 - Condition: Responsibilities of the medical director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... responsible for the delivery of patient care and outcomes in the facility. The medical director is accountable to the governing body for the quality of medical care provided to patients. Medical director... admissions, patient care, infection control, and safety are adhered to by all individuals who treat...

  15. Critical Illness in Pregnancy: Part II: Common Medical Conditions Complicating Pregnancy and Puerperium.

    PubMed

    Guntupalli, Kalpalatha K; Karnad, Dilip R; Bandi, Venkata; Hall, Nicole; Belfort, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The first of this two-part series on critical illness in pregnancy dealt with obstetric disorders. In Part II, medical conditions that commonly affect pregnant women or worsen during pregnancy are discussed. ARDS occurs more frequently in pregnancy. Strategies commonly used in nonpregnant patients, including permissive hypercapnia, limits for plateau pressure, and prone positioning, may not be acceptable, especially in late pregnancy. Genital tract infections unique to pregnancy include chorioamnionitis, group A streptococcal infection causing toxic shock syndrome, and polymicrobial infection with streptococci, staphylococci, and Clostridium perfringens causing necrotizing vulvitis or fasciitis. Pregnancy predisposes to VTE; D-dimer levels have low specificity in pregnancy. A ventilation-perfusion scan is preferred over CT pulmonary angiography in some situations to reduce radiation to the mother's breasts. Low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparins form the mainstay of treatment; vitamin K antagonists, oral factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors are not recommended in pregnancy. The physiologic hyperdynamic circulation in pregnancy worsens many cardiovascular disorders. It increases risk of pulmonary edema or arrhythmias in mitral stenosis, heart failure in pulmonary hypertension or aortic stenosis, aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome, or valve thrombosis in mechanical heart valves. Common neurologic problems in pregnancy include seizures, altered mental status, visual symptoms, and strokes. Other common conditions discussed are aspiration of gastric contents, OSA, thyroid disorders, diabetic ketoacidosis, and cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy. Studies confined to pregnant women are available for only a few of these conditions. We have, therefore, reviewed pregnancy-specific adjustments in the management of these disorders. PMID:26020727

  16. The immunological basis of endotoxin-induced tumor regression. Requirement for a pre-existing state of concomitant anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    It was shown that of four syngeneic, murine tumors investigated, only those that evoked the generation of a state of concomitant anti-tumor immunity were susceptible to endotoxin-induced regression. Moreover, the temporal relationship between the generation of concomitant immunity and the onset of susceptibility to endotoxin-induced regression points to the likely possibility that tumor regression depends on the preceding acquisition of the specifically-sensitized, effector T cells that express concomitant immunity. It is suggested that endotoxin-induced hemorrhagic necrosis which invariably precedes tumor regression serves to create conditions inside the tumor that are conducive to the entry and the functioning of effector T cells. It is also suggested that tumor necrosis factor causes hemorrhagic necrosis rather than tumor regression. PMID:309922

  17. The prevalence of the pre-existing hepatitis C viral variants and the evolution of drug resistance in patients treated with the NS3-4a serine protease inhibitor telaprevir

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Libin; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Perelson, Alan S

    2008-01-01

    Telaprevir (VX-950), a novel hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3-4A serine protease inhibitor, has demonstrated substantial antiviral activity in patients infected with HCV genotype 1. Some patients experience viral breakthrough, which has been shown to be associated with emergence of telaprevir-resistant HCV variants during treatment. The exact mechanisms underlying the rapid selection of drug resistant viral variants during dosing are not fully understood. In this paper, we develop a two-strain model to study the pre-treatment prevalence of the mutant virus and derive an analytical solution of the mutant frequency after administration of the protease inhibitor. Our analysis suggests that the rapid increase of the mutant frequency during therapy is not due to mutant growth but rather due to the rapid and profound loss of wild-type virus, which uncovers the pre-existing mutant variants. We examine the effects of backward mutation and hepatocyte proliferation on the pre-existence of the mutant virus and the competition between wild-type and drug resistant virus during therapy. We then extend the simple model to a general model with multiple viral strains. Mutations during therapy do not play a significant role in the dynamics of various viral strains, although they are capable of generating low levels of HCV variants that would otherwise be completely suppressed because of fitness disadvantages. Hepatocyte proliferation may not affect the pretreatment frequency of mutant variants, but is able to influence the quasispecies dynamics during therapy. It is the relative fitness of each mutant strain compared with wild-type that determines which strain(s) will dominate the virus population. The study provides a theoretical framework for exploring the prevalence of pre-existing mutant variants and the evolution of drug resistance during treatment with other protease inhibitors or HCV polymerase inhibitors.

  18. The mechanism of Fe(2+)-initiated lipid peroxidation in liposomes: the dual function of ferrous ions, the roles of the pre-existing lipid peroxides and the lipid peroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Zhang, Y; Qian, Z; Shen, X

    2000-11-15

    The mechanism of Fe(2+)-initiated lipid peroxidation in a liposomal system was studied. It was found that a second addition of ferrous ions within the latent period lengthened the time lag before lipid peroxidation started. The apparent time lag depended on the total dose of Fe(2+) whenever the second dose of Fe(2+) was added, which indicates that Fe(2+) has a dual function: to initiate lipid peroxidation on one hand and suppress the species responsible for the initiation of the peroxidation on the other. When the pre-existing lipid peroxides (LOOH) were removed by incorporating triphenylphosphine into liposomes, Fe(2+) could no longer initiate lipid peroxidation and the acceleration of Fe(2+) oxidation by the liposomes disappeared. However, when extra LOOH were introduced into liposomes, both enhancement of the lipid peroxidation and shortening of the latent period were observed. When the scavenger of lipid peroxyl radicals (LOO(.)), N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylene-diamine, was incorporated into liposomes, neither initiation of the lipid peroxidation nor acceleration of the Fe(2+) oxidation could be detected. The results may suggest that both the pre-existing LOOH and LOO(.) are necessary for the initiation of lipid peroxidation. The latter comes initially from the decomposition of the pre-existing LOOH by Fe(2+) and can be scavenged by its reaction with Fe(2+). Only when Fe(2+) is oxidized to such a degree that LOO(.) is no longer effectively suppressed does lipid peroxidation start. It seems that by taking the reactions of Fe(2+) with LOOH and LOO(.) into account, the basic chemistry in lipid peroxidation can explain fairly well the controversial phenomena observed in Fe(2+)-initiated lipid peroxidation, such as the existence of a latent period, the critical ratio of Fe(2+) to lipid and the required oxidation of Fe(2+). PMID:11062055

  19. The contribution of negative reproductive experiences and chronic medical conditions to depression and pain among Israeli women.

    PubMed

    Sarid, Orly; Segal-Engelchin, Dorit; Cwikel, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This study of 302 Israeli women sought to investigate the associations among stressful reproductive experiences (e.g. fertility problems, abortions, and traumatic births), chronic medical conditions, pain, and depression. The specific aims of the study were to examine (1) the effect of stressful reproductive experiences, chronic medical conditions, and pain on depressive symptoms and (2) the effect of stressful reproductive experiences, chronic medical conditions, and depressive symptoms on pain. Our findings corroborate with previous studies demonstrating that depression and pain are two interrelated, but different phenomena, which have both common and distinct risk factors. The findings are discussed in the light of stress and adaptation theories that point to the long-term effects of stressful life events on emotional and physiological aspects such as depression and pain.

  20. Trends, productivity losses, and associated medical conditions among toxoplasmosis deaths in the United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Patricia L; Kuo, Tony; Javanbakht, Marjan; Sorvillo, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have quantified toxoplasmosis mortality, associated medical conditions, and productivity losses in the United States. We examined national multiple cause of death data and estimated productivity losses caused by toxoplasmosis during 2000-2010. A matched case-control analysis examined associations between comorbid medical conditions and toxoplasmosis deaths. In total, 789 toxoplasmosis deaths were identified during the 11-year study period. Blacks and Hispanics had the highest toxoplasmosis mortality compared with whites. Several medical conditions were associated with toxoplasmosis deaths, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lymphoma, leukemia, and connective tissue disorders. The number of toxoplasmosis deaths with an HIV codiagnosis declined from 2000 to 2010; the numbers without such a codiagnosis remained static. Cumulative disease-related productivity losses for the 11-year period were nearly $815 million. Although toxoplasmosis mortality has declined in the last decade, the infection remains costly and is an important cause of preventable death among non-HIV subgroups.

  1. Management of Osteoporosis among the Elderly with Other Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Safford, Monika M.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent chronic disease in the US and worldwide. The most serious consequence of this disorder is fractures, which have a serious negative impact on quality of life and are often the trigger for accelerated deterioration, ultimately ending in death. Despite the availability of effective preventive treatments, osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and/or undertreated, particularly among the elderly, who are also at greatest risk. In addition, the presence of co-morbid medical conditions may be both a barrier to osteoporosis care and a risk factor for falls; thus individuals with multiple co-morbid conditions may be a particularly high-risk group. The management of osteoporosis involves improving bone health via adequate nutrition, calcium and vitamin D supplements, and fall prevention strategies. Although these measures are important in the management of all patients, most elderly patients are likely to need additional pharmacological therapy to adequately reduce their fracture risk. Several pharmacological treatments have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of fracture, including bisphosphonates (e.g. alendronate, risedronate, ibandronate, zoledronic acid), denosumab, raloxifene, calcitonin and teriparatide. Despite recent advances in osteoporosis care, additional action is urgently needed to improve the quality of life of osteoporotic patients in general and of elderly patients in particular, since fracture outcomes are typically poorer in older than in younger patients. This article reviews the current status of osteoporosis management, emphasizing the need to improve osteoporosis care, with a particular focus on the US, by the use of quality- improvement measures and incentives, which might result in an increased awareness and improved treatment for this debilitating disease. PMID:22715862

  2. Agreement Between Self-Report and Medical Record Prevalence of 16 Chronic Conditions in the Alaska EARTH Study.

    PubMed

    Koller, Kathryn R; Wilson, Amy S; Asay, Elvin D; Metzger, Jesse S; Neal, Diane E

    2014-07-01

    The gold standard for health information is the health record. Hospitalization and outpatient diagnoses provide health systems with data on which to project health costs and plan programmatic changes. Although health record information may be reliable and perceived as accurate, it may not include population-specific information and may exclude care provided outside a specific health care facility. Sole reliance on medical record information may lead to underutilization of health care services and inadequate assessment of population health status. In this study, we analyzed agreement, without assuming a gold standard, between self-reported and recorded chronic conditions in an American Indian/Alaska Native cohort. Self-reported health history was collected from 3821 adult participants of the Alaska EARTH study during 2004-2006. Participant medical records were electronically accessed and reviewed. Self-reported chronic conditions were underreported in relation to the medical record and both information sources reported the absence more reliably than the presence of conditions (across conditions, median positive predictive value = 64%, median negative predictive value = 94%). Agreement was affected by age, gender, and education. Differences between participant- and provider-based prevalence of chronic conditions demonstrate why health care administrators and policy makers should not rely exclusively on medical record-based administrative data for a comprehensive evaluation of population health.

  3. Agreement Between Self-Report and Medical Record Prevalence of 16 Chronic Conditions in the Alaska EARTH Study.

    PubMed

    Koller, Kathryn R; Wilson, Amy S; Asay, Elvin D; Metzger, Jesse S; Neal, Diane E

    2014-07-01

    The gold standard for health information is the health record. Hospitalization and outpatient diagnoses provide health systems with data on which to project health costs and plan programmatic changes. Although health record information may be reliable and perceived as accurate, it may not include population-specific information and may exclude care provided outside a specific health care facility. Sole reliance on medical record information may lead to underutilization of health care services and inadequate assessment of population health status. In this study, we analyzed agreement, without assuming a gold standard, between self-reported and recorded chronic conditions in an American Indian/Alaska Native cohort. Self-reported health history was collected from 3821 adult participants of the Alaska EARTH study during 2004-2006. Participant medical records were electronically accessed and reviewed. Self-reported chronic conditions were underreported in relation to the medical record and both information sources reported the absence more reliably than the presence of conditions (across conditions, median positive predictive value = 64%, median negative predictive value = 94%). Agreement was affected by age, gender, and education. Differences between participant- and provider-based prevalence of chronic conditions demonstrate why health care administrators and policy makers should not rely exclusively on medical record-based administrative data for a comprehensive evaluation of population health. PMID:24399443

  4. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination must be placed in the patient's medical... anesthesia services. (B) An updated examination of the patient, including any changes in the patient's... anesthesia services. (ii) Admitting diagnosis. (iii) Results of all consultative evaluations of the...

  5. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination must be placed in the patient's medical... anesthesia services. (B) An updated examination of the patient, including any changes in the patient's... anesthesia services. (ii) Admitting diagnosis. (iii) Results of all consultative evaluations of the...

  6. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent...

  7. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent...

  8. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... payment: Medically directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent...

  9. Men in extreme conditions: some medical and psychological aspects of the Auschwitz concentration camp.

    PubMed

    Radil-Weiss, T

    1983-08-01

    The second world war ended many years ago. Most of those who survived the stay at the German concentration camp at Auschwitz have already died of the consequences of their imprisonment; those still alive are already in the last third of their life. Is there any point in returning to the experiences of those days? Consideration of the mental hygiene of former prisoners cautions us that perhaps we should not do it. But consideration of the general interest holds that we are not entitled to ignore any knowledge that can contribute to social development--including medicine and psychology--even if acquired under unspeakably awful conditions. In addition, since the war new generations have grown up that play an increasingly significant role in various spheres of life but have little concrete information about those events; they can neither rationally nor emotionally understand how the horrors connected with fascism and the war could have happened. In a sense it is encouraging that they cannot grasp such inhuman behavior; nevertheless, we must adhere to the following motto: "Nothing must be forgotten, nobody will be forgotten." We owe it to those millions who did not survive--both the victims of the Holocaust and those who fought against it. These are arguments in favor of returning to the facts that are ineffaceably recorded somewhere in our memories. In doing so, however, we must remember that at times we are revisiting experiences of a boy of 14 as recalled by a 50-year-old man. The material below, examining the medical as well as psychological aspects of imprisonment at Auschwitz, is based on my own memories, as an adolescent imprisoned at Auschwitz. I have tried to move from this individual account to more general statements, although the methodological apparatus on which scientific analysis is usually based is absent. PMID:6622601

  10. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... a doctor of medicine, osteopathy, or podiatric medicine. (a) Standard: Plan of care. The plan of..., plan of care, and medical supervision. 484.18 Section 484.18 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... HEALTH SERVICES Administration § 484.18 Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of...

  11. Chronic kidney disease is associated with a higher 90-day mortality than other chronic medical conditions in patients with sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Ashham; Mulwande, Evelyn; Steinau, Maximilian; Bergmann, Ingo; Frederik Popov, Aron; Ghadimi, Michael; Beissbarth, Tim; Bauer, Martin; Hinz, José

    2015-01-01

    According to previous studies, the clinical course of sepsis could be affected by preexisting medical conditions, which are very common among patients with sepsis. This observational study aimed at investigating whether common chronic medical conditions affect the 90-day mortality risk in adult Caucasian patients with sepsis. A total of 482 patients with sepsis were enrolled in this study. The ninety-day mortality was the primary outcome; organ failure was the secondary outcome. Sepsis-related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores and the requirements for organ support were evaluated to assess organ failure. A multivariate Cox regression model for the association between the 90-day mortality risk and chronic preexisting medical conditions adjusted for all relevant confounders and mortality predictors revealed the highest hazard ratio for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) (hazard ratio, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.46-3.46; p = 0.0002). Patients with CKD had higher SOFA scores than patients without CKD (8.9 ± 4.0 and 6.5 ± 3.4, respectively; p < 0.0001). Additionally, an analysis of organ-specific SOFA scores revealed higher scores in three organ systems (kidney, cardiovascular and coagulation). Patients with CKD have the highest 90-day mortality risk compared with patients without CKD or with other chronic medical conditions. PMID:25995131

  12. Medical Conditions and Healthcare Utilization among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Group Homes in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Joel M.; Botuck, Shelly; Damiani, Marco R.; Levy, Philip H.; Dern, Thomas A.; Freeman, Stephen E.

    2006-01-01

    The shift in living situations for adults with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDDD) from family homes to group homes has raised questions about their healthcare needs and access to appropriate healthcare services. This study was undertaken to describe the disability characteristics and medical conditions in a sample of adults…

  13. ROC study of four LCD displays under typical medical center lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Langer, Steve; Fetterly, Ken; Mandrekar, Jay; Harmsen, Scott; Bartholmai, Brian; Patton, Charles; Bishop, Alan; McCannel, Colin

    2006-03-01

    Nine observers reviewed a previously assembled library of 320 chest computed radiography (CR) images. Observers participated in four sessions, reading a different 1/4 of the sample on each of four liquid crystal displays: a 2-megapixel (MP) consumer color display, a 2-MP business color display, a 2-MP medical-grade gray display, and a 3-MP gray display. Each display was calibrated according to the DICOM Part 14 standard. The viewing application required observer log-in, then randomized the order of the subsample seen on the display, and timed the responses of the observer to render a 1-5 judgment on the absence or presence of ILD on chest CRs. Selections of 1-2 were considered negative, 3 was indeterminate, and 4-5 were positive. The order of viewing sessions was also randomized for each observer. The experiment was conducted under controlled lighting, temperature, and sound conditions to mimic conditions typically found in a patient examination room. Lighting was indirect, and illuminance at the display face was 195 +/- 8% lux and was monitored over the course of the experiment. The average observer sensitivity for the 2 MP color consumer, 2 MP business color, 2 MP gray, and 3 MP gray displays were 83.7%, 84.1%, 85.5%, and 86.7%, respectively. The only pairwise significant difference was between the 2-MP consumer color and the 2-MP gray (P = 0.05). Effect of order within a session was not significant (P = 0.21): period 1 (84.3%), period 2 (86.2%), period 3 (85.4%), period 4 (84.1%). Observer specificity for the various displays was not statistically significant (P = 0.21). Finally, a timing analysis showed no significant difference between the displays for the user group (P = 0.13), ranging from 5.3 s (2 MP color business) to 5.9 s (3 MP Gray). There was, however, a reduction in time over the study that was significant (P < 0.001) for all users; the group average decreased from 6.5 to 4.7 s per image. Physical measurements of the resolution, contrast, and noise

  14. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  15. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  16. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  17. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Medical records must stress the psychiatric components of the record, including history of findings and... record of mental status; (4) Note the onset of illness and the circumstances leading to admission;...

  18. Diabetes mellitus, other medical conditions and familial history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, D T; Schiffman, M; Everhart, J; Goldstein, A; Lillemoe, K D; Swanson, G M; Schwartz, A G; Brown, L M; Greenberg, R S; Schoenberg, J B; Pottern, L M; Hoover, R N; Fraumeni, J F

    1999-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer conducted in three areas of the USA, 484 cases and 2099 controls were interviewed to evaluate the aetiologic role of several medical conditions/interventions, including diabetes mellitus, cholecystectomy, ulcer/gastrectomy and allergic states. We also evaluated risk associated with family history of cancer. Our findings support previous studies indicating that diabetes is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, as well as a possible complication of the tumour. A significant positive trend in risk with increasing years prior to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was apparent (P-value for test of trend = 0.016), with diabetics diagnosed at least 10 years prior to diagnosis having a significant 50% increased risk. Those treated with insulin had risks similar to those not treated with insulin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6 and 1.5 respectively), and no trend in risk was associated with increasing duration of insulin treatment. Cholecystectomy also appeared to be a risk factor, as well as a consequence of the malignancy. Subjects with a cholecystectomy at least 20 years prior to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer experienced a 70% increased risk, which was marginally significant. In contrast, subjects with a history of duodenal or gastric ulcer had little or no elevated risk (OR = 1.2; confidence interval = 0.9–1.6). Those treated by gastrectomy had the same risk as those not receiving surgery, providing little support for the hypothesis that gastrectomy is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A significant 40% reduced risk was associated with hay fever, a non-significant 50% decreased risk with allergies to animals, and a non-significant 40% reduced risk with allergies to dust/moulds. These associations, however, may be due to chance since no risk reductions were apparent for asthma or several other types of allergies. In addition, we observed significantly increased risks for subjects reporting a first-degree relative

  19. Effect of Providing Conditional Economic Compensation on Uptake of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Masters, Samuel H.; Rao, Samwel; Bronson, Megan A.; Lanham, Michele; Omanga, Eunice; Evens, Emily; Agot, Kawango

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Novel strategies are needed to increase the uptake of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in sub-Saharan Africa and enhance the effectiveness of male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy. OBJECTIVE To determine whether small economic incentives could increase circumcision prevalence by addressing reported economic barriers to VMMC and behavioral factors such as present-biased decision making. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized clinical trial conducted between June 22, 2013, and February 4, 2014, among 1504 uncircumcised men aged 25 to 49 years in Nyanza region, Kenya. VMMC services were provided free of charge and participants were randomized to 1 of 3 intervention groups or a control group. INTERVENTIONS Participants in the 3 intervention groups received varying amounts of compensation conditional on undergoing circumcision at 1 of 9 study clinics within 2 months of enrollment. Compensation took the form of food vouchers worth 200 Kenya shillings (≈US $2.50), 700 Kenya shillings (≈US $8.75), or 1200 Kenya shillings (≈US $15.00), which reflected a portion of transportation costs and lost wages associated with getting circumcised. The control group received no compensation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES VMMC uptake within 2 months. RESULTS Analysis of data for 1502 participants with complete data showed that VMMC uptake within 2 months was higher in the US $8.75 group (6.6%; 95% CI, 4.3%–9.5% [25 of 381]) and the US $15.00 group (9.0%; 95% CI, 6.3%–12.4% [34 of 377]) than in the US $2.50 group (1.9%; 95% CI, 0.8%–3.8% [7 of 374]) and the control group (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.6%–3.5% [6 of 370]). In logistic regression analysis, the US $8.75 group had significantly higher VMMC uptake than the control group (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.3; 95% CI, 1.7–10.7), as did the US $15.00 group (AOR 6.2; 95% CI, 2.6–15.0). Effect sizes for the US $8.75 and US $15.00 groups did not differ significantly (P = .20). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE

  20. Disparities in the Reporting and Treatment of Health Conditions in Children: An Analysis of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, James P; Mandell, David S; Rostain, Anthony L; Zhao, Huaqing; Hadley, Trevor R

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether racial and ethnic disparities in health care use differ for physical and behavioral health conditions. Data Sources Secondary analysis of the 1996–1997 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of children aged 2–18 years old who were members of participating households. Children were categorized as Hispanic, black, or white. Differences in caregiver-reported behavioral and physical health conditions and services use were compared, and estimates were weighted to reflect the complex sampling scheme. Principal Findings Of eligible children weighted to represent over 44 million in each year, 13–15 percent were Hispanic, 14 percent black, and 68–70 percent white. After adjusting for potential confounding, Hispanic and black children were less likely to report externalizing behavioral conditions than white children. Black but not Hispanic children were more likely than white children to report asthma. In addition, Hispanic and black children were less likely to report ambulatory visits, and black children were less likely to report receiving a prescription medication than white children. There were no differences in reported emergency room visits or hospitalizations. Interactions between race and various health conditions, health status, insurance, and income were not significant. Conclusions In this nationally representative sample, we identified racial and ethnic disparities in the reporting of health conditions and the use of discretionary health services. Disparities differed between those with behavioral conditions and those with physical conditions. These disparities were not explained by traditional measures including the presence of health conditions, health status, insurance, and family income, and suggest that national surveys such as Medical Expenditure Panel Survey may benefit from the inclusion of additional explanatory measures. PMID:16584463

  1. [Intravitreal injections of medications in Germany. Contract situation and legal conditions].

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, F; Wiedemann, P; Kampik, A; Holz, F; Bartz-Schmidt, K U

    2009-05-01

    Despite the increasing application of both approved and off-label drugs for intravitreal administration, the German health system still does not provide an accounting code for the procedure of intravitreal injections. Health insurances and politicians are exerting pressure in order to limit the expected increase in the number of medications and costs due to demographic factors. Although the price for the drug can be determined by the manufacturer, a standing committee has to agree on the fee to be charged for the medical service of injection and subsequent examinations. Until the missing arrangement has been made, each individual surgeon can balance accounts with the patients who have claim for reimbursement. Many contracts have recently been made in order to regulate the extent of performance and charges for the application of medications and follow-up examinations to reduce administration costs. Due to medical liability and ethical code, physicians are obliged to provide a cost-effective and adequate treatment as well as a comprehensive preoperative patient education including efficacy, potential complications, limited prescription and free choice of a medical practitioner. It also appears prudent to explain relevant terms such as 'off-label' and 'level of evidence'. To prevent any suspicion of personal advantage, patients should be informed if placed contracts do not allow equal reimbursement for the same treatment or similar drugs. PMID:19408003

  2. [On systemic training of preventive medical specialists under the present conditions].

    PubMed

    Makarova, V G; Tkachev, P G; Kiriushin, V A

    2002-01-01

    The results of a systemic approach to training the students of the Faculty of Preventive Medicine, I. P. Pavlov Ryazan State Medical University during the reorganization of higher medical education in the country, which covered pre-higher higher, and post-higher education are presented. Prehigher education on the basis of school and the university assumes that students will obtain extended theoretical and practical skills in chemistry, anatomy, and biology. Higher education at the stage of propedeutic hygiene forms in students ideas of the significance of environmental factors for human health, the threshold of their action, and sanitary standardization. PMID:12198902

  3. Manchester Clinical Placement Index (MCPI). Conditions for Medical Students' Learning in Hospital and Community Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dornan, Tim; Muijtjens, Arno; Graham, Jennifer; Scherpbier, Albert; Boshuizen, Henny

    2012-01-01

    The drive to quality-manage medical education has created a need for valid measurement instruments. Validity evidence includes the theoretical and contextual origin of items, choice of response processes, internal structure, and interrelationship of a measure's variables. This research set out to explore the validity and potential utility of an…

  4. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... State laws, court orders, or subpoenas. (c) Standard: Content of record. The medical record must contain... such a practitioner is acting in accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, hospital... with nationally recognized and evidence-based guidelines; (iii) Ensures that the periodic and...

  5. Spiritually Competent Practice with Individuals and Families Dealing with Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len

    2011-01-01

    Counselors and psychotherapists are increasingly expected to provide services that are spiritually competent. Those counseling individuals and families where medical concerns are a focus would do well to consider the implications of spiritual competence in their work. The article defines spiritual competence, describes spiritual competencies, and…

  6. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent anesthesia services...

  7. 42 CFR 415.110 - Conditions for payment: Medically directed anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... anesthesia services. 415.110 Section 415.110 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... directed anesthesia services. (a) General payment rule. Medicare pays for the physician's medical direction of anesthesia services for one service or two through four concurrent anesthesia services...

  8. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination... prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. (B) An updated examination of the patient... surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. (ii) Admitting diagnosis. (iii) Results of...

  9. 42 CFR 482.24 - Condition of participation: Medical record services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. The medical history and physical examination... prior to surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. (B) An updated examination of the patient... surgery or a procedure requiring anesthesia services. (ii) Admitting diagnosis. (iii) Results of...

  10. 42 CFR 410.38 - Durable medical equipment: Scope and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 1861(e)(1), 1861(mm)(1) and 1819(a)(1) of the Act, respectively. (c) Power mobility devices (PMDs)—(1... meaning as in section 1861(r)(1) of the Act. Power mobility device means a covered item of durable medical... mobility device if the physician or treating practitioner, as defined in paragraph (c)(1) of this...

  11. Prevalence of Chronic Medical Conditions in Adults with Mental Retardation: Comparison with the General Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapell, Deborah; Nightingale, Beryle; Rodriguez, Ana; Lee, Joseph H.; Zigman, Warren B.; Schupf, Nicole

    1998-01-01

    A study interviewed caregivers and reviewed medical records of 278 adults with mental retardation with and without Down syndrome. The adults with mental retardation had age-related disorders comparable to those in the general population, but there was an increased frequency of thyroid disorders, nonischemic heart disorders, and sensory impairment.…

  12. A Multi-Group Latent Class Analysis of Chronic Medical Conditions Among Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Swartz, James A

    2016-10-01

    Until recently, research on the health of gay and other men who have sex with men (MSM) has focused on risk for and the health consequences of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. A multigroup latent class analysis examined a range of lifetime chronic medical conditions (CMCs) among MSM. Covariates included sociodemographics, substance use, psychological distress, and HIV serostatus. A two-class model best fit the medical condition data: a low probabilities class for most CMCs and a moderate to high probabilities (MHP) class. HIV serostatus was associated with increased within-class probabilities for some CMCs, particularly gastrointestinal and skin disorders. Only increasing age and use of erectile dysfunction drugs were directly associated with increased odds of being in the MHP class whereas methamphetamine use, identifying as gay, and lower alcohol use were indirectly associated. Implications of the findings for future research and the health care needs of MSM are discussed.

  13. Concordance between respondent self-reports and medical records for chronic conditions: experience from the Veterans Health Study.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Katherine M; Miller, Donald R; Lincoln, Elizabeth; Lee, Austin; Kazis, Lewis E

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have frequently relied on case identification using clinician-based screening as the standard. This study evaluates a self-administered screening questionnaire developed for use in the Veterans Health Study. We compared concordance between elderly patients' reports of selected chronic illnesses and the medical record. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a self-report screening questionnaire for case identification in an outcomes study of elderly respondents. Reports of the presence of selected chronic illnesses were compared in a sample of patients (N=402) receiving outpatient care between 2 data sources, patient self-report and medical record, to determine overall concordance in 5 common chronic conditions (hypertension, adult-onset diabetes mellitus, chronic low-back pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, and chronic lung disease). Discordance between the 2 data sources varied by condition. Differences in reporting were small for diabetes and hypertension, intermediate for chronic lung disease, and larger for osteoarthritis of the knee and chronic low-back pain, where the chart did not identify substantial proportions of cases reported in the questionnaire. Use of patient-reported screening questionnaires, which are self-administered, is a valid, cost-efficient method to identify some chronic illnesses. Using medical records alone may result in underestimation of some symptom-based conditions.

  14. Living conditions, ability to seek medical treatment, and awareness of health conditions and healthcare options among homeless persons in Tokyo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Toda, Ryouhei; Shiraishi, Tomonobu; Toyoda, Hirokuni; Toyozawa, Hideyasu; Kamioka, Yasuaki; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shimada, Naoki; Shirasawa, Takako; Hoshino, Hiromi; Kokaze, Akatsuki

    2011-12-01

    Empirical data indicative of the health conditions and medical needs of homeless persons are scarce in Japan. In this study, with the aim of contributing to the formulation of future healthcare strategies for the homeless, we conducted a self-administered questionnaire survey and interviews at a park in Shinjuku Ward, Tokyo, to clarify the living conditions of homeless persons and their health conditions and awareness about the availability of medical treatment. Responses from 55 homeless men were recorded (response rate: 36.7%). With the exception of one person, none of them possessed a health insurance certificate. Half of the respondents reported having a current income source, although their modal monthly income was 30,000 yen($1 was approximately 90 yen). The number of individuals who responded "yes" to the questions regarding "Consulting a doctor on the basis of someone's recommendation" and "Being aware of the location of the nearest hospital or clinic" was significantly higher among those who had someone to consult when they were ill than among those who did not (the odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] were 15.00 [3.05-93.57] and 11.45 [1.42-510.68], respectively). This showed that whether or not a homeless person had a person to consult might influence his healthcare-seeking behavior. When queried about the entity they consulted (multiple responses acceptable), respondents mentioned "life support organizations" (61.1%) and "public offices" (33.3%). Overall, 94.5% of the respondents were aware of swine flu (novel influenza A (H1N1)). Their main sources of information were newspapers and magazines. On the basis of these findings, with regard to the aim of formulating healthcare strategies for homeless persons, while life support organizations and public offices play significant roles as conduits to medical institutions, print media should be considered useful for communicating messages to homeless persons.

  15. Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control Among Hypertensive Patients With Coexisting Long-Term Conditions in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu Ting; Wang, Harry H.X.; Liu, Kirin Q.L.; Lee, Gabrielle K.Y.; Chan, Wai Man; Griffiths, Sian M.; Chen, Ruo Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a typical example of long-term disease posing formidable challenges to health care. One goal of antihypertensive therapy is to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) control and reduce co-occurring chronic conditions (multimorbidity). This study aimed to assess the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence, and to explore the association between poor BP control and multimorbidity, with implications for hypertension management. A cross-sectional design with multistage sampling was adopted to recruit Chinese hypertensive patients attending general out-patient clinics from 3 geographic regions in Hong Kong. A modified systemic sampling methodology with 1 patient as a sampling unit was used to recruit consecutive samples in each general out-patient clinic. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a standardized protocol. Poor BP control was defined as having systolic BP/diastolic BP ≥130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease; and ≥140/90 mm Hg for others. Medication adherence was assessed by a validated Chinese version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A simple unweighted enumeration was adopted to measure the combinations of coexisting long-term conditions. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted with medication adherence and multimorbidity as outcome variables, respectively, after controlling for effects of patient-level covariates. The prevalence of multimorbidity was 47.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 45.4%–49.4%) among a total of 2445 hypertensive patients. The proportion of subjects having 0, 1, and ≥2 additional long-term conditions was 52.6%, 29.1%, and 18.3%, respectively. The overall rate of poor adherence to medication was 46.6%, whereas the rate of suboptimal BP control was 48.7%. Albeit the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence was not found to be statistically significant, patients with poorly controlled BP were more likely to have multimorbidity

  16. Perception of stress-related working conditions in hospitals (iCept-study): a comparison between physicians and medical students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The students’ perception of working conditions in hospitals hasn’t been subject of research in Germany so far. However the perception plays an important role talking about the sustainability of working conditions. The iCept Study wants to examine the perception of medical students compared to the perception of practicing physicians. Methods/design The perception will be investigated with a redesigned questionnaire based upon two established and validated questionnaires. The two samples built for this study (students and physician) will be chosen from members of the labor union Marburger Bund. The iCept-Study is designed as an anonymized online-survey. Discussion The iCept-Study is thought to be the basis of ongoing further investigations regarding the perception of working conditions in hospitals. The results shall serve the facilitation of improving working conditions. PMID:23442606

  17. An Integral Effects Test in a zion-like geometry to investigate the effects of pre-existing hydrogen on direct containment heating in the Surtsey Test Facility. The IET-6 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    The sixth experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-6) series was conducted to investigate the effects of high pressure melt ejection on direct containment heating. Scale models of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limitor plate with a 4-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The cavity contained 3.48 kg of water, which corresponds to condensate levels in the Zion plant, and the containment basement floor was dry. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten thermite was ejected by steam at an initial pressure of 6.3 MPa into the reactor cavity. The Surtsey vessel atmosphere contained pre-existing hydrogen to represent partial oxidation of the zirconium in the Zion core. The initial composition of the vessel atmosphere was 87.1 mol.% N{sub 2}, 9.79 mol.% O{sub 2}, and 2.59 mol.% H{sub 2}, and the initial absolute pressure was 198 kPa. A partial hydrogen burn occurred in the Surtsey vessel. The peak vessel pressure increase was 279 kPa in IET-6, compared to 246 kPa in the IET-3 test. The total debris mass ejected into the Surtsey vessel in IET-6 was 42.5 kg. The gas grab sample analysis indicated that there were 180 g{center_dot} moles of pre-existing hydrogen, and that 308{center_dot}moles of hydrogen were produced by steam/metal reactions. About 335 g{center_dot}moles of hydrogen burned, and 153 g{center_dot}moles remained unreacted.

  18. [Investigation of actual condition of management and disposal of medical radioactive waste in Korea].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Horiuchi, Shoji; Imoto, Atsushi

    2009-07-20

    In order to realize the rational management and disposal of radioactive waste like DIS or its clearance as performed in Europe, North America, and Japan, we investigated the situation of medical radioactive waste in Korea and its enforcement. We visited three major Korean facilities in May 2008 and confirmed details of the procedure being used by administering a questionnaire after our visit. From the results, we were able to verify that the governmental agency had established regulations for the clearance of radioactive waste as self-disposal based on the clearance level of IAEA in Korea and that the medical facilities performed suitable management and disposal of radioactive waste based on the regulations and superintendence of a radiation safety officer. The type of nuclear medicine was almost the same as that in Japan, and the half-life of all radiopharmaceuticals was 60 days or less. While performing regulatory adjustment concerning the rational management and disposal of radioactive waste in Korea for reference also in this country, it is important to provide an enforcement procedure with quality assurance in the regulations.

  19. [Hygienic aspects of the lifestyle of medical students under the present conditions].

    PubMed

    Kozhevnikova, N G; Kataeva, V A

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives the results of a study of the lifestyle of medical students. The students' motor activity has been found to be lower and to continue to drop in the undergraduates. Examination of the daily routine has shown that 92% of the students break the study-and-rest routine; the reported reasons for this are a high academic load, a prolonged academic day, a study-work combination, mental stress during examinations, and computer-aided learning. The students' nutrition is inadequate in major nutrients, poor-quality, irregular, and uncontrolled. The college crowd shows a preponderance of bad habits; 85% of cases had these or those combinations of risk factors: smoking, low motor activity, overweight, alcohol consumption, etc.

  20. An Index of Multiple Psychosocial, Syndemic Conditions Is Associated with Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Lisa M; Hotton, Anna L; Garofalo, Rob; Muldoon, Abigail L; Jaffe, Kaitlyn; Bouris, Alida; Voisin, Dexter; Schneider, John

    2016-04-01

    Medication adherence among HIV-infected individuals is critical to limit disease progression and onward transmission. Evidence indicates that among youth living with HIV (YLH), adherence is suboptimal and related to co-morbid psychosocial conditions. Cross-sectional data from 212 YLH, ages 16-29, collected between 2011-2014 in Chicago were analyzed to assess the relationship of multiple psychosocial conditions (e.g., depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, moderate/heavy marijuana use, moderate/heavy alcohol use, HIV-related stigma) to ART adherence (i.e., a "syndemic.") Adherence was regressed on an index of increasing numbers of psychosocial conditions, controlling for demographic and treatment factors as well as enrollment site. The mean age of participants was 24, 89% were male, 87% black, and 91% behaviorally infected. Psychosocial conditions were prevalent, including 38% and 34% with high depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively, 54% and 25% with a moderate/high level of marijuana and alcohol use, respectively, and 46% reporting high HIV-related stigma. In regression analysis, the likelihood of ART adherence decreased with the number of syndemic conditions (linear dose response, p = 0.02) as did the odds of viral load suppression (p = 0.008). Interventions to address these conditions in concert with biomedical treatment as prevention for YLH are needed. PMID:27028184

  1. An Index of Multiple Psychosocial, Syndemic Conditions Is Associated with Antiretroviral Medication Adherence Among HIV-Positive Youth.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Lisa M; Hotton, Anna L; Garofalo, Rob; Muldoon, Abigail L; Jaffe, Kaitlyn; Bouris, Alida; Voisin, Dexter; Schneider, John

    2016-04-01

    Medication adherence among HIV-infected individuals is critical to limit disease progression and onward transmission. Evidence indicates that among youth living with HIV (YLH), adherence is suboptimal and related to co-morbid psychosocial conditions. Cross-sectional data from 212 YLH, ages 16-29, collected between 2011-2014 in Chicago were analyzed to assess the relationship of multiple psychosocial conditions (e.g., depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, moderate/heavy marijuana use, moderate/heavy alcohol use, HIV-related stigma) to ART adherence (i.e., a "syndemic.") Adherence was regressed on an index of increasing numbers of psychosocial conditions, controlling for demographic and treatment factors as well as enrollment site. The mean age of participants was 24, 89% were male, 87% black, and 91% behaviorally infected. Psychosocial conditions were prevalent, including 38% and 34% with high depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively, 54% and 25% with a moderate/high level of marijuana and alcohol use, respectively, and 46% reporting high HIV-related stigma. In regression analysis, the likelihood of ART adherence decreased with the number of syndemic conditions (linear dose response, p = 0.02) as did the odds of viral load suppression (p = 0.008). Interventions to address these conditions in concert with biomedical treatment as prevention for YLH are needed.

  2. Association between mental health conditions and rehospitalization, mortality, and functional outcomes in patients with stroke following inpatient rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Limited evidence exists regarding the association of pre-existing mental health conditions in patients with stroke and stroke outcomes such as rehospitalization, mortality, and function. We examined the association between mental health conditions and rehospitalization, mortality, and functional outcomes in patients with stroke following inpatient rehabilitation. Methods Our observational study used the 2001 VA Integrated Stroke Outcomes database of 2162 patients with stroke who underwent rehabilitation at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Separate models were fit to our outcome measures that included 6-month rehospitalization or death, 6-month mortality post-discharge, and functional outcomes post inpatient rehabilitation as a function of number and type of mental health conditions. The models controlled for patient socio-demographics, length of stay, functional status, and rehabilitation setting. Results Patients had an average age of 68 years. Patients with stroke and two or more mental health conditions were more likely to be readmitted or die compared to patients with no conditions (OR: 1.44, p = 0.04). Depression and anxiety were associated with a greater likelihood of rehospitalization or death (OR: 1.33, p = 0.04; OR:1.47, p = 0.03). Patients with anxiety were more likely to die at six months (OR: 2.49, p = 0.001). Conclusions Patients with stroke with pre-existing mental health conditions may need additional psychotherapy interventions, which may potentially improve stroke outcomes post-hospitalization. PMID:22085779

  3. Implications of maternal conditions and pregnancy course on offspring's medical problems in adult life.

    PubMed

    von Ehr, Julia; von Versen-Höynck, Frauke

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, numerous epidemiological, clinical and experimental data show that periconceptional, perinatal and postnatal environment determines the offspring's risk for later-life chronic disease. For this phenomenon, the term "fetal" or "perinatal programming" is used. In exposed offspring already in childhood and early adulthood, metabolic and cardiovascular changes can be observed, leading to obesity, diabetes and hypertension. Nowadays, the mode of conception (e.g., in vitro fertilization), maternal metabolic conditions (e.g., undernutrition, overnutrition, diabetes) and complications during pregnancy (e.g., preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction) are suspected to be negative predictors for offspring's long-term health. Mechanisms responsible for these effects still remain mainly unclear, but include epigenetic, transcriptional, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and reactive oxygen species. This review presents a piece of the puzzle with regards to periconceptional and early perinatal conditions determining later-life risk for chronic adult disease. PMID:27522600

  4. Apparatus for detecting at least one predetermined condition and providing an informational signal in response thereto in a medication infusion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A medication infusion system provides redundant safety and includes condition detecting and informational alarm signal generating apparatus for indicating if (1) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; (2) a programmable input from a patient or physician would result in exceeding a safe dosage limit; (3) the reservoir containing medication has been filled; (4) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually effected; (5) battery voltage is low; (6) the medication reserve is low; and (7) the system has been switched off. The apparatus may provide subcutaneous electrical, thermal, or audible stimulation to the patient and also provides a signal which a physician may monitor. The stimulation may be coded to separately identify each above-listed deviation in nominal system performance. In addition, the number of medication requests are correlated with actual medication dispensing to assure proper operation. An identification scheme is provided which matches the patient with his or her corresponding medication.

  5. PubMed search strategies for the identification of etiologic associations between hypothalamic-pituitary disorders and other medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Mattioli, Stefano; Ghigo, Ezio; Gori, Davide

    2013-12-01

    Biomedical literature has enormously grown in the last decades and become broadly available through online databases. Ad-hoc search methods, created on the basis of research field and goals, are required to enhance the quality of searching. Aim of this study was to formulate efficient, evidence-based PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles assessing etiologic associations between a condition of interest and hypothalamic-pituitary disorders (HPD). Based on expert knowledge, 17 MeSH (Medical Subjects Headings) and 79 free terms related to HPD were identified to search PubMed. Using random samples of abstracts retrieved by each term, we estimated the proportion of articles containing pertinent information and formulated two strings (one more specific, one more sensitive) for the detection of articles focusing on the etiology of HPD, that were then applied to retrieve articles identifying possible etiologic associations between HPD and three diseases (malaria, LHON and celiac disease) considered not associated to HPD, and define the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to find one potentially pertinent article. We propose two strings: one sensitive string derived from the combination of articles providing the largest literature coverage in the field and one specific including combined terms retrieving ≥40% of potentially pertinent articles. NNR were 2.1 and 1.6 for malaria, 3.36 and 2.29 for celiac disease, 2.8 and 2.2 for LHON, respectively. For the first time, two reliable, readily applicable strings are proposed for the retrieval of medical literature assessing putative etiologic associations between HPD and other medical conditions of interest.

  6. A Description of Medical Conditions in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Follow-Up of the 1980s Utah/UCLA Autism Epidemiologic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kyle B.; Cottle, Kristina; Bakian, Amanda; Farley, Megan; Bilder, Deborah; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes medical conditions experienced by a population-based cohort of adults with autism spectrum disorder whose significant developmental concerns were apparent during childhood. As part of a 25-year outcome study of autism spectrum disorder in adulthood, medical histories were collected on 92 participants (N = 69 males) who were…

  7. [Evaluating dependency of medical rehabilitation results in occupational polyneuropathy patiens on treatment strategy and work conditions].

    PubMed

    Boiko, I V; Loginova, N N; Klitsenko, O A

    2015-01-01

    The authors evaluated efficiency of rehabilitation in patients with upper limbs occupational polyneuropathy, in accordance with length of service under physical overstrain. The study was based on follow-up of 268 patients. Treatment was initiated after the patients discontinued work hazardous for health. Drug and sanatorium treatment was effective in 67-86% of patients (with differences in occupational groups). The effect was only transitory (for 15-60 days) decrease of the disease clinical manifestations. Rehabilitation prognosis was reliably better in patients who worked during the disease development in conditions with number of stereotypic working movements of hands within hygienic norms. The treatment efficiency is reliably higher when started at younger age, regular drug and sanatorium treatment for many years. Placement of the patients on jobs avoiding physical overstrain enabled nowadays to prevent progression of occupational polyneuropathy.

  8. Pharmacological modulation of caspase-8 in thymus-related medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzesi, Nicola; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Thuy, Trinh Thy; Martelli, Maria Paola; Liberati, Anna Marina; Ayroldi, Emira; Riccardi, Carlo; Delfino, Domenico V

    2014-10-01

    The thymus is a lymphoid organ that governs the development of a diverse T-cell repertoire capable of defending against nonself-antigens and avoiding autoimmunity. However, the thymus can also succumb to different diseases. Hypertrophic diseases, such as thymomas, are typically associated with impairment of negative selection, which leads to autoimmune disease, or disruption of positive selection, which results in immunodeficiency. Hypotrophic diseases of the thymus can manifest during acute infections, cancer, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, or with aging. This condition leads to decreased immune function and can be treated by either replacing lost thymic tissue or by preventing thymic tissue death. Studies have demonstrated the critical role of caspase-8 in regulating apoptosis in the thymus. In this review, we discuss how pharmacological activation and inhibition of caspase-8 can be used to treat hypertrophic and hypotrophic diseases of the thymus, respectively, to improve its function.

  9. Medical Underwriting In Long-Term Care Insurance: Market Conditions Limit Options For Higher-Risk Consumers.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Portia Y; Grabowski, David C; Cohen, Marc; Shi, Xiaomei; Stevenson, David G

    2016-08-01

    A key feature of private long-term care insurance is that medical underwriters screen out would-be buyers who have health conditions that portend near-term physical or cognitive disability. We applied common underwriting criteria based on data from two long-term care insurers to a nationally representative sample of individuals in the target age range (50-71 years) for long-term care insurance. The screening criteria put upper bounds on the current proportion of Americans who could gain coverage in the individual market without changes to medical underwriting practice. Specifically, our simulations show that in the target age range, approximately 30 percent of those whose wealth meets minimum industry standards for suitability for long-term care insurance would have their application for such insurance rejected at the underwriting stage. Among the general population-without considering financial suitability-we estimated that 40 percent would have their applications rejected. The predicted rejection rates are substantially higher than the rejection rates of about 20-25 percent of applicants in the actual market. In evaluating reforms for long-term care financing and their potential to increase private insurance rates, as well as to reduce financial pressure on public safety-net programs, policy makers need to consider the role of underwriting in the market for long-term care insurance. PMID:27503976

  10. Medical Underwriting In Long-Term Care Insurance: Market Conditions Limit Options For Higher-Risk Consumers.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Portia Y; Grabowski, David C; Cohen, Marc; Shi, Xiaomei; Stevenson, David G

    2016-08-01

    A key feature of private long-term care insurance is that medical underwriters screen out would-be buyers who have health conditions that portend near-term physical or cognitive disability. We applied common underwriting criteria based on data from two long-term care insurers to a nationally representative sample of individuals in the target age range (50-71 years) for long-term care insurance. The screening criteria put upper bounds on the current proportion of Americans who could gain coverage in the individual market without changes to medical underwriting practice. Specifically, our simulations show that in the target age range, approximately 30 percent of those whose wealth meets minimum industry standards for suitability for long-term care insurance would have their application for such insurance rejected at the underwriting stage. Among the general population-without considering financial suitability-we estimated that 40 percent would have their applications rejected. The predicted rejection rates are substantially higher than the rejection rates of about 20-25 percent of applicants in the actual market. In evaluating reforms for long-term care financing and their potential to increase private insurance rates, as well as to reduce financial pressure on public safety-net programs, policy makers need to consider the role of underwriting in the market for long-term care insurance.

  11. Special medical conditions associated with catatonia in the internal medicine setting: hyponatremia-inducing psychosis and subsequent catatonia.

    PubMed

    Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases.There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia.

  12. Special Medical Conditions Associated with Catatonia in the Internal Medicine Setting: Hyponatremia-Inducing Psychosis and Subsequent Catatonia

    PubMed Central

    Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases. There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia. PMID:25102520

  13. The choice dilemma in chronic hematological conditions: Why choosing is not only a medical issue? A psycho-cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Chiara; Riva, Silvia; Masiero, Marianna; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Research in cognitive psychology focused on risk perception and decision making was shown to facilitate treatment choice and patient's satisfaction with decision in a number of medical conditions, increasing perceived alliance between patient and physician, and adherence to treatment. However, this aspect has been mostly neglected in the literature investigating choice of treatment for chronic hematological conditions. In this paper, a patient centered model and a shared decision making (SDM) approach to treatment switch in chronic hematological conditions, in particular chronic myeloid leukemia, atrial fibrillation, and β-thalassemia is proposed. These pathologies have a series of implications requiring important decisions about new available treatments. Although new generation treatments may provide a significant improvement in patient's health and health-related quality of life (HrQoL), a significant percentage of them is uncertain about or refuse treatment switch, even when strongly suggested by healthcare guidelines. Possible cognitive and emotional factors which may influence decision making in this field and may prevent appropriate risk-and-benefits evaluation of new treatment approaches are reviewed. Possible adaptive strategies to improve quality of care, patient participation, adherence to treatment and final satisfaction are proposed, and implications relatively to new treatment options available are discussed.

  14. [Conditions of professional activity of the staff of units and formations of special support and its medical and psychological support].

    PubMed

    Poluboyarinov, V N; Grabskii, Yu V; Zemlyannikov, D A; Kushchev, G G

    2016-02-01

    In the field of special support of nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects "human factor" is highlighted, which means that psychological status of crew is at the first place. The authors analysed conditions of professional activity, determined morbidity rates and psychologically important labour characteristics for military specialists working at nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects. The staff working at these objects undergoes irradiation, hostility of inhabitation and high psychological pressure. The authors presented data on peculiarities of health status and morbidity rate among military servicemen of the given category: the frequency of digestive apparatus diseases, diseases of nervous and circulatory systems is higher than in auxiliary subunits of the same military units. The authors determined the main principles and structure of measures of medical and psychological support of professional activity of the staff of military units of special support. PMID:27263211

  15. Measurement of Serum Melatonin in Intensive Care Unit Patients: Changes in Traumatic Brain Injury, Trauma, and Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Seifman, Marc A.; Gomes, Keith; Nguyen, Phuong N.; Bailey, Michael; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.; Cooper, David J.; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous hormone mainly produced by the pineal gland whose dysfunction leads to abnormal sleeping patterns. Changes in melatonin have been reported in acute traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the impact of environmental conditions typical of the intensive care unit (ICU) has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to compare daily melatonin production in three patient populations treated at the ICU to differentiate the role of TBI versus ICU conditions. Forty-five patients were recruited and divided into severe TBI, trauma without TBI, medical conditions without trauma, and compared to healthy volunteers. Serum melatonin levels were measured at four daily intervals at 0400 h, 1000 h, 1600 h, and 2200 h for 7 days post-ICU admission by commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The geometric mean concentrations (95% confidence intervals) of melatonin in these groups showed no difference being 8.3 (6.3–11.0), 9.3 (7.0–12.3), and 8.9 (6.6–11.9) pg/mL, respectively, in TBI, trauma, and intensive care cohorts. All of these patient groups demonstrated decreased melatonin concentrations when compared to control patients. This study suggests that TBI as well as ICU conditions, may have a role in the dysfunction of melatonin. Monitoring and possibly substituting melatonin acutely in these settings may assist in ameliorating long-term sleep dysfunction in all of these groups, and possibly contribute to reducing secondary brain injury in severe TBI. PMID:25477861

  16. Net Differences in Interview Data on Chronic Conditions and Information Derived from Medical Records. Vital and Health Statistics, Series 2, No. 57.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madow, William G.

    The California study, based on data from a national survey, compared accuracy and completeness of information on 7,182 chronic health conditions of persons, 17 years of age or older, given in household interviews with diagnostic information given by group medical plan physicians. Overreporting referred to conditions reported in the interview which…

  17. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., and medical supervision. Patients are accepted for treatment on the basis of a reasonable expectation that the patient's medical, nursing, and social needs can be met adequately by the agency in...

  18. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., and medical supervision. Patients are accepted for treatment on the basis of a reasonable expectation that the patient's medical, nursing, and social needs can be met adequately by the agency in...

  19. 42 CFR 484.18 - Condition of participation: Acceptance of patients, plan of care, and medical supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., and medical supervision. Patients are accepted for treatment on the basis of a reasonable expectation that the patient's medical, nursing, and social needs can be met adequately by the agency in...

  20. Apparatus for detecting a condition of a medication infusion system and providing an informational signal in response thereto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A medication infusion system having a means for providing an informational signal when (1) medication in the reservoir falls below a threshold level; (2) a fluid leak occurs in different portions of the system; and (3) the intended medication pumping does not correlate with the pumping actually affected.

  1. [Experience of medical assistance in the hosital of Plesetsk Cosmodrome under conditions of large patient load after explosion of a launch vehicle].

    PubMed

    Plekhanov, V N; Mel'nikov, O N; Shut', A D

    2013-11-01

    Military hospital of Plesetsk Cosmodrome was founded on 20 December 1958. The aims of the hospital were always connected with medical support of the cosmodrome, including emergency situations. On 18 March 1980 a Vostok-2M rocket exploded on its launch pad during a fuelling operation. Experience of medical assistance under conditions of large patient load showed the necessity of constant readiness to medical assistance to patients with combined pathology (burn injury, orthopedic trauma and thermochemical injury of the upper respiratory tract), expediency of compact patient accommodation along with the modern anaesthetic machine and readiness to frequent suction bronchoscopy.

  2. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills

    PubMed Central

    Psihogios, Alexandra M.; Kolbuck, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. Method 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Results Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. Conclusions This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. PMID:26002195

  3. Medical Comorbidity of Full and Partial Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in United States Adults: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Southwick, Steven M.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examined associations between lifetime trauma exposures, PTSD and partial PTSD, and past-year medical conditions in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Methods Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 34,653 participants in the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Logistic regression analyses evaluated associations of trauma exposure, PTSD and partial PTSD with respondent-reported medical diagnoses. Results After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid Axis I and II disorders, respondents with full PTSD were more likely than traumatized respondents without full or partial PTSD (comparison group) to report diagnoses of diabetes mellitus, noncirrhotic liver disease, angina pectoris, tachycardia, hypercholesterolemia, other heart disease, stomach ulcer, HIV seropositivity, gastritis, and arthritis (odds ratios [ORs]=1.2-2.5). Respondents with partial PTSD were more likely than the comparison group to report past-year diagnoses of stomach ulcer, angina pectoris, tachycardia, and arthritis (ORs=1.3-1.6). Men with full and partial PTSD were more likely than controls to report diagnoses of hypertension (both ORs=1.6), and both men and women with PTSD (ORs=1.8 and 1.6, respectively), and men with partial PTSD (OR=2.0) were more likely to report gastritis. Total number of lifetime traumatic event types was associated with many assessed medical conditions (ORs=1.04-1.16), reducing the magnitudes and rendering non-significant some of the associations between PTSD status and medical conditions. Conclusions Greater lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD are associated with numerous medical conditions, many of which are stress-related and chronic, in U.S. adults. Partial PTSD is associated with intermediate odds of some of these conditions. PMID:21949429

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR

  5. Concurrent Medical Conditions and Health Care Use and Needs among Children with Learning and Behavioral Developmental Disabilities, National Health Interview Survey, 2006-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieve, Laura A.; Gonzalez, Vanessa; Boulet, Sheree L.; Visser, Susanna N.; Rice, Catherine E.; Braun, Kim Van Naarden; Boyle, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies document various associated health risks for children with developmental disabilities (DDs). Further study is needed by disability type. Using the 2006-2010 National Health Interview Surveys, we assessed the prevalence of numerous medical conditions (e.g. asthma, frequent diarrhea/colitis, seizures), health care use measures (e.g. seeing a…

  6. [Organization of medical and psycho-educational services for first-grader's under condition of gymnasium education secondary education].

    PubMed

    Setko, N P; Lozinskiĭ, A S; Bulycheva, E V

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a model of organization of medical-psychological-pedagogical service for first graders not ready for systematic teaching in secondary education has been suggested. The results of study of the effectiveness of the introduction of medical, psychological and educational services in school are presented. Based on the dynamics of the autonomic balance, and functional reserve of biological adaptation in children at risk--not ready for medical and psycho-physiological criteria for the systematic training the need for such services on the basis of modern educational institutions has been proven in order to prevent deterioration of the health of students. PMID:23088129

  7. Trends in self-medication for dental conditions among patients attending oral health outreach programs in coastal Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Arun K.; Rao, Ashwini; Rajesh, Gururaghavendran; Shenoy, Ramya; Pai, Mithun B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence, pattern, and awareness of self-medication practices among patients presenting at oral health outreach programs in coastal Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study, based on an interview conducted in randomly selected 400 study subjects from the patients presenting at these oral health outreach programs. Data were collected regarding demographic information and the interview schedule consisting of 14 questions was administered. Results: Prevalence of self-medication was 30%. Respondents’ gender (χ2 = 5.095, P < 0.05), occupation (χ2 = 10.215, P < 0.05), the time from the last dental visit (χ2 = 8.108, P < 0.05), recommendation of drug(s) to family members or friends (χ2 = 75.565, P < 0.001), and the likelihood of self-medication in the next 6 months (χ2 = 80.999, P < 0.001) were significantly associated with self-medication. Male respondents were less likely to have undertaken self-medication (odds ratio = 0.581 [0.361, 0.933]). The frequently self-medicated drug was analgesics (42.5%) for toothache (69.2%). The regression model explained 39.4% (Nagelkerke R2) of the variance in self-medication practices. Conclusions: Prevalence of self-medication was 30% with demographic influence. Hence, this study highlights the policy implications for drug control by government agencies and stresses on the need for dental health education to discourage irrational drug use. PMID:26600642

  8. Specificity and Sensitivity of Claims-Based Algorithms for Identifying Members of Medicare+Choice Health Plans That Have Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rector, Thomas S; Wickstrom, Steven L; Shah, Mona; Thomas Greeenlee, N; Rheault, Paula; Rogowski, Jeannette; Freedman, Vicki; Adams, John; Escarce, José J

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of varying diagnostic and pharmaceutical criteria on the performance of claims-based algorithms for identifying beneficiaries with hypertension, heart failure, chronic lung disease, arthritis, glaucoma, and diabetes. Study Setting Secondary 1999–2000 data from two Medicare+Choice health plans. Study Design Retrospective analysis of algorithm specificity and sensitivity. Data Collection Physician, facility, and pharmacy claims data were extracted from electronic records for a sample of 3,633 continuously enrolled beneficiaries who responded to an independent survey that included questions about chronic diseases. Principal Findings Compared to an algorithm that required a single medical claim in a one-year period that listed the diagnosis, either requiring that the diagnosis be listed on two separate claims or that the diagnosis to be listed on one claim for a face-to-face encounter with a health care provider significantly increased specificity for the conditions studied by 0.03 to 0.11. Specificity of algorithms was significantly improved by 0.03 to 0.17 when both a medical claim with a diagnosis and a pharmacy claim for a medication commonly used to treat the condition were required. Sensitivity improved significantly by 0.01 to 0.20 when the algorithm relied on a medical claim with a diagnosis or a pharmacy claim, and by 0.05 to 0.17 when two years rather than one year of claims data were analyzed. Algorithms that had specificity more than 0.95 were found for all six conditions. Sensitivity above 0.90 was not achieved all conditions. Conclusions Varying claims criteria improved the performance of case-finding algorithms for six chronic conditions. Highly specific, and sometimes sensitive, algorithms for identifying members of health plans with several chronic conditions can be developed using claims data. PMID:15533190

  9. Adaptive multi-level conditional random fields for detection and segmentation of small enhanced pathology in medical images.

    PubMed

    Karimaghaloo, Zahra; Arnold, Douglas L; Arbel, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Detection and segmentation of large structures in an image or within a region of interest have received great attention in the medical image processing domains. However, the problem of small pathology detection and segmentation still remains an unresolved challenge due to the small size of these pathologies, their low contrast and variable position, shape and texture. In many contexts, early detection of these pathologies is critical in diagnosis and assessing the outcome of treatment. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic Adaptive Multi-level Conditional Random Fields (AMCRF) with the incorporation of higher order cliques for detecting and segmenting such pathologies. In the first level of our graphical model, a voxel-based CRF is used to identify candidate lesions. In the second level, in order to further remove falsely detected regions, a new CRF is developed that incorporates higher order textural features, which are invariant to rotation and local intensity distortions. At this level, higher order textures are considered together with the voxel-wise cliques to refine boundaries and is therefore adaptive. The proposed algorithm is tested in the context of detecting enhancing Multiple Sclerosis (MS) lesions in brain MRI, where the problem is further complicated as many of the enhancing voxels are associated with normal structures (i.e. blood vessels) or noise in the MRI. The algorithm is trained and tested on large multi-center clinical trials from Relapsing-Remitting MS patients. The effect of several different parameter learning and inference techniques is further investigated. When tested on 120 cases, the proposed method reaches a lesion detection rate of 90%, with very few false positive lesion counts on average, ranging from 0.17 for very small (3-5 voxels) to 0 for very large (50+ voxels) regions. The proposed model is further tested on a very large clinical trial containing 2770 scans where a high sensitivity of 91% with an average false positive

  10. An Evaluation of the Significance of Work-Related Influence Factors on Fitness and the Development of Medical and Orthopaedic Conditions in Military Executives

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Michael; Finze, Susanne; Holtherm, Christoph; Hinder, Jens; Lison, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health promotion is an effective tool to improve the state of health of employees. As part of occupational health promotion in the German Bundeswehr, top-ranking military executives are offered a medical examination and training programme. Health-related data is collected as a basis for training and lifestyle counselling. This data was subjected to a retrospective evaluation in order to identify occupational risk factors and their correlation with cardiovascular resilience, trunk strength, and the development of orthopaedic and internal disorders. A total of 122 military executives (all male, age 54.6 ± 4.2 years) answered a questionnaire aimed at evaluating private and occupational stress factors. The medical history was followed by a medical and orthopaedic examination involving a lactate performance test (treadmill or bicycle ergometry) and an isometric trunk strength measurement. The data obtained was then statistically evaluated. For military executives, work-related travelling and commuting involve a high risk of medical and orthopaedic conditions. Regular exercise leads to improved fitness levels. In order to prevent medical problems, military executives working long hours should regularly take part in fitness and weight training under professional instructions. PMID:27774505

  11. Effects of the Nursing Psychoeducation Program on the Acceptance of Medication and Condition-Specific Knowledge of Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Mitsunobu; Kohno, Ayumi

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the nursing psychoeducation program (NPE) for improving the acceptance of medication of inpatients with schizophrenia as well as their knowledge regarding their illness and the effects of medication on it. This study was a quasi-experimental study involving a convenience sample and was performed at the acute treatment units of two Japanese psychiatric hospitals. The subjects were recruited from among the inpatients being treated at the acute treatment units and were assigned to either the experimental or control group. The experimental group took part in the NPE, and the control group received the standard treatments for schizophrenia. Data were collected using structured questionnaires; i.e., the Medication Perception Scale for Patients with Schizophrenia (MPS), Drug Attitude Inventory-10 Questionnaire (DAI-10), and Knowledge of Illness and Drugs Inventory. Forty-three patients (13 men and 30 women) agreed in writing to participate in this study. During pre-/postintervention comparisons, the total MPS score, the 'efficacy of medication' subscale score, and the total DAI-10 score exhibited significant group×time interactions.

  12. The biostatistical theory versus the harmful dysfunction analysis, part 1: is part-dysfunction a sufficient condition for medical disorder?

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2014-12-01

    Christopher Boorse's biostatistical theory of medical disorder claims that biological part-dysfunction (i.e., failure of an internal mechanism to perform its biological function), a factual criterion, is both necessary and sufficient for disorder. Jerome Wakefield's harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder agrees that part-dysfunction is necessary but rejects the sufficiency claim, maintaining that disorder also requires that the part-dysfunction causes harm to the individual, a value criterion. In this paper, I present two considerations against the sufficiency claim. First, I analyze Boorse's central argument for the sufficiency claim, the "pathologist argument," which takes pathologists' intuitions about pathology as determinative of medical disorder and conclude that it begs the question and fails to support the sufficiency claim. Second, I present four counterexamples from the medical literature in which salient part-dysfunctions are considered nondisorders, including healthy disease carriers, HIV-positive status, benign mutations, and situs inversus totalis, thus falsifying the sufficiency claim and supporting the harm criterion.

  13. Teachers' Drug Reference: A Guide to Medical Conditions and Drugs Commonly Used in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agins, Alan P.

    This book provides a guide to approximately 175 drugs used with children. An introduction precedes the three major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, and medications in school.…

  14. Parent & Educators' Drug Reference: A Guide to Common Medical Conditions & Drugs Used in School-Aged Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agins, Alan P.

    This book provides a guide to more than 180 drugs used for children. An introduction precedes the four major sections of the guide. Section 1 provides an overview of pharmacology and therapeutics in chapters on the basics of pharmacology, the language of pharmacology and therapeutics, compliance, side effects, medications in school, and drug…

  15. [THE DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICAL CARE OF POPULATION IN CONDITIONS OF SPECIALIZED DAY-TIME HOSPITALS OF NEUROLOGICAL PROFILE].

    PubMed

    Grishina, N K; Solovieva, N B; Abdulsalamova, Z A

    2015-01-01

    The article considers issues concerning increasing of quality and accessibility of medical care in Moscow neurological profile included at the expense of wide-spread implementation of specialized day-time hospitals in health care practice. The analysis applied was based on average Moscow indicators of functioning of public health institutions and characteristics of clinical course of diseases of the mentioned profile.

  16. Effects of the Nursing Psychoeducation Program on the Acceptance of Medication and Condition-Specific Knowledge of Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Mitsunobu; Kohno, Ayumi

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the nursing psychoeducation program (NPE) for improving the acceptance of medication of inpatients with schizophrenia as well as their knowledge regarding their illness and the effects of medication on it. This study was a quasi-experimental study involving a convenience sample and was performed at the acute treatment units of two Japanese psychiatric hospitals. The subjects were recruited from among the inpatients being treated at the acute treatment units and were assigned to either the experimental or control group. The experimental group took part in the NPE, and the control group received the standard treatments for schizophrenia. Data were collected using structured questionnaires; i.e., the Medication Perception Scale for Patients with Schizophrenia (MPS), Drug Attitude Inventory-10 Questionnaire (DAI-10), and Knowledge of Illness and Drugs Inventory. Forty-three patients (13 men and 30 women) agreed in writing to participate in this study. During pre-/postintervention comparisons, the total MPS score, the 'efficacy of medication' subscale score, and the total DAI-10 score exhibited significant group×time interactions. PMID:27654241

  17. Medication Adherence and Blood Pressure Control Among Hypertensive Patients With Coexisting Long-Term Conditions in Primary Care Settings: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Ting; Wang, Harry H X; Liu, Kirin Q L; Lee, Gabrielle K Y; Chan, Wai Man; Griffiths, Sian M; Chen, Ruo Ling

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension is a typical example of long-term disease posing formidable challenges to health care. One goal of antihypertensive therapy is to achieve optimal blood pressure (BP) control and reduce co-occurring chronic conditions (multimorbidity). This study aimed to assess the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence, and to explore the association between poor BP control and multimorbidity, with implications for hypertension management.A cross-sectional design with multistage sampling was adopted to recruit Chinese hypertensive patients attending general out-patient clinics from 3 geographic regions in Hong Kong. A modified systemic sampling methodology with 1 patient as a sampling unit was used to recruit consecutive samples in each general out-patient clinic. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews using a standardized protocol. Poor BP control was defined as having systolic BP/diastolic BP ≥130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease; and ≥140/90 mm Hg for others. Medication adherence was assessed by a validated Chinese version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. A simple unweighted enumeration was adopted to measure the combinations of coexisting long-term conditions. Binary logistic regression analysis was conducted with medication adherence and multimorbidity as outcome variables, respectively, after controlling for effects of patient-level covariates.The prevalence of multimorbidity was 47.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 45.4%-49.4%) among a total of 2445 hypertensive patients. The proportion of subjects having 0, 1, and ≥2 additional long-term conditions was 52.6%, 29.1%, and 18.3%, respectively. The overall rate of poor adherence to medication was 46.6%, whereas the rate of suboptimal BP control was 48.7%. Albeit the influence of multimorbidity on medication adherence was not found to be statistically significant, patients with poorly controlled BP were more likely to have multimorbidity (adjusted

  18. Increased IgG4 responses to multiple food and animal antigens indicate a polyclonal expansion and differentiation of pre-existing B cells in IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Emma L; Vermeulen, Ellen; Makuch, Mateusz; van Leeuwen, Astrid; Sadler, Ross; Cargill, Tamsin; Klenerman, Paul; Aalberse, Rob C; van Ham, S Marieke; Barnes, Eleanor; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Background IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic fibroinflammatory condition, characterised by an elevated serum IgG4 concentration and abundant IgG4-positive plasma cells in the involved organs. An important question is whether the elevated IgG4 response is causal or a reflection of immune-regulatory mechanisms of the disease. Objectives To investigate if the IgG4 response in IgG4-RD represents a generalised polyclonal amplification by examining the response to common environmental antigens. Methods Serum from 24 patients with IgG4-RD (14 treatment-naive, 10 treatment-experienced), 9 patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis and an elevated serum IgG4 (PSC-high IgG4), and 18 healthy controls were tested against egg white and yolk, milk, banana, cat, peanut, rice and wheat antigens by radioimmunoassay. Results We demonstrated an elevated polyclonal IgG4 response to multiple antigens in patients with IgG4-RD and in PSC-high IgG4, compared with healthy controls. There was a strong correlation between serum IgG4 and antigen-specific responses. Responses to antigens were higher in treatment-naive compared with treatment-experienced patients with IgG4-RD. Serum electrophoresis and immunofixation demonstrated polyclonality. Conclusions This is the first study to show enhanced levels of polyclonal IgG4 to multiple antigens in IgG4-RD. This supports that elevated IgG4 levels reflect an aberrant immunological regulation of the overall IgG4 response, but does not exclude that causality of disease could be antigen-driven. PMID:25646372

  19. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma: Associated Conditions Asthma and Pregnancy Asthma Medications Asthma Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... make sure you are using it correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) ...

  20. Astronomy for Special Needs Children (Low-income and/or Serious Medical Conditions) and Their Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald

    2015-08-01

    I present the results of two NASA-IDEAS/STScI* sponsored and one IAU OAD grant for astronomy outreach programs for seriously ill or traumatically injured children and their families staying at the Ronald McDonald Houses of Long Island (New Hyde Park, NY) and Chicago or for children hospitalized at the Winthrop University Hospital Children’s Medical Center, (Mineola, NY). An astronomy program was also created for the five Fresh Air Fund Charity summer camps (low-income and special needs) and for a Hofstra summer camp for developmentally challenged youths.These programs are designed for children of all ages include” STSCi’s “Tonight’s Sky” (monthly guide to the sky); telescope observations of the Moon, Sun, planets, nebulae, and stars; and hands-on activities. During cloudy weather remote/robotic telescope observations are shown to the children.The staff and volunteers at the Ronald McDonald House and Children’s Medical Center are trained to use the telescope and to do astronony demonstrations. I created an Activity Book for the staff with demonstrations, participatory hands-on activities, and edible demonstrations using chocolate, marshmallows, and popcorn are to stimulate interest.These educational activities help children and their families learn about astronomy while providing a diversion to take their minds off their illness during a stressful time. The RMHs provide free or low-cost housing in a comfortable, supportive alternative atmosphere where family members sleep, eat, relax and find support from other families in similar situations. Families are kept united when mutual support is as critical as the medical treatment itself. The ill children and their families may stay for a few days or months because of chemotherapy, dialysis, or rehabilitative therapy. Children from 50 states and 50 countries stay the Chicago RMHs and there are 260 RMHs in the US and 65 worldwide.

  1. California decides that medical staff bylaws are not contracts.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Michael A

    2002-03-01

    The point of conflict between the majority and minority views is the existence of consideration. There is no question that hospitals are required to adopt medical staff bylaws, nor is there any doubt hornbook law states the performance of a pre-existing duty does not constitute consideration. Therefore, the issue of law is whether the hospital's grant of privileges and the physician's agreement to abide by the bylaws is separate or different "consideration" sufficient to justify the creation of a contract.

  2. A comparison of teaching three common ear, nose, and throat conditions to medical students through video podcasts and written handouts: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Edmond, Mark; Neville, Francesca; Khalil, Hisham S

    2016-01-01

    Background This pilot study conducted at the Peninsula Medical School is one of very few studies to compare the use of video podcasts to traditional learning resources for medical students. Methods We developed written handouts and video podcasts for three common ear, nose, and throat conditions; epistaxis, otitis media, and tonsillitis. Forty-one second-year students were recruited via email. Students completed a 60-item true or false statement test written by the senior author (20 questions per subject). Students were subsequently randomized to podcast or handouts. Students were able to access their resource via their unique university login on the university homepage and were given 3 weeks to use their resource. They then completed the same 60-item test. Results Both podcasts and handouts demonstrated a statistically significant increase in student scores (podcasts mean increase in scores 4.7, P=0.004, 95% confidence interval =0.07). Handout mean increase in scores 5.3, P=0.015, 95% confidence interval =0.11). However, there was no significant difference (P=0.07) between the two, with the handout group scoring fractionally higher (podcasts average post-exposure score =37.3 vs handout 37.8) with a larger average improvement. A 5-point Likert scale questionnaire demonstrated that medical students enjoy using reusable learning objects such as podcasts and feel that they should be used more in their curriculum. Conclusion Podcasts are as good as traditional handouts in teaching second-year medical students three core ear, nose, and throat conditions and enhance their learning experience. PMID:27274331

  3. Development of novel fluorescent probes for the analysis of protein interactions under physiological conditions with medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mafina, Marc-Krystelle; Hing, Karin A; Sullivan, Alice C

    2013-02-01

    In this article, a method to analyze protein adsorption on porous, clinically relevant samples under physiologically relevant conditions is described. The use of fluorescent probes was identified as a methodology that would facilitate analysis under a range of conditions including fully competitive conditions where a protein of interest may be labeled in isolation and then allowed to compete with unlabeled proteins on samples that require no specialized surface pretreatment. As a first step, this article describes the covalent labeling of isolated bovine serum albumin (BSA) with fluorescent fluoresceinthioureidoaminocaproic acid, FTCA, giving FTCA-BSA. The fluorescence intensity of FTCA-BSA was then used to monitor the adsorption and desorption of the protein under noncompetitive conditions with two forms of hydroxyapatite discs (silicate-substituted, SA and stoichiometric, HA) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and minimum essential Eagles' medium (MEM). Noncompetitive conditions were used to facilitate the validation of the technique in which data obtained from these experiments were corroborated against data obtained using an established total protein assay method (Quant-IT kit, Invitrogen). These experiments demonstrated that the FTCA-BSA probe had several advantages including a greater sensitivity at lower concentrations and a considerably longer lifetime. The results also demonstrated that the interaction of BSA with SA and HA was also highly temperature- and media-dependent. Under the most physiologically relevant conditions of MEM at 37 °C, BSA was more readily adsorbed to SA with significant differences between biomaterials, but no differences were observed during the desorption process. The use of this method to analyze adsorption under competitive conditions will be the subject of further investigations.

  4. 5% Lidocaine-medicated plaster for the treatment of chronic peripheral neuropathic pain: complex regional pain syndrome and other neuropathic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Enrique; Calderón-Seoane, María Eloísa; García-Hernández, Rafael; Torres, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic neuropathic pain and chronic complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), in particular, are debilitating and difficult-to-treat conditions that have a strong impact on patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster as add-on therapy in patients with chronic peripheral neuropathic pain conditions, including CRPS. Patients and methods This was a single-center, prospective, observational study set in a specialized pain unit of a tertiary hospital in Spain. A total of 56 patients with long-standing peripheral neuropathic pain, ten of them with CRPS, received 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster as add-on analgesic therapy for 6 months. Results After 6 months of treatment, a ≥50% reduction in pain intensity was attained by 75% of patients, as measured by numeric rating scale (NRS) for pain. The average NRS score was reduced by 61% (4.7 points), from a baseline mean score of 7.8 to an end point mean score of 3.1. Marked improvements were also observed in the CRPS group: six out of ten patients achieved a ≥50% reduction in NRS score, and the average NRS score for patients with CRPS was reduced by 51% (4.0 points), from a baseline mean score of 7.9 to an end point mean score of 3.9. The improvements in pain intensity were partially translated into a decrease in disability index and in anxiety levels. Conclusion 5% Lidocaine-medicated plaster may be useful as add-on therapy for a number of peripheral neuropathic pain conditions, including CRPS. PMID:27785090

  5. Treatment of pre-existing cardiomyopathy during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Sofie; De Pauw, Michel; Tromp, Fiona; Ascoop, An-Kristien; Roelens, Kristien; De Backer, Julie

    2014-04-01

    Heart failure is an established predictor of primary cardiac events during pregnancy. Adequate heart failure treatment in pregnant women is hampered by important foetotoxicity of several conventional drugs. Hydralazine with or without long-acting nitrates has been proposed as an alternative for ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. There are no published data, however, on the use of hydralazine to treat heart failure during pregnancy. We describe the course and outcome of pregnancy in two patients with heart failure. A 31-year-old woman with dilated cardiomyopathy was not treated with hydralazine during pregnancy and developed worsening heart failure. A 36-year-old woman with ischaemic cardiomyopathy was treated with hydralazine early during pregnancy and remained stable throughout and after pregnancy. We assume that early initiation of hydralazine as an alternative for ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers during pregnancy in patients with cardiomyopathy could prevent further left ventricular dilatation and worsening heart failure.

  6. Effect of Hot-Attribute Aged Ginger Tea on Chinese Medical Pulse Condition of Healthy Young Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Dan-Ping; Tyan, Chu-Chang; Chen, Jian-Jung; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Young individuals typically have a dry-heat (燥熱 zào rè) constitution and feel overly stimulated. This study observes specialties on the right-bar (右關 yòu guān) section of the radial-arterial pulse of healthy young subjects, and investigates pulse variations induced by different attribute foods. Chinese medical doctors grouped thirty subjects into heat and non-heat constitutions. Each subject took water, aged ginger tea, and coconut water, well recognized as neutral, hot, and cold drinks, on different visits. The current study observed physiological signals induced by the samples using novel noninvasive sphygmography and a blood pressure monitor. As the baseline bigger percussion wave, dicrotic wave, and area in the sphygmogram of the non-heat constitution subjects, this work suggests that blood vessels of these subjects may be more relaxed than that of the heat constitution ones. Stroke volume increased and pulse pressure decreased in the non-heat constitution subjects after taking aged ginger tea, which may elevate arterial compliance corresponding to maintaining an estimated radial-arterial diameter in our study. However, the percussion wave widened and the valley increased in the heat constitution subjects after taking aged ginger tea. This corresponds to the markedly reduced radial-arterial diameter, indicating tighter blood vessels than the baseline status. Accordingly, this study confirms that selecting foods with attributes opposite to personal constitutions is important for reestablishing a healthy cold-heat balance within the human body. Moreover, novel noninvasive sphygmography may be a useful instrument to classify scientifically the heat personal constitution and the responses to different attribute foods. PMID:24716108

  7. Effect of hot-attribute aged ginger tea on chinese medical pulse condition of healthy young humans.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dan-Ping; Tyan, Chu-Chang; Chen, Jian-Jung; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2011-10-01

    Young individuals typically have a dry-heat ( zào rè) constitution and feel overly stimulated. This study observes specialties on the right-bar ( yòu guān) section of the radial-arterial pulse of healthy young subjects, and investigates pulse variations induced by different attribute foods. Chinese medical doctors grouped thirty subjects into heat and non-heat constitutions. Each subject took water, aged ginger tea, and coconut water, well recognized as neutral, hot, and cold drinks, on different visits. The current study observed physiological signals induced by the samples using novel noninvasive sphygmography and a blood pressure monitor. As the baseline bigger percussion wave, dicrotic wave, and area in the sphygmogram of the non-heat constitution subjects, this work suggests that blood vessels of these subjects may be more relaxed than that of the heat constitution ones. Stroke volume increased and pulse pressure decreased in the non-heat constitution subjects after taking aged ginger tea, which may elevate arterial compliance corresponding to maintaining an estimated radial-arterial diameter in our study. However, the percussion wave widened and the valley increased in the heat constitution subjects after taking aged ginger tea. This corresponds to the markedly reduced radial-arterial diameter, indicating tighter blood vessels than the baseline status. Accordingly, this study confirms that selecting foods with attributes opposite to personal constitutions is important for reestablishing a healthy cold-heat balance within the human body. Moreover, novel noninvasive sphygmography may be a useful instrument to classify scientifically the heat personal constitution and the responses to different attribute foods. PMID:24716108

  8. Sociodemographic characteristics and chronic medical conditions as risk factors for herpes zoster: a population-based study from primary care in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Esteban-Vasallo, María D; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro; Gil de Miguel, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate incidence density rates (IDR) of herpes zoster (HZ) and to analyze the association with sociodemographic characteristics and selected chronic medical conditions. The study cohort consisted of the adult population included in the Public Health System of the Autonomous Community of Madrid, Spain on 1/10/2009 (5 244 402 persons). Data source were electronic medical records from primary care between 1/10/2009-31/12/2012. Individual socioeconomic status (SES) was inferred by geocoding. Poisson regression analyses were stratified by sex, to identify factors associated with HZ. We identified 81 541 incident cases of HZ (61.7% in women and 46.5% in the group aged 60 and over). IDR was 4.11 per 1000 person-years in men and 5.95 in women. IDR were higher with age, in autochthonous population, those with lower SES and in patients with immunodeficiencies. After adjustment, higher incidence rate ratios were found with age, autochthonous origin, lower SES, and in patients with HIV-infection/AIDS (3.20, CI95% 2.90-3.53 in men and 2.98, CI95% 2.58-3.45 in women), and other immunodeficiencies (1.57, CI95% 1.41-1.75 and 1.65, CI95% 1.50-1.80). COPD, asthma, DM, ischemic heart disease, other cardiovascular diseases, and cancer were also associated with an increased incidence of HZ. We conclude that older, autochthonous patients with lower SES and with certain underlying medical conditions had a higher probability of suffering HZ. Electronic databases are useful for estimating the incidence of HZ, and for finding associations with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Identifying unrecognized risk factors for HZ, such as asthma or cardiovascular diseases, is crucial to interpret the epidemiology of HZ, to target vaccination programs and to monitor their effect. PMID:24805130

  9. Nonequilibrium structural condition in the medical TiNi-based alloy surface layer treated by electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Neiman, Aleksei A. Lotkov, Aleksandr I.; Meisner, Ludmila L. Semin, Viktor O.; Koval, Nikolai N.; Teresov, Anton D.

    2014-11-14

    The research is devoted to study the structural condition and their evolution from the surface to the depth of TiNi specimens treated by low-energy high-current electron beams with surface melting at a beam energy density E = 10 J/cm{sup 2}, number of pulses N = 10, and pulse duration τ = 50 μs. Determined thickness of the remelted layer, found that it has a layered structure in which each layer differs in phase composition and structural phase state. Refinement B2 phase lattice parameters in local areas showed the presence of strong inhomogeneous lattice strain.

  10. Withdrawal and withholding of medical treatment for patients lacking capacity who are in a critical condition--reflections on the judgment of the Supreme Court in Aintree University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust v James.

    PubMed

    Wise, Ian

    2014-12-01

    Consideration of recent judgment of the Supreme Court in leading case concerning the withdrawal and withholding of medical treatment for a patient lacking capacity who was in a critical condition. PMID:25349194

  11. Medical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2016-01-01

    The use of medicinal marijuana is increasing. Marijuana has been shown to have therapeutic effects in certain patients, but further research is needed regarding the safety and efficacy of marijuana as a medical treatment for various conditions. A growing body of research validates the use of marijuana for a variety of healthcare problems, but there are many issues surrounding the use of this substance. This article discusses the use of medical marijuana and provides implications for home care clinicians.

  12. Weather conditions and visits to the medical wing of emergency rooms in a metropolitan area during the warm season in Israel: a predictive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Ilya; Kalter-Leibovici, Ofra; Chetrit, Angela; Stav, Nir; Epstein, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Global climate changes affect health and present new challenges to healthcare systems. The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of visits to the medical wing of emergency rooms (ERs) in public hospitals during warm seasons, and to develop a predictive model that will forecast the number of visits to ERs 2 days ahead. Data on daily visits to the ERs of the four largest medical centers in the Tel-Aviv metropolitan area during the warm months of the year (April-October, 2001-2004), the corresponding daily meteorological data, daily electrical power consumption (a surrogate marker for air-conditioning), air-pollution parameters, and calendar information were obtained and used in the analyses. The predictive model employed a time series analysis with transitional Poisson regression. The concise multivariable model was highly accurate ( r 2 = 0.819). The contribution of mean daily temperature was small but significant: an increase of 1°C in ambient temperature was associated with a 1.47% increase in the number of ER visits ( P < 0.001). An increase in electrical power consumption significantly attenuated the effect of weather conditions on ER visits by 4% per 1,000 MWh ( P < 0.001). Higher daily mean SO2 concentrations were associated with a greater number of ER visits (1% per 1 ppb increment; P = 0.017). Calendar data were the main predictors of ER visits ( r 2 = 0.794). The predictive model was highly accurate in forecasting the number of visits to ERs 2 days ahead. The marginal effect of temperature on the number of ER visits can be attributed to behavioral adaptations, including the use of air-conditioning.

  13. The Effect of Different Storage Conditions on the Physical Properties of Pigmented Medical Grade I Silicone Maxillofacial Material

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dharrab, Ayman A.; Tayel, Seham B.; Abodaya, Mona H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage solutions that simulate acidic, alkaline, and sebum conditiions on the physical properties of pigmented (colorant elastomer) cosmesil M511 maxillofacial prosthetic material. Materials and Methods. Sixty specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions and were tested before and after immersion of different storage conditions for six months at 37 °C. The following tests were performed: color changes (group I), solution absorption (group II), surface roughness (group III), and scanning electron microscopy (group IV). Results. There were no significant changes observed in the color and solution absorption tests while surface roughness revealed significant difference between control group and other testing storage medium groups, and this result was supported by SEM analysis that revealed limited surface changes. Conclusions. Cosmaseil material is an acceptable cross-linked formulation that withstands storage in different solutions with variable pH. The addition of pigment cannot vary the physical properties of these materials. Surface roughness test as well as SEM microscopic study showed moderate changes indicating a limited effect on the surface of the material. PMID:23606978

  14. Managing work–family conflict in the medical profession: working conditions and individual resources as related factors

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Bernburg, Monika; Vitzthum, Karin; Groneberg, David A; Klapp, Burghard F; Danzer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study developed and tested a research model that examined the effects of working conditions and individual resources on work–family conflict (WFC) using data collected from physicians working at German clinics. Material and methods This is a cross-sectional study of 727 physicians working in German hospitals. The work environment, WFC and individual resources were measured by the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, the WFC Scale, the Brief Resilient Coping Scale and the Questionnaire for Self-efficacy, Optimism and Pessimism. Descriptive, correlation and linear regression analyses were applied. Results Clinical doctors working in German hospitals perceived high levels of WFC (mean=76). Sociodemographic differences were found for age, marital status and presence of children with regard to WFC. No significant gender differences were found. WFCs were positively related to high workloads and quantitative job demands. Job resources (eg, influence at work, social support) and personal resources (eg, resilient coping behaviour and self-efficacy) were negatively associated with physicians’ WFCs. Interaction terms suggest that job and personal resources buffer the effects of job demands on WFC. Conclusions In this study, WFC was prevalent among German clinicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WFC. Our results give a strong indication that both individual and organisational factors are related to WFC. Results may play an important role in optimising clinical care. Practical implications for physicians’ career planning and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:25941177

  15. Gender role stereotype and poor working condition pose obstacles for female doctors to stay in full-time employment: alumnae survey from two private medical schools in Japan.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Miki; Nomura, Kyoko; Higaki, Yuko; Akaishi, Yu; Seki, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Shizuko; Komoda, Takayuki; Otaki, Junji

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of physicians has become a serious problem in Japan. It has been pointed out that an increase in the number of female doctors may contribute to the aggravation of this shortage because it is known that women work fewer hours than male doctors. Here, we investigated how many female doctors had ever resigned from a full-time position, and elucidated the reasons why female doctors find it difficult to stay in full-time employment. An alumnae survey of 2 private medical schools was conducted in 2007. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to 1423 graduates and 711 responded with informed consent (response rate, 50%; mean age, 39 years). Overall, 55% of the respondents had previously resigned from full-time employment, of which 90% resigned within 10 years of graduating from medical school. The difficulty in balancing work, childbirth and child rearing (45%) were the top 2 reasons for resignation, followed by physical problems (12%) and long working hours (8%). Among those who resigned, only 33% returned to full-time employment. Women who had at least 1 child were only 30% of those who had never resigned and 84% of those who had previously resigned. The majority of study subjects, regardless of experience of resignation (88%), agreed that women should continue to work even after childbirth. In conclusion, the results of this study suggested that many female doctors resigned from a full-time position within 10 years of graduating from medical school, largely because of the gender role stereotype and poor working conditions.

  16. Preserved function of late outgrowth endothelial cells in medically-treated hypertensive patients under well-controlled conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Herrmann, Sandra M. S.; Zhu, Xiangyang; Jordan, Kyra L.; Gloviczki, Monika L.; Lerman, Amir; Textor, Stephen C.; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial-progenitor-cells participate in renal repair, but their number and function may be impaired by exposure to cardiovascular risk factors. The number of circulating endothelial-progenitor-cells is decreased in essential and renovascular hypertensive patients, but the effects of hypertension on endothelial-progenitor-cell function are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that endothelial-progenitor-cell function was preserved under well-controlled conditions in treated hypertensive patients. Patients with atherosclerotic-renal-artery-stenosis (n=22) or essential-hypertension (n=24) were studied during controlled sodium intake and anti-hypertensive regimen. Late-outgrowth-endothelial-progenitor-cells were isolated from the inferior vena cava and renal vein blood of atherosclerotic-renal-artery-stenosis and essential-hypertension patients, and a peripheral vein of matched normotensive controls (n=18). The angiogenic function of endothelial-progenitor-cells was assessed in vitro and multi-detector computer tomography used to measure single-kidney hemodynamics and function in atherosclerotic-renal-artery-stenosis and essential-hypertension patients. Inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial-progenitor-cell homing signals levels and renal release were calculated. Inferior vena cava and renal vein-obtained endothelial-progenitor-cell function were similar in atherosclerotic-renal-artery-stenosis and essential-hypertension patients, and comparable to that in normal controls (tube length 171.86±16.846, 191.09±14.222, 174.925±19.774μm, respectively). Function of renal vein-obtained endothelial-progenitor-cells directly correlated with stenotic-kidney glomerular filtration rate, endothelial-progenitor-cell homing factors and anti-inflammatory mediator levels in atherosclerotic-renal-artery-stenosis patients. Therefore, endothelial-progenitor-cell function was relatively preserved in atherosclerotic-renal-artery-stenosis patients, although it directly correlated

  17. Something is amiss in Denmark: A comparison of preventable hospitalisations and readmissions for chronic medical conditions in the Danish Healthcare system and Kaiser Permanente

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As many other European healthcare systems the Danish healthcare system (DHS) has targeted chronic condition care in its reform efforts. Benchmarking is a valuable tool to identify areas for improvement. Prior work indicates that chronic care coordination is poor in the DHS, especially in comparison with care in Kaiser Permanente (KP), an integrated delivery system based in the United States. We investigated population rates of hospitalisation and readmission rates for ambulatory care sensitive, chronic medical conditions in the two systems. Methods Using a historical cohort study design, age and gender adjusted population rates of hospitalisations for angina, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypertension, plus rates of 30-day readmission and mortality were investigated for all individuals aged 65+ in the DHS and KP. Results DHS had substantially higher rates of hospitalisations, readmissions, and mean lengths of stay per hospitalisation, than KP had. For example, the adjusted angina hospitalisation rates in 2007 for the DHS and KP respectively were 1.01/100 persons (95%CI: 0.98-1.03) vs. 0.11/100 persons (95%CI: 0.10-0.13/100 persons); 21.6% vs. 9.9% readmission within 30 days (OR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.84-3.47); and mean length of stay was 2.52 vs. 1.80 hospital days. Mortality up through 30 days post-discharge was not consistently different in the two systems. Conclusions There are substantial differences between the DHS and KP in the rates of preventable hospitalisations and subsequent readmissions associated with chronic conditions, which suggest much opportunity for improvement within the Danish healthcare system. Reductions in hospitalisations also could improve patient welfare and free considerable resources for use towards preventing disease exacerbations. These conclusions may also apply for similar public systems such as the US Medicare system, the NHS and other systems striving to improve the integration of care for persons

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of cancer in medical textbooks of ancient Iran.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud; Ali Tabatabaei, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that ancient Iranians were among the pioneers of medical science, and are therefore admired and praised by non-Iranian scholars for their efforts and accomplishments in this field. Investigations of medical and historical texts indicate that between the 10(th) and the 18(th) century A.D., ancient Iran experienced a golden age of medicine. Great physicians such as Rhazes, al-Ahwazi, Avicenna and others reviewed the medical textbooks of civilizations such as Greece and India, Theories were scientifically criticized, superstitious beliefs were discarded, valuable innovations were added to pre-existing knowledge and the ultimate achievements were compiled as precious textbooks. Alhawi by Rhazes, Cannon by Avicenna, and Kamil al-Sina'ah by al-Ahwazi are among the works that were treasured by domestic and foreign scientists alike, as well as future generations who continued to appreciate them for centuries. The above-mentioned textbooks discuss diseases and conditions related to neurosurgery, ophthalmology, ear, nose and throat, gastroenterology, urology, skeletomuscular system and other specialties, as well as cancer and similar subjects. One of the richest texts on the description, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and prognosis of cancer and therapeutic approaches is Alhawi by Mohammad ibn Zakarya al Razi (Rhazes). This article presents a brief summary of Rhazes' views about the definition of cancer, types, signs and symptoms, prevalence, complications, medical care, treatment and even surgical indications and contraindications. Moreover, his opinions are compared against the views of other physicians and theories of modern medicine. It is also recommended to review the medical heritage of Iran and evaluate the proposed treatments based on modern methodologies and scientific approaches. PMID:25512835

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of cancer in medical textbooks of ancient Iran

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud; Ali Tabatabaei, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Research shows that ancient Iranians were among the pioneers of medical science, and are therefore admired and praised by non-Iranian scholars for their efforts and accomplishments in this field. Investigations of medical and historical texts indicate that between the 10th and the 18th century A.D., ancient Iran experienced a golden age of medicine. Great physicians such as Rhazes, al-Ahwazi, Avicenna and others reviewed the medical textbooks of civilizations such as Greece and India, Theories were scientifically criticized, superstitious beliefs were discarded, valuable innovations were added to pre-existing knowledge and the ultimate achievements were compiled as precious textbooks. Alhawi by Rhazes, Cannon by Avicenna, and Kamil al-Sina’ah by al-Ahwazi are among the works that were treasured by domestic and foreign scientists alike, as well as future generations who continued to appreciate them for centuries. The above-mentioned textbooks discuss diseases and conditions related to neurosurgery, ophthalmology, ear, nose and throat, gastroenterology, urology, skeletomuscular system and other specialties, as well as cancer and similar subjects. One of the richest texts on the description, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and prognosis of cancer and therapeutic approaches is Alhawi by Mohammad ibn Zakarya al Razi (Rhazes). This article presents a brief summary of Rhazes’ views about the definition of cancer, types, signs and symptoms, prevalence, complications, medical care, treatment and even surgical indications and contraindications. Moreover, his opinions are compared against the views of other physicians and theories of modern medicine. It is also recommended to review the medical heritage of Iran and evaluate the proposed treatments based on modern methodologies and scientific approaches. PMID:25512835

  20. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They range from ... need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep instructions ...

  1. Abortion - medical

    MedlinePlus

    ... womb (uterus). There are different types of medical abortions: Therapeutic medical abortion is done because the woman has ... Therapeutic medical abortion; Elective medical abortion; Induced abortion; Nonsurgical abortion

  2. Conditional probability analysis of multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacilli isolated from tertiary medical institutions in South Korea during 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hak

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacilli is a major problem globally. However, little is known about the combined probability of resistance to various antibiotics. In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations of widely used antibiotics were determined using clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii, randomly chosen from strain collections created during 1999-2009 in tertiary medical institutions in Seoul, South Korea. To analyze combined efficacy of antibiotics against a subgroup of isolates, conditional probabilities were determined based on arbitrary, non-independent patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance. Multidrug resistance, defined as resistance to three or more classes of antibiotics, was observed in the following order: A. baumannii (96%), P. aeruginosa (65%), E. coli (52%), and K. pneumoniae (7%). A. baumannii strains resistant to gentamicin were found to be resistant to a number of antibiotics, except for colistin and polymyxin B. Resistance to gentamicin following exposure to this antibiotic was highly likely to lead to multidrug resistance in all four microbes. This study shows a causal relationship between gentamicin resistance and the prevalence of multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Gramnegative bacilli in South Korea during 1999-2009 and suggests the importance of prudent use of gentamicin in hospitals.

  3. [Social conditions in which medical students from the faculty of medicine of the National University of Mexico (UNAM) perform their Social Service in rural areas].

    PubMed

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the conditions in which medical students perform their Social Service, highlighting their experiences in areas such as: information before they move and the motivation to leave home; the perception of personal and environmental lack of safety; the institutional support that they receive during their work in the community and the financial support provided. The methodological design of the study included an exploratory phase, in which collective interviews were performed, using the focal group technique, with students who had been in rural areas. Three hundred sixty cases were considered, 72.8% corresponded to rural areas, and 27.7% to Mexico City. According to the findings, the following actions are proposed: give better information and improve the process of vacancy selection; increase the scholarship received by students in Social Service; establish legal, police, and community support mechanisms to guarantee the student's personal safety; pay attention to aspects such as the student's emotional and social situation, and design programs with gender perspective to enhance certainty and safety.

  4. Are there lessons to be learned from a more scientific approach to mental condition defences?

    PubMed

    Claydon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The timing of the English Law Commission's consideration of reform to the law of insanity coincides with increasing scientific and in particular neuroscientific understanding of the brain. The work of researchers is leading to a greater comprehension of what had been termed irresistible impulses to commit crime and of the impact of brain damage, particularly evidence of brain lesions and frontal lobe damage on behaviour. There remain problems in establishing causal relationships which might diminish or eliminate criminal responsibility for crimes committed by those suffering from pre existing mental conditions at the time they commit a criminal offence. This is especially the case where those mental conditions are of short duration. However, the law should not ignore the best available scientific knowledge. Neuroscientific advances are already informing court deliberations in England and Wales: assisting in considerations of guilt, fitness to plead and in sentencing. In terms of the insanity defence the questions that the law seeks to address are not necessarily the most medically or scientifically pertinent questions. They remain grounded in 19th century scientific understanding. It is argued that the more nuanced Dutch approach to mental condition defences warrants very serious consideration by those charged with making proposals to reform the English law.

  5. Medical marijuana.

    PubMed

    Marmor, J B

    1998-06-01

    Although many clinical studies suggest the medical utility of marijuana for some conditions, the scientific evidence is weak. Many patients in California are self-medicating with marijuana, and physicians need data to assess the risks and benefits. The only reasonable solution to this problem is to encourage research on the medical effects of marijuana. The current regulatory system should be modified to remove barriers to clinical research with marijuana. The NIH panel has identified several conditions for which there may be therapeutic benefit from marijuana use and that merit further research. Marijuana should be held to the same evaluation standards of safety and efficacy as other drugs (a major flaw in Proposition 215) but should not have to be proved better than current medications for its use to be adopted. The therapeutic window for marijuana and THC between desired effect and unpleasant side effects is narrow and is a major reason for discontinuing use. Although the inhaled route of administration has the benefit of allowing patients to self-titrate the dose, the smoking of crude plant material is problematic. The NIH panel recommended that a high priority be given to the development of a controlled inhaled form of THC. The presence of a naturally occurring cannabinoid-receptor system in the brain suggests that research on selective analogues of THC may be useful to enhance its therapeutic effects and minimize adverse effects.

  6. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Toggle navigation Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications ( ...

  7. Medical Transcriptionists

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment or software that is connected to their computer. However, technological advances have changed the way medical ... this section Medical transcriptionists must be comfortable using computers. Medical transcriptionists typically need postsecondary education. Prospective medical ...

  8. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional medical evidence, as set forth in § 30.222, is required to establish chronic silicosis. (3) For consequential injuries, illnesses... ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES...

  9. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....207, is required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional medical... OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000, AS AMENDED Filing Claims; Evidence and Burden of...

  10. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....207, is required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional medical... OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000, AS AMENDED Filing Claims; Evidence and Burden of...

  11. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional medical evidence, as set forth in § 30.222, is required to establish chronic silicosis. (3) For consequential injuries, illnesses... ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES...

  12. 20 CFR 30.114 - What kind of evidence is needed to establish a compensable medical condition and how will that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....207, is required to establish a beryllium illness. (2) For chronic silicosis, additional medical... OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000, AS AMENDED Filing Claims; Evidence and Burden of...

  13. Predictors of Age of Diagnosis for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of a Consistent Source of Medical Care, Race, and Condition Severity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Natacha D.; Morrell, Holly E. R.; Neece, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Having a consistent source of medical care may facilitate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study examined predictors of age of ASD diagnosis using data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Using multiple linear regression analysis, age of diagnosis was predicted by race, ASD severity, having a consistent…

  14. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Using Upper Gastrointestinal Tract for the Treatment of Refractory or Severe Complicated Clostridium difficile Infection in Elderly Patients in Poor Medical Condition: The First Study in an Asian Country

    PubMed Central

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Kim, Jinsu; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, In Seok; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective treatment option for refractory Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). FMT may be challenging in patients with a low performance status, because of their poor medical condition. The aims of this study were to describe our experience treating patients in poor medical condition with refractory or severe complicated CDI using FMT via the upper GI tract route. Methods. This study was a retrospective review of seven elderly patients with refractory or severe complicated CDI and a poor medical condition who were treated with FMT through the upper GI tract route from May 2012 through August 2013. The outcomes studied included the cure rate of CDI and adverse events. Results. Of these seven patients who received FMT via the upper GI tract route, all patients were cured. During the 11-month follow-up period, CDI recurrence was observed in two patients; rescue FMT was performed in these patients, which led to a full cure. Vomiting was observed in two patients. Conclusions. FMT via the upper gastrointestinal tract route may be effective for the treatment of refractory or severe complicated CDI in patients with a low performance status. Physicians should be aware of adverse events, especially vomiting. PMID:27127501

  15. Medical marijuana

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have not had relief from other treatments. Unlike medical marijuana, the active ingredient in these drugs can be ... American Academy of Neurology. Medical Marijuana in Certain Medical Disorders. ... . Accessed August 24, 2015. ...

  16. Medical tourism in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vijay; Das, Poonam

    2012-06-01

    The term 'medical tourism' is under debate because health care is a serious business and rarely do patients combine the two. India is uniquely placed by virtue of its skilled manpower, common language, diverse medical conditions that doctors deal with, the volume of patients, and a large nonresident Indian population overseas. Medical tourism requires dedicated services to alleviate the anxiety of foreign patients. These include translation, currency conversion, travel, visa, posttreatment care system,and accommodation of patient relatives during and after treatment.

  17. 20 CFR 30.611 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one medical condition, can the amount paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... different conditions for purposes of calculating the amount to which the United States is subrogated? 30.611... amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different conditions for purposes of calculating... subrogated. Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers...

  18. 20 CFR 30.611 - If a settlement or judgment is received for more than one medical condition, can the amount paid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... different conditions for purposes of calculating the amount to which the United States is subrogated? 30.611... amount paid on a single EEOICPA claim be attributed to different conditions for purposes of calculating... subrogated. Effect of Tort Suits Against Beryllium Vendors and Atomic Weapons Employers...

  19. Psychotropic Medications for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordoba, Oscar A.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the clinical conditions and medications used with children who have emotional and behavioral problems including hyperactivity, enuresis, anxiety, depression, mental retardation, and Tourette's Syndrome. Discusses the role of the social worker, ethical issues, and training needs. (JAC)

  20. Surgery under extreme conditions in the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake: the importance of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Missair, Andres; Gebhard, Ralf; Pierre, Edgar; Cooper, Lebron; Lubarsky, David; Frohock, Jeffery; Pretto, Ernesto A

    2010-01-01

    The 12 January 2010 earthquake that struck Port-au-Prince, Haiti caused >200,000 deaths, thousands of injuries requiring immediate surgical interventions, and 1.5 million internally displaced survivors. The earthquake destroyed or disabled most medical facilities in the city, seriously hampering the ability to deliver immediate life- and limb-saving surgical care. A Project Medishare/University of Miami Miller School of Medicine trauma team deployed to Haiti from Miami within 24 hours of the earthquake. The team began work at a pre-existing tent facility in the United Nations (UN) compound based at the airport, where they encountered 225 critically injured patients. However, non-sterile conditions, no means to administer oxygen, the lack of surgical equipment and supplies, and no anesthetics precluded the immediate delivery of general anesthesia. Despite these limitations, resuscitative care was administered, and during the first 72 hours following the event, some amputations were performed with local anesthesia. Because of these austere conditions, an anesthesiologist, experienced and equipped to administer regional block anesthesia, was dispatched three days later to perform anesthesia for limb amputations, debridements, and wound care using single shot block anesthesia until a better equipped tent facility was established. After four weeks, the relief effort evolved into a 250-bed, multi-specialty trauma/intensive care center staffed with >200 medical, nursing, and administrative staff. Within that timeframe, the facility and its staff completed 1,000 surgeries, including spine and pediatric neurological procedures, without major complications. This experience suggests that when local emergency medical resources are completely destroyed or seriously disabled, a surgical team staffed and equipped to provide regional nerve block anesthesia and acute pain management can be dispatched rapidly to serve as a bridge to more advanced field surgical and intensive care

  1. Surgery under extreme conditions in the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake: the importance of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Missair, Andres; Gebhard, Ralf; Pierre, Edgar; Cooper, Lebron; Lubarsky, David; Frohock, Jeffery; Pretto, Ernesto A

    2010-01-01

    The 12 January 2010 earthquake that struck Port-au-Prince, Haiti caused >200,000 deaths, thousands of injuries requiring immediate surgical interventions, and 1.5 million internally displaced survivors. The earthquake destroyed or disabled most medical facilities in the city, seriously hampering the ability to deliver immediate life- and limb-saving surgical care. A Project Medishare/University of Miami Miller School of Medicine trauma team deployed to Haiti from Miami within 24 hours of the earthquake. The team began work at a pre-existing tent facility in the United Nations (UN) compound based at the airport, where they encountered 225 critically injured patients. However, non-sterile conditions, no means to administer oxygen, the lack of surgical equipment and supplies, and no anesthetics precluded the immediate delivery of general anesthesia. Despite these limitations, resuscitative care was administered, and during the first 72 hours following the event, some amputations were performed with local anesthesia. Because of these austere conditions, an anesthesiologist, experienced and equipped to administer regional block anesthesia, was dispatched three days later to perform anesthesia for limb amputations, debridements, and wound care using single shot block anesthesia until a better equipped tent facility was established. After four weeks, the relief effort evolved into a 250-bed, multi-specialty trauma/intensive care center staffed with >200 medical, nursing, and administrative staff. Within that timeframe, the facility and its staff completed 1,000 surgeries, including spine and pediatric neurological procedures, without major complications. This experience suggests that when local emergency medical resources are completely destroyed or seriously disabled, a surgical team staffed and equipped to provide regional nerve block anesthesia and acute pain management can be dispatched rapidly to serve as a bridge to more advanced field surgical and intensive care

  2. Variants Near FOXE1 Are Associated with Hypothyroidism and Other Thyroid Conditions: Using Electronic Medical Records for Genome- and Phenome-wide Studies

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.; Crawford, Dana C.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Basford, Melissa A.; Bradford, Yuki; Chai, High Seng; Bastarache, Lisa; Zuvich, Rebecca; Peissig, Peggy; Carrell, David; Ramirez, Andrea H.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Wilke, Russell A.; Rasmussen, Luke; Wang, Xiaoming; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Kho, Abel N.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Weston, Noah; Matsumoto, Martha; Kopp, Peter A.; Newton, Katherine M.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Chute, Christopher G.; Chisholm, Rex L.; Larson, Eric B.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Masys, Daniel R.; Roden, Dan M.; de Andrade, Mariza

    2011-01-01

    We repurposed existing genotypes in DNA biobanks across the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics network to perform a genome-wide association study for primary hypothyroidism, the most common thyroid disease. Electronic selection algorithms incorporating billing codes, laboratory values, text queries, and medication records identified 1317 cases and 5053 controls of European ancestry within five electronic medical records (EMRs); the algorithms' positive predictive values were 92.4% and 98.5% for cases and controls, respectively. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium at 9q22 near FOXE1 were associated with hypothyroidism at genome-wide significance, the strongest being rs7850258 (odds ratio [OR] 0.74, p = 3.96 × 10−9). This association was replicated in a set of 263 cases and 1616 controls (OR = 0.60, p = 5.7 × 10−6). A phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) that was performed on this locus with 13,617 individuals and more than 200,000 patient-years of billing data identified associations with additional phenotypes: thyroiditis (OR = 0.58, p = 1.4 × 10−5), nodular (OR = 0.76, p = 3.1 × 10−5) and multinodular (OR = 0.69, p = 3.9 × 10−5) goiters, and thyrotoxicosis (OR = 0.76, p = 1.5 × 10−3), but not Graves disease (OR = 1.03, p = 0.82). Thyroid cancer, previously associated with this locus, was not significantly associated in the PheWAS (OR = 1.29, p = 0.09). The strongest association in the PheWAS was hypothyroidism (OR = 0.76, p = 2.7 × 10−13), which had an odds ratio that was nearly identical to that of the curated case-control population in the primary analysis, providing further validation of the PheWAS method. Our findings indicate that EMR-linked genomic data could allow discovery of genes associated with many diseases without additional genotyping cost. PMID:21981779

  3. Variants near FOXE1 are associated with hypothyroidism and other thyroid conditions: using electronic medical records for genome- and phenome-wide studies.

    PubMed

    Denny, Joshua C; Crawford, Dana C; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Bielinski, Suzette J; Basford, Melissa A; Bradford, Yuki; Chai, High Seng; Bastarache, Lisa; Zuvich, Rebecca; Peissig, Peggy; Carrell, David; Ramirez, Andrea H; Pathak, Jyotishman; Wilke, Russell A; Rasmussen, Luke; Wang, Xiaoming; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Kho, Abel N; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Weston, Noah; Matsumoto, Martha; Kopp, Peter A; Newton, Katherine M; Jarvik, Gail P; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Chute, Christopher G; Chisholm, Rex L; Larson, Eric B; McCarty, Catherine A; Masys, Daniel R; Roden, Dan M; de Andrade, Mariza

    2011-10-01

    We repurposed existing genotypes in DNA biobanks across the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics network to perform a genome-wide association study for primary hypothyroidism, the most common thyroid disease. Electronic selection algorithms incorporating billing codes, laboratory values, text queries, and medication records identified 1317 cases and 5053 controls of European ancestry within five electronic medical records (EMRs); the algorithms' positive predictive values were 92.4% and 98.5% for cases and controls, respectively. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium at 9q22 near FOXE1 were associated with hypothyroidism at genome-wide significance, the strongest being rs7850258 (odds ratio [OR] 0.74, p = 3.96 × 10(-9)). This association was replicated in a set of 263 cases and 1616 controls (OR = 0.60, p = 5.7 × 10(-6)). A phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) that was performed on this locus with 13,617 individuals and more than 200,000 patient-years of billing data identified associations with additional phenotypes: thyroiditis (OR = 0.58, p = 1.4 × 10(-5)), nodular (OR = 0.76, p = 3.1 × 10(-5)) and multinodular (OR = 0.69, p = 3.9 × 10(-5)) goiters, and thyrotoxicosis (OR = 0.76, p = 1.5 × 10(-3)), but not Graves disease (OR = 1.03, p = 0.82). Thyroid cancer, previously associated with this locus, was not significantly associated in the PheWAS (OR = 1.29, p = 0.09). The strongest association in the PheWAS was hypothyroidism (OR = 0.76, p = 2.7 × 10(-13)), which had an odds ratio that was nearly identical to that of the curated case-control population in the primary analysis, providing further validation of the PheWAS method. Our findings indicate that EMR-linked genomic data could allow discovery of genes associated with many diseases without additional genotyping cost. PMID:21981779

  4. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  5. Over-the-horizon, connected home/office (OCHO): situation management of environmental, medical, and security conditions at remote premises via broadband wireless access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2010-04-01

    Broadband wireless access standards, together with advances in the development of commercial sensing and actuator devices, enable the feasibility of a consumer service for a multi-sensor system that monitors the conditions within a residence or office: the environment/infrastructure, patient-occupant health, and physical security. The proposed service is a broadband reimplementation and combination of existing services to allow on-demand reports on and management of the conditions by remote subscribers. The flow of on-demand reports to subscribers and to specialists contracted to mitigate out-of-tolerance conditions is the foreground process. Service subscribers for an over-the-horizon connected home/office (OCHO) monitoring system are the occupant of the premises and agencies, contracted by the service provider, to mitigate or resolve any observed out-of-tolerance condition(s) at the premises. Collectively, these parties are the foreground users of the OCHO system; the implemented wireless standards allow the foreground users to be mobile as they request situation reports on demand from the subsystems on remote conditions that comprise OCHO via wireless devices. An OCHO subscriber, i.e., a foreground user, may select the level of detail found in on-demand reports, i.e., the amount of information displayed in the report of monitored conditions at the premises. This is one context of system operations. While foreground reports are sent only periodically to subscribers, the information generated by the monitored conditions at the premises is continuous and is transferred to a background configuration of servers on which databases reside. These databases are each used, generally, in non-real time, for the assessment and management of situations defined by attributes like those being monitored in the foreground by OCHO. This is the second context of system operations. Context awareness and management of conditions at the premises by a second group of analysts and

  6. Alcohol-medical drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bankole A; Seneviratne, Chamindi

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant use of alcohol and medications may lead to potentially serious medical conditions. Increasing prescription medication abuse in today's society necessitates a deeper understanding of the mechanisms involved in alcohol-medication interactions in order to help prevent adverse events. Interactions of medications with alcohol result in altered bioavailability of the medication or alcohol (pharmacokinetic interactions) or modification of the effects at receptor or ion channel sites to alter behavioral or physical outcome (pharmacodynamic interactions). The nature of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions involved in alcohol-medication interactions may differ between acute and chronic alcohol use and be influenced by race, gender, or environmental or genetic factors. This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between alcohol and medications and provides examples for such interactions from replicated research studies. In conclusion, further translational research is needed to address several gaps in our current knowledge of alcohol-medication interactions, including those under various pathologic conditions.

  7. [MEDICAL CANNABIS].

    PubMed

    Naftali, Timna

    2016-02-01

    The cannabis plant has been known to humanity for centuries as a remedy for pain, diarrhea and inflammation. Current research is inspecting the use of cannabis for many diseases, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dystonia, and chronic pain. In inflammatory conditions cannabinoids improve pain in rheumatoid arthritis and:pain and diarrhea in Crohn's disease. Despite their therapeutic potential, cannabinoids are not free of side effects including psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, dependence and abuse. Controlled clinical studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cannabis are few and small, whereas pressure for expanding cannabis use is increasing. Currently, as long as cannabis is classified as an illicit drug and until further controlled studies are performed, the use of medical cannabis should be limited to patients who failed conventional better established treatment.

  8. [MEDICAL CANNABIS].

    PubMed

    Naftali, Timna

    2016-02-01

    The cannabis plant has been known to humanity for centuries as a remedy for pain, diarrhea and inflammation. Current research is inspecting the use of cannabis for many diseases, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, dystonia, and chronic pain. In inflammatory conditions cannabinoids improve pain in rheumatoid arthritis and:pain and diarrhea in Crohn's disease. Despite their therapeutic potential, cannabinoids are not free of side effects including psychosis, anxiety, paranoia, dependence and abuse. Controlled clinical studies investigating the therapeutic potential of cannabis are few and small, whereas pressure for expanding cannabis use is increasing. Currently, as long as cannabis is classified as an illicit drug and until further controlled studies are performed, the use of medical cannabis should be limited to patients who failed conventional better established treatment. PMID:27215115

  9. Medical geography in Charaka Samhita

    PubMed Central

    Bhavana, K.R.; Shreevathsa

    2014-01-01

    Charaka Samhita is the oldest and the most authentic treatise on Ayurveda and is the ancient medical science of India. Apart from giving information on medical conditions and their treatment; it also gives valuable information on geographical, social, and economic conditions of India. This article is an attempt to explore geographical conditions of the ancient India, its geographical position in present India and its medical significance. PMID:26195898

  10. Travel Medical Kit.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne C; Haulman, N Jean

    2016-03-01

    "The traveler's medical kit is an essential tool for both the novice and expert traveler. It is designed to treat travel-related illness and injury and to ensure preexisting medical conditions are managed appropriately. Travelers are at increased risk for common gastrointestinal issues during travel. Respiratory illnesses make up approximately 8% of the ailments present in returned international travelers. Approximately 12% of travelers experience a travel-related skin condition. First aid treatment for minor injuries is essential to all travel medical kits. The complexity ranges from a small, simple case for the urban traveler to a larger, extensive case for wilderness travel." PMID:26900112

  11. Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

  12. Medical applications of artificial olfactometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor); Kelso, David M. (Inventor); Munoz, Beth C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for detecting the presence of an analyte indicative of various medical conditions, including halitosis, periodontal disease and other diseases are also disclosed.

  13. Healthcare services for those with musculoskeletal conditions: a rheumatology service. Recommendations of the European Union of Medical Specialists Section of Rheumatology/European Board of Rheumatology 2006

    PubMed Central

    Rheumatology, Anthony D Woolf and The European Union of Medical Specialists Section of

    2007-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions are very common across Europe. They affect all age groups, and the associated physical disability is an enormous burden on individuals and society. They can be effectively prevented and controlled in many situations, but this is not at present fully achieved. This report outlines what is required to achieve this and the role of rheumatology in providing these healthcare services. Strategies are given for the prevention and management of musculoskeletal conditions. The needs of people with these conditions are expressed in the PARE Manifesto and the clinical needs have been identified. The healthcare services required to implement these strategies and meet these needs are considered focusing on what services a rheumatology centre should provide. A key principle is that management of musculoskeletal conditions requires a coordinated, integrated, multidisciplinary and multiprofessional approach providing access to a combination of expertise and competencies. Guidance is given of what a rheumatology service should be expected to offer. For a rheumatology centre to provide these services, the need for appropriate facilities and resources is identified, which considers physical resources as well as personnel, training and management needs. Maintaining high standards of care and achieving the best outcomes at all times needs the monitoring of quality indicators as well as ongoing education and research. In conclusion, improving musculoskeletal health is dependent on access to effective treatments and this document shows how the services provided by a rheumatology centre is central to this. PMID:17158137

  14. "You teach us to listen,… but you don't teach us about suffering": self-care and resilience strategies in medical school curricula.

    PubMed

    Outram, Sue; Kelly, Brian

    2014-11-01

    This article examines the pre-vocational preparation of doctors to cope with the demands of clinical practice, drawing on literature from across a number of domains: mental health, psychological stress among medical students and medical practitioners; and self-care strategies in medicine curricula. High rates of psychological distress in medical students and medical practitioners were consistently reported. A number of questions remain pertinent to medical education: how does the experience of medical education impact on this level of distress, and possibly exacerbate pre-existing student vulnerabilities? What will help future doctors respond to, and cope with, suffering in their patients? Can the formal curriculum build resilience? Medical schools and educators have a responsibility to address these questions and to provide effective self-care curricula. In this review promising interventions such as mindfulness training are reported, frameworks to guide self-awareness in medical students are suggested, and recommendations for a self-care curriculum are made.

  15. "You teach us to listen,… but you don't teach us about suffering": self-care and resilience strategies in medical school curricula.

    PubMed

    Outram, Sue; Kelly, Brian

    2014-11-01

    This article examines the pre-vocational preparation of doctors to cope with the demands of clinical practice, drawing on literature from across a number of domains: mental health, psychological stress among medical students and medical practitioners; and self-care strategies in medicine curricula. High rates of psychological distress in medical students and medical practitioners were consistently reported. A number of questions remain pertinent to medical education: how does the experience of medical education impact on this level of distress, and possibly exacerbate pre-existing student vulnerabilities? What will help future doctors respond to, and cope with, suffering in their patients? Can the formal curriculum build resilience? Medical schools and educators have a responsibility to address these questions and to provide effective self-care curricula. In this review promising interventions such as mindfulness training are reported, frameworks to guide self-awareness in medical students are suggested, and recommendations for a self-care curriculum are made. PMID:25395229

  16. Medical marijuana: legal considerations.

    PubMed

    Schouten, J T

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, Washington State passed a law, Initiative 692 (I-692), that gives individuals who are charged with possession of marijuana for medical purposes a possible affirmative defense. The law lets these individuals provide a note from their doctor or a copy of their medical records stating they have a condition that may benefit from the use of marijuana. I-692 does not legalize the medical use of marijuana and does not affect Federal law, which makes obtaining, possessing, and growing marijuana illegal. The Washington law limits the amount of marijuana a patient can possess to a 60-day supply and defines the conditions for which medical marijuana may be used. These conditions include HIV, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy.

  17. [A comparative study of coding and information systems for the evaluation of medical and social conditions: the case of addictive disorders].

    PubMed

    Bourdais-Mannone, Claire; Cherikh, Faredj; Gicquel, Nathalie; Gelsi, Eve; Jove, Frédérique; Staccini, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a descriptive and comparative analysis of the tools used by healthcare professionals specializing in addictive disorders to promote a rapprochement of information systems. The evaluation guide used to assess the compensation needs of disabled persons treated in "Maisons Départementales des Personnes Handicapées" (centres for disabled people) organizes information in different areas, including a psychological component. The guide includes social and environmental information in the "Recueil Commun sur les Addictions et les Prises en charges" (Joint Report on Drug Addiction and Drug Treatment). While the program for the medicalization of information systems includes care data, the current information about social situations remains inadequate. The international classification of diseases provides synthetic diagnostic codes to describe substance use, etiologic factors and the somatic and psychological complications inherent to addictive disorders. The current system could be radically simplified and harmonized and would benefit from adopting a more individualized approach to non-substance behavioral addictions. The international classification of disabilities provides tools for evaluating the psychological component included in the recent definition of addictive disorders. Legal information should play an integral role in the structure of the information system and in international classifications. The prevalence of episodes of care and treatment of addictive and psychological disorders was assessed at Nice University Hospital in all disciplines. Except in addiction treatment units, very few patients were found to have a RECAP file.

  18. Impact of medicated feed along with clay mineral supplementation on Escherichia coli resistance to antimicrobial agents in pigs after weaning in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Seyedehameneh; Kabore, Kiswendsida Paul; Fravalo, Philippe; Letellier, Ann; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in antimicrobial resistance (AMR) phenotype and virulence and AMR gene profiles in Escherichia coli from pigs receiving in-feed antimicrobial medication following weaning and the effect of feed supplementation with a clay mineral, clinoptilolite, on this dynamic. Eighty E. coli strains isolated from fecal samples of pigs receiving a diet containing chlortetracycline and penicillin, with or without 2% clinoptilolite, were examined for antimicrobial resistance to 15 antimicrobial agents. Overall, an increased resistance to 10 antimicrobials was observed with time. Supplementation with clinoptilolite was associated with an early increase but later decrease in blaCMY-2, in isolates, as shown by DNA probe. Concurrently, a later increase in the frequency of blaCMY-2 and the virulence genes iucD and tsh was observed in the control pig isolates, being significantly greater than in the supplemented pigs at day 28. Our results suggest that, in the long term, supplementation with clinoptilolite could decrease the prevalence of E. coli carrying certain antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes.

  19. Medical Scenarios Relevant to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacal, Kira; Hurs, Victor; Doerr, Harold

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Operational Support Team (MOST) was tasked by the JSC Space Medicine and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) to incorporate medical simulation into 1) medical training for astronaut-crew medical officers (CMO) and medical flight control teams and 2) evaluations of procedures and resources required for medical care aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Development of evidence-based medical scenarios that mimic the physiology observed during spaceflight will be needed for the MOST to complete these two tasks. The MOST used a human patient simulator, the ISS-like resources in the Medical Simulation Laboratory (MSL), and evidence from space operations, military operations and medical literature to develop space relevant medical scenarios. These scenarios include conditions concerning airway management, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and mitigating anaphylactic symptoms. The MOST has used these space relevant medical scenarios to develop a preliminary space medical training regimen for NASA flight surgeons, Biomedical Flight Controllers (Biomedical Engineers; BME) and CMO-analogs. This regimen is conducted by the MOST in the MSL. The MOST has the capability to develop evidence-based space-relevant medical scenarios that can help SLSD I) demonstrate the proficiency of medical flight control teams to mitigate space-relevant medical events and 2) validate nextgeneration medical equipment and procedures for space medicine applications.

  20. Medical neglect.

    PubMed

    Boos, Stephen C; Fortin, Kristine

    2014-11-01

    Medical neglect occurs when children are harmed or placed at significant risk of harm by gaps in their medical care. This is most likely to occur and to be recognized when families lack resources, commonly due to poverty, and when medical demands are high, such as with complex, severe, and chronic illness. A systematic evaluation of the probabilities for harm from gaps in care versus benefits from improved care will define medical neglect. A broad consideration of child, family, community, and medical system contributions to identified gaps will guide management. Special circumstances, such as lapsed immunizations, unremitting obesity, and medically motivated alterations in care, are often challenging for medical providers. Guidance for these specific situations is available from the American Academy of Pediatrics, and from the medical literature.

  1. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the risk of medication errors to industry and others at FDA. Additionally, DMEPA prospectively reviews ... List of Abbreviations Regulations and Guidances Guidance for Industry: Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication ...

  2. Medical Appointments

    MedlinePlus

    ... trouble concentrating, stomach problems or emotional issues like anxiety. New or increasing side effects or reactions to your medications. Again, for how long? How serious are they? Medication compliance: How well you’ve been taking your medications. Have you missed doses? If so, ...

  3. MEDICAL "DEPRIVATION."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUCHMAN, EDWARD A.

    THE SOCIAL AND MEDICAL PROBLEM TODAY HAS SHIFTED FROM PROVIDING FOR THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL NEEDS OF THE INDIGENT SICK TO RAISING THE LEVEL OF LOWER CLASS PARTICIPATION IN THE BENEFITS OF MODERN MEDICINE. GREATER ATTENTION IS BEING FOCUSED ON MEDICAL DEPRIVATION SUFFERED BY LARGE SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION WHO DO NOT SHARE EQUALLY IN MEDICAL…

  4. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects.

  5. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects. PMID:26912385

  6. Supporting Medical Decision Making with Argumentation Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Jingyan; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the collaborative decision-making and communicative discourse of groups of learners engaged in a simulated medical emergency in two conditions. In one condition subgroups used a traditional whiteboard (TW group) to document medical arguments on how to solve a medical emergency. In the other condition subgroups used…

  7. Medication safety.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W

    2008-03-01

    Patient safety is a state of mind, not a technology. The technologies used in the medical setting represent tools that must be properly designed, used well, and assessed on an on-going basis. Moreover, in all settings, building a culture of safety is pivotal for improving safety, and many nontechnologic approaches, such as medication reconciliation and teaching patients about their medications, are also essential. This article addresses the topic of medication safety and examines specific strategies being used to decrease the incidence of medication errors across various clinical settings.

  8. Adherence To JNC-VII and WHO-ISH guidelines of antihypertensive medications prescribed to hypertensive patients with co-morbid conditions.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Nitin; Ganguly, Barna

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims at comparing the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive drugs in essential hypertension with specific co-morbid conditions with JNC-VII and WHO-ISH guidelines. Adult patients of both sex, who were attending medicine OPD of Shri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad, Gujarat since last 6 months and being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patients with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were included in the study. Adherence to JNC-VII guideline and WHO-ISH guidelines with respect to prescribing antihypertensive drugs in patients with diabetes mellitus were found to be 97% and 40.81% respectively, while it was found to be 72.27% to both the guidelines in patients with IHD. Similarly in cases of hypertension with CHF, adherence to prescribing antihypertensive were found to be 93.62% and 38.30% respectively, whereas for CKD patients, adherence to both guidelines was found to be same i.e. 33.33%. There is need of following such authentic guidelines in managing hypertension like chronic disease since these guidelines are based on various clinical trials and successful attainment of target BP in patients will be much easier by implementing them. PMID:26571984

  9. Medical tourism in India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vijay; Das, Poonam

    2012-06-01

    The term 'medical tourism' is under debate because health care is a serious business and rarely do patients combine the two. India is uniquely placed by virtue of its skilled manpower, common language, diverse medical conditions that doctors deal with, the volume of patients, and a large nonresident Indian population overseas. Medical tourism requires dedicated services to alleviate the anxiety of foreign patients. These include translation, currency conversion, travel, visa, posttreatment care system,and accommodation of patient relatives during and after treatment. PMID:22727009

  10. [The death of Yasser Arafat: molecular-genetic authentication of the remains as an indispensable condition for the evaluation of the medical hypotheses of the cause of his death].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Kvacheva, Yu E; Kovalev, A V; Ivanov, P L

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the molecular-genetic authentication of the remains as an indispensable condition for the evaluation of the medical hypotheses of the cause of death in 2004 of Yasser Arafat, the former Palestinian leader and the first president of the Palestinian National Administration, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate. We carried out molecular-genetic investigations aimed at establishing the circumstances and cause of the death of Yasser Arafat including the analysis of the relevant medical documentation, the examination of the burial place at Ramallah, remains, and personal belongings stored in his Al Muqata'ah residence at Ramallah. The objective of the present molecular- genetic investigations was to confirm the authenticity of the fragments of Yasser Arafat's remains available for radio-toxicological, chemical toxicological, and other laboratory studies. The reference objects were the contact traces left on the personal belongings by their owner. The aggregate probabilistic estimate of the coincidence of genotype traits of autosomal DNA, Y-chromosomal DNA, and mtDNA was at least 99,(9)29 4% which gives evidence of the genetic identity of the objects of study. It is this value (99.999999 <...> 9999999(29) 4%) that characterizes the probability that the bone fragments provided for the laboratory studies are actually authentic remains of Yasser Arafat.

  11. [The death of Yasser Arafat: molecular-genetic authentication of the remains as an indispensable condition for the evaluation of the medical hypotheses of the cause of his death].

    PubMed

    Zemskova, E Yu; Kvacheva, Yu E; Kovalev, A V; Ivanov, P L

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the molecular-genetic authentication of the remains as an indispensable condition for the evaluation of the medical hypotheses of the cause of death in 2004 of Yasser Arafat, the former Palestinian leader and the first president of the Palestinian National Administration, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate. We carried out molecular-genetic investigations aimed at establishing the circumstances and cause of the death of Yasser Arafat including the analysis of the relevant medical documentation, the examination of the burial place at Ramallah, remains, and personal belongings stored in his Al Muqata'ah residence at Ramallah. The objective of the present molecular- genetic investigations was to confirm the authenticity of the fragments of Yasser Arafat's remains available for radio-toxicological, chemical toxicological, and other laboratory studies. The reference objects were the contact traces left on the personal belongings by their owner. The aggregate probabilistic estimate of the coincidence of genotype traits of autosomal DNA, Y-chromosomal DNA, and mtDNA was at least 99,(9)29 4% which gives evidence of the genetic identity of the objects of study. It is this value (99.999999 <...> 9999999(29) 4%) that characterizes the probability that the bone fragments provided for the laboratory studies are actually authentic remains of Yasser Arafat. PMID:26856052

  12. Medical criminalistics.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S

    2007-01-17

    Medical criminalistics is an essential part of legal/forensic medicine. It includes the clinical examination of surviving victims and suspects, the inspection of the scene in suspicious deaths with subsequent performance of medico-legal autopsies, the assessment of (biological) traces and the reconstruction of criminal events under medical aspects. Just as the circumstances of life and the manifestations of crime are changing with time, there is a permanent alteration regarding the issues of medical criminalistics. Legal/forensic medicine is a university subject in most countries and therefore, research work is one of the main tasks also in medical criminalistics. In contrast to clinical medicine and basic research, some common study designs are not suitable for the special needs of medical criminalistics, whereas other types are more appropriate like epidemiological evaluations, cross-sectional studies and (retrospective) observation studies. Moreover, experimental model tests and case reports also rate high in medical criminalistics. PMID:16822631

  13. Medical criminalistics.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S

    2007-01-17

    Medical criminalistics is an essential part of legal/forensic medicine. It includes the clinical examination of surviving victims and suspects, the inspection of the scene in suspicious deaths with subsequent performance of medico-legal autopsies, the assessment of (biological) traces and the reconstruction of criminal events under medical aspects. Just as the circumstances of life and the manifestations of crime are changing with time, there is a permanent alteration regarding the issues of medical criminalistics. Legal/forensic medicine is a university subject in most countries and therefore, research work is one of the main tasks also in medical criminalistics. In contrast to clinical medicine and basic research, some common study designs are not suitable for the special needs of medical criminalistics, whereas other types are more appropriate like epidemiological evaluations, cross-sectional studies and (retrospective) observation studies. Moreover, experimental model tests and case reports also rate high in medical criminalistics.

  14. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Medical consequences of doping with anabolic androgenic steroids: effects on reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) are appearance and performance-enhancing drugs (APEDs) used in competitive athletics, in recreational sports, and by body-builders. The global lifetime prevalence of AASs abuse is 6.4% for males and 1.6% for women. Many AASs, often obtained from the internet and dubious sources, have not undergone proper testing and are consumed at extremely high doses and in irrational combinations, also along with other drugs. Controlled clinical trials investigating undesired side effects are lacking because ethical restrictions prevent exposing volunteers to potentially toxic regimens, obscuring a causal relationship between AASs abuse and possible sequelae. Because of the negative feedback in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, in men AASs cause reversible suppression of spermatogenesis, testicular atrophy, infertility, and erectile dysfunction (anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism). Should spermatogenesis not recover after AASs abuse, a pre-existing fertility disorder may have resurfaced. AASs frequently cause gynecomastia and acne. In women, AASs may disrupt ovarian function. Chronic strenuous physical activity leads to menstrual irregularities and, in severe cases, to the female athlete triad (low energy intake, menstrual disorders and low bone mass), making it difficult to disentangle the effects of sports and AASs. Acne, hirsutism and (irreversible) deepening of the voice are further consequences of AASs misuse. There is no evidence that AASs cause breast carcinoma. Detecting AASs misuse through the control network of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) not only aims to guarantee fair conditions for athletes, but also to protect them from medical sequelae of AASs abuse.

  15. Medical confidence.

    PubMed

    Havard, J

    1985-03-01

    If medical confidentiality is not observed patients may well be reluctant to disclose information to their doctors or even to seek medical advice. Therefore, argues the author, it is of the utmost importance that doctors strive to protect medical confidentiality, particularly now when it is under threat not only in this country but also overseas. The profession must cease to regard ethical issues to do with confidentiality, and indeed to do with all areas of medical practice, as abstract phenomena requiring no justification. If it does not then it will come under increasing and justified criticism from the community it serves.

  16. Medical syncretism with reference to malaria in a Tanzanian community.

    PubMed

    Muela, Susanna Hausmann; Ribera, Joan Muela; Mushi, Adiel K; Tanner, Marcel

    2002-08-01

    What happens when new health information is introduced into a community? We have explored this question in a semi-rural community of Southeastern Tanzania whose population has been in contact with biomedicine for many decades. With the example of malaria, we illustrate how biomedical knowledge transmitted in health messages coexists, interacts and merges with local pre-existing ideas and logics. The results are syncretic models, which may deviate considerably from what health promoters intended to transmit. Some of those may have implications for treatment of malaria, which may include delay in seeking treatment and non-compliance with therapy. Analysing this medical syncretism clearly demonstrates that even if comprehension of health messages is accurate, the way in which people interpret these messages may not be. Disentangling syncretic processes permits us to understand the dynamics of how information is processed by the recipients, and provides orientations for health promoters for adapting messages to the local context.

  17. Cardiac Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diovan) What the Medication Does Rather than lowering levels of angiotensin II (as ACE inhibitors do) angiotensin II receptor blockers prevent this chemical from having any effects on the heart and blood vessels. This keeps blood pressure from rising. Reason for Medication Used to treat or improve ...

  18. Medical photography.

    PubMed

    Brown, S E

    Medical photography and illustration still provides an essential service for the clinician and researcher, despite an ever-increasing remit. This article describes the role of the medical illustration department and may help the hospital practitioner to use this service to the full.

  19. Medication reviews

    PubMed Central

    Blenkinsopp, Alison; Bond, Christine; Raynor, David K

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a formalization of medication review by pharmacists in all settings of care. This article describes the different types of medication review provided in primary care in the UK National Health Service (NHS), summarizes the evidence of effectiveness and considers how such reviews might develop in the future. Medication review is, at heart, a diagnostic intervention which aims to identify problems for action by the prescriber, the clinican conducting the review, the patient or all three but can also be regarded as an educational intervention to support patient knowledge and adherence. There is good evidence that medication review improves process outcomes of prescribing including reduced polypharmacy, use of more appropriate medicines formulation and more appropriate choice of medicine. When ‘harder’ outcome measures have been included, such as hospitalizations or mortality in elderly patients, available evidence indicates that whilst interventions could improve knowledge and adherence they did not reduce mortality or hospital admissions with one study showing an increase in hospital admissions. Robust health economic studies of medication reviews remain rare. However a review of cost-effectiveness analyses of medication reviews found no studies in which the cost of the intervention was greater than the benefit. The value of medication reviews is now generally accepted despite lack of robust research evidence consistently demonstrating cost or clinical effectiveness compared with traditional care. Medication reviews can be more effectively deployed in the future by targeting, multi-professional involvement and paying greater attention to medicines which could be safely stopped. PMID:22607195

  20. 32 CFR 564.37 - Medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Medical care. 564.37 Section 564.37 National... REGULATIONS Medical Attendance and Burial § 564.37 Medical care. (a) General. The definitions of medical care; policies outlining the manner, conditions, procedures, and eligibility for care; and the sources from...

  1. [A medical-pharmaceutical partnership model as a contributor to the success in conditioning regimen for allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults: a cross-reflection on our organizations].

    PubMed

    Bourget, Philippe; Falaschi, Ludivine; Suarez, Felipe; Galland, Valérie; Blot, Dominique; Trompette, Caroline; Sibon, David; Fontbrune, Flore Sicre de; Merlette, Christophe; Vidal, Fabrice; Corriol, Odile; Giraud, Bérénice; Broissand, Christine; Clement, Rozenn; Hermine, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant (allo-SCT) remains the only cure for many hematological malignancies and some benign and congenital diseases. Busulfan, proposed in its injectable form, has quickly become a mainstay of pharmacological and myeloablative (or non-myeloablative) conditioning. This is following the outbreak in 2010 of a multicenter international clinical phase II trial, we tested the robustness and reliability of our organization in a complex model of organization and multifactorial partnership. In this type "BuCy2" protocol based on a classical treatment duration of 4 consecutive days, the administration of IV busulfan is given in one single daily infusion instead of the conventional 16 infusions, while keeping the same total dose. Under these conditions, the treatment is totally secured using a therapeutic drug monitoring of busulfan, applied in real-time. The process is technically complex and requires the very close cooperation of the teams involved. A strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) analysis has been constructed; it fully supports continuous quality improvement to the triple benefit of the nursing chain, the patients and their environment. Several critical points were identified and corrected. The experiment strongly contributes to the safety and security of the medication circuit at the hospital and, improves the performance of allo-SCT. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in the health field and their working environment via a well-functioning quality management system.

  2. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area. PMID:26904890

  3. Exploration Medical System Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, D. A.; McGrath, T. L.; Reyna, B.; Watkins, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    A near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) mission will present significant new challenges including hazards to crew health created by exploring a beyond low earth orbit destination, traversing the terrain of asteroid surfaces, and the effects of variable gravity environments. Limited communications with ground-based personnel for diagnosis and consultation of medical events require increased crew autonomy when diagnosing conditions, creating treatment plans, and executing procedures. Scope: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will be a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to show an end-to-end medical system assisting the Crew Medical Officers (CMO) in optimizing medical care delivery and medical data management during a mission. NEA medical care challenges include resource and resupply constraints limiting the extent to which medical conditions can be treated, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and rendering of medical care by a non-clinician. The system demonstrates the integration of medical technologies and medical informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making. Project Objectives: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a) Reduce and possibly eliminate the time required for a crewmember and ground personnel to manage medical data from one application to another. b) Demonstrate crewmember's ability to access medical data/information via a software solution to assist/aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c) Develop a common data management architecture that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all crew health and life sciences activities. d) Develop a common data management architecture that allows for scalability, extensibility, and interoperability of data sources and data users. e) Lower total cost of ownership for development and sustainment of peripheral hardware and software that use EMSD for data management f) Provide

  4. Exploration Medical System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. A.; Watkins, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exploration class missions will present significant new challenges and hazards to the health of the astronauts. Regardless of the intended destination, beyond low Earth orbit a greater degree of crew autonomy will be required to diagnose medical conditions, develop treatment plans, and implement procedures due to limited communications with ground-based personnel. SCOPE: The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) project will act as a test bed on the International Space Station (ISS) to demonstrate to crew and ground personnel that an end-to-end medical system can assist clinician and non-clinician crew members in optimizing medical care delivery and data management during an exploration mission. Challenges facing exploration mission medical care include limited resources, inability to evacuate to Earth during many mission phases, and potential rendering of medical care by non-clinicians. This system demonstrates the integration of medical devices and informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making and can be designed to assist crewmembers in nominal, non-emergent situations and in emergent situations when they may be suffering from performance decrements due to environmental, physiological or other factors. PROJECT OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the EMSD project are to: a. Reduce or eliminate the time required of an on-orbit crew and ground personnel to access, transfer, and manipulate medical data. b. Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information via an intuitive and crew-friendly solution to aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c. Develop a common data management framework that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all activities pertaining to crew health and life sciences. d. Ensure crew access to medical data during periods of restricted ground communication. e. Develop a common data management framework that

  5. Treating Child Obesity and Associated Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprio, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    With American children on course to grow into the most obese generation of adults in history, Sonia Caprio argues that it is critical to develop more effective strategies for preventing childhood obesity and treating serious obesity-related health complications. She notes that although pediatricians are concerned about the obesity problem, most…

  6. [The mandatory medical insurance through eyes of medical personnel].

    PubMed

    Semenov, V Yu; Lakunin, K Yu; Livshits, S A

    2014-01-01

    The article considers the results of sociological survey carries out among medical personnel of the Moscowskaya oblast in August-September 2013. The purpose of the study was to examine opinions of medical personnel about system of mandatory insurance in conditions of implementation of the new law regulating system of mandatory medical insurance during last three years. The sampling included 932 respondents that corresponds approximately 1% of all medical personnel in the oblast. It is established that even 20 years later after the moment of organization of the system of mandatory medical insurance not all medical personnel is oriented in it. More than 70% of respondents consider this system too convoluted and over bureaucratized and only 22.2% of respondents assume that medical insurance organizations defense interests of patient and 25.8% feel no impact of mandatory medical insurance funds on functioning of medical organizations. Most of respondents consider functions of mandatory medical insurance organizations and mandatory medical insurance funds as controlling only. Only 31% of respondents support the actual system of mandatory medical insurance.

  7. A Smoothed Boundary Condition for Reducing Nonphysical Field Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Arlynn W.; Parks, Joseph W., Jr.; Haralson, Joe N., II; Brennan, Kevin F.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the problem associated with abruptly mixing boundary conditions in the context of a two-dimensional semiconductor device simulator. Explicitly, this paper addresses the transition between an ohmic-type Dirichlet condition and a passivated Neumann boundary. In the traditional setting, the details or the transition between the two boundary types are not addressed and an abrupt transition is assumed. Subsequently, the calculated observables (most notably the potential) exhibit discontinuous derivatives near the surface at the point where the boundary type switches. This paper proposes an alternative condition which models the progression between the two boundary types through the use of a finite length, smoothed boundary whereby the numerical discontinuities are eliminated. The physical and mathematical basis for this smoothed boundary condition is discussed and examples of the technique's implementation given. It is found that the proposed boundary condition is numerically efficient and can be implemented in pre-existing device simulators with relative ease.

  8. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  9. Medical Scientists

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientists typically have a Ph.D., usually in biology or a related life science. Some medical scientists ... specialize in this field seek to understand the biology of aging and investigate ways to improve the ...

  10. Stability Analysis of ISS Medications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    It is known that medications degrade over time, and that extreme storage conditions will hasten their degradation. The temperature and humidity conditions of the ISS have been shown to be within the ideal ranges for medication storage, but the effects of other environmental factors, like elevated exposure to radiation, have not yet been evaluated. Current operational procedures ensure that ISS medications are re-stocked before expiration, but this may not be possible on long duration exploration missions. For this reason, medications that have experienced long duration storage on the ISS were returned to JSC for analysis to determine any unusual effects of aging in the low- Earth orbit environment. METHODS Medications were obtained by the JSC Pharmacy from commercial distributors and were re-packaged by JSC pharmacists to conserve up mass and volume. All medication doses were part of the ISS crew medical kit and were transported to the International Space Station (ISS) via NASA's Shuttle Transportation System (Space Shuttle). After 568 days of storage, the medications were removed from the supply chain and returned to Earth on a Dragon (SpaceX) capsule. Upon return to Earth, medications were transferred to temperature and humidity controlled environmental chambers until analysis. Nine medications were chosen on the basis of their availability for study. The medications included several of the most heavily used by US crewmembers: 2 sleep aids, 2 antihistamines/decongestants, 3 pain relievers, an antidiarrheal and an alertness medication. Each medication was available at a single time point; analysis of the same medication at multiple time points was not possible. Because the samples examined in this study were obtained opportunistically from medical supplies, there were no control samples available (i.e. samples aged for a similar period of time on the ground); a significant limitation of this study. Medications were analyzed using the HPLC/MS methods described in

  11. Medical education.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P

    1992-01-01

    In theory, the Medical Council of India (MCI) determines the standards and qualifications of medical schools. It also sanctions curricula and ensures standards. Yet no standards exist on the mode of selection in medical schools, duration of study, course content, student stipends or period of internship. It takes 4.5 years to finish medical school. Students undergo preclinical, paraclinical, and clinical training. Most courses are in English which tends to favor the urban elite. Students cannot always communicate with patients in local languages. Textbooks often provide medical examples unrelated to India. Pedagogy consists mainly of lectures and rote learning predominates. Curricula tend not to provide courses in community health. Students pick up on the elitist attitudes of the faculty. For example, faculty do not put much emphasis on community health, individual health, equity in health care delivery, and teamwork. Further the education system is not patient oriented, but hospital or disease oriented. Faculty should train students in creating sanitation programs, knowing local nutritious foods, and in making community diagnoses. Yet they tend to be practitioners 1st then educators. Further faculty are not paid well and are not always invited to take part in improving curriculum, so morale is often low. Moreover experience in health planning and management issues is not required for administrators. In addition, medical schools are not well equipped with learning aids, libraries, or teaching staff. Tax revenues finance medical education. 75% of graduating physicians set up a private practice. Further many physicians go to urban areas. 34-57% emigrate to other countries. The problems of medical education will not be solved until the political and economic system becomes more responsive to the health needs of the people.

  12. Medical Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Kirk W.; Dunmire, Barbrina

    Medical acoustics can be subdivided into diagnostics and therapy. Diagnostics are further separated into auditory and ultrasonic methods, and both employ low amplitudes. Therapy (excluding medical advice) uses ultrasound for heating, cooking, permeablizing, activating and fracturing tissues and structures within the body, usually at much higher amplitudes than in diagnostics. Because ultrasound is a wave, linear wave physics are generally applicable, but recently nonlinear effects have become more important, even in low-intensity diagnostic applications.

  13. Medical marijuana.

    PubMed

    1999-04-30

    The Florida Supreme Court heard oral arguments in April regarding a glaucoma patient's request for a medical exception to the State prohibition on use of marijuana. [Name removed] was convicted on possession and cultivation charges, and a trial judge refused to allow a medical necessity defense. A State appeals court subsequently overturned [name removed]'s conviction. The case focuses on whether the legislature intended to prohibit such a defense when it declared in 1993 that the substance had no medicinal benefits.

  14. Medicare and Caregivers: Planning for Medical Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Medicare and Caregivers Planning for Medical Care If you find that an older relative ... friend needs your help to deal with a medical condition, there are a number of steps you ...

  15. Barriers to weight-related health behaviours: a qualitative comparison of the socioecological conditions between pregnant and post-partum low-income women.

    PubMed

    Graham, Meredith; Uesugi, Keriann; Olson, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The association between socioecological factors and poor health outcomes for low-income women and their children has been the focus of disparities research for several decades. This research compares the socioecological conditions among low-income women from pregnancy to post-partum and highlights the factors that make weight management increasingly difficult after delivery. As part of the formative research for an online health intervention, group and individual interviews were conducted with low-income pregnant and post-partum women. Five pregnancy group interviews (n = 15 women), five post-partum group interviews (n = 23 women) and seven individual interviews with a total of 45 participants were conducted in Rochester, New York. All interviews were audio-recorded. The constant comparative method was used to code interview notes and identify emergent themes. Subjects faced many challenges that affected their attitudes, beliefs and their ability to maintain or improve healthy weight behaviours. These included unemployment, relationship issues, minimal social support, lack of education, limited health care access, pre-existing medical conditions and neighbourhood disadvantage. Compared with pregnant women, post-partum women faced additional difficulties, such as child illnesses and custody issues. The most striking differences between pregnancy and post-partum related to the family's medical problems and greater environmental constraints. Many factors detracted from women's capacity to engage in healthy weight behaviours post-partum, including challenges present prior to delivery, challenges present prior to delivery that worsen after delivery, and new challenges that begin after delivery. These additional post-partum challenges need to be considered in designing programmes, policies and interventions that promote healthy weight.

  16. [Modern medical science and Military Medical Academy].

    PubMed

    Gaĭdar, B V; Lobzin, Iu V; Chursin, I G; Tsygan, V N

    2005-08-01

    The article presents the information about the main directions of scientific investigations of Military Medical Academy and their results during the period of 1999-2000. The scientific work was conducted in conformity with demands of orders and directives of RF Ministry of Defense. 12 integrated scientific problems were formed in the annual plans of the Academy's research work. Together with traditional directions the new ones connected with the experience of troops medical support during the armed conflicts, liquidation of consequences of extreme situations, participation of military contingents in peace-making operations were developed. The complex clinical investigations of specific features of combat pathology due to firearms used by the enemy during the military operations in Afghanistan and in the Northern Caucasus are going on. In the most of clinical departments the problems of etiology, pathogenesis and treatment of servicemen' diseases under peacetime conditions are the main directions of scientific investigations. Every year the Academy's rationalizers and inventors produce 60-70 inventions and more than 500 rationalization proposals. Since 1995 the Academy publishes the journal "Clinical medicine and pathophysiology" and since 1999--"Bulletin of Russian Military Medical Academy". The Academy's scientific potential comprises 194 professors, 295 associate professors, 349 Doctors and 894 Candidates of Science, 20 Honoured Scientists of RF, 57 members and corresponding members of academies (Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and other social academies). PMID:16259295

  17. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ...

  18. Usage of pioglitazone at Medanta, the Medicity.

    PubMed

    Mithal, Ambrish; Kaur, Parjeet; Bansal, Beena; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Wasir, Jasjeet S; Jevalikar, Ganesh; Mahendru, Shama

    2014-01-01

    Pioglitazone improves glycemic control by acting as an insulin sensitizer and is used in the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pioglitazone has recently been at the center of a controversy with regards to its safety. There is no clear consensus on how, when and in what dose the drug should be used in the management of diabetes. We have summarized our strategy on pioglitazone use in Type 2 diabetes in a large private tertiary care center - Medanta, the Medicity- which may help in generating further thought about positioning of this anti-diabetic molecule. We use pioglitazone as the fourth in the pecking order of oral anti-diabetic agents. We typically use pioglitazone in a dose of 15 mg/day. We avoid using pioglitazone with insulin. We do not use pioglitazone under following situations: In the presence of significant or proven cardiac disease, in patients who are struggling with their weight or need to lose weight, in patients at high risk for osteoporotic fractures, in patients with macular edema, in patients with pre-existing bladder cancer and would discontinue in case hematuria or any other symptom of bladder cancer develops. We continue to use the drug in patients well controlled on it without any evident side-effects or contraindications.

  19. Medical Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology. PMID:26065591

  20. Medical Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology.