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Sample records for pre-transplant serum ferritin

  1. Serum ferritin.

    PubMed

    Worwood, M

    1979-01-01

    (1) Brief introduction to iron metabolism and the biochemistry of ferritin. (2) Early studies of circulating ferritin. (3) Methods for measuring serum ferritin concentrations -- immunoradiometric, radioimmuno- and enzyme-linked immuno assays based on liver or spleen ferritin -- an evaluation of these techniques. (4) Serum ferritin concentrations in normal subjects -- definition of normality -- relationship between storage iron and serum ferritin concentrations -- changes during development from birth to old age -- iron deficiency -- variability of serum ferritin concentration -- evaluation of use of ferritin assay for assessment of storage iron levels. (5) Serum ferritin concentrations in disease -- hemochromatosis -- secondary iron overload -- liver damage -- infection and chronic disease -- cancer. (6) Assay of serum ferritin with antibodies to ferritins other than liver or spleen -- ferritinemia and cancer. (7) Properties of serum ferritin -- molecular weight -- iron content -- isoelectric focusing patterns -- carbohydrate content -- immunological properties. (8) Physiology of circulating ferritin -- release of ferritin from tissues -- origin of circulating ferritin -- clearance from the plasma -- iron and protein turnover. (9) Summary -- factors influencing serum ferritin concentrations and clinical use of ferritin estimations.

  2. Design and Validation of an Augmented Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index Comprising Pre-transplant Ferritin, Albumin and Platelet Count for Prediction of Outcomes after Allogeneic Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Jennifer E.; Storer, Barry; Armand, Philippe; Raimondi, Roberto; Gibson, Christopher; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Benedetto; Martin, Paul J.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storb, Rainer; Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pre-transplant values of serum ferritin, albumin and peripheral blood counts were previously suggested to provide prognostic information about hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes. Whether these “biomarkers” have prognostic value independent of each other and the HCT-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is unknown. Patients and Methods We analyzed data from 3917 allogeneic HCT recipients at multiple sites in the US and Italy using multivariate models including each biomarker and the HCT-CI. Data from all sites were then randomly divided into a training set (n=2352) to develop weights for the relevant biomarkers to be added to the HCT-CI scores and a validation set (n=1407) to validate an augmented HCT-CI compared to the original index. Results Multivariate analysis with data from one site showed that ferritin, albumin and platelets-- not neutrophils or hemoglobin--were independently associated with increased non-relapse mortality (NRM) and decreased overall survival. Findings were validated in data from the other sites. Subsequently, in a training set from all sites, ferritin >2500 mg/dL (HR:1.69); albumin 3–3.5 g/dL (HR:1.61) and <3.0 g/dL (HR:2.27); and platelets 50–<100,000 (HR:1.28), 20–<50,000 (HR:1.29) and <20,000 (HR:1.55) were statistically significantly associated with NRM. Weights were assigned to these laboratory values following the same equation used to design the original index. In the validation set, The addition of the biomarkers to the original index to develop an augmented HCT-CI resulted in a statistically significant increase in higher c-statistic estimate for prediction of NRM. (p=0.0007). Conclusion Ferritin, albumin, and platelet counts are important prognostic markers that further refine the discriminative power of the HCT-CI for transplant outcomes. PMID:25862589

  3. Serum selenium assay following serum ferritin assay

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.; Morris, J.S.; Hann, H.L.; Pulsipher, B.; Stahlhut, M.W.

    1986-08-01

    Stored serum samples can be an important research resource into the etiology of cancer. These sera cannot be replaced and should therefore be used to best advantage. In previous epidemiologic studies, only single serum constituents have been assayed in individual serum samples. For example, serum ferritin has been examined in samples stored for as long as 10 years at -20C for a possible relation with general mortality (1) and cancer death (2). Ferritin is the tissue iron-storage protein and is therefore subject to denaturation. Serum selenium has also been examined in relation to cancer risk in a prospective manner by using stored frozen serum samples (3, 4). The interactions of a variety of serum factors in relation to cancer risk would be a desirable research goal, except that the amounts of serum typically available in frozen serum banks are less than 1 ml. It was the purpose of this investigation to determine if a radioimmunoassay for ferritin affected a subsequent neutron activation assay for selenium on the same 0.1 ml serum sample.

  4. Iron and ADHD: Time to Move beyond Serum Ferritin Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Parisi, Pasquale; Vanacore, Nicola; Martines, Francesca; Sargentini, Vittorio; Cortese, Samuele

    2013-01-01

    Objective: (a) To compare serum ferritin levels in a sample of stimulant-naive children with ADHD and matched controls and (b) to assess the association of serum ferritin to ADHD symptoms severity, ADHD subtypes, and IQ. Method: The ADHD and the control groups included 101 and 93 children, respectively. Serum ferritin levels were determined with…

  5. Serum & cerebrospinal fluid ferritin levels in children with acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, A; Rusia, U; Anand, N K; Sood, S K

    1989-06-01

    Serum and CSF ferritin were estimated in 35 consecutive patients of acute leukaemia at the time of admission and on induction of remission. Serum ferritin levels were significantly raised in 94 per cent patients of acute leukaemia. The mean (+/- SD) serum ferritin (314.36 +/- 158.4 micrograms/1) was significantly higher when compared with control values (P less than 0.001). Remission induction resulted in significant fall in serum ferritin values to a mean of 149 (+/- 98.7) micrograms/l (P less than 0.05). Serum ferritin is thus of value in assessing the state of remission and is a sensitive indicator of the leukaemic cell mass and the state of activity of the disease. CSF ferritin levels in acute leukaemia were comparable to normal control values. CSF ferritin did not reflect CNS involvement in acute leukaemia and therefore its value as a tumour marker of CNS infiltration is doubtful.

  6. Serum ferritin concentration in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lynn, K L; Mitchell, T R; Shepperd, J

    1980-09-01

    Studies in 144 patients on maintenace hemodialysis have shown that serum ferritin concentration is influenced by the period the patient has been on dialysis, the presence of liver disease and to some extent the underlying diagnosis. It was observed that parenteral iron therapy could still produce an increase in hemoglobin concentration when the serum ferritin was as high as 60--55 micrograms/l. This suggests that the target serum ferritin, whatever the route of iron replacement, should be at least 55 micrograms/l. The higher levels of ferritin at which an increase in hemoglobin concentration can occur, together with the variable increment in serum ferritin after parenteral iron, indicates that the simple relationship between serum ferritin and marrow iron stores may be distrubed in some patients.

  7. [Serum ferritin in donors with regular plateletpheresis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-Hui; Guo, Ru-Hua; Wu, Wei-Jian; Yan, Jun-Xiong; Yu, Jin-Lin; Zhu, Ye-Hua; He, Qi-Tong; Luo, Yi-Hong; Huang, Lu; Ye, Rui-Yun

    2011-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the impact of regular donating platelets on serum ferritin (SF) of donors. A total of 93 male blood donors including 24 initial plateletpheresis donors and 69 regular plateletpheresis donors were selected randomly. Their SF level was measured by ELISA. The results showed that the SF level of initial plateletpheresis donors and regular plateletpheresis donors were 91.08 ± 23.38 µg/L and 57.16 ± 35.48 µg/L respectively, and all were in normal levels, but there was significant difference between the 2 groups (p < 0.05). The SF level decreased when the donation frequency increased, there were no significant differences between the groups with different donation frequency. Correlation with lifetime donations of platelets was not found. It is concluded that regular plateletpheresis donors may have lower SF level.

  8. The purification and properties of ferritin from human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Worwood, M; Dawkins, S; Wagstaff, M; Jacobs, A

    1976-01-01

    1. Ferritin has been isolated from the serum of four patients with iron overload by using two methods. 2. In method A, the serum was adjusted to pH 4.8 and heated to 70 degrees C. After removal of denatured protein, ferritin was concentrated and further purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. In most cases, only a partial purification was achieved. 3. In method B, ferritin was extracted from the serum with a column of immuno-adsorbent [anti-(human ferritin)] and released from the column with 3M-KSCN. Further purification was achieved by anion-exchange chromatography followed by the removal of remaining contaminating serum proteins by means of a second immunoadsorbent. Purifications of up to 31 000-fold were achieved, and the homogeneity of the final preparations was demonstrated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. 4. Serum ferritin purified by either method has the same elution volume as human spleen ferritin on gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. Serum ferritin has a relatively low iron content and iron/protein ratios of 0.023 and 0.067 (mug of Fe/mug of protein) were found in two pure preparations. On anion-exchange chromatography serum ferritin has a low affinity for the column when compared with various tissue ferritins. Isoelectric focusing has demonstrated the presence of a high proportion of isoferritins of relatively high pI. 5. Possible mechanisms for the release of ferritin into the circulation are briefly discussed. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 PMID:962866

  9. Abnormally high serum ferritin levels among professional road cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Zotter, H; Robinson, N; Zorzoli, M; Schattenberg, L; Saugy, M; Mangin, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: An international, longitudinal medical follow up examination of male professional road cyclists revealed excessively elevated serum ferritin levels. Objective: To evaluate the importance of elevated ferritin values among professional cyclists, their relationship with age and nationality, and their evolution over 3 years. Methods: Over 1000 serum ferritin values were collected. Other parameters were included in order to exclude conditions which might have increased ferritin levels without changing body iron stores. Results: In 1999, over 45% of riders displayed ferritin values above 300 ng/ml and one fourth levels over 500 ng/ml. These percentages had decreased to 27% and 9%, respectively, 3 years later, while the overall average, which was above the normal limits in 1999, had decreased by 33% in 3 years. Older cyclists had higher ferritin values than younger cyclists. There was also a relationship between ferritin levels and the nationality of the cyclists. Analysis of 714 riders in 2000 and 2002 showed only a slight and insignificant decrease in the mean ferritin value although those with initially elevated iron stores had a much greater decrease. Conclusion: Professional road cyclists used excessive iron supplementation leading to high serum ferritin levels correlating with increased body iron stores. Although the situation progressively improved over 3 years, it remains worrying as increased body iron stores are related to health complications. Therefore, prevention in addition to the fight against doping should be a main goal of the UCI. Aggressive therapy for athletes with excessive ferritin values should be carried out at or before the end of their careers. PMID:15562163

  10. Relationship between Serum Ferritin Levels and Dyslipidemia in Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Eun; Roh, Yong-Kyun; Ju, Sang-Yhun; Yoon, Yeo-Joon; Nam, Ga-Eun; Nam, Hyo-Yun; Choi, Jun-Seok; Lee, Jong-Eun; Sang, Jung-Eun; Han, Kyungdo

    2016-01-01

    Background Ferritin is associated with various cardiometabolic risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, and insulin resistance in adults. We aimed to study the association between serum ferritin levels and dyslipidemia in adolescents, because dyslipidemia is considered an important modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in the young. Methods We analyzed 1,879 subjects (1,026 boys and 853 girls) from the 2009–2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV. Subjects were categorized into quartiles according to their lipid parameters, which were classified according to age and gender. Those in the highest quartile groups for total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglyceride concentrations were diagnosed as having dyslipidemia. Those in the lowest quartile for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values were diagnosed with abnormal levels. Results In boys, total cholesterol, LDL-C, and triglyceride concentrations were significantly correlated with serum ferritin levels. In both boys and girls, serum ferritin levels were negatively associated with HDL-C values, even after adjusting for all covariates. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between serum ferritin levels and total cholesterol, LDL, and triglyceride concentrations in girls. Conclusion Serum ferritin levels were significantly associated with major dyslipidemia parameters, more prominently in boys than in girls, and this association represents a cardiometabolic risk factor. PMID:27070153

  11. Measurement of ferritin and anti-ferritin autoantibodies in serum and colostrum of Holstein and Japanese Black cows.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Yoshiya; Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Orino, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    Anti-ferritin autoantibody is a ferritin-binding protein commonly found in mammals; it is thought to form an immune complex with ferritin and thereby mediate the rapid clearance of circulating ferritin. The aim of this study is to determine concentrations of ferritin and anti-ferritin autoantibodies (immunoglobulin (Ig)M, IgG and IgA) in serum and colostrum of Holstein (H) and Japanese Black (JB) cows within 24 h of normal calving. Blood and colostrum samples were collected from cows of various ages (2-11 years) and calving number (1-8 live births). Mean ferritin concentrations were higher in colostrum than in serum for both breeds, and higher colostrum ferritin concentrations were found in H than JB cows. IgA antibodies in serum and colostrum from both breeds had negligible ferritin-binding activity. For both breeds, IgM and IgG antibodies had higher ferritin-binding activity in colostrum than in serum. There was a significant correlation between IgM and IgG ferritin-binding activities in serum and colostrum of H and JB cows. These results suggest that ferritin and IgM and IgG autoantibodies are actively transferred from the blood stream to the colostrum at prepartum or early lactation.

  12. Serum iron and ferritin level in idiopathic Parkinson.

    PubMed

    Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Aliakbar; Farid, Gholnar Abbasi; Talebi, Mahnaz; Pashapou, Ali; Majidi, Jafar; Goldust, Mohamad

    2012-11-15

    Parkinson disease is a prevalent progressive neurodegenerative disorder, especially in western countries and among the elderly. This study aimed at evaluating serum iron and ferritin in patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease. In this case-control study, 50 patients with clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson disease (case group) were evaluated during a 12 month period. Fifty healthy persons (control group) recruited as well. Serum iron and ferritin levels were measured by biochemical and quantitative luminance methods, respectively in the case and control group. Fifty patients, 28 males and 22 females with the mean age of 64.53 +/- 10.18 (40-84) years and 50 controls were enrolled. Serum iron levels were 70.22 +/- 25.18 mg dL(-1) and 67.62 +/- 39.53 mg dL(-1) in case and control group, respectively. Serum ferritin levels were 129.79 +/- 137.67 ng dL(-1) and 109.87 +/- 154.71 ng dL(-1) in case and control group, respectively. There was no significant difference between different grades of Parkinson disease considering the serum level of iron or ferritin. The current study showed that generally there is no significant difference between the patients with the idiopathic Parkinson disease and healthy controls in terms of serum iron and ferritin levels. The same results were attributable to different grades of the disease.

  13. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum ferritin and the relationship between serum ferritin and nonheme iron stores in cats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, G A; Chavey, P S; Smith, J E

    1994-11-01

    Serum ferritin concentration correlates with tissue iron stores in humans, horses, calves, dogs, and pigs but not in rats. Because serum iron and total iron-binding capacity can be affected by disorders unrelated to iron adequacy (such as hypoproteinemia, chronic infection, hemolytic anemia, hypothyroidism, and renal disease), serum ferritin is probably the most reliable indicator of total body iron stores in larger species. To test the hypothesis that serum ferritin might be correlated with tissue iron levels in cats, we developed a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that uses two monoclonal antibodies in a sandwich arrangement to measure feline serum ferritin. The recovery of purified ferritin added to feline sera ranged from 94% to 104%; the within-assay coefficient of variability was 8.4%, and the assay-to-assay variability was 13.2%. Mean serum ferritin from 40 apparently healthy cats was 76 ng/ml (SD = 24 ng/ml). Serum ferritin concentration was significantly correlated (P < 0.001, n = 101, r = 0.365) with the nonheme iron in the liver and spleen (expressed as milligrams of iron per kilogram of body weight), as determined by Pearson product-moment correlation analysis. Because serum iron can decrease in diseases other than iron deficiency, the combination of serum iron and serum ferritin should provide sufficient evidence to differentiate anemia of chronic inflammation from anemia of iron deficiency in the cat.

  14. Relationship between serum ferritin, alcohol intake, and social status in 2235 Danish men and women.

    PubMed

    Milman, N; Kirchhoff, M

    1996-03-01

    The objective was to examine the relationships between serum ferritin, alcohol intake, and socioeconomic factors (school education, occupational education, occupation, income, marital status, cohabitation status, housing, social class) in a population survey performed in Copenhagen County during 1982-1984. The participants were selected at random from the census register and comprised 2235 healthy Danish individuals, non-blood donors (1044 men, 1191 women) in cohorts being 30, 40, 50, and 60 years old. The participants gave a detailed social and medical history and had a clinical examination including blood samples. In all age-groups, men had significantly higher serum ferritin and alcohol intake than women. In men, there was no relationship between serum ferritin and social class. Significant relationships were observed between ferritin and occupation (unemployed and self-employed men had higher ferritin than those with other occupations) and ferritin and income (in younger men, ferritin displayed a steady increase with income). None of the social variables were related to the prevalence of iron deficiency or iron overload. Alcohol intake was related to occupation and income, but not to social class. In women, none of the social variables showed any significant relationship to ferritin levels or iron overload. The prevalence of small iron stores (serum ferritin < or = 30 micrograms/l) was lower and the intake of alcohol was higher in women from high social classes. In both men and women, serum ferritin displayed highly significant positive correlations with alcohol intake. Likewise, the prevalence of iron overload (serum ferritin > 90th percentile) was closely correlated to alcohol intake. In conclusion, socioeconomic factors per se had a minor influence on serum ferritin levels and iron status in Danes. The distinct association between alcohol intake and serum ferritin levels should be considered in future iron status surveys.

  15. Serum ferritin and total iron-binding capacity to estimate iron storage in pigs.

    PubMed

    Smith, J E; Moore, K; Boyington, D; Pollmann, D S; Schoneweis, D

    1984-11-01

    The inability to accurately determine storage iron in baby pigs limits the development of new treatment programs. In pigs treated neonatally with iron dextran, serum ferritin had increased dramatically at ten days of age and then returned to near preinjection levels by 50 days of age. In contrast, serum ferritin in untreated pigs declined until they were offered creep feed at 21 days of age. When serum ferritin, serum iron, serum total iron-binding capacity, erythrocyte number, packed cell volume, and blood hemoglobin were measured in three-week-old pigs, serum ferritin combined with serum total iron-binding capacity correlated significantly with the total nonheme iron in the liver and spleen. The nonheme iron (in mg) could be predicted (r2 = 0.71) by the following expression: 8.7 + 0.6 (ferritin in ng/ml).

  16. Transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin assayed by serum ferritin kinetics in patients with normal iron stores and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao

    2015-11-01

    Ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron, total iron stores and transformation rate were determined by serum ferritin kinetics. The transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin is motivated by the potential difference between them. The transformer determines transformation rate according to the potential difference in iron mobilization and deposition. The correlations between transformation rate and iron stores were studied in 11 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 1 patent with treated iron deficiency anemia (TIDA), 9 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and 4 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia (TD). The power regression curve of approximation showed an inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron in part and total iron stores in HH. Such an inverse correlation between transformation rate and iron stores implies that the larger the amount of iron stores, the smaller the transformation of iron stores. On the other hand, a minimal inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron and no correlation between transformation rate and hemosiderin iron or total iron stores in CHC indicate the derangement of storage iron metabolism in the cells with CHC. Radio-iron fixation on the iron storing tissue in iron overload was larger than that in normal subjects by ferrokinetics. This is consistent with the inverse correlation between transformation rate and total iron stores in HH. The characteristics of iron turnover between ferritin and hemosiderin were disclosed from the correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron or total iron stores.

  17. Assessing the Association between Serum Ferritin, Transferrin Saturation, and C-Reactive Protein in Northern Territory Indigenous Australian Patients with High Serum Ferritin on Maintenance Haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Paul D.; Barzi, Federica; Cass, Alan; Hughes, Jaquelyne T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To determine the significance of high serum ferritin observed in Indigenous Australian patients on maintenance haemodialysis in the Northern Territory, we assessed the relationship between ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) as measures of iron status and ferritin and C-reactive protein (CRP) as markers of inflammation. Methods. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of data from adult patients (≥18 years) on maintenance haemodialysis (>3 months) from 2004 to 2011. Results. There were 1568 patients. The mean age was 53.9 (11.9) years. 1244 (79.3%) were Indigenous. 44.2% (n = 693) were male. Indigenous patients were younger (mean age [52.3 (11.1) versus 57.4 (15.2), p < 0.001]) and had higher CRP [14.7 mg/l (7–35) versus 5.9 mg/l (1.9–17.5), p < 0.001], higher median serum ferritin [1069 µg/l (668–1522) versus 794.9 µg/l (558.5–1252.0), p < 0.001], but similar transferrin saturation [26% (19–37) versus 28% (20–38), p = 0.516]. We observed a small positive correlation between ferritin and TSAT (r2 = 0.11, p < 0.001), no correlation between ferritin and CRP (r2 = 0.001, p < 0.001), and positive association between high serum ferritin and TSAT (p < 0.001), Indigenous ethnicity (p < 0.001), urea reduction ratio (p = 0.001), and gender (p < 0.001) after adjustment in mixed regression analysis. Conclusion. Serum ferritin and TSAT may inadequately reflect iron status in this population. The high ferritin was poorly explained by inflammation. PMID:28243472

  18. Serum Ferritin as a Predictor of Host Response to Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustbader, Edward D.; Hann, Hie-Won L.; Blumberg, Baruch S.

    1983-04-01

    With hemodialysis patients, a high serum ferritin before there was serological evidence of hepatitis B virus infection increased the likelihood that the infection would be persistent. This finding suggested that hepatitis B virus is likely to infect and actively replicate in liver cells with the propensity for increased ferritin synthesis. The virus itself could stimulate the synthesis of ferritin in a cyclic positive feedback mechanism that increases intracellular ferritin concentration and, eventually, intracellular iron. Transformed liver cells have low iron content, do not replicate hepatitis B virus, and require iron for growth. Infected, nonmalignant liver cells could supply iron to the transformed cells and nourish their expansion.

  19. Quantitating Iron in Serum Ferritin by Use of ICP-MS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Gillman, Patricia L.

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory method has been devised to enable measurement of the concentration of iron bound in ferritin from small samples of blood (serum). Derived partly from a prior method that depends on large samples of blood, this method involves the use of an inductively-coupled-plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Ferritin is a complex of iron with the protein apoferritin. Heretofore, measurements of the concentration of serum ferritin (as distinguished from direct measurements of the concentration of iron in serum ferritin) have been used to assess iron stores in humans. Low levels of serum ferritin could indicate the first stage of iron depletion. High levels of serum ferritin could indicate high levels of iron (for example, in connection with hereditary hemochromatosis an iron-overload illness that is characterized by progressive organ damage and can be fatal). However, the picture is complicated: A high level of serum ferritin could also indicate stress and/or inflammation instead of (or in addition to) iron overload, and low serum iron concentration could indicate inflammation rather than iron deficiency. Only when concentrations of both serum iron and serum ferritin increase and decrease together can the patient s iron status be assessed accurately. Hence, in enabling accurate measurement of the iron content of serum ferritin, the present method can improve the diagnosis of the patient s iron status. The prior method of measuring the concentration of iron involves the use of an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer with a graphite furnace. The present method incorporates a modified version of the sample- preparation process of the prior method. First, ferritin is isolated; more specifically, it is immobilized by immunoprecipitation with rabbit antihuman polyclonal antibody bound to agarose beads. The ferritin is then separated from other iron-containing proteins and free iron by a series of centrifugation and wash steps. Next, the ferritin is digested with nitric acid

  20. Association between serum ferritin and goitre in Iranian school children.

    PubMed

    Hashemipour, Mahin; Soheilipour, Fahimeh; Keshteli, Ammar Hassanzadeh; Siavash, Mansour; Amini, Masoud; Kelishadi, Roya

    2010-04-01

    Despite long-standing supplementation of iodine in Iran, the prevalence of goitre among general people remains high in some regions. The study investigated the role of iron status in the aetiology of goitre in school children in Isfahan, Iran. Two thousand three hundred and thirty-one school children were selected by multi-stage random sampling. Thyroid size was estimated by inspection and palpation. Urinary iodine concentration (UIC) and serum ferritin (SF) were measured. Overall, 32.9% of the children had goitre. The median UIC was 195.5 microg/L. The mean +/- SD of SF in the goitrous and non-goitrous children was 47.65 +/- 42.51 and 44.55 +/- 37.07 microg/L respectively (p=0.52). The prevalence of iron deficiency in goitrous and non-goitrous children was 9.6% and 3.1% respectively (p=0.007). Goitre is still prevalent in school children of Isfahan. However, their median UIC was well in the accepted range. Iron deficiency is associated with goitre in a small group of goitrous children. The role of goitrogens should also be investigated in this region.

  1. Changes in Serum Ferritin and Other Factors Associated with Iron Metabolism During Chronic Hyperbaric Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    N. Cooley. 1974. Bone scane withcomplex. Damageo fluorine-18 in diagnosing osteonecrosis in divers. In: :ould result in release of stored reserves...STRESS-GILMAN ET AL. Related Osteonecrosis . Proceedings of a symposium on in patients with iron overload and with acute and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis ...N. Walder. 1975. Serum ferritin, cobalt excretion, and body iron 19ඕ. Serum ferritin and dysbaric osteonecrosis . Under- status. C.M.A. J., 112

  2. Serum ferritin concentrations and body iron stores in a multicenter, multiethnic primary-care population

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R.; Reboussin, David M.; McLaren, Christine E.; Barton, James C.; Acton, Ronald T.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Harris, Emily L.; Reiss, Jacob A.; Adams, Paul C.; Speechley, Mark; Phatak, Pradyumna D.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Eckfeldt, John H.; Chen, Wen-Pin; Passmore, Leah; Dawkins, Fitzroy W.

    2013-01-01

    How often elevated serum ferritin in primary-care patients reflects increased iron stores (normally 0.8 g in men, 0.4 g in women) is not known. The Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) study screened 101,168 primary-care participants (44% Caucasians, 27% African-Americans, 14% Asians/Pacific Islanders, 13% Hispanics, 2% others). Follow-up clinical evaluation was performed in 302 of 333 HFE C282Y homozygotes regardless of iron measures and 1,375 of 1,920 nonhomozygotes with serum ferritin >300 μg/L (men), >200 μg/L (women) and transferrin saturation >50% (men), >45% (women). Quantitative phlebotomy was conducted in 122 of 175 C282Y homozygotes and 122 of 1,102 nonhomozygotes with non-transfusional serum ferritin elevation at evaluation. The estimated prevalence in the Caucasian population of C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 μg/L at evaluation was 20 per 10,000 men and 4 per 10,000 women; this constellation was predictive of iron stores >4 g in men and >2 g in women. The estimated prevalence per 10,000 of non-C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 μg/L at evaluation was 7 among Caucasians, 13 among Hispanics, 20 among African Americans, and 38 among Asians and Pacific Islanders, and this constellation was predictive of iron stores >2 g but <4 g. In conclusion, serum ferritin >900 μg/L after initial elevations of both serum ferritin and transferrin saturation is predictive of mildly increased iron stores in multiple ethnic populations regardless of HFE genotype. Serum ferritin >900 μg/L in male C282Y homozygotes is predictive of moderately increased iron stores. PMID:18429050

  3. Is the serum ferritin level a considerable predictor for hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Mehrpour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhagic Transformation (HT) of Ischemic Stroke (IS) is a detrimental complication. This study investigated the association between serum ferritin level and HT in patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery. Methods: Thirty patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. They were divided into two groups based on the serum ferritin level, lower or greater than 164.1ng/ml at the first 24 hours after admission. To investigate the incidence of HT in the two groups, we observed them for two weeks. Results: During the two- week observation, the incidence of HT was two persons (13.3%) in the group with the serum ferritin level of lower than 164.1ng/ml, and eight persons (53.3%) in the other group. This difference was statistically significant between the two groups (p=0.02). The relative risk of HT was 4 (95% CI: 1.012- 15.8) in the patients with massive IS of middle cerebral artery and the serum ferritin level greater than 164.1ng/ml. Conclusion: This study revealed that the serum ferritin level greater than 164.1ng/ml in the first 24 hours after admission is a reasonably important predictor for HT of IS. Conducting studies on factors affecting the serum ferritin level are suggested. PMID:27493907

  4. Relation between serum ferritin and liver and heart MRI T2* in beta thalassaemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Azarkeivan, A; Hashemieh, M; Akhlaghpoor, S; Shirkavand, A; Yaseri, M; Sheibani, K

    2013-08-01

    There is a need for higly accurate non-invasive methods for assessing organ iron content in thalassaemia patients. This study evaluated the relation between serum ferritin level, liver enzyme levels and hepatitis C antibody and liver and heart iron deposition assessed by MRI T2*. Data were obtained from the medical records of 156 thalassemia major patients in Tehran. There was a moderate negative correlation between serum ferritin and liver MRI T2* relaxation time (r = -0.535) and a weak negative correlation between serum ferritin and heart MRI T2* relaxation time (r = -0.361). Hepatitis C infection and liver enzyme levels did not confound or modify the relation between ferritin and liver or heart MRI T2*. Liver and heart MRI T2* readings were poorly correlated (r = 0.281). Routine evaluation of liver and heart iron content using MRI T2* is suggested to better evaluate the haemosiderosis status in thalassemia patients.

  5. The Association of Serum Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Ferritin in Diabetic Microvascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li; Jiang, Fang; Tang, Yue-Ting; Si, Meng-Ya

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular disease. Most diabetes patients have higher serum levels of ferritin that may participate in diabetic vascular complications through high oxidative stress induced by iron. However, the mechanistic link between ferritin and VEGF is obscure. The study investigated the association of VEGF and ferritin in patients with diabetic microvascular disease. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and 26 healthy individuals were selected in this study. Serum ferritin, VEGF, hematological parameters, and clinical data were assessed in this cohort. The Spearman rank method was used to evaluate the associations among them. Results: Serum levels of VEGF and ferritin were significantly higher in diabetes patients compared with the controls; levels of both were elevated with development of the disease. There were positive correlations between VEGF and glucose levels and between VEGF and ferritin in diabetes groups, especially in patients with diabetic retinopathy. Positive correlations were also found between VEGF level and the parameters of age, hemoglobin, and albumin in patients with diabetes hypertension. Conclusions: Our data suggest that high ferritin levels in T2DM are closely related to the development of diabetic vascular complications through interaction with VEGF. PMID:24279470

  6. Postmenopausal vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk for metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Bae, Yun Jung

    2012-10-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the serum ferritin status between the postmenopausal vegetarians and non-vegetarians and to identify the relation of serum ferritin with metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors in postmenopausal women. The two study groups consisted of postmenopausal vegetarians (n=59) who maintained a vegetarian diet for over 20 years and age-matched non-vegetarian controls (n=48). Anthropometric measurements, dietary intakes, serum metabolic syndrome-related parameters, and serum ferritin level between the two groups were compared. The vegetarians exhibited significantly lower weight (p<0.01), body mass index (BMI) (p<0.001), percentage of body fat (p<0.001), waist circumference (p<0.01), SBP (p<0.001), DBP (p<0.001), and fasting glucose (p<0.05). According to the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP)-Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for MetS applying Korean guidelines for waist circumference, the prevalence of MetS was lower in vegetarians (33.9 %) than in non-vegetarians (47.9 %). Vegetarians had significantly lower serum level of ferritin (p<0.01) than non-vegetarians. In the correlation analysis, serum ferritin was positively related to fasting glucose (r=0.264, p<0.01), triglycerides (r=0.232, p<0.05), and the NCEP score (r=0.214, p<0.05) and negatively related to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (r=-0.225, p<0.05) after adjusting for BMI, lifestyle, and dietary factors (animal protein, animal fat, and dietary fiber intake). In conclusion, postmenopausal vegetarians had lower MetS presence and a lower serum ferritin level compared to non-vegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians' low serum ferritin level may reduce the risk of MetS in postmenopausal women.

  7. High serum ferritin is associated with worse outcome of patients with decompensated cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Theodora; Goulis, Ioannis; Soulaidopoulos, Stergios; Karasmani, Areti; Doumtsis, Petros; Tsioni, Konstantina; Mandala, Eudokia; Akriviadis, Evangelos; Cholongitas, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies in patients with decompensated cirrhosis showed a correlation between serum ferritin levels and patients’ prognosis. Besides, red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and mean platelet volume (MPV) have been associated with the severity of hepatic function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of serum ferritin and RDW/MPV in the outcome [survival, death, or liver transplantation (LT)] of patients with stable decompensated cirrhosis. Methods Consecutive adult patients with stable decompensated cirrhosis admitted to our department between September 2010 and February 2016 were included. Serum ferritin, RDW and MPV were recorded in every patient. They were followed up and their outcome (alive, death, or LT) was evaluated. Results 192 consecutive patients with stable decompensated cirrhosis (142 men, age 54.2±12 years); at the end of follow up [12 (range: 1-64) months] 62 patients remained alive and 130 died or underwent LT. In multivariate analysis, serum ferritin (HR 1.001, 95%CI 1.00-1.002, P=0.005) and GFR (HR 0.96, 95%CI 0.92-0.99, P=0.035) were the only independent factors significantly associated with the outcome. Ferritin had low discriminative ability (AUC: 0.61) to the outcome yielding a sensitivity and specificity of 85.3% and 44.2%, respectively, at the best cut-off point (>55 ng/mL), while patients with ferritin >55 ng/mL (n=145) had a worse outcome compared to those with ferritin ≤55 ng/mL (n=47) (log rank P=0.001). RDW and MPV were not associated with the outcome. Conclusion High serum ferritin, but not RDW/MPV, is associated with worse outcome in patients with established decompensated cirrhosis. However, further studies are needed to elucidate better this issue. PMID:28243043

  8. Serum ferritin levels and transferrin saturation in men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kuvibidila, Solo R.; Gauthier, Tony; Rayford, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Elevated body iron stores (serum ferritin >300 microg/L, transferrin saturation TS >50%) are associated with increased risk of liver and lung cancers. To determine whether such association also exists for prostate cancer (PC), we measured serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), and TS in serum samples from 34 men with newly diagnosed, untreated PC and 84 healthy men, ranging in age from 49-78 years. In contrast with other malignancies, men with PC had significantly lower mean concentrations of serum ferritin (156 microg/L) and TS (24.35%) than those without PC (ferritin, 245 microg/L; TS, 31.98%) (p<0.05). The 95% confidence intervals for ferritin were 109-203 microg/L and 205-286 microg/L, and those for TS were 20.29-28.4% and 28.35-35.61% for men with and without PC, respectively. Significant differences were observed between both groups in the distribution of serum ferritin (<100, 101-300, >300 microg/L) and TS (<16, 16-50, >50%) (p<0.05). A lower percentage of cases than of controls had serum ferritin (17.6% versus 29.8%) and TS (5.9% versus 14.7%) above normal. These differences persisted when the analysis was limited to African-American men (31 cases and 52 controls). Data suggest that elevated body iron stores are less common in men with PC compared to those without PC. PMID:15160979

  9. Association between hemoglobin variability, serum ferritin levels, and adverse events/mortality in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kuragano, Takahiro; Matsumura, Osamu; Matsuda, Akihiko; Hara, Taiga; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Murata, Toshiaki; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Hase, Hiroki; Joki, Nobuhiko; Fukatsu, Atushi; Inoue, Toru; Itakura, Ikuhiro; Nakanishi, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    In recent times, therapy for renal anemia has changed dramatically in that iron administration has increased and doses of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) have decreased. Here we used a prospective, observational, multicenter design and measured the serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels every 3 months for 2 years in 1086 patients on maintenance hemodialysis therapy. The associations of adverse events with fluctuations in ferritin and hemoglobin levels and ESA and iron doses were measured using a Cox proportional hazards model for time-dependent variables. The risks of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease (CCVD), infection, and hospitalization were higher among patients who failed to maintain a target-range hemoglobin level and who exhibited high-amplitude fluctuations in hemoglobin compared with patients who maintained a target-range hemoglobin level. Patients with a higher compared with a lower ferritin level had an elevated risk of CCVD and infectious disease. Moreover, the risk of death was significantly higher among patients with high-amplitude ferritin fluctuations compared with those with a low ferritin level. The risks of CCVD, infection, and hospitalization were significantly higher among patients who were treated with high weekly doses of intravenous iron compared with no intravenous iron. Thus, there is a high risk of death and/or adverse events in patients with hemoglobin levels outside the target range, in those with high-amplitude hemoglobin fluctuations, in those with consistently high serum ferritin levels, and in those with high-amplitude ferritin fluctuations.

  10. Quantification of ferritin bound iron in human serum using species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yao; Walczyk, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Ferritin is a hollow sphere protein composed of 24 subunits that can store up to 4500 iron atoms in its inner cavity. It is mainly found in the liver and spleen but also in serum at trace levels. Serum ferritin is considered as the best single indicator in assessing body iron stores except liver or bone marrow biopsy. However, it is confounded by other disease conditions. Ferritin bound iron (FBI) and ferritin saturation have been suggested as more robust biomarkers. The current techniques for FBI determination are limited by low antibody specificity, low instrument sensitivity and possible analyte losses during sample preparation. The need for a highly sensitive and reliable method is widely recognized. Here we describe a novel technique to detect serum FBI using species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SS-IDMS). [(57)Fe]-ferritin was produced by biosynthesis and in vitro labeling with the (57)Fe spike in the form of [(57)Fe]-citrate after cell lysis and heat treatment. [(57)Fe]-ferritin for sample spiking was further purified by fast liquid protein chromatography. Serum ferritin and added [(57)Fe]-ferritin were separated from other iron species by ultrafiltration followed by isotopic analysis of FBI using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Repeatability of our assay is 8% with an absolute detection limit of 18 ng FBI in the sample. As compared to other speciation techniques, SS-IDMS offers maximum control over sample losses and species conversion during analysis. The described technique may therefore serve as a reference technique for clinical applications of FBI as a new biomarker for assessing body iron status.

  11. Serum Ferritin Is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome and Red Meat Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Felipe, Avila; Guadalupe, Echeverría; Druso, Pérez; Carlos, Martinez; Pablo, Strobel; Oscar, Castillo; Luis, Villaroel; Diego, Mezzano; Jaime, Rozowski; Inés, Urquiaga; Federico, Leighton

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. Hyperferritinemia has been related with a wide spectrum of pathologies, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, and metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperferritinemia and iron consumption. Methods and Results. Serum ferritin concentration was evaluated in 66 presumed healthy men, along with other clinical and biochemical markers of chronic diseases. A three-day food questionnaire was applied for nutrition information. Hyperferritinemia was a condition found in 13.4% of the volunteers analyzed. Significant correlations were found between serum ferritin concentration and metabolic syndrome parameters (HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose) as well as an increase of the serum ferritin mean value with the number of risk factors of metabolic syndrome. Also, oxidative stress markers (carbonyl groups, AOPP, and glycated hemoglobin), hepatic damage markers (GGT, SGOT), and parameters related to insulin resistance (HOMA, blood insulin, and blood glucose) correlate significantly with serum ferritin. Volunteers had an excessive iron intake, principally by bread consumption. Analyses of food intake showed that red meat consumption correlates significantly with serum ferritin. Conclusion. Red meat consumption, metabolic syndrome, and chronic disease markers are associated with hyperferritinemia in a population of Chilean men. PMID:26451235

  12. Presence of Serum Ferritin before and after Bariatric Surgery: Analysis in Dentate and Edentulous Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mosquim, Victor; Sales Peres, Matheus de Carvalho; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Chaim, Elinton Adami

    2016-01-01

    Society has changed its own lifestyle, specially its eating habits and physical activities, leading to excessive weight and a sedentary behavior, which has contributed to obesity increase. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment to obesity, allowing weight loss and its maintenance. However, it has been related high levels of iron deficiency after surgery. A person’s nutritional status might be affected by total or partial tooth loss. The aim of this longitudinal prospective cohort study was to evaluate the levels of serum ferritin before and after bariatric surgery and to identify if there is a relation with tooth loss. The sample was composed of 50 patients selected and assisted at Amaral Carvalho Hospital, located in Jaú city, Brazil. The use and necessity of prosthesis, dental absence or presence, and serum ferritin dosage were evaluated. Student’s t test, Univariate analysis, Chi-square and Odds Ratio were adopted (p<0.05). There was no significant difference regarding the serum ferritin levels between dentate and edentulous patients prior to surgery (p = 0.436). After surgery, the serum ferritin levels were higher in edentulous patients (prosthesis users) when compared to the pre-surgical levels, and the post-surgical levels presented significant difference regarding the dentate patients (p = 0.024). It can be concluded that rehabilitated patients in postoperative period showed better levels of serum ferritin after surgical intervention. PMID:27695053

  13. Association between serum ferritin levels and metabolic syndrome: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuelong; He, Lianping; Chen, Yi; Fang, Yun; Yao, Yingshui

    2015-01-01

    It is definite that the serum iron level has a positive correlation with the risk of obesity. However, the association between increased serum ferritin levels and the metabolic syndrome still remains controversial. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to confirm the association between serum ferritin levels and metabolic syndrome. We searched PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) for relevant articles that assessed the association between serum ferritin levels and metabolic syndrome and were published between 2006 and 2014. Review Manage 5.3 software was used to collect and analysis the data cited in the ultimately selected papers. The variance was exhibited using the forest plot and the heterogeneity among studies was examined using the I2 index. We use the funnel plot to evaluate the publication bias. Cross-sectional study, case-control study and prospective cohort study met our inclusion criteria including data from a total of 4,797 participants. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the metabolic syndrome comparing the highest and lowest category of ferritin levels was 1.20 (95% CI: 0.69, 1.71; I2=96%). The meta-analysis demonstrates that elevated ferritin levels are positive aassociated with metabolic syndrome. PMID:26550259

  14. High maternal serum ferritin in early pregnancy and risk of spontaneous preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Khambalia, Amina Z; Collins, Clare E; Roberts, Christine L; Morris, Jonathan M; Powell, Katie L; Tasevski, Vitomir; Nassar, Natasha

    2015-08-14

    Previous studies have reported inconsistent associations between maternal serum ferritin concentrations and the risk of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB). The aim of the present study was to examine the association between Fe biomarkers, including serum ferritin concentrations, and the risk of total ( 75th percentile ( ≥ 43 μg/l) (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.06, 2.10) and >90th percentile ( ≥ 68 μg/l) (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.25, 2.96). Increased odds of early and moderate-to-late sPTB were associated with ferritin levels >90th percentile (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.32, 4.73) and >75th percentile (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.03, 2.37), respectively. No association was found between the risk of sPTB and elevated sTfR levels or Fe deficiency. In conclusion, elevated maternal serum ferritin levels in early pregnancy are associated with an increased risk of sPTB from 34 weeks of gestation. The usefulness of early pregnancy ferritin levels in identifying women at risk of sPTB warrants further investigation.

  15. Association of Serum Ferritin and Kidney Function with Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Il Hwan; Choi, Eun Young; Park, Joon-Sung; Lee, Chang Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin is considered to be a marker of the body’s iron stores and has a potential relationship with the systemic manifestations of inflammatory reactions. Data on the association between increased levels of serum ferritin and ocular problems are limited, particularly in relation to age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Serum ferritin levels, as a possible clinical parameter for predicting AMD, were analyzed in anthropometric, biochemical, and ophthalmologic data from a nation-wide, population-based, case-control study (KNHNES IV and V). All native Koreans aged ≥ 20 years and who had no medical illness were eligible to participate. Among them, 2.9% had AMD, and its prevalence was found to increase in the higher ferritin quintile groups (Ptrend < 0.0001). In multiple linear regression analysis, serum ferritin level was closely related to conventional risk factors for AMD. Comparison of early AMD with a control group showed that serum ferritin levels were closely associated with AMD (OR = 1.004, 95% CI = 1.002–1.006), and further adjustment for age, gender, serum iron, and kidney function did not reduce this association (OR = 1.003, 95% CI = 1.001–1.006). Furthermore, the relationship between ferritin quintile and early AMD was dose-dependent. Thus, an increased level of serum ferritin in a healthy person may be a useful indicator of neurodegenerative change in the macula. A large population-based prospective clinical study is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27096155

  16. Serum iron, Folate, Ferritin and CD4 Count in HIV Seropositive Women.

    PubMed

    Kharb, Simmi; Kumawat, Manjulata; Lallar, Meenakshi; Ghalaut, P S; Nanda, Smiti

    2017-03-01

    HIV infects cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) T-lymphocytes, monocytes and macrophages resulting in decreased number and function of CD4 cells, changes that affect both cell mediated and humoral immunity. Hematological abnormalities are a common complication of human immune virus (HIV) infection and these abnormalities increase as the disease advances. Anemia is the most common haematological abnormality in HIV seropositive patients and its incidence is strongly associated with the progression of the disease. The aim of present study was to assess the haematological profile of HIV seropositive women and compare them with CD4 count. Two hundred seropositive females (age 18-25 years) attending antiretroviral therapy clinic were selected. Routine gynaecological and haematological investigations were carried out, study samples were drawn and serum iron, folate and ferritin were analysed by chemiluminiscence and CD4 count was determined by using flow-cytometry. Anemia was prevalent in seropositive women especially in those with low CD4 levels. Serum folate and ferritin levels were significantly lower in females with lower CD4 levels. Serum iron levels were higher at low CD4 levels. The mean CD4 count in HIV seropositive anaemic women were lower as compared to non anaemics suggesting that anaemia improves with higher CD4 cell counts. Plasma folate and ferritin levels are sensitive predictor of anaemia in early HIV infections and these patients should have a regular monitoring of their folate and ferritin levels especially with lower CD4 levels.

  17. Associations between serum hepcidin, ferritin and Hb concentrations and type 2 diabetes risks in a Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Zhou, Daizhan; An, Peng; Wu, Qian; Wang, Hao; Wu, Aimin; Mu, Mingdao; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Hui; He, Lin; Liu, Yun; Wang, Fudi

    2013-12-01

    Systemic Fe overload can contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism and the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although hepcidin is the master regulator of systemic Fe homeostasis, few studies have systematically evaluated the associations of serum hepcidin concentrations with Fe metabolism parameters and risks for the development of T2D. In this regard, whether hepcidin concentrations are associated with T2D remains controversial. We measured serum hepcidin and ferritin concentrations in a case-control study of 1259 Han Chinese participants to evaluate the possible associations of serum hepcidin concentrations with Fe metabolism parameters and risks of T2D. Individuals with diabetes (n 555) and control participants (n 704) were recruited and serum hepcidin and ferritin concentrations were quantified. Additionally, selected biochemical and anthropometric variables were determined. A logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association of serum hepcidin and ferritin concentrations with T2D. A linear regression analysis was used to test for associations between serum hepcidin and ferritin concentrations and a number of clinical, demographic and diabetes-associated variables. We found that serum hepcidin concentrations correlated with Hb and serum ferritin concentrations. No differences in hepcidin concentrations were found between the group with diabetes and the control group. Hepcidin concentrations were not significantly correlated with T2D risk factors. We also found that serum ferritin concentrations were elevated in individuals with diabetes and were positively correlated with both Hb concentrations and T2D risk factors. The present findings suggest that serum ferritin concentrations correlate with T2D risk factors, while serum hepcidin concentrations are positively associated with Hb and serum ferritin concentrations, but do not correlate with T2D.

  18. The challenges of using serum ferritin to guide i.v. iron treatment practices in patients on hemodialysis with anemia.

    PubMed

    Easom, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Expert guidelines recommend routine administration of intravenous iron therapy and frequent monitoring of iron status for patients on hemodialysis who are being treated for anemia with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. However, monitoring iron status using conventional markers, such as serum ferritin, may be complicated by acute and chronic inflammation and malnutrition, which are common in this patient population. Therefore, nephrology nurses must be knowledgeable of the limitations of using serum ferritin to assess iron status and how to interpret high serum ferritin values to effectively treat patients on hemodialysis with anemia.

  19. Intravenous iron for the treatment of fatigue in nonanemic, premenopausal women with low serum ferritin concentration.

    PubMed

    Krayenbuehl, Pierre-Alexandre; Battegay, Edouard; Breymann, Christian; Furrer, Joerg; Schulthess, Georg

    2011-09-22

    This is the first study to investigate the efficacy of intravenous iron in treating fatigue in nonanemic patients with low serum ferritin concentration. In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 90 premenopausal women presenting with fatigue, serum ferritin ≤ 50 ng/mL, and hemoglobin ≥ 120 g/L were randomized to receive either 800 mg of intravenous iron (III)-hydroxide sucrose or intravenous placebo. Fatigue and serum iron status were assessed at baseline and after 6 and 12 weeks. Median fatigue at baseline was 4.5 (on a 0-10 scale). Fatigue decreased during the initial 6 weeks by 1.1 in the iron group compared with 0.7 in the placebo group (P = .07). Efficacy of iron was bound to depleted iron stores: In patients with baseline serum ferritin ≤ 15 ng/mL, fatigue decreased by 1.8 in the iron group compared with 0.4 in the placebo group (P = .005), and 82% of iron-treated compared with 47% of placebo-treated patients reported improved fatigue (P = .03). Drug-associated adverse events were observed in 21% of iron-treated patients and in 7% of placebo-treated patients (P = .05); none of these events was serious. Intravenous administration of iron improved fatigue in iron-deficient, nonanemic women with a good safety and tolerability profile. The efficacy of intravenous iron was bound to a serum ferritin concentration ≤ 15 ng/mL. This study was registered at the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register (www.isrctn.org) as ISRCTN78430425.

  20. Serum ferritin and risk of the metabolic syndrome: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jung-Su; Lin, Shiue-Ming; Huang, Tzu-Chieh; Chao, Jane C-J; Chen, Yi-Chun; Pan, Wen-Harn; Bai, Chyi-Huey

    2013-01-01

    Ferritin concentrations in circulation reflect iron stores in healthy individuals. However, elevated serum ferritin (SF) concentrations have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We aim to investigate factors associated with elevated SF and to evaluate the association between SF and risk of MetS in Taiwanese adults. Data was collected from 2654 healthy individuals aged >=19 years old, who participated in the Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT Adults 2005-2008). Mean concentrations of SF were 173±282 ng/mL (men 229±349 ng/mL and women 119±180 ng/mL). Prevalence proportion of MetS was 34.6% (men 43.1% and women 26.5%). Prevalence proportion of iron overload was 18.6% (men 21.5% and women 15.8%) and iron deficiency anemia was 5.2% (2.0% for men and 8.3% for women). Individuals with the highest SF tertile (T3) were more likely to consume higher amount of animal protein (p=0.001), betel nuts (p=0.004), and lower amounts of carbohydrates (p<0.0001), compared with the lowest SF group (T1). After adjustments, individuals with the highest SF tertile were associated with risk of MetS compared with those with the lowest (OR=1.724, 95% CI: 1.21-2.45). Serum ferritin concentrations showed a gradient relationship with individual components of MetS (all p<0.0001). Individuals with the highest SF tertile were significantly associated with fasting serum glucose (OR=2.16, 95% CI: 1.75-2.65) and serum triglyceride (OR=2.58, 95% CI: 1.07-3.22) than those with the lowest. In conclusions, our results highlight the crucial role of serum ferritin in the pathogenesis of the MetS in healthy Taiwanese adults.

  1. The prognostic value of the serum ferritin in a southern Brazilian cohort of patients with Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Koppe, Tiago; Doneda, Divair; Siebert, Marina; Paskulin, Livia; Camargo, Matheus; Tirelli, Kristiane Michelin; Vairo, Filippo; Daudt, Liane; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The clinical utility of serum ferritin as a biomarker of disease severity and prognosis in Gaucher disease (GD) is still debated. Here, we aimed to evaluate ferritin and its relation to clinicolaboratory parameters of GD patients seen at the Reference Center for Gaucher Disease of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, so as to gather evidence on the utility of ferritin as a biomarker of this condition. A retrospective chart review was performed collecting pre-and posttreatment data from GD patients. Eighteen patients with ferritin levels available before and after treatment were included in the study. Nine of these participants were males, and seventeen had type I GD. All patients were given either enzyme replacement (n = 16) or substrate reduction therapy (n = 2), and ferritin was found to decrease from 756 [318-1441] ng/mL at baseline to 521 [227-626] ng/mL (p=0.025) after 28.8 month soft treatment. Serum ferritin levels did not correlate with measures of disease severity, but showed an association with age at onset of treatment (ρ= 0.880; n = 18; p < 0.001). In conclusion, although serum ferritin did not correlate with disease severity, after a median 28.8 months of treatment, clinical outcomes had clearly improved, and ferritin levels had decreased. PMID:27007895

  2. EVALUATION OF SERUM FERRITIN AND SERUM IRON IN FREE-RANGING BLACK RHINOCEROS (DICEROS BICORNIS) AS A TOOL TO UNDERSTAND FACTORS AFFECTING IRON-OVERLOAD DISORDER.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele; Chavey, Patricia Sue; Hofmeyr, Jennifer; Mathebula, Nomkhosi; Doering, Alyssa; Buss, Peter; Olea-Popelka, Francisco

    2016-09-01

    Iron overload disorder (IOD) is a significant health issue for captive black rhinoceros ( Diceros bicornis ). Measurement of serum ferritin with a validated rhinoceros ferritin ELISA has been used extensively to detect animals in U.S. zoos that are at risk of developing IOD. However, there is limited information on serum ferritin levels in free-ranging black rhinoceros using this same assay. Serum ferritin, iron, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) were determined in 194 black rhinoceros from southern Africa. Mean ferritin in free-ranging black rhinoceros (290.54 ±247.4 ng/ml) was significantly higher than in free-ranging white rhinoceros (64.0 ± 102.4 ng/ml) sampled in this study from Kruger National Park, South Africa. However, there were no significant differences between genders or age groups. Ferritin values varied with geographical location of the black rhinoceros, although this was not clinically significant. Serum iron values were also higher in black rhinoceros (40.4 ± 19.1 μmol/L) compared to white rhinoceros (29.7 ± 10.7 μmol/L). There was no association between ferritin and GGT. This study provides serum ferritin, iron, and GGT values from free-ranging black rhinoceros that can be used for as comparative target values for captive animals.

  3. Ferritin in the Serum of Normal Subjects and Patients with Iron Deficiency and Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, A.; Miller, F.; Worwood, M.; Beamish, M. R.; Wardrop, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    The concentration of ferritin in serum gives a quantitative measure of the amount of storage iron in normal subjects and those with iron deficiency or overload. The mean level in normal men is 69 ng/ml, compared with 35 ng/ml in normal women. A concentration below 10 ng/ml is associated with a low transferrin saturation and iron-deficient erythropoiesis. PMID:5082548

  4. The Association between the Levels of Serum Ferritin and Sex Hormones in a Large Scale of Chinese Male Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiying; Gao, Yong; Tan, Aihua; Zhang, Shijun; Xiao, Qiang; Zhang, Bing; Huang, Lulu; Ye, Bingbing; Qin, Xue; Wu, Chunlei; Lu, Zheng; Zhang, Youjie; Liao, Ming; Yang, Xiaobo; Mo, Zengnan

    2013-01-01

    Background The ferritin is an important participant of iron-storage but its regulation and related factors were not well defined. The present objective was to explore the potential association between serum ferritin levels and sex hormones. Methods 1999 Chinese men in the Fangchenggang Area Male Health and Examination Survey (FAMHES) were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Levels of serum ferritin, total testosterone (free testosterone was calculated from the total one), estradiol and sex hormone-binding protein were detected in venous blood samples. The effects of age, BMI, smoking as well as alcohol consumption were analyzed on ferritin levels, respectively, and then the Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to evaluate the association between ferritin levels and sex hormones adjusting for the above factors. Results The age, BMI and alcohol consumption significantly affected serum ferritin levels, but there was no significant difference between smokers and nonsmokers. Ferritin levels were significantly and negatively associated with total testosterone (R = −0.205, P< 0.001), sex hormone-binding protein (R = −0.161, P<0.001) and free testosterone (R = −0.097, P<0.001). After age and alcohol consumption were adjusted, the above associations were still significant (R = −0.200, −0.181 and −0.083, respectively, all P<0.001). However, there was only borderline negative association between ferritin levels and estradiol (adjusted R = −0.039, P = 0.083). Conclusion The large scale of epidemic results showed the significantly negative associations between serum ferritin levels and sex hormones, which may provide more clues to explore the potential regulation and biological mechanism of ferritin. PMID:24146788

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Variants in PMS1 Associated with Serum Ferritin in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yong; Tan, Aihua; Wu, Chunlei; Lu, Zheng; Yang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Shijun; Hu, Yanlin; Qin, Xue; Li, Jianling; Chen, Gang; Xu, Jianfeng; Mo, Zengnan; Zhang, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Only a small proportion of genetic variation in serum ferritin has been explained by variant genetic studies, and genome-wide association study (GWAS) for serum ferritin has not been investigated widely in Chinese population. We aimed at exploring the novel genetic susceptibility to serum ferritin, and performed this two stage GWAS in a healthy Chinese population of 3,495 men aged 20–69 y, including 1,999 unrelated subjects in the first stage and 1,496 independent individuals in the second stage. Serum ferritin was measured with electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, and DNA samples were collected for genotyping. A total of 1,940,243 SNPs were tested by using multivariate linear regression analysis. After adjusting for population stratification, age and BMI, the rs5742933 located in the 5′UTR region of PMS1 gene on chromosome 2 was the most significantly associated with ferritin concentrations (P-combined = 2.329×10−10) (β = −0.11, 95% CI: −0.14, −0.07). Moreover, this marker was about 200kb away from the candidate gene SLC40A1 which is responsible for iron export. PMS1 gene was the novel genetic susceptibility to serum ferritin in Chinese males and its relation to SLC40A1 needs further study. PMID:25162662

  6. The diagnostic value of cervicovaginal and serum ferritin levels in midgestation time to predict spontaneous preterm delivery

    PubMed Central

    Broumand, Farzaneh; Saeidkar, Soudabeh; Behrouzlak, Tahereh; Khalkhali, Hamidreza; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine diagnostic value of cervicovaginal ferretin and serum ferretin levels at midgestation time in predicting preterm delivery in singleton pregnancies. Patients and Methods: A diagnostic test study through a prospective cohort design was carried out on 300 singleton pregnant women in 2012. A blood sample was obtained from all the patients within 22-24 gestational weeks for laboratory assessment of serum ferretin, and cervicovaginal sample was also taken to assess cervicovaginal ferritin level. Ferritin levels were compared between term and preterm deliveries at 37, 34 and 32 weeks of gestation. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were plotted to assess the diagnostic test values. Results: Mean serum ferritin level was 55.38 [standard deviation (SD 23.8)] ng/mL in term deliveries versus a mean of 91.27 (SD 25.2) ng/mL in preterm deliveries, which showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). The ferritin levels in cervicovaginal term delivery group had mean of 11.29 (SD 16.2) ng/mL compared with a mean of 21.95 (SD 10.1) ng/mL among those with preterm delivery before 37 weeks of gestational age(P < 0.001). The cervicovaginal ferritin level had a moderate to good diagnostic value with an area under curve being above 0.8 for all assessments. The serum ferritin level had a moderate to good diagnostic value with an area under curve being above 0.8 for all assessments. In both tests, its diagnostic value was higher for predicting preterm delivery at earlier gestational age. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that high levels of serum and cervicovaginal ferritin in singleton pregnancies may alert the clinician of the risk of preterm delivery. Serum and cervicovaginal ferritin measurement at midgestation may be used as a predictive scale for preterm delivery in singleton pregnancies. PMID:25114368

  7. The usage of phage mini-antibodies as a means of detecting ferritin concentration in animal blood serum.

    PubMed

    Staroverov, Sergey A; Volkov, Alexei A; Fomin, Alexander S; Laskavuy, Vladislav N; Mezhennyy, Pavel V; Kozlov, Sergey V; Larionov, Sergey V; Fedorov, Michael V; Dykman, Lev A; Guliy, Olga I

    2015-01-01

    Mini-antibodies that have specific ferritin response have been produced for the first time using sheep's phage libraries (Griffin.1, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, UK). Produced phage antibodies were used for the first time for the development of diagnostic test kits for ferritin detection in the blood of cattle. The immunodot assay with secondary biospecific labeling is suggested as means of ferritin detection in cow blood serum (antiferritin phage antibodies and rabbit antiphage antibodies conjugated with different labels). Сolloidal gold, gold nanoshells, and horse reddish peroxidase used as labels have shown a similar response while detecting concentration of ferritin (0.2 mg/mL). It is shown that the method of solid-phase immunoassay with a visual view of the results allows determination of the minimum concentration of ferritin in the blood of cows at 0.225 g/mL.

  8. Associations between serum C-reactive protein and serum zinc, ferritin, and copper in Guatemalan school children.

    PubMed

    Bui, Vinh Q; Stein, Aryeh D; DiGirolamo, Ann M; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Flores-Ayala, Rafael C; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Grant, Frederick K; Villalpando, Salvador; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2012-08-01

    Inflammation affects trace nutrient concentrations, but research on copper and particularly in children is limited. We assessed associations between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and zinc, iron, copper, and other biomarkers (alkaline phosphatase, hemoglobin, and albumin), in 634 healthy 6- to 11-year-old Guatemalan schoolchildren. CRP was measured by a standardized, high-sensitive method. For significant associations with CRP, we stratified nutrient concentrations across categories of CRP and compared concentrations above and below several CRP cutoff points (0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/L), and then adjusted values using correction factors (ratios of geometric means of the nutrients in the low and high groups). Prevalence of serum zinc (<65 μg/dL0, ferritin (<15 μg/L), and copper (<90 μg/dL) deficiency were 21%, 2.1%, and 23.8%, respectively. Median (25th and 75th percentiles) CRP was 0.56 (0.26 and 1.54) mg/L. CRP concentration was positively associated with ferritin and copper concentrations (r = 0.23 and 0.29, respectively; P < 0.0001) but not with zinc and other biomarkers (P > 0.05). Regardless of CRP cutoffs, high (> cutoff) vs. low (≤ cutoff) CRP levels had higher ferritin and copper concentrations and lower prevalence of copper deficiency of <90 μg/dL (P < 0.05). Adjustment for inflammation had the greatest influence on recalculated prevalence for the CRP 0.5 mg/L cutoff. The low ferritin prevalence hardly changed (from 2.1% to 2.5%) while the low copper prevalence changed appreciably (from 23.8% to 31.2%). In conclusion, CRP was positively associated with ferritin and copper but not with zinc concentrations. Adjustment for inflammation had little effect on low ferritin prevalence, low to begin with, and a large impact on low copper prevalence. High-sensitive CRP methods and the use of very low CRP cutoffs may be more accurate than traditional CRP methods in the adjustment of serum copper concentrations for inflammation in healthy school children.

  9. Urinary hepcidin identifies a serum ferritin cut-off for iron supplementation in young athletes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Borrione, P; Spaccamiglio, A; Rizzo, M; Termine, A; Chierto, E; Campostrini, N; Quaranta, F; Di Gianfrancesco, A; Pigozzi, F

    2011-01-01

    The use of iron supplements should be a judicious choice, primarily when considering the possible risks deriving from an unjustified treatment. In trained athletes, levels of ferritin between 15 and 30 microg/L are frequently observed. Within this ferritin range, the usefulness of iron supplementation is still controversial. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of hepcidin assessment in the analysis of the iron status of young non-anemic athletes. Fifty young athletes were enrolled. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to their ferritin levels. No statistically significant difference was found regarding hepcidin levels between athletes with ferritin lower than 15 microg/L and those in the 15-30 microg/L range. Similarly, no difference was found between athletes with ferritin higher than 50 microg/L and those in the 30-50 microg/L range. On the contrary, statistically significant differences were found between athletes with ferritin levels ranging from 15 to 30 microg/L and those in the 30-50 microg/L range. The present study suggests that serum ferritin levels below 30 microg/L indicate an asymptomatic iron deficiency status inhibiting hepcidin expression and that 30 microg/L should be considered the ferritin cut-off when considering an iron supplementation in young athletes.

  10. Logarithmic quantitation model using serum ferritin to estimate iron overload in secondary haemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Güngör, T; Rohrbach, E; Solem, E; Kaltwasser, J P; Kornhuber, B

    1996-04-01

    Nineteen children and adolescents receiving repeated transfusions and subcutaneous desferrioxamine treatment were investigated in an attempt to quantitate iron overload non-invasively. Before patients were started on desferrioxamine individual relationships were correlated for 12 to 36 months between transfused iron, absorbed iron estimated gastrointestinally, and increasing serum ferritin concentrations. Patients with inflammation, increased liver enzymes, or haemolysis were excluded from analysis. The relationship between the variables could be described by a logarithmic regression curve (y = transfused iron [plus eventually gastrointestinally absorbed iron] = iron overload = a+b log [x = serum ferritin]) for each individual patient. All patients showed close correlation (R2) between x and y (median R2 of 0.909, 0.98, and 0.92 in thalassaemia, aplastic anaemia, and sickle cell anaemia patients, respectively). When started on desferrioxamine, current serum ferritin concentrations were used to derive the iron overload from each individual regression curve. The derived estimated iron overload ranged from 0.6 g to 31 g. Left ventricular dilatation was observed in three patients with beta thalassaemia and in one patient with aplastic anaemia with median iron overload of 20.7 (14.1-31.3) g and 24.0 g respectively. Hypothyroidism was found in four patients with beta thalassaemia and one patient with aplastic anaemia with iron overload between 14.7 (6.8 and 26.1) g and 15.1 g respectively. Human growth hormone deficiency was detected in three patients with beta thalassaemia with an iron overload of 4.2 (3.5-6.8) g; all three patients had excellent desferrioxamine compliance.

  11. Serum ferritin level and red blood cell parameters in healthy controls and chronic periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Latha, S; Thirugnanamsambandan, S; Arun, R T; Masthan, K M K; Malathi, L; Rajesh, E

    2015-04-01

    Periodontitis, which is a chronic inflammatory disease causes reduction in the number of erythrocytes and hemoglobin. It is found to be caused by specific pathogenic subgingival plaque bacteria. Periodontitis is host mediated through release of pro inflammatory cytokines by local tissues and immune cells in response to bacterial flora and its products, especially lipopolysacharides. Periodontitis is found to have systemic effect and the cytokines produced inhibit proliferation and differentiation of erythrocytes leading to anaemia. This study evaluate level of hemoglobin erythrocytes, hematocrit and serum ferritin levels in healthy subjects and periodontitis patient.

  12. Blood metal concentrations of manganese, lead, and cadmium in relation to serum ferritin levels in Ohio residents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangho; Lobdell, Danelle T; Wright, Chris W; Gocheva, Vihra V; Hudgens, Edward; Bowler, Rosemarie M

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess ferritin-specific profiles of blood metal concentrations such as manganese, lead, and cadmium and to evaluate whether ferritin may affect the behavior of the blood metals in relation to menstruation, menopause, or sex in Ohio residents. Recruited participants included residents from Marietta, East Liverpool, and Mt. Vernon, OH, USA, who were aged 30-75 years and lived at least 10 years in their respective town. The levels of the neurotoxic metals such as manganese, cadmium, and lead were assayed in whole blood. Serum was analyzed for ferritin level [as a biomarker of iron (Fe) status]. An association between blood metal concentrations and independent variables (age, serum ferritin, manganese exposure status, and sex) by multiple regression analysis was assessed, controlling for various covariates such as BMI, educational level, smoking, and alcohol drinking status. Overall, the geometric means of blood manganese, cadmium, and lead levels of all participants (n = 276) were 9.307 μg/L, 0.393 μg/L, and 1.276 μg/dL, respectively. Log serum ferritin concentrations were inversely associated with log blood manganese concentration (β = -0.061 log ferritin and β = 0.146 categorical ferritin) and log blood cadmium concentrations (β = -0.090 log ferritin and β = 0.256 categorical ferritin). Log serum ferritin concentrations were not associated with log blood lead concentrations. Variables of age, sex, and exposure status were not associated with log manganese concentrations; however, log blood cadmium concentrations were higher in older population, women, and smokers. Log blood lead concentrations were higher in older population, men, and postmenopausal women. Our study showed that iron deficiency is associated with increased levels of blood manganese and cadmium, but not blood lead, in Ohio residents. These metals showed different toxicokinetics in relation to age, sex, and menopausal status despite

  13. Serum iron level, ferritin and total iron binding capacity level among nonpregnant women with and without melasma

    PubMed Central

    Behrangi, Elham; Baniasadi, Farzaneh; Esmaeeli, Shooka; Hedayat, Kosar; Goodarzi, Azade; Azizian, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Melasma is a common acquired disorder characterized by symmetric, hyperpigmented patches with an irregular outline, occurring most commonly on the face. It is most prevalent among young to middle-aged women. Although iron overload affects skin pigmentation, effect of iron deficiency on skin is not clear. So, we evaluated serum iron level, ferritin and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) level among nonpregnant women with and without melasma. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional case study was conducted in 2012 at university dermatologic department on 33 nonpregnant women with melasma (case) and 33 nonpregnant women without melasma (control). Serum iron level, TIBC and ferritin in the two groups was measured and compared. Results: Serum iron level was lower in the case group (85 ± 11) in comparison with control group (102 ± 9), but the difference was not significant (P: 0.9). Mean TIBC and Ferritin were higher in the case group (TIBC: 329.4 ± 29, ferritin: 6 ± 18) than the control group (TIBC: 329.3 ± 29, ferritin: 33 ± 6) without significant difference. Conclusion: Although the serum iron level was lower in nonpregnant women with mealsma, it was not significant compared with those without melasma. PMID:26109976

  14. Dietary iron intake and serum ferritin concentration in 213 patients homozygous for the HFEC282Y hemochromatosis mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Lovato, Laura; Barton, James C; Vitolins, Mara; McLaren, Gordon; Acton, Ronald T; McLaren, Christine; Harris, Emily L; Speechley, Mark; Eckfeldt, John H; Diaz, Sharmin; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Adams, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HFEC282Y homozygotes have an increased risk for developing increased iron stores and related disorders. It is controversial whether dietary iron restrictions should be recommended to such individuals. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dietary iron content influences iron stores in HFEC282Y homozygotes as assessed by serum ferritin concentration. DESIGN: Serum ferritin concentration was measured and a dietary iron questionnaire was completed as part of the evaluation of 213 HFEC282Y homozygotes who were identified through screening of >100,000 primary care patients at five HEmochromatosis and IRon Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study Field Centers in the United States and Canada. RESULTS: No significant relationships between serum ferritin concentration and dietary heme iron content, dietary nonheme iron content or reports of supplemental iron use were found. CONCLUSION: These results do not support recommending dietary heme or nonheme iron restrictions for HFEC282Y homozygotes diagnosed through screening in North America. PMID:22720276

  15. Relationship of Iron Deficiency and Serum Ferritin Levels with Pulmonary Hypertension: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Elston, Beth; Evans, Samuel K.; Wu, Wen-Chih; Choudhary, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iron deficiency is prevalent in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), but whether iron deficiency or ferritin levels are associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the general population is unknown. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data on iron deficiency (exposure), and PH (pulmonary artery systolic pressure>40mmHg on echocardiogram) (outcome) on subjects with complete data on exposures and outcomes as well as covariates (n = 2,800) enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study, a longitudinal prospective observational cohort study of heart disease in African-Americans from Jackson, Mississippi. Iron deficiency was defined as a serum ferritin level < 15ng/mL (females); < 30ng/mL (males). We determined crude prevalence ratios (PRs) for PH in iron deficient versus non-iron deficient groups using modified Poisson regression modeling. We also analyzed the prevalence of PH by sex-specific quartiles of ferritin (Females ≤ 47ng/mL; > 47ng/mL– 95ng/mL; > 95ng/mL– 171ng/mL; > 171ng/mL; Males ≤ 110ng/mL; > 110ng/mL– 182ng/mL; > 182ng/mL– 294ng/mL; > 294ng/mL), using the same modeling technique with the lowest quartile as the referent. Results Median pulmonary artery systolic pressure was 27mmHg (interquartile range 23-31mmHg) in the study cohort. 147 subjects (5.2%) had PH and 140 (5.0%) had iron deficiency. However, of the 147 subjects with PH, only 4 were also iron deficient. The crude PH PR was 0.5 (95% CI 0.2–1.4) in iron-deficiency compared to non-deficient. In analysis by quartiles of ferritin, adjusting for age and sex, there was no evidence of association with PH in quartiles 2 (PR 1.1, 95% CI 0.7–1.6), 3 (PR 0.8, 95% CI 0.5–1.3), or 4 (PR 0.8, 95% CI 0.5–1.2) compared with quartile 1 (referent group, PR 1). Further analyses of the relationship between PH and ferritin as a log-transformed continuous variable or by quartiles of serum iron showed similar results. Conclusions In the Jackson Heart Study, the

  16. Relationship Between Serum Hepcidin and Ferritin Levels in Patients With Thalassemia Major and Intermedia in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Esmaeilzadeh, Masoomeh; Honar, Naser; Hassani, Fatemeh; Dehbozorgian, Javad; Rezaei, Narges; Abdollahi, Maryam; Bardestani, Marzieh; Safaei, Sanaz; Karimi, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron absorption in humans. It is mainly affected by hypoxia and iron stores. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the correlation between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in patients with Thalassemia Major (TM) and Thalassemia Intermedia (TI). Patients and Methods: The current cross-sectional study investigated 88 randomly selected patients with Thalassemia, 48 TM and 40 TI, registered at the Thalassemia Clinic of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, a referral center for Thalassemia in Southern Iran in 2013. All patients with TI were receiving Hydroxyurea (HU) 10 - 15 mg/kg/day for at least 10 years. The serum hepcidin, ferritin levels, hemoglobin (Hb) and nucleated Red Blood Cell (RBC) of the two groups were measured. Results: No statistically significant correlation was observed between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in any of the two groups of patients with TM (rs = 0.02, P = 0.892) or TI (rs = 0.055, P = 0.734). The median Interquartile Range (IQR) for serum hepcidin and ferritin levels were significantly higher in TM compared to TI group, (hepcidin: 87.6 (43.9) vs. 51.8 (23.4), P < 0.001; ferritin: 2208 (3761) vs. 465 (632), P < 0.001). Conclusions: There was insignificant correlation between serum hepcidin and ferritin levels in the two groups of patients with TM and TI. It seems that regulation of hepcidin in patients with Thalassemia is more affected by erythropoeitic activity than iron stores. Also, hepcidin levels were significantly higher in patients with TM than TI, possibly due to higher erythropoeitic activity in TI. In TI, it seems that low dose HU increases Hb levels and leads to transfusion-independence, but it is not high enough to suppress bone marrow activity and ineffective erythropoiesis. Consequently, serum hepcidin level decreases. PMID:26421179

  17. Predictors of serum ferritin and haemoglobin during pregnancy, in a malaria-endemic area of western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Alusala, D N; Estambale, B B A; Magnussen, P; Friis, H; Luoba, A I; Mwaniki, D

    2008-06-01

    Between 2000 and 2004, a cross-sectional survey was conducted, as part of a prospective cohort study, among the women attending antenatal-care clinics in Bondo district, a malaria-endemic area of western Kenya. The aim was to assess the prevalence of iron deficiency and determine the predictors of haemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations in the women who had a gestational age between 14 and 24 weeks. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect and store the relevant bio-data for the study. Haemoglobin and ferritin concentrations were evaluated, sickle-cell status was determined, and malarial parasitaemias were detected and evaluated, using blood samples collected at enrollment. Multiple regression analysis was then used to test for significant predictors of the haemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations. Although 842 women were enrolled in the prospective cohort study, haemoglobin concentrations were evaluated for only 828 of them, serum ferritin levels for 621, and levels of parasitaemia for 812. The mean haemoglobin concentration recorded was 10.9 g/dl. Although 37.9% of the subjects had mild-moderate anaemia (7.0-10.5 g haemoglobin/dl), only 0.5% were severely anaemic (<7.0 g haemoglobin/dl). The geometric mean serum ferritin concentration recorded was 18.9 microg/litre, and 32.3% of the subjects evaluated had low serum concentrations of ferritin (<12 microg/litre). Among the parasitaemic primigravidae (but not the parasitaemic multigravidae), those found positive for sickle-cell trait had significantly lower haemoglobin concentrations than those found negative in a sickling test (P=0.01). Among the pregnant women of Bondo district, gravidity, malarial infection and sickle cell appear to be key predictors of haemoglobin concentration.

  18. Association between Serum Ferritin and Osteocalcin as a Potential Mechanism Explaining the Iron-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Juanola-Falgarona, Martí; Cándido-Fernández, José; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Estruch, Ramón; Fiol, Miquel; Arija-Val, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased iron stores are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes, however, the mechanisms underlying these associations are poorly understood. Because a reduction of circulating osteocalcin levels after iron overload have been demonstrated in cell cultures, and osteocalcin is related to glucose and insulin metabolism, the iron-induced osteocalcin reductions could contribute to explain the role of iron metabolism in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Objective To analyzed the associations between serum total and uncarboxylated osteocalcin and adiponectin concentrations with serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) in elderly subjects. Design We evaluated a total of 423 subjects from the PREDIMED cohort in a population-based cross-sectional analysis. Extensive clinical, nutritional and laboratory measurements, including total and uncarboxylated osteocalcin, adiponectin, ferritin and sTfR were recorded. Results Serum ferritin was positively correlated with increased glucose and insulin circulating levels but also with HOMA-IR, and was inversely associated with total osteocalcin and adiponectin. A regression analysis revealed that serum ferritin and transferrin receptor levels were significantly associated with a decrease in total and uncarboxylated osteocalcin. Serum sTfR levels were associated with lower uncarboxylated osteocalcin levels in the whole-study subjects and remained significant only in the IFG (impaired fasting glucose) individuals. Conclusions We described, for the first time, an inverse association between serum ferritin and sTfR with osteocalcin and extend previous results on adiponectin, thus supporting that factors related to iron metabolism could contribute to the insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN35739639 . PMID:24167545

  19. Meta-analysis of the relationship between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and susceptibility to serum ferritin level elevation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaohui; Yang, Yan; Su, Junfeng; Yao, Changjiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible relationship between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and their susceptibility to serum ferritin level elevation. Methods: We searched the PubMed, Springer, Medline, and OVID databases for any-language original research articles relating to serum ferritin levels in ALS patients published between June 2005 and June 2015. The search term used with ‘amyotrophic lateral sclerosis’, ‘ferritins’, ‘ferritin’, ‘iron’, ‘iron stores, ‘iron status, ‘iron intake’, and ‘iron consumption’. The meta-analysis software RevMan 5.0 was used for the heterogeneity test, and to test for the overall effect. Results: Six case-control studies met our inclusion criteria including data from a total of 1813 participants. The mean difference of serum ferritin levels comparing ALS to healthy controls was 69.05 (95% confidence interval: 52.56-85.54; p<0.00001); heterogeneity: p=0.03; I2=50%. The findings indicate homology in the sensitivity analysis. Funnel plot assessment indicated publication bias. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ALS is positively associated with susceptibility to the elevation of serum ferritin levels; however, further evidence is required to support this. PMID:27094521

  20. Serum ferritin in normal individuals and in patients with malignant lymphoma and chronic renal failure measured with seven different commercial immunoassay techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Grail, A; Hancock, B W; Harrison, P M

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of serum ferritin determination by seven different commercial immunoassay techniques gave mean coefficients of variation of 57% for normal individuals, 41 . 4% for patients with malignant lymphoma and 43 . 1% for patients with chronic renal failure. One of the immunoradiometric assays gave consistently higher serum ferritin values in both normal and patient groups; mean values were increased (greater than 100% for normal males, greater than 50% for normal females) with respect to the other assays. Underestimation of serum ferritin by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was also evident. Results were affected by storage conditions, but not by dilution of samples, in two kits. Solutions of ferritin purified from normal and malignant human and mouse tissues, and lymphoma isoferritins, were used for reference. There were overestimations of normal human liver ferritin and the most basic isoferritin. Mouse ferritin displayed minimal reactivity in all kits, and human lymphoma ferritin was often underestimated. Variability in serum ferritin determination chiefly reflects the lack of a universal standard for ferritin measurement. Images PMID:7142429

  1. Role of Serum Uric Acid and Ferritin in the Development and Progression of NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Rosa; Pisano, Giuseppina; Fargion, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), tightly linked to the metabolic syndrome (MS), has emerged as a leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Since it is potentially progressive towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatic fibrosis, up to cirrhosis and its associated complications, the need for predictive factors of NAFLD and of its advanced forms is mandatory. Despite the current “gold standard” for the assessment of liver damage in NAFLD being liver biopsy, in recent years, several non-invasive tools have been designed as alternatives to histology, of which fibroscan seems the most promising. Among the different serum markers considered, serum uric acid (SUA) and ferritin have emerged as possible predictors of severity of liver damage in NAFLD. In fact, as widely described in this review, they share common pathogenetic pathways and are both associated with hepatic steatosis and MS, thus suggesting a likely synergistic action. Nevertheless, the power of these serum markers seems to be too low if considered alone, suggesting that they should be included in a wider perspective together with other metabolic and biochemical parameters in order to predict liver damage. PMID:27077854

  2. Initial Serum Ferritin Predicts Number of Therapeutic Phlebotomies to Iron Depletion in Secondary Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Panch, Sandhya R.; Yau, Yu Ying; West, Kamille; Diggs, Karen; Sweigart, Tamsen; Leitman, Susan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic phlebotomy is increasingly used in patients with transfusional siderosis to mitigate organ injury associated with iron overload (IO). Laboratory response parameters and therapy duration are not well characterized in such patients. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 99 consecutive patients undergoing therapeutic phlebotomy for either transfusional IO (TIO, n=88; 76% had undergone hematopoietic transplantation) or non-transfusional indications (hyperferritinemia or erythrocytosis) (n=11). CBC, serum ferritin (SF), transferrin saturation, and transaminases were measured serially. Phlebotomy goal was an SF< 300 mcg/L. Results Mean SF prior to phlebotomy among TIO and nontransfusional subjects was 3,093 and 396 mcg/L, respectively. Transfusion burden in the TIO group was 94 ± 108 (mean ± SD) RBC units; about half completed therapy with 24 ± 23 phlebotomies (range 1–103). One-third was lost to follow-up. Overall, 15% had mild adverse effects, including headache, nausea, and dizziness, mainly during first phlebotomy. Prior transfusion burden correlated poorly with initial ferritin and total number of phlebotomies to target (NPT) in the TIO group. However, NPT was strongly correlated with initial SF (R2=0.8; p<0.0001) in both TIO and nontransfusional groups. ALT decreased significantly with serial phlebotomy in all groups (mean initial and final values, 61 and 39 U/L; p = 0.03). Conclusions Initial SF but not transfusion burden predicted number of phlebotomies to target in patients with TIO. Despite good treatment tolerance, significant losses to follow-up were noted. Providing patients with an estimated phlebotomy number and follow-up duration, and thus a finite endpoint, may improve compliance. Hepatic function improved with iron off-loading. PMID:25209879

  3. Biological Signatures of Brain Damage Associated with High Serum Ferritin Levels in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke and Thrombolytic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Millán, Mónica; Sobrino, Tomás; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Rodríguez-Yáñez, Manuel; García, María; Nombela, Florentino; Castellanos, Mar; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Cuadras, Patricia; Serena, Joaquín; Castillo, José; Dávalos, Antoni

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Increased body iron stores have been related to greater oxidative stress and brain injury in clinical and experimental cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. We aimed to investigate the biological signatures of excitotoxicity, inflammation and blood brain barrier disruption potentially associated with high serum ferritin levels-related damage in acute stroke patients treated with i.v. t-PA. Methods: Serum levels of ferritin (as index of increased cellular iron stores), glutamate, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cellular fibronectin were determined in 134 patients treated with i.v. t-PA within 3 hours from stroke onset in blood samples obtained before t-PA treatment, at 24 and 72 hours. Results: Serum ferritin levels before t-PA infusion correlated to glutamate (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and interleukin-6 (r = 0.55, p <0.001) levels at baseline, and with glutamate (r = 0.57,p <0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.49,p <0.001), metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.23, p = 0.007) and cellular fibronectin (r = 0.27, p = 0.002) levels measured at 24 hours and glutamate (r = 0.415, p < 0.001), interleukin-6 (r = 0.359, p < 0.001) and metalloproteinase-9 (r = 0.261, p = 0.004) at 72 hours. The association between ferritin and glutamate levels remained after adjustment for confounding factors in generalized linear models. Conclusions: Brain damage associated with increased iron stores in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with iv. tPA may be mediated by mechanisms linked to excitotoxic damage. The role of inflammation, blood brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress in this condition needs further research. PMID:19096131

  4. Evaluation of serum ferritin in screening for iron deficiency in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kotru, M; Rusia, U; Sikka, M; Chaturvedi, S; Jain, A K

    2004-02-01

    Serum ferritin (SF) values

  5. Association of serum ferritin with insulin resistance, abdominal obesity, and metabolic syndrome in Korean adolescent and adults: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Shim, Young Suk; Kang, Min Jae; Oh, Yeon Jeong; Baek, Joon Woo; Yang, Seung; Hwang, Il Tae

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the associations of serum ferritin with insulin resistance indices, body fat mass/percentage, and all the components of metabolic syndrome (MetS), as well as the risk for MetS according to serum ferritin levels in Korean adolescents and adults.A total of 15,963 Korean males and females aged 16 to 80 years were analyzed using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005 to 2011.The median serum ferritin concentration was 98.82 ng/mL for males and 38.60 ng/mL for females (P < 0.001). Increased risks of greater waist circumference and elevated glucose levels, elevated triglyceride levels, and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were noted across the serum ferritin quartiles after adjustment for confounders in both genders (P ≤ 0.012 for trend). Insulin resistance indices and abdominal obesity (trunk fat mass/percent) increased across the ferritin concentration quartiles after adjustment for confounders in males and females (P ≤ 0.011 for trend), and the risk of MetS increased across the ferritin quartiles in males (P < 0.001 for trend) and females (P = 0.001 for trend). The highest serum ferritin quartile exhibited a 1.62-fold increased risk of MetS (95% CI, 1.28-2.12) in males and a 1.36-fold increased risk of MetS (95% CI, 1.09-1.69) in females compared with the lowest quartile after adjustment for confounders.Our results suggest that ferritin is associated with insulin resistance and abdominal obesity.

  6. Serum magnesium, iron and ferritin levels in patients with diabetic retinopathy attending Makkah Eye Complex, Khartoum, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Hamdan Z; Nasser, Nasser M; Adam, Ammar M; Saleem, Mahgoub A; Elamin, Maha I

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common complications of diabetes mellitus that, in most occasions, lead to blindness. Multiple evidences linked the serum magnesium, iron and ferritin disturbance with diabetes and its complications. A case-control study was conducted at Makkah Eye Complex, Khartoum, Sudan, to compare the levels of serum magnesium, iron and ferritin in patients with diabetic retinopathy with diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy (controls). Findings indicate that all patients had type 2 diabetes. The two groups (50 in each arm) were well matched in their basic characteristics. Median (25th-75th interquartile) of serum magnesium in patients with diabetic retinopathy were significantly lower than patients without diabetic retinopathy [1.48 (0.75-1.64) vs. 1.92 (1.4-2.3)mg/dl, P = 0.022]. The median of serum iron and ferritin were lower in cases than control group but did not reach a statistical significance [20.5 (17.2-48.0) vs. 27.0 (16.0-54.0) μg/dl, P = 0.568; 98.0 (45.0-134.75) vs. 101.0 (47.0-161.0) μg/l, P = 0.818]. The duration of diabetes [16.5 (9.3) vs. 11.2 (6.6) years; P = 0.014] and haemoglobin level [13.7 (0.9) vs. 12.5 (2.0) g/dl; P = 0.039] were significantly higher in cases group than control group. A significant inverse correlation was observed between serum magnesium and iron levels. Twenty (40 %) patients had severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy with mild macular edema, which is the most prevalent type among the cases group. Hypomagnesaemia among diabetic patients was associated with diabetic retinopathy, while serum iron and ferritin have no significant effect in this setting. Severe non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy with mild macular edema is the prevalent type in this study.

  7. Evaluation of serum ferritin and some metal elements in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: comparative cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Wolide, Amare Desalegn; Zawdie, Belay; Alemayehu, Tilahun; Tadesse, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background The chronic hyperglycemia of diabetes has been associated with an imbalance of some trace metal elements in the blood sample of type 2 diabetes patients. Aim To evaluate the status of serum ferritin and some selected metal elements among type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Methods Facility-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from February 15, 2015 to October 30, 2015, at Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. A total of 428 type 2 diabetes and nondiabetes study subjects were recruited to the study. After overnight fasting, 10 mL of venous blood samples were taken for biochemical and trace metal element analysis. Data were entered into EpiData version 3.5.1 and exported to SPSS version 20 for Windows for analysis. Results Serum concentration of Zn+2, Mg+2, Cr+3, ferritin, and Fe+3 in patients with type 2 diabetes was significantly lower (p<0.0001) than nondiabetes patients. In contrast, serum Cu+2 was significantly higher (p<0.0001) in type 2 diabetes patients than nondiabetics. In addition, significant differences were not seen in both groups with regard to serum Mn+2, Ca+2, and Po4−3. Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), serum Fe+3, ferritin, and Mn+2 were significantly higher among oral hypoglycemic agent users of type 2 diabetes patients than the injectable insulin users. Serum Zn+2 had significant positive correlation with serum Mg+2 (r=0.738), Cr+3 (r=0.233), Ca+2 (r=0.238), and Po4−3 (r=0.222). In addition, serum Zn+2 had shown significant and negative correlation with body mass index (BMI, r=−0.331), WHR (r=−0.340), and fasting blood glucose (FBG, r=−0.186). Likewise, serum Mg+2 and Po4−3 are significantly and negatively correlated with BMI, WHR, and FBG. Conclusion The imbalance of trace metal elements in the blood sample of diabetes is uncertain. Thus, we recommend a prospective cohort study to find out the principal factors behind the problem. PMID:27980430

  8. Endocrine involvement in children with beta-thalassaemia major. Transverse and longitudinal studies. I. Pituitary-thyroidal axis function and its correlation with serum ferritin levels.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, L; Licci, D; Acquafredda, A; Marranzini, M; Beccasio, R; Scardino, M L; Altomare, M; Mastro, F; Sisto, L; Schettini, F

    1984-09-01

    Thyroid function was investigated by a TRH test in 24 clinically prepubertal children, 3-15 years old with beta-thalassaemia major; in 7 of them the test was repeated once and in 2 twice at intervals of at least 12 months. Basal T4, T3, TBG and TSH levels and the TSH levels during a TRH test were determined and correlated with age and serum ferritin levels. Basal serum T4, T3 and TBG levels were lower and serum TSH levels were higher during the test and in the basal state in thalassaemia major children than in control children. These results show a compensated sub-clinical primary hypothyroidism. The transversal study did not show any significant correlation between the hormonal parameters studied and chronological age or serum ferritin levels. In contrast, the longitudinal study showed a significant correlation between pituitary-thyroidal axis function and siderosis (positive correlations between the variations of TSH levels as delta, peak, 30 and 45 min values and the variations of serum ferritin levels). The thyroid impairment seems not to be correlated with serum ferritin levels in the transversal study because of the presence of an individual different sensitivity of the gland to the iron overload. The ferritin dependence of this impairment is shown only by longitudinal studies where individual differences in sensitivity of the gland are absent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Adult Onset Still's Disease with a Serum Ferritin of 26,387 μg/L.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheetal; Monemian, Seyed; Khalid, Ayesha; Dosik, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Serum ferritin rises in the anemia of chronic inflammation reflecting increased iron storage and other changes mediated by inflammation. When iron deficiency coexists, the ferritin may not always decline into the subnormal range. We describe the rare interaction of iron deficiency with the extreme hyperferritinemia characteristic of adult onset Still's disease. The combination has clinical relevance and allows deductions about the presence of serum ferritin at 26,387 μg/L despite obvious iron depletion. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was delayed and became fully obvious when her Still's disease remitted and serum ferritin decreased to 6.5 μg/L. The coexistence of iron deficiency should be considered when evaluating a patient with anemia of chronic inflammation even when the ferritin level is elevated several hundredfold. Further insights on ferritin metabolism in Still's disease are suggested by the likelihood that the patient's massive hyperferritinemia in the acute phase of Still's disease was almost entirely of the iron-free apoferritin form.

  10. Association of serum ferritin levels with smoking and lung function in the Korean adult population: analysis of the fourth and fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan Ho; Goag, Eun Kyung; Lee, Su Hwan; Chung, Kyung Soo; Jung, Ji Ye; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Song, Joo Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron-catalyzed oxidative stress contributes to lung injury after exposure to various toxins, including cigarette smoke. An oxidant/antioxidant imbalance is considered to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Ferritin is a key protein in iron homeostasis, and its capacity to oxidize and sequester the metal preventing iron prooxidant activity implicates its possible role in the alteration of antioxidant imbalance. We investigated the relationship among cigarette smoking, lung function, and serum ferritin concentration in a large cohort representative of the Korean adult population. Materials and methods Among 50,405 participants of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2014, 15,239 adult subjects older than 40 years with serum ferritin levels and spirometric data were selected for this study. Results The mean age was 56.5 years for men (43%) and 56.9 years for women (57%). The prevalence of airway obstruction was 13.4%, which was significantly higher in men than in women, and increased in former or current smokers. The median levels of serum ferritin were highest in the airway obstruction group, followed by the restrictive pattern group, and lowest in the normal lung function group. The median ferritin levels were increased by smoking status and amounts in each spirometric subgroup. In multivariable regression analysis, serum ferritin was positively associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity, whereas the smoking amount was negatively associated with the adjustment with age, sex, height, and weight. Conclusion Serum ferritin levels were increased in former or current smokers and were increased with smoking amount in all subgroups of participants categorized according to spirometric results. The result was also evident in the subgroups divided by obstructive severity. While smoking amount was inversely related to lung function, higher

  11. A novel association between a SNP in CYBRD1 and serum ferritin levels in a cohort study of HFE Hereditary Haemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Constantine, C. C.; Anderson, G. J.; Vulpe, C. D.; McLaren, C. E.; Bahlo, M.; Yeap, H. L.; Gertig, D. M.; Osborne, N. J.; Bertalli, N. A.; Beckman, K. B.; Chen, V.; Matak, P.; McKie, A. T.; Delatycki, M. B.; Olynyk, J. K.; English, D. R.; Southey, M. C.; Giles, G. G.; Hopper, J. L.; Allen, K. J.; Gurrin, L. C.

    2009-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that there are genetic modifiers of iron indices for HFE gene mutation carriers at risk of hereditary hemochromatosis. A random sample stratified by HFE genotype of 863 from a cohort of 31,192 people of northern European descent provided blood samples for genotyping of 476 SNPs in 44 genes involved in iron metabolism. Single SNP association testing using linear regression models adjusted for sex, menopause and HFE genotype was conducted for four continuously distributed outcomes: serum ferritin (log transformed), transferrin saturation, serum transferrin, and serum iron. The SNP rs884409 in CYBRD1 is a novel modifier specific to HFE C282Y homozygotes. Median unadjusted serum ferritin concentration decreased from 1194 µg/L (N=27) to 387 µg/L (N=16) for male C282Y homozygotes and from 357 µg/L (N=42) to 69 µg/L (N=12) for females, comparing those with no copies to those with one copy of rs884409. Functional testing of this CYBRD1 promoter polymorphism using a heterologous expression assay resulted in a 30% decrease in basal promoter activity relative to the common genotype (p=0.004). This putative genetic modifier of iron overload expression accounts for 11% (95% CI 0.4%, 22.6%) of the variance in serum ferritin levels of C282Y homozygotes. PMID:19673882

  12. FERROPORTIN Q248H, DIETARY IRON AND SERUM FERRITIN IN COMMUNITY AFRICAN AMERICANS WITH LOW TO HIGH ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R.; Diaz, Sharmin F.; Onojobi, Gladys O.; Kasvosve, Ishmael; Debebe, Zufan; Edossa, Amanuel; Pantin, Jeremy M.; Xiong, Shigang; Nekhai, Sergei; Nouraie, Mehdi; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Taylor, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is associated with increased iron stores. In sub-Saharan Africa, high dietary ionic iron and the ferroportin Q248H allele have also been implicated in iron accumulation. We examined the associations of ferroportin Q248H, alcohol and dietary iron with serum ferritin, aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) concentrations in African Americans. Methods Inner-city African Americans (103 men, 40 women) were recruited from the community according to reported ingestion of >4 alcoholic drinks per day or <2 per week. Typical daily heme iron, non-heme iron and alcohol were estimated using University of Hawaii’s multiethnic dietary questionnaire. Based on dietary questionnaire estimates we established categories of < versus ≥56 g alcohol per day, equivalent to 4 alcoholic drinks per day assuming 14 g alcohol per drink. Results Among 143 participants, 77% drank <56 g alcohol/day and 23% ≥56 g/d as estimated by the questionnaire. The prevalence of ferroportin Q248H was 23.3% with alcohol >56 g/d versus 7.5% with lower amounts (P=0.012). Among subjects with no history of HIV disease, serum ferritin concentration had positive relationships with male gender (P=0.041), alcohol consumption (P=0.021) and ALT concentration (P=0.0001) but not with dietary iron intake or ferroportin Q248H. Serum AST and ALT concentrations had significant positive associations with male gender and hepatitis C seropositivity but not with alcohol or dietary iron intake or ferroportin Q248H. Conclusions Our findings suggest a higher prevalence of ferroportin Q248H with greater alcohol consumption, and this higher prevalence raises the possibility that the allele might ameliorate the toxicity of alcohol. Our results suggest that alcohol but not dietary iron contributes to higher body iron stores in African Americans. Studies with larger numbers of participants are needed to further clarify the relationship of ferroportin Q248H with the

  13. Relationship of Baseline Hemoglobin Level with Serum Ferritin, Postphlebotomy Hemoglobin Changes, and Phlebotomy Requirements among HFE C282Y Homozygotes.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Mahmood, Faiza; Aandahl, Astrid; Knutsen, Teresa Risopatron; Llohn, Abid Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to examine whether baseline hemoglobin levels in C282Y-homozygous patients are related to the degree of serum ferritin (SF) elevation and whether patients with different baseline hemoglobin have different phlebotomy requirements. Methods. A total of 196 patients (124 males and 72 females) who had undergone therapeutic phlebotomy and had SF and both pre- and posttreatment hemoglobin values were included in the study. Results. Bivariate correlation analysis suggested that baseline SF explains approximately 6 to 7% of the variation in baseline hemoglobin. The results also showed that males who had higher (≥150 g/L) baseline hemoglobin levels had a significantly greater reduction in their posttreatment hemoglobin despite requiring fewer phlebotomies to achieve iron depletion than those who had lower (<150 g/L) baseline hemoglobin, regardless of whether baseline SF was below or above 1000 µg/L. There were no significant differences between hemoglobin subgroups regarding baseline and treatment characteristics, except for transferrin saturation between male subgroups with SF above 1000 µg/L. Similar differences were observed when females with higher (≥138 g/L) baseline hemoglobin were compared with those with lower (<138 g/L) baseline hemoglobin. Conclusion. Dividing C282Y-homozygous patients into just two subgroups according to the degree of baseline SF elevation may obscure important subgroup variations.

  14. Deficiencies of Serum Ferritin and Vitamin B12, but not Folate, are Common in Adolescent Girls Residing in a Slum in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Gupta Bansal, Priyanka; Singh Toteja, Gurudayal; Bhatia, Neena; Kishore Vikram, Naval; Siddhu, Anupa; Kumar Garg, Ashok; Kumar Roy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Anemia among adolescent girls is one of the major challenges faced by India. The present study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of anemia and status of other hematological parameters among adolescent girls (11 - 18 years) residing in an urban slum of Delhi. A total of 794 adolescent girls were recruited for the study. The prevalence of anemia was estimated using the cyanmethemoglobin method. Serum levels of ferritin, folic acid and vitamin B12 were estimated for anemic subjects. The prevalence of anemia was reported as 58.7 %, with 31.6 %, 25.7 % and 1.4 % of subjects being mild, moderate and severely anemic. Hemoglobin levels of subjects who had attained menarche were found to be significantly lower than those who had not attained menarche. The prevalence of serum ferritin, folic acid and vitamin B12 deficiency among those who were anemic was reported as 41.1 %, 5.0 % and 63.3 % respectively. A total of 23.5 % anemic subjects had concomitant micronutrient deficiencies of serum vitamin B12 and ferritin. The results indicate that supplemental iron and vitamin B12 may better address the burden of anemia in adolescent girls in Delhi.

  15. Defining serum ferritin thresholds to predict clinically relevant liver iron concentrations for guiding deferasirox therapy when MRI is unavailable in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Taher, Ali T; Porter, John B; Viprakasit, Vip; Kattamis, Antonis; Chuncharunee, Suporn; Sutcharitchan, Pranee; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Origa, Raffaella; Karakas, Zeynep; Habr, Dany; Zhu, Zewen; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2015-01-01

    Liver iron concentration (LIC) assessment by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the gold standard to diagnose iron overload and guide iron chelation therapy in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (NTDT). However, limited access to MRI technology and expertise worldwide makes it practical to also use serum ferritin assessments. The THALASSA (assessment of Exjade(®) in non-transfusion-dependent THALASSemiA patients) study assessed the efficacy and safety of deferasirox in iron-overloaded NTDT patients and provided a large data set to allow exploration of the relationship between LIC and serum ferritin. Using data from screened patients and those treated with deferasirox for up to 2 years, we identified clinically relevant serum ferritin thresholds (for when MRI is unavailable) for the initiation of chelation therapy (>800 μg/l), as well as thresholds to guide chelator dose interruption (<300 μg/l) and dose escalation (>2000 μg/l). (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00873041).

  16. Study of the correlation between serum ferritin levels and the aggregation of metabolic disorders in non-diabetic elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Biqiang; Lin, Wei; Lin, Nan; Dong, Xiaowen; Liu, Libin

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to explore the correlation between serum ferritin (SF) levels and the aggregation of metabolic disorders in non-diabetic elderly patients. A total of 2,600 patients were enrolled in the study. Various parameters, including blood pressure (BP), height, weight, lipid profiles, blood glucose (BG), body mass index (BMI), fasting insulin (FINS), serum uric acid (SUA), the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) and SF levels were measured. A homeostatic model was used to evaluate insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA-β). The quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and disposition index (DI) were calculated. The QUICKI and DI decreased significantly and other parameters increased significantly when the number of metabolic disorders increased. Patients with high triglycerides (TG), high total cholesterol (TC), high SUA and obesity demonstrated higher SF levels than those with normal TG, normal TC, normal SUA and normal weight, respectively (P<0.01). Male patients with metabolic disorders (high TG, high TC, high BP, high SUA and obesity) had higher SF levels than female patients with the corresponding disorders (P<0.01). BG, FINS, BMI, TC, TG, SUA, HOMA-IR and HOMA-β were positively correlated with SF, while DI and QUICKI were negatively correlated with SF (P<0.01). Stepwise regression analysis showed that HOMA-IR, BMI, TC, TG and SUA were risk factors for elevated SF levels. In conclusion, the SF levels in non-diabetic, elderly individuals with metabolic disorders may be significantly related to the clustering of the metabolic disorders. Dyslipidemia, obesity, disorders of purine metabolism and insulin resistance may be important risk factors for higher SF levels in the elderly.

  17. Association between Serum Ferritin Concentrations and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Adults: A Population Study from the Tianjin Chronic Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIHealth) Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bin; Yu, Fei; He, Haiyan; Zhang, Qing; Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Du, Huanmin; Liu, Li; Shi, Hongbin; Xia, Yang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xing; Li, Chunlei; Bao, Xue; Liu, Fangfang; Fang, Liyun; Yang, Huijun; Sun, Shaomei; Wang, Xing; Zhou, Ming; Jia, Qiyu; Zhao, Honglin; Song, Kun; Niu, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    Depressive symptoms have become the most important global public health issue. Iron plays an important role in brain function, cognition, and behavior, and its impacts on depressive symptoms may be multifactorial with both positive and negative effects. Previous observational studies focusing on the association between iron status and depressive symptoms showed inconsistent results. Ferritin is a ubiquitous intracellular protein that can store and release iron and is widely used as a clinical biomarker to evaluate iron status. We performed a cross-sectional study to examine the relationship between serum ferritin and depressive symptoms among 3,839 subjects who were from the Tianjin Chronic Low-grade Systemic Inflammation and Health (TCLSIHealth) cohort. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Chinese version of 20-item self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) with 4 cutoffs (40, 45, 48 and 50) to indicate elevated depressive symptoms (40 was the primary cut-off). The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 36.5%, 17.6%, 11.0% and 7.0% for SDS ≥40, ≥45, ≥48 and ≥50, respectively. With the primary cut-off point of 40, multiple potential confounding factors were adjusted and the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of having elevated depressive symptoms by quartiles of serum ferritin concentrations were 1.00 (reference), 1.10 (0.91, 1.34), 0.81 (0.66, 1.01) and 1.02 (0.81, 1.28) for the first, second, third and fourth quartile, respectively (P for trend = 0.76). Similar relations were observed with the use of other cut-offs as a definition of depressive symptoms. In conclusion, there is no significant relationship between serum ferritin concentrations and depressive symptoms among Chinese adults. PMID:27611581

  18. Ferritin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... presence and severity of iron deficiency or iron overload. ^ Back to top When is it ordered? The ... ferritin level may also be ordered when iron overload is suspected. Symptoms of iron overload will vary ...

  19. Effect of sodium iron ethylenediaminetetra-acetate (NaFeEDTA) on haemoglobin and serum ferritin in iron-deficient populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhan, Siyan; Xia, Yinyin; Lee, Liming

    2008-12-01

    We aimed to synthesise evidence to assess the effect and safety of NaFeEDTA on Hb and serum ferritin in Fe-deficient populations. We performed a systematic review, identifying potential studies by searching the electronic databases of Medline, Cochrane Library, Embase, WHO Library and China National Knowledge Infrastructure. We also hand-searched relevant conference proceedings and reference lists. Finally, we contacted experts in the field. The selection criteria included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of NaFeEDTA compared with placebo. Hb, serum ferritin and adverse effects were outcomes of interest. Inclusion decisions, quality assessment and data extraction were performed by two reviewers independently. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. All included studies assessed the effect of NaFeEDTA on Hb concentration, four studies assessed the effect on serum ferritin concentration, and one study on serum Zn concentration. After the intervention, Hb concentration and serum ferritin concentration were both higher in the NaFeEDTA group compared with the control group. For Hb, data from six studies could be pooled and the pooled estimate (weighted mean difference) was 8.56 (95 % CI 2.21, 14.90) g/l (P = 0.008). For serum ferritin, data from four studies could be pooled and the pooled difference was 1.58 (95 % CI 1.20, 2.09) microg/l (P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis indicated that a lower baseline Hb level was associated with a greater increase in Hb concentration. No significant difference in serum Zn concentration was found. We concluded that NaFeEDTA increased both Hb concentration and serum ferritin concentration substantially in Fe-deficient populations, and could be an effective Fe preparation to combat Fe deficiency.

  20. Ferritin, finger clubbing, and lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shneerson, J M; Jones, B M

    1981-01-01

    The serum ferritin concentration has been determined by an immunoradiometric assay in 90 subjects with a variety of pulmonary diseases. No association between ferritin concentrations and finger clubbing has been found in any of the diseases studied. Ferritin levels were significantly raised in the subjects with bronchial carcinoma, but were not useful in monitoring recurrence of the tumour. Pulmonary artery and pulmonary vein ferritin concentrations were similar to systemic venous concentrations. It is therefore unlikely that the tumour releases ferritin into the pulmonary circulation. Ferritin levels were raised in patients with acute pneumonias but did not correlate with the total white cell count or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serum ferritin concentrations were also increased in a variety of chronic lung diseases but were normal in subjects with asbestosis. PMID:7314044

  1. Blood Metal Concentrations of Manganese, Lead, and Cadmium in Relation to Serum Ferritin Levels in Ohio Residents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to assess fcrritin-specific profiles of blood metal concentrations such as manganese, lead, and cadmium and to evaluate whether ferritin may affect the behavior of the blood metals in relation to menstruation, menopause, or sex in Ohio residents....

  2. Low body weight gain, low white blood cell count and high serum ferritin as markers of poor nutrition and increased risk for preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Yin; Wu, Cheng-Hsuan; Hsieh, Charles Tsung-Che; Lo, Hui-Chen; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Kao, Mei-Ding

    2013-01-01

    This study determined factors of preterm delivery in Taiwan. Healthy women (n=520, age 29.1±4.2 y) at 8-12 weeks of pregnancy were recruited from prenatal clinics. Background information, anthropometrics, biochemical parameters, and dietary intake, collected by 24 h-recall were obtained from the first, second, and third trimesters to delivery. Clinical outcomes of neonates were also collected. The results show that 53.7% of women were primiparous and that the incidence of preterm delivery was 6.2%. Body weight gains in the first trimester and throughout pregnancy were significantly lower in mothers with preterm delivery (preterm group) than in mothers with term delivery (term group, p<0.05). Maternal cholesterol intake, circulating white blood cell counts (WBC) and serum albumin were significantly lower and that serum magnesium and ferritin were significantly higher in the preterm group than in the term group. Maternal weight gain was positively correlated with caloric and nutrient intake (p<0.05). Neonatal birth weight was positively correlated with maternal weight gain and intakes of protein and phosphate during pregnancy; with intakes of calories, vitamin B-1 and B-2 in the first trimester; and with intakes of calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc, as well as circulating WBC in the third trimester. However, neonatal birth weight was negatively correlated with serum iron in the third trimester and with serum iron and ferritin at the time of delivery. In conclusion, maternal weight gain in early pregnancy and WBC, mineral intake and iron status in late pregnancy seem to be major factors affecting delivery and neonatal outcomes.

  3. Genome-wide admixture and association study of serum iron, ferritin, transferrin saturation and total iron binding capacity in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Lange, Leslie A; Duan, Qing; Lu, Yurong; Singleton, Andrew B; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Li, Yun; Taylor, Herman A; Willis, Monte S; Nalls, Mike; Wilson, James G; Lange, Ethan M

    2015-01-15

    Iron is an essential component of many important proteins and enzymes, including hemoglobin, which is responsible for carrying oxygen to the cells. African Americans (AAs) have a greater prevalence of iron deficiency compared with European Americans. We conducted genome-wide admixture-mapping and association studies for serum iron, serum ferritin, transferrin saturation (SAT) and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) in 2347 AAs participating in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). Follow-up replication analyses for JHS iron-trait associated SNPs were conducted in 329 AA participants in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study (HANDLS). Higher estimated proportions of global African ancestry were significantly associated with lower levels of iron (P = 2.4 × 10(-5)), SAT (P = 0.0019) and TIBC (P = 0.042). We observed significant associations (P < 5 × 10(-8)) between serum TIBC levels and two independent SNPs around TF on chromosome 3, the first report of a genome-wide significant second independent signal in this region, and SNPs near two novel genes: HDGFL1 on chromosome 6 and MAF on chromosome 16. We also observed significant associations between ferritin levels and SNPs near GAB3 on chromosome X. We replicated our two independent associations at TF and our association at GAB3 in HANDLS. Our study provides evidence for both shared and unique genetic risk factors that are associated with iron-related measures in AAs. The top two variants in TF explain 11.2% of the total variation in TIBC levels in AAs after accounting for age, gender, body mass index and background ancestry.

  4. Accuracy of erythrogram and serum ferritin for the maternal anemia diagnosis (AMA): a phase 3 diagnostic study on prediction of the therapeutic responsiveness to oral iron in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pregnancy anemia remains as a public health problem, since the official reports in the 70’s. To guide the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy, the haemoglobin concentration is the most used test in spite of its low accuracy, and serum ferritin is the most reliable test, although its cutoff point remains an issue. Methods/design The aim of this protocol is to verify the accuracy of erythrocyte indices and serum ferritin (studied tests) for the diagnosis of functional iron-deficiency in pregnancy using the iron-therapy responsiveness as the gold-standard. This is an ongoing phase III accuracy study initiated in August 2011 and to be concluded in April 2013. The subjects are anemic pregnant women (haemoglobin concentration < 11.0 g/dL) attended at a low-risk prenatal care center in the Northeast of Brazil. The sample size (n 278) was calculated to estimate sensitivity of 90% and 80% of specificity with relative error of 10% and power of 95%. This study has a prospective design with a before-after intervention of 80 mg of daily oral iron during 90 days and will be analyzed as a delayed-type cross-sectional study. Women at the second trimester of pregnancy are being evaluated with clinical and laboratorial examinations at the enrollment and monthly. The ‘responsiveness to therapeutic test with oral iron’ (gold-standard) was defined to an increase of at least 0.55 Z-score in haemoglobin after 4 weeks of treatment and a total dose of 1200 mg of iron. At the study conclusion, sensitivities, specificities, predictive values, likelihood ratios and areas under the ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curves of serum ferritin and erythrocyte indices (red blood cell count, haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, red blood cell distribution width, reticulocyte count) will be tested. The compliance and adverse effects are considered

  5. Ferritin Protein Nanocage Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tosha, Takehiko; Behera, Rabindra K.; Ng, Ho-Leung; Bhattasali, Onita; Alber, Tom; Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin protein nanocages, self-assembled from four-α-helix bundle subunits, use Fe2+ and oxygen to synthesize encapsulated, ferric oxide minerals. Ferritin minerals are iron concentrates stored for cell growth. Ferritins are also antioxidants, scavenging Fenton chemistry reactants. Channels for iron entry and exit consist of helical hairpin segments surrounding the 3-fold symmetry axes of the ferritin nanocages. We now report structural differences caused by amino acid substitutions in the Fe2+ ion entry and exit channels and at the cytoplasmic pores, from high resolution (1.3–1.8 Å) protein crystal structures of the eukaryotic model ferritin, frog M. Mutations that eliminate conserved ionic or hydrophobic interactions between Arg-72 and Asp-122 and between Leu-110 and Leu-134 increase flexibility in the ion channels, cytoplasmic pores, and/or the N-terminal extensions of the helix bundles. Decreased ion binding in the channels and changes in ordered water are also observed. Protein structural changes coincide with increased Fe2+ exit from dissolved, ferric minerals inside ferritin protein cages; Fe2+ exit from ferritin cages depends on a complex, surface-limited process to reduce and dissolve the ferric mineral. High concentrations of bovine serum albumin or lysozyme (protein crowders) to mimic the cytoplasm restored Fe2+ exit in the variants to wild type. The data suggest that fluctuations in pore structure control gating. The newly identified role of the ferritin subunit N-terminal extensions in gating Fe2+ exit from the cytoplasmic pores strengthens the structural and functional analogies between ferritin ion channels in the water-soluble protein assembly and membrane protein ion channels gated by cytoplasmic N-terminal peptides. PMID:22362775

  6. Weekly supplementation with iron and vitamin A during pregnancy increases hemoglobin concentration but decreases serum ferritin concentration in Indonesian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Muslimatun, S; Schmidt, M K; Schultink, W; West, C E; Hautvast, J A; Gross, R; Muhilal

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether weekly iron supplementation was as effective as the national daily iron supplementation program in Indonesia in improving iron status at near term in pregnancy. In addition, we examined whether weekly vitamin A and iron supplementation was more efficacious than weekly supplementation with iron alone. One group of pregnant women (n = 122)was supplemented weekly with iron (120 mg Fe as FeSO4) and folic acid (500 microg); another group (n = 121) received the same amount of iron and folic acid plus vitamin A [4800 retinol equivalents (RE)]. A third ("daily") group (n = 123), participating in the national iron plus folic acid supplementation program, was also recruited. Data on subjects with complete biochemical data are reported (n = 190). At near term, hemoglobin concentrations increased, whereas serum ferritin concentrations decreased significantly in the weekly vitamin A and iron group, suggesting that vitamin A improved utilization of iron for hematopoiesis. Iron status in the weekly iron group was not different from that of the "daily" group. However, iron status decreased with daily supplementation if <50 iron tablets were ingested. Serum transferrin receptor concentrations increased in all groups (P < 0.01). Serum retinol concentrations were maintained in the weekly vitamin A and iron group, but decreased in the other two groups (P < 0.01). Thus, delivery of iron supplements on a weekly basis can be as effective as ona daily basis if compliance can be ensured. Addition of vitamin A to the supplement improved hemoglobin concentration.

  7. Pre-Altitude Serum Ferritin Levels and Daily Oral Iron Supplement Dose Mediate Iron Parameter and Hemoglobin Mass Responses to Altitude Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Govus, Andrew D.; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A.; Abbiss, Chris R.; Peeling, Peter; Gore, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of daily oral iron supplementation on changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) and iron parameters after 2–4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure. Methods Hematological data collected from 178 athletes (98 males, 80 females) exposed to moderate altitude (1,350–3,000 m) were analysed using linear regression to determine how altitude exposure combined with oral iron supplementation influenced Hbmass, total iron incorporation (TII) and blood iron parameters [ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT)]. Results Altitude exposure (mean ± s: 21 ± 3 days) increased Hbmass by 1.1% [-0.4, 2.6], 3.3% [1.7, 4.8], and 4.0% [2.0, 6.1] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who ingested nil, 105 mg and 210 mg respectively, of oral iron supplement daily. Serum ferritin levels decreased by -33.2% [-46.9, -15.9] and 13.8% [-32.2, 9.7] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who supplemented with nil and 105 mg of oral iron supplement daily, but increased by 36.8% [1.3, 84.8] in athletes supplemented with 210 mg of oral iron daily. Finally, athletes who ingested either 105 mg or 210 mg of oral iron supplement daily had a greater TII compared with non-supplemented athletes (0 versus 105 mg: effect size (d) = -1.88 [-2.56, -1.17]; 0 versus 210 mg: effect size (d) = -2.87 [-3.88, -1.66]). Conclusion Oral iron supplementation during 2–4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure may enhance Hbmass production and assist the maintenance of iron balance in some athletes with low pre-altitude iron stores. PMID:26263553

  8. End-Stage Renal Disease after Liver Transplantation in Patients with Pre-Transplant Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bahirwani, Ranjeeta; Forde, Kimberly A.; Mu, Yifei; Lin, Fred; Reese, Peter; Goldberg, David; Abt, Peter; Reddy, K Rajender; Levine, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Renal dysfunction prior to liver transplantation has a marked impact on post-transplant kidney outcomes. The aim of this study was to assess post-transplant renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) receiving orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) alone. METHODS Retrospective review of 40 OLT recipients with pre-transplant CKD (serum creatinine ≥ 2 mg/dl for at least 3 months) at the University of Pennsylvania from February 2002 to July 2010. Primary outcome was estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) up to 3 years post-transplant. Secondary outcomes included incidence of stage 4 CKD (eGFR < 30 ml/min), need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), meeting criteria for kidney transplant listing (eGFR ≤ 20 ml/min), and mortality. RESULTS Median patient age was 56.5 years and 48% patients had pre-transplant diabetes. Median serum creatinine at transplant was 2.7 mg/dl (eGFR 24 ml/min). Median eGFR at 1, 2, and 3 years post-transplant was 35, 34, and 37 ml/min respectively. Twelve patients (30%) required RRT at a median of 1.21 years posttransplant and 16 (40%) achieved an eGFR ≤ 20 ml/min at 1.09 years post-transplant. Mortality was 35% at a median of 1.60 years post-transplant. CONCLUSIONS OLT recipients with pre-transplant CKD have a substantial burden of post-transplant renal dysfunction and high short-term mortality, questioning the rationale for OLT alone in this population. PMID:24382253

  9. A prospective randomized wait list control trial of intravenous iron sucrose in older adults with unexplained anemia and serum ferritin 20-200 ng/mL.

    PubMed

    Price, Elizabeth; Artz, Andrew S; Barnhart, Huiman; Sapp, Shelly; Chelune, Gordon; Ershler, William B; Walston, Jeremy D; Gordeuk, Victor R; Berger, Nathan A; Reuben, David; Prchal, Josef; Rao, Sunil V; Roy, Cindy N; Supiano, Mark A; Schrier, Stanley L; Cohen, Harvey Jay

    2014-12-01

    Anemia is common in older persons and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. One third of anemic older adults have unexplained anemia of the elderly (UAE). We carried out a randomized, wait list control trial in outpatients with UAE and serum ferritin levels between 20 and 200 ng/mL. Intravenous iron sucrose was given as a 200-mg weekly dose for 5 weeks either immediately after enrollment (immediate intervention group) or following a 12-week wait list period (wait list control group). The primary outcome measure was changed in 6-minute walk test (6MWT) distances from baseline to 12 weeks between the two groups. Hematologic, physical, cognitive, and quality of life parameters were also assessed. The study was terminated early after 19 subjects enrolled. The distance walked in the 6MWT increased a mean 8.05±55.48 m in the immediate intervention group and decreased a mean 11.45±49.46 m in the wait list control group (p=0.443). The hemoglobin increased a mean 0.39±0.46 g/dL in the immediate intervention group and declined a mean 0.39±0.85 g/dL in the wait list control group (p=0.026). Thus, a subgroup of adults with UAE may respond to intravenous iron. Enrollment of subjects into this type of study remains challenging.

  10. Initial screening transferrin saturation values, serum ferritin concentrations, and HFE genotypes in Native Americans and whites in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening Study.

    PubMed

    Barton, J C; Acton, R T; Lovato, L; Speechley, M R; McLaren, C E; Harris, E L; Reboussin, D M; Adams, P C; Dawkins, F W; Gordeuk, V R; Walker, A P

    2006-01-01

    We compared initial screening transferrin saturation (TfSat) and serum ferritin (SF) phenotypes and HFE C282Y and H63D genotypes of 645 Native American and 43,453 white Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening Study participants who did not report a previous diagnosis of hemochromatosis or iron overload. Elevated measurements were defined as TfSat >50% in men and >45% in women and SF >300 ng/ml in men and >200 ng/ml in women. Mean TfSat was 31% in Native American men and 32% in white men (p = 0.0337) and 25% in Native American women and 27% in white women (p < 0.0001). Mean SF was 153 microg/l in Native American and 151 microg/l in white men (p = 0.8256); mean SF was 55 microg/l in Native American women and 63 microg/l in white women (p = 0.0015). The C282Y allele frequency was 0.0340 in Native Americans and 0.0683 in whites (p < 0.0001). The H63D allele frequency was 0.1150 in Native Americans and 0.1532 in whites (p = 0.0001). We conclude that the screening TfSat and SF phenotypes of Native Americans are similar to those of whites. The allele frequencies of HFE C282Y and H63D are significantly lower in Native Americans than in whites.

  11. Association of ferroportin Q248H polymorphism with elevated levels of serum ferritin in African-Americans in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Charles A.; Barton, James C.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Acton, Ronald T.; Speechley, Mark R.; Snively, Beverly M.; Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Press, Richard D.; Adams, Paul C.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Dawkins, Fitzroy W.; McLaren, Christine E.; Reboussin, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The ferroportin (FPN1) Q248H polymorphism has been associated with increased serum ferritin (SF) levels in sub-Saharan Africans and in African Americans (AA). AA participants of the HEIRS Study who did not have HFE C282Y or H63D who had elevated initial screening SF (≥300 μg/L in men and ≥200 μg/L in women) (defined as cases) were frequency-matched to AA participants with normal SF (defined as controls) to investigate the association of the Q248H with elevated SF. 10.4% of cases and 6.7% of controls were Q248H heterozygotes (P = 0.257). Q248H homozygosity was observed in 0.5% of the cases and none of the controls. The frequency of Q248H was higher among men with elevated SF than among control men (P = 0.047); corresponding differences were not observed among women. This appeared to be unrelated to self-reports of a previous diagnosis of liver disease. Men with elevated SF were three times more likely than women with elevated SF to have Q248H (P = 0.012). There were no significant differences in Q248H frequencies in men and women control participants. We conclude that the frequency of the FPN1 Q248H polymorphism is greater in AA men with elevated SF than in those with normal SF. PMID:17276706

  12. Failure of twice-weekly iron supplementation to increase blood haemoglobin and serum ferritin concentrations: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Olsen, A; Nawiri, J; Magnussen, P; Krarup, H; Friis, H

    2006-04-01

    In order to increase the intestinal absorption of iron whilst simultaneously minimising the side-effects and thus increasing compliance, once- or twice-weekly, instead of daily, iron supplementation has been widely recommended. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study in western Kenya, a tablet of ferrous dextran (containing 60 mg elemental iron) or an identical-looking placebo tablet was provided twice-weekly for 12 months to each child or adult investigated. At baseline each subject had a moderately low blood concentration of haemoglobin (Hb). Initial Hb and serum ferritin (SF) concentrations were determined and each subject was tested for malarial and helminth infection and treated, if necessary, with the appropriate anthelminthic drug(s). Overall, 200 children (aged 4-15 years) and 129 adults (aged 16-63 years) completed the 12-month study. At baseline, 47.5% of the children and 58.1% of the adults were anaemic, hookworm (detected in 60.0% of the children and 69.9% of the adults) was the most common helminth infection, and malaria was endemic. The results of bivariate analyses indicated that twice-weekly iron supplementation had no significant effect on blood Hb or SF concentrations, either in the children or the adults investigated. The results were confirmed in multiple linear-regression analyses, which revealed that the predictors of the final Hb concentration in the children investigated were age and infection, after enrollment, with Ascaris lumbricoides. Gender and the serum concentration of alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) at final follow-up were predictors of the final SF concentration in the children. In adults, the predictors of the final Hb concentration were gender and HIV infection, and the predictors of the final SF concentration were age and the serum concentration of ACT at the final follow-up. Twice-weekly iron supplementation did not increase Hb or iron stores in children or adults. Since compliance appeared to be high, this lack

  13. Serum ferritin level changes in children with sickle cell disease on chronic blood transfusion are nonlinear and are associated with iron load and liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Miguel R.; Paley, Carole; Olivieri, Nancy; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Vichinsky, Elliott; Casella, James F.; Alvarez, Ofelia A.; Barredo, Julio C.; Lee, Margaret T.; Iyer, Rathi V.; Kutlar, Abdullah; McKie, Kathleen M.; McKie, Virgil; Odo, Nadine; Gee, Beatrice; Kwiatkowski, Janet L.; Woods, Gerald M.; Coates, Thomas; Wang, Winfred; Adams, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic blood transfusion is increasingly indicated in patients with sickle cell disease. Measuring resulting iron overload remains a challenge. Children without viral hepatitis enrolled in 2 trials for stroke prevention were examined for iron overload (STOP and STOP2; n = 271). Most received desferrioxamine chelation. Serum ferritin (SF) changes appeared nonlinear compared with prechelation estimated transfusion iron load (TIL) or with liver iron concentrations (LICs). Averaged correlation coefficient between SF and TIL (patients/observations, 26 of 164) was r = 0.70; between SF and LIC (patients/observations, 33 of 47) was r = 0.55. In mixed models, SF was associated with LIC (P = .006), alanine transaminase (P = .025), and weight (P = .026). Most patients with SF between 750 and 1500 ng/mL had a TIL between 25 and 100 mg/kg (72.8% ± 5.9%; patients/observations, 24 of 50) or an LIC between 2.5 and 10 mg/g dry liver weight (75% ± 0%; patients/observations, 8 of 9). Most patients with SF of 3000 ng/mL or greater had a TIL of 100 mg/kg or greater (95.3% ± 6.7%; patients/observations, 7 of 16) or an LIC of 10 mg/g dry liver weight or greater (87.7% ± 4.3%; patients/observations, 11 of 18). Although SF changes are nonlinear, levels less than 1500 ng/mL indicated mostly acceptable iron overload; levels of 3000 ng/mL or greater were specific for significant iron overload and were associated with liver injury. However, to determine accurately iron overload in patients with intermediately elevated SF levels, other methods are required. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00000592 and #NCT00006182. PMID:19721013

  14. Bivariate mixture modeling of transferrin saturation and serum ferritin concentration in Asians, African Americans, Hispanics, and whites in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Mclaren, Christine E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Chen, Wen-Pin; Barton, James C.; Acton, Ronald T.; Speechley, Mark; Castro, Oswaldo; Adams, Paul C.; Snively, Beverly M.; Harris, Emily L.; Reboussin, David M.; Mclachlan, Geoffrey J.; Bean, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Bivariate mixture modeling was used to analyze joint population distributions of transferrin saturation (TS) and serum ferritin concentration (SF) measured in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study. Four components (C1, C2, C3, and C4) with successively age-adjusted increasing means for TS and SF were identified in data from 26,832 African Americans, 12,620 Asians, 12,264 Hispanics, and 43,254 whites. The largest component, C2, had normal mean TS (21% to 26% for women, 29% to 30% for men) and SF (43–82 μg/L for women, 165–242 μg/L for men), which consisted of component proportions greater than 0.59 for women and greater than 0.68 for men. C3 and C4 had progressively greater mean values for TS and SF with progressively lesser component proportions. C1 had mean TS values less than 16% for women (<20% for men) and SF values less than 28 μg/L for women (<47 μg/L for men). Compared with C2, adjusted odds of iron deficiency were significantly greater in C1 (14.9–47.5 for women, 60.6–3530 for men), adjusted odds of liver disease were significantly greater in C3 and C4 for African-American women and all men, and adjusted odds of any HFE mutation were increased in C3 (1.4–1.8 for women, 1.2–1.9 for men) and in C4 for Hispanic and white women (1.5 and 5.2, respectively) and men (2.8 and 4.7, respectively). Joint mixture modeling identifies a component with lesser SF and TS at risk for iron deficiency and 2 components with greater SF and TS at risk for liver disease or HFE mutations. This approach can identify populations in which hereditary or acquired factors influence metabolism measurement. PMID:18201677

  15. Ferritin Diversity: Mechanistic Studies, Disease Implications, and Materials Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.

    2011-07-01

    The study of ferritin includes a rich history of discoveries and scientific progress. Initially, the composition of ferritin was determined. Soon, it was shown that ferritin is a spherical, hollow protein. Eventually, over several decades of research, the structure and some function of this interesting protein was elucidated. However, the ferritin field was not completely satisfied. Today, for example, researchers are interested in refining the details of ferritin function, in discovering the role of ferritin in a variety of diseases, and in using ferritin for materials chemistry applications. The work presented in this dissertation highlights the progress that we have made in each of these three areas: (1) Mechanistic studies: The buffer used during horse spleen ferritin iron loading significantly influences the mineralization process and the quantity of iron deposited in ferritin. The ferrihydrite core of ferritin is crystalline and ordered when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of imidazole buffer. On the other hand, when iron is loaded into ferritin in the presence of MOPS buffer, the ferrihydrite core is less crystalline and less ordered, and a smaller amount of total iron is loaded in ferritin. We also show that iron can be released from the ferritin core in a non-reductive manner. The rate of Fe3+ release from horse spleen ferritin was measured using the Fe3+-specific chelator desferoxamine. We show that iron release occurs by three kinetic events. (2) Disease studies: In order to better understand iron disruption during disease states, we performed in vitro assays that mimicked chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that elevated levels of serum phosphate interrupted normal iron binding by transferrin and ferritin. Results show that phosphate competes for iron, forming an iron(III)-phosphate complex that is inaccessible to either transferrin or ferritin. Ferritin samples separated from the iron(III)-phosphate complex shows that as the

  16. Neuroferritinopathy: From ferritin structure modification to pathogenetic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Sonia; Rovida, Ermanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuroferritinopathy is a rare, late-onset, dominantly inherited movement disorder caused by mutations in L-ferritin gene. It is characterized by iron and ferritin aggregate accumulation in brain, normal or low serum ferritin levels and high variable clinical feature. To date, nine causative mutations have been identified and eight of them are frameshift mutations determined by nucleotide(s) insertion in the exon 4 of L-ferritin gene altering the structural conformation of the C-terminus of the L-ferritin subunit. Acting in a dominant negative manner, mutations are responsible for an impairment of the iron storage efficiency of ferritin molecule. Here, we review the main characteristics of neuroferritinopathy and present a computational analysis of some representative recently defined mutations with the purpose to gain new information about the pathogenetic mechanism of the disorder. This is particularly important as neuroferritinopathy can be considered an interesting model to study the relationship between iron, oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. PMID:25772441

  17. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-storing protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurements of ferritin aid in the diagnosis of diseases affecting iron metabolism, such as hemochromatosis (iron overload) and iron deficiency amemia....

  18. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  19. Obesity is an independent risk factor for pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis in liver recipients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Portal vein thrombosis is a frequent complication in end-stage cirrhosis with a considerable peri-operative risk for liver transplant candidates. We aimed to characterize the pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis in a cohort of liver transplant recipients, and to identify independent risk factors for this complication. Methods 380 consecutive primary orthotopic liver transplants were performed in the Digestive Surgery Department of “12 de Octubre” Hospital (Madrid, Spain), between January 2001 and December 2006. The main risk factors considered were smoking, obesity, metabolic disorders, previous immobility, surgery or trauma, nephrotic syndrome, associated tumor, inflammatory disease, neoplasm myeloprolipherative. Furthermore we have reported genetic thrombophilia results for 271 recipients. Results Sixty-two (16.3%) patients developed pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis and its presence had no impact in the overall survival of liver recipients. Obesity was the only independent risk factor for pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis. Conclusion We recommend close control of cardiovascular factors in patients with liver cirrhosis in order to avoid associated thrombosis. PMID:22909075

  20. Pre-Transplant Depression Is Associated with Length of Hospitalization, Discharge Disposition, and Survival after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rogal, Shari S.; Mankaney, Gautham; Udawatta, Viyan; Chinman, Matthew; Good, Chester B.; Zickmund, Susan; Bielefeldt, Klaus; Chidi, Alexis; Jonassaint, Naudia; Jazwinski, Alison; Shaikh, Obaid; Hughes, Christopher; Fontes, Paulo; Humar, Abhinav; DiMartini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Depression after liver transplantation has been associated with decreased survival, but the effects of pre-transplant depression on early and late post-transplant outcomes remain incompletely evaluated. We assessed all patients who had undergone single-organ liver transplantation at a single center over the prior 10 years. A diagnosis of pre-transplant depression, covariates, and the outcomes of interest were extracted from the electronic medical record. Potential covariates included demographics, etiology and severity of liver disease, comorbidities, donor age, graft type, immunosuppression, and ischemic times. In multivariable models adjusting for these factors, we evaluated the effect of pre-transplant depression on transplant length of stay (LOS), discharge disposition (home vs. facility) and long-term survival. Among 1115 transplant recipients with a median follow-up time of 5 years, the average age was 56±11 and MELD was 12±9. Nineteen percent of the study population had a history of pre-transplant depression. Pre-transplant depression was associated with longer LOS (median = 19 vs. 14 days, IRR = 1.25, CI = 1.13,1.39), discharge to a facility (36% vs. 25%, OR 1.70,CI = 1.18,2.45), and decreased survival (HR = 1.54,CI = 1.14,2.08) in this cohort, accounting for other potential confounders. In conclusion, pre-transplant depression was significantly associated with longer transplant length of stay, discharge to a facility, and mortality in this cohort. PMID:27820828

  1. Prognostic pre-transplant factors in myelodysplastic syndromes primarily treated by high dose allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a retrospective study of the MDS subcommittee of the CMWP of the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Cremers, E M P; van Biezen, A; de Wreede, L C; Scholten, M; Vitek, A; Finke, J; Platzbecker, U; Beelen, D; Schwerdtfeger, R; Volin, L; Harhalakis, N; Blijlevens, N; Nagler, A; Kröger, N; de Witte, T

    2016-12-01

    Many pre-transplant factors are known to influence the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) treatment in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, patient cohorts are often heterogeneous by disease stage and treatment modalities, which complicates interpretation of the results. This study aimed to obtain a homogeneous patient cohort by including only de novo MDS patients who received upfront allogeneic SCT after standard high dose myelo-ablative conditioning. The effect of pre-transplant factors such as age, disease stage, transfusions, iron parameters and comorbidity on overall survival (OS), non-relapse mortality (NRM), and relapse incidence (RI) was evaluated in 201 patients. In this cohort, characterized by low comorbidity and a short interval between diagnosis and transplantation, NRM was the most determinant factor for survival after SCT (47 % after 2-year follow-up). WHO classification and transfusion burden were the only modalities with a significant impact on overall survival after SCT. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) showed a strongly increased risk of death, NRM and RI, in patients with a high transfusion-burden (HR 1.99; P = 0.006, HR of 1.89; P = 0.03 and HR 2.67; P = 0.03). The HR's for ferritin level and comorbidity were not significantly increased.

  2. Inflammation associated anemia and ferritin as disease markers in SLE

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In a recent screening to detect biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), expression of the iron storage protein, ferritin, was increased. Given that proteins that regulate the storage, transfer and release of iron play an important role in inflammation, this study aims to determine the serum and urine levels of ferritin and of the iron transfer protein, transferrin, in lupus patients and to correlate these levels with disease activity, inflammatory cytokine levels and markers of anemia. Methods A protein array was utilized to measure ferritin expression in the urine and serum of SLE patients and healthy controls. To confirm these results as well as the role of the iron transfer pathway in SLE, ELISAs were performed to measure ferritin and transferrin levels in inactive or active SLE patients and healthy controls. The relationship between ferritin/transferrin levels and inflammatory markers and anemia was next analyzed. Results Protein array results showed elevated ferritin levels in the serum and urine of lupus patients as compared to controls, which were further validated by ELISA. Increased ferritin levels correlated with measures of disease activity and anemia as well as inflammatory cytokine titers. Though active SLE patients had elevated urine transferrin, serum transferrin was reduced. Conclusion Urine ferritin and transferrin levels are elevated significantly in SLE patients and correlate with disease activity, bolstering previous reports. Most importantly, these changes correlated with the inflammatory state of the patients and anemia of chronic disease. Taken together, altered iron handling, inflammation and anemia of chronic disease constitute an ominous triad in SLE. PMID:22871034

  3. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis prevalence in pre-transplant patients and its effect on survival and graft loss post-transplant

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeral L; Intagliata, Nicolas M; Henry, Zachary H; Argo, Curtis K; Northup, Patrick G

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in pre-transplant patients and its effect on post transplant mortality and graft failure. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patient records from the organ procurement and transplant network data set. Patients were identified by the presence of SBP pre-transplant. Univariate post-transplant survival models were constructed using the Kaplan-Meier technique and multivariate models were constructed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Variables that affected post-transplant graft survival were identified in the SBP population. RESULTS Forty-seven thousand eight hundred and eighty patient records were included in the analysis for both groups, and 1966 (4.11%) patients were identified in the data set as having pre-transplant SBP. Patients that had pre-transplant SBP had higher rates of graft loss from recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) (3.6% vs 2.0%, P < 0.0001), infections leading to graft loss (1.9% vs 1.3%, P = 0.02), primary non-function (4.3% vs 3.0%, P < 0.0001) and chronic rejection (1.1% vs 0.7%, P = 0.04). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a statistically significant difference in all-cause survival in patients with a history of SBP vs those without (P < 0.0001). Pre-transplant history of SBP was independently predictive of mortality due to recurrent HCV (HR = 1.11, 95%CI: 1.02-1.21, P < 0.017) after liver transplantation. CONCLUSION HCV patients prior to the advent of directing acting anti-viral agents had a higher incidence of pre-transplant SBP than other patients on the liver transplant wait list. SBP history pre-transplant resulted in a higher rate of graft loss due to recurrent HCV infection and chronic rejection. PMID:28083084

  4. Risk of end-stage renal disease among liver transplant recipients with pre-transplant renal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ruebner, R; Goldberg, D; Abt, PL; Bahirwani, R; Levine, M; Sawinski, D; Bloom, RD; Reese, PP

    2012-01-01

    Guidelines recommend restricting simultaneous liver-kidney (SLK) transplant to candidates with prolonged dialysis or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <30 ml/min/1.73m2 for 90 days. However, few studies exist to support the latter recommendation. Using SRTR and Medicare dialysis data, we assembled a cohort of 4997 liver transplant recipients from 2/27/2002–1/1/2008. Serial eGFRs were calculated from serum creatinines submitted with MELD reports. We categorized recipients by eGFR patterns in the 90 days pre-transplant: Group 1 (eGFR always >30), Group 2 (eGFR fluctuated), Group 3 (eGFR always <30) and Group 4 (short-term dialysis). For Group 2, we characterized fluctuations in renal function using time-weighted mean eGFR. Among liver-alone recipients in Group 3, the rate of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by 3 years was 31%, versus <10% for other groups (p<0.001). In multivariable Cox regression, eGFR Group, diabetes (HR 2.65, p<0.001) and black race (HR 1.83, p=0.02) were associated with ESRD. Among liver-alone recipients in Group 2, only diabetics with time-weighted mean eGFR<30 had a substantial ESRD risk (25.6%). In summary, among liver transplant candidates not on prolonged dialysis, SLK should be considered for those whose eGFR is always <30 and diabetic candidates whose weighted mean eGFR is <30 for 90 days. PMID:22759237

  5. Pre-transplant thymic function is associated with the risk of cytomegalovirus disease after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ahufinger, I; Ferrando-Martínez, S; Montejo, M; Muñoz-Villanueva, M C; Cantisán, S; Rivero, A; Solana, R; Leal, M; Torre-Cisneros, J

    2015-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is an important complication in solid organ transplant recipients. Thymic function in adults is associated with specific T-cell immunity. Pre-transplant thymic function was analysed in 75 solid organ transplant patients by the use of nested PCR. The primary outcome was the incidence of CMV disease 12 months after transplantation. Using multivariable logistic regression, we studied whether pre-transplant thymic function is an independent risk factor for CMV disease after transplantation. Thymic function was related to the risk of CMV disease in CMV-seropositive recipients. In these recipients, pre-transplant thymic function of <9.5 (OR 11.27, 95% CI 1.11-114.43, p 0.040) and the use of thymoglobulin (OR 8.21, 95% CI 1.09-61.84, p 0.041) were independent risk factors for CMV disease at 12 months after transplantation. Patients with pre-transplant thymic function values of <9.5 had a higher subsequent incidence of CMV disease (24%) than patients with values of ≥ 9.5 (3%) (log-rank test: 5.727; p 0.017). The positive and negative predictive values of these pre-transplant thymic function cut-offs were 0.24 (95% CI 0.10-0.45) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.82-1.00), respectively. Pre-transplant thymic function in CMV-seropositive candidates could be useful in determining the risk of post-transplant CMV disease in solid organ transplant patients, selecting a group of low-risk candidates.

  6. Biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in idiopathic hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hultcrantz, R.; Angelin, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.E.; Ewerth, S.; Einarsson, K.

    1989-06-01

    The role of biliary excretion of iron and ferritin in iron overload was studied and evaluated. Ten patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis and two groups of controls (14 gallstone patients and 16 healthy subjects) were included. Liver tissue (obtained by percutaneous or operative biopsy) was investigated with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in combination with x-ray microanalysis. Fasting bile samples were obtained through duodenal aspiration or at cholecystectomy. Iron was determined in liver tissue and bile using atomic absorption spectroscopy, and ferritin was determined in serum and bile with a radioimmunoassay technique. All patients with hemochromatosis had iron-positive staining as seen in light microscopy. Electron microscopy showed iron-containing proteins in the lysosomes and cytosol of liver parenchymal cells, and this observation was supported by x-ray microanalysis. Hepatic iron concentration was increased about eightfold in the patients with hemochromatosis (p less than 0.001). Biliary iron concentration, expressed per millimole of bile acid, was increased about twofold (p less than 0.05) and biliary ferritin concentration about fivefold (p less than 0.001) in hemochromatosis. Four of the patients with hemochromatosis were reexamined after completed treatment with venesection; this resulted in normalized biliary concentrations of iron and ferritin. We conclude that biliary secretion of ferritin occurs in humans and that both iron and ferritin excretion are enhanced in hepatic iron overload. The apparently limited capacity of biliary iron excretion may be of importance for the hepatic iron accumulation in hemochromatosis.

  7. Impact of Obesity on Heart and Lung Transplantation: Does Pre-Transplant Obesity Affect Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Bozso, S J; Nagendran, Je; Gill, R S; Freed, D H; Nagendran, Ja

    2017-03-01

    Increasing prevalence of obesity has led to a rise in the number of prospective obese heart and lung transplant recipients. The optimal management strategy of obese patients with end-stage heart and lung failure remains controversial. This review article discusses and provides a summary of the literature surrounding the impact of obesity on outcomes in heart and lung transplantation. Studies on transplant obesity demonstrate controversy in terms of morbidity and mortality outcomes and obesity pre-transplantation. However, the impact of obesity on outcomes seems to be more consistently demonstrated in lung rather than heart transplantation. The ultimate goal in heart and lung transplantation in the obese patient is to identify those at highest risk of complication that may warrant therapies to mitigate risk by addressing comorbid conditions.

  8. INVERTEBRATE FERRITIN: OCCURRENCE IN MOLLUSCA.

    PubMed

    TOWE, K M; LOWENSTAM, H A; NESSON, M H

    1963-10-04

    Ferritin, in both crystalline and paracrystalline forms, occurs in the columnar epithelial cells of the dorsal wall of the radula of the marine chiton Cryptochiton stelleri, order, Polyplacophora. The ferritin occurs in association with the magnetite of the radular teeth. It has been isolated and crystallized in the presence of cadmium sulfate.

  9. Multilayer Ferritin Array for Bionanobattery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R., Jr. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A thin-film electrode for a bio-nanobattery is produced by consecutively depositing arrays of a ferritin protein on a substrate, employing a spin self-assembly procedure. By this procedure, a first ferritin layer is first formed on the substrate, followed by building a second, oppositely-charged ferritin layer on the top of the first ferritin layer to form a bilayer structure. Oppositely-charged ferritin layers are subsequently deposited on top of each other until a desired number of bilayer structures is produced. An ordered, uniform, stable and robust, thin-film electrode material of enhanced packing density is presented, which provides optimal charge density for the bio-nanobattery.

  10. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-10-27

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3-6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2-5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2-5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted.

  11. Iron loading into ferritin by an intracellular ferroxidase.

    PubMed

    Reilly, C A; Aust, S D

    1998-11-01

    An intracellular, membrane-bound enzyme exhibiting both p-phenylenediamine oxidase activity and ferrous iron oxidase activity was isolated with the plasma membrane fraction of horse heart and studied for its ability to load iron into ferritin. The ferroxidase activity of the tissue oxidase was stimulated approximately twofold by horse spleen apoferritin, and the iron was loaded into ferritin. The loading of iron into ferritin by the tissue oxidase was inhibited by anti-horse serum ceruloplasmin antibody. The stoichiometry of iron oxidation and oxygen consumption during iron loading into ferritin by the tissue-derived oxidase and serum ceruloplasmin were 3.6 +/- 0.2 and 3.9 +/- 0.2, respectively. These data provide evidence that an enzyme analogous to ceruloplasmin is present on the plasma membrane of horse heart and that this ferroxidase is capable of catalyzing the loading of iron into ferritin. The implications of these data on the present models for the uptake and storage of iron by cells are discussed.

  12. [Red cell zinc protoporphyrin and its ratio to serum ferritin (ZPP/logSF index) in the detection of iron deficiency in patients with end-stage renal failure on hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Matuszkiewicz-Rowińska, Joanna; Ostrowski, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanisław; Przedlacki, Jerzy; Wardyn, Kazimierz; Puka, Janusz; Włodarczyk, Dariusz; Switalski, Marek; Zakrzewska, Teresa; Ostrowski, Kazimierz

    2003-07-01

    Monitoring of iron metabolism has become a major clinical issue in end-stage renal patients undergoing hemodialysis. It can be done at three levels: storage, transport and marrow availability. The objective of that study was to evaluate if a combination of an iron storage marker, serum ferritin (SF) with red cell zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), a marker of iron availability for erythron, will improve diagnostic value of both tests. In a baseline survey in the population of 186 haemodialysis patients (75% treated with rHuEpo), the following parameters were determined: complete blood count, serum transferrin saturation (TSAT), transferrin, SF, hypochromic red cells % (HRC) and ZPP; the ZPP/logSF ratio was calculated. Iron deficiency was defined as a fernitin saturation--TSAT < 20%. In the second part of the study, 24 pts with SF < 50 ng/ml were given 50 mg of i.v. iron weekly for three months, then the same tests were repeated. During that time the doses of rhuEpo were stable. An increase in hemoglobin of > 1.0 g/dl was considered as a positive response. In 186 studied patients mean SF was 274 +/- 335 ng/ml, and mean ZPP was 68 +/- 44 mumol/mol heme. A ZPP/logSF ratio > or = 40 had the best combination of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity in detecting iron deficiency (76% and 83% vs: 56% and 89% for ZPP > 90 mumol/mol heme, 84% and 34% for HRC > 5%, 68% and 58% for HRC > 10%) and the strong correlations with all other examined parameters were found. The index showed also the highest correlation with the response to the i.v. iron (r = 59; p < 0.01) of the tests evaluated. After three months the values of ZPP/logSF ratio decreased from 80 +/- 105 to 39 +/- 19 (p < 0.01). A significant difference between responders and nonresponders was found for basal ZPP/logSF (p < 0.05) but not for ZPP. Our data suggest that the ZPP/logSF index provides a new valuable parameter for the identification of hemodialysis patients with iron deficiency and the prediction an erythropoietic

  13. Magneto-Optics of Ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobek, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Ferritins are the metalloproteides present in plant and animal cells. Their micelleous tertiary structure allows iron accumulation in the form of hydratated oxides and phosphates. Thus, ferritin is a large spherical macromolecular protein with iron compounds in the cavity created by a peptide shell. Because of the spherical shape, ferritin macromolecule should not manifest magnetic anisotropy; however, in solution it shows the induced magnetic birefringence (Cotton-Mouton effect) and changes in intensity of the scattered light components. Therefore, the Cotton-Mouton effect, Rayleigh light scattering and nonlinear light scattering in dc magnetic field, were measured at room temperature for 100 mM NaCl solutions of apoferritin/ferritin loaded with different contents of Fe atoms/molecule. Analysis of the results has shown that the deformation of linear optical polarizability induced in the ferritin by a magnetic field and the orientation of the induced and permanent magnetic dipole moment by this field are the main sources of the magneto-optical phenomena observed. The results suggest the simultaneous diamagnetic and superparamagnetic behavior of the ferritin biomacromolecule.

  14. Pre-transplantation specification of stem cells to cardiac lineage for regeneration of cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Maritza; Finan, Amanda; Penn, Marc

    2009-03-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a lead cause of mortality in the Western world. Treatment of acute MI is focused on restoration of antegrade flow which inhibits further tissue loss, but does not restore function to damaged tissue. Chronic therapy for injured myocardial tissue involves medical therapy that attempts to minimize pathologic remodeling of the heart. End stage therapy for chronic heart failure (CHF) involves inotropic therapy to increase surviving cardiac myocyte function or mechanical augmentation of cardiac performance. Not until the point of heart transplantation, a limited resource at best, does therapy focus on the fundamental problem of needing to replace injured tissue with new contractile tissue. In this setting, the potential for stem cell therapy has garnered significant interest for its potential to regenerate or create new contractile cardiac tissue. While to date adult stem cell therapy in clinical trials has suggested potential benefit, there is waning belief that the approaches used to date lead to regeneration of cardiac tissue. As the literature has better defined the pathways involved in cardiac differentiation, preclinical studies have suggested that stem cell pretreatment to direct stem cell differentiation prior to stem cell transplantation may be a more efficacious strategy for inducing cardiac regeneration. Here we review the available literature on pre-transplantation conditioning of stem cells in an attempt to better understand stem cell behavior and their readiness in cell-based therapy for myocardial regeneration.

  15. Impact of Pre-transplant Therapy and Depth of Disease Response prior to Autologous Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Vij, Ravi; Kumar, Shaji; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhong, Xiaobo; Huang, Jiaxing; Dispenzieri, Angela; Abidi, Muneer H.; Bird, Jennifer M.; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila L.; Kyle, Robert A.; Landsburg, Daniel J.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Munker, Reinhold; Roy, Vivek; Sharma, Manish; Vogl, Dan T.; Wirk, Baldeep; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with multiple myeloma (MM), who are eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), typically receive a finite period of initial therapy prior to ASCT. It is not clear if patients with suboptimal (less than a partial) response to initial therapy benefit from additional alternative therapy with intent to maximize pre-transplant response. We identified 539 patients with MM who had an ASCT after having achieved less than a partial response (PR) to first line induction chemotherapy between 1995 and 2010. These patients were then divided into two groups: those who received additional salvage chemotherapy prior to ASCT (n=324) and those who had no additional salvage chemotherapy immediately prior to ASCT (n=215). Additional pre-transplant chemotherapy resulted in deepening responses in 68% (complete response in 8% and PR in 60%). On multivariate analysis there was no impact of pre-transplant salvage chemotherapy on treatment related mortality (TRM), risk for relapse, progression free or overall survival. In conclusion, for patients achieving a less than PR to initial induction therapy including with novel agent combinations, additional pre-ASCT salvage chemotherapy improved the depth of response and pre-ASCT disease status but was not associated with survival benefit. PMID:25445028

  16. Pre-transplant diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for non-relapse mortality, especially infection-related mortality, after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Takano, K; Fuji, S; Uchida, N; Ogawa, H; Ohashi, K; Eto, T; Sakamaki, H; Morishima, Y; Kato, K; Suzuki, R; Fukuda, T

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a factor in the hematopoietic cell transplantation-comorbidity index. However, the impact of pre-transplant DM on morbidity and cause-specific non-relapse mortality (NRM) remains unclear. We performed a retrospective study with registry data that included a total of 7626 patients who underwent their first allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) between 2007 and 2010. The median age was 44 years (range 0-88). Compared with patients without pre-transplant DM (non-DM group, n=7248), patients with pre-transplant DM (DM group, n=378) were older and were more likely to have high-risk disease, a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen and GVHD prophylaxis using tacrolimus. Multivariate analyses showed that pre-transplant DM was associated with increased risks of NRM (hazard ratio (HR)1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-1.76, P<0.01) and infection-related NRM (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.58-2.73, P<0.01). The presence of pre-transplant DM was associated with an increased risk of overall mortality in a multivariate analysis (HR 1.55, 95% CI 1.35-1.78, P<0.01). In conclusion, pre-transplant DM was a risk factor for NRM, particularly infection-related mortality, after allogeneic HSCT. To improve the clinical outcome in patients with DM, the benefits of strict infection control and appropriate glycemic control should be explored in future trials.

  17. Pre-transplant dialysis modality does not influence short- or long-term outcome in kidney transplant recipients: analysis of paired kidneys from the same deceased donor.

    PubMed

    Dipalma, Teresa; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Praga, Manuel; Polanco, Natalia; González, Esther; Gutiérrez-Solis, Elena; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Andrés, Amado

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have reported contradictory results regarding the effect of pre-transplant dialysis modality on the outcomes after kidney transplantation (KT). To minimize the confounding effect of donor-related variables, we performed a donor-matched retrospective comparison of 160 patients that received only one modality of pre-transplant dialysis (peritoneal dialysis [PD] and hemodialysis [HD] in 80 patients each) and that subsequently underwent KT at our center between January 1990 and December 2007. Cox regression models were used to evaluate the association between pre-transplant dialysis modality and primary study outcomes (death-censored graft survival and patient survival). To control for imbalances in recipient-related baseline characteristics, we performed additional adjustments for the propensity score (PS) for receiving pre-transplant PD (versus HD). There were no significant differences according to pre-transplant dialysis modality in death-censored graft survival (PS-adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 0.65; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.25-1.68) or patient survival (aHR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.13-2.68). There were no differences in 10-year graft function or in the incidence of post-transplant complications either, except for a higher risk of lymphocele in patients undergoing PD (odds ratio: 4.31; 95% CI: 1.15-16.21). In conclusion, pre-transplant dialysis modality in KT recipients does not impact short- or long-term graft outcomes or patient survival.

  18. Soluble transferrin receptor, ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor--Ferritin index in assessment of anaemia in rhaeumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pavai, S; Jayaranee, S; Sargunan, S

    2007-10-01

    Anaemia of chronic disease (ACD) is a frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A diagnostic difficulty in RA is the distinction between iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and ACD. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/log ferritin (TfR-F) index to diagnose iron deficiency in RA patients with anaemia. Routine laboratory indices of anaemia and sTfR were measured in 20 healthy persons to form the control group, 30 patients with iron deficiency anaemia and 28 RA patients with anaemia. Serum sTfR levels were significantly elevated above the cut-off value in patients with IDA and those in the iron depleted RA subgroup (ferritin < 60 microg/L) compared with those in the control and iron repleted RA subgroup (ferritin > 60 microg/L). The same was observed for TfR-F index. However, five patients in the iron repleted RA sub group had an elevated sTfR level, of which two had increased TfR-F index. Serum sTfR correlated well with the markers of anaemia and not with ESR. Ferritin had no correlation with markers of anaemia but correlated well with ESR. Measurement of sTfR and TfR-F index are good indicators of iron deficiency in RA patients with anaemia. To be cost effective, sTfR can be estimated in RA patients with anaemia when the ferritin level is more than 60 microg/L.

  19. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Mizumoto, Chisaki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L) and heavy (H) subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body’s iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR)1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin. PMID:26441243

  20. Pre-transplant assessment of CMV-specific immune response by Elispot assay in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Rittà, Massimo; Costa, Cristina; Sidoti, Francesca; Ballocco, Cinzia; Ranghino, Andrea; Messina, Maria; Biancone, Luigi; Cavallo, Rossana

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) primary infection or re-activation in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, with patients with IgG-CMV D+/R- sero-matching at greater risk. The impact of pre-transplant CMV-specific host cellular immunity on the long-term risk of CMV replication in kidney transplants (KT) was prospectively evaluated in eighty patients by CMV-EliSpot assay. The study population included 54 male and 26 female recipients, with CMV-IgG distribution: 60 D+/R+, 11 D-/R+, 7 D+/R-, 2 D-/R-. At pre-transplantation, 49 KT (61.3%) were CMV-responders by EliSpot. At 3-month follow up, 16 (32.7%) out of 49 CMV-responders showed CMV blood infection, compared to 8 (25.8%) out of 31 non-responders. No further episode of CMV viraemia was reported in the responder group, in comparison to 15 out 31 non-responders (48.4%) showing at least one episode of CMV-DNAemia at 12-month follow-up. Baseline CMV-IgG serology showed a strong correlation with EliSpot determinations; KT recipients exhibiting at least one episode of CMV viraemia at 12-month follow-up showed lower baseline CMV-EliSpot values than those without signs of CMV replication. The study suggests that monitoring CMV-specific T-cell responses at pre-transplantation by EliSpot assay may be useful for predicting the post-transplantation risk of CMV infection and reactivation.

  1. Quantification of ferritin from staple food crops.

    PubMed

    Lukac, Rebecca J; Aluru, Maneesha R; Reddy, Manju B

    2009-03-25

    Ferritin-iron has been shown to be as bioavailable as ferrous sulfate in humans. Thus, biofortification to breed crops with high ferritin content is a promising strategy to alleviate the global iron deficiency problem. Although ferritin is present in all food crops, its concentration varies between species and varieties. Therefore, a successful ferritin biofortification strategy requires a method to rapidly measure ferritin concentrations in food crops. The objective of this study was to develop a simple and reliable ELISA using an anti-ferritin polyclonal antibody to detect ferritin in various crops. Crude seed extracts were found to have 10.2 +/- 1.0, 4.38 +/- 0.9, 1.2 +/- 0.3, 0.38 +/- 0.1, and 0.04 +/- 0.01 microg of ferritin/g of dry seed in red beans, white beans, wheat, maize, and brown rice, respectively. Although the measured absolute concentrations of ferritin values were low, the presented method is applicable for rapid screening for the relative ferritin concentrations of large numbers of seeds to identify and breed ferritin-rich crops.

  2. Ferritin Assembly in Enterocytes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Arellano, Abraham; Vásquez-Procopio, Johana; Gambis, Alexis; Blowes, Liisa M.; Steller, Hermann; Mollereau, Bertrand; Missirlis, Fanis

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are protein nanocages that accumulate inside their cavity thousands of oxidized iron atoms bound to oxygen and phosphates. Both characteristic types of eukaryotic ferritin subunits are present in secreted ferritins from insects, but here dimers between Ferritin 1 Heavy Chain Homolog (Fer1HCH) and Ferritin 2 Light Chain Homolog (Fer2LCH) are further stabilized by disulfide-bridge in the 24-subunit complex. We addressed ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo using novel transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. We concentrated on the intestine, where the ferritin induction process can be controlled experimentally by dietary iron manipulation. We showed that the expression pattern of Fer2LCH-Gal4 lines recapitulated iron-dependent endogenous expression of the ferritin subunits and used these lines to drive expression from UAS-mCherry-Fer2LCH transgenes. We found that the Gal4-mediated induction of mCherry-Fer2LCH subunits was too slow to effectively introduce them into newly formed ferritin complexes. Endogenous Fer2LCH and Fer1HCH assembled and stored excess dietary iron, instead. In contrast, when flies were genetically manipulated to co-express Fer2LCH and mCherry-Fer2LCH simultaneously, both subunits were incorporated with Fer1HCH in iron-loaded ferritin complexes. Our study provides fresh evidence that, in insects, ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo are tightly regulated. PMID:26861293

  3. Ferritin Is a Marker of Inflammation rather than Iron Deficiency in Overweight and Obese People

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wazir Muhammad; Ayub, Maimoona; Humayun, Mohammad; Haroon, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background. In clinical practice, serum ferritin is used as a screening tool to detect iron deficiency. However, its reliability in obesity has been questioned. Objectives. To investigate the role of ferritin in overweight and obese people, either as a marker of inflammation or iron deficiency. Methods. On the basis of body mass index (BMI), 150 participants were divided into three equal groups: A: BMI 18.5–25 kg/m2, B: BMI 25–30 kg/m2, and C: BMI > 30 kg/m2. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation, ferritin, C-reactive protein, and hemoglobin (Hb) were measured for each participant and analyzed through SPSS version 16. One-way ANOVA and Pearson's correlation tests were applied. Results. Ferritin was the highest in group C (M = 163.48 ± 2.23, P < 0.001) and the lowest in group A, (M = 152.78 ± 1.81, P < 0.001). Contrarily to ferritin, transferrin was the lowest in group C, (M = 30.65 ± 1.39, P < 0.001) and the highest in group A, (M = 38.66 ± 2.14, P < 0.001). Ferritin had a strong positive correlation with both BMI (r = 0.86, P < 0.001) and CRP (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) and strong negative correlation with Hb, iron, TIBC, and transferrin saturation (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Ferritin is a marker of inflammation rather than iron status in overweight and obese people. Complete iron profile including transferrin, rather than serum ferritin alone, can truly predict iron deficiency in such people. PMID:28116148

  4. Hepcidin-25, mean corpuscular volume, and ferritin as predictors of response to oral iron supplementation in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Takasawa, Kazuya; Takaeda, Chikako; Maeda, Teiryo; Ueda, Norishi

    2014-12-29

    The benefit of oral iron therapy (OIT) and factors predictive of OIT response are not established in hemodialysis (HD) patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). We examined the values of hepcidin-25, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), and ferritin as predictors of OIT response. Oral ferrous fumarate (50 mg/day, 8 weeks) was given to 51 HD patients with IDA (hemoglobin (Hb) < 12 g/dL, ferritin < 100 ng/mL) treated with an erythropoietin activator. Sixteen patients were responders (improvement of Hb (ΔHb) ≥ 2 g/dL) and 35 were non-responders (ΔHb < 2g/dL). Baseline Hb, MCV, serum hepcidin-25, ferritin, iron parameters, and C-reactive protein (CRP) before and ΔHb after OIT were compared between groups. Hepcidin-25, MCV, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were lower in the responders than in the non-responders. Hepcidin-25 positively correlated with ferritin. Hepcidin-25, MCV, and ferritin positively correlated with baseline Hb and negatively correlated with ΔHb. Despite normal CRP levels in all patients, CRP correlated positively with hepcidin-25 and ferritin. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis and receiver operating characteristics curve analysis revealed that hepcidin-25, MCV, and ferritin could predict OIT response. We conclude that hepcidin-25, MCV, and ferritin could be useful markers of iron storage status and may help predict OIT response in HD patients.

  5. A comparative study on iron sources for mitochondrial haem synthesis including ferritin and models of transit pool species.

    PubMed

    Funk, F; Lecrenier, C; Lesuisse, E; Crichton, R R; Schneider, W

    1986-06-02

    The rates of reaction of various exogenic iron(III) complexes with deuteroporphyrin IX in isolated mitochondria to form deuterohaem were measured. Ferritin was shown to supply iron readily for haem synthesis if the ferritin iron was reductively mobilised by the mitochondrial respiratory chain with succinate as substrate and FMN as mediator. In contrast, polynuclear complexes of iron(III) were able to form deuterohaem without added FMN. Rates of haem formation are about five times higher for the lowest polynuclear units than for ferritin. Sorbitol, gluconate, and bovine serum albumin were used as scavengers for polynuclear complexes with restricted size. Strong chelators of iron(II) compete favourably for deuterohaem formation, which supports the multistep mechanism for haem formation suggested by a priori arguments. Rates of deuterohaem formation were measured in homologous and heterologous systems of ferritins and mitochondria. Slightly differing rates of haem formation were shown to originate in different rates of iron mobilisation from the ferritins. The lack of species specificity in the interaction of ferritin with mitochondria also shows up in the linear dependence of ferritin binding on its bulk concentration as measured using 3H-labeled ferritin. Rates of haem formation are virtually the same in mitoplasts and mitochondria which indicates insignificant influences of the outer membrane. The hypothesis of low polynuclears as major components of the intracellular transit iron pool implies that both ferritin and transit iron pool species are largely equivalent sources of iron for mitochondrial haem synthesis.

  6. Evaluation of Usefulness of hs-CRP and Ferritin Assays in Patients with Nasal Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Partyka, Robert; Pałac, Jacek; Paluch, Zbigniew; Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Namysłowski, Grzegorz; Misiołek, Maciej; Jałowiecki, Przemysław; Kokocińska, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic nature of the nasal polyps, tendency to recurrence, and lack of satisfying treatment need the diagnostic's parameters which show early inflammatory state as ferritin and hs-CRP. The Aim of Study. Assessment of hs-CRP and ferritin blood levels in nasal polyps patients in evaluation of treatment efficacy. Methods. All 38 patients were divided into 2 groups. Group I included 19 patients with anti-inflammatory therapy 2 weeks after surgery. Group II included 19 patients without anti-inflammatory therapy 2 weeks after surgery. The levels of hs-CRP and ferritin have been assessed before and 2 and 6 weeks after surgical treatment. Results. Research showed statistically significant difference of ferritin's concentration between examined groups 6 weeks after surgery (P < 0.05) and statistically significant difference of hs-CRP concentration 2 and 6 weeks after surgery (P < 0.05). Conclusion. (1) The analysis of serum ferritin and hs-CRP concentrations can be useful in early postoperative detection of inflammatory state in patients with nasal polyps and for the effectiveness of therapy. (2) Lack of correlation between mean ferritin and hs-CRP serum levels, at each diagnostic and monitoring stage, shows that they are independent and cannot be determined interchangeably. PMID:24737923

  7. A photonic crystal biosensor assay for ferritin utilizing iron-oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Ross D; Cunningham, Brian T; Andrade, Juan E

    2014-06-15

    Iron deficiency anemia afflicts 1 in 3 individuals, mostly women and children worldwide. A novel application using iron-oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and a photonic crystal (PC) optical biosensor as an immunodiagnostic platform for detection of serum ferritin, a biomarker for iron deficiency, is presented. Human liver ferritin (450 kDa), clinical serum controls, and three commercially available ferritin ELISA tests were used to evaluate the PC biosensor assay in terms of inter- and intra-assay variability, spike-recovery (%), limit of detection (LOD), and matrix effects on binding. For the PC biosensor, signal response from label-free, sandwich with secondary antibody (pAb), and pAb functionalized with iron-oxide nanoparticles (FpAb) assays were detected using the Biomolecular Interaction Detection (BIND) system. Bland-Altman analysis was used to evaluate agreement between expected values for ferritin in control sera and each of the detection platforms. Inter- and intra-assay variability of the PC biosensor were both <10%. Percent mean recovery (±%RSD) of ferritin from two control sera samples were 94.3% (13.1%) and 96.9% (7.6%). Use of FpAb in PC biosensor resulted in two orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to label-free assay; capable of measuring serum ferritin as low as 26 ng/mL. In comparison to ELISA tests, the PC biosensor assay had the lowest bias (-1.26; 95% CI [-3.0-5.5]) and narrower limit of agreement (-11.6-9.1 ng/mL) when determining ferritin concentrations from control sera. These proof-of-concept studies support the use of IONPs to enhance detection sensitivity of PC biosensors for determination of biomarkers of nutritional status.

  8. Ferritin-stimulated lipid peroxidation, lysosomal leak, and macroautophagy promote lysosomal "metastability" in primary hepatocytes determining in vitro cell survival.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Margit A; Schürz, Melanie; Teufl, Bernhard; Uchida, Koji; Eckl, Peter M; Bresgen, Nikolaus

    2015-03-01

    Several pathologies are associated with elevated levels of serum ferritin, for which growth inhibitory properties have been reported; however, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly defined. Previously we have described cytotoxic properties of isoferritins released from primary hepatocytes in vitro, which induce apoptosis in an iron and oxidative stress-dependent mode. Here we show that this ferritin species stimulates endosome clustering and giant endosome formation in primary hepatocytes accompanied by enhanced lysosomal membrane permeability (LMP). In parallel, protein modification by lipid peroxidation-derived 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is strongly promoted by ferritin, the HNE-modified proteins (HNE-P) showing remarkable aggregation. Emphasizing the prooxidant context, GSH is rapidly depleted and the GSH/GSSG ratio is substantially declining in ferritin-treated cells. Furthermore, ferritin triggers a transient upregulation of macroautophagy which is abolished by iron chelation and apparently supports HNE-P clearance. Macroautophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine strongly amplifies ferritin cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent mode, suggesting an important role of macroautophagy on cellular responses to ferritin endocytosis. Moreover, pointing at an involvement of lysosomal proteolysis, ferritin cytotoxicity and lysosome fragility are aggravated by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, EGF which suppresses ferritin-induced cell death attenuates ferritin-mediated LMP. In conclusion, we propose that HNE-P accumulation, lysosome dysfunction, and macroautophagy stimulated by ferritin endocytosis provoke lysosomal "metastability" in primary hepatocytes which permits cell survival as long as in- and extrinsic determinants (e.g., antioxidant availability, damage repair, EGF signaling) keep the degree of lysosomal destabilization below cell death-inducing thresholds.

  9. Effects of Radiofrequency Radiation on Human Ferritin: An In Vitro Enzymun Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi-asl, Jafar; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Molood; Karbalae, Mojtaba; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin is a macromolecule and is responsible for the long term iron storage function in human serum and plasma. Recent studies have highlighted the role of cell phone exposure on central nervous system, immune function and reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the human serum ferritin level could be interfered by the exposure to the 900 MHz GSM cell phones. Fifty human serum wells from 25 normal healthy donors were labeled with ruthenium to form a sandwich complex based on an immunoassay technique. All of them were placed into two batches, and the well heads in the first batch were exposed to 900 MHz exposure emitted from a speech mode cell phone (Nokia, Model 1202, India) for 30 min. Unexposed batch was served as the control sample under identical conditions and was compared with the exposed one in quantitative determination of ferritin using the Wilcoxon test with criterion level of P = 0.050. Human serum wells in the exposed batch showed a significant decrease in serum ferritin relative to the control batch (P = 0.029). The average ± SD ferritin level in the exposed batch was 84.94 ± 1.04 μg/L while it was 87.25 ± 0.83 μg/L for the unexposed batch. Radiofrequency electromagnetic waves emitted from cell phones may lead to oxidative stress and rapid diffusion of the human ferritin level in an in vitro enzymun assay. Also, the enzyme activity can be affected. Effects of exposure from mobile phones must be considered further. PMID:23724375

  10. Effects of radiofrequency radiation on human ferritin: an in vitro enzymun assay.

    PubMed

    Fattahi-Asl, Jafar; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Molood; Karbalae, Mojtaba; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Hamid Reza

    2012-10-01

    Ferritin is a macromolecule and is responsible for the long term iron storage function in human serum and plasma. Recent studies have highlighted the role of cell phone exposure on central nervous system, immune function and reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the human serum ferritin level could be interfered by the exposure to the 900 MHz GSM cell phones. Fifty human serum wells from 25 normal healthy donors were labeled with ruthenium to form a sandwich complex based on an immunoassay technique. All of them were placed into two batches, and the well heads in the first batch were exposed to 900 MHz exposure emitted from a speech mode cell phone (Nokia, Model 1202, India) for 30 min. Unexposed batch was served as the control sample under identical conditions and was compared with the exposed one in quantitative determination of ferritin using the Wilcoxon test with criterion level of P = 0.050. Human serum wells in the exposed batch showed a significant decrease in serum ferritin relative to the control batch (P = 0.029). The average ± SD ferritin level in the exposed batch was 84.94 ± 1.04 μg/L while it was 87.25 ± 0.83 μg/L for the unexposed batch. Radiofrequency electromagnetic waves emitted from cell phones may lead to oxidative stress and rapid diffusion of the human ferritin level in an in vitro enzymun assay. Also, the enzyme activity can be affected. Effects of exposure from mobile phones must be considered further.

  11. Characterization of mitochondrial ferritin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Missirlis, Fanis; Holmberg, Sara; Georgieva, Teodora; Dunkov, Boris C.; Rouault, Tracey A.; Law, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial function depends on iron-containing enzymes and proteins, whose maturation requires available iron for biosynthesis of iron–sulfur clusters and heme. Little is known about how mitochondrial iron homeostasis is maintained, although the recent discovery of a mitochondrial ferritin in mammals and plants has uncovered a potential key player in the process. Here, we show that Drosophila melanogaster expresses mitochondrial ferritin from an intron-containing gene. It has high similarity to the mouse and human mitochondrial ferritin sequences and, as in mammals, is expressed mainly in testis. This ferritin contains a putative mitochondrial targeting sequence and an epitope-tagged version localizes to mitochondria in transfected cells. Overexpression of mitochondrial ferritin fails to alter both total-body iron levels and iron that is bound to secretory ferritins. However, the viability of iron-deficient flies is compromised by overexpression of mitochondrial ferritin, suggesting that it may sequester iron at the expense of other important cellular functions. The conservation of mitochondrial ferritin in an insect species underscores the importance of this iron-storage molecule. PMID:16571656

  12. The role of vesicles in the transport of ferritin through frog endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Clough, G; Michel, C C

    1981-01-01

    1. The transport of ferritin molecules by endothelial cell vesicles has been quantitatively investigated by electron microscopy. Single mesenteric capillaries of pithed frogs were perfused with solutions containing 6.7 g ferritin 100 ml.-1 for known periods before fixation in situ with osmium tetroxide. 2. Two series of experiments were carried out: in the first series the perfusate contained bovine serum albumin (1.0 g 100 ml.-1); in the second series the perfusate contained no protein other than the ferritin. To assess the molecular radius of ferritin in solution, the free diffusion coefficient of ferritin was measured in the presence and absence of albumin. 3. The free diffusion coefficient of ferritin in saline solution (110 m-mole 1.-1) was found to be 0.35 X 10(-6) cm2 sec-1 at 21 degrees C and was not affected by the presence of bovine serum albumin. This indicates that there is no significant binding of albumin to ferritin in solution and yields a value for the Stokes-Einstein radius of ferritin of 6.1 nm. 4. In all perfusion experiments the percentage of luminal vesicles containing ferritin exceeded the percentage of labelled cytoplasmic vesicles, which in turn exceeded the percentage of labelled abluminal vesicles. 5. Labelling of all vesicle populations was seen after perfusions lasting less than 1 sec. At this time luminal vesicles were more heavily labelled in the absence of albumin. 6. The labelling of luminal vesicles increased with lengthening perfusion times up to 30-40 sec, after which steady levels of labelling were achieved. The rate of rise in luminal labelling and the steady-state levels reached were both greater in the absence of albumin. By contrast cytoplasmic labelling increased above its initial value only after perfusions of longer than 10 sec. 7. In the steady state, labelled cytoplasmic vesicles contained, on average, fewer ferritin molecules than labelled luminal vesicles. This finding is inconsistent with translocation of labelled

  13. Ferritin and iron status in pregnancy: Relationship to fetal alcohol syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Baumstark, J.S.; Hill, W.C.; Chun, M.A.; Hunter, W.J. )

    1989-02-09

    Ferritin is a water soluble macromolecule of M{sub r} = 450,000 within whose inner core is stored approximately 4,500 atoms of iron (as ferric oxyhydroxide). The protein is the chief source of stored iron and its determination in serum is an excellent indicator of iron status. This laboratory is engaged in a study of iron metabolism and its relationship to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Ferritin and transferrin levels have been determined ion serial maternal sera, as well as cord serum. Patients were identified as high risk for the development of FAS by questionnaire. Transferrin levels for both maternal and cord serum were within normal literature values and increased, in maternal serum, at a rate of 5 mg/dl per week of gestation. Ferritin levels decreased at a rate of 1 ng/ml per gestational week. At term, the ferritin level for maternal serum in ten patients was 17 ng/ml {plus minus} 12 SD with a range of 2-35 ng/ml. The value for ferritin in cord serum was 78 {plus minus} 36 SD which is significantly lower than the normal mean value of 101 {plus minus} 52 ng/ml. Equating 101 ng/ml with 100% efficiency in iron metabolism it can be calculated that the high risk-for-FAS fetus is 23% less efficient in general iron metabolism than is the fetus of the normal patient. A decrease of 23% efficiency in iron metabolism could be associated with intrauterine growth retardation and/or the genesis of birth defects.

  14. Ferritins and iron storage in plants.

    PubMed

    Briat, Jean-François; Duc, Céline; Ravet, Karl; Gaymard, Frédéric

    2010-08-01

    Iron is essential for both plant productivity and nutritional quality. Improving plant iron content was attempted through genetic engineering of plants overexpressing ferritins. However, both the roles of these proteins in the plant physiology, and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of their expression are largely unknown. Although the structure of ferritins is highly conserved between plants and animals, their cellular localization differ. Furthermore, regulation of ferritin gene expression in response to iron excess occurs at the transcriptional level in plants, in contrast to animals which regulate ferritin expression at the translational level. In this review, our knowledge of the specific features of plant ferritins is presented, at the level of their (i) structure/function relationships, (ii) cellular localization, and (iii) synthesis regulation during development and in response to various environmental cues. A special emphasis is given to their function in plant physiology, in particular concerning their respective roles in iron storage and in protection against oxidative stress. Indeed, the use of reverse genetics in Arabidopsis recently enabled to produce various knock-out ferritin mutants, revealing strong links between these proteins and protection against oxidative stress. In contrast, their putative iron storage function to furnish iron during various development processes is unlikely to be essential. Ferritins, by buffering iron, exert a fine tuning of the quantity of metal required for metabolic purposes, and help plants to cope with adverse situations, the deleterious effects of which would be amplified if no system had evolved to take care of free reactive iron.

  15. GATED PORES IN THE FERRITIN PROTEIN NANOCAGE

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Elizabeth C.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis and pictogram: Gated pores in the ferritin family of protein nanocages, illustrated in the pictogram, control transfer of ferrous iron into and out of the cages by regulating contact between hydrated ferric oxide mineral inside the protein cage, and reductants such as FMNH2 on the outside. The structural and functional homology between the gated ion channel proteins in inaccessible membranes and gated ferritin pores in the stable, water soluble nanoprotein, make studies of ferritin pores models for gated pores in many ion channel proteins. Properties of ferritin gated pores, which control rates of FMNH2 reduction of ferric iron in hydrated oxide minerals inside the protein nanocage, are discussed in terms of the conserved pore gate residues (arginine 72-apspartate 122 and leucine 110-leucine 134), of pore sensitivity to heat at temperatures 30 °C below that of the nanocage itself, and of pore sensitivity to physiological changes in urea (1–10 mM). Conditions which alter ferritin pore structure/function in solution, coupled with the high evolutionary conservation of the pore gates, suggest the presence of molecular regulators in vivo that recognize the pore gates and hold them either closed or open, depending on biological iron need. The apparent homology between ferrous ion transport through gated pores in the ferritin nanocage and ion transport through gated pores in ion channel proteins embedded in cell membranes, make studies of water soluble ferritin and the pore gating folding/unfolding a useful model for other gated pores. PMID:19262678

  16. Structure of Human Ferritin L Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,Z.; Li, C.; Ellenburg, M.; Soistman, E.; Ruble, J.; Wright, B.; Ho, J.; Carter, D.

    2006-01-01

    Ferritin is the major iron-storage protein present in all cells. It generally contains 24 subunits, with different ratios of heavy chain (H) to light chain (L), in the shape of a hollow sphere hosting up to 4500 ferric Fe atoms inside. H-rich ferritins catalyze the oxidation of iron(II), while L-rich ferritins promote the nucleation and storage of iron(III). Several X-ray structures have been determined, including those of L-chain ferritins from horse spleen (HoSF), recombinant L-chain ferritins from horse (HoLF), mouse (MoLF) and bullfrog (BfLF) as well as recombinant human H-chain ferritin (HuHF). Here, structures have been determined of two crystal forms of recombinant human L-chain ferritin (HuLF) obtained from native and perdeuterated proteins. The structures show a cluster of acidic residues at the ferrihydrite nucleation site and at the iron channel along the threefold axis. An ordered Cd{sup 2+} structure is observed within the iron channel, offering further insight into the route and mechanism of iron transport into the capsid. The loop between helices D and E, which is disordered in many other L-chain structures, is clearly visible in these two structures. The crystals generated from perdeuterated HuLF will be used for neutron diffraction studies.

  17. Magnetic properties of artificially synthesized ferritins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. J.; Lee, H. I.; Cho, S.-B.; Yoon, S.; Suh, B. J.; Jang, Z. H.; St. Pierre, T. G.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, K.-S.

    2005-05-01

    Human ferritin homopolymers with H or L subunits (rHF and rLF) were genetically engineered in E coli. Apoferritins were then reconstituted with 2000 Fe atoms. A big difference was observed in the rates of iron uptake, whereas the mean core size was similar in rHF and rLF. Magnetization of the recombinant human ferritins were measured as functions of temperature and field. The blocking temperature TB(H) at low fields is considerably higher in rLF than in rHF. From the fit of M(H ) data to a modified Langevin function: M(H )=M0L(μpH/kBT)+χaH, the effective magnetic moment μp is found to be much larger in rLF than in rHF. Experimental data demonstrate that the magnetic properties, in particular, the uncompensated spins of ferritin core are related to the biomineralization process in ferritins.

  18. Autophagy promotes ferroptosis by degradation of ferritin.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wen; Xie, Yangchun; Song, Xinxin; Sun, Xiaofang; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2016-08-02

    Macroautophagy/autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved degradation pathway that maintains homeostasis. Ferroptosis, a novel form of regulated cell death, is characterized by a production of reactive oxygen species from accumulated iron and lipid peroxidation. However, the relationship between autophagy and ferroptosis at the genetic level remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that autophagy contributes to ferroptosis by degradation of ferritin in fibroblasts and cancer cells. Knockout or knockdown of Atg5 (autophagy-related 5) and Atg7 limited erastin-induced ferroptosis with decreased intracellular ferrous iron levels, and lipid peroxidation. Remarkably, NCOA4 (nuclear receptor coactivator 4) was a selective cargo receptor for the selective autophagic turnover of ferritin (namely ferritinophagy) in ferroptosis. Consistently, genetic inhibition of NCOA4 inhibited ferritin degradation and suppressed ferroptosis. In contrast, overexpression of NCOA4 increased ferritin degradation and promoted ferroptosis. These findings provide novel insight into the interplay between autophagy and regulated cell death.

  19. Intestinal ferritin H is required for an accurate control of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Vanoaica, Liviu; Darshan, Deepak; Richman, Larry; Schümann, Klaus; Kühn, Lukas C

    2010-09-08

    To maintain appropriate body iron levels, iron absorption by the proximal duodenum is thought to be controlled by hepcidin, a polypeptide secreted by hepatocytes in response to high serum iron. Hepcidin limits basolateral iron efflux from the duodenal epithelium by binding and downregulating the intestinal iron exporter ferroportin. Here, we found that mice with an intestinal ferritin H gene deletion show increased body iron stores and transferrin saturation. As expected for iron-loaded animals, the ferritin H-deleted mice showed induced liver hepcidin mRNA levels and reduced duodenal expression of DMT1 and DcytB mRNA. In spite of these feedback controls, intestinal ferroportin protein and (59)Fe absorption were increased more than 2-fold in the deleted mice. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin-mediated regulation alone is insufficient to restrict iron absorption and that intestinal ferritin H is also required to limit iron efflux from intestinal cells.

  20. Vitamin B12, folic acid, ferritin and haematological variables among Thai construction site workers in urban Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Tungtrongchitr, R; Pongpaew, P; Phonrat, B; Chanjanakitskul, S; Paksanont, S; Migasena, P; Schelp, F P

    1995-01-01

    Serum vitamin B12, folic acid, ferritin and haematological variables were investigated in eighty-seven male and nineteen female construction site workers in Bangkok. Haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit and MCHC were found to be higher in male than in female workers. Serum ferritin was slightly higher in males than in females. Serum B12 was found to be higher in male than in female workers and serum folic acid level were significantly higher in female than in male workers. Vitamin B12 deficiency was found in 2.3 per cent and folic acid deficiency in 6.9 per cent of the male workers. Serum vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were normal for female workers. The adequate serum levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid might be the result of the habit of the workers to consume tonic drinks which contain glucose, caffeine, and vitamins especially vitamins B6, and B12.

  1. Relationship between iron and phosphate in mammalian ferritins.

    PubMed

    de Silva, D; Guo, J H; Aust, S D

    1993-06-01

    The core of mammalian ferritin is known to contain varying amounts of phosphate as well as iron. This study examined the variations in phosphate found in ferritins from horse spleen, rat liver, and bovine liver. The amount of phosphate varied inversely with the amount of iron present in the core. Theoretical extrapolation showed that in the absence of phosphate approximately 4400 atoms of iron could be incorporated into ferritin. Reconstitution of ferritin with iron and ceruloplasmin followed by prolonged incubation with phosphate produced cores similar to native ferritin in terms of iron to phosphate ratios and rates of iron release. However, ferritin reconstituted in the presence of phosphate differed markedly from native ferritins. The data suggest that phosphate is an integral part of mammalian ferritin cores and influences both core formation and the ease by which iron is released from ferritin.

  2. Bioavailability of iron from plant and animal ferritins.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chenyan; Zhao, Guanghua; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2015-05-01

    Iron deficiency is a major public health problem in the world. Ferritin is being explored as a novel and natural strategy for iron supplementation. The objective of this study was to evaluate iron bioavailability from ferritin isolated from plant and animal sources. The stability of plant ferritin and animal ferritin was studied by in vitro and in vivo digestion to determine whether these ferritins can pass through the gastrointestinal tract in intact form. Results from sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot indicate that both plant ferritin and animal ferritin can resist digestion (both under acidic and moderately acidic conditions). Furthermore, ferritin was labeled with (59)Fe, and bioavailability of iron from ferritin was assessed by uptake into Caco-2 cells. Our results indicate that iron is taken up from the ferritins and that iron bioavailability from soybean ferritin (rH-1:rH-2=1:1) is the highest. These results may be explained by the binding of ferritin to Caco-2 cells, which can be attributed to the interaction between ferritin and its putative receptor(s) at the surface of Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, ferritin from plant and animal sources may be developed as an iron source.

  3. Ferritin couples iron and fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bu, Weiming; Liu, Renyu; Cheung-Lau, Jasmina C; Dmochowski, Ivan J; Loll, Patrick J; Eckenhoff, Roderic G

    2012-06-01

    A physiological relationship between iron, oxidative injury, and fatty acid metabolism exists, but transduction mechanisms are unclear. We propose that the iron storage protein ferritin contains fatty acid binding sites whose occupancy modulates iron uptake and release. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we found that arachidonic acid binds ferritin specifically and with 60 μM affinity. Arachidonate binding by ferritin enhanced iron mineralization, decreased iron release, and protected the fatty acid from oxidation. Cocrystals of arachidonic acid and horse spleen apoferritin diffracted to 2.18 Å and revealed specific binding to the 2-fold intersubunit pocket. This pocket shields most of the fatty acid and its double bonds from solvent but allows the arachidonate tail to project well into the ferrihydrite mineralization site on the ferritin L-subunit, a structural feature that we implicate in the effects on mineralization by demonstrating that the much shorter saturated fatty acid, caprylate, has no significant effects on mineralization. These combined effects of arachidonate binding by ferritin are expected to lower both intracellular free iron and free arachidonate, thereby providing a previously unrecognized mechanism for limiting lipid peroxidation, free radical damage, and proinflammatory cascades during times of cellular stress.

  4. Novel mutations in the ferritin-L iron-responsive element that only mildly impair IRP binding cause hereditary hyperferritinaemia cataract syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary Hyperferritinaemia Cataract Syndrome (HHCS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by increased serum ferritin levels and early onset of bilateral cataract. The disease is caused by mutations in the Iron-Responsive Element (IRE) located in the 5′ untranslated region of L-Ferritin (FTL) mRNA, which post-transcriptionally regulates ferritin expression. Methods We describe two families presenting high serum ferritin levels and juvenile cataract with novel mutations in the L-ferritin IRE. The mutations were further characterized by in vitro functional studies. Results We have identified two novel mutations in the IRE of L-Ferritin causing HHCS: the Badalona +36C > U and the Heidelberg +52 G > C mutation. Both mutations conferred reduced binding affinity on recombinant Iron Regulatory Proteins (IPRs) in EMSA experiments. Interestingly, the Badalona +36C > U mutation was found not only in heterozygosity, as expected for an autosomal dominant disease, but also in the homozygous state in some affected subjects. Additionally we report an update of all mutations identified so far to cause HHCS. Conclusions The Badalona +36C > U and Heidelberg +52 G > C mutations within the L-ferritin IRE only mildly alter the binding capacity of the Iron Regulatory Proteins but are still causative for the disease. PMID:23421845

  5. C29G in the iron-responsive element of L-ferritin: a new mutation associated with hyperferritinemia-cataract.

    PubMed

    Bosio, Sandra; Campanella, Alessandro; Gramaglia, Enrico; Porporato, Paolo; Longo, Filomena; Cremonesi, Laura; Levi, Sonia; Camaschella, Clara

    2004-01-01

    Hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome (HHCS) is a dominant disorder characterized by high serum ferritin and early onset of bilateral cataract. The disorder is caused by mutations in the iron-responsive element (IRE) of l-ferritin, which disrupt the postranscriptional control of l-ferritin synthesis. Here, we report a new (C>G) mutation which affects base 29 in the loop (c.-169C>G), previously unrecognized as essential for the stem loop stability. The mutation was identified in two members of an Italian family. Computer modeling and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirm a decreased affinity of the C29G IRE for IRPs control proteins.

  6. Ferritin protein imaging and detection by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Zheng, Bin; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2010-03-14

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to image and detect ferritin proteins and the strength of the magnetic signal is discussed, revealing a large workable lift height between the magnetic tip and the ferritin sample.

  7. Solving Biology's Iron Chemistry Problem with Ferritin Protein Nanocages.

    PubMed

    Theil, Elizabeth C; Tosha, Takehiko; Behera, Rabindra K

    2016-05-17

    Ferritins reversibly synthesize iron-oxy(ferrihydrite) biominerals inside large, hollow protein nanocages (10-12 nm, ∼480 000 g/mol); the iron biominerals are metabolic iron concentrates for iron protein biosyntheses. Protein cages of 12- or 24-folded ferritin subunits (4-α-helix polypeptide bundles) self-assemble, experimentally. Ferritin biomineral structures differ among animals and plants or bacteria. The basic ferritin mineral structure is ferrihydrite (Fe2O3·H2O) with either low phosphate in the highly ordered animal ferritin biominerals, Fe/PO4 ∼ 8:1, or Fe/PO4 ∼ 1:1 in the more amorphous ferritin biominerals of plants and bacteria. While different ferritin environments, plant bacterial-like plastid organelles and animal cytoplasm, might explain ferritin biomineral differences, investigation is required. Currently, the physiological significance of plant-specific and animal-specific ferritin iron minerals is unknown. The iron content of ferritin in living tissues ranges from zero in "apoferritin" to as high as ∼4500 iron atoms. Ferritin biomineralization begins with the reaction of Fe(2+) with O2 at ferritin enzyme (Fe(2+)/O oxidoreductase) sites. The product of ferritin enzyme activity, diferric oxy complexes, is also the precursor of ferritin biomineral. Concentrations of Fe(3+) equivalent to 2.0 × 10(-1) M are maintained in ferritin solutions, contrasting with the Fe(3+) Ks ∼ 10(-18) M. Iron ions move into, through, and out of ferritin protein cages in structural subdomains containing conserved amino acids. Cage subdomains include (1) ion channels for Fe(2+) entry/exit, (2) enzyme (oxidoreductase) site for coupling Fe(2+) and O yielding diferric oxy biomineral precursors, and (3) ferric oxy nucleation channels, where diferric oxy products from up to three enzyme sites interact while moving toward the central, biomineral growth cavity (12 nm diameter) where ferric oxy species, now 48-mers, grow in ferric oxy biomineral. High ferritin protein

  8. Structural differences in ferritins from normal and malignant rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Moor, J R; Munro, H N; Morris, H P

    1975-04-29

    Ferritins purified from several normal and malignant rat tissues were examined for amino acid composition, content of tryptic peptides, available sulfhydryl groups and subunit sizes and proportion. Ferritin extracted from adult kidney, neonatal liver and hepatic and renal tumors differed from the ferritin of adult rat liver in migration on electrophoretic gels and in antibody affinity, but did not differ among themselves. Nevertheless, they showed distinctive differences in amino acid composition and tryptic peptide content. All of them and also adult liver ferritin contained two major species of subunits differing in molecular weight. The proportions of subunits, and the available sulfhydryl groups of the intact ferritin molecules, differed among these tissue ferritins. On the basis of amino acid and peptide content, the ferritins of hepatomas and the renal tumor analyzed showec the greatest similarity but not identity. The ferritin of neonatal liver was next most similar. Kidney ferritin differed considerably in composition from tumor and neonatal ferritins, while adult liver ferritin was the most extremely divergent of the series examined. A similar progressive difference was found on examining the proportions of subunits and sulfhydryl groups in these ferritins. However, changes in subunit proportion cannot explain the amino acid and peptide compositional changes.

  9. Magic ferritin: A novel chemotherapeutic encapsulation bullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Ece; Akif Kilic, Mehmet

    2005-05-01

    The dissociation of apoferritin into subunits at pH 2 followed by its reformation at pH 7.4 in the presence of doxorubicin-HCl gives rise to a solution containing five doxorubicin-HCl molecules trapped within the apoferritin. This is the first report showing that ferritin can encapsulate an anti-cancer drug into its cavity.

  10. Ferric gluconate reduces epoetin requirements in hemodialysis patients with elevated ferritin.

    PubMed

    Kapoian, Toros; O'Mara, Neeta B; Singh, Ajay K; Moran, John; Rizkala, Adel R; Geronemus, Robert; Kopelman, Robert C; Dahl, Naomi V; Coyne, Daniel W

    2008-02-01

    The Dialysis Patients Response to IV Iron with Elevated Ferritin (DRIVE) study demonstrated the efficacy of intravenous ferric gluconate to improve hemoglobin levels in anemic hemodialysis patients who were receiving adequate epoetin doses and who had ferritin levels between 500 and 1200 ng/ml and transferrin saturation (TSAT) < or = 25%. The DRIVE-II study reported here was a 6-wk observational extension designed to investigate how ferric gluconate impacted epoetin dosage after DRIVE. During DRIVE-II, treating nephrologists and anemia managers adjusted doses of epoetin and intravenous iron as clinically indicated. By the end of observation, patients in the ferric gluconate group required significantly less epoetin than their DRIVE dose (mean change of -7527 +/- 18,021 IU/wk, P = 0.003), whereas the epoetin dose essentially did not change for patients in the control group (mean change of 649 +/- 19,987 IU/wk, P = 0.809). Mean hemoglobin, TSAT, and serum ferritin levels remained higher in the ferric gluconate group than in the control group (P = 0.062, P < 0.001, and P = 0.014, respectively). Over the entire 12-wk study period (DRIVE plus DRIVE-II), the control group experienced significantly more serious adverse events than the ferric gluconate group (incidence rate ratio = 1.73, P = 0.041). In conclusion, ferric gluconate maintains hemoglobin and allows lower epoetin doses in anemic hemodialysis patients with low TSAT and ferritin levels up to 1200 ng/ml.

  11. Children with autism: effect of iron supplementation on sleep and ferritin.

    PubMed

    Dosman, Cara F; Brian, Jessica A; Drmic, Irene E; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Harford, Mary M; Smith, Ryan W; Sharieff, Waseem; Zlotkin, Stanley H; Moldofsky, Harvey; Roberts, S Wendy

    2007-03-01

    To determine if there is a relationship between low serum ferritin and sleep disturbance in children with autism spectrum disorder, an 8-week open-label treatment trial with oral iron supplementation was conducted as a pilot study. At baseline and posttreatment visits, parents completed a Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children and a Food Record. Blood samples were obtained. Thirty-three children completed the study. Seventy-seven percent had restless sleep at baseline, which improved significantly with iron therapy, suggesting a relationship between sleep disturbance and iron deficiency in children with autism spectrum disorder. Sixty-nine percent of preschoolers and 35% of school-aged children had insufficient dietary iron intake. Mean ferritin increased significantly (16 microg/L to 29 microg/L), as did mean corpuscular volume and hemoglobin, suggesting that low ferritin in this patient group resulted from insufficient iron intake. Similar prevalence of low ferritin at school age as preschool age indicates that children with autism spectrum disorder require ongoing screening for iron deficiency.

  12. Axillary versus peripheral blood levels of sialic acid, ferritin, and CEA in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Monti, M; Catania, S; Locatelli, E; Gandini, R; Reggiani, A; Cunietti, E

    1990-12-01

    Serum levels of total sialic acid, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine phosphokinase were measured both in tumor drainage blood (axillary vein) and in peripheral blood obtained from 121 breast cancer patients during surgery. No significant differences between mean values in peripheral and tumor draining blood, between cancer patients and healthy controls, or between patients with or without axillary lymph node metastases were found for any of the markers. Both ferritin and CEA levels were higher in axillary and peripheral blood from patients with central breast cancer versus other sites but the difference was significant only for CEA (p less than 0.05). CEA levels were significantly higher (p less than 0.01) in patients with greater than 2 cm diameter carcinomas versus T1 stage patients in axillary but not in peripheral blood. When the cephalic vein was clamped before the axillary sample was taken, ferritin showed a significant increase (p less than 0.05). We conclude that measurement of sialic acid, CEA, and ferritin in axillary venous blood in breast cancer patients is not of clinical benefit, although further data are needed to clarify whether other advantages can be derived.

  13. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Tanya M; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-21

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  14. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Tanya M.; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-01

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  15. Ferritins as Nanoplatforms for Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Zipeng; Tang, Wei; Todd, Trever; Xie, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Due to unique architecture and surface properties, ferritin has emerged as an important class of biomaterial. Many studies suggest that ferritin and its derivatives hold great potential in a wide range of bio-applications. Areas covered In this review, we summarize recent progress on employing ferritins as a platform to construct functional nanoparticles for applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, cell tracking, and drug delivery. Expert opinion As a natural polymer, ferritins afford advantages such as high biocompatibility, good biodegradability, and a relatively long plasma half-life. These attributes put ferritins ahead of conventional materials in clinical translation for imaging and drug delivery purposes. PMID:25070839

  16. Utility of Access Soluble Transferrin Receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/log Ferritin Index in Diagnosing Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Min Jeong; Suh, In Bum; Shin, Kyu Sung

    2015-01-01

    The Access(®) soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is considered the world's first automated chemiluminescence immunoassay. In this study, the diagnostic utility of this and other tests for serum iron were evaluated by studying their interrelationships with inflammation. A total of 367 patients with anemia (iron deficiency anemia [IDA], 157; anemia of chronic disease [ACD], 210) and 80 normal controls were subjected to a battery of diagnostic tests, including complete blood cell count, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, sTfR, and hepcidin. The accuracy of test parameters was determined by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Patients falling within the ferritin grey zone (10-100 ng/ml) were evaluated separately, given that such individuals are typically difficult to detect and manage in actual clinical practice. CRP was used to assess the correlation between the aforementioned markers of iron and inflammation. The single most accurate diagnostic test used to differentiate IDA from ACD was serum ferritin (AUC 0.989). However, sTfR assay outperformed other tests in the ferritin grey zone (AUC 0.931), and the sTfR/log ferritin index was the most reliable parameter in both scenarios (AUC 0.994 and 0.962, respectively). Ferritin, TIBC, and hepcidin showed the highest correlation with CRP, whereas sTfR displayed the lowest. The Access sTfR and sTfR/log ferritin index enabled highly accurate diagnosis of IDA in the ferritin grey zone. This is an easy-to-use automated chemiluminescence immunoassay, amenable to routine use in hospitals.

  17. Pre-transplant low level HLA antibody shows a composite poor outcome in long-term outcome of renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Li, Dadong; Alberghini, Tod V; Rewinski, Michael; Guo, Ning; Bow, Laurine M

    2015-03-01

    To determine the significance of low-level DSA (donor specific antibody) in patients transplanted with negative cytotoxicity AHG (antihuman immunoglobulin) crossmatch, data from 279 patients who received a kidney transplant between July 1999 and March 2006 were collected. All kidney recipients received ABO-compatible donors. A poor outcome was defined as any one of the following: death, Cr>2.0 mmol/L, occurrence of a rejection episode. Luminex Screening and Single Antigen assays from Tepnel Life Codes were used to detect human leukocyte antigen antibodies on pre-transplant sera retrospectively. Twenty-four out of 279 recipients demonstrated the presence of solid-phase DSA (MFI>1000) present pre-transplant. In DSA+ group, the accumulated good versus poor outcome rate was 0.30 versus 0.70, respectively. These rates were 0.49 and 0.51, respectively, in the DSA- group. The difference in composite poor outcome between DSA+ versus DSA- group was significant (p=0.030). The DSA- group had no difference in patient survival as compared to the DSA+ group (p=0.061). There is no statistically significant difference for either mortality or outcome results between high MFI (>2000) and low MFI (≤2000) groups. Our data suggest that solid-phase antibodies which are not strong enough to elicit a positive T-AHG crossmatch may influence long-term graft outcome.

  18. THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SERUM FERRITIN AND URIC ACID IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVE: Urate forms a coordination complex with Fe(3+) which does not support electron transport. The only enzymatic source of urate is xanthine oxidoreductase. If a major purpose of xanthine oxidoreductase is the production of urate to function as an iron chelator and antioxi...

  19. Ferritin levels and risk of metabolic syndrome: meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated ferritin levels have been associated with single cardiovascular risk factors but the relationship to the presence of metabolic syndrome is inconclusive. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis of published observational studies was to estimate the association between serum ferritin levels and metabolic syndrome in adults. Methods The Pubmed, SCOPUS and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for epidemiological studies that assessed the association between ferritin levels and metabolic syndrome and were published before September 2013. There were no language restrictions. Two investigators independently selected eligible studies. Measures of association were pooled by using an inverse-variance weighted random-effects model. The heterogeneity among studies was examined using the I2 index. Publication bias was evaluated using the funnel plot. Results Twelve cross-sectional, one case–control and two prospective studies met our inclusion criteria including data from a total of 56,053 participants. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the metabolic syndrome comparing the highest and lowest category of ferritin levels was 1.73 (95% CI: 1.54, 1.95; I2 = 75,4%). Subgroup analyses indicate that pooled OR was 1.92 (95% CI: 1.61, 2.30; I2 = 78%) for studies adjusting for C-reactive protein (CRP), and 1.52 (95% CI:1. 36, 1.69; I2 = 41%) for studies that did not adjust for CRP (P = 0.044). This finding was remarkably robust in the sensitivity analysis. We did not find publication bias. Conclusions The meta-analysis suggests that increased ferritin levels are independently and positively associated with the presence of the metabolic syndrome with an odds ratio higher than 1.73. PMID:24884526

  20. Ferritin Level Is Positively Associated with Chronic Kidney Disease in Korean Men, Based on the 2010–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee-Taik; Linton, John A.; Kwon, Soon Kil; Park, Byoung-Jin; Lee, Jong Hun

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with higher risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Serum ferritin concentrations correlate with total iron levels and systemic inflammation. (2) Methods: This study was cross-sectionally designed, based on the 2010–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). According to ferritin values, 13,462 participants (6082 men and 7380 women) were categorized into the normal- and high-ferritin groups (cut-off points: 200 ng/mL in men, 150 ng/mL in women). (3) Results: The mean ages of men and women were 44.5 and 48.4 years, respectively. The percentage of participants categorized into the high-ferritin group was 15.1% for men and 3.6% for women. The estimated glomerular filtration rate levels in the normal- and high-ferritin groups were 93.2 and 93.8 mL/min/1.73 m2 for men and 97.1 and 87.7 mL/min/1.73 m2 for women, respectively. The prevalence of CKD in the normal- and high-ferritin groups was 2.6% and 3.9% for men and 3.2% and 8.1% for women, respectively. Compared with the normal-ferritin group, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for CKD of the high-ferritin group were 1.573 (1.014–2.441) in men and 1.061 (0.381–2.955) in women, after adjustments for age and other covariates. (4) Conclusions: High ferritin levels were associated with a higher risk of CKD in men but not in women. PMID:27801876

  1. Independent Pre-Transplant Recipient Cancer Risk Factors after Kidney Transplantation and the Utility of G-Chart Analysis for Clinical Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Kurok, Marlene; Goldis, Alon; Dreier, Maren; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Gwinner, Wilfried; Barthold, Marc; Liebeneiner, Jan; Winny, Markus; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Kleine, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to identify independent pre-transplant cancer risk factors after kidney transplantation and to assess the utility of G-chart analysis for clinical process control. This may contribute to the improvement of cancer surveillance processes in individual transplant centers. Patients and Methods 1655 patients after kidney transplantation at our institution with a total of 9,425 person-years of follow-up were compared retrospectively to the general German population using site-specific standardized-incidence-ratios (SIRs) of observed malignancies. Risk-adjusted multivariable Cox regression was used to identify independent pre-transplant cancer risk factors. G-chart analysis was applied to determine relevant differences in the frequency of cancer occurrences. Results Cancer incidence rates were almost three times higher as compared to the matched general population (SIR = 2.75; 95%-CI: 2.33–3.21). Significantly increased SIRs were observed for renal cell carcinoma (SIR = 22.46), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (SIR = 8.36), prostate cancer (SIR = 2.22), bladder cancer (SIR = 3.24), thyroid cancer (SIR = 10.13) and melanoma (SIR = 3.08). Independent pre-transplant risk factors for cancer-free survival were age <52.3 years (p = 0.007, Hazard ratio (HR): 0.82), age >62.6 years (p = 0.001, HR: 1.29), polycystic kidney disease other than autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) (p = 0.001, HR: 0.68), high body mass index in kg/m2 (p<0.001, HR: 1.04), ADPKD (p = 0.008, HR: 1.26) and diabetic nephropathy (p = 0.004, HR = 1.51). G-chart analysis identified relevant changes in the detection rates of cancer during aftercare with no significant relation to identified risk factors for cancer-free survival (p<0.05). Conclusions Risk-adapted cancer surveillance combined with prospective G-chart analysis likely improves cancer surveillance schemes by adapting processes to identified risk factors and by using G-chart alarm

  2. Value of ascitic fluid ferritin in the differential diagnosis of malignant ascites.

    PubMed

    Kountouras, J; Boura, P; Tsapas, G; Charisis, K; Magoula, I; Tsakiri, I

    1993-01-01

    The ascitic fluid ferritin concentrations were compared with serum-ascites albumin gradient (SAAG), in their diagnostic ability for detection of malignancy in 60 patients with ascites: 29 with chronic liver disease alone (CLD) and 31 patients with various neoplasms. Of the patients with malignancy, 12 had liver metastases, 9 had no evidence of liver involvement, and 10 had hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with or without coexisting liver cirrhosis. Analysis of our data confirms that the ascitic ferritin is a more accurate indicator of malignant ascites (MA) than the SAAG. This new parameter is particularly helpful in distinguishing MA associated with HCC and/or metastatic liver disease from nonmalignant ascites due to CLD alone.

  3. Other aspects of bariatric surgery: liver steatosis, ferritin and cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pontiroli, A E; Benetti, A; Folini, L; Merlotti, C; Frigè, F

    2013-03-01

    Bariatric surgery developed in the late 1970 to treat severe hyperlipidemias in overweight individuals, not necessarily obese. Several techniques have been developed, and the concept has come first of a surgery for morbid obesity, then of a cure for diabetes in morbid obesity. There are other aspects of bariatric surgery that deserve attention, beyond BMI and diabetes, such as hypertension, poor life expectancy, increased prevalence of cancer, congestive heart failure, social inadequacy. The aim of this presentation is to review some recent development in clinical research, in the fields of liver steatosis, ferritin metabolism, and cholesterol metabolism. Liver steatosis, also called fatty liver encompasses a graduation of diseases with different clinical relevance and prognosis. NAFLD correlates with atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. There is now evidence that weight loss, obtained through diet or restrictive surgery, reduces the prevalence (and the severity) of NAFLD. An other issue is represented by serum ferritin concentrations, that are strongly associated with fibrosis, portal and lobular inflammation in NAFLD patients, especially in the presence of obesity. Body iron contributes to excess oxidative stress already at non iron overload concentrations. Moreover, serum ferritin is an important and independent predictor of the development of diabetes. Weight loss is accompanied by reduction of ferritin, more after restrictive than malabsorptive surgery. Metabolic changes are greater after malabsorptive or mixed surgery than after purely restrictive surgery, and this has been ascribed to a greater weight loss. Studies comparing the two kinds of surgery indicate that, for the same amount of weight loss, decrease of cholesterol is greater with the former than with the latter techniques, and this difference is mainly due to a greater reduction of intestinal absorption of cholesterol. In the choice of surgery for the single patient, among

  4. Electron microscopic localization of cytoplasmic myosin with ferritin- labeled antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We localized myosin in vertebrate nonmuscle cells by electron microscopy using purified antibodies coupled with ferritin. Native and formaldehyde-fixed filaments of purified platelet myosin filaments each consisting of approximately 30 myosin molecules bound an equivalent number of ferritin-antimyosin conjugates. In preparations of crude platelet actomyosin, the ferritin-antimyosin bound exclusively to similar short, 10-15 nm wide filaments. In both cases, binding of the ferritin-antimyosin to the myosin filaments was blocked by preincubation with unlabeled antimyosin. With indirect fluorescent antibody staining at the light microscope level, we found that the ferritin-antimyosin and unlabeled antimyosin stained HeLa cells identically, with the antibodies concentrated in 0.5-microns spots along stress fibers. By electron microscopy, we found that the concentration of ferritin-antimyosin in the dense regions of stress fibers was five to six times that in the intervening less dense regions, 20 times that in the cytoplasmic matrix, and 100 times that in the nucleus. These concentration differences may account for the light microscope antibody staining pattern of spread interphase cells. Some, but certainly not all, of the ferritin-antimyosin was associated with 10-15-nm filaments. In mouse intestinal epithelial cells, ferritin- antimyosin was located almost exclusively in the terminal web. In isolated brush borders exposed to 5 mM MgCl2, ferritin-antimyosin was also concentrated in the terminal web associated with 10-15-nm filaments. PMID:7193682

  5. A ferritin from Dendrorhynchus zhejiangensis with heavy metals detoxification activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenghua; Li, Zhen; Li, Ye; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Chundan; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin, an iron homeostasis protein, has important functions in transition and storage of toxic metal ions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of ferritin was isolated from Dendrorhynchus zhejiangensis by cDNA library and RACE approaches. The higher similarity and conserved motifs for ferritin were also identified in worm counterparts, indicating that it belonged to a new member of ferritin family. The temporal expression of worm ferritin in haemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR, and revealed the ferritin could be induced by Cd(2+), Pb(2+) and Fe(2+). The heavy metal binding activity of recombinant ferritin was further elucidated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was observed that the ferritin protein could form a chain of beads with different size against three metals exposure, and the largest one with 35~40 nm in height was identified in the Cd(2+) challenge group. Our results indicated that worm ferritin was a promising candidate for heavy metals detoxification.

  6. A Ferritin from Dendrorhynchus zhejiangensis with Heavy Metals Detoxification Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenghua; Li, Zhen; Li, Ye; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Chundan; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin, an iron homeostasis protein, has important functions in transition and storage of toxic metal ions. In this study, the full-length cDNA of ferritin was isolated from Dendrorhynchus zhejiangensis by cDNA library and RACE approaches. The higher similarity and conserved motifs for ferritin were also identified in worm counterparts, indicating that it belonged to a new member of ferritin family. The temporal expression of worm ferritin in haemocytes was analyzed by RT-PCR, and revealed the ferritin could be induced by Cd2+, Pb2+ and Fe2+. The heavy metal binding activity of recombinant ferritin was further elucidated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was observed that the ferritin protein could form a chain of beads with different size against three metals exposure, and the largest one with 35∼40 nm in height was identified in the Cd2+ challenge group. Our results indicated that worm ferritin was a promising candidate for heavy metals detoxification. PMID:23284696

  7. Ferritins: iron/oxygen biominerals in protein nanocages.

    PubMed

    Theil, Elizabeth C; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Liu, Xiaofeng

    2006-10-01

    Ferritin protein nanocages that form iron oxy biominerals in the central nanometer cavity are nature's answer to managing iron and oxygen; gene deletions are lethal in mammals and render bacteria more vulnerable to host release of antipathogen oxidants. The multifunctional, multisubunit proteins couple iron with oxygen (maxi-ferritins) or hydrogen peroxide (mini-ferritins) at catalytic sites that are related to di-iron sites oxidases, ribonucleotide reductase, methane monooxygenase and fatty acid desaturases, and synthesize mineral precursors. Gated pores, distributed symmetrically around the ferritin cages, control removal of iron by reductants and chelators. Gene regulation of ferritin, long known to depend on iron and, in animals, on a noncoding messenger RNA (mRNA) structure linked in a combinatorial array to functionally related mRNA of iron transport, has recently been shown to be linked to an array of proteins for antioxidant responses such as thioredoxin and quinone reductases. Ferritin DNA responds more to oxygen signals, and ferritin mRNA responds more to iron signals. Ferritin genes (DNA and RNA) and protein function at the intersection of iron and oxygen chemistry in biology.

  8. Growth retardation and hair loss in transgenic mice overexpressing human H-ferritin gene.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Harada, Kazutoshi; Morokoshi, Yukie; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2013-06-01

    H-ferritin (HF) is a core subunit of the iron storage protein ferritin, and plays a central role in the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Recent studies revealed that ferritin and HF are involved in a wide variety of iron-independent functions, including regulating biological processes during physiological and pathological conditions, and can be overexpressed in some human diseases. To investigate the in vivo function of HF, we generated transgenic (tg) mice overexpressing the human HF gene (hHF-tg). We established two independent hHF-tg mouse lines. Although both lines of hHF-tg mice were viable, they showed reduced body size compared to wild-type (WT) mice at 4-12 weeks of age. Serum iron concentration and blood parameters of hHF-tg mice such as hemoglobin and red blood cell counts were comparable to those of WT mice. At 3-5 weeks of age, hHF-tg mice exhibited temporary loss of coat hair on the trunk, but not on the head or face. Histological analyses revealed that although initial hair development was normal, hHF-tg mice had epidermal hyperplasia with hyperkeratosis, dilated hair follicles, bended hair shafts and keratinous debris during the hairless period. In conclusion, we showed that hHF-tg mice exhibited mild growth retardation and temporary hairless phenotype. Our findings highlight the physiological roles of HF and demonstrate that hHF-tg mice are useful for understanding the in vivo functions of HF.

  9. What is the evidence for gender differences in ferritin and haemoglobin?

    PubMed

    Rushton, D Hugh; Barth, Julian H

    2010-01-01

    Reference ranges for haemoglobin and ferritin in women of reproductive age are widely reported showing values that are lower than equivalent aged males. Similar values would be expected in the absence of different biological requirements. While reference ranges have been derived from data on large populations, it is likely that these populations have included significant numbers of women who are iron deficient in view of menstrual blood loss and poor dietary intake. Populations with a daily iron intake in excess of 100mg have shown that iron deficiency in females is rare. Studies reporting bone marrow with iron stains from 50 years ago pointed out that significant numbers of women were iron deficient and more recently serum ferritin studies have confirmed this. However, a large number of women in the Western world spend a significant part of their lives in a negative iron balance due to a combination of poor diet and menstrual blood loss. The presence of haem iron in the diet of humans enhances non-haem iron absorption but dietary surveys consistently report that women's diet is deficient in iron. Furthermore, the typical Western diet contains many common foods that limit iron absorption. It appears that lower haemoglobin and ferritin values in menstruating women have been accepted as normal rather than possibly representing widespread iron deficiency. Reference ranges should be re-evaluated in populations proven to be iron replete.

  10. Magnetic birefringence of natural and synthetic ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewski, M.; Pochylski, M.; Mitróová, Z.; Timko, M.; Kopčanský, P.; Melníková, L.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetically induced optical birefringence (Δn) was measured for magnetoferritin (MFer), horse spleen ferritin (HSF) and nanoscale magnetite aqueous suspensions. The anisotropy of optical polarizability was calculated. The average magnetic dipole moment calculated assuming the Langevin model was about 20,000 and 8500 μB per particle, for magnetite nanoparticle and magnetoferritin, respectively. Poor fitting results and the unphysical value of average magnetic moment per Fe ion for MFer excluded the use of the simple Langevin model for description of Δn for this compound. It was deduced that for MFer the estimated average magnetic moment should be about 1125 μB per molecule. A magnetic contribution from the protein shell was found to be negligible. Results from the low-field region permit the calculation of the Cotton-Mouton (C-M) constants and their comparison for the substances studied. It was shown that magnetic birefringence and C-M constant can be powerful parameters in identification of the magnetic core structure of ferritins, especially useful in biomedicine.

  11. Tuning Ferritin's Band Gap through Mixed Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Cameron; Embley, Jacob; Hansen, Kameron; Henrichsen, Andrew; Peterson, J; Colton, John S; Watt, Richard

    2017-03-23

    This study uses the formation of a mixed metal oxide inside ferritin to tune the band gap energy of the ferritin mineral. The mixed metal oxide is composed of both Co and Mn, and is formed by reacting aqueous Co2+ with MnO4- in the presence of apoferritin. Altering the ratio between the two reactants allowed for controlled tuning of the band gap energies. All minerals formed were indirect band gap materials, with indirect band gap energies ranging from 0.52 to 1.30 eV. The direct transitions were also measured, with energy values ranging from 2.71 to 3.11 eV. Tuning the band gap energies of these samples changes the wavelengths absorbed by each mineral, increasing ferritin's potential in solar-energy harvesting. Additionally, the success of using MnO4- in ferritin mineral formation opens the possibility for new mixed metal oxide cores inside ferritin.

  12. Ferritin family proteins and their use in bionanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    He, Didi; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin family proteins are found in all kingdoms of life and act to store iron within a protein cage and to protect the cell from oxidative damage caused by the Fenton reaction. The structural and biochemical features of the ferritins have been widely exploited in bionanotechnology applications: from the production of metal nanoparticles; as templates for semi-conductor production; and as scaffolds for vaccine design and drug delivery. In this review we first discuss the structural properties of the main ferritin family proteins, and describe how their organisation specifies their functions. Second, we describe materials science applications of ferritins that rely on their ability to sequester metal within their cavities. Finally, we explore the use of ferritin as a container for drug delivery and as a scaffold for the production of vaccines. PMID:25573765

  13. Enrichment and characterization of ferritin for nanomaterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Mutskova, Radina; Schwartz, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous iron storage protein utilized as a nanomaterial for labeling biomolecules and nanoparticle construction. Commercially available preparations of horse spleen ferritin, widely used as a starting material, contain a distribution of ferritins with different iron loads. We describe a detailed approach to the enrichment of differentially loaded ferritin molecules by common biophysical techniques such as size exclusion chromatography and preparative ultracentrifugation, and characterize these preparations by dynamic light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate a combination of methods to standardize an approach for determining the chemical load of nearly any particle, including nanoparticles and metal colloids. Purification and characterization of iron content in monodisperse ferritin species is particularly critical for several applications in nanomaterial science.

  14. Ferritin-Templated Quantum-Dots for Quantum Logic Gates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Kim, Seon-Jeong; Elliott, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum logic gates (QLGs) or other logic systems are based on quantum-dots (QD) with a stringent requirement of size uniformity. The QD are widely known building units for QLGs. The size control of QD is a critical issue in quantum-dot fabrication. The work presented here offers a new method to develop quantum-dots using a bio-template, called ferritin, that ensures QD production in uniform size of nano-scale proportion. The bio-template for uniform yield of QD is based on a ferritin protein that allows reconstitution of core material through the reduction and chelation processes. One of the biggest challenges for developing QLG is the requirement of ordered and uniform size of QD for arrays on a substrate with nanometer precision. The QD development by bio-template includes the electrochemical/chemical reconsitution of ferritins with different core materials, such as iron, cobalt, manganese, platinum, and nickel. The other bio-template method used in our laboratory is dendrimers, precisely defined chemical structures. With ferritin-templated QD, we fabricated the heptagonshaped patterned array via direct nano manipulation of the ferritin molecules with a tip of atomic force microscope (AFM). We also designed various nanofabrication methods of QD arrays using a wide range manipulation techniques. The precise control of the ferritin-templated QD for a patterned arrangement are offered by various methods, such as a site-specific immobilization of thiolated ferritins through local oxidation using the AFM tip, ferritin arrays induced by gold nanoparticle manipulation, thiolated ferritin positioning by shaving method, etc. In the signal measurements, the current-voltage curve is obtained by measuring the current through the ferritin, between the tip and the substrate for potential sweeping or at constant potential. The measured resistance near zero bias was 1.8 teraohm for single holoferritin and 5.7 teraohm for single apoferritin, respectively.

  15. Pre-transplant Evaluation of Donor Urinary Biomarkers can Predict Reduced Graft Function After Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Yonggu; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Lee, Sik; Park, Suk Joo; Park, Jae Berm; Han, Miyeon; Lim, Hye Jin; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several recipient biomarkers are reported to predict graft dysfunction, but these are not useful in decision making for the acceptance or allocation of deceased donor kidneys; thus, it is necessary to develop donor biomarkers predictive of graft dysfunction. To address this issue, we prospectively enrolled 94 deceased donors and their 109 recipients who underwent transplantation between 2010 and 2013 at 4 Korean transplantation centers. We investigated the predictive values of donor urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) for reduced graft function (RGF). We also developed a prediction model of RGF using these donor biomarkers. RGF was defined as delayed or slow graft function. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to generate a prediction model, which was internally validated using a bootstrapping method. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of biomarkers with 1-year graft function. Notably, donor urinary NGAL levels were associated with donor AKI (P = 0.014), and donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP were predictive for RGF, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.758 and 0.704 for NGAL and L-FABP, respectively. The best-fit model including donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine conveyed a better predictive value for RGF than donor serum creatinine alone (P = 0.02). In addition, we generated a scoring method to predict RGF based on donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine levels. Diagnostic performance of the RGF prediction score (AUROC 0.808) was significantly better than that of the DGF calculator (AUROC 0.627) and the kidney donor profile index (AUROC 0.606). Donor urinary L-FABP levels were also predictive of 1-year graft function (P = 0.005). Collectively, these findings suggest donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP to be useful biomarkers for RGF, and support

  16. Sialic acid, ferritin and CEA levels in peripheral blood and blood draining from the tumor in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Monti, M; Catania, S; Locatelli, E; Scazzoso, A; Calzaferri, G; Cunietti, E

    1988-01-01

    Concentrations of total serum N-acetyl-neuraminic acid, carcinoembryonic antigen, ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine phosphokinase and total proteins were measured in both tumor drainage blood (axillary vein) and in peripheral blood taken during surgery from 44 breast cancer patients. There were no significant differences in any of the markers between mean values in peripheral and tumor drainage blood, between cancer patients and healthy controls, between patients with or without axillary lymph node metastases, or according to the site of breast mass.

  17. Redox reactions of apo mammalian ferritin.

    PubMed

    Watt, R K; Frankel, R B; Watt, G D

    1992-10-13

    Apo horse spleen ferritin undergoes a 6.3 +/- 0.5 electron redox reaction at -310 mV at pH 6.0-8.5 and 25 degrees C to form reduced apoferritin (apoMFred). Reconstituted ferritin containing up to 50 ferric ions undergoes reduction at the same potential, taking up one electron per ferric ion and six additional electrons by the protein. We propose that apo mammalian ferritin (apoMF) contains six redox centers that can be fully oxidized forming oxidized apoferritin (apoMFox) or fully reduced forming apoMFred. ApoMFred can be prepared conveniently by dithionite or methyl viologen reduction. ApoMFred is slowly oxidized by molecular oxygen but more rapidly by Fe(CN)6(3-) to apoMFox. Fe(III)-cytochrome c readily oxidizes apoMFred to apoMFox with a stoichiometry of 6 Fe(III)-cytochrome c per apoMFred, demonstrating a rapid interprotein electron-transfer reaction. Both redox states of apoMF react with added Fe3+ and Fe2+. Addition of eight Fe2+ to apoMFox under anaerobic conditions produced apoMFred and Fe3+, as evidenced by the presence of a strong g = 4.3 EPR signal. Subsequent addition of bipyridyl produced at least six Fe(bipyd)3(2+) per MF, establishing the reversibility of this internal electron-transfer process between the redox centers of apoMF and bound iron. Incubation of apoMFred with the Fe(3+)-ATP complex under anaerobic conditions resulted in the formation and binding of two Fe2+ and four Fe3+ by the protein. The various redox states formed by the binding of Fe2+ and Fe3+ to apoMFox and apoMFred are proposed and discussed. The yellow color of apoMF appears to be an integral characteristic of the apoMF and is possibly associated with its redox activity.

  18. Iron release analyses from ferritin by visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Kentaro; Zhang, Xiao Mei; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Hiramitsu, Tadahisa; Matsugo, Seiichi

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the iron release from ferritin by irradiation from a white fluorescent light in the absence or presence of ADP. Irradiation of a ferritin solution at 17,000 lx in the absence of ADP slightly induces iron release from ferritin but only at acidic pH conditions (pH 5.0 or pH 6.0). Irradiation in the presence of ADP markedly enhances iron release from ferritin under the same conditions. In the absence of irradiation, the iron release from ferritin was low even in the presence of ADP. The induction of the iron release by irradiation in the presence of ADP was also affected by various factors such as irradiation dose and acidity, but not temperature (4-47 degrees C), oxygen concentration, or free radical generations during the irradiation. The iron release during the irradiation ceased to increase by turning off the light and was found to increase again after additional irradiation. These results suggest that visible light directly induces iron release from ferritin via the photoreduction of iron stored inside ferritin.

  19. Electrochemically Controlled Reconstitution of Immobilized Ferritins for Bioelectronic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Choi, Sang H.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Chu, Sang-Hong; King, Glen C.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific reconstituted nanoparticles were fabricated via electrochemically-controlled biomineralization through the immobilization of biomolecules. The work reported herein includes the immobilization of ferritin with various surface modifications, the electrochemical biomineralization of ferritins with different inorganic cores, and the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen on the reconstituted Pt-cored ferritins. Protein immobilization on the substrate is achieved by anchoring ferritins with dithiobis-N-succinimidyl propionate (DTSP). A reconstitution process of site-specific electrochemical biomineralization with a protein cage loads ferritins with different core materials. The ferritin acts as a nano-scale template, a biocompatible cage, and a separator between the nanoparticles. This first demonstration of electrochemically controlled site-specific reconstitution of biomolecules provides a new tool for biomineralization and opens the way to produce the bio-templated nanoparticles by electrochemical control. The nanosized platinum-cored ferritins on gold displayed good catalytic activity for the electrochemical reduction of oxygen, which is applicable to biofuel cell applications. This results in a smaller catalyst loading on the electrodes for fuel cells or other bioelectronic devices.

  20. A distance-controlled nanoparticle array using PEGylated ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Uenuma, Mutsunori; Okamoto, Naofumi; Kamitake, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2014-12-01

    A distance-controlled nanoparticle (NP) array was investigated using a simple spin coating process. It was found that the separation distance of NPs was controlled at the nanoscale by using polyethylene glycols (PEGs). Ferritin was used to synthesize NPs and carry them to a substrate by using the different molecular weight of PEGs. In order to control the distance of the NPs, PEGs with molecular weights of 2k, 5k, 10k and 20k were modified on ferritin with 10 mM ion strength and 0.01 mg ml-1 ferritin concentration. The separated distances of NPs increased along with increase in PEG molecular weight.

  1. Long Term Clinical Outcome of Patients with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency who Received Related Donor Bone Marrow Transplants without Pre-transplant Chemotherapy or Post-transplant GVHD Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Railey, Mary Dell; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine long term health benefits of non-ablative bone marrow transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), we investigated our cohort of 161 related donor bone marrow transplanted SCID patients. Only 16 (10%) had HLA-identical donors. Study design All 124 survivors were sent questionnaires about their current clinical statuses. Details from clinic visits were also compiled. One hundred eleven patients (90%) were reached. We compared outcomes of patients transplanted before and after 3.5 months of life and by molecular defect. Results The overall survival rate is 77%, but the rate for the 48 infants transplanted in the first 3.5 months of life is 94%, compared with 70% for the 113 transplanted after 3.5 months (p=0.002). Twenty-eight (76%) of the 37 deceased patients died from viral infections present at diagnosis. One or more clinical problems were reported to have been present in the past two years in 71 (64%) of the survivors, although 95 (86%) are considered healthy by their families. Conclusions Most patients with SCID transplanted with related donor marrow without pre-transplant chemotherapy have done well long-term, but those transplanted at <3.5 months of age had a superior survival rate, a lower rate of clinical problems, less need for booster transplants and better nutritional status. PMID:19818451

  2. Correlation between maternal and childhood VitB12, folic acid and ferritin levels

    PubMed Central

    Zeeshan, Fatima; Bari, Attia; Farhan, Saima; Jabeen, Uzma; Rathore, Ahsan Waheed

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the correlation between serum folic acid, vitamin B12 and ferritin of mother and child and to study various neonatal risk factors as a cause of anemia in children. Methods: One hundred eighty children two months to two years of age admitted in the department of Pediatric Medicine of The Children’s Hospital and The Institute of Child Health Lahore from January 2013 to January 2015 with common medical conditions having anemia were included. Complete blood count (CBC), serum ferritin level, folic acid and Vitamin (Vit) B12 level were sent of children and their mothers. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: Out of 180 children with anemia, 66.7% were males. Mean age of children was 7.3months. Fifty-five percent children were malnourished according to z scoring. The mean Hemoglobin (Hb) of children was 8 g/dl. Only 4% children had low ferritin level while 60% had low folic acid and 45% had decreased VitB12. There was significant correlation between Hb of mother and child (p =0.02), Vit B12 deficiency (p=0.008) and iron deficiency (p<0.001). Premature children had lower folic acid levels (p =0.02), while prematurity, IUGR, previous admission and history of sepsis showed no association with anemia in our study. Both breast-feeding and top feeding showed significant association with anemia with p-value of 0.042 and 0.003 respectively while dilution showed no impact on anemia. Conclusion: Maternal anemia has a significant impact on child’s hemoglobin. As compared to previous concept of increased iron deficiency in children we found increased occurrence of folic acid and VitB12 deficiency in children and their mothers. PMID:28367192

  3. Dual-Functional Carbon Dots Pattern on Paper Chips for Fe(3+) and Ferritin Analysis in Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shan-Wen; Qiao, Shu; Xu, Bi-Yi; Peng, Xiang; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-02-07

    Though microfluidic paper analytical devices (μPADs) have attracted paramounting attentions in recent years as promising devices for low cost point-of-care tests, their real applications for blood analysis are still challenged by integrating sample preparation with different detection modes on a same μPAD. Herein, we developed a novel μPAD, which well coupled automatic serum extraction with reliable dual mode iron health tests: fluorescent analysis for Fe(3+) and colorimetric ELISA for ferritin. All these functions are made available by in situ carbon dots (CDs) and AuNPs sequential patterning techniques. For CDs immobilization, hydrothermal reaction was taken on paper, to which a patterned through-hole polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mask was applied. None fluorescence CDs (nF-CDs) were generated on exposed regions, while the fluorescent CDs (F-CDs) were generated simultaneously on covered regions. Sensitive serum iron quantification was realized on the F-CDs modified regions, where Fe(3+) ion can selectively quench the fluorescence of F-CDs. For AuNPs immobilization, electroless plating was taken on nF-CDs modified regions. The resulting AuNPs on nF-CDs layer on one hand triggered the coagulation of blood cells and thus led to the longest ever wicking distance for serum separation, on the other hand facilitated colorimetric enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of serum ferritin. Combining the two readings, the μPAD can provide reliable measurement for serum iron and serum ferritin in whole blood. Furthermore, as CDs and AuNPs modified μPAD has the features of easy handling, low-cost, lightweight, and disposability, it is accounting for a promising prototype for whole blood point-of-care analysis.

  4. Sequence analysis of dolphin ferritin H and L subunits and possible iron-dependent translational control of dolphin ferritin gene

    PubMed Central

    Takaesu, Azusa; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Takai, Shinji; Sasaki, Yukako; Orino, Koichi

    2008-01-01

    Background Iron-storage protein, ferritin plays a central role in iron metabolism. Ferritin has dual function to store iron and segregate iron for protection of iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species. Tissue ferritin is composed of two kinds of subunits (H: heavy chain or heart-type subunit; L: light chain or liver-type subunit). Ferritin gene expression is controlled at translational level in iron-dependent manner or at transcriptional level in iron-independent manner. However, sequencing analysis of marine mammalian ferritin subunits has not yet been performed fully. The purpose of this study is to reveal cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits, and demonstrate the possibility of expression of these subunits, especially H subunit, by iron. Methods Sequence analyses of cetacean ferritin H and L subunits were performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments from cDNAs generated via reverse transcription-PCR of leukocyte total RNA prepared from blood samples of six different dolphin species (Pseudorca crassidens, Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Grampus griseus, Globicephala macrorhynchus, Tursiops truncatus, and Delphinapterus leucas). The putative iron-responsive element sequence in the 5'-untranslated region of the six different dolphin species was revealed by direct sequencing of PCR fragments obtained using leukocyte genomic DNA. Results Dolphin H and L subunits consist of 182 and 174 amino acids, respectively, and amino acid sequence identities of ferritin subunits among these dolphins are highly conserved (H: 99–100%, (99→98) ; L: 98–100%). The conserved 28 bp IRE sequence was located -144 bp upstream from the initiation codon in the six different dolphin species. Conclusion These results indicate that six different dolphin species have conserved ferritin sequences, and suggest that these genes are iron-dependently expressed. PMID:18954429

  5. Ferritin nanocontainers that self-direct in synthetic polymer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengonul, Merih C.

    Currently, there are many approaches to introduce functionality into synthetic polymers. Among these, for example, are copolymerization, grafting, and blending methods. However, modifications made by such methods also change the thermodynamics and rheological properties of the polymer system of interest, and each new modification often requires a costly reoptimization of polymer processing. Such a reoptimalization would not be necessary if new functionality could be introduced via a container whose external surface is chemically and physically tuned to interact with the parent polymer. The contents of the container could then be changed without changing other important properties of the parent polymer. In this context this thesis project explores an innovative nanocontainer platform which can be introduced into phase-separating homopolymer blends. Ferritin is a naturally existing nanocontainer that can be used synthetically to package and selectively transport functional moieties to a particular phase that is either in the bulk or on the surface of a homopolymer blend system. The principal focus of this work centers on modifying the surface of wild ferritin to: (1) render modified ferritin soluble in a non-aqueous solvent; and (2) impart it with self-directing properties when exposed to a homopolymer blend surface or incorporated into the bulk of a homopolymer blend. Wild ferritin is water soluble, and this research project successfully modified wild ferritin by grafting either amine-functional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) or short-chain alkanes to carbodiimide activated carboxylate groups on ferritin's surface. Such modified ferritin is soluble in dichloromethane (DCM). Modification was confirmed by ion-exchange chromatography, zeta-potential measurements, and electrospray mass spectroscopy. FT-IR was used to quantify the extent of PEGylation of the reaction products through area ratios of the -C-O-C asymmetric stretching vibration of the grafted PEG chains to the

  6. Complex I, iron, and ferritin in Parkinson's disease substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Mann, V M; Cooper, J M; Daniel, S E; Srai, K; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D; Schapira, A H

    1994-12-01

    Elevated iron levels, enhanced oxidative damage, and complex I deficiency have been identified in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. To understand the interrelationship of these abnormalities, we analyzed iron levels, ferritin levels, and complex I activity in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease. Total iron levels were increased significantly, ferritin levels were unchanged, and complex I activities were decreased significantly in the substantia nigra samples. The failure of ferritin levels to increase with elevated iron concentrations suggests that the amount of reactive iron may increase in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease patients. There was no correlation between the iron levels and complex I activity or the iron-ferritin ratio and complex I activity in the substantia nigra samples.

  7. Conceptions and First Results on the Electrocrystallization Behaviour of Ferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno,A.; Rivera, M.

    2005-01-01

    The role of electrochemical processes on Fe and CdSO{sub 4} in the crystallization of horse spleen ferritin has been investigated using the cyclic voltammetry technique. It was found that although both species exhibit important redox properties in the presence of an external applied potential, CdSO4 played a leading role not only in the nucleation process but also in the growth behavior and morphology of ferritin crystals.

  8. Permanganate-Based Synthesis of Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles in Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Cameron; Smith, Trevor; Embley, Jacob; Maxfield, Jake; Hansen, Kameron; Peterson, J; Henrichsen, Andrew; Erickson, Stephen; Buck, David; Colton, John S; Watt, Richard

    2017-03-23

    This paper investigates the comproportionation reaction of MnII with MnO4- as a route for manganese oxide nanoparticle synthesis in the protein ferritin. We report that MnO4- serves as the electron acceptor and reacts with MnII in the presence of apoferritin to form manganese oxide cores inside the protein shell. Manganese loading into ferritin was studied under acidic, neutral, and basic conditions and the ratios of MnII and permanganate were varied at each pH. The manganese-containing ferritin samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, UV/Vis absorption, and by measuring the band gap energies for each sample. Manganese cores were deposited inside ferritin under both the acidic and basic conditions. All resulting manganese ferritin samples were found to be indirect band gap materials with band gap energies ranging from 1.01 eV to 1.34 eV. An increased UV/Vis absorption around 370 nm was observed for samples formed under acidic conditions, suggestive of MnO2 formation inside ferritin.

  9. Cellular regulation and molecular interactions of the ferritins.

    PubMed

    Hintze, K J; Theil, E C

    2006-03-01

    Controlling iron/oxygen chemistry in biology depends on multiple genes, regulatory messenger RNA (mRNA) structures, signaling pathways and protein catalysts. Ferritin, a protein nanocage around an iron/oxy mineral, centralizes the control. Complementary DNA (antioxidant responsive element/Maf recognition element) and mRNA (iron responsive element) responses regulate ferritin synthesis rates. Multiple iron-protein interactions control iron and oxygen substrate movement through the protein cage, from dynamic gated pores to catalytic sites related to di-iron oxygenase cofactor sites. Maxi-ferritins concentrate iron for the bio-synthesis of iron/heme proteins, trapping oxygen; bacterial mini-ferritins, DNA protection during starvation proteins, reverse the substrate roles, destroying oxidants, trapping iron and protecting DNA. Ferritin is nature's unique and conserved approach to controlled, safe use of iron and oxygen, with protein synthesis in animals adjusted by dual, genetic DNA and mRNA sequences that selectively respond to iron or oxidant signals and link ferritin to proteins of iron, oxygen and antioxidant metabolism.

  10. Ferritin, an iron source in meat for Staphylococcus xylosus?

    PubMed

    Vermassen, Aurore; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2016-05-16

    Staphylococcus xylosus is frequently isolated from food of animal origin. Moreover, this species is one of the major starter cultures used for meat fermentation. Iron is a key element for growth and survival of bacteria. Meat is particularly rich in haemic (myoglobin and haemoglobin) and non-haemic (ferritin and transferrin) iron sources. Ferritin is a storage protein able to capture large quantities of iron. It is highly resistant to microbial attack and few microorganisms can use it as an iron source. Surprisingly, we found that the S. xylosus C2a strain grows in the presence of ferritin as a sole iron source. A three-cistron operon was highly overexpressed under ferritin iron growth conditions. We generated a deletion-insertion in the first gene of the operon and evaluated the phenotype of the mutant. The mutant showed decreased growth because it was less able to acquire iron from ferritin. Transcriptional analysis of the mutant revealed downregulation of several genes involved in the response to oxidative stress. This study characterized for the first time the capacity of a Staphylococcus to use iron from ferritin and revealed that a potential reductive pathway was involved in this acquisition. We hypothesize that this ability could give an advantage to S. xylosus in meat products.

  11. Ferritin Is Required in Multiple Tissues during Drosophila melanogaster Development

    PubMed Central

    Blowes, Liisa M.; Missirlis, Fanis; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, iron is stored in the cellular endomembrane system inside a protein cage formed by 24 ferritin subunits of two types (Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH) in a 1:1 stoichiometry. In larvae, ferritin accumulates in the midgut, hemolymph, garland, pericardial cells and in the nervous system. Here we present analyses of embryonic phenotypes for mutations in Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH and in both genes simultaneously. Mutations in either gene or deletion of both genes results in a similar set of cuticular embryonic phenotypes, ranging from non-deposition of cuticle to defects associated with germ band retraction, dorsal closure and head involution. A fraction of ferritin mutants have embryonic nervous systems with ventral nerve cord disruptions, misguided axonal projections and brain malformations. Ferritin mutants die with ectopic apoptotic events. Furthermore, we show that ferritin maternal contribution, which varies reflecting the mother’s iron stores, is used in early development. We also evaluated phenotypes arising from the blockage of COPII transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, feeding the secretory pathway, plus analysis of ectopically expressed and fluorescently marked Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH. Overall, our results are consistent with insect ferritin combining three functions: iron storage, intercellular iron transport, and protection from iron-induced oxidative stress. These functions are required in multiple tissues during Drosophila embryonic development. PMID:26192321

  12. Ferritin Is Required in Multiple Tissues during Drosophila melanogaster Development.

    PubMed

    González-Morales, Nicanor; Mendoza-Ortíz, Miguel Ángel; Blowes, Liisa M; Missirlis, Fanis; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, iron is stored in the cellular endomembrane system inside a protein cage formed by 24 ferritin subunits of two types (Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH) in a 1:1 stoichiometry. In larvae, ferritin accumulates in the midgut, hemolymph, garland, pericardial cells and in the nervous system. Here we present analyses of embryonic phenotypes for mutations in Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH and in both genes simultaneously. Mutations in either gene or deletion of both genes results in a similar set of cuticular embryonic phenotypes, ranging from non-deposition of cuticle to defects associated with germ band retraction, dorsal closure and head involution. A fraction of ferritin mutants have embryonic nervous systems with ventral nerve cord disruptions, misguided axonal projections and brain malformations. Ferritin mutants die with ectopic apoptotic events. Furthermore, we show that ferritin maternal contribution, which varies reflecting the mother's iron stores, is used in early development. We also evaluated phenotypes arising from the blockage of COPII transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, feeding the secretory pathway, plus analysis of ectopically expressed and fluorescently marked Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH. Overall, our results are consistent with insect ferritin combining three functions: iron storage, intercellular iron transport, and protection from iron-induced oxidative stress. These functions are required in multiple tissues during Drosophila embryonic development.

  13. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of the association between ferritin level and severity of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Luca; Dongiovanni, Paola; Fargion, Silvia

    2012-08-07

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined by excessive liver fat deposition related to the metabolic syndrome, is a leading cause of progressive liver disease, for which accurate non-invasive staging systems and effective treatments are still lacking. Evidence has shown that increased ferritin levels are associated with the metabolic insulin resistance syndrome, and higher hepatic iron and fat content. Hyperferritinemia and iron stores have been associated with the severity of liver damage in NAFLD, and iron depletion reduced insulin resistance and liver enzymes. Recently, Kowdley et al demonstrated in a multicenter study in 628 adult patients with NAFLD from the NAFLD-clinical research network database with central re-evaluation of liver histology and iron staining that the increased serum ferritin level is an independent predictor of liver damage in patients with NAFLD, and is useful to identify NAFLD patients at risk of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and advanced fibrosis. These data indicate that incorporation of serum ferritin level may improve the performance of noninvasive scoring of liver damage in patients with NAFLD, and that iron depletion still represents an attractive therapeutic target to prevent the progression of liver damage in these patients.

  14. The Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) of Marginal Donors Allocated by Standardized Pre-Transplant Donor Biopsy Assessment: Distribution and Association with Graft Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfini, I.; Buzio, C.; Zanelli, P.; Palmisano, A.; Cremaschi, E.; Vaglio, A.; Piotti, G.; Melfa, L.; La Manna, G.; Feliciangeli, G.; Cappuccilli, M.; Scolari, M.P.; Capelli, I.; Panicali, L.; Baraldi, O.; Stefoni, S.; Buscaroli, A.; Ridolfi, L.; D'Errico, A.; Cappelli, G.; Bonucchi, D.; Rubbiani, E.; Albertazzi, A.; Mehrotra, A.; Cravedi, P.; Maggiore, U.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-transplant donor biopsy (PTDB)-based marginal-donor allocation systems to single or dual renal transplantation could increase the use of organs with Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) in the highest range (e.g. >80 or >90), whose discard rate approximates 50% in the US. To test this hypothesis, we retrospectively calculated the KDPI and analyzed the outcomes of 442 marginal kidney transplants (340 single transplants: 278 with a PTDB Remuzzi score <4 [median KDPI:87; interquartile range(IQR):78-94] and 62 with a score =4 [median KDPI:87; IQR:76-93]; 102 dual transplants [median KDPI: 93; IQR:86-96]) and 248 single standard transplant controls [median KDPI:36; IQR:18-51]. PTDB-based allocation of marginal grafts led to a limited discard rate of 15% for kidneys with KDPI of 80-90 and of 37% for kidneys with a KDPI of 91-100. Although 1-year eGFRs were significantly lower in recipients of marginal kidneys (-9.3, -17.9, and -18.8ml/min, for dual transplants, single kidneys with PTDB score <4, and =4, respectively; P<0.001), graft survival (median follow-up 3.3 years) was similar between marginal and standard kidney transplants (hazard ratio: 1.20 [95% confidence interval: 0.80 to 1.79; P=0.38]). In conclusion, PTDB-based allocation allows the safe transplantation of kidneys with KDPI in the highest range that may otherwise be discarded. PMID:25155294

  15. Pre-transplant donor CD4(-) invariant NKT cell expansion capacity predicts the occurrence of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Rubio, M-T; Bouillié, M; Bouazza, N; Coman, T; Trebeden-Nègre, H; Gomez, A; Suarez, F; Sibon, D; Brignier, A; Paubelle, E; Nguyen-Khoc, S; Cavazzana, M; Lantz, O; Mohty, M; Urien, S; Hermine, O

    2017-04-01

    Clinically useful pre-transplant predictive factors of acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) are lacking. We prospectively analyzed HSC graft content in CD34(+), NK, conventional T, regulatory T and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in 117 adult patients before allo-SCT. Results were correlated with occurrence of aGVHD and relapse. In univariate analysis, iNKT cells were the only graft cell populations associated with occurrence of aGVHD. In multivariate analysis, CD4(-) iNKT/T cell frequency could predict grade II-IV aGVHD in bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) grafts, while CD4(-) iNKT expansion capacity was predictive in PBSC grafts. Receiver operating characteristic analyses determined the CD4(-) iNKT expansion factor as the best predictive factor of aGVHD. Incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD was reduced in patients receiving a graft with an expansion factor above versus below 6.83 (9.7 vs 80%, P<0.0001), while relapse incidence at two years was similar (P=0.5).The test reached 94% sensitivity and 100% specificity in the subgroup of patients transplanted with human leukocyte antigen 10/10 PBSCs without active disease. Analysis of this CD4(-) iNKT expansion capacity test may represent the first diagnostic tool allowing selection of the best donor to avoid severe aGVHD with preserved graft-versus-leukemia effect after peripheral blood allo-SCT.

  16. Soybean Ferritin Forms an Iron-Containing Oligomer in Tofu Even after Heat Treatment.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro

    2015-10-14

    Ferritin, a multimeric iron storage protein distributed in almost all living kingdoms, has been highlighted recently as a nutritional iron source in plant-derived foodstuffs, because ferritin iron is suggested to have high bioavailability. In soybean seeds, ferritin contributes largely to the net iron contents. Here, the oligomeric states and iron contents of soybean ferritin during food processing (especially tofu gel formation) were analyzed. Ferritin was purified from tofu gel as an iron-containing oligomer (approximately 1000 Fe atoms per oligomer), which was composed of two types of subunits similar to the native soybean seed ferritin. Circular dichroism spectra also showed no differences in α-helical structure between native soybean ferritin and tofu ferritin. The present data demonstrate that ferritin was stable during the heat treatment (boiling procedure) in food processing, although partial denaturation was observed at temperatures higher than 80 °C.

  17. Iron at the center of ferritin, metal/oxygen homeostasis and novel dietary strategies.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Hintze, K; Lonnerdal, B; Theil, E C

    2006-01-01

    Bioiron - central to respiration, photosynthesis and DNA synthesis and complicated by radical chemistry with oxygen - depends on ferritin, the super family of protein nanocages (maxi-ferritins in humans, animals, plant, and bacteria, and mini-ferritins, also called DPS proteins, in bacteria) for iron and oxygen control. Regulation of ferritin synthesis, best studied in animals, uses DNA transcription and mRNA translation check points. Ferritin is a member of both the "oxidant stress response" gene family that includes thioredoxin reductase and quinine reductase, and a member of the iron responsive gene family that includes ferroportin and mt-aconitase ferritin DNA regulation responds preferentially to oxidant response inducers and ferritin mRNA to iron inducers: heme confers regulator synergy. Ferritin proteins manage iron and oxygen, with ferroxidase sites and iron + oxygen substrates to form mineral of both Fe and O atoms; maxi-ferritins contribute more to cellular iron metabolism and mini-ferritins to stress responses. Iron recovery from ferritin is controlled by gated protein pores, possibly contributing to iron absorption from ferritin, a significant dietary iron source. Ferritin gene regulation is a model for integrating DNA/mRNA controls, while ferritin protein function is central to molecular nutrition cellular metabolism at the crossroads of iron and oxygen in biology.

  18. Ferritin-iron is released during boiling and in vitro gastric digestion.

    PubMed

    Hoppler, Matthias; Schönbächler, Andrea; Meile, Leo; Hurrell, Richard F; Walczyk, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Biofortification of staple foods with iron in the form of ferritin-iron is a promising approach to fighting iron-deficiency anemia in developing countries. However, contradictory results regarding iron bioavailability to humans from ferritin are not yet fully clarified. Furthermore, the question has been raised whether ferritin can potentially survive gastric passage intact and be absorbed via a ferritin-specific uptake mechanism. We studied changes of ferritin-iron and protein during cooking and in vitro gastric digestion. Water soluble, native ferritin-iron, measured in different legumes, represented 18% (soybeans) up to maximally 42% (peas) of total seed iron. Ferritin-iron was no longer detectable after boiling the legumes for 50 min in excess water. When the same cooking treatment was applied to recombinant bean ferritin propagated in Escherichia coli, some ferritin-iron remained measurable. During in vitro gastric digestion of recombinant bean ferritin and red kidney bean extract, ferritin-iron was fully released from the protein and dissolved at pH 2. Stability tests at varying pH at 37 degrees C showed that the release of ferritin-iron starts at pH 5 and is complete at pH 2. We concluded that ferritin-iron is efficiently released from the ferritin molecule during cooking and at gastric pH and that it should be absorbed as efficiently as all other nonheme iron in food.

  19. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products. PMID:28067263

  20. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  1. Iron binding to human heavy-chain ferritin.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Cecilia; Di Pisa, Flavio; Bernacchioni, Caterina; Ciambellotti, Silvia; Turano, Paola; Mangani, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Maxi-ferritins are ubiquitous iron-storage proteins with a common cage architecture made up of 24 identical subunits of five α-helices that drive iron biomineralization through catalytic iron(II) oxidation occurring at oxidoreductase sites (OS). Structures of iron-bound human H ferritin were solved at high resolution by freezing ferritin crystals at different time intervals after exposure to a ferrous salt. Multiple binding sites were identified that define the iron path from the entry ion channels to the oxidoreductase sites. Similar data are available for another vertebrate ferritin: the M protein from Rana catesbeiana. A comparative analysis of the iron sites in the two proteins identifies new reaction intermediates and underlines clear differences in the pattern of ligands that define the additional iron sites that precede the oxidoreductase binding sites along this path. Stopped-flow kinetics assays revealed that human H ferritin has different levels of activity compared with its R. catesbeiana counterpart. The role of the different pattern of transient iron-binding sites in the OS is discussed with respect to the observed differences in activity across the species.

  2. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-09

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein - namely the ferritin - in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  3. Stimulation of the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin during iron loading into ferritin.

    PubMed

    Reilly, C A; Aust, S D

    1997-11-15

    Ceruloplasmin purified from horse serum was rapidly reduced upon addition of increasing equivalents of ferrous iron, generating an electronically and conformationally distinct form. This form of ceruloplasmin was characterized by significant (80%) loss of EPR detectable type I and type II copper(II), complete loss of visible absorbance at 610 nm, as well as decreased hydrophobic surface area. The reduced form of ceruloplasmin slowly reduced molecular oxygen to complete its catalytic cycle. The presence of varied concentrations of apoferritin, but not apotransferrin, significantly enhanced the rate of ceruloplasmin oxidation. The magnitude of this stimulatory effect increased as the molar ratio of ceruloplasmin to apoferritin approached 1.0, shown previously to be the optimum ratio for loading iron into ferritin. The rate of ferrous iron oxidation by ceruloplasmin was significantly stimulated by the presence of apoferritin; however, apotransferrin had no effect. The length of time required for ceruloplasmin to oxidize all the iron and return to the native form of the enzyme was also affected by the concentration of iron. In addition, the rate of iron loading into ferritin was dependent upon ferrous iron concentration. These results provide evidence for the formation of a specific complex between the reduced form of ceruloplasmin and apoferritin and that reduction of ceruloplasmin by ferrous iron may be the signal for complex formation.

  4. High ferritin levels have major effects on the morphology of erythrocytes in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bester, Janette; Buys, Antoinette V.; Lipinski, Boguslaw; Kell, Douglas B.; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Unliganded iron both contributes to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and also changes the morphology of erythrocytes (RBCs). We tested the hypothesis that these two facts might be linked, i.e., that the RBCs of AD individuals have a variant morphology, that might have diagnostic or prognostic value. Methods: We included a literature survey of AD and its relationships to the vascular system, followed by a laboratory study. Four different microscopy techniques were used and results statistically compared to analyze trends between high and normal serum ferritin (SF) AD individuals. Results: Light and scanning electron microscopies showed little difference between the morphologies of RBCs taken from healthy individuals and from normal SF AD individuals. By contrast, there were substantial changes in the morphology of RBCs taken from high SF AD individuals. These differences were also observed using confocal microscopy and as a significantly greater membrane stiffness (measured using force-distance curves). Conclusion: We argue that high ferritin levels may contribute to an accelerated pathology in AD. Our findings reinforce the importance of (unliganded) iron in AD, and suggest the possibility both of an early diagnosis and some means of treating or slowing down the progress of this disease. PMID:24367334

  5. Iron Overload Coordinately Promotes Ferritin Expression and Fat Accumulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haizhen; Jiang, Xue; Wu, Jieyu; Zhang, Linqiang; Huang, Jingfei; Zhang, Yuru; Zou, Xiaoju; Liang, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The trace element iron is crucial for living organisms, since it plays essential roles in numerous cellular functions. Systemic iron overload and the elevated level of ferritin, a ubiquitous intracellular protein that stores and releases iron to maintain the iron homeostasis in cells, has long been epidemiologically associated with obesity and obesity-related diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association remain unclear. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that iron overload induces the expression of sgk-1, encoding the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase, to promote the level of ferritin and fat accumulation. Mutation of cyp-23A1, encoding a homolog of human cytochrome P450 CYP7B1 that is related to neonatal hemochromatosis, further enhances the elevated expression of ftn-1, sgk-1, and fat accumulation. sgk-1 positively regulates the expression of acs-20 and vit-2, genes encoding homologs of the mammalian FATP1/4 fatty acid transport proteins and yolk lipoproteins, respectively, to facilitate lipid uptake and translocation for storage under iron overload. This study reveals a completely novel pathway in which sgk-1 plays a central role to synergistically regulate iron and lipid homeostasis, offering not only experimental evidence supporting a previously unverified link between iron and obesity, but also novel insights into the pathogenesis of iron and obesity-related human metabolic diseases.

  6. Propensity Score-Based Survival Benefit of Simultaneous Liver-Kidney Transplant over Liver Transplant Alone for Recipients with Pre-Transplant Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pratima; Shu, Xu; Schaubel, Douglas E.; Sung, Randall S.; Magee, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Survival benefit of simultaneous liver-kidney transplant (SLKT) over liver transplant alone (LTA) is unclear from the current literature. Additionally, the role of donor kidney quality, measured by kidney donor risk index (KDRI), in survival benefit of SLKT is not studied. We compared survival benefit after SLKT and LTA among recipients with similar pre-transplant renal dysfunction using novel methodology, specifically with respect to survival probability and area under the survival curve by dialysis status and KDRI. Methods Data were obtained from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. The study cohort included patients with pre-LT renal dysfunction who were waitlisted and received either a SLKT (n=1,326) or a LTA (n=4,283) between 3/1/02–12/31/09. Inverse Probability of Treatment Weighted (IPTW) – SLKT and LTA survival curves, along with the 5-year area under the survival curve were computed by dialysis status at transplant. The difference in the area under the curve represents the average additional survival time gained via SLKT over LTA. Results For patients not on dialysis, SLKT resulted in a significant 3.7 month gain in 5-year mean post-transplant survival time. The decrease in mortality rate differs significantly by KDRI, and an estimated 76% of SLKT recipients received a kidney with KDRI sufficiently low for mortality. The mortality decrease for SLKT was concentrated in the first year post-transplant. The difference between SLK and LTA 5-year mean post-transplant survival time was 1.4 months and non-significant for patients not on dialysis. Conclusion The propensity score-adjusted survival among SLKT and LTA recipients was similar for those who were dialysis at LT. Although statistically significant, the survival advantage of SLKT over LTA was of marginal clinical significance among patients not on dialysis; and occurred only if the donor kidney was of sufficient quality. These results should be considered in the ongoing debate regarding the

  7. Ferritin: Design and Formation of an Iron-Storage Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, G. C.; Harrison, P. M.; Rice, D. W.; Smith, J. M. A.; Treffry, A.; White, J. L.; Yariv, J.

    1984-02-01

    Although essential for most forms of life, too much iron is harmful. To cope with these antagonistic phenomena an iron-storage molecule, ferritin, has evolved. The structure of horse spleen apoferritin, which has recently been refined, consists of 24 symmetrically related subunits forming a near-spherical hollow shell. In ferritin the central cavity is occupied by an iron core of 'ferrihydrite', a geologically ephemeral mineral found in hot or cold springs and in mine workings, or produced in the laboratory by heating solutions of ferric salts. Ferritin itself forms most readily from apoferritin, in the presence of dioxygen, from FeII, not FeIII. Access to its interior is through small intersubunit channels, and the protein influences both the rate of FeII-oxidation and the form of oxide produced.

  8. METAL-DEPENDENT EXPRESSION OF FERRITIN AND LACTOFERRIN BY RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased availability of catalytically active metal has been associated with an oxidative injury. The sequestration of transition metals within intracellular ferritin confers an antioxidant function to this protein. Such storage by ferritin requires that the metal be transported...

  9. The ratio of sTfR/ferritin is associated with the expression level of TfR in rat bone marrow cells after endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Zhao, Jiexiu; Zhao, Binxiu; Gao, Qi; Xu, Jincheng; Liu, Dongsen

    2012-06-01

    Currently, it is unclear which index of haematological parameters could be used to most easily monitor iron deficiency during endurance training. To address this question, 16 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: a sedentary group (n = 8) and an exercised group (n = 8). Initially, animals in the exercise group started running on a treadmill at a rate of 30 m/min, on a 0% grade, for 1 min/session. Running time was gradually increased by 2 min/day. The training plan was one session per day during the initial 2 weeks and two sessions per day during the third to ninth week. At the end of the 9-week experiment, we analysed the blood of the experimental animals for haemoglobin levels, erythrocyte numbers, haematocrit, serum iron levels, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin levels and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) levels, and we calculated the ratio of sTfR/ferritin. Erythrocyte numbers, haemoglobin levels and haematocrit values were decreased after 9 weeks of exercise, but sTfR and sTfR/ferritin values were increased (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). The training regime significantly increased TfR mRNA levels in the bone marrow cells of the exercised rats compared with the sedentary group (1.8 ± 0.5 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2, P < 0.01). These results revealed a significant correlation between TfR levels in the bone marrow cells and the ratio of sTfR/ferritin (r = 0.517; P < 0.01) and sTfR levels (r = 0.206; P < 0.05) in sedentary and exercised rats. In conclusion, we show that sTfR indices and the ratio of sTfR/ferritin could be useful indicators for monitoring iron deficiency during endurance training.

  10. Crosslinking of hemin to a specific site on the 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jihjing; Thach, R.E. ); Patino, M.M.; Gaffield, L.; Walden. W.E. ); Smith, A. )

    1991-07-15

    Incubation of a 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein (FRP) with small amounts of radiolabeled hemin resulted in the formation of a strong interaction between the two that was stable to SDS/PAGE. Of seven other proteins tested individually, only apohemopexin and bovine serum albumin showed similar crosslinking ability, albeit to a much lower extent. ({sup 14}C)Hemin specifically crosslinked to FRP in the presence of a 50-fold excess of total wheat germ proteins. Inclusion of catalase did not prevent the reaction of hemin with FRP, suggesting that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not involved. The subsequent addition of a stoichiometric amount of apohemopexin did not reverse the reaction. Exhaustive digestion of the complex with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease produced a major labeled peptide of 17 kDa. These results show the existence of a highly specific, uniquely reactive hemin binding site on FRP.

  11. Genome-wide comparison of ferritin family from Archaea, Bacteria, Eukarya, and Viruses: its distribution, characteristic motif, and phylogenetic relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lina; Xie, Ting; Hu, Qingqing; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Wanping

    2015-10-01

    Ferritins are highly conserved proteins that are widely distributed in various species from archaea to humans. The ubiquitous characteristic of these proteins reflects the pivotal contribution of ferritins to the safe storage and timely delivery of iron to achieve iron homeostasis. This study investigated the ferritin genes in 248 genomes from various species, including viruses, archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. The distribution comparison suggests that mammals and eudicots possess abundant ferritin genes, whereas fungi contain very few ferritin genes. Archaea and bacteria show considerable numbers of ferritin genes. Generally, prokaryotes possess three types of ferritin (the typical ferritin, bacterioferritin, and DNA-binding protein from starved cell), whereas eukaryotes have various subunit types of ferritin, thereby indicating the individuation of the ferritin family during evolution. The characteristic motif analysis of ferritins suggested that all key residues specifying the unique structural motifs of ferritin are highly conserved across three domains of life. Meanwhile, the characteristic motifs were also distinguishable between ferritin groups, especially phytoferritins, which show a plant-specific motif. The phylogenetic analyses show that ferritins within the same subfamily or subunits are generally clustered together. The phylogenetic relationships among ferritin members suggest that both gene duplication and horizontal transfer contribute to the wide variety of ferritins, and their possible evolutionary scenario was also proposed. The results contribute to a better understanding of the distribution, characteristic motif, and evolutionary relationship of the ferritin family.

  12. Genome-wide comparison of ferritin family from Archaea, Bacteria, Eukarya, and Viruses: its distribution, characteristic motif, and phylogenetic relationship.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lina; Xie, Ting; Hu, Qingqing; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Wanping

    2015-10-01

    Ferritins are highly conserved proteins that are widely distributed in various species from archaea to humans. The ubiquitous characteristic of these proteins reflects the pivotal contribution of ferritins to the safe storage and timely delivery of iron to achieve iron homeostasis. This study investigated the ferritin genes in 248 genomes from various species, including viruses, archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. The distribution comparison suggests that mammals and eudicots possess abundant ferritin genes, whereas fungi contain very few ferritin genes. Archaea and bacteria show considerable numbers of ferritin genes. Generally, prokaryotes possess three types of ferritin (the typical ferritin, bacterioferritin, and DNA-binding protein from starved cell), whereas eukaryotes have various subunit types of ferritin, thereby indicating the individuation of the ferritin family during evolution. The characteristic motif analysis of ferritins suggested that all key residues specifying the unique structural motifs of ferritin are highly conserved across three domains of life. Meanwhile, the characteristic motifs were also distinguishable between ferritin groups, especially phytoferritins, which show a plant-specific motif. The phylogenetic analyses show that ferritins within the same subfamily or subunits are generally clustered together. The phylogenetic relationships among ferritin members suggest that both gene duplication and horizontal transfer contribute to the wide variety of ferritins, and their possible evolutionary scenario was also proposed. The results contribute to a better understanding of the distribution, characteristic motif, and evolutionary relationship of the ferritin family.

  13. Serum hepcidin level correlates with hyperlipidemia status in patients following allograft renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Xue, D; He, X; Zhou, C

    2014-01-01

    Hepcidin is synthesized and secreted by liver cells and has been reported as one of the hormone molecules that regulates iron homeostasis. To determine whether serum level of hepcidin can be used as a biomarker for the evaluation of chronic inflammatory status, iron level and renal function in patients following allograft renal transplantation, serum levels of hepcidin, interleukin (IL)-6, ferritin, serum iron, and renal functions were measured. Sixty patients were included in the current study and were further separated into groups with or without hyperlipidemia. We found that allogeneic kidney transplant recipients with hyperlipidemia have significantly increased serum levels of hepcidin, IL-6, and ferritin. The increased serum hepcidin is positively correlated with serum IL-6 and ferritin as analyzed by single-factor correlation analysis. Multivariant correlation analysis in all specimens further demonstrated that serum hepcidin negatively correlated with glomerular filtration rate, and positively correlated with serum total cholesterol, triglycerides, serum ferritin, and IL-6. Our study demonstrated that serum level of hepcidin after allogeneic kidney transplantation not only reflects the status of chronic inflammation but can also indicate changes in renal function. Thus, hepcidin has the potential to be used as a promising marker for the detection and monitoring of the status of chronic inflammation, hyperlipidemia, and renal function in patients following allograft renal transplantation.

  14. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5340 - Ferritin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferritin immunological test system. 866.5340 Section 866.5340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems §...

  18. Haemopexin affects iron distribution and ferritin expression in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Noemi; Tonoli, Elisabetta; Logrand, Federica; Fiorito, Veronica; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Vercelli, Alessandro; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2009-01-01

    Haemopexin (Hx) is an acute phase plasma glycoprotein, mainly produced by the liver and released into plasma where it binds heme with high affinity and delivers it to the liver. This system provides protection against free heme-mediated oxidative stress, limits access by pathogens to heme and contributes to iron homeostasis by recycling heme iron. Hx protein has been found in the sciatic nerve, skeletal muscle, retina, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Recently, a comparative proteomic analysis has shown an increase of Hx in CSF from patients with Alzheimer’s disease, thus suggesting its involvement in heme detoxification in brain. Here, we report that Hx is synthesised in brain by the ventricular ependymal cells. To verify whether Hx is involved in heme scavenging in brain, and consequently, in the control of iron level, iron deposits and ferritin expression were analysed in cerebral regions known for iron accumulation. We show a twofold increase in the number of iron-loaded oligodendrocytes in the basal ganglia and thalamus of Hx-null mice compared to wild-type controls. Interestingly, there was no increase in H- and L-ferritin expression in these regions. This condition is common to several human neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in which iron loading is not associated with an adequate increase in ferritin expression. However, a strong reduction in the number of ferritin-positive cells was observed in the cerebral cortex of Hx-null animals. Consistent with increased iron deposits and inadequate ferritin expression, malondialdehyde level and Cu–Zn superoxide dismutase-1 expression were higher in the brain of Hx-null mice than in that of wild-type controls. These data demonstrate that Hx plays an important role in controlling iron distribution within brain, thus suggesting its involvement in iron-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19120692

  19. Crystal structure of plant ferritin reveals a novel metal binding site that functions as a transit site for metal transfer in ferritin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro; Goto, Fumiyuki; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Mikami, Bunzo

    2010-02-05

    Ferritins are important iron storage and detoxification proteins that are widely distributed in living kingdoms. Because plant ferritin possesses both a ferroxidase site and a ferrihydrite nucleation site, it is a suitable model for studying the mechanism of iron storage in ferritin. This article presents for the first time the crystal structure of a plant ferritin from soybean at 1.8-A resolution. The soybean ferritin 4 (SFER4) had a high structural similarity to vertebrate ferritin, except for the N-terminal extension region, the C-terminal short helix E, and the end of the BC-loop. Similar to the crystal structures of other ferritins, metal binding sites were observed in the iron entry channel, ferroxidase center, and nucleation site of SFER4. In addition to these conventional sites, a novel metal binding site was discovered intermediate between the iron entry channel and the ferroxidase site. This site was coordinated by the acidic side chain of Glu(173) and carbonyl oxygen of Thr(168), which correspond, respectively, to Glu(140) and Thr(135) of human H chain ferritin according to their sequences. A comparison of the ferroxidase activities of the native and the E173A mutant of SFER4 clearly showed a delay in the iron oxidation rate of the mutant. This indicated that the glutamate residue functions as a transit site of iron from the 3-fold entry channel to the ferroxidase site, which may be universal among ferritins.

  20. Evidence for a protein-protein complex during iron loading into ferritin by ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Reilly, C A; Sorlie, M; Aust, S D

    1998-06-01

    The formation of a protein-protein complex for the loading of iron into ferritin by ceruloplasmin was investigated. Ferritin stimulated the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin unless the ferritin was fully loaded, in which case it inhibited the ferroxidase activity of ceruloplasmin. The apparent association constant for the interaction of ferritin and ceruloplasmin was 24 nM. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that the interaction of ceruloplasmin and ferritin was endothermic, driven by positive changes in entropy. The association constants for complex formation between ferritin and ceruloplasmin were 4.5 +/- 0.7 x 10(5) and 9.5 +/- 0.3 x 10(4) M-1 for the reduced and oxidized forms of ceruloplasmin, respectively. The oxidized form of ceruloplasmin was retained on an affinity column with ferritin immobilized as the ligand and remained bound to the column with mobile phases of increased hydrophobicity, but was eluted with increased ionic strength. The ability of ceruloplasmin to remain bound to the affinity resin was affected by the species from which ceruloplasmin was isolated. Gradient ultracentrifugation also provided evidence that the two proteins were associated, since ferritin promoted migration of ceruloplasmin through the gradient. Including ferrous iron in the gradient resulted in reduction of ceruloplasmin and increased the mobility of ceruloplasmin with ferritin. These data provide evidence that ferritin and ceruloplasmin form a protein-protein complex during iron loading into ferritin, which may limit redox cycling of iron in vivo.

  1. Ferritin trends do not predict changes in total body iron in patients with transfusional iron overload.

    PubMed

    Puliyel, Mammen; Sposto, Richard; Berdoukas, Vasilios A; Hofstra, Thomas C; Nord, Anne; Carson, Susan; Wood, John; Coates, Thomas D

    2014-04-01

    Ferritin levels and trends are widely used to manage iron overload and assess the efficacy of prescribed iron chelation in patients with transfusional iron loading. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 134 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia, over a period of up to 9 years. To determine whether the trends in ferritin adequately reflect the changes in total body iron, changes in ferritin between consecutive liver iron measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared to changes in liver iron concentrations (LIC), a measure of total body iron. The time period between two consecutive LIC measurements was defined as a segment. Trends in ferritin were considered to predict the change in LIC within a segment if the change in one parameter was less than twofold that of the other, and was in the same direction. Using the exclusion criteria detailed in methods, the trends in ferritin were compared to changes in LIC in 358 segments. An agreement between ferritin trends and LIC changes was found in only 38% of the 358 segments examined. Furthermore, the change in ferritin was in opposite direction to that of LIC in 26% of the segments. Trends in ferritin were a worse predictor of changes in LIC in sickle cell disease than in thalassemia (P < 0.01). While ferritin is a convenient measure of iron status; ferritin trends were unable to predict changes in LIC in individual patients. Ferritin trends need to be interpreted with caution and confirmed by direct measurement of LIC.

  2. Comparison of plasma ferritin concentration versus the ratio of plasma transferrin receptor to ferritin in estimating body iron stores: results of 4 intervention trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: To develop global programs for the control of iron deficiency, simple, low-cost, accurate indicators of iron status are needed. Objectives: To compare estimates of body iron stores, as calculated from either plasma ferritin concentration alone (BI-ferritin) or the ratio of plasma transf...

  3. Translational control of ferritin synthesis: a study of repression using natural and synthetic mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, L.F.; Wang, Y.H.; Wortman, I.; Shull, G.E.; Theil, E.C.

    1987-05-01

    Ferritin synthesis is a dramatic example of mRNA repression: excess iron causes recruitment of ferritin mRNA, increasing synthesis less than or equal to 40 x. Using the iron-storing tadpole red cell as a simple and accessible model, isolated poly(A+) RNA directed the synthesis of ferritin and globin in cell-free extracts from wheat germ (WG); in contrast, ferritin mRNA was specifically repressed (72%) in extracts from rabbit reticulocytes (RR) as it is in vivo. Translatable and hybridizable ferritin mRNA did not enter polysomes of RR in contrast to globin mRNA and to both ferritin and globin mRNA in WG. Single-sequence mRNA, uncapped, was prepared in vitro for both a ferritin M chain and a globin beta chain; both were translated with similar efficiency in RR (164 +/- 66) x 10/sup -3/ and (205 +/- 144) x 10/sup -3/ cpm (/sup 3/H)leucine/h/..mu..g RNA for ferritin and globin, respectively). Ferritin with the expected immunoreactivity and mobility in SDS gel electrophoresis was obtained. The results suggest that ferritin mRNA repression may require a cap or factors present in poly(A+) RNA and that repression can be released in WG but not in RR.

  4. Ferritin: the protein nanocage and iron biomineral in health and in disease.

    PubMed

    Theil, Elizabeth C

    2013-11-04

    At the center of iron and oxidant metabolism is the ferritin superfamily: protein cages with Fe(2+) ion channels and two catalytic Fe/O redox centers that initiate the formation of caged Fe2O3·H2O. Ferritin nanominerals, initiated within the protein cage, grow inside the cage cavity (5 or 8 nm in diameter). Ferritins contribute to normal iron flow, maintenance of iron concentrates for iron cofactor syntheses, sequestration of iron from invading pathogens, oxidant protection, oxidative stress recovery, and, in diseases where iron accumulates excessively, iron chelation strategies. In eukaryotic ferritins, biomineral order/crystallinity is influenced by nucleation channels between active sites and the mineral growth cavity. Animal ferritin cages contain, uniquely, mixtures of catalytically active (H) and inactive (L) polypeptide subunits with varied rates of Fe(2+)/O2 catalysis and mineral crystallinity. The relatively low mineral order in liver ferritin, for example, coincides with a high percentage of L subunits and, thus, a low percentage of catalytic sites and nucleation channels. Low mineral order facilitates rapid iron turnover and the physiological role of liver ferritin as a general iron source for other tissues. Here, current concepts of ferritin structure/function/genetic regulation are discussed and related to possible therapeutic targets such as mini-ferritin/Dps protein active sites (selective pathogen inhibition in infection), nanocage pores (iron chelation in therapeutic hypertransfusion), mRNA noncoding, IRE riboregulator (normalizing the ferritin iron content after therapeutic hypertransfusion), and protein nanovessels to deliver medicinal or sensor cargo.

  5. Electrical conductivity of cationized ferritin decorated gold nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Rebecca; Slocik, Joseph M.; Van Nostrand, Joseph E.; Halas, Naomi J.; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2012-06-01

    We report on a novel method of controlling the resistance of nanodimensional, gold-coated SiO2 nanoparticles by utilizing biomolecules chemisorbed to the nanoshell surface. Local electronic transport properties of gold-coated nanoshells were measured using scanning conductance microscopy. These results were compared to transport properties of identical gold nanoshells biofunctionalized with cationized ferritin protein both with and without an iron oxide core (apoferritin). Measured resistances were on the order of mega-ohms. White light irradiation effects on transport properties were also explored. The results suggest that the light energy influences the nanoshells' conductivity. A mechanism for assembly of gold nanoshells with cationized ferritin or cationized apoferritin is proposed to explain the resistivity dependence on irradiation.

  6. Folic acid conjugated ferritins as photosensitizer carriers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Zipeng; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Weizhong; Xie, Jin

    2015-06-01

    We coupled folic acid as a tumour targeting ligand to the surface of ferritins and loaded them with ZnF16Pc. The resulting nanoconjugates can efficiently hone in on 4T1 tumours in vivo, and, with photoirradiation, leading to suppressed tumour growth and tumour metastasis.We coupled folic acid as a tumour targeting ligand to the surface of ferritins and loaded them with ZnF16Pc. The resulting nanoconjugates can efficiently hone in on 4T1 tumours in vivo, and, with photoirradiation, leading to suppressed tumour growth and tumour metastasis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experiments and ex vivo imaging results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01833a

  7. Low Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lyberopoulou, Aggeliki; Chachami, Georgia; Gatselis, Nikolaos K; Kyratzopoulou, Eleni; Saitis, Asterios; Gabeta, Stella; Eliades, Petros; Paraskeva, Efrosini; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K; Mamalaki, Avgi; Dalekos, George N; Simos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin, a liver hormone, is important for both innate immunity and iron metabolism regulation. As dysfunction of the hepcidin pathway may contribute to liver pathology, we analysed liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Hepcidin mRNA levels were determined in liver biopsies obtained from 126 patients with HCV (n = 21), HBV (n = 23), autoimmune cholestatic disease (primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis; PBC/PSC; n = 34), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH; n = 16) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD; n = 32). Sera sampled on the biopsy day from the same patients were investigated for serum hepcidin levels. Hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels correlated positively with ferritin and negatively with serum γ-GT levels. However, no correlation was found between serum hepcidin and either ferritin or liver hepcidin mRNA. Both serum hepcidin and the serum hepcidin/ferritin ratio were significantly lower in AIH and PBC/PSC patients' sera compared to HBV, HCV or NAFLD (P<0.001 for each comparison) and correlated negatively with serum ALP levels. PBC/PSC and AIH patients maintained low serum hepcidin during the course of their two-year long treatment. In summary, parallel determination of liver hepcidin mRNA and serum hepcidin in patients with chronic liver diseases shows that circulating hepcidin and its respective ratio to ferritin are significantly diminished in patients with autoimmune liver diseases. These novel findings, once confirmed by follow-up studies involving bigger size and better-matched disease subgroups, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune liver diseases.

  8. Electrical Conductivity of Ferritin Proteins by Conductive AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-25 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 PA and 0.19 PA, respectively.

  9. The Ferritin Superfamily: Supramolecular Templates for Materials Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masaki; Kang, Sebyung; Reichhardt, Courtney; Harlen, Kevin; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Members of the ferritin superfamily are multi-subunit cage-like proteins with a hollow interior cavity. These proteins possess three distinct surfaces, i.e. interior and exterior surfaces of the cages and interface between subunits. The interior cavity provides a unique reaction environment in which the interior reaction is separated from the external environment. In biology the cavity is utilized for sequestration of irons and biomineralization as a mechanism to render Fe inert and sequester it from the external environment. Material scientists have been inspired by this system and exploited a range of ferritin superfamily proteins as supramolecular templates to encapsulate nanoparticles and/or as well-defined building blocks for fabrication of higher order assembly. Besides the interior cavity, the exterior surface of the protein cages can be modified without altering the interior characteristics. This allows us to deliver the protein cages to a targeted tissue in vivo or to achieve controlled assembly on a solid substrate to fabricate higher order structures. Furthermore, the interface between subunits is utilized for manipulating chimeric self-assembly of the protein cages and in the generation of symmetry-broken Janus particles. Utilizing these ideas, the ferritin superfamily has been exploited for development of a broad range of materials with applications from biomedicine to electronics. PMID:20026386

  10. Effect of systemic inflammation on level of ferritin seminal in chronic renal male patient undergoing hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Most hemodialysis patients present with chronic systemic inflammation characterized by the elevation of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and/or the production of proinflammatory interleukins by the immune system in response to the hemodialysis process. Plasma ferritin(PF) is one of the parameters used to correct anemia. An PF level of >500 ng/mL is not recommended for correction of anemia because of the uncertainty of whether these levels are elevated because of anemia or a mere reaction to inflammation. we aimed to study the effects of inflammation on seminal ferritin (SF) levels and hypothesized that SF is not affected because of the testicular immune privilege. Methods A prospective prevalence study was conducted at the Department of Hemodialysis of the University Hospital of Brasília (HuB) between June 2010 and July 2011. The sample included 60 chronic renal patients undergoing hemodialysis and 20 control subjects from the health promotion general outpatient clinic. All participants were males aged 18–60 years. Inflammation was assessed through serum CRP levels, and the testicular condition was determined by measuring sex hormone levels. In the patient group, inflammation was considered to be present when CRP was >5 mg/L (n = 27) and absent when CRP was ≤5 mg/L (n = 33). Control group (n = 20) CRP was ≤1 mg/L. Blood and semen were collected via arm venoclysis and after voluntary masturbation, respectively. CRP was measured by turbidimetry; PF, SF, and sex hormone levels by immunochemoluminescence. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results There was no significant difference in mean SF levels among patients with inflammation (295.34 ± 145.39 ng/mL), those without inflammation (324.42 ± 145.51 mg/mL), and controls (335.70 ± 075.90 ng/mL; p = 0.49). There was no correlation between mean SF and PF levels in the patients with and without inflammation). All participants were eugonadal with mean

  11. Increased Dietary Intake of Saturated Fatty Acid Heptadecanoic Acid (C17:0) Associated with Decreasing Ferritin and Alleviated Metabolic Syndrome in Dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Venn-Watson, Stephanie K.; Parry, Celeste; Baird, Mark; Stevenson, Sacha; Carlin, Kevin; Daniels, Risa; Smith, Cynthia R.; Jones, Richard; Wells, Randall S.; Ridgway, Sam; Jensen, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Similar to humans, bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) can develop metabolic syndrome and associated high ferritin. While fish and fish-based fatty acids may protect against metabolic syndrome in humans, findings have been inconsistent. To assess potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome related to fish diets, fatty acids were compared between two dolphin populations with higher (n = 30, Group A) and lower (n = 19, Group B) mean insulin (11 ± 12 and 2 ± 5 μIU/ml, respectively; P < 0.0001) and their dietary fish. In addition to higher insulin, triglycerides, and ferritin, Group A had lower percent serum heptadecanoic acid (C17:0) compared to Group B (0.3 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.4%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Using multivariate stepwise regression, higher percent serum C17:0, a saturated fat found in dairy fat, rye, and some fish, was an independent predictor of lower insulin in dolphins. Capelin, a common dietary fish for Group A, had no detectable C17:0, while pinfish and mullet, common in Group B’s diet, had C17:0 (41 and 67 mg/100g, respectively). When a modified diet adding 25% pinfish and/or mullet was fed to six Group A dolphins over 24 weeks (increasing the average daily dietary C17:0 intake from 400 to 1700 mg), C17:0 serum levels increased, high ferritin decreased, and blood-based metabolic syndrome indices normalized toward reference levels. These effects were not found in four reference dolphins. Further, higher total serum C17:0 was an independent and linear predictor of lower ferritin in dolphins in Group B dolphins. Among off the shelf dairy products tested, butter had the highest C17:0 (423mg/100g); nonfat dairy products had no detectable C17:0. We hypothesize that humans’ movement away from diets with potentially beneficial saturated fatty acid C17:0, including whole fat dairy products, could be a contributor to widespread low C17:0 levels, higher ferritin, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26200116

  12. Increased Dietary Intake of Saturated Fatty Acid Heptadecanoic Acid (C17:0) Associated with Decreasing Ferritin and Alleviated Metabolic Syndrome in Dolphins.

    PubMed

    Venn-Watson, Stephanie K; Parry, Celeste; Baird, Mark; Stevenson, Sacha; Carlin, Kevin; Daniels, Risa; Smith, Cynthia R; Jones, Richard; Wells, Randall S; Ridgway, Sam; Jensen, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    Similar to humans, bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) can develop metabolic syndrome and associated high ferritin. While fish and fish-based fatty acids may protect against metabolic syndrome in humans, findings have been inconsistent. To assess potential protective factors against metabolic syndrome related to fish diets, fatty acids were compared between two dolphin populations with higher (n = 30, Group A) and lower (n = 19, Group B) mean insulin (11 ± 12 and 2 ± 5 μIU/ml, respectively; P < 0.0001) and their dietary fish. In addition to higher insulin, triglycerides, and ferritin, Group A had lower percent serum heptadecanoic acid (C17:0) compared to Group B (0.3 ± 0.1 and 1.3 ± 0.4%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Using multivariate stepwise regression, higher percent serum C17:0, a saturated fat found in dairy fat, rye, and some fish, was an independent predictor of lower insulin in dolphins. Capelin, a common dietary fish for Group A, had no detectable C17:0, while pinfish and mullet, common in Group B's diet, had C17:0 (41 and 67 mg/100g, respectively). When a modified diet adding 25% pinfish and/or mullet was fed to six Group A dolphins over 24 weeks (increasing the average daily dietary C17:0 intake from 400 to 1700 mg), C17:0 serum levels increased, high ferritin decreased, and blood-based metabolic syndrome indices normalized toward reference levels. These effects were not found in four reference dolphins. Further, higher total serum C17:0 was an independent and linear predictor of lower ferritin in dolphins in Group B dolphins. Among off the shelf dairy products tested, butter had the highest C17:0 (423mg/100g); nonfat dairy products had no detectable C17:0. We hypothesize that humans' movement away from diets with potentially beneficial saturated fatty acid C17:0, including whole fat dairy products, could be a contributor to widespread low C17:0 levels, higher ferritin, and metabolic syndrome.

  13. Proanthocyanidins inhibit iron absorption from soybean (Glycine max) seed ferritin in rats with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yun, Shaojun; Zhang, Tuo; Li, Meiliang; Chen, Bin; Zhao, Guanghua

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of proanthocyanidins (PAs) on iron uptake from soybean seed ferritin (SSF) crude by rats with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) for the first time. Six groups of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n = 10) were used, which contain (1) SSF crude group; (2) SSF crude + PAs group; (3) PAs group; (4) FeSO(4) group; (5) iron deficiency control group; and (6) control group. The bioavailability of iron was examined by measuring hemoglobin (Hb) concentration value, red blood cell (RBC) numbers, and serum iron stores. After 8 weeks, Hb concentration was almost recovered to the normal level upon feeding SSF crude or FeSO(4) to rats. In contrast, Hb concentration was recovered to less extent when SSF crude plus PAs was used instead of SSF crude alone (P < 0.05). A similar profile was observed with these three sample groups when serum iron and RBC were used as parameters. All rats in PAs group died at the 8th week. Taken together, all these results demonstrated that PAs inhibited iron uptake of rats from SSF, and are toxic for rats with IDA.

  14. The clearance of /sup 131/I-human plasma ferritin in man

    SciTech Connect

    Worwood, M.; Cragg, S.J.; Williams, A.M.; Wagstaff, M.; Jacobs, A.

    1982-10-01

    Ferritin was purified 33,000-fold from the plasma of patients with idiopathic hemochromatosis. The plasma ferritin was labeled with /sup 131/I and injected into 2 normal men. Clearance was found to be relatively slow, with 50% /sup 131/I-ferritin remaining in the plasma at 27-30 hr. The fraction of plasma ferritin that bound to concanavalin-A was found to be cleared more slowly than the nonbinding fraction. These findings confirm our previous suggestion that glycosylation is a major factor prolonging the survival of ferritin in the plasma, but differ from the results of earlier studies in experimental animals and preterm infants, which indicated very rapid plasma ferritin turnover.

  15. Phosphate and arsenate removal efficiency by thermostable ferritin enzyme from Pyrococcus furiosus using radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Sevcenco, Ana-Maria; Paravidino, Monica; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S; Wolterbeek, Hubert Th; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2015-06-01

    Oxo-anion binding properties of the thermostable enzyme ferritin from Pyrococcus furiosus were characterized with radiography. Radioisotopes (32)P and (76)As present as oxoanions were used to measure the extent and the rate of their absorption by the ferritin. Thermostable ferritin proved to be an excellent system for rapid phosphate and arsenate removal from aqueous solutions down to residual concentrations at the picomolar level. These very low concentrations make thermostable ferritin a potential tool to considerably mitigate industrial biofouling by phosphate limitation or to remove arsenate from drinking water.

  16. A facile synthesis of fluorescent silver nanoclusters with human ferritin as a synthetic and interfacing ligand.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Hwan; Ahn, Byungjun; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Chang Soo; Jung, Yongwon

    2015-05-21

    Water-soluble fluorescent silver nanoclusters (NCs) formed on biomolecule ligands have been extensively studied due to their great potential as new biocompatible fluorescent materials for biosensors. As synthetic ligands, proteins in particular can provide unique structures and functions to the assembled fluorescent silver clusters. A key challenge, however, is to develop appropriate protein ligands and synthetic approaches for cluster formation, especially using native aqueous solutions, to fully preserve the valuable properties of the protein templates. Here we report a human ferritin-templated synthesis of fluorescent silver NCs under neutral aqueous buffer conditions. The unique metal binding property of ferritin and an optimized silver ion reduction allowed us to produce highly stable fluorescent silver NCs that are steadily assembled in the cage-like ferritin proteins. The fluorescent clusters were also successfully assembled on genetically engineered ferritin with antibody-binding protein G. The resulting protein G-ferritin-silver NC complex fully retained the ferritin structure as well as the antibody binding ability. The present silver nanoclusters on ferritin (Ft-Ag NCs) also showed highly specific Cu(2+)-induced fluorescence quenching. By exploiting the large but stable nature of ferritin, we fabricated a highly robust and porous hydrogel sensor system for rapid Cu(2+) detection, where the Ft-Ag NCs were stably encapsulated in surface-bound hydrogels with large pore sizes. Our Ft-Ag NCs that are formed under native aqueous conditions will have great potential as a new fluorescent material with the high structural and functional diversities of ferritin.

  17. Mutated recombinant human heavy-chain ferritins and myelosuppression in vitro and in vivo: a link between ferritin ferroxidase activity and biological function.

    PubMed Central

    Broxmeyer, H E; Cooper, S; Levi, S; Arosio, P

    1991-01-01

    Human heavy-chain (H-) ferritin muteins obtained by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis, together with wild-type recombinant human H- and light-chain (L-) ferritins, were evaluated for in vitro effects on the suppression of human bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells and for in vivo effects on marrow and splenic myelopoiesis in C3H/HeJ mice. The 10 H-ferritin muteins exhibited alterations of various regions of the molecule, including ones exposed on the outer surface, on the inner cavity, and on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic channels and of the four-alpha-helix bundle forming the subunit structure. They were stable and were electrophoretically analogous to wild-type H-ferritin. The muteins showed in vitro and in vivo myelosuppressive activity analogous to wild type, except for mutein 222, which was totally inactive and which lacked ferroxidase activity. Recombinant human L-ferritin, devoid of ferroxidase activity, was also inactive as a suppressor. The results demonstrate that H-ferritin myelosuppressive and ferroxidase activities are linked. One possibility is that ferroxidase activity may interfere with the cellular uptake of transferrin iron that is needed for cell proliferation, an interpretation consistent with the presently described ability of hemin to overcome H-ferritin suppressive effects. PMID:1992468

  18. Iron Oxide Biominerals in Protein Nanocages, the Ferritins: Easing Into Life With Oxygen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theil, E. C.

    2008-12-01

    Organisms with ferritins could represent the progenitors of organisms that successfully made the transition to aerobic life. Ferritins are protein nanocages (8 or 12 nm diameter) that catalyze reactions between Fe(II) and O2 or H2O2 to synthesize ferrihydrite-like biominerals of Fe2O3(H2 O)n; phosphate is sometimes incorporated during mineralization. All groups of organisms, archea, bacteria, plants and animals have ferritins. Catalytic reactions between Fe and O occur in the protein cage with the products moving into the central protein cavity (5 or 8 nm diameter) where mineralization occurs; mineral sizes reach 4500 Fe with more than 7000 O atoms in the large cavities of maxi-ferritins and 500 Fe with more than 800 O atoms in the smaller, mini-ferritins, also called Dps proteins. H2O2 is preferentially used by mini-ferritins in archea and bacteria, contrasting with O2, preferentially used by maxi-ferritins in bacteria plants and animals, and some bacterial mini-ferritins that use either H2O2 or O2, to oxidize Fe(II) during biomineralization. The study of ferritins in contemporary organisms can illuminate mechanisms for oxygen and oxidant responses in changing environments now and in the past. Multiple genes encoding ferritins are often regulated by different environmental stimuli and in multi-cellular organisms, by tissue-specific, differentiation programs. The single celled E.coli has four ferritin genes, encoding three maxi-ferritins, one with a heme cofactor (bacterioferritin), and one mini-ferritin (Dps), expressed at different points in the culture cycle and/or in response to different stresses. Environmental iron, oxygen and peroxide all change the amounts of ferritin. When iron is plentiful, mineralized ferritin accumulates. Ferritin iron is recovered during periods of iron deficiency, apparently by selective unfolding of gated pores in ferritin protein nanocage that expose the mineral to reductants. Gene (DNA) transcription is the genetic target for iron

  19. Magnetic properties of ferritin and akaganeite nanoparticles in aqueous suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewski, Marceli; Pochylski, Mikołaj; Gierszewski, Jacek

    2013-09-01

    We have studied the magnetically induced optical birefringence Δ n of horse spleen ferritin (HSF) and aqueous suspensions of several different-sized iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles coated with different polysaccharides mimicking ferritin. The structure and dimensions of the akaganeite mineral core were characterized by XRD and TEM, respectively. The stability of the suspensions in the measurement temperature range from 278 to 358 K was confirmed by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The values of optical polarizability anisotropy Δ α, magnetic susceptibility anisotropy Δ χ, and permanent magnetic dipole moment μ m of the akaganeite nanoparticles have been estimated on the basis of the temperature dependence of the Cotton-Mouton (C-M) constant. The magnetic birefringence of Fe-sucrose has been described tentatively by different types of Langevin function allowing another estimation of Δ χ and μ m. The obtained permanent magnetic dipole moment μ m of the studied akaganeite nanoparticles proves small and comparable to that of HSF. The value of μ m is found to increase with decreasing nanoparticle diameter. Observed in a range spanning more than five orders of magnitude, the linear relation between the C-M constant and the iron concentration provides a basis for possible analytical application of the C-M effect in biomedicine. The established relation between the C-M constant and the nanoparticle diameter confirms that the dominant contribution to the measured magnetic birefringence comes from the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy Δ χ. A comparison of the C-M constants of the studied akaganeite nanoparticles with the data obtained for HSF provides evidence that the ferritin core behaves as a non-Euclidian solid.

  20. Soybean Ferritin Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Modulates Iron Accumulation and Resistance to Elevated Iron Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    de Llanos, Rosa; Martínez-Garay, Carlos Andrés; Fita-Torró, Josep; Romero, Antonia María; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungi, including the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lack ferritin and use vacuoles as iron storage organelles. This work explored how plant ferritin expression influenced baker's yeast iron metabolism. Soybean seed ferritin H1 (SFerH1) and SFerH2 genes were cloned and expressed in yeast cells. Both soybean ferritins assembled as multimeric complexes, which bound yeast intracellular iron in vivo and, consequently, induced the activation of the genes expressed during iron scarcity. Soybean ferritin protected yeast cells that lacked the Ccc1 vacuolar iron detoxification transporter from toxic iron levels by reducing cellular oxidation, thus allowing growth at high iron concentrations. Interestingly, when simultaneously expressed in ccc1Δ cells, SFerH1 and SFerH2 assembled as heteropolymers, which further increased iron resistance and reduced the oxidative stress produced by excess iron compared to ferritin homopolymer complexes. Finally, soybean ferritin expression led to increased iron accumulation in both wild-type and ccc1Δ yeast cells at certain environmental iron concentrations. IMPORTANCE Iron deficiency is a worldwide nutritional disorder to which women and children are especially vulnerable. A common strategy to combat iron deficiency consists of dietary supplementation with inorganic iron salts, whose bioavailability is very low. Iron-enriched yeasts and cereals are alternative strategies to diminish iron deficiency. Animals and plants possess large ferritin complexes that accumulate, detoxify, or buffer excess cellular iron. However, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks ferritin and uses vacuoles as iron storage organelles. Here, we explored how soybean ferritin expression influenced yeast iron metabolism, confirming that yeasts that express soybean seed ferritin could be explored as a novel strategy to increase dietary iron absorption. PMID:26969708

  1. Loading of iron into recombinant rat liver ferritin heteropolymers by ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Juan, S H; Guo, J H; Aust, S D

    1997-05-15

    We have reported previously that the heavy chain of ferritin is required for iron incorporation by ceruloplasmin (J.-H. Guo, M. Abedi, and S. D. Aust (1996) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 335(1)). The purpose of this study was to determine how many heavy chains were required for ceruloplasmin to interact with ferritin such that iron loading occurred. The cDNA sequences encoding the heavy and light chains of rat liver ferritin were cloned into the baculovirus transfer vector pA-cUW51 under the control of polyhedrin and p10 promoters, respectively, which was then incorporated by homologous recombination into the infections Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus genome. Both ferritin chains were expressed and assembled into two heteropolymers following the infection of insect cells by recombinant virus, which were separated by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography. The percentage of heavy (H) and light (L) chains making up the two heteropolymers, determined by gel scanning following the resolution of chains on SDS-PAGE, were equivalent to 1 H and 23 L chains and 2 H and 22 L chains. The maximal extent of iron loading was observed using 1 mol of rat ceruloplasmin per mole of H chain in the two heteropolymers. The extent of iron incorporation decreased with additional ceruloplasmin. Iron incorporation into rat liver ferritin, found to contain 10 H chains, increased as the molar ratio of ceruloplasmin to ferritin increased to 4:1 and remained the same up to 8:1. Iron loading into horse spleen ferritin, found to have one H chain, appeared similar to that for recombinant ferritin, having only one H chain. Therefore, we propose that the optimal molar ratio of ceruloplasmin to ferritin depends upon the numbers of H chain making up the ferritin molecule for the maximal incorporation of iron into ferritin. These results also suggest that the iron loading channel is contained within a single H chain subunit.

  2. Electrical conductivity of ferritin proteins by conductive AFM.

    PubMed

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D; Harb, John N; Davis, Robert C

    2005-04-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-15 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 pA and 0.19 pA, respectively.

  3. Serum iron, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Madenci, Gulizar; Bilen, Sule; Arli, Berna; Saka, Mustafa; Ak, Fikri

    2012-07-01

    We aimed to investigate possible associations between systemic iron metabolism deficiency and Parkinson's disease, and also to research any possible correlations between stage of the disease and vitamin B12 and folic acid levels. 33 male and 27 female patients diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 22 male and 20 female age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Having the diagnosis of secondary Parkinsonism or Parkinson plus syndromes, and for the females, not being in the menopausal stage were considered as exclusion criteria. Recordings of blood samples of both groups collected after 8 h fasts were assessed in terms of serum iron, ferritin levels and iron-binding capacity, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels. The Hoehn and Yahr scale was used to determine the stage of the disease. No statistically significant difference was found with respect to mean serum iron, median serum ferritin levels and median serum iron-binding capacity between the groups. A statistically significant but inverse correlation was found between symptoms' duration and serum iron and ferritin levels. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to vitamin B12 and folic acid levels. However, a statistically significant but inverse correlation was determined between the patients' vitamin B12 levels and the Hoehn and Yahr scores. As Parkinson's disease progresses, serum iron, ferritin and vitamin B12 levels may decrease. The lower levels of these parameters may be the cause of the progression or may be the result of it.

  4. Effect of supplementation with ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate on ferritin concentration in Mexican schoolchildren: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide. It is more prevalent when iron requirements are increased during pregnancy and during growth spurts of infancy and adolescence. The last stage in the process of iron depletion is characterized by a decrease in hemoglobin concentration, resulting in iron deficiency anemia. Iron deficiency, even before it is clinically identified as anemia, compromises the immune response, physical capacity for work, and intellectual functions such as attention level. Therefore, interventions addressing iron deficiency should be based on prevention rather than on treatment of anemia. The aim of this study was to compare short- and medium-term effects on ferritin concentration of daily supplementation with ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate in schoolchildren with iron deficiency but without anemia. Methods Two hundred schoolchildren from public boarding schools in Mexico City who had low iron stores as assessed by serum ferritin concentration but without anemia were randomly assigned to a daily supplement of 30 mg/day of elemental iron as ferrous sulfate or iron bis-glycinate chelate for 12 weeks. Iron status was evaluated at baseline, one week post-supplementation (short term), and 6 months (medium term) after supplementation. Results Ferritin concentration increased significantly between baseline and post-supplementation as well as between baseline and 6 months after supplementation. One week post-supplementation no difference was found in ferritin concentration between iron compounds, but 6 months after supplementation ferritin concentration was higher in the group that received bis-glycinate chelate iron. However, there is no difference in the odds for low iron storage between 6 months after supplementation versus the odds after supplementation; nor were these odds different by type of supplement. Hemoglobin concentration did not change significantly in either group after

  5. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    ABSTRACT

    Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  6. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, A; Alonso, J; Muñoz, D; Marcano, L; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A; Fernández de Luis, R; Orue, I; Mathon, O; Muela, A; Fdez-Gubieda, M L

    2016-01-14

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction.

  7. Induction of ferritin synthesis by water deficit and iron excess in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    DeLaat, Daiane Mariele; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Carbonell, Sergio Augusto Morais

    2014-03-01

    Ferritins are molecules for iron storage present in most living beings. In plants, ferritin is an essential iron homeostasis regulator and therefore plays a fundamental role in control of iron induced by oxidative stress or by excess of iron ions. Ferritin gene expression is modulated by various environmental factors, including the intensity of drought, cold, light and pathogenic attack. Common bean, one of the most important species in the Brazilian diet, is also affected by insufficiency or lack of water. Thus, the present study was conducted for the purpose of determining the levels of expression of ferritins transcripts in leaf tissues of three common bean cultivars (BAT 477, Carioca Comum and IAC-Diplomata) under osmotic shock caused by polyethylene glycol 6000 and by iron excess. The expression of three ferritins genes (PvFer1, PvFer2 and PvFer3), determined by quantitative PCR, indicated a difference in the expression kinetics among the cultivars. All the ferritin genes were actively transcribed under iron excess and water deficit conditions. The cultivars most responsive to treatments were BAT 477 and IAC-Diplomata. All the cultivars responded to treatments. Nevertheless, the ferritin genes were differentially regulated according to the cultivars. Analysis of variance indicated differences among cultivars in expression of the genes PvFer1 and PvFer3. Both genes were most responsive to treatments. This result suggests that ferritin genes may be functionally important in acclimatization of common bean under iron excess or water deficit conditions.

  8. Ferritin protect shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei from WSSV infection by inhibiting virus replication.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Wu, Xiaoting; Wu, Wenlin; Dai, Congjie; Yuan, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Iron is considered as an essential element for all living organisms. Therefore, limiting iron availability may be key part of the host's innate immune response to various pathogens. Ferritin is a major iron storage protein in living cells and plays an important role in iron homeostasis. One way the host can transiently reduce iron bioavailability is by ferritin over expression. In invertebrates, ferritin was found to be up-regulated after pathogens challenge and is considered to be an important element in the innate immune system. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of ferritin in shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei defense against WSSV. We discovered that the viral load of shrimp injected with recombinant ferritin protein was lower than that of control group. The suppression of ferritin by dsRNA increased susceptibility to WSSV with 3-fold high viral copies. The present study documented that ferritin protected shrimp L. vannamei from WSSV by inhibiting virus replication. We presume that ferritin reduce iron availability, leading to inhibit the activity of ribonucleotide reductase and delay the replication of virus genome. This study provided new insights into the understanding of molecular responses and defense mechanisms in shrimp against WSSV.

  9. Expression and purification of intact and functional soybean (Glycine max) seed ferritin complex in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangbai; Tang, Bo; Li, Jie; Xu, Qian; Fang, Shentong; Hua, Zichun

    2008-02-01

    Soybean seed ferritin is essential for human iron supplementation and iron deficiency anemia prevention because it contains abundant bioavailable iron and is frequently consumed in the human diet. However, it is poorly understood in regards its several properties, such as iron mineralization, subunit assembly, and protein folding. To address these issues, we decided to prepare the soybean seed ferritin complex via a recombinant DNA approach. In this paper, we report a rapid and simple Escherichia coli expression system to produce the soybean seed ferritin complex. In this system, two subunits of soybean seed ferritin, H-2 and H-1, were encoded in a single plasmid, and optimal expression was achieved by additionally coexpressing a team of molecular chaperones, trigger factor and GroEL-GroES. The His-tagged ferritin complex was purified by Ni2+ affinity chromatography, and an intact ferritin complex was obtained following His-tagged enterokinase (His-EK) digestion. The purified ferritin complex synthesized in E. coli demonstrated some reported features of its native counterpart from soybean seed, including an apparent molecular weight, multimeric assembly, and iron uptake activity. We believe that the strategy described in this paper may be of general utility in producing other recombinant plant ferritins built up from two types of subunits.

  10. Differential expression of ferritin genes in response to abiotic stresses and hormones in pear (Pyrus pyrifolia).

    PubMed

    Xi, Li; Xu, Kuanyong; Qiao, Yushan; Qu, Shenchun; Zhang, Zhen; Dai, Wenhao

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the expression patterns of four ferritin genes (PpFer1, PpFer2, PpFer3, and PpFer4) in pear were investigated using quantitative real-time PCR. Analysis of tissue-specific expression revealed higher expression level of these genes in leaves than in other tested tissues. These ferritin genes were differentially expressed in response to various abiotic stresses and hormones treatments. The expression of ferritin wasn't affected by Fe(III)-citrate treatment. Abscisic acid significantly enhanced the expression of all four ferritin genes, especially PpFer2, followed by N-benzylyminopurine, gibberellic acid, and indole-3-acetic acid. The expression peaks of PpFer1 and PpFer3 in leaves appeared at 6, 6, and 12 h, respectively, after pear plant was exposed to oxidative stress (5 mM H(2)O(2)), salt stress (200 mM NaCl), and heat stress (40°C). A significant increase in PpFer4 expression was detected at 6 h after salt stress or heat stress. The expression of ferritin genes was not altered by cold stress. These results suggested that ferritin genes might be functionally important in acclimation of pear to salt and oxidative stresses. Hormone treatments had no significant effect on expression of ferritin genes compared to abiotic stresses. This showed accumulation of ferritin genes could be operated by different transduction pathways under abiotic stresses and hormones treatments.

  11. Biologically Derived Nanoparticle Arrays via a Site-Specific Reconstitution of Ferritin and their Electrochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Choi, Sang H.; Lillehei, Peter T.; King, Glen C.; Elliott, James R.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Park, Yeonjoon; Watt, Gerald D.

    2004-01-01

    Nanoparticle arrays biologically derived from an electrochemically-controlled site-specific biomineralization were fabricated on a gold substrate through the immobilization process of biomolecules. The work reported herein includes the immobilization of ferritin with various surface modifications, the electrochemical biomineralization of ferritins with different inorganic cores, the fabrication of self-assembled arrays with the immobilized ferritin, and the electrochemical characterization of various core materials. Protein immobilization on the substrate is achieved by anchoring ferritins with dithiobis-N-succinimidyl propionate (DTSP). A reconstitution process of electrochemical site-specific biomineralization with a protein cage loads ferritins with different core materials such as Pt, Co, Mn, and Ni. The ferritin acts as a nano-scale template, a biocompatible cage, and a separator between the nanoparticles. The nano-sized metalcored ferritins on a gold substrate displayed a good electrochemical activity for the electron transport and storage, which is suitable for bioelectronics applications such as biofuel cell, bionanobattery, biosensors, etc. Keywords: Ferritin, immobilization, site-specific reconstitution, biomineralization, and bioelectronics

  12. Salsolinol, a catechol neurotoxin, induces modification of ferritin: Protection by histidine dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Hoon

    2010-05-01

    1-Methyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (salsolinol), an endogenous neurotoxin present in the mammalian brain, is known to perform a role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we evaluated oxidative modifications of ferritin occurring after incubation with salsolinol. When ferritin was incubated with salsolinol, protein aggregation increased in a time-dependent manner. Free radical scavengers inhibited this salsolinol-mediated ferritin modification. The exposure of ferritin to salsolinol also results in the generation of protein carbonyl compounds and the formation of dityrosine. The results of this study show that free radicals may perform a pivotal role in salsolinol-mediated ferritin modification. Histidine dipeptides, such as carnosine, have been proposed to function as antioxidant agents in vivo. In this study, we also attempted to determine whether the histidine dipeptides, carnosine and N-acetyl-carnosine, could prevent salsolinol-mediated oxidative modification of ferritin. Our results showed that both carnosine and N-acetyl-carnosine significantly reduced ferritin aggregation. Both compounds effectively inhibited the formation of both carbonyl compounds and dityrosine. These results suggest that carnosine derivatives can, indeed, protect against salsolinol-mediated ferritin modification, as the consequence of free radical-scavenging activity.

  13. Absorption of iron from ferritin is independent of heme iron and ferrous salts in women and rat intestinal segments.

    PubMed

    Theil, Elizabeth C; Chen, Huijun; Miranda, Constanza; Janser, Heinz; Elsenhans, Bernd; Núñez, Marco T; Pizarro, Fernando; Schümann, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    Ferritin iron from food is readily bioavailable to humans and has the potential for treating iron deficiency. Whether ferritin iron absorption is mechanistically different from iron absorption from small iron complexes/salts remains controversial. Here, we studied iron absorption (RBC (59)Fe) from radiolabeled ferritin iron (0.5 mg) in healthy women with or without non-ferritin iron competitors, ferrous sulfate, or hemoglobin. A 9-fold excess of non-ferritin iron competitor had no significant effect on ferritin iron absorption. Larger amounts of iron (50 mg and a 99-fold excess of either competitor) inhibited iron absorption. To measure transport rates of iron that was absorbed inside ferritin, rat intestinal segments ex vivo were perfused with radiolabeled ferritin and compared to perfusion with ferric nitrilotriacetic (Fe-NTA), a well-studied form of chelated iron. Intestinal transport of iron absorbed inside exogenous ferritin was 14.8% of the rate measured for iron absorbed from chelated iron. In the steady state, endogenous enterocyte ferritin contained >90% of the iron absorbed from Fe-NTA or ferritin. We found that ferritin is a slow release source of iron, readily available to humans or animals, based on RBC iron incorporation. Ferritin iron is absorbed by a different mechanism than iron salts/chelates or heme iron. Recognition of a second, nonheme iron absorption process, ferritin endocytosis, emphasizes the need for more mechanistic studies on ferritin iron absorption and highlights the potential of ferritin present in foods such as legumes to contribute to solutions for global iron deficiency.

  14. Menopause increases the iron storage protein ferritin in skin.

    PubMed

    Pelle, Edward; Jian, Jinlong; Zhang, Qi; Muizzuddin, Neelam; Yang, Qing; Dai, Jisen; Maes, Daniel; Pernodet, Nadine; Yarosh, Daniel B; Frenkel, Krystyna; Huang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Menstruation and desquamation are important routes for humans to excrete iron. Because menstruation is no longer available in postmenopausal women, in the present study, we examined whether iron accumulates more in postmenopausal skin than in premenopausal skin. Skin biopsy samples were obtained from six pre- and six postmenopausal Caucasian women. Iron levels in the form of ferritin were 42% higher, but vascular endothelial growth factor and total antioxidant capacity were 45% and 34% lower in postmenopausal skin (58.8 ± 1.3 years old) than in premenopausal skin (41.6 ± 1.7 years old), respectively. Moreover, in vitro cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes had surprisingly high levels of ferritin when compared to immortalized human breast epithelial MCF-10A cells or human liver HepG2 cancer cells. Our results indicate that skin is a cellular repository of iron and that menopause increases iron in skin and, thus, may contribute to the manifestation of accelerated skin aging and photo aging after menopause.

  15. Crystal structure of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesized from ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krispin, Michael; Ullrich, Aladin; Horn, Siegfried

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the crystal structure of nanosized iron-oxide by X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements at the iron K-edge as well as by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Iron-oxide nanoparticles were produced by thermal treatment of horse spleen ferritin molecules. The structure of these particles was compared to α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 nanopowder references. The thermal treatment of a submonolayer film of ferritin molecules results in pure γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, while for films above a certain thickness α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 coexist, exhibiting two different crystallite sizes. TEM shows a characteristic particle diameter of 7 nm for γ-Fe2O3 resulting from thermal treatment of monolayers, consistent with the crystallite size of the γ-phase as obtained from XRD measurements on multi-layered samples. XRD shows the α-Fe2O3 phase to be characterized by a crystallite size of 34 nm.

  16. Magnetically induced behaviour of ferritin corpuscles in avian ears: can cuticulosomes function as magnetosomes?

    PubMed

    Jandacka, Petr; Burda, Hynek; Pistora, Jaromir

    2015-01-06

    Magnetoreception is an enigmatic, poorly understood sensory ability, described mainly on the basis of behavioural studies in animals of diverse taxa. Recently, corpuscles containing superparamagnetic iron-storage protein ferritin were found in the inner ear hair cells of birds, a predominantly single ferritin corpuscle per cell. It was suggested that these corpuscles might represent magnetosomes and function as magnetosensors. Here we determine ferritin low-field paramagnetic susceptibility to estimate its magnetically induced intracellular behaviour. Physical simulations show that ferritin corpuscles cannot be deformed or rotate in weak geomagnetic fields, and thus cannot provide magnetoreception via deformation of the cuticular plate. Furthermore, we reached an alternative hypothesis that ferritin corpuscle in avian ears may function as an intracellular electromagnetic oscillator. Such an oscillator would generate additional cellular electric potential related to normal cell conditions. Though the phenomenon seems to be weak, this effect deserves further analyses.

  17. Ferritin-Polymer Conjugates: Grafting Chemistry and Integration into Nanoscale Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Y Hu; D Samanta; S Parelkar; S Hong; Q Wang; T Russell; T Emrick

    2011-12-31

    Controlled free radical polymerization chemistry is used to graft polymer chains to the corona of horse spleen ferritin (HSF) nanocages. Specifically, poly(methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (polyMPC) and poly(PEG methacrylate) (polyPEGMA) chains are grafted onto the nanocages by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), in which the molecular weight of the polymer grafts is controlled by the monomer-to-initiator feed ratio. PolyMPC and polyPEGMA-grafted ferritin show a generally suppressed inclusion into diblock copolymer films relative to native ferritin, and the polymer coating is seen to mask the ferritin nanocages from antibody recognition. The solubility of polyPEGMA-coated ferritin in organic solvents enables its processing with polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers, and selective integration into the PEO domains of microphase-separated copolymer structures.

  18. Molecular characterization and gene expression of the channel catfish Ferritin H subunit after bacterial infection and iron treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferritins are the major iron storage protein in the cytoplasm of cells, responsible for regulating levels of intracellular iron. Ferritin genes are widely distributed in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In mammals, ferritin molecules are composed of heavy- (H) and light- (L) chain subunits; amphibia...

  19. Design and Validation of an Augmented Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation-Comorbidity Index Comprising Pretransplant Ferritin, Albumin, and Platelet Count for Prediction of Outcomes after Allogeneic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Jennifer E; Storer, Barry E; Armand, Philippe; Raimondi, Roberto; Gibson, Christopher; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Benedetto; Martin, Paul J; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storb, Rainer; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-08-01

    Pretransplant values of serum ferritin, albumin, and peripheral blood counts were previously suggested to provide prognostic information about hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes. Whether these "biomarkers" have prognostic value independent of each other and the HCT-comorbidity index (HCT-CI) is unknown. We analyzed data from 3917 allogeneic HCT recipients at multiple sites in the United States and Italy using multivariate models including each biomarker and the HCT-CI. Data from all sites were then randomly divided into a training set (n = 2352) to develop weights for the relevant biomarkers to be added to the HCT-CI scores and a validation set (n = 1407) to validate an augmented HCT-CI compared with the original index. Multivariate analysis with data from one site showed that ferritin, albumin, and platelets-not neutrophils or hemoglobin-were independently associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and decreased overall survival. Findings were validated in data from the other sites. Subsequently, in a training set from all sites, ferritin >2500 mg/dL (hazard ratio [HR], 1.69); albumin 3 to 3.5 g/dL (HR, 1.61) and <3.0 g/dL (HR, 2.27); and platelets 50 to <100,000 (HR, 1.28), 20 to <50,000 (HR, 1.29), and <20,000 (HR, 1.55) were statistically significantly associated with NRM. Weights were assigned to these laboratory values following the same equation used to design the original index. In the validation set, the addition of the biomarkers to the original index to develop an augmented HCT-CI resulted in a statistically significant increase in a higher c-statistic estimate for prediction of NRM (P = .0007). Ferritin, albumin, and platelet counts are important prognostic markers that further refine the discriminative power of the HCT-CI for transplant outcomes.

  20. Fe(2+) substrate transport through ferritin protein cage ion channels influences enzyme activity and biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Torres, Rodrigo; Tosha, Takehiko; Bradley, Justin M; Goulding, Celia W; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2015-09-01

    Ferritins, complex protein nanocages, form internal iron-oxy minerals (Fe2O3·H2O), by moving cytoplasmic Fe(2+) through intracage ion channels to cage-embedded enzyme (2Fe(2+)/O2 oxidoreductase) sites where ferritin biomineralization is initiated. The products of ferritin enzyme activity are diferric oxy complexes that are mineral precursors. Conserved, carboxylate amino acid side chains of D127 from each of three cage subunits project into ferritin ion channels near the interior ion channel exits and, thus, could direct Fe(2+) movement to the internal enzyme sites. Ferritin D127E was designed and analyzed to probe properties of ion channel size and carboxylate crowding near the internal ion channel opening. Glu side chains are chemically equivalent to, but longer by one -CH2 than Asp, side chains. Ferritin D127E assembled into normal protein cages, but diferric peroxo formation (enzyme activity) was not observed, when measured at 650 nm (DFP λ max). The caged biomineral formation, measured at 350 nm in the middle of the broad, nonspecific Fe(3+)-O absorption band, was slower. Structural differences (protein X-ray crystallography), between ion channels in wild type and ferritin D127E, which correlate with the inhibition of ferritin D127E enzyme activity include: (1) narrower interior ion channel openings/pores; (2) increased numbers of ion channel protein-metal binding sites, and (3) a change in ion channel electrostatics due to carboxylate crowding. The contributions of ion channel size and structure to ferritin activity reflect metal ion transport in ion channels are precisely regulated both in ferritin protein nanocages and membranes of living cells.

  1. Toxicity, biodistribution, and ex vivo MRI detection of intravenously injected cationized ferritin.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Scott C; Georges, Joseph F; Bennett, Kevin M

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the work was to establish the toxicity and biodistribution of the superparamagnetic protein cationized ferritin (CF) after intravenous injection. Intravenously injected CF has been used to target the extracellular matrix with high specificity in the kidney glomerulus, allowing measurements of individual glomeruli using T2*-weighted MRI. For the routine use of CF as an extracellular matrix-specific tracer, it is important to determine whether CF is toxic. In this work, we investigated the renal and hepatic toxicity, leukocyte count, and clearance of intravenously injected CF. Furthermore, we studied CF labeling in several organs using MRI and immunohistochemistry. Serum measurements of biomarkers suggest that intravenous injection of CF is neither nephrotoxic nor hepatotoxic and does not increase leukocyte counts in healthy rats at a dose of 5.75 mg/100 g. In addition to known glomerular labeling, confocal and MRI suggest that intravenously injected CF labels the extracellular matrix of the hepatic sinusoid, extracellular glycocalyx of alveolar endothelial cells, and macrophages in the spleen. Liver T2* values suggest that CF is cleared by 7 days after injection. These results suggest that CF may serve as a useful contrast agent for detection of a number of structures and functions with minimal toxicity.

  2. Relationship between Serum Iron Profile and Blood Groups among the Voluntary Blood Donors of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M M; Adnan, S D; Karim, S; Al-Mamun, M A; Faruki, M A; Islam, K; Nandy, S

    2016-04-01

    Blood donation results in a substantial iron loss and subsequent mobilization from body stores. Chronic iron deficiency is a well-recognized complication of regular blood donation. The present study conducted to compare the level of serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and percentage transferrin saturation in different ABO and Rhesus type blood groups among the voluntary blood donors of Bangladesh. The present prospective study included 100 healthy voluntary donors attending at Department of Blood Transfusion, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka between the periods of July 2013 to Jun 2014. From each donor 10mL venous blood sample was taken and divided into heparinized and non-heparinized tubes for determination of hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin by standard laboratory methods. Percentage of transferrin saturation (TS) calculated from serum iron and TIBC. Data were analyzed with SPSS (version 16) software and comparisons between groups were made using student's t-test and one way ANOVA. In the present study mean±SD of age of the respondents was 27.2±6.5 years with a range of 18 to 49 years and 81.0% were male and 19.0% were female. Among the donors 18.0% had blood group A, 35.0% had blood group B, 14.0% had blood group AB and 33.0% had blood group O. Among the donors 91.0% had rhesus positive and 9.0% had rhesus negative. Donors with blood group O had lowest haemoglobin, serum iron and transferring saturation levels. Donors with blood group A had highest TIBC level. Donors with blood group B had lowest serum ferritin level. An independent samples 't' test showed statistically significant difference in serum ferritin and percentage transferrin saturation between blood group AB and blood group O and in percentage transferrin saturation between blood group B and blood group O. One way ANOVA showed that there is no significant difference in haemoglobin, serum iron, serum

  3. Ferritin protects endothelial cells from oxidized low density lipoprotein in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Juckett, M. B.; Balla, J.; Balla, G.; Jessurun, J.; Jacob, H. S.; Vercellotti, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL), if it becomes oxidized, develops several unique properties including the capacity to provoke endothelial cytotoxicity via metal-catalyzed free radical-mediated mechanisms. As were previously have shown that iron-catalyzed oxidant injury to endothelial cells can be attenuated by the addition of exogenous iron chelators such as the lazaroids and deferoxamine, we have examined whether the endogenous iron chelator, ferritin, might provide protection from oxidized LDL. LDL oxidized by iron-containing hemin and H2O2 is toxic to endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Endothelial cell ferritin content is increased by pretreatment of cells with iron compounds or by the direct addition of exogenous apoferritin; ferritin-loaded cells are markedly resistant to the toxicity caused by oxidized LDL. Iron inactivation by ferritin depends on its ferroxidase activity. When a recombinant human ferritin heavy chain mutant, 222, which is devoid of ferroxidase activity, is added to endothelial cells, unlike the excellent protection afforded by the wild-type recombinant heavy chain, endothelial cells are not protected from oxidized LDL. To assess the in vivo relevance of our observation, we examined human coronary arteries of cardiac explants taken from patients with end-stage atherosclerosis. Large amounts of immunoreactive ferritin are focally detected in atherosclerotic lesions, specifically in the myofibroblasts, macrophages, and endothelium without a notable increase in Prussian blue-detectable iron. These findings suggest that ferritin may modulate vascular cell injury in vivo. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7677189

  4. Plant ferritin--a source of iron to prevent its deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Dawidziak, Magdalena

    2015-02-12

    Iron deficiency anemia affects a significant part of the human population. Due to the unique properties of plant ferritin, food enrichment with ferritin iron seems to be a promising strategy to prevent this malnutrition problem. This protein captures huge amounts of iron ions inside the apoferritin shell and isolates them from the environment. Thus, this iron form does not induce oxidative change in food and reduces the risk of gastric problems in consumers. Bioavailability of ferritin in human and animal studies is high and the mechanism of absorption via endocytosis has been confirmed in cultured cells. Legume seeds are a traditional source of plant ferritin. However, even if the percentage of ferritin iron in these seeds is high, its concentration is not sufficient for food fortification. Thus, edible plants have been biofortified in iron for many years. Plants overexpressing ferritin may find applications in the development of bioactive food. A crucial achievement would be to develop technologies warranting stability of ferritin in food and the digestive tract.

  5. Diffusion dependence of proton NMR relaxation rates in the presence of ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Michael; Hammel, P. Chris

    2009-03-01

    Ferritin is the predominant iron-storage protein in living organisms. It may serve as an indicator of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Measuring brain ferritin concentration non-invasively via MRI could enable better diagnoses and treatments of such diseases. Quantitative MRI determination of the ferritin concentration requires an understanding of the NMR relaxation mechanisms of hydrogen protons in the presence of ferritin. In aqueous solutions, ferritin enhances the transverse relaxation rate (R2) of the protons. This is thought to occur due to a diffusive mechanism, where protons diffusing near ferritin pass through a region of elevated magnetic field, and a chemical exchange mechanism, where protons bind to the protein for a period of time, experiencing an even higher magnetic field. These two mechanisms exhibit different dependencies on the self-diffusion coefficient of the protons. By adding glycerol to aqueous solutions, we control the self-diffusion of protons. We measure the R2 of protons in ferritin-containing binary mixtures of water and glycerol using CPMG sequences, and compare the experimental results to theoretical predictions of diffusion dependence in order to distinguish the relative importance of the mechanisms.

  6. The Faraday effect of natural and artificial ferritins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koralewski, M.; Kłos, J. W.; Baranowski, M.; Mitróová, Z.; Kopčanský, P.; Melníková, L.; Okuda, M.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of the Faraday rotation at room temperature over the light wavelength range of 300-680 nm for horse spleen ferritin (HSF), magnetoferritin with different loading factors (LFs) and nanoscale magnetite and Fe2O3 suspensions are reported. The Faraday rotation and the magnetization of the materials studied present similar magnetic field dependences and are characteristic of a superparamagnetic system. The dependence of the Faraday rotation on the magnetic field is described, excluding HSF and Fe2O3, by a Langevin function with a log-normal distribution of the particle size allowing the core diameters of the substances studied to be calculated. It was found that the specific Verdet constant depends linearly on the LF. Differences in the Faraday rotation spectra and their magnetic field dependences allow discrimination between magnetoferritin with maghemite and magnetite cores which can be very useful in biomedicine.

  7. The Faraday effect of natural and artificial ferritins.

    PubMed

    Koralewski, M; Kłos, J W; Baranowski, M; Mitróová, Z; Kopčanský, P; Melníková, L; Okuda, M; Schwarzacher, W

    2012-09-07

    Measurements of the Faraday rotation at room temperature over the light wavelength range of 300-680 nm for horse spleen ferritin (HSF), magnetoferritin with different loading factors (LFs) and nanoscale magnetite and Fe(2)O(3) suspensions are reported. The Faraday rotation and the magnetization of the materials studied present similar magnetic field dependences and are characteristic of a superparamagnetic system. The dependence of the Faraday rotation on the magnetic field is described, excluding HSF and Fe(2)O(3), by a Langevin function with a log-normal distribution of the particle size allowing the core diameters of the substances studied to be calculated. It was found that the specific Verdet constant depends linearly on the LF. Differences in the Faraday rotation spectra and their magnetic field dependences allow discrimination between magnetoferritin with maghemite and magnetite cores which can be very useful in biomedicine.

  8. Serum transferrin receptors in detection of iron deficiency in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rusia, U; Flowers, C; Madan, N; Agarwal, N; Sood, S K; Sikka, M

    1999-08-01

    A prospective hospital-based study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of serum transferrin receptors in the detection of iron deficiency in pregnant women. The iron status of 100 pregnant women with single uncomplicated term pregnancies in the first stage of labor was established using standard laboratory measures. These included complete hemogram, red cell indices, serum iron, percent transferrin saturation, and serum ferritin. In addition, serum transferrin receptor (STFR) was estimated. The results of 81 women with complete laboratory profiles were analyzed. Thirty-five (43.2%) women were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dl). Hemoglobin (Hb) showed a significant correlation with MCH, MCHC, serum iron, and percent transferrin saturation, suggesting that the anemia was likely to be due to iron deficiency. The mean STFR level was 18.05+/-9.9 mg/l in the anemic women and was significantly raised (p<0.001) compared with that of the nonanemic women. STFR correlated significantly with Hb (p<0.001), MCH (p<0.05), MCHC (p<0.01), serum iron (p<0.01), and percent transferrin saturation (p<0.01) and also showed a highly significant correlation with the degree of anemia. Serum ferritin in these women did not correlate with Hb, and only 54.4% of the women had levels <12 ng/ml, which does not reflect the true prevalence of iron deficiency. Serum transferrin receptor estimation is thus a useful measure for detecting iron deficiency in pregnancy.

  9. Ferritin reactions: direct identification of the site for the diferric peroxide reaction intermediate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2004-06-08

    Ferritins managing iron-oxygen biochemistry in animals, plants, and microorganisms belong to the diiron carboxylate protein family and concentrate iron as ferric oxide approximately 10(14) times above the ferric K(s). Ferritin iron (up to 4,500 atoms), used for iron cofactors and heme, or to trap DNA-damaging oxidants in microorganisms, is concentrated in the protein nanocage cavity (5-8 nm) formed during assembly of polypeptide subunits, 24 in maxiferritins and 12 in miniferritins/DNA protection during starvation proteins. Direct identification of ferritin ferroxidase (F(ox)) sites, complicated by multiple types of iron-ferritin interactions, is now achieved with chimeric proteins where putative F(ox) site residues were introduced singly and cumulatively into an inactive host, an L maxiferritin. A dimagnesium ferritin cocrystal model guided site design and the diferric peroxo F(ox) intermediates (A at 650 nm) monitored activity. Diferric peroxo formation in chimeric and WT proteins had similar K(app) values and Hill coefficients. Catalytic activity required cooperative ferrous substrate binding to two sites A (E, EXXH) and B (E, QXXD). The weaker B sites in ferritin contrast with stronger B sites (E, EXXH) in diiron carboxylate oxygenases, explaining diferric oxo/hydroxo product release in ferritin vs. diiron cofactor retention in oxygenases. Codons for Q/H and D/E differ by single nucleotides, suggesting simple DNA mutations relate site B diiron substrate sites and diiron cofactor sites in proteins. The smaller k(cat) values in chimeras indicate the absence of second-shell residues important for ferritin substrate-product channeling that, when identified, will outline the entire iron path from ferritin pores through the F(ox) site to the mineral cavity.

  10. Radioimmunoassay of tumor markers in serum of patients with renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cordoni-Voutsas, M.; Glaubitt, D.; Wagner, W.; Lichtenberg, T.

    1984-01-01

    Having noted an increased serum level of TPA and CEA in patients with renal carcinoma the authors extended these studies by using a larger number of tumor markers. In 15 patients (11 men and 4 women after menopause) aged 33 to 74 years who had renal carcinoma, among them 3 with tumor metastases, the serum concentration of TPA, CA 12-5, CEA, AFP, ferritin, prolactin, ..beta..-HCG, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. Monoclonal antibodies were used in the determination of serum CA 12-5 and CEA. In all patients surgical treatment, irradiation, or cytostatic therapy had not been performed. In serum the normal range was exceeded by TPA in 7 patients, CA 12-5 in 3, CEA and AFP in one each, ferritin in 12, prolactin in 2, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in 10 patients. In one man serum prolactin was reduced. Serum ..beta..-HCG was normal in all patients. According to these results serum ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin are of great value as tumor markers in patients with renal carcinoma. In several patients the increase of serum ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin may be ascribed partly to deterioration of renal function. As no consistent patterns of tumor markers in serum were observed it is recommended to determine several tumor markers and not only one of them during the follow-up of patients. Radioimmunoassays for measuring the serum level of tumor markers, especially ferritin, TPA, and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin, may considerably assist in the management of patients with renal carcinoma by providing early information about tumor recurrence or metastases.

  11. [How to handle unexpected biological abnormalities observed in the pre-donation workup for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: an SFGM-TC report on pre-transplant cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, or syphilis IgM positive serology test].

    PubMed

    Duléry, R; Giraud, C; Beaumont, J-L; Bilger, K; Borel, C; Dhedin, N; Thiebaut, A; Willems, E; Alain, S; Alfandari, S; Dewilde, A; Jouet, J-P; Milpied, N; Yakoub-Agha, I

    2013-08-01

    In the attempt to harmonize clinical practices between different French transplantation centers, the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC) set up the third annual series of workshops which brought together practitioners from all member centers and took place in October 2012 in Lille. Here we report our results and recommendations regarding the management of pre-transplant donor's cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, or syphilis IgM positive serology test.

  12. Comparison of serum levels of hepcidin and pro-hepcidin in hemodialysis patients and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Taheri, N; Mojerloo, M; Hadad, M; Mirkarimi, H; Nejad, R Khorasani; Joshaghani, H R

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin prevents absorption of iron from the intestine and inhibits release of iron from macrophages and hepatocytes. For this reason, it seems that high levels of hepcidin are a predisposing factor for anemia in chronic inflammatory conditions such as chronic kidney disease and dialysis patients. This study was designed to determine the role of changes in the level of serum hepcidin in the management of hemodialysis patients. This study included 44 dialysis patients and 44 controls. The hepcidin and pro-hepcidin levels were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. The serum ferritin level was measured by the chemiluminescence method. The mean hepcidin level was 999.3 ± 996.7 ng/mL in the case group and 770.4 ± 815.9 ng/mL in the control group (P = 0.25). The mean pro-hepcidin level was, respectively, 186.1 ± 220.3 pg/mL and 150.87 ± 207.7 pg/mL, in the case group and control groups (P = 0.45). The mean (standard deviation) ferritin level was 816.4 ± 379.4 ng/mL in the case group and 193 ± 171.8 ng/mL in the control group (P < 0.001). In the case group, the correlation between serum ferritin and hepcidin was not significant (r = 0.6, P = 0.08). Also, there was no significant correlation between serum ferritin and pro-hepcidin levels (r = 0.6, P = 0.08). A positive correlation was seen between pro-hepcidin and hepcidin levels (r = 0.92, P < 0.01). In this study, the results showed that the serum hepcidin levels are high in dialysis patients and that there was no correlation with the serum ferritin levels.

  13. On the mineral core of ferritin-like proteins: structural and magnetic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Prieto, A.; Alonso, J.; Muñoz, D.; Marcano, L.; Abad Díaz de Cerio, A.; Fernández de Luis, R.; Orue, I.; Mathon, O.; Muela, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS)) and a magnetic study of the mineral core biomineralized by horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and three prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins: bacterial ferritin (FtnA) and bacterioferritin (Bfr) from Escherichia coli and archaeal ferritin (PfFtn) from Pyrococcus furiosus. The prokaryotic ferritin-like proteins have been studied under native conditions and inside the cells for the sake of preserving their natural attributes. They share with HoSF a nanocrystalline structure rather than an amorphous one as has been frequently reported. However, the presence of phosphorus changes drastically the short-range order and magnetic response of the prokaryotic cores with respect to HoSF. The superparamagnetism observed in HoSF is absent in the prokaryotic proteins, which show a pure atomic-like paramagnetic behaviour attributed to phosphorus breaking the Fe-Fe exchange interaction.It is generally accepted that the mineral core synthesized by ferritin-like proteins consists of a ferric oxy-hydroxide mineral similar to ferrihydrite in the case of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and an oxy-hydroxide-phosphate phase in plant and prokaryotic ferritins. The structure reflects a dynamic process of deposition and dissolution, influenced by different biological, chemical and physical variables. In this work we shed light on this matter by combining a structural (High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM

  14. Increasing expression of H- or L-ferritin protects cortical astrocytes from hemin toxicity

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHI; CHEN-ROETLING, JING; REGAN, RAYMOND F.

    2009-01-01

    Iron toxicity may contribute to oxidative injury in cells surrounding an intracerebral hematoma. Cells detoxify iron by sequestering it in ferritin, a 24-mer heteropolymer constructed of H and L subunits. The relative antioxidant efficacy of H and L-ferritin has not been defined, and was tested in this study using an established model of hemin toxicity. Consistent with prior observations, cultures treated with 30 μM hemin sustained loss of approximately half of cells by six hours, as measured by LDH and MTT assays, and a 14-fold increase in protein carbonyls. Increasing expression of either ferritin by adenoviral gene transfer prior to hemin treatment had a similar protective effect. Quenching of calcein fluorescence, a marker of the labile iron pool, in hemin-treated cultures was also equally reduced by either subunit. These results suggest that over-expression of either H or L ferritin protects astrocytes from hemin, and may be beneficial after CNS hemorrhage. PMID:19513908

  15. Surface charge of trypanosoma cruzi. Binding of cationized ferritin and measurement of cellular electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    De Souza, W; Arguello, C; Martinez-Paloma, A; Trissl, D; Gonzáles-Robles, A; Chiari, E

    1977-08-01

    The surface charge of epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated by means of binding of cationized ferritin to the cell surface as visualized by electron microscopy, and by direct measurements of the cellular microelectrophoretic mobility (EPM). Epimastigote forms had a mean EPM of -0.52 micrometer-s-1-V-1-cm and were lightly labeled with cationized ferritin. In contrast, bloodstream trypomastigotes had a much higher EPM (-1.14), and the surface was heavily labeled with cationized ferritin. When trypomastigotes from staionary phase cultures were isolated on DEAE cellulose columns, the mean EPM was found to be significantly lower (-0.63), and labeling with cationized ferritin decreased. With a mixed population containing epimastigote, trypomastigote, and intermediate forms, EPM values ranging between -0.70 to -1.14 were found. From these observations we conclude that there is a definite increase in negative surface charge during development from epi- to trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi.

  16. FERRITIN EXPRESSION AFTER IN VITRO EXPOSURES OF HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES TO SILICA IS IRON-DEPENDENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increased availability of catalytically active iron after silica exposure can present an oxidative injury to a living system. Sequestration of reactive iron would, therefore, confer a protective effect. The intracellular storage of iron by ferritin within macrophages can limi...

  17. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-11-24

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation.

  18. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  19. Electron Microscopy of Hemosiderin: Presence of Ferritin and Occurrence of Crystalline Lattices in Hemosiderin Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Goetz W.

    1958-01-01

    Injections of hemoglobin were given to rats in order to produce hemosiderosis, and selected hemosiderin granules in sectioned cells of proximal convoluted tubules were studied by means of electron microscopy. When examined at high resolution, many of the dense particles that were present in hemosiderin granules proved to have the structure that characterizes the iron hydroxide micelles of molecular ferritin. In some hemosiderin deposits the dense particles formed lattices similar to those present in sections of crystalline ferritin. Such ordered arrangement of dense particles was encountered inside as well as outside of the cytoplasmic organelles for which the name "siderosomes" has been proposed previously, and which may be derived from mitochondria. Study of hemosiderin granules in hepatic parenchymal and reticuloendothelial cells of human beings yielded similar results. The findings confirm the inference that ferritin is a component of hemosiderin, and they indicate that some of the so called hemosiderin granules are crystals of ferritin. PMID:13502428

  20. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization causes oxidative stress and ferritin induction in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Carlsson, Fredrik; Laskar, Amit; Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei

    2011-02-18

    Moderate lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is an important inducer of apoptosis. Macrophages are professional scavengers and are rich in hydrolytic enzymes and iron. In the present study, we found that LMP by lysosomotropic detergent MSDH resulted in early up-regulation of lysosomal cathepsins, oxidative stress and ferritin up-regulation, and cell death. Lysosomotropic base NH(4)Cl reduced the ferritin induction and oxidative stress in apoptotic cells induced by MSDH. Cysteine cathepsin inhibitors significantly protected cell death and oxidative stress, but had less effect on ferritin induction. We conclude that oxidative stress induced by lysosomal rupture causes ferritin induction with concomitant mitochondrial damage, which are the potential target for prevention of cellular oxidative stress and cell death induced by typical lysosomotropic substances in different disorders.

  1. Ferritin ion channel disorder inhibits Fe(II)/O2 reactivity at distant sites.

    PubMed

    Tosha, Takehiko; Behera, Rabindra K; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2012-11-05

    Ferritins, a complex, mineralized, protein nanocage family essential for life, provide iron concentrates and oxidant protection. Protein-based ion channels and Fe(II)/O(2) catalysis initiate conversion of thousands of Fe atoms to caged, ferritin Fe(2)O(3)·H(2)O minerals. The ion channels consist of six helical segments, contributed by 3 of 12 or 24 polypeptide subunits, around the 3-fold cage axes. The channel structure guides entering Fe(II) ions toward multiple, catalytic, diiron sites buried inside ferritin protein helices, ~20 Å away from channel internal exits. The catalytic product, Fe(III)-O(H)-Fe(III), is a mineral precursor; mineral nucleation begins inside the protein cage with mineral growth in the central protein cavity (5-8 nm diameter). Amino acid substitutions that changed ionic or hydrophobic channel interactions R72D, D122R, and L134P increased ion channel structural disorder (protein crystallographic analyses) and increased Fe(II) exit [chelated Fe(II) after ferric mineral reduction/dissolution]. Since substitutions of some channel carboxylate residues diminished ferritin catalysis with no effect on Fe(II) exit, such as E130A and D127A, we investigated catalysis in ferritins with altered Fe(II) exit, R72D, D122R and L134P. The results indicate that simply changing the ionic properties of the channels, as in the R72D variant, need not change the forward catalytic rate. However, both D122R and L134P, which had dramatic effects on ferritin catalysis, also caused larger effects on channel structure and order, contrasting with R72D. All three amino acid substitutions, however, decreased the stability of the catalytic intermediate, diferric peroxo, even though overall ferritin cage structure is very stable, resisting 80 °C and 6 M urea. The localized structural changes in ferritin subdomains that affect ferritin function over long distances illustrate new properties of the protein cage in natural ferritin function and for applied ferritin uses.

  2. Three ferritin subunit analogs in Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus) and their response to microbial stimulation.

    PubMed

    You, Xiuling; Sheng, Jianghong; Liu, Liu; Nie, Dongsong; Liao, Zhiyong

    2015-10-01

    Ferritin, an evolutionarily conserved iron-binding protein, plays important roles in iron storage and detoxification and in host immune response to invading stimulus as well. In the present study, we identified three ferritin subunit analog cDNAs from Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus). All the three ferritin subunit cDNAs had a putative iron responsive element in the 5'-untranslated region. Two deduced ferritin subunits (designated as cgsFerH and cgsFerM) had the highest identity of 90% to H type subunit of vertebrate ferritins, while another deduced ferritin subunit (designated as cgsFerL) had the highest identity of 84% to L type subunit of vertebrate ferritins. The Chinese giant salamander ferritin (cgsFer) was widely expressed in various tissues, with highest expression for cgsFerH and cgsFerL in liver and highest expression for cgsFerM in spleen. Infection of Chinese giant salamander with A. davidianus ranavirus showed significant induction of cgsFer expression. Both lipopolysaccharide and iron challenge drastically augmented cgsFer expression in the splenocytes and hepatocytes from Chinese giant salamander. In addition, recombinant cgsFers bound to ferrous iron in a dose-dependent manner, with significant ferroxidase activity. Furthermore, the recombinant cgsFer inhibited the growth of the pathogen Vibrio anguillarum. These results indicated that cgsFer was potential candidate of immune molecules involved in acute phase response to invading microbial pathogens in Chinese giant salamander possibly through its regulatory roles in iron homeostasis.

  3. Preparation and representation of recombinant Mn-ferritin flower-like spherical aggregates from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liping; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yunyun; Chu, Shuangshuang; He, Weina; Li, Ye; Su, Xiurong

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin has important functions in the transition and storage of toxic metal ions, but its regulation and function in many invertebrate species are still largely unknown. In our previous work, the cDNA sequence of Sinonovacula constricta, Apostichopus japonicas and Acaudina leucoprocta were constructed and efficiently expressed in E. Coli BL21 under IPTG induction. In this follow-up study, the recombinant ferritins were exposed to heavy metal manganese. The manganese concentration levels in three recombinant ferritins were greater than horse spleen ferritin (HSF). Compared with HSF, the amount of manganese enrichment in the three recombinant ferritins was 1.75-fold, 3.25-fold and 2.42-fold increases in ScFER, AjFER, and AlFER, respectively. After phosphate stimulation, the concentration of manganese increased and was higher than the ordinary dialysis control groups. The ScFER was four times its baseline value. The AjFER and AlFER were 1.4- and 8-fold higher, respectively. The AlFER sample stimulated by phosphate was 22-fold that of HSF. The morphologies of the resulting Mn-Ferritin from different marine invertebrates were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Surface morphologies were lamella flower-like and are consistent with changes in surface morphologies of the standard Mn-HSF. Invertebrate recombinant ferritin and HSF both can uptake manganese. We found that the structure of A. leucoproctarecombinant Mn-Ferritin aggregate changed over time. The surface formed lamella flower-like aggregate, but gradually merged to create a relatively uniform plate-like phase of aggregate spherically and fused without clear boundaries.

  4. Preparation and Representation of Recombinant Mn-Ferritin Flower-Like Spherical Aggregates from Marine Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liping; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Yunyun; Chu, Shuangshuang; He, Weina; Li, Ye; Su, Xiurong

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin has important functions in the transition and storage of toxic metal ions, but its regulation and function in many invertebrate species are still largely unknown. In our previous work, the cDNA sequence of Sinonovacula constricta, Apostichopus japonicas and Acaudina leucoprocta were constructed and efficiently expressed in E. Coli BL21 under IPTG induction. In this follow-up study, the recombinant ferritins were exposed to heavy metal manganese. The manganese concentration levels in three recombinant ferritins were greater than horse spleen ferritin (HSF). Compared with HSF, the amount of manganese enrichment in the three recombinant ferritins was 1.75-fold, 3.25-fold and 2.42-fold increases in ScFER, AjFER, and AlFER, respectively. After phosphate stimulation, the concentration of manganese increased and was higher than the ordinary dialysis control groups. The ScFER was four times its baseline value. The AjFER and AlFER were 1.4- and 8-fold higher, respectively. The AlFER sample stimulated by phosphate was 22-fold that of HSF. The morphologies of the resulting Mn-Ferritin from different marine invertebrates were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Surface morphologies were lamella flower-like and are consistent with changes in surface morphologies of the standard Mn-HSF. Invertebrate recombinant ferritin and HSF both can uptake manganese. We found that the structure of A. leucoproctarecombinant Mn-Ferritin aggregate changed over time. The surface formed lamella flower-like aggregate, but gradually merged to create a relatively uniform plate-like phase of aggregate spherically and fused without clear boundaries. PMID:25879665

  5. Genetic manipulation of iron biomineralization enhances MR relaxivity in a ferritin-M6A chimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Radoul, Marina; Lewin, Limor; Cohen, Batya; Oren, Roni; Popov, Stanislav; Davidov, Geula; Vandsburger, Moriel H.; Harmelin, Alon; Bitton, Ronit; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Neeman, Michal; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin has gained significant attention as a potential reporter gene for in vivo imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, due to the ferritin ferrihydrite core, the relaxivity and sensitivity for detection of native ferritin is relatively low. We report here on a novel chimeric magneto-ferritin reporter gene – ferritin-M6A – in which the magnetite binding peptide from the magnetotactic bacteria magnetosome-associated Mms6 protein was fused to the C-terminal of murine h-ferritin. Biophysical experiments showed that purified ferritin-M6A assembled into a stable protein cage with the M6A protruding into the cage core, enabling magnetite biomineralisation. Ferritin-M6A-expressing C6-glioma cells showed enhanced (per iron) r2 relaxivity. MRI in vivo studies of ferritin-M6A-expressing tumour xenografts showed enhanced R2 relaxation rate in the central hypoxic region of the tumours. Such enhanced relaxivity would increase the sensitivity of ferritin as a reporter gene for non-invasive in vivo MRI-monitoring of cell delivery and differentiation in cellular or gene-based therapies. PMID:27211820

  6. Ferritin and Soluble Transferrin Receptors in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-diabetic Post-menopausal Women in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Md Ruhul, A; Sharmin, H; Luthfor, A; Farzana, S; Liaquat, A

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional comparative study was aimed at investigating the iron status of a group of post-menopausal women with and without diabetes. Thirty-five post-menopausal women in each group were selected purposively from among patients attending the out-patient department of Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM), a specialist hospital, and two of its satellite clinics, all in Dhaka. Patients were enrolled based on their existing records. The subjects were matched on age, menstrual status and fasting status at blood draw. Ferritin, serum soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR) and fasting plasma glucose were measured by standard methods. Dietary information was collected by a specific food frequency questionnaire. No significant difference in plasma ferritin [62.02 ng/ml, (range: 4.68-288.89) vs 54.25 ng/ml (range: 4.58-137.17); p=0.28] was observed between the groups. But a higher level of plasma sTfR was found in diabetic women [(21.12 nmol/l (range: 7.91-39.79) vs 17.63 nmol/l (range: 10.30-110.00); p<0.01]. TFR-F index showed no difference between diabetic and control (p=0.25). Significantly a lower hemoglobin level [10.58±0.67 g/dl vs11.76±1.5 g/dl; p<0.01] was detected in diabetic women. Plasma sTfR (log) did not show any significant association with the dietary parameters and iron indices. No significant association between fasting glucose, ferritin and sTfR was seen except for haemoglobin (r=0.39, p=0.05). Total iron intake recorded was more than the requirement, and was significantly higher in control group [38.11mg/day (range: 19.83-105.63) vs 56.65 mg/day (range: 29.75-109.54); p<0.01)]. More than 97 % of total iron was of plant origin. No differences in heme iron [0.85 mg/day (range: 0.09-4.07) vs. 0.96 mg/day (range: 0.04-4.34), p= 0.17] and vitamin C intake was observed between the groups. Iron indices of non-diabetic women were within the normal range. A higher level of sTfR and a

  7. Ferritins control interaction between iron homeostasis and oxidative stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ravet, Karl; Touraine, Brigitte; Boucherez, Jossia; Briat, Jean-François; Gaymard, Frédéric; Cellier, Françoise

    2009-02-01

    Ferritin protein nanocages are the main iron store in mammals. They have been predicted to fulfil the same function in plants but direct evidence was lacking. To address this, a loss-of-function approach was developed in Arabidopsis. We present evidence that ferritins do not constitute the major iron pool either in seeds for seedling development or in leaves for proper functioning of the photosynthetic apparatus. Loss of ferritins in vegetative and reproductive organs resulted in sensitivity to excess iron, as shown by reduced growth and strong defects in flower development. Furthermore, the absence of ferritin led to a strong deregulation of expression of several metal transporters genes in the stalk, over-accumulation of iron in reproductive organs, and a decrease in fertility. Finally, we show that, in the absence of ferritin, plants have higher levels of reactive oxygen species, and increased activity of enzymes involved in their detoxification. Seed germination also showed higher sensitivity to pro-oxidant treatments. Arabidopsis ferritins are therefore essential to protect cells against oxidative damage.

  8. Magnetic Langmuir-Blodgett films of ferritin with different iron contents.

    PubMed

    Clemente-León, Miguel; Coronado, Eugenio; Soriano-Portillo, Alejandra; Colacio, Enrique; Domínguez-Vera, José M; Galvez, Natividad; Madueño, Rafael; Martín-Romero, María T

    2006-08-01

    Magnetic Langmuir-Blodgett films of four ferritin derivatives with different iron contents containing 4220, 3062, 2200, and 1200 iron atoms, respectively, have been prepared by using the adsorption properties of a 6/1 mixed monolayer of methyl stearate (SME) and dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODA). The molecular organization of the mixed SME/DODA monolayer is strongly affected by the presence of the water-soluble protein in the subphase as shown by pi-A isotherms, BAM images, and imaging ellipsometry at the water-air interface. BAM images reveal the heterogeneity of this mixed monolayer at the air-water interface. We propose that the ferritin is located under the mixed matrix in those regions where the reflectivity is higher whereas the dark regions correspond to the matrix. Ellipsometric angle measurements performed in zones of different brightness of the mixed monolayer confirm such a heterogeneous distribution of the protein under the lipid matrix. Transfer of the monolayer onto different substrates allowed the preparation of multilayer LB films of ferritin. Both infrared and UV-vis spectroscopy indicate that ferritin molecules are incorporated within the LB films. AFM measurements show that the heterogeneous distribution of the ferritin at the water-air interface is maintained when it is transferred onto solid substrates. Magnetic measurements show that the superparamagnetic properties of these molecules are preserved. Thus, marked hysteresis loops of magnetization are obtained below 20 K with coercive fields that depend on the number of iron atoms of the ferritin derivative.

  9. Ferritin Levels in Colombian Children: Findings from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey (ENSIN)

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson; Correa-Bautista, Jorge Enrique; Martínez-Torres, Javier; González-Ruíz, Katherine; Lobelo, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Low ferritin is associated with many adverse health outcomes and is highly prevalent worldwide. The aim of this study was to describe the key findings related to plasma ferritin levels to identify the prevalence and associated sociodemographic factors in a representative sample of children in Colombia, based on the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 6650 Colombian children between the ages of 5 and 12. Plasma ferritin levels were determined by chemiluminescence. Sociodemographic data was assessed by computer-assisted personal interview technology. All analyses were conducted considering the complex nature of the sample. Of the children assessed, 3.5% had low ferritin, defined as levels <12 µg/L. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed increased risks for low ferritin levels among black or Afro-Colombian ethnic group and for those living in the northern, western and southern regions of the country. In conclusion, a significant prevalence of anemia caused by low ferritin levels was found and various sociodemographic factors were associated with this finding in Colombia. Continued surveillance and implementation of interventions to improve dietary patterns among the identified high-risk groups should be considered. Implementing these recommendations can help reduce manifestations of iron deficiency (e.g., delays in infant and child development) and thus improve public health. PMID:27058547

  10. Ferritin-supported lipid bilayers for triggering the endothelial cell response.

    PubMed

    Satriano, C; Lupo, G; Motta, C; Anfuso, C D; Di Pietro, P; Kasemo, B

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid nanoassemblies of ferritin and silica-supported lipid bilayers (ferritin-SLBs) have been prepared and tested for the adhesion, spreading and proliferation of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (ECs). Lipid membranes with varying surface charge were obtained by mixing cationic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (POEPC) with zwitterionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) at increasing POPC/POEPC ratios. The supported bilayer formation and their subsequent interaction processes with ferritin were studied at the pH of 7.4 at different protein concentrations, by using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and by atomic force microscopy. Both kinetics and viscoelastic parameters of the protein-lipid membrane interface were scrutinized, as well as surface coverage. Phase-contrast optical microscopy analyses of the ferritin-SLBs substrates after their interaction with endothelial cells evidenced the highest cell adhesion (2-4h of incubation time) and proliferation (from 24h to 5 days) for the membranes of POPC/POEPC (75:25 ratio). Moreover, ferritin increased both cell adhesion and proliferation in comparison to control glass (respectively 1.5- and 1.75-fold) as well as proliferation in comparison to bare POPC/POEPC (95:5 ratio) (2 fold). Results are very promising in the goal of modulating the endothelial cell response through the interplay of viscoelastic/charge properties of the solid-supported membranes and the SLB-conditioned ferritin activity.

  11. Self-assembly in the ferritin nano-cage protein superfamily.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Orner, Brendan P

    2011-01-01

    Protein self-assembly, through specific, high affinity, and geometrically constraining protein-protein interactions, can control and lead to complex cellular nano-structures. Establishing an understanding of the underlying principles that govern protein self-assembly is not only essential to appreciate the fundamental biological functions of these structures, but could also provide a basis for their enhancement for nano-material applications. The ferritins are a superfamily of well studied proteins that self-assemble into hollow cage-like structures which are ubiquitously found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Structural studies have revealed that many members of the ferritin family can self-assemble into nano-cages of two types. Maxi-ferritins form hollow spheres with octahedral symmetry composed of twenty-four monomers. Mini-ferritins, on the other hand, are tetrahedrally symmetric, hollow assemblies composed of twelve monomers. This review will focus on the structure of members of the ferritin superfamily, the mechanism of ferritin self-assembly and the structure-function relations of these proteins.

  12. Glutamyl cysteine dipeptide suppresses ferritin expression and alleviates liver injury in iron-overload rat model.

    PubMed

    Salama, Samir A; Al-Harbi, Mohammad S; Abdel-Bakky, Mohamed S; Omar, Hany A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its biological importance, iron is a pro-oxidant element and its accumulation results in tissue injury. Iron overload diseases such as thalassemia and hereditary hemochromatosis are commonly associated with liver tissue injury. Glutamyl cysteine (GC) is a dipeptide with antioxidant properties owing to its cysteine residue. The aim of the current work was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of GC against iron overload-induced liver injury. Rats were distributed into five groups; normal control, GC control, iron-treated (150 mg/kg ip injection) and both iron and GC-treated (total iron: 150 mg/kg ip and GC: 50 mg or 100 mg/kg/day ip for 30 days). Our results showed that treatment with GC at the two-dose levels attenuated iron-induced liver tissue injury as evidenced by significant reduction in serum activity of liver enzymes ALT and AST, amelioration of iron-induced histopathological alteration, suppression of iron-induced oxidative stress as demonstrated by significant reduction of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl content beside elevation of total antioxidant capacity, reduced glutathione and the antioxidant enzymes GPx and SOD in liver tissue. In addition, GC significantly reduced levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β and activity of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 in liver tissues. To our surprise, GC reduced liver iron content and ferritin expression, denoting the possible iron chelation competency. Collectively our results highlight evidence for the hepatoprotective effect of GC against iron overload-induced liver injury that is potentially mediated through suppression of oxidative tissue injury, attenuation of inflammatory response, amelioration of hepatocellular apoptosis and possibly through iron chelation.

  13. Serum Hepcidin Levels in Childhood-Onset Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Seham F.; Akeel, Nagwa E.; Abdalhady, Mohamed A.; Elhewala, Ahmed A.; Ali, Al Shymaa A.; Amin, Ezzat K.; Sarhan, Dina T.; Almalky, Mohamed A.A.; Elhindawy, Eman M.; Salam, Mohamed M.A.; Soliman, Attia A.; Abdellatif, Sawsan H.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elsamad, Nahla A.; Hashem, Mustafa I.A.; Aziz, Khalid A.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.; Arafat, Manal S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recently, hepcidin, an antimicrobial-like peptide hormone, has evolved as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. Despite the growing evidence of iron imbalance in childhood-onset ischemic stroke, serum hepcidin level in those patients has not yet been researched. In this study, we aimed to estimate serum (hepcidin) level in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients and to investigate whether subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium, which is a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) derivative, could modulate serum hepcidin level in those patients. This was a case–control study included 60 (AIS) cases, and 100 healthy children with comparable age and gender as control group. For all subjects’ serum hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble transferrin receptor [sTfR]) levels were assessed by (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] method). Iron parameters including (serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, and total iron binding capacity [TIBC]) were also measured. The patients were subdivided according to treatment with an LMWH derivative into 2 groups and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and 1 week after stroke onset for all cases. We found that AIS cases had higher serum iron, ferritin, and IL6 levels compared to the control group (all P < 0.01). Serum hepcidin was significantly higher in AIS cases (median, 36[15–73]ng/mL) compared to the control group (median, 24[10–41]ng/mL; P < 0.01). On the 1st day of AIS diagnosis, serum hepcidin levels were similar in both stroke subgroups (P > 0.05). However, on the 7th day of diagnosis serum hepcidin level decreased significantly in AIS cases treated with LMWH (group 1) (median, 36 vs 21 ng/mL; P < 0.01, respectively). Meanwhile, no significant change was observed in serum hepcidin level in AIS cases not treated with LMWH (group 2) (P > 0.05). Serum hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin, and IL6 (r = 0.375, P < 0

  14. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  15. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the

  16. Opening protein pores with chaotropes enhances Fe reduction and chelation of Fe from the ferritin biomineral.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Jin, Weili; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2003-04-01

    Iron is concentrated in ferritin, a spherical protein with a capacious cavity for ferric nanominerals of <4,500 Fe atoms. Global ferritin structure is very stable, resisting 6 M urea and heat (85 degrees C) at neutral pH. Eight pores, each formed by six helices from 3 of the 24 polypeptide subunits, restrict mineral access to reductant, protons, or chelators. Protein-directed transport of Fe and aqueous Fe(3+) chemistry (solubility approximately 10(-18) M) drive mineralization. Ferritin pores are "gated" based on protein crystals and Fe chelation rates of wild-type (WT) and engineered proteins. Pore structure and gate residues, which are highly conserved, thus should be sensitive to environmental changes such as low concentrations of chaotropes. We now demonstrate that urea or guanidine (1-10 mM), far below concentrations for global unfolding, induced multiphasic rate increases in Fe(2+)-bipyridyl formation similar to conservative substitutions of pore residues. Urea (1 M) or the nonconservative LeuPro substitution that fully unfolded pores without urea both induced monophasic rate increases in Fe(2+) chelation rates, indicating unrestricted access between mineral and reductantchelator. The observation of low-melting ferritin subdomains by CD spectroscopy (melting midpoint 53 degrees C), accounting for 10% of ferritin alpha-helices, is unprecedented. The low-melting ferritin subdomains are pores, based on percentage helix and destabilization by either very dilute urea solutions (1 mM) or LeuPro substitution, which both increased Fe(2+) chelation. Biological molecules may have evolved to control gating of ferritin pores in response to cell iron need and, if mimicked by designer drugs, could impact chelation therapies in iron-overload diseases.

  17. Cloning and Characterisation of Multiple Ferritin Isoforms in the Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Hoe; Pooley, Nicholas J.; Mohd-Adnan, Adura; Martin, Samuel A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ferritin is a highly-conserved iron-storage protein that has also been identified as an acute phase protein within the innate immune system. The iron-storage function is mediated through complementary roles played by heavy (H)-chain subunit as well as the light (L) in mammals or middle (M)-chain in teleosts, respectively. In this study, we report the identification of five ferritin subunits (H1, H2, M1, M2, M3) in the Atlantic salmon that were supported by the presence of iron-regulatory regions, gene structure, conserved domains and phylogenetic analysis. Tissue distribution analysis across eight different tissues showed that each of these isoforms is differentially expressed. We also examined the expression of the ferritin isoforms in the liver and kidney of juvenile Atlantic salmon that was challenged with Aeromonas salmonicida as well as in muscle cell culture stimulated with interleukin-1β. We found that each isoform displayed unique expression profiles, and in certain conditions the expressions between the isoforms were completely diametrical to each other. Our study is the first report of multiple ferritin isoforms from both the H- and M-chains in a vertebrate species, as well as ferritin isoforms that showed decreased expression in response to infection. Taken together, the results of our study suggest the possibility of functional differences between the H- and M-chain isoforms in terms of tissue localisation, transcriptional response to bacterial exposure and stimulation by specific immune factors. PMID:25078784

  18. L-Ferritin Binding to Scara5: A New Iron Traffic Pathway Potentially Implicated in Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Jorge, Luísa; Ramos, David; Valença, Andreia; López-Luppo, Mariana; Pires, Virgínia Maria Rico; Catita, Joana; Nacher, Victor; Navarro, Marc; Carretero, Ana; Rodriguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Ruberte, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential in the retina because the heme-containing enzyme guanylate cyclase modulates phototransduction in rods and cones. Transferrin endocytosis is the classical pathway for obtaining iron from the blood circulation in the retina. However, the iron storage protein ferritin has been also recently proposed as an iron carrier. In this study, the presence of Scara5 and its binding to L-ferritin was investigated in the retina. Our results showed that Scara5, the specific receptor for L-ferritin, was expressed in mouse and human retinas in many cell types, including endothelial cells. Furthermore, we showed that intravenously injected ferritin crossed the blood retinal barrier through L-ferritin binding to Scara5 in endothelial cells. Thus, suggesting the existence of a new pathway for iron delivery and trafficking in the retina. In a murine model of photoreceptor degeneration, Scara5 was downregulated, pointing out this receptor as a potential player implicated in retinopathy and also as a possible therapeutic target. PMID:25259650

  19. Iron- and ferritin-dependent reactive oxygen species distribution: impact on Arabidopsis root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Guilhem; Boudouf, Soukaina; Boucherez, Jossia; Gaymard, Frédéric; Briat, Jean-Francois

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is integrated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and distribution at the root tip participates in the control of root growth. Excess Fe increases ferritin abundance, enabling the storage of Fe, which contributes to protection of plants against Fe-induced oxidative stress. AtFer1 and AtFer3 are the two ferritin genes expressed in the meristematic zone, pericycle and endodermis of the Arabidopsis thaliana root, and it is in these regions that we observe Fe stained dots. This staining disappears in the triple fer1-3-4 ferritin mutant. Fe excess decreases primary root length in the same way in wild-type and in fer1-3-4 mutant. In contrast, the Fe-mediated decrease of lateral root (LR) length and density is enhanced in fer1-3-4 plants due to a defect in LR emergence. We observe that this interaction between excess Fe, ferritin, and root system architecture (RSA) is in part mediated by the H2O2/O2·- balance between the root cell proliferation and differentiation zones regulated by the UPB1 transcription factor. Meristem size is also decreased in response to Fe excess in ferritin mutant plants, implicating cell cycle arrest mediated by the ROS-activated SMR5/SMR7 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors pathway in the interaction between Fe and RSA.

  20. L-Ferritin targets breast cancer stem cells and delivers therapeutic and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Ruiu, Roberto; Cadenazzi, Marta; Cavallo, Federica; Aime, Silvio; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSC) have the unique biological properties necessary for tumor maintenance and spreading, and function as a reservoir for the relapse and metastatic evolution of the disease by virtue of their resistance to radio- and chemo-therapies. Thus, the efficacy of a therapeutic approach relies on its ability to effectively target and deplete CSC. In this study, we show that CSC-enriched tumorspheres from breast cancer cell lines display an increased L-Ferritin uptake capability compared to their monolayer counterparts as a consequence of the upregulation of the L-Ferritin receptor SCARA5. L-Ferritin internalization was exploited for the simultaneous delivery of Curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A, both entrapped in the L-Ferritin cavity. This theranostic system was able to impair viability and self-renewal of tumorspheres in vitro and to induce the regression of established tumors in mice. In conclusion, here we show that Curcumin-loaded L-Ferritin has a strong therapeutic potential due to the specific targeting of CSC and the improved Curcumin bioavailability, opening up the possibility of its use in a clinical setting. PMID:27579532

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of reconstructed ferritin as an iron-induced pathological model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balejcikova, Lucia; Strbak, Oliver; Baciak, Ladislav; Kovac, Jozef; Masarova, Marta; Krafcik, Andrej; Frollo, Ivan; Dobrota, Dusan; Kopcansky, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Iron, an essential element of the human body, is a significant risk factor, particularly in the case of its concentration increasing above the specific limit. Therefore, iron is stored in the non-toxic form of the globular protein, ferritin, consisting of an apoferritin shell and iron core. Numerous studies confirmed the disruption of homeostasis and accumulation of iron in patients with various diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular or neurological conditions), which is closely related to ferritin metabolism. Such iron imbalance enables the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a sensitive technique for the detection of iron-based aggregates through changes in the relaxation times, followed by the change in the inherent image contrast. For our in vitrostudy, modified ferritins with different iron loadings were prepared by chemical reconstruction of the iron core in an apoferritin shell as pathological model systems. The magnetic properties of samples were studied using SQUID magnetometry, while the size distribution was detected via dynamic light scattering. We have shown that MRI could represent the most advantageous method for distinguishing native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin which, after future standardisation, could then be suitable for the diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation.

  2. Effect of iron status in rats on the absorption of metal ions from plant ferritin.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Dawidziak, Magdalena; Hertig, Iwona; Staniek, Halina; Piasecka-Kwiatkowska, Dorota; Nowak, Krzysztof W

    2014-06-01

    An isolate of lead-ferritin obtained from soybean seeds sprouted in 25 mM of PbNO3 was introduced into the diet of both iron-deficient and iron non-deficient male rats. After a 21-day administration period, statistical differences in the lead accumulation in the femurs of the rats were noted. Iron-deficient rats accumulated more than four times the amount of lead in their bones than rats without iron-deficiency. No further decrease was observed in haemoglobin concentrations in the groups of animals fed with lead isolates, either iron-deficient or iron non-deficient. Also, no differences in the mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were observed at the end of the experiment in the group of iron non-deficient rats fed with lead-ferritin isolate compared to the control group of iron non-deficient rats. In the iron-deficient group fed with lead-ferritin isolate, a small increase in haemoglobin concentrations, MCH, MCV and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentrations (MCHC) was recorded. The results presented in this paper confirm that lead from the tested preparation-lead ferritin isolate-was better absorbed by those rats with induced iron deficiency anaemia. Additionally, we may also suspect based on the obtained results that absorption of ferritin-iron depends on iron status in the body.

  3. Iron release and uptake by plant ferritin: effects of pH, reduction and chelation.

    PubMed Central

    Laulhere, J P; Briat, J F

    1993-01-01

    Ferritins are iron-storage proteins that accumulate in plastids during seed formation, and also in leaves during senescence or iron overload. Iron release from ferritins occurs during growth of seedlings and greening of plastids. Depending on the concentration of the reducing agent ascorbate, either an overall iron release or uptake by ferritins from iron(III) citrate may occur. We have designed methods to measure these simultaneous and independent uptake and release fluxes. Each individual step of the exchange was studied using different iron chelates and an excess of ligand. It is shown that: (i) the chelated form of iron, and not ionic Fe3+, is the substrate for iron reduction, which controls the subsequent uptake by ferritin; (ii) iron uptake by ferritins is faster at pH 8.4 than at pH 7 or 6 and is inhibited by an excess of strongly binding free ligands; and (iii) strongly binding free ligands are inhibitory during iron release by ascorbate. When reactions are allowed to proceed simultaneously, the iron chelating power is shown to be a key factor in the overall exchange. The interactions of iron chelating power, reducing capacity and pH are discussed with regard to their influence on the biochemical mobilization of iron. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8457196

  4. Mutation analysis of the ferritin L-chain gene in age-related cataract

    PubMed Central

    Assia, Nurit; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Rechavi, Gideon; Amariglio, Ninette

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether acquired somatic mutations in the iron response element of the ferritin L-chain gene account for the age-related cataract. Methods The 15 most prevalent point mutations causing hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) were screened in patients with age-related cataract using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. DNA samples were obtained from the lens capsules of patients following cataract surgery, and subjected to PCR amplification. Products were analyzed by a Sequenom® mass spectrometer, and classified as a mutation or wild type according to molecular weight. For a positive control, L-ferritin G32T mutation detected by direct sequencing in 3 members of an Israeli family known to be affected by HHCS was used. Results DNA samples were isolated from the lens capsules of 90 patients, mean age 73.86, and screened for L-ferritin mutations. While the G32T mutation was detected in all 3 positive control cases, all other patients were negative for the 15 mutations. Conclusions Somatic mutations in the iron response elements (IRE) of the L-ferritin gene are infrequent in the age-related cataract. The role of L-ferritin genetic variations in the pathogenesis of age-related cataract is yet to be explored. PMID:21139976

  5. Bioinformatic prediction of the antigenic epitopes of recombinant ferritin of Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuelei; Zhao, Hui; Cao, Wenyan; Liu, Yumei; Zhang, Chuntao; Lan, Xi; Peng, Shanshan; Wen, Hao; Ding, Jianbing; Ma, Xiumin

    2016-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a zoonotic parasitic disease affecting humans and other mammals, which is mainly caused Echinococcus at larval stages. It is predominantly endemic in Chinese pasture regions, including Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu and Ningxia. The aim of the present study was to predict the T‑ and B‑combined epitopes of Echinococcus granulosus (Eg). ferritin, and to analyze its secondary structure using online software. Prediction of the T‑ and B‑combined epitopes of Eg. ferritin was performed using IEDB, SYFPEITHI and LEPS software, which are used to identify common areas of T‑ and B‑cells. The results of the present study identified several potential antigenic epitopes of Eg. ferritin, including seven B‑cell antigen epitope amino acid sequences with high values: 8‑16, 54‑61, 70‑75, 80‑90, 103‑109, 117‑124 and 167‑173; and four T‑cell antigen epitope amino acid sequences with high values: 85‑93, 105‑113, 133‑141 and 157‑165. Furthermore, a combined epitope region comprising an 105‑109 amino acid sequence was identified. In conclusion, using bioinformatic methods, the present study confirmed the existence of Eg. ferritin on four T‑cell antigen epitopes, seven B‑cell antigen epitopes, and one T‑ and B‑combined epitope region. These findings provide significant information for further investigation of the antigenicity of Eg. ferritin and the development of highly efficient epitope vaccines.

  6. M. tuberculosis ferritin (Rv3841): Potential involvement in Amikacin (AK) & Kanamycin (KM) resistance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divakar; Lata, Manju; Faheem, Mohammad; Khan, Asad Ullah; Joshi, Beenu; Venkatesan, Krishnamurthy; Shukla, Sangeeta; Bisht, Deepa

    2016-09-16

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease, caused by one of the most successful human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Aminoglycosides, Amikacin (AK) & Kanamycin (KM) are commonly used to treat drug resistant tuberculosis. They target the protein synthesis machinery by interacting with several steps of translation. Several explanations have been proposed to explain the mechanism of aminoglycoside resistance but still our information is inadequate. Iron storing/interacting proteins were found to be overexpressed in aminoglycosides resistant isolates. Iron assimilation and utilization in M. tuberculosis plays a crucial role in growth, virulence and latency. To establish the relationship of ferritin with AK & KM resistance ferritin (Rv3841/bfrB) was cloned, expressed and antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing (DST) was carried out. Rv3841/bfrB gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli BL21 using pQE2 expression vector. Etest results for DST against AK & KM showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ferritin recombinant cells was changed. Recombinants showed two fold changes in MIC with AK and three fold with KM E-strips. Overexpression of ferritin reflect the MIC shift which might be playing a critical role in the survival of mycobacteria by inhibiting/modulating the effects of AK & KM. String analysis also suggests that ferritin interacted with few proteins which are directly and indirectly involved in M. tuberculosis growth, Iron assimilation, virulence, resistance, stresses and latency.

  7. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage*

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M.; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R.; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe3+ exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe2+ oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  8. Atom Probe Tomographic Mapping Directly Reveals the Atomic Distribution of Phosphorus in Resin Embedded Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah; Dicken, Quinten; Thevuthasan, S. Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces within the ferritin protein using atom probe tomography that is facilitated by an advanced specimen preparation approach. Embedding ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualise atomic distributions and distinguish the inorganic-organic interface of the ferrihydrite mineral core and protein shell, as well as the organic-organic interface between the ferritin protein shell and embedding resin. In addition, we definitively show the atomic-scale distribution of phosphorus as being at the surface of the ferrihydrite mineral with the distribution of sodium mapped within the protein shell environment with an enhanced distribution at the mineral/protein interface. The sample preparation method is robust and can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment. PMID:26924804

  9. The iron content and ferritin contribution in fresh, dried, and toasted nori, Pyropia yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Taro; Yamamoto, Ami; Toyohara, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Iron is one of the essential trace elements for humans. In this study, the iron contents in fresh, dried, and toasted nori (Pyropia yezoensis) were analyzed. The mean iron content of fresh, dried, and toasted nori were 19.0, 22.6, and 26.2 mg/100 g (dry weight), respectively. These values were superior to other food of plant origin. Furthermore, most of the iron in nori was maintained during processing, such as washing, drying, and toasting. Then, the form of iron in fresh, dried, and toasted nori was analyzed. As a result, an iron storage protein ferritin contributed to iron storage in raw and dried nori, although the precise rate of its contribution is yet to be determined, while ferritin protein cage was degraded in the toasted nori. It is the first report that verified the ferritin contribution to iron storage in such edible macroalgae with commercial importance.

  10. Morphology of the ferritin iron core by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jian, Nan; Dowle, Miriam; Horniblow, Richard D; Tselepis, Chris; Palmer, Richard E

    2016-11-18

    As the major iron storage protein, ferritin stores and releases iron for maintaining the balance of iron in fauna, flora, and bacteria. We present an investigation of the morphology and iron loading of ferritin (from equine spleen) using aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Atom counting method, with size selected Au clusters as mass standards, was employed to determine the number of iron atoms in the nanoparticle core of each ferritin protein. Quantitative analysis shows that the nuclearity of iron atoms in the mineral core varies from a few hundred iron atoms to around 5000 atoms. Moreover, a relationship between the iron loading and iron core morphology is established, in which mineral core nucleates from a single nanoparticle, then grows along the protein shell before finally forming either a solid or hollow core structure.

  11. Morphology of the ferritin iron core by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Nan; Dowle, Miriam; Horniblow, Richard D.; Tselepis, Chris; Palmer, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    As the major iron storage protein, ferritin stores and releases iron for maintaining the balance of iron in fauna, flora, and bacteria. We present an investigation of the morphology and iron loading of ferritin (from equine spleen) using aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Atom counting method, with size selected Au clusters as mass standards, was employed to determine the number of iron atoms in the nanoparticle core of each ferritin protein. Quantitative analysis shows that the nuclearity of iron atoms in the mineral core varies from a few hundred iron atoms to around 5000 atoms. Moreover, a relationship between the iron loading and iron core morphology is established, in which mineral core nucleates from a single nanoparticle, then grows along the protein shell before finally forming either a solid or hollow core structure.

  12. The Effectiveness of Ferritin as a Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking MRI in Mouse Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chan Wha; Choi, Sun Il; Lee, Sang Jin; Oh, Young Taek; Park, Gunwoo; Park, Na Yeon; Yoon, Kyoung-Ah; Kim, Sunshin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of ferritin as a contrast agent and a potential reporter gene for tracking tumor cells or macrophages in mouse cancer models. Materials and Methods Adenoviral human ferritin heavy chain (Ad-hFTH) was administrated to orthotopic glioma models and subcutaneous colon cancer mouse models using U87MG and HCT116 cells, respectively. Brain MR images were acquired before and daily for up to 6 days after the intracranial injection of Ad-hFTH. In the HCT116 tumor model, MR examinations were performed before and at 6, 24, and 48 h after intratumoral injection of Ad-hFTH, as well as before and every two days after intravenous injection of ferritin-labeled macrophages. The contrast effect of ferritin in vitro was measured by MR imaging of cell pellets. MRI examinations using a 7T MR scanner comprised a T1-weighted (T1w) spin-echo sequence, T2-weighted (T2w) relaxation enhancement sequence, and T2*-weighted (T2*w) fast low angle shot sequence. Results Cell pellet imaging of Ad-hFTH in vitro showed a strong negatively enhanced contrast in T2w and T2*w images, presenting with darker signal intensity in high concentrations of Fe. T2w images of glioma and subcutaneous HCT116 tumor models showed a dark signal intensity around or within the Ad-hFTH tumor, which was distinct with time and apparent in T2*w images. After injection of ferritin-labeled macrophages, negative contrast enhancement was identified within the tumor. Conclusion Ferritin could be a good candidate as an endogenous MR contrast agent and a potential reporter gene that is capable of maintaining cell labeling stability and cellular safety. PMID:27873495

  13. Identification and molecular analysis of a ferritin subunit from red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong-hua; Zheng, Wen-jiang; Sun, Li

    2010-04-01

    Ferritin is a conserved iron binding protein existing ubiquitously in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this study, the gene encoding a ferritin M subunit homologue (SoFer1) was cloned from red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and analyzed at expression and functional levels. The open reading frame of SoFer1 is 531 bp and preceded by a 5'-untranslated region that contains a putative Iron Regulatory Element (IRE) preserved in many ferritins. The deduced amino acid sequence of SoFer1 possesses both the ferroxidase center of mammalian H ferritin and the iron nucleation site of mammalian L ferritin. Expression of SoFer1 was tissue specific and responded positively to experimental challenges with Gram-positive and Gram-negative fish pathogens. Treatment of red drum liver cells with iron, copper, and oxidant significantly upregulated the expression of SoFer1 in time-dependent manners. To further examine the potential role of SoFer1 in antioxidation, red drum liver cells transfected transiently with SoFer1 were prepared. Compared to control cells, SoFer1 transfectants exhibited reduced production of reactive oxygen species following H(2)O(2) challenge. Finally, to examine the iron binding potential of SoFer1, SoFer1 was expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli as a recombinant protein. Iron-chelating analysis showed that purified recombinant SoFer1 was capable of iron binding. Taken together, these results suggest that SoFer1 is likely to be a functional ferritin involved in iron sequestration, host immune defence against bacterial infection, and antioxidation.

  14. A capillary electrophoresis method for studying apo, holo, recombinant, and subunit dissociated ferritins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Malik, A; Lee, M L; Watt, G D

    1994-04-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method is described for detecting and quantitating apo and holo ferritins from horse spleen (HoSF), rat liver (RLF), recombinant human light chain (rLF), recombinant human heavy chain (rHF), site-directed variants of human light chain, and Azotobacter vinelandii bacterial ferritin (AVBF). This procedure is carried out at pH 8.2, where the ferritin molecules are associated into their 24-mers. Protein mobilities as expressed as elution times were clearly resolved and could be used to distinguish one ferritin type from another, providing a means for detecting and quantitating various ferritin species in purified or partially purified states. Measurements of these and other ferritins were also conducted at pH 2.0, where dissociation into their respective subunits occurs. For HoSF and RLF, the individual L and H subunits were resolved and their relative concentrations were determined by integrating the areas of the elution peaks. HoSF gave 89.8% L and 10.2% H and RLF gave 70.7% L and 29.3% H, while rLF, rHF, and AVBF gave only a single subunit, all in agreement with reported values obtained by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. CE of HoSF, containing increasing amounts of iron in the interior, in general, showed that protein mobilities increased, reached a plateau, and then slowly decreased with increasing core size, although buffer effects altered this CE behavior to some extent. Such results indicate that species formed early during core formation have individual iron atoms present and differ from those formed later in which the oligomeric iron core has formed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A new approach to the ferritin iron core growth: influence of the H/L ratio on the core shape.

    PubMed

    López-Castro, J D; Delgado, J J; Perez-Omil, J A; Gálvez, Natividad; Cuesta, Rafael; Watt, Richard K; Domínguez-Vera, José M

    2012-01-28

    An electron microscopy study, in combination with modeling and image simulation, of four different reconstituted ferritin samples: recombinant human H and L homopolymers, and H and L heteropolymers of native L-subunit-rich horse spleen and H-subunit-rich human heart ferritins, points out the existence of a correlation between iron core shape and protein shell.

  16. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  17. Diagnosis of Iron Deficiency in Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Transferrin Receptor-Ferritin Index.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Vered; Borderie, Didier; Polin, Vanessa; Maksimovic, Fanny; Sarfati, Gilles; Esch, Anouk; Tabouret, Tessa; Dhooge, Marion; Dreanic, Johann; Perkins, Geraldine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2015-07-01

    Iron deficiency is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but can be difficult to diagnose in the presence of inflammation because ferritin is an acute phase reactant. The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (TfR-F) has a high sensitivity and specificity for iron deficiency diagnosis in chronic diseases. The diagnostic efficacy of TfR-F is little known in patients with IBD. The aim of the study was to assess the added value of TfR-F to iron deficiency diagnosis in a prospective cohort of patients with IBD.Consecutive IBD patients were prospectively enrolled. Patients were excluded in case of blood transfusion, iron supplementation, or lack of consent. IBD activity was assessed on markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, endoscopy, fecal calprotectin). Hemoglobin, ferritin, vitamin B9 and B12, Lactate dehydrogenase, haptoglobin, and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were assayed. TfR-F was calculated as the ratio sTfR/log ferritin. Iron deficiency was defined by ferritin <30 ng/mL or TfR-F >2 in the presence of inflammation.One-hundred fifty patients with median age 38 years (16-78) and Crohn disease (n = 105), ulcerative colitis (n = 43), or unclassified colitis (n = 2) were included. Active disease was identified in 45.3%. Anemia was diagnosed in 28%. Thirty-six patients (24%) had ferritin <30 ng/mL. Thirty-two patients (21.3%) had ferritin levels from 30 to 100 ng/ml and inflammation: 2 had vitamin B12 deficiency excluding TfR-F analysis, 13 of 30 (43.3%) had TfR-F >2. Overall, iron deficiency was diagnosed in 32.7% of the patients.TfR-F in addition to ferritin <30 ng/mL criterion increased by 36% diagnosis rates of iron deficiency. TfR-F appeared as a useful biomarker that could help physicians to diagnose true iron deficiency in patients with active IBD.

  18. Changes of serum trace elements level in patients with alopecia areata: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Waishu; Zheng, Haibo; Shan, Baihui; Wu, Yi

    2017-02-02

    Abnormalities of serum trace elements are involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of alopecia areata (AA); however, the results of published studies are controversial. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the alterations of serum level of trace elements and AA using a meta-analysis approach. We searched all articles indexed in PubMed, Embase and Science Citation Index published up to 30 April 2016 concerning the association between serum level of zinc, copper, iron/ferritin, selenium or magnesium and AA. Ten eligible articles involving 764 subjects were identified. Overall, pooled analysis indicated that patients with AA had a lower serum level of zinc (P < 10(-4) ) and selenium (P < 10(-4) ) than the healthy controls. However, there was no significant difference between the AA patients and controls in the levels of serum copper (P = 0.81), serum iron (P = 0.36), serum ferritin (P = 0.37) and serum magnesium (P = 0.07). This meta-analysis suggests that low serum levels of zinc and selenium seem to be important risk factors for AA.

  19. Patterned poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) brushes on silicon surfaces behave as "tentacles" to capture ferritin from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Chen, Zong-Yan; Lin, Han-Ching; Hong, Po-Da; Chang, Feng-Chih

    2009-07-01

    We have used a very large scale integration process to generate well-defined patterns of polymerized 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on patterned Si(100) surfaces. An atom transfer radical polymerization initiator covalently bonded to the patterned surface was employed for the graft polymerization of HEMA to prepare the poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) brushes. After immersing wafers presenting lines of these polymers in water and cyclohexane, we observed brush- and mushroom-like regions, respectively, for the PHEMA brushes, with various pattern resolutions. The PHEMA brushes behaved as "tentacles" that captured ferritin complexes from aqueous solution through entanglement between the brushes and the ferritin proteins, whose ferritins were trapped due to the collapsing of the PHEMA. Using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, we observed patterned ferritin iron cores on the Si surface after thermal removal of the patterned PHEMA brushes and ferritin protein sheaths.

  20. Effects of Ascorbic Acid, Phytic Acid and Tannic Acid on Iron Bioavailability from Reconstituted Ferritin Measured by an In Vitro Digestion/Caco-2 Cell Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ascorbic acid, phytate and tannic acid on Fe bioavailability from Fe supplied as ferritin was compared to FeSO4 using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Horse spleen ferritin (HSF) was chemically reconstituted into a plant-type ferritin (P-HSF). In the presence of ascorbic acid...

  1. Iron acquisition in Bacillus cereus: the roles of IlsA and bacillibactin in exogenous ferritin iron mobilization.

    PubMed

    Segond, Diego; Abi Khalil, Elise; Buisson, Christophe; Daou, Nadine; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Arosio, Paolo; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Nielsen Le Roux, Christina

    2014-02-01

    In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A) binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis.

  2. Pre-transplantation risk factors to develop sclerotic chronic GvHD after allogeneic HSCT: a multicenter retrospective study from the Société Française de Greffe de Moelle et de Thérapie Cellulaire (SFGM-TC).

    PubMed

    Detrait, M Y; Morisset, S; Peffault de Latour, R; Yakoub-Agha, I; Crocchiolo, R; Tabrizi, R; Bay, J-O; Chevalier, P; Barraco, F; Raus, N; Vigouroux, S; Magro, L; Mohty, M; Milpied, N; Blaise, D; Socié, G; Michallet, M

    2015-02-01

    Sclerotic chronic GvHD (cGvHD) is one of the most severe complications after allo-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Risk factors associated with this complication remain not very well defined. With the aim to define a pre-transplantation risk profile, we have conducted a French retrospective analysis in 705 consecutive patients between 2005 and 2010. Analyses to determine pre-transplantation risk factors included as variables: patient and donor age, kind of donor, HLA matching, ABO matching, sex-matching, diagnosis, stem cell source, gender, GvHD prophylaxis and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) in the conditioning regimen. The cumulative incidence of sclerotic cGvHD was 18% (95% CI, 16.6-19.6) 3 years after onset of cGvHD. In univariate analysis, we found a significantly lower number of sclerotic cGvHD form in patients transplanted from cord blood cells (P=0.0021), in patients with a one mismatched donor (P=0.041) and in patients who had received ATG in the conditioning regimen (P=0.002). In multivariate analysis, factors associated with an increased risk of sclerotic cGvHD were young patient age, multiple myeloma and PBSC as the stem cell source. ATG in conditioning regimen and cord blood unit as the stem cell source were associated with a lower risk.

  3. Intermittent hypoxia upregulates hepatic heme oxygenase-1 and ferritin-1, thereby limiting hepatic pathogenesis in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2016-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is prevalent in patients with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). Intermittent hypoxia (IH) and a high-fat diet (HFD) reproduce SAS and NAFLD, respectively, in rodents. In this study, rats were fed either an HFD or a standard diet (SD) for 2 weeks, and breathed either IH air or normoxic air for 4 days (early phase) or 6 weeks (late phase), with the same diets maintained during the exposure. HFD increased hepatic lipid accumulation, as detected by oil-red staining and triglyceride content. However, IH exposure reversed the hepatic steatosis at the late phase in these HFD-rats. IH exposure also increased hepatic expression of HO-1 and iron-binding protein ferritin-1 at the late phase, in association with increase in serum iron, bilirubin, and hepatic levels of lipid peroxides, such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE). IH exposure increased serum levels of hemoglobin (Hb) at the early phase and immunofluorescence of Hb and HO-1 in CD68-positive Kupffer cells (KCs) at the late phase. These findings support that IH induces erythrocytosis, erythro-phagocytosis, and generation of Hb in the KCs. The Hb promotes HO-1 expression in KCs, thereby produces iron, bilirubin, and carbon monoxide (CO). The iron would be either sequestrated by ferritin-1, transferred to the bone marrow for erythropoiesis, or would produce hydroxyradicals and HNE in the liver of rats fed an HFD. HNE might also contribute to the upregulation of HO-1, transferrin-1, and IκB, thereby limiting hepatic steatosis and inflammation via inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation.

  4. Electron exchange between Fe(II)-horse spleen ferritin and Co(III)/Mn(III) reconstituted horse spleen and Azotobacter vinelandii ferritins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Harb, John N; Davis, Robert C; Choi, Sang; Kim, Jae-Woo; Miller, Tim; Chu, Sang-Hyon; Watt, Gerald D

    2006-05-09

    Azotobacter vinelandii bacterioferritin (AvBF) containing 800-1500 Co or Mn atoms as Co(III) and Mn(III) oxyhydroxide cores (Co-AvBF, Mn-AvBF) was synthesized by the same procedure used previously for horse spleen ferritin (HoSF). The kinetics of reduction of Co-AvBF and Mn-AvBF by ascorbic acid are first-order in each reactant. The rate constant for the reduction of Mn-AvBF (8.52 M(-1) min(-1)) is approximately 12 times larger than that for Co-AvBF (0.72 M(-1) min(-1)), which is consistent with a previous observation that Mn-HoSF is reduced approximately 10-fold faster than Co-HoSF [Zhang, B. et al. (2005) Inorg. Chem. 44, 3738-3745]. The rates of reduction of M-AvBF (M = Co and Mn) are more than twice that for the reduction of the corresponding M-HoSF. HoSF containing reduced Fe(II) cores (Fe(II)-HoSF), prepared by methyl viologen and CO, also reduces M-HoSF and M-AvBF species, with both cores remaining within ferritin, suggesting that electrons transfer through the ferritin shell. Electron transfer from Fe(II)-HoSF to Co-AvBF occurs at a rate approximately 3 times faster than that to Co-HoSF, indicating that the Co cores in AvBF are more accessible to reduction than the Co cores in HoSF. The presence of nonconductive (SiO2) or conductive (gold) surfaces known to bind ferritins enhances the rate of electron transfer. A more than approximately 4-fold increase in the apparent reaction rate is observed in the presence of gold. Although both surfaces (SiO2 and gold) enhance reaction by providing binding sites for molecular interaction, results show that ferritins with different mineral cores bound to a gold surface transfer electrons through the gold substrate so that direct contact of the reacting molecules is not required.

  5. ARSENIC SPECIES THAT CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN AND GENERATION OF ACTIVATED OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT

    The in vitro effects of four different species of arsenic { arsenate, arsenite, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid) in mobilizing iron from horse spleen ferritin under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were investigated. Dimethylarsinicacid {DMA(V...

  6. Iron-independent phosphorylation of iron regulatory protein 2 regulates ferritin during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallander, Michelle L; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Rodansky, Eva S; Romney, S Joshua; Leibold, Elizabeth A

    2008-08-29

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a key iron sensor that post-transcriptionally regulates mammalian iron homeostasis by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in mRNAs that encode proteins involved in iron metabolism (e.g. ferritin and transferrin receptor 1). During iron deficiency, IRP2 binds IREs to regulate mRNA translation or stability, whereas during iron sufficiency IRP2 is degraded by the proteasome. Here, we identify an iron-independent IRP2 phosphorylation site that is regulated by the cell cycle. IRP2 Ser-157 is phosphorylated by Cdk1/cyclin B1 during G(2)/M and is dephosphorylated during mitotic exit by the phosphatase Cdc14A. Ser-157 phosphorylation during G(2)/M reduces IRP2 RNA-binding activity and increases ferritin synthesis, whereas Ser-157 dephosphorylation during mitotic exit restores IRP2 RNA-binding activity and represses ferritin synthesis. These data show that reversible phosphorylation of IRP2 during G(2)/M has a role in modulating the iron-independent expression of ferritin and other IRE-containing mRNAs during the cell cycle.

  7. Apo-Ferritin as a Therapeutic Treatment for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: James R. Connor, Ph.D...August 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Apo-Ferritin as a Therapeutic Treatment for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis 5b. GRANT NUMBER...accumulation and deposition have been reported in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previous work in mutant SOD1 mice mouse models of ALS

  8. Structural characterization of encapsulated ferritin provides insight into iron storage in bacterial nanocompartments

    PubMed Central

    He, Didi; Hughes, Sam; Vanden-Hehir, Sally; Georgiev, Atanas; Altenbach, Kirsten; Tarrant, Emma; Mackay, C Logan; Waldron, Kevin J; Clarke, David J; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are ubiquitous proteins that oxidise and store iron within a protein shell to protect cells from oxidative damage. We have characterized the structure and function of a new member of the ferritin superfamily that is sequestered within an encapsulin capsid. We show that this encapsulated ferritin (EncFtn) has two main alpha helices, which assemble in a metal dependent manner to form a ferroxidase center at a dimer interface. EncFtn adopts an open decameric structure that is topologically distinct from other ferritins. While EncFtn acts as a ferroxidase, it cannot mineralize iron. Conversely, the encapsulin shell associates with iron, but is not enzymatically active, and we demonstrate that EncFtn must be housed within the encapsulin for iron storage. This encapsulin nanocompartment is widely distributed in bacteria and archaea and represents a distinct class of iron storage system, where the oxidation and mineralization of iron are distributed between two proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18972.001 PMID:27529188

  9. Molecular entrapment of small molecules within the interior of horse spleen ferritin.

    PubMed

    Webb, B; Frame, J; Zhao, Z; Lee, M L; Watt, G D

    1994-02-15

    A procedure for trapping small molecules inside the interior of horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and methods for characterizing HoSF and its small entrapped molecules are described. HoSF is first dissociated into subunits by adjustment to pH 2 in the presence of the small molecules to be trapped. The pH of the dissociated HoSF is then increased to 7 at which time the dissociated subunits reassemble reforming the 24-mer HoSF, thereby trapping solvent within its interior. HoSF is then separated from unbound molecules by dialysis, ultrafiltration, and/or ammonium sulfate precipitation. Sephadex G-25 and DEAE chromatographic methods were also used to separate HoSF from unbound small molecules. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to demonstrate the association of small molecules with HoSF after the pH-induced unfolding-refolding process. The pH indicator neutral red was clearly associated with HoSF and presumed trapped within the ferritin interior. Acid/base titrations suggested that the trapped indicator had a different pKa than the free indicator, a result which indicates that the ferritin interior is different than the external solution. The utility of using trapped molecules for gaining information on ferritin function is proposed and discussed.

  10. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  11. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin.

    Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  12. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVIE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES. CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON , FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). R...

  13. Iron regulatory protein-2 knockout increases perihematomal ferritin expression and cell viability after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mai; Awe, Olatilewa O; Chen-Roetling, Jing; Regan, Raymond F

    2010-06-14

    Iron is deposited in perihematomal tissue after an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and may contribute to oxidative injury. Cell culture studies have demonstrated that enhancing ferritin expression by targeting iron regulatory protein (IRP) binding activity reduces cellular vulnerability to iron and hemoglobin. In order to assess the therapeutic potential of this approach after striatal ICH, the effect of IRP1 or IRP2 gene knockout on ferritin expression and injury was quantified. Striatal ferritin in IRP1 knockout mice was similar to that in wild-type controls 3 days after stereotactic injection of artificial CSF or autologous blood. Corresponding levels in IRP2 knockouts were increased by 11-fold and 8.4-fold, respectively, compared with wild-type. Protein carbonylation, a sensitive marker of hemoglobin neurotoxicity, was increased by 2.4-fold in blood-injected wild-type striata, was not altered by IRP1 knockout, but was reduced by approximately 60% by IRP2 knockout. Perihematomal cell viability in wild-type mice, assessed by MTT assay, was approximately half of that in contralateral striata at 3 days, and was significantly increased in IRP2 knockouts but not in IRP1 knockouts. Protection was also observed when hemorrhage was induced by collagenase injection. These results suggest that IRP2 binding activity reduces ferritin expression in the striatum after ICH, preventing an optimal response to elevated local iron concentrations. IRP2 binding activity may be a novel therapeutic target after hemorrhagic CNS injuries.

  14. Relationship of Ferritin to Symptom Ratings Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Effect of Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oner, Pinar; Oner, Ozgur

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the relation between behavioral symptoms and hematological variables which are related with iron deficiency and anemia, ferritin, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), and reticulosite distribution width (RDW) in children and adolescents with pure Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or ADHD comorbid with…

  15. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  16. Characteristics and kinetics of iron release from the ferritin under the EGCG reduction.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xuetao; Huang, Lin; Lin, Qing; Huang, Heqing

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of iron release from ferritin in vivo is still unclear even though it represents a key step of the metabolism of iron in vivo. Here, both interaction intensity and binding stability between epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) from tea and liver ferritin of Dasyatis akajei (DALF) were investigated using UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry, respectively. The results indicated that EGCG could reduce the iron within the ferritin shell directly in the absence of chemical reducers such as Na(2)S(2)O(4), but this process was strictly pH-dependent, and the rate of iron release is faster at low pH than at high pH. The kinetic study of iron release showed that this process fitted the law of zero order reaction, which differed from that of first order reaction by various chemical reducers such as Vitamin C. In addition, Both fluorescence and CD spectrometry were further used to study the reduction mechanism of iron release in vitro, showing that there was a slight conformation change of the ferritin shell during EGCG reduction because of a complex formation of DALF-EGCG. It appears that chemical reducers with large molecular sizes reduce the iron across the protein shell by the way of an electron transfer pathway (ETP). A novel pathway for iron release from DALF with EGCG reduction is suggested to explain for a reductive route of iron metabolism by biological reducers in vivo.

  17. Iron Regulatory Protein-2 Knockout Increases Perihematomal Ferritin Expression and Cell Viability after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mai; Awe, Olatilewa O.; Chen-Roetling, Jing; Regan, Raymond F.

    2010-01-01

    Iron is deposited in perihematomal tissue after an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and may contribute to oxidative injury. Cell culture studies have demonstrated that enhancing ferritin expression by targeting iron regulatory protein (IRP) binding activity reduces cellular vulnerability to iron and hemoglobin. In order to assess the therapeutic potential of this approach after striatal ICH, the effect of IRP1 or IRP2 gene knockout on ferritin expression and injury was quantified. Striatal ferritin in IRP1 knockout mice was similar to that in wild-type controls three days after stereotactic injection of artificial CSF or autologous blood. Corresponding levels in IRP2 knockouts were increased by 11-fold and 8.4-fold, respectively, compared with wild-type. Protein carbonylation, a sensitive marker of hemoglobin neurotoxicity, was increased by 2.4-fold in blood-injected wild-type striata, was not altered by IRP1 knockout, but was reduced by approximately 60% by IRP2 knockout. Perihematomal cell viability in wild-type mice, assessed by MTT assay, was approximately half of that in contralateral striata at three days, and was significantly increased in IRP2 knockouts but not in IRP1 knockouts. Protection was also observed when hemorrhage was induced by collagenase injection. These results suggest that IRP2 binding activity reduces ferritin expression in the striatum after ICH, preventing an optimal response to elevated local iron concentrations. IRP2 binding activity may be a novel therapeutic target after hemorrhagic CNS injuries. PMID:20399759

  18. Estrogen staining in breast carcinoma by PAP methods compared to CEA and ferritin staining.

    PubMed

    Osamu, K; Takashi, M; Yohichi, T; Yasuo, U; Tetsuro, Y; Yoshiro, F; Toshio, T

    1987-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to demonstrate the stainability of estrogen, CEA, and ferritin in breast carcinomas, fibroadenomas, and fibrocystic diseases; to examine whether the findings of endogenous estrogen using the immunohistochemical detection method are related to estrogen receptor (ER) assays; and to determine whether the stainability of estrogen, CEA, and ferritin were related to the prognosis of breast carcinomas. In breast cancer, the stainability of estrogen using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) method was positively correlated with the dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) assay for ER. In breast cancers, the percentage of positive staining was 46% for estrogen, 48% for CEA, and 47% for ferritin. With all three stains, significant differences were observed between cancer and benign diseases. Cases that were both positive for estrogen staining and negative for CEA showed a good prognosis after the recurrence of disease. Our data suggest that the immunohistochemical staining of estrogen, CEA, and ferritin might predict the biological behavior of breast carcinomas and be a prognostically useful indicator of breast cancer patients.

  19. Evidence that ferritin is associated with light production in the mucus of the marine worm Chaetopterus

    PubMed Central

    Rawat, Renu; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    The blue glow of the mucus from Chaetopterus involves a photoprotein, iron and flavins. Identity and respective role of these components remain, however, largely unresolved today, likely because of viscosity issues and inhibition of this system by oxidizers conventionally used to track bioluminescence activity. Here, we used gentle centrifugation to obtain a mucus supernatant showing no inhibition to oxidizers, allowing for further analysis. We applied conventional chromatographic techniques to isolate major proteins associated with light emission. Luminescence ability of elutriate fractions was tested with hydrogen peroxide to track photoprotein and/or protein-bound chromophore. Fractions producing light contained few major proteins, one with similarity to ferritin. Addition to the mucus of elements with inhibitory/potentiary effect on ferritin ferroxidase activity induced corresponding changes in light production, emphasizing the possible role of ferritin in the worm bioluminescence. DNA of the protein was cloned, sequenced, and expressed, confirming its identity to a Chaetopterus Ferritin (ChF). Both ferric and ferrous iron were found in the mucus, indicating the occurrence of both oxidase and reductase activity. Biochemical analysis showed ChF has strong ferroxidase activity, which could be a source of biological iron and catalytic energy for the worm bioluminescence when coupled to a reduction process with flavins. PMID:27830745

  20. Local packing modulates diversity of iron pathways and cooperative behavior in eukaryotic and prokaryotic ferritins.

    PubMed

    Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Vakser, Ilya A; Rivera, Mario

    2014-03-21

    Ferritin-like molecules show a remarkable combination of the evolutionary conserved activity of iron uptake and release that engage different pores in the conserved ferritin shell. It was hypothesized that pore selection and iron traffic depend on dynamic allostery with no conformational changes in the backbone. In this study, we detect the allosteric networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterioferritin (BfrB), bacterial ferritin (FtnA), and bullfrog M and L ferritins (Ftns) by a network-weaving algorithm (NWA) that passes threads of an allosteric network through highly correlated residues using hierarchical clustering. The residue-residue correlations are calculated in the packing-on elastic network model that introduces atom packing into the common packing-off model. Applying NWA revealed that each of the molecules has an extended allosteric network mostly buried inside the ferritin shell. The structure of the networks is consistent with experimental observations of iron transport: The allosteric networks in BfrB and FtnA connect the ferroxidase center with the 4-fold pores and B-pores, leaving the 3-fold pores unengaged. In contrast, the allosteric network directly links the 3-fold pores with the 4-fold pores in M and L Ftns. The majority of the network residues are either on the inner surface or buried inside the subunit fold or at the subunit interfaces. We hypothesize that the ferritin structures evolved in a way to limit the influence of functionally unrelated events in the cytoplasm on the allosteric network to maintain stability of the translocation mechanisms. We showed that the residue-residue correlations and the resultant long-range cooperativity depend on the ferritin shell packing, which, in turn, depends on protein sequence composition. Switching from the packing-on to the packing-off model reduces correlations by 35%-38% so that no allosteric network can be found. The influence of the side-chain packing on the allosteric networks explains the

  1. [Various aspects of iron in the organism. I. Ferritin and ferruginous micelles].

    PubMed

    BESSIS, M; BRETON-GORIUS, J

    1959-10-01

    Des cellules réticulaires remplies de molécules de ferritine et d'hémosidérine se trouvent au centre "d'ilots érythroblastiques." Dans la zone de contact entre la cellule réticulaire chargée de ferritine et les érythroblastes, on voit des invaginations et des petites vacuoles au bord desquelles adhérent des molécules de ferritine. Il est postulé que la ferritine passe de la cellule réticulaire centrale dans les érythroblastes par ce mécanisme, apparenté à la pinocytose (rhophéocytose). Dans tous les érythroblastes normaux, il existe du fer sous forme de ferritine. Celle-ci peut se trouver à l'état dispersé ou agglomérée en amas. Lorsque ces amas sont assez gros, ils sont visibles au microscope optique: ce sont les granules des sidéroblastes. On trouve du fer dans les mitochondries, mais rarement à l'état normal. Il est soit sous forme de granules ferritiniques soit sous forme de micelles ferrugineuses. Dans les thalassémies et d'autres maladies s'accompagnant d'un trouble de l'hémoglobinogénèse, on trouve, en grande quantité, du fer visible au microscope électronique, dans les érythroblastes. Il s'y trouve sous forme de ferritine, en amas ou dispersé. Il existe parfois en grande quantité dans les mitochondries soit sous forme de ferritine, soit sous forme de micelles ferrugineuses. Il semble que soit objectivé ainsi le trouble de la synthèse de l'hémoglobine: le fer inutilisé s'accumule dans des érythroblastes hypochromes. Il est probable qu'à l'etat normal, le fer est métabolisé dans les mitochondries. Dans le thalassémies et les anémies hypochromes hypersidérémiques, il semble souvent bloqué dans ces organites.

  2. Labile iron potentiates ascorbate-dependent reduction and mobilization of ferritin iron.

    PubMed

    Badu-Boateng, Charles; Pardalaki, Sofia; Wolf, Claude; Lajnef, Sonia; Peyrot, Fabienne; Naftalin, Richard J

    2017-03-21

    Ascorbate mobilizes iron from equine spleen ferritin by two separate processes. Ascorbate alone mobilizes ferritin iron with an apparent Km (ascorbate) ≈1.5mM. Labile iron >2μM, complexed with citrate (10mM), synergises ascorbate-dependent iron mobilization by decreasing the apparent Km (ascorbate) to ≈270μM and raising maximal mobilization rate by ≈5-fold. Catalase reduces the apparent Km(ascorbate) for both ascorbate and ascorbate+iron dependent mobilization by ≈80%. Iron mobilization by ascorbate alone has a higher activation energy (Ea=45.0±5.5kJ/mole) than when mediated by ascorbate with labile iron (10μM) (Ea=13.7±2.2kJ/mole); also mobilization by iron-ascorbate has a three-fold higher pH sensitivity (pH range 6.0-8.0) than with ascorbate alone. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits ascorbate's iron mobilizing action. EPR and autochemiluminescence studies show that ascorbate and labile iron within ferritin enhances radical formation, whereas ascorbate alone produces negligible radicals. These findings suggest that iron catalysed single electron transfer reactions from ascorbate, involving ascorbate or superoxide and possibly ferroxidase tyrosine radicals, accelerate iron mobilization from the ferroxidase centre more than EPR silent, bi-dentate two-electron transfers. These differing modes of electron transference from ascorbate mirror the known mono and bidentate oxidation reactions of dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide with di-ferrous iron at the ferroxidase centre. This study implies that labile iron, at physiological pH, complexed with citrate, synergises iron mobilization from ferritin by ascorbate (50-4000μM). This autocatalytic process can exacerbate oxidative stress in ferritin-containing inflamed tissue.

  3. Moving metal ions through ferritin-protein nanocages from three-fold pores to catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Tosha, Takehiko; Ng, Ho-Leung; Bhattasali, Onita; Alber, Tom; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2010-10-20

    Ferritin nanocages synthesize ferric oxide minerals, containing hundreds to thousands of Fe(III) diferric oxo/hydroxo complexes, by reactions of Fe(II) ions with O(2) at multiple di-iron catalytic centers. Ferric-oxy multimers, tetramers, and/or larger mineral nuclei form during postcatalytic transit through the protein cage, and mineral accretion occurs in the central cavity. We determined how Fe(II) substrates can access catalytic sites using frog M ferritins, active and inactivated by ligand substitution, crystallized with 2.0 M Mg(II) ± 0.1 M Co(II) for Co(II)-selective sites. Co(II) inhibited Fe(II) oxidation. High-resolution (<1.5 Å) crystal structures show (1) a line of metal ions, 15 Å long, which penetrates the cage and defines ion channels and internal pores to the nanocavity that link external pores to the cage interior, (2) metal ions near negatively charged residues at the channel exits and along the inner cavity surface that model Fe(II) transit to active sites, and (3) alternate side-chain conformations, absent in ferritins with catalysis eliminated by amino acid substitution, which support current models of protein dynamics and explain changes in Fe-Fe distances observed during catalysis. The new structural data identify a ∼27-Å path Fe(II) ions can follow through ferritin entry channels between external pores and the central cavity and along the cavity surface to the active sites where mineral synthesis begins. This "bucket brigade" for Fe(II) ion access to the ferritin catalytic sites not only increases understanding of biological nanomineral synthesis but also reveals unexpected design principles for protein cage-based catalysts and nanomaterials.

  4. Alteration of T Cell Subtypes in Beta-Thalassaemia Major: Impact of Ferritin Level

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Leila; Beshkar, Pezhman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative damage and regular antigenic stimulation are main factors in accelerating immunosenescence. The present study was conducted to investigate new concepts of early immunosenescence in thalassaemia patients. Materials and Methods Twenty seven beta-thalassaemia major patients and a group of matched healthy volunteers aged 10-30 years in Shahrekord, Iran were recruited into the study. Ferritin level was determined and CD4 or CD8 T cells were analysed versus phenotyping markers, CD27, CD28, CD57 and CCR7, by flowcytometry. Data were analysed by Mann-Whitney and Spearman’s correlation coefficient test in SPSS 11.5. Results Absolute lymphocytosis and partial decrease in T cells were observed in the patients. CD4+CD57+ and CD4+CCR7- T cells were significantly higher, whereas CD8+CD27+ and CD8+CCR7+ T cells were partially higher in patients. A negative correlation was observed between ferritin level and number of CD8+CD27+ and CD8+CCR7+ T cells, whereas the correlation was positive between ferritin level and number of CD57+ T cells. Conclusion Moderate alteration of T cell repertoire and increase in CCR27-, CCR7-, and CD57+ T cells could reflect antigenic stimulation, decline in naïve T cells, and being closer to terminally differentiated cells. Effect of iron overload is potentially explained by positive correlation of blood transfusion and ferritin level with frequency of CD3+CD27- and that of ferritin with frequency of CD57+ T cells. PMID:27042462

  5. Oxidative damage of DNA induced by the reaction of methylglyoxal with lysine in the presence of ferritin

    PubMed Central

    An, Sung Ho; Kang, Jung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is an endogenous metabolite which is present in increased concentrations in diabetics and reacts with amino acids to form advanced glycation end products. In this study, we investigated whether ferritin enhances DNA cleavage by the reaction of MG with lysine. When plasmid DNA was incubated with MG and lysine in the presence of ferritin, DNA strand breakage was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The ferritin/MG/lysine system-mediated DNA cleavage was significantly inhibited by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers. These results indicated that ROS might participate in the ferritin/MG/lysine system-mediated DNA cleavage. Incubation of ferritin with MG and lysine resulted in a time-dependent release of iron ions from the protein molecules. Our data suggest that DNA cleavage caused by the ferritin/MG/lysine system via the generation of ROS by the Fenton-like reaction of free iron ions released from oxidatively damaged ferritin. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(4): 225-229] PMID:23615265

  6. Behavioral decline and premature lethality upon pan-neuronal ferritin overexpression in Drosophila infected with a virulent form of Wolbachia

    PubMed Central

    Kosmidis, Stylianos; Missirlis, Fanis; Botella, Jose A.; Schneuwly, Stephan; Rouault, Tracey A.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is required for organismal growth. Therefore, limiting iron availability may be a key part of the host’s innate immune response to various pathogens, for example, in Drosophila infected with Zygomycetes. One way the host can transiently reduce iron bioavailability is by ferritin overexpression. To study the effects of neuronal-specific ferritin overexpression on survival and neurodegeneration we generated flies simultaneously over-expressing transgenes for both ferritin subunits in all neurons. We used two independent recombinant chromosomes bearing UAS-Fer1HCH, UAS-Fer2LCH transgenes and obtained qualitatively different levels of late-onset behavioral and lifespan declines. We subsequently discovered that one parental strain had been infected with a virulent form of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia, causing widespread neuronal apoptosis and premature death. This phenotype was exacerbated by ferritin overexpression and was curable by antibiotic treatment. Neuronal ferritin overexpression in uninfected flies did not cause evident neurodegeneration but resulted in a late-onset behavioral decline, as previously reported for ferritin overexpression in glia. The results suggest that ferritin overexpression in the central nervous system of flies is tolerated well in young individuals with adverse manifestations appearing only late in life or under unrelated pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24772084

  7. Mild increases in serum hepcidin and interleukin-6 concentrations impair iron incorporation in haemoglobin during an experimental human malaria infection.

    PubMed

    de Mast, Quirijn; van Dongen-Lases, Edmee C; Swinkels, Dorine W; Nieman, An-Emmie; Roestenberg, Meta; Druilhe, Pierre; Arens, Theo A; Luty, Adrian J; Hermsen, Cornelis C; Sauerwein, Robert W; van der Ven, Andre J

    2009-06-01

    The correct selection of individuals who will benefit from iron supplements in malaria-endemic regions requires improved insight in the effects of malaria on host iron homeostasis and innovative biomarkers. We assessed sequential changes in serum hepcidin and in traditional biochemical iron status indicators during an experimental Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection with five adult volunteers. The haemoglobin content of reticulocytes (Ret-H(e)) and of mature red blood cells (RBC-H(e)) represented iron incorporation into haemoglobin. Low-density parasitaemia and its treatment induced a mild increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and serum hepcidin concentrations. Despite this only mild increase, a marked hypoferraemia with a strong increase in serum ferritin concentrations developed, which was associated with a sharp fall in Ret-H(e), while RBC-H(e) remained unchanged. The ratio of soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) to log ferritin concentrations decreased to an average nadir of 63% of the baseline value. We concluded that even mild increases in serum hepcidin and IL-6 concentrations result in a disturbed host iron homeostasis. Serum hepcidin, Ret-H(e) and Delta-H(e) (Ret-H(e) minus RBC-H(e)) are promising biomarkers to select those individuals who will benefit from iron supplements in malaria endemic regions, while the sTfR/log ferritin ratio should be used with caution to assess iron status during malaria.

  8. Structural insights into the ferroxidase site of ferritins from higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Ivano; Lalli, Daniela; Mangani, Stefano; Pozzi, Cecilia; Rosa, Camilla; Theil, Elizabeth C; Turano, Paola

    2012-04-11

    The first step of iron biomineralization mediated by ferritin is the oxidation at the ferroxidase active site of two ferrous ions to a diferric oxo/hydroxo species. Metal-loaded ferritin crystals obtained by soaking crystals of frog ferritin in FeSO(4) and CuSO(4) solutions followed by flash freezing provided X-ray crystal structures of the tripositive iron and bipositive copper adducts at 2.7 and 2.8 Å resolution, respectively. At variance with the already available structures, the crystal form used in this study contains 24 independent subunits in the asymmetric unit permitting comparison between them. For the first time, the diferric species at the ferroxidase site is identified in ferritins from higher eukaryotes. Anomalous difference Fourier maps for crystals (iron crystal 1) obtained after long soaking times in FeSO(4) solution invariantly showed diferric species with a Fe-Fe average distance of 3.1 ± 0.1 Å, strongly indicative of the presence of a μ-oxo/hydroxo bridge between the irons; protein ligands for each iron ion (Fe1 and Fe2) were also unequivocally identified and found to be the same in all subunits. For copper bound ferritin, dicopper(II) centers are also observed. While copper at site 1 is essentially in the same position and has the same coordination environment as Fe1, copper at site 2 is displaced toward His54, now acting as a ligand; this results in an increased intermetal distance (4.3 ± 0.4 Å). His54 coordination and longer metal-metal distances might represent peculiar features of divalent cations at the ferroxidase site. This oxidation-dependent structural information may provide key features for the mechanistic pathway in ferritins from higher eukaryotes that drive uptake of bivalent cation and release of ferric products at the catalytic site. This mechanism is supported by the X-ray picture obtained after only 1 min of soaking in FeSO(4) solutions (iron crystal 2) which reasonably contain the metal at different oxidation states

  9. Reference limits and behaviour of serum transferrin receptor in children 6-10 years of age.

    PubMed

    Danise, P; Maconi, M; Morelli, G; Di Palma, A; Rescigno, G; Esposito, C; Avino, D; Talento, B

    2008-08-01

    Serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) originates mostly from erythroblasts and lesser from reticulocytes. The usefulness of sTfR has been implicated in several clinical situations, mainly as a marker of accelerated erythropoiesis or iron deficiency. The assessment of sTfR may be useful in the period of rapid growth during infancy, childhood and adolescence. We evaluated sTfR and the other quantitative and qualitative parameters of the erythropoiesis (Hb, MCV, CHr, Ret-He) and of the iron storage (serum ferritin, sTfR/ferritin index) in a total of 916 children aged 6-10 years. Children were divided into three groups: (A) healthy children, (B) with storage iron deficiency (serum ferritin < 12 microg/l) and (C) Beta trait carriers (HbA2 > 3.3). We determined reference intervals by sex and by age in healthy children. sTfR showed a slight but statistically significant age related increase but did not show significant sex differences. We compared sTfR and the other parameters investigated in the three groups of children. sTfR is not a decisive parameter that can be utilized alone in discriminating the border-line situations between normal and pathologic ones but can help in completing the panel of tests in iron deficiency and in thalassaemia Beta trait carriers.

  10. Increased serum hepcidin levels in subjects with the metabolic syndrome: a population study.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Nicola; Traglia, Michela; Campostrini, Natascia; Biino, Ginevra; Corbella, Michela; Sala, Cinzia; Busti, Fabiana; Masciullo, Corrado; Manna, Daniele; Previtali, Sara; Castagna, Annalisa; Pistis, Giorgio; Olivieri, Oliviero; Toniolo, Daniela; Camaschella, Clara; Girelli, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of hepcidin, the key iron regulatory hormone, has changed our view of iron metabolism, which in turn is long known to be linked with insulin resistant states, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Serum ferritin levels are often elevated in MetS (Dysmetabolic hyperferritinemia--DHF), and are sometimes associated with a true mild-to-moderate hepatic iron overload (dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome--DIOS). However, the pathophysiological link between iron and MetS remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate, for the first time, the relationship between MetS and hepcidin at population level. We measured serum hepcidin levels by Mass Spectrometry in 1,391 subjects from the Val Borbera population, and evaluated their relationship with classical MetS features. Hepcidin levels increased significantly and linearly with increasing number of MetS features, paralleling the trend of serum ferritin. In multivariate models adjusted for relevant variables including age, C-Reactive Protein, and the HFE C282Y mutation, ferritin was the only significant independent predictor of hepcidin in males, while in females MetS was also independently associated with hepcidin. Overall, these data indicate that the fundamental iron regulatory feedback is preserved in MetS, i.e. that hepcidin tends to progressively increase in response to the increase of iron stores. Due to recently discovered pleiotropic effects of hepcidin, this may worsen insulin resistance and contribute to the cardiovascular complications of MetS.

  11. Increased Serum Hepcidin Levels in Subjects with the Metabolic Syndrome: A Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Nicola; Traglia, Michela; Campostrini, Natascia; Biino, Ginevra; Corbella, Michela; Sala, Cinzia; Busti, Fabiana; Masciullo, Corrado; Manna, Daniele; Previtali, Sara; Castagna, Annalisa; Pistis, Giorgio; Olivieri, Oliviero; Toniolo, Daniela; Camaschella, Clara; Girelli, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of hepcidin, the key iron regulatory hormone, has changed our view of iron metabolism, which in turn is long known to be linked with insulin resistant states, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Serum ferritin levels are often elevated in MetS (Dysmetabolic hyperferritinemia - DHF), and are sometimes associated with a true mild-to-moderate hepatic iron overload (dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome - DIOS). However, the pathophysiological link between iron and MetS remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate, for the first time, the relationship between MetS and hepcidin at population level. We measured serum hepcidin levels by Mass Spectrometry in 1,391 subjects from the Val Borbera population, and evaluated their relationship with classical MetS features. Hepcidin levels increased significantly and linearly with increasing number of MetS features, paralleling the trend of serum ferritin. In multivariate models adjusted for relevant variables including age, C-Reactive Protein, and the HFE C282Y mutation, ferritin was the only significant independent predictor of hepcidin in males, while in females MetS was also independently associated with hepcidin. Overall, these data indicate that the fundamental iron regulatory feedback is preserved in MetS, i.e. that hepcidin tends to progressively increase in response to the increase of iron stores. Due to recently discovered pleiotropic effects of hepcidin, this may worsen insulin resistance and contribute to the cardiovascular complications of MetS. PMID:23144745

  12. Mössbauer Spectra of Mouse Hearts reveal age-dependent changes in mitochondrial and ferritin iron levels.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul Alan

    2017-02-15

    Cardiac function requires continuous high levels of energy, and so iron, a critical player in mitochondrial respiration, is an important component of the heart. Hearts from (57)Fe-enriched mice were evaluated by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Spectra consisted of a sextet and two quadrupole doublets. One doublet was due to residual blood while the other was due to [Fe4S4](2+) clusters and Fe(II) hemes, most of which were associated with mitochondrial respiration. The sextet was due to ferritin; there was no evidence of hemosiderin, a ferritin decomposition product. Iron from ferritin was nearly absent in young hearts, but increased steadily with age. EPR spectra exhibited signals similar to those of brain, liver, and human cells. No age-dependent EPR trends were apparent. Hearts from HFE(-/-) mice with hemochromatosis contained slightly more iron overall than controls, including more ferritin and less mitochondrial iron; these differences typify slightly older hearts, perhaps reflecting the burden due to this disease. HFE(-/-) livers were overloaded with ferritin but had low mitochondrial iron levels. IRP2(-/-) hearts contained less ferritin than controls but normal levels of mitochondrial iron. Hearts of young mice born to an iron-deficient mother contained normal levels of mitochondrial iron and no ferritin; the mothers heart contained low ferritin and normal levels of mitochondrial iron. High-spin Fe(II) ions were nearly undetectable in heart samples; these were evident in brains, livers, and human cells. Previous Mossbauer spectra of unenriched diseased human hearts lacked mitochondrial and blood doublets, and included hemosiderin features. This suggests degradation of iron-containing species during sample preparation.

  13. Caffeine Positively Modulates Ferritin Heavy Chain Expression in H460 Cells: Effects on Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zolea, Fabiana; Biamonte, Flavia; Battaglia, Anna Martina; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    Both the methylxanthine caffeine and the heavy subunit of ferritin molecule (FHC) are able to control the proliferation rate of several cancer cell lines. While caffeine acts exclusively as a negative modulator of cell proliferation, FHC might reduce or enhance cell viability depending upon the different cell type. In this work we have demonstrated that physiological concentrations of caffeine reduce the proliferation rate of H460 cells: along with the modulation of p53, pAKT and Cyclin D1, caffeine also determines a significant FHC up-regulation through the activation of its transcriptional efficiency. FHC plays a central role in the molecular pathways modulated by caffeine, ending in a reduced cell growth, since its specific silencing by siRNA almost completely abolishes caffeine effects on H460 cell proliferation. These results allow the inclusion of ferritin heavy subunits among the multiple molecular targets of caffeine and open the way for studying the relationship between caffeine and intracellular iron metabolism.

  14. Effect of lanthanum ions (La3+) on ferritin-regulated antioxidant process under PEG stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijing; Yang, Tongwen; Gao, Yongsheng; Liu, Yubing; Zhang, Tengguo; Xu, Shijian; Zeng, Fuli; An, Lizhe

    2006-11-01

    The physiological effects of lanthanum(III) ions on the ferritin-regulated antioxidant process were studied in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings under polyethylene glycol (PEG) stress. Treatment with 0.1 mM La3+ resulted in increased levels of chlorophyll, carotenoid, proline, ascorbate, and reduced glutathione. The activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, monodehydroascorbate reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, and peroxidase were also increased after La3+ treatment. Treatment with La3+ seems to enhance the capacity of the reactive oxygen species scavenging system, affect the Fe2+ and Fe3+ electron-transfer process in ferritin, and restrain the formation of hydroxyl radical (OH.), alleviating the oxidative damage induced by PEG stress.

  15. Assembly of Modified Ferritin Proteins on Carbon Nanotubes and its Electrocatalytic Activity for Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Park, Cheol

    2012-01-01

    Highly effective dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be made using a commercially available buffer solution. Buffer solutions of 3-(N-morpholino)-propanesulfonic acid (MOPS), which consists of a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatoms, a charged group, and an alkyl chain greatly enhance the dispersibility and stability of CNTs in aqueous solutions. Additionally, the ability of biomolecules, especially cationized Pt-cored ferritins, to adhere onto the well-dispersed CNTs in the aqueous buffer solution is also improved. This was accomplished without the use of surfactant molecules, which are detrimental to the electrical, mechanical, and other physical properties of the resulting products. The assembled Pt-cored ferritin proteins on the CNTs were used as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

  16. Size-dependent structural evolution of the biomineralized iron-core nanoparticles in ferritins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunsook; Kim, D. H.; Hwang, Jihoon; Lee, Kiho; Yoon, Sungwon; Suh, B. J.; Hyun Kim, Kyung; Kim, J.-Y.; Jang, Z. H.; Kim, Bongjae; Min, B. I.; Kang, J.-S.

    2013-04-01

    The structural identity of the biomineralized iron core nanoparticles in Helicobacter pylori ferritins (Hpf's) has been determined by employing soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Valence states of Fe ions are nearly trivalent in all Hpf's, indicating that the amount of magnetite (Fe3O4) is negligible. With increasing filling of Fe ions, the local configurations of Fe3+ ions change from the mixture of the tetrahedral and octahedral symmetries to the octahedral symmetry. These results demonstrate that the biomineralization of the ferritin core changes from maghemite-like (γ-Fe2O3) formation to hematite-like (α-Fe2O3) formation with increasing Fe content.

  17. Revelation of endogenously bound Fe(2+) ions in the crystal structure of ferritin from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thiruselvam, Viswanathan; Sivaraman, Padavattan; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappagounder

    2014-10-24

    Ferritin is an iron regulatory protein. It is responsible for storage and detoxification of excess iron thereby it regulates iron level in the body. Here we report the crystal structure of ferritin with two endogenously expressed Fe atoms binding in both the sites. The protein was purified and characterized by MALDI-TOF and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The crystal belongs to I4 space group and it diffracted up to 2.5Å. The structural analysis suggested that it crystallizes as hexamer and confirmed that it happened to be the first report of endogenously expressed Fe ions incorporated in both the A and B sites, situated in between the helices.

  18. Identification, characterization and modulation of ferritin-H in the sub-Antarctic Notothenioid Eleginops maclovinus challenged with Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Martínez, D; Oyarzún, R; Vargas-Lagos, C; Pontigo, J P; Soto-Dávila, M; Saravia, J; Romero, A; Núñez, J J; Yáñez, A J; Vargas-Chacoff, L

    2017-03-21

    Ferritin is a major iron storage protein essential not only in the infectious process, but also in any circumstance generating oxidative stress. In this study, the cDNA coding sequence of ferritin-H was obtained from the sub-Antarctic Notothenioid fish Eleginops maclovinus through transcriptomic analysis of the head kidney. This sequence contained a 534 bp open reading frame that coded for a 177 amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 20,786.2 Da and a theoretical pI of 5.56. The protein displayed a region of iron putative response elements in the 5'UTR, two putative ferritin iron-binding region signatures, and seven characteristic amino acids with ferroxidase functions. Phylogenetic analysis related this sequence to ferritin-H sequences of other Antarctic Notothenioid fish, sharing 96.61% similarity. Constitutive gene expression analysis in different organs revealed increased ferritin-H gene expression in the gills, spleen, muscle, and liver. After infection with two bacterial strains of Piscirickettsia salmonis (LF-89 and Austral-005), ferritin-H was differentially expressed depending on bacterial strain and tissue. This study provides relevant information towards understanding the iron metabolism of a sub-Antarctic Notothenioid fish.

  19. Construction of a cDNA library for sea cucumber Acaudina leucoprocta and differential expression of ferritin peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Hou, Fujing; Li, Ye; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu; Jin, Chunhua

    2016-07-01

    Acaudina leucoprocta is an edible sea cucumber of economic interest that is widely distributed in China. Little information is available concerning the molecular genetics of this species although such knowledge would contribute to a better understanding of the optimal conditions for its aquaculture and its mechanisms of defense against disease. Therefore, we constructed a cDNA library and, based on bioinformatics analysis of the sequences, the functions of 75% of the cDNAs were identified, including those involved in cell structure, energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, and signal transduction pathways. Approximately 25% of genes in the library were unmatched. The gene for A. leucoprocta ferritin was also cloned. The predicted amino-acid sequence of ferritin displayed significant homology with other sea-cucumber counterparts but indicated that it was a new member of the ferritin family. Semiquantitative real-time RT-PCR indicated the highest levels of ferritin mRNA expression in the intestine. A polyclonal antibody of ferritin was also produced. These data provide a set of molecular tools essential for further studies of the functions of ferritin protein in A. leucoprocta.

  20. Oxidant-induced autophagy and ferritin degradation contribute to epithelial–mesenchymal transition through lysosomal iron

    PubMed Central

    Sioutas, Apostolos; Vainikka, Linda K; Kentson, Magnus; Dam-Larsen, Sören; Wennerström, Urban; Jacobson, Petra; Persson, Hans Lennart

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 triggers epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) through autophagy, which is partly driven by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to determine whether leaking lysosomes and enhanced degradation of H-ferritin could be involved in EMT and whether it could be possible to prevent EMT by iron chelation targeting of the lysosome. Materials and methods EMT, H-ferritin, and autophagy were evaluated in TGF-β1-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells cultured in vitro using Western blotting, with the additional morphological assessment of EMT. By using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, lysosomes and ROS were assessed by acridine orange and 6-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate assays, respectively. Results TGF-β1-stimulated cells demonstrated a loss of H-ferritin, which was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and inhibitors of lysosomal degradation. TGF-β1 stimulation generated ROS and autophagosome formation and led to EMT, which was further promoted by the additional ROS-generating cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α. Lysosomes of TGF-β1-stimulated cells were sensitized to oxidants but also completely protected by lysosomal loading with dextran-bound deferoxamine (DFO). Autophagy and EMT were prevented by NAC, DFO, and inhibitors of autophagy and lysosomal degradation. Conclusion The findings of this study support the role of enhanced autophagic degradation of H-ferritin as a mechanism for increasing the vulnerability of lysosomes to iron-driven oxidant injury that triggers further autophagy during EMT. This study proposes that lysosomal leakage is a novel pathway of TGF-β1-induced EMT that may be prevented by iron-chelating drugs that target the lysosome.

  1. Atom probe tomographic mapping directly reveals the atomic distribution of phosphorus in resin embedded ferritin

    SciTech Connect

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah A. G.; Dicken, Quinten G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-02-29

    In this study, we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces using atom probe tomography. Embedding the protein ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualize atomic distributions and distinguish organic-organic and organic-inorganic interfaces. The sample preparation method can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment.

  2. Conditional Deletion of Ferritin H in Mice Reduces B and T Lymphocyte Populations

    PubMed Central

    Vanoaica, Liviu; Richman, Larry; Jaworski, Maike; Darshan, Deepak; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Kühn, Lukas C.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system and iron availability are intimately linked as appropriate iron supply is needed for cell proliferation, while excess iron, as observed in hemochromatosis, may reduce subsets of lymphocytes. We have tested the effects of a ferritin H gene deletion on lymphocytes. Mx-Cre mediated conditional deletion of ferritin H in bone marrow reduced the number of mature B cells and peripheral T cells in all lymphoid organs. FACS analysis showed an increase in the labile iron pool, enhanced reactive oxygen species formation and mitochondrial depolarization. The findings were confirmed by a B-cell specific deletion using Fthlox/lox; CD19-Cre mice. Mature B cells were strongly under-represented in bone marrow and spleen of the deleted mice, whereas pre-B and immature B cells were not affected. Bone marrow B cells showed increased proliferation as judged by the number of cells in S and G2/M phase as well as BrdU incorporation. Upon in vitro culture with B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), ferritin H-deleted spleen B cells showed lower survival rates than wild type cells. This was partially reversed with iron-chelator deferiprone. The loss of T cells was also confirmed by a T cell-specific deletion in Fthlox/lox;CD4-Cre mice. Our data show that ferritin H is required for B and T cell survival by actively reducing the labile iron pool. They further suggest that natural B and T cell maturation is influenced by intracellular iron levels and possibly deregulated in iron excess or deprivation. PMID:24586648

  3. Construction of an enterobactin analogue with symmetrically arranged monomer subunits of ferritin.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kondo, Mio; Nakane, Taiki; Abe, Satoshi; Nakao, Takahiro; Watanabe, Yoshihito; Ueno, Takafumi

    2015-12-04

    A set of three catecholamide ligands mimicking the structure of enterobactin was constructed on ferritin, where the 3-fold symmetric arrangement of the monomer subunits served as a foundation to form a coordination space. Similar to enterobactin, the ligands showed strong affinity for the ferric ion and formed a tris-catechoyl complex. Crystallography revealed that the complex was embedded in the entrance of the 3-fold axis channel.

  4. The Role of Nonconserved Residues of Archaeoglobus fulgidus Ferritin on Its Unique Structure and Biophysical Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Barindra; Johnson, Eric; Le Magueres, Pierre; Criswell, Angela; Cascio, Duilio; Lim, Sierin

    2013-01-01

    Archaeoglobus fulgidus ferritin (AfFtn) is the only tetracosameric ferritin known to form a tetrahedral cage, a structure that remains unique in structural biology. As a result of the tetrahedral (2-3) symmetry, four openings (∼45 Å in diameter) are formed in the cage. This open tetrahedral assembly contradicts the paradigm of a typical ferritin cage: a closed assembly having octahedral (4-3-2) symmetry. To investigate the molecular mechanism affecting this atypical assembly, amino acid residues Lys-150 and Arg-151 were replaced by alanine. The data presented here shed light on the role that these residues play in shaping the unique structural features and biophysical properties of the AfFtn. The x-ray crystal structure of the K150A/R151A mutant, solved at 2.1 Å resolution, indicates that replacement of these key residues flips a “symmetry switch.” The engineered molecule no longer assembles with tetrahedral symmetry but forms a typical closed octahedral ferritin cage. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the overall shape and size of AfFtn and AfFtn-AA in solution are consistent with those observed in their respective crystal structures. Iron binding and release kinetics of the AfFtn and AfFtn-AA were investigated to assess the contribution of cage openings to the kinetics of iron oxidation, mineralization, or reductive iron release. Identical iron binding kinetics for AfFtn and AfFtn-AA suggest that Fe2+ ions do not utilize the triangular pores for access to the catalytic site. In contrast, relatively slow reductive iron release was observed for the closed AfFtn-AA, demonstrating involvement of the large pores in the pathway for iron release. PMID:24030827

  5. Serum Hepcidin Levels in Childhood-Onset Ischemic Stroke: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Azab, Seham F; Akeel, Nagwa E; Abdalhady, Mohamed A; Elhewala, Ahmed A; Ali, Al Shymaa A; Amin, Ezzat K; Sarhan, Dina T; Almalky, Mohamed A A; Elhindawy, Eman M; Salam, Mohamed M A; Soliman, Attia A; Abdellatif, Sawsan H; Ismail, Sanaa M; Elsamad, Nahla A; Hashem, Mustafa I A; Aziz, Khalid A; Elazouni, Osama M A; Arafat, Manal S

    2016-03-01

    Recently, hepcidin, an antimicrobial-like peptide hormone, has evolved as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. Despite the growing evidence of iron imbalance in childhood-onset ischemic stroke, serum hepcidin level in those patients has not yet been researched. In this study, we aimed to estimate serum (hepcidin) level in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients and to investigate whether subcutaneous enoxaparin sodium, which is a low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) derivative, could modulate serum hepcidin level in those patients. This was a case-control study included 60 (AIS) cases, and 100 healthy children with comparable age and gender as control group. For all subjects' serum hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble transferrin receptor [sTfR]) levels were assessed by (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] method). Iron parameters including (serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, and total iron binding capacity [TIBC]) were also measured. The patients were subdivided according to treatment with an LMWH derivative into 2 groups and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and 1 week after stroke onset for all cases. We found that AIS cases had higher serum iron, ferritin, and IL6 levels compared to the control group (all P < 0.01). Serum hepcidin was significantly higher in AIS cases (median, 36[15-73]ng/mL) compared to the control group (median, 24[10-41]ng/mL; P < 0.01). On the 1st day of AIS diagnosis, serum hepcidin levels were similar in both stroke subgroups (P > 0.05). However, on the 7th day of diagnosis serum hepcidin level decreased significantly in AIS cases treated with LMWH (group 1) (median, 36 vs 21 ng/mL; P < 0.01, respectively). Meanwhile, no significant change was observed in serum hepcidin level in AIS cases not treated with LMWH (group 2) (P > 0.05). Serum hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin, and IL6 (r = 0.375, P < 0.05; r = 0.453, P

  6. Blood ferritin concentrations in newborn infants and the sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Raha-Chowdhury, R; Moore, C A; Bradley, D; Henley, R; Worwood, M

    1996-01-01

    Liver iron concentrations have been shown to be higher in victims of SIDS than in postmortem controls suggesting that high levels of tissue iron may be implicated in SIDS. To determine whether infants who subsequently die from SIDS are born with greater iron stores than those who do not, the iron stores in newborn infants were assessed retrospectively by measuring blood ferritin concentration in spots from Guthrie cards (collected from almost all infants born in the UK in the first week of life). A method for extracting and measuring ferritin from stored blood spots is described. Eighteen cases of SIDS were identified in South Glamorgan along with four controls for each case. Ferritin concentrations did not differ in SIDS victims and controls suggesting that victims of SIDS are not born with abnormal concentrations of stored iron. If iron stores are found to be higher in SIDS victims than in healthy live infants of the same age then it is more likely that the iron will have been acquired after birth. PMID:8655686

  7. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; Di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5′ flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors. PMID:27625068

  8. Characterization and recombinant protein expression of ferritin light chain homologue in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sun Mee; Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2014-04-01

    The silkworm genome encodes three iron storage proteins or ferritins, Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH, and Fer3HCH. Probing our EST library constructed from 1-day-old silkworm eggs revealed only Fer2LCH mRNA, which encoded for a protein with a predicted putative N-glycosylation site. Developmental and tissue expression analyses during embryogenesis revealed that Fer2LCH mRNA was abundant from 6 h to 6 days after oviposition. Transcriptional expression of Fer2LCH during the postembryonic stage is also high in the larval fat body and mid-gut, and then is upregulated in all pupal tissues tested. We found that Fer2LCH mRNA contains an iron-responsive element, suggesting this ferritin subunit is subject to translational control. Although ferritin expression has been shown to increase following immune challenge in other insects, the levels of Fer2LCH mRNA were not significantly induced following viral or bacterial infection of Bombyx mori. Using a baculovirus expression system we expressed recombinant BmFer2LCH protein, which was detectable in the cytoplasmic fraction, likely in a compartment of the secretory pathway, and was shown to undergo posttranslational modifications including N-glycosylation. In particular, rBmFer2LCH carbohydrate chains were composed of mannose and GlcNAc. We suggest that Fer2LCH is important for iron homeostasis and maintaining normal organ function in silkworms.

  9. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5‧ flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors.

  10. Relationships of testicular iron and ferritin concentrations with testicular weight and sperm production in boars.

    PubMed

    Wise, T; Lunstra, D D; Rohrer, G A; Ford, J J

    2003-02-01

    The inverse relationship of testicular size and circulating follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations has been documented, and accompanying this relationship is the change in color of the parenchymal tissue of the testes. Large testes (300 to 400 g) are pink to light red and small testes (100 g) are dark maroon with color gradations for weights in between. It was hypothesized that this color most likely represented an iron protein. Chromatographic analysis of testicular tissue indicated that the Fe was associated primarily with ferritin, and immunohistochemistry showed that Leydig cells were the primary location of ferritin storage within the testes. Concentrations of Fe and ferritin were higher in small testes and decreased as testes weight increased (P < 0.05). As testicular Fe concentrations increased, daily sperm production (DSP) and total DSP declined (P < 0.05). Genotyping six generations of Meishan x White composite boars (n = 288) for a quantitative trait locus that is indicative of elevated FSH and small testes in boars indicated that the Meishan genotype had elevated testicular iron concentrations and darker color in conjunction with reduced total DSP (P < 0.01). It is not thought the elevated iron concentrations affect testicular weights but are probably a result of elevated FSH and FSH inducement of Fe transport. The storage of Fe in Leydig cells may provide a reservoir of Fe for easy access by Sertoli and germ cells, but still provide a degree of protection to germ cells from ionic iron.

  11. Dissociation between iron accumulation and ferritin upregulation in the aged substantia nigra: attenuation by dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Thomas; Michaelides, Christos; Ekonomou, Antigoni; Geraki, Kalotina; Parkes, Harold G; Suessmilch, Maria; Herlihy, Amy H; Crum, William R; So, Po-Wah

    2016-01-01

    Despite regulation, brain iron increases with aging and may enhance aging processes including neuroinflammation. Increases in magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation rates, R2 and R2*, in the brain have been observed during aging. We show R2 and R2* correlate well with iron content via direct correlation to semi-quantitative synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence iron mapping, with age-associated R2 and R2* increases reflecting iron accumulation. Iron accumulation was concomitant with increased ferritin immunoreactivity in basal ganglia regions except in the substantia nigra (SN). The unexpected dissociation of iron accumulation from ferritin-upregulation in the SN suggests iron dyshomeostasis in the SN. Occurring alongside microgliosis and astrogliosis, iron dyshomeotasis may contribute to the particular vulnerability of the SN. Dietary restriction (DR) has long been touted to ameliorate brain aging and we show DR attenuated agerelated in vivo R2 increases in the SN over ages 7 – 19 months, concomitant with normal iron-induction of ferritin expression and decreased microgliosis. Iron is known to induce microgliosis and conversely, microgliosis can induce iron accumulation, which of these may be the initial pathological aging event warrants further investigation. We suggest iron chelation therapies and anti-inflammatory treatments may be putative ‘antibrain aging’ therapies and combining these strategies may be synergistic. PMID:27743512

  12. Maximizing the efficiency of ferritin as a photocatalyst for applications in an artificial photosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Robert J.; Keyes, Jeremiah D.; Watt, Richard K.

    2010-04-01

    Alternate fuel sources are becoming increasingly important as the reserve of fossil fuels decrease. We describe a photosynthesis mimic that is capable of extracting electrons from sacrificial electron donors. This model is based on the bio-photo-catalyst ferritin. Ferritin is an iron storage protein that naturally sequesters ferrihydrite inside a spherical 12 nm protein shell. Ferrihydrite is a semi-conductor that functions as a photo-catalyst in aqueous solvents. Ferritin has been shown to photoreduce Au3+ to form Au(0) nanoparticles. Citrate acts as a sacrificial electron donor to supply electrons for the photoreduction. We describe studies designed to understand the mechanism of this catalyst in order to improve the efficiency of the reaction. We have developed a spectrophotometric assay to simultaneously illuminate the sample and kinetically monitor the formation of products of Au3+ reduction. We report that buffers containing sulfur significantly increase the rate of the reactions. Control reactions with colloidal ferrihydrite nanoparticles do not catalyze the photochemical reaction, but produce a black precipitate indicating that the protein shell has an important function in nanoparticle formation.

  13. The assessment of frequency of iron deficiency in athletes from the transferrin receptor-ferritin index.

    PubMed

    Malczewska, J; Szczepańska, B; Stupnicki, R; Sendecki, W

    2001-03-01

    The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logFerr) was determined in 131 male and 121 female athletes in order to assess the frequency of iron deficiency (threshold value of that index taken as 1.8). Blood was drawn for determining morphological indices as well as sTfR, ferritin, iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and haptoglobin. A significantly (p <.01) higher incidence of iron deficiency was observed in women (26%) than in men (11%). The iron deficiency was latent, since no subject was found to be anemic. The plasma iron was significantly lower and TIBC higher (p <.001) in both iron-deficient subgroups than in the non-deficient ones. This confirmed the latent character of iron deficiency. Some hematological indices (Hb, MCH, MCHC, MCV) were significantly lower in iron-deficient female athletes than in male athletes, which suggested a more profound iron deficiency in the former. The sTfR/logFerr index might thus be useful in detecting iron deficiency in athletes, especially in those with erythropoiesis disorders, since physical loads may affect the widely used ferritin levels.

  14. The anomalous Mössbauer fraction of ferritin and polysaccharide iron complex (PIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohie-Eldin, M.-E. Y.; Frankel, R. B.; Gunther, L.; Papaefthymiou, G. C.

    1995-12-01

    Mössbauer studies of the ubiquitous protein molecule ferritin and its synthetic “biomimic” polysaccharide iron complex (PIC) exhibit an anomaly in the Mössbauer spectrum wherein the recoil free fraction or f-factor has a sharp drop with respect to temperature as the temperature rises above 30 K for mammalian ferritin and 60 K for PIC. The anomaly coincides with the disappearance of hyperfine splitting, which is due to superparamagnetic relaxation above the blocking temperature. Different absorbers were used to experimentally investigate the effect of absorber thickness on the Mössbauer spectrum. The anomaly persists for thin absorbers. Also, spectra treated with FFT procedures to eliminate the thickness effect still exhibit this anomaly. Motion of the core with respect to the protein shell was also eliminated as a possible source for this phenomenon, by comparing the Debye temperature obtained from the temperature dependence of the f-factor and the isomer shift. A comparison of the magnetic anisotropy constants from magnetization studies with those obtained by relating the hyperfine field H of the Mössbauer spectra to the fluctuations of the magnetization imply that the ferritin and PIC molecules possess magnetic anisotropy energy which may not be strictly uniaxial. This, we believe, may be intimately connected with the mechanism causing the f-factor anomaly.

  15. Combined measurement of ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, retinol binding protein, and C-reactive protein by an inexpensive, sensitive, and simple sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Juergen G; Estes, John E; Pfeiffer, Christine M; Biesalski, Hans K; Craft, Neal E

    2004-11-01

    The measurement of vitamin A (VA) and iron status is very important in the assessment of nutritional deficiencies. The objective of this research was to develop a sandwich ELISA technique for the simultaneous measurement of ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, retinol binding protein, and C-reactive protein (CRP) as indicators for VA and iron status. The inclusion of CRP as marker of infection allows for more accurate interpretation of VA and iron status. This is accomplished in a 30-microL serum or plasma sample using an ELISA with different capture and detection antibodies and different dilutions of the sample. Commercially available clinical serum controls were used for calibration purposes. The developed assays were compared to commercially available traditional tests. Regression coefficients comparing both assays were better than 0.84 (P < 0.001). Using a limited sample set, the sandwich ELISA assay produced very similar specificity and sensitivity compared to traditional methods when common cutoff values were applied. Intra- and interassay variability was between 5 and 14% for all tests. The cost of the materials for all 5 measurements decreases to less than $1/sample if a large number of samples is analyzed. Due to the low cost, high throughput, and comparability to traditional tests, this procedure has several advantages for assessing VA and iron status in population surveys.

  16. Study of anemia in nondialysis dependent chronic kidney disease with special reference to serum hepcidin

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, H.; Mohanty, S.; Sharma, M.; Rani, A.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the role of serum hepcidin in anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a hospital-based cross-sectional study. Serum hepcidin, ferritin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels were evaluated in patients of CKD. Hepcidin levels were increased in patients as compared to healthy adults. Hepcidin levels increased as CKD progressed through stage 3–5 (P trend = 0.015) but did not correlate with estimated glomerular filtration rate. Hepcidin correlated positively with ferritin (P < 0.0001) and transferrin saturation (TSAT) (P = 0.0217) and negatively with erythropoietin (EPO) levels (P = 0.0258) but did not correlate with either hsCRP or estimated glomerular filtration rate. Iron status influenced hepcidin levels of patients. Patients were divided according to iron status on the basis of TSAT and serum ferritin levels. We observed that while absolute iron deficiency (transferrin saturation <20%, ferritin <40 ng/ml) is associated with downregulation of hepcidin, hepcidin is elevated in other two categories of CKD patients (P = 0.0039). Iron status of patients also influenced interaction between hepcidin and hemoglobin (Hb). Hepcidin correlated negatively with Hb in patients with sufficient iron status (r = −0.7452, P < 0.0001) but nearly correlated positively with Hb in patients with absolute iron deficiency (r = 0.9428, P = 0.0572). Almost similar association persisted when cutoff value for serum ferritin was raised to 100 ng/ml as per NKF/KDOQI 2006 clinical practice guidelines except that no association was observed in absolute iron deficiency category. Cutoff value for hepcidin for differentiating absolute iron deficiency from other categories in our study population is ≤ 34 ng/ml (area under curve = 0.836, P < 0.0001). In conclusion, serum hepcidin level is increased in nondialysis CKD patients as compared to healthy adults possibly due to associated inflammation and decreased renal clearance. Furthermore, iron status modifies

  17. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of the human ferritin gene by hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while it upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5'UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  18. Serum retinol levels are positively correlated with hemoglobin concentrations, independent of iron homeostasis: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seyed Mojtaba; Heidari, Gholamreza; Nabipour, Iraj; Amirinejad, Roya; Assadi, Majid; Bargahi, Afshar; Akbarzadeh, Samad; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Sanjdideh, Zahra

    2013-04-01

    Micronutrient interactions give rise to complex issues that have an impact on preventive strategies when multiple micronutrient deficiencies coexist. The aim of this population-based study was to determine the prevalence of vitamins A and E and iron deficiencies among women 15 to 49 years of age in the northern Persian Gulf region. We hypothesized that serum retinol levels may show correlations with hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, independent of iron status. A total of 1242 nonpregnant women of reproductive age were selected via a multistage stratified random cluster sampling technique. Serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor levels were measured using enzyme immunoassay techniques. Serum retinol (vitamin A) and α-tocopherol (vitamin E) were determined for 727 women by high-performance liquid chromatography. The prevalence of anemia (Hb <12 g/dL), iron deficiency (serum ferritin <15 μg/L), and iron deficiency anemia was 8.7%, 25.4%, and 4.6%, respectively. Vitamin A (<0.7 μmol/L) and vitamin E (<11.6 μmol/L) deficiencies were found in 1.2% and 5.9% of the studied population, respectively. Multiple regression analysis revealed that serum retinol levels exhibit a significant association with Hb concentrations after controlling for serum ferritin levels, anemia associated with chronic disease, and risk factors for anemia. Therefore, most nonpregnant women of reproductive age in the northern Persian Gulf were found to have adequate serum vitamin A and E levels. However, the status of anemia and iron deficiency anemia could be considered a mild public health problem in this region. On the basis of multivariate analyses, we conclude that low serum retinol levels may contribute to anemia, independent of iron homeostasis.

  19. Cloning analysis of ferritin and the cisplatin-subunit for cancer cell apoptosis in Aplysia juliana hepatopancreas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Huang, Lin; Huang, He-Qing

    2012-08-01

    Ferritin, an iron storage protein, plays a key role in iron metabolism in vivo. Here, we have cloned an inducible ferritin cDNA with 519 bp within the open reading frame fragment from the hepatopancreas of Aplysia juliana (AJ). The subunit sequence of the ferritin was predicted to be a polypeptide of 172 amino acids with a molecular mass of 19.8291kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.01. The cDNA sequence of hepatopancreas ferritin in AJ was constructed into a pET-32a system for expressing its relative protein efficiently in E. coli strain BL21, under isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside induction. The recombinant ferritin, which was further purified on a Ni-NTA resin column and digested with enterokinase, was detected as a single subunit of approximately 20 kDa mass using both SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry. The secondary structure and phosphorylation sites of the deduced amino acids were predicted using both ExPASy proteomic tools and the NetPhos 2.0 server, and the subunit space structure of the recombinant AJ ferritin (rAjFer) was built using a molecular operating environment software system. The result of in-gel digestion and identification using MALDI-TOF MS/MS showed that the recombinant protein was AjFer. ICP-MS results indicated that the rAjFer subunit could directly bind to cisplatin[cis-Diaminedichloroplatinum(CDDP)], giving approximately 17.6 CDDP/ferritin subunits and forming a novel CDDP-subunit. This suggests that a nanometer CDDP core-ferritin was constructed, which could be developed as a new anti-cancer drug. The flow cytometry results indicated that CDDP-rAjFer could induce Hela cell apoptosis. Results of the real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the expression of AjFer mRNA was up-regulated in AJ under Cd(2+) stress. The recombinant AjFer protein should prove to be useful for further study of the structure and function of ferritin in Aplysia.

  20. Immunocytochemical analysis of the subcellular distribution of ferritin in Imperata cylindrica (L.) Raeuschel, an iron hyperaccumulator plant.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Vicenta; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo

    2012-05-01

    Ferritin is of interest at the structural and functional level not only as storage for iron, a critical element, but also as a means to prevent cell damage produced by oxidative stress. The main objective of this work was to confirm by immunocytochemistry the presence and the subcellular distribution of the ferritin detected by Mösbauer spectroscopy in Imperata cylindrica, a plant which accumulates large amounts of iron. The localization of ferritin was performed in epidermal, parenchymal and vascular tissues of shoots and leaves of I. cylindrica. The highest density of immunolabeling in shoots appeared in the intracellular space of cell tissues, near the cell walls and in the cytoplasm. In leaves, ferritin was detected in the proximity of the dense network of the middle lamella of cell walls, following a similar path to that observed in shoots. Immunolabeling was also localized in chloroplasts. The abundance of immunogold labelling in mitochondria for I. cylindrica was rather low, probably because the study dealt with tissues from old plants. These results further expand the localization of ferritin in cell components other than chloroplasts and mitochondria in plants.

  1. A comparative study of neurotoxic potential of synthesized polysaccharide-coated and native ferritin-based magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Borysov, Arseniy; Krisanova, Natalia; Chunihin, Olexander; Ostapchenko, Ludmila; Pozdnyakova, Nataliya; Borisova, Тatiana

    2014-01-01

    Aim To analyze the neurotoxic potential of synthesized magnetite nanoparticles coated by dextran, hydroxyethyl starch, oxidized hydroxyethyl starch, and chitosan, and magnetic nanoparticles combined with ferritin as a native protein. Methods The size of nanoparticles was analyzed using photon correlation spectroscopy, their effects on the conductance of planar lipid membrane by planar lipid bilayer technique, membrane potential and acidification of synaptic vesicles by spectrofluorimetry, and glutamate uptake and ambient level of glutamate in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) by radiolabeled assay. Results Uncoated synthesized magnetite nanoparticles and nanoparticles coated by different polysaccharides had no significant effect on synaptic vesicle acidification, the initial velocity of L-[14C]glutamate uptake, ambient level of L-[14C]glutamate and the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes, and conductance of planar lipid membrane. Native ferritin-based magnetic nanoparticles had no effect on the membrane potential but significantly reduced L-[14C]glutamate transport in synaptosomes and acidification of synaptic vesicles. Conclusions Our study indicates that synthesized magnetite nanoparticles in contrast to ferritin have no effects on the functional state and glutamate transport of nerve terminals, and so ferritin cannot be used as a prototype, analogue, or model of polysaccharide-coated magnetic nanoparticle in toxicity risk assessment and manipulation of nerve terminals by external magnetic fields. Still, the ability of ferritin to change the functional state of nerve terminals in combination with its magnetic properties suggests its biotechnological potential. PMID:24891278

  2. Iron overload correlates with serum liver fibrotic markers and liver dysfunction: Potential new methods to predict iron overload-related liver fibrosis in thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Man; Liu, Rongrong; Liang, Yuzhen; Yang, Gaohui; Huang, Yumei; Yu, Chunlan; Sun, Kaiqi; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Early detection of liver fibrosis in thalassemia patients and rapid initiation of treatment to interfere with its progression are extremely important. Objective This study aimed to find a sensitive, easy-to-detect and noninvasive method other than liver biopsy for early detection of liver fibrosis in thalassemia patients. Methods A total of 244 Chinese Thalassemia patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT, n = 105) or thalassemia major (TM, n = 139) and 120 healthy individuals were recruited into the present study, and blood collagen type IV (C IV), precollagen type III (PIIINPC) and hyaluronic acid (HA), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and ferritin were measured. Liver iron concentration was determined by MRI. The correlation of serum markers with liver iron load and liver function was evaluated. Results Serum C IV, PIIINPC and HA were significantly elevated in Chinese patients with NTDT and further elevated in TM patients. Moreover, C IV, PIIINPC and HA were also positively correlated to serum ferritin and liver iron concentration and further elevated during the progression to multi-organ damage in NTDT patients. Finally, serum ferritin and liver iron concentration were significantly correlated with liver dysfunction determined by AST and ALT. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that monitoring serum C IV, PIIINPC and HA is a potentially sensitive method to predict the risks for iron overload-related liver fibrosis in Chinese thalassemia patients.

  3. Systemic and Cerebral Iron Homeostasis in Ferritin Knock-Out Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Garringer, Holly J.; Goodwin, Charles B.; Richine, Briana; Acton, Anthony; VanDuyn, Natalia; Muhoberac, Barry B.; Irimia-Dominguez, Jose; Chan, Rebecca J.; Peacock, Munro; Nass, Richard; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin, a 24-mer heteropolymer of heavy (H) and light (L) subunits, is the main cellular iron storage protein and plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis by modulating free iron levels thus reducing radical-mediated damage. The H subunit has ferroxidase activity (converting Fe(II) to Fe(III)), while the L subunit promotes iron nucleation and increases ferritin stability. Previous studies on the H gene (Fth) in mice have shown that complete inactivation of Fth is lethal during embryonic development, without ability to compensate by the L subunit. In humans, homozygous loss of the L gene (FTL) is associated with generalized seizure and atypical restless leg syndrome, while mutations in FTL cause a form of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. Here we generated mice with genetic ablation of the Fth and Ftl genes. As previously reported, homozygous loss of the Fth allele on a wild-type Ftl background was embryonic lethal, whereas knock-out of the Ftl allele (Ftl-/-) led to a significant decrease in the percentage of Ftl-/- newborn mice. Analysis of Ftl-/- mice revealed systemic and brain iron dyshomeostasis, without any noticeable signs of neurodegeneration. Our findings indicate that expression of the H subunit can rescue the loss of the L subunit and that H ferritin homopolymers have the capacity to sequester iron in vivo. We also observed that a single allele expressing the H subunit is not sufficient for survival when both alleles encoding the L subunit are absent, suggesting the need of some degree of complementation between the subunits as well as a dosage effect. PMID:25629408

  4. Visualizing the Impurity Depletion Zone Around Holoferritin Crystals Growing in Gel with Ferritin Dimers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Thomas, B. R.

    2000-01-01

    Colorless transparent apoferritin (Mr = 450KDa) crystals have been grown from gel with Cd(2+) as precipitant in the presence of reddish brown-colored ferritin dimers (Mr = 900KDa). In agreement with our previous measurements, showing preferential trapping of dimers (distribution coefficient K = 4), the apoferritin crystals become strongly colored while the gel solution around them became nearly colorless. The depth of the depletion with respect to the colored dimer impurity allowed us to visualize the impurity depletion zone. Depletion with respect to impurity as compared to the crystallizing protein is discussed.

  5. Guided Assemblies of Ferritin Nanocages: Highly Ordered Arrays of Monodisperse Nanoscopic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yunxia; Chen, Dian; Park, Soojin; Emrick, Todd; Russell, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Protein nanocages, like horse spleen ferritin (HSF, 12 nm in diameter) with magnetic cores (8 nm in diameter), have the distinct advantage over synthetic nanoparticles of being truly monodisperse in size and shape. Provided planar, ordered arrays of nanocages can be achieved, these attributes can be used to generate two-dimensional arrays of nanoscopic elements, in which each element is exactly the same size and shape, and the areal density and lateral packing can be manipulated by the charge on the nanocage surface. This strategy is shown to be viable, providing a unique pathway to overcome some of the current technological limitations in generating addressable media.

  6. Use of Cationized Ferritin Nanoparticles to Measure Renal Glomerular Microstructure with MRI.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kevin M; Beeman, Scott C; Baldelomar, Edwin J; Zhang, Min; Wu, Teresa; Hann, Bradley D; Bertram, John F; Charlton, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming important for whole-kidney assessment of glomerular morphology, both in vivo and ex vivo. MRI-based renal morphological measurements can be made in intact organs and allow direct measurements of every perfused glomerulus. Cationic ferritin (CF) is used as a superparamagnetic contrast agent for MRI. CF binds to the glomerular basement membrane after intravenous injection, allowing direct, whole-kidney measurements of glomerular number, volume, and volume distribution. Here we describe the production, testing, and use of CF as an MRI contrast agent for quantitative glomerular morphology in intact mouse, rat, and human kidneys.

  7. IL-1β/IL-6/CRP and IL-18/ferritin: Distinct Inflammatory Programs in Infections

    PubMed Central

    ten Oever, Jaap; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2016-01-01

    The host inflammatory response against infections is characterized by the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins, driving both innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. Distinct patterns of circulating cytokines and acute-phase responses have proven indispensable for guiding the diagnosis and management of infectious diseases. This review discusses the profiles of acute-phase proteins and circulating cytokines encountered in viral and bacterial infections. We also propose a model in which the inflammatory response to viral (IL-18/ferritin) and bacterial (IL-6/CRP) infections presents with specific plasma patterns of immune biomarkers. PMID:27977798

  8. Redox reactivity of animal apoferritins and apoheteropolymers assembled from recombinant heavy and light human chain ferritins.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J L; Norcross, D C; Arosio, P; Frankel, R B; Watt, G D

    1999-03-30

    The redox reactivities of air-oxidized apo horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) and apo rat liver ferritin (RaF) were examined by microcoulometry and reductive optical titrations. Microcoulometry on several independent lots of commercial HoSF revealed two distinct types of redox activity: one requiring 3-4 electrons and one requiring 6-7 electrons for full reduction of the protein shell. ApoRaF required 8-9 electrons to fully reduce the oxidized form. Reductive optical titrations confirmed the microcoulometric reduction stoichiometry and, in addition, showed that the spectra of both oxidized and reduced apoHoSF were distinct and possessed absorbances tailing into the visible region. The redox reactivity of both apoRaF and apoHoSF correlated with their H-subunit composition. Identical microcoulometric and optical experiments were conducted with recombinant apo human liver heavy (rHuHF) and light (rHuLF) ferritins, but neither was redox-active. These results suggest that the redox reactivity of native ferritins is due to their heteropolymeric nature. This was confirmed by mixing various proportions of rHuHF and rHuLF, dissociating the 24-mers into individual subunits with guanidine hydrochloride at pH 3.5, and renaturing to form heteropolymeric 24-mers. Microcoulometric measurements of these apoheteropolymers reassembled in vitro showed that they were redox-active like their native apoheteropolymer counterparts. The redox activity of these apoheteropolymers increased with H-subunit composition, reached a maximum near 12 H- and 12 L-subunits, and then declined to zero with increasing L-subunit composition. The decline in redox reactivity at high L-subunit concentrations indicates that both H- and L-subunits are involved in forming the observed redox centers. Apoheteropolymers formed from rHuLF and W93F (an H-chain mutant) were redox-inactive, suggesting that the conserved tryptophan is necessary for redox center formation.

  9. Serum hepcidin levels in Helicobacter pylori-infected children with iron-deficiency anemia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Azab, Seham F A; Esh, Asmaa M H

    2013-11-01

    Recently, hepcidin, an antimicrobial-like peptide hormone, has evolved as the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin integrates signals from diverse physiological inputs, forming a key connection between iron trafficking and response to infection. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether Helicobacter pylori infection modulates serum hepcidin level and response to oral iron therapy in children with iron-deficiency anemia. This was a case-control study including 60 children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA; 30 H. pylori infected and 30 H. pylori noninfected) and 30 healthy children with comparable age and gender as the control group. Iron parameters including serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and after 3 months of oral iron therapy for IDA. Compared to the control group, serum hepcidin was significantly lower in H. pylori-noninfected children with IDA (P < 0.01) and significantly higher in H. pylori-infected children with IDA (P < 0.01). Hepcidin increased significantly in noninfected children with IDA after 3 months of oral iron therapy (P < 0.01). On the other hand, H. pylori-infected children showed nonsignificant change in hepcidin level after oral iron therapy (P > 0.05). Although hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with serum ferritin, hemoglobin (Hb), iron, and transferrin saturation in noninfected children with IDA (P < 0.01), it showed significant negative correlations with serum ferritin, Hb, iron, and transferrin saturation in H. pylori-infected children with IDA (P < 0.05). H. pylori infection upregulates serum hepcidin levels and was associated with diminished response to oral iron therapy in children with iron-deficiency anemia.

  10. Revelation of endogenously bound Fe{sup 2+} ions in the crystal structure of ferritin from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Thiruselvam, Viswanathan; Sivaraman, Padavattan; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappagounder

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Crystal structure of ferritin was determined. • Endogenously expressed iron’s were identified. • Binuclear iron sites were observed at A and B active sites. - Abstract: Ferritin is an iron regulatory protein. It is responsible for storage and detoxification of excess iron thereby it regulates iron level in the body. Here we report the crystal structure of ferritin with two endogenously expressed Fe atoms binding in both the sites. The protein was purified and characterized by MALDI-TOF and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. The crystal belongs to I4 space group and it diffracted up to 2.5 Å. The structural analysis suggested that it crystallizes as hexamer and confirmed that it happened to be the first report of endogenously expressed Fe ions incorporated in both the A and B sites, situated in between the helices.

  11. Study of serum hepcidin in hereditary hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    El Beshlawy, Amal; Alaraby, Ibrahim; Abdel Kader, Mohamed S E M; Ahmed, Dina H; Abdelrahman, Hossam E M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the level of hepcidin in hereditary chronic hemolytic anemias and to correlate the serum hepcidin levels to the need for blood transfusions (frequency of blood transfusions and the serum ferritin level). Seventy pediatric patients with hereditary chronic hemolytic anemias, attending to hematology clinics of Cairo University and Misr University for Science and Technology (MUST) hospitals were the subjects of this study [53 patients with β-thalassemia major (β-TM), 10 patients with β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI), four patients with congenital spherocytosis and three patients with sickle cell disease) (38 males and 32 females)]; their ages ranged from 1-14 years. Seventy normal children, age- and sex-matched, served as the control group. The results of this study revealed decreased hepcidin levels in patients (all types of congenital chronic hemolytic anemias) [mean ± SD (standard deviation) = 22.9 ± 6.0] compared to controls (mean ± SD = 132.4 ± 16.7) with highly significant statistical difference in between. Hepcidin levels were higher in β-TM patients (mean ± SD = 23.7 ± 6.2) than in β-TI patients (mean ± SD = 21.8 ± 4.0), the hepcidin to ferritin ratio was significantly less than one. In β-TM patients, the mean ± SD was 0.03 ± 0.004, and in β-TI patients the mean ± SD = 0.025 ± 0.002, with highly significant statistical difference with hepcidin-to-ferritin ratios in controls being mean ± SD = 2.3 ± 0.7. Hepcidin and hepcidin/ferritin ratios can be used as good markers of hemolytic anemia and iron overload as they have very high sensitivity (99.0 and 99.0%, respectively) and very high specificity (98.0 and 97.0%, respectively). Our findings highlight the potential usefulness of hepcidin measurement as a diagnostic tool. The use of hepcidin as an adjuvant therapy with iron chelators is important as it has a vital role in combating hemosidrosis.

  12. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene

    PubMed Central

    Kanobe, Milly N.; Rodermel, Steven R.; Bailey, Theodore; Scott, M. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and expressed in the maize seed endosperm. mRNA abundance of seven tested iron homeostasis genes and seed storage protein genes differed significantly between seed samples positive and negative for the transgene. The PCR negative samples had higher zein and total protein content compared to the positive samples. However, PCR positive samples had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and iron. We have shown that the soybean ferritin transgene affected the expression of native iron homeostasis genes in the maize plant. These results underscore the importance of taking a holistic approach to the evaluation of transgenic events in target plants, comparing the transgenic plant to the untransformed controls. PMID:23785377

  13. Immunological function and antibacterial activity of two ferritin proteins from the freshwater pearl mussel Hyriopsis schlegelii.

    PubMed

    Sheng, J Q; Shu, Q C; Shi, J W; Wang, J H; Peng, K; Yuan, S; Hong, Y J

    2016-08-29

    Ferritin is a conserved iron-binding protein involved in host defense and cellular iron metabolism in most organisms. We investigated the expression profiles of two ferritin genes (designated HsFer-1 and HsFer-2) in the hemocytes, gonad, and hepatopancreas of Hyriopsis schlegelii, when challenged with bacteria and metal ions. HsFer gene transcription increased 1.8-7.7- and 1.9-6.1-fold in these tissues after stimulation with Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio anguillarum, respectively. In addition, following exposure to Fe(3+), expression of HsFer-1 and HsFer-2 was elevated by 1.5-6.1- and 3.6-10.1-fold, respectively. Levels of HsFer-1 and -2 mRNA also increased significantly after treatment with Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) at certain concentrations. Moreover, recombinant HsFer-1 and -2 were able to inhibit the growth of two strains of bacteria, and the former efficiently chelated Fe(3+). From these results, we conclude that HsFer-1 and -2 may be involved in iron metabolism and immune defense by inhibiting the growth of bacteria.

  14. Rice endosperm iron biofortification by targeted and synergistic action of nicotianamine synthase and ferritin.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Judith; Poletti, Susanna; Aeschlimann, Beat; Yakandawala, Nandadeva; Drosse, Benedikt; Osorio, Sonia; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Günther, Detlef; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Sautter, Christof

    2009-09-01

    Nearly one-third of the world's population, mostly women and children, suffer from iron malnutrition and its consequences, such as anaemia or impaired mental development. Iron fortification of food is difficult because soluble iron is either unstable or unpalatable, and non-soluble iron is not bioavailable. Genetic engineering of crop plants to increase iron content has therefore emerged as an alternative for iron biofortification. To date, strategies to increase iron content have relied on single genes, with limited success. Our work focuses on rice as a model plant, because it feeds one-half of the world's population, including the majority of the iron-malnourished population. Using the targeted expression of two transgenes, nicotianamine synthase and ferritin, we increased the iron content of rice endosperm by more than six-fold. Analysis of transgenic rice lines confirmed that, in combination, they provide a synergistic effect on iron uptake and storage. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry showed that the iron in the endosperm of the transgenic rice lines accumulated in spots, most probably as a consequence of spatially restricted ferritin accumulation. Agronomic evaluation of the high-iron rice lines did not reveal a yield penalty or significant changes in trait characters, except for a tendency to earlier flowering. Overall, we have demonstrated that rice can be engineered with a small number of genes to achieve iron biofortification at a dietary significant level.

  15. Caffeine Positively Modulates Ferritin Heavy Chain Expression in H460 Cells: Effects on Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Anna Martina; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Both the methylxanthine caffeine and the heavy subunit of ferritin molecule (FHC) are able to control the proliferation rate of several cancer cell lines. While caffeine acts exclusively as a negative modulator of cell proliferation, FHC might reduce or enhance cell viability depending upon the different cell type. In this work we have demonstrated that physiological concentrations of caffeine reduce the proliferation rate of H460 cells: along with the modulation of p53, pAKT and Cyclin D1, caffeine also determines a significant FHC up-regulation through the activation of its transcriptional efficiency. FHC plays a central role in the molecular pathways modulated by caffeine, ending in a reduced cell growth, since its specific silencing by siRNA almost completely abolishes caffeine effects on H460 cell proliferation. These results allow the inclusion of ferritin heavy subunits among the multiple molecular targets of caffeine and open the way for studying the relationship between caffeine and intracellular iron metabolism. PMID:27657916

  16. Mitochondrial Ferritin Deletion Exacerbates β-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peina; Wu, Qiong; Wu, Wenyue; Li, Haiyan; Guo, Yuetong; Yu, Peng; Gao, Guofen; Shi, Zhenhua; Zhao, Baolu

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is a mitochondrial iron storage protein which protects mitochondria from iron-induced oxidative damage. Our previous studies indicate that FtMt attenuates β-amyloid- and 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. To explore the protective effects of FtMt on β-amyloid-induced memory impairment and neuronal apoptosis and the mechanisms involved, 10-month-old wild-type and Ftmt knockout mice were infused intracerebroventricularly (ICV) with Aβ25–35 to establish an Alzheimer's disease model. Knockout of Ftmt significantly exacerbated Aβ25–35-induced learning and memory impairment. The Bcl-2/Bax ratio in mouse hippocampi was decreased and the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP were increased. The number of neuronal cells undergoing apoptosis in the hippocampus was also increased in Ftmt knockout mice. In addition, the levels of L-ferritin and FPN1 in the hippocampus were raised, and the expression of TfR1 was decreased. Increased MDA levels were also detected in Ftmt knockout mice treated with Aβ25–35. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the neurological impairment induced by Aβ25–35 was exacerbated in Ftmt knockout mice and that this may relate to increased levels of oxidative stress. PMID:28191272

  17. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin.

    PubMed

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-04-26

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation.

  18. Changes in endogenous gene transcript and protein levels in maize plants expressing the soybean ferritin transgene.

    PubMed

    Kanobe, Milly N; Rodermel, Steven R; Bailey, Theodore; Scott, M Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic agricultural crops with increased nutritive value present prospects for contributing to public health. However, their acceptance is poor in many countries due to the perception that genetic modification may cause unintended effects on expression of native genes in the host plant. Here, we tested effects of soybean ferritin transgene (SoyFer1, M64337) on transcript and protein levels of endogenous genes in maize. Results showed that the transgene was successfully introduced and expressed in the maize seed endosperm. mRNA abundance of seven tested iron homeostasis genes and seed storage protein genes differed significantly between seed samples positive and negative for the transgene. The PCR negative samples had higher zein and total protein content compared to the positive samples. However, PCR positive samples had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and iron. We have shown that the soybean ferritin transgene affected the expression of native iron homeostasis genes in the maize plant. These results underscore the importance of taking a holistic approach to the evaluation of transgenic events in target plants, comparing the transgenic plant to the untransformed controls.

  19. Localization and Characterization of Ferritin in Demospongiae: A Possible Role on Spiculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Natalio, Filipe; Wiese, Stefanie; Friedrich, Norman; Werner, Peter; Nawaz Tahir, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Iron, as inorganic ion or as oxide, is widely used by biological systems in a myriad of biological functions (e.g., enzymatic, gene activation and/or regulation). In particular, marine organisms containing silica structures—diatoms and sponges—grow preferentially in the presence of iron. Using primary sponge cell culture from S. domuncula–primmorphs—as an in vitro model to study the Demospongiae spiculogenesis, we found the presence of agglomerates 50 nm in diameter exclusively inside sponge specialized cells called sclerocytes. A clear phase/material separation is observed between the agglomerates and the initial stages of intracellular spicule formation. STEM-HRTEM-EDX analysis of the agglomerates (30–100 nm) showed that they are composed of pseudohexagonal nanoparticles between 5 and 15 nm in size, displaying lattice parameters corresponding to hematite (Fe2O3) and mixed iron oxide phases typically attributed to ferritin. Further analysis, using western blotting, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), sequence alignment analysis, immunostaining and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), of mature spicule filaments confirm the presence of ferritin within these organic structures. We suggest that S. domuncula can be classified as a dual biomineralizating organism, i.e., within the same cellular structure two distinct biomineralizing processes can occur as a result of the same cellular/metabolic function, spiculogenesis. PMID:25153764

  20. Regulation of neuronal ferritin heavy chain, a new player in opiate-induced chemokine dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Anna Cook; Meucci, Olimpia

    2013-01-01

    The heavy chain subunit of ferritin (FHC), a ubiquitous protein best known for its iron-sequestering activity as part of the ferritin complex, has recently been described as a novel inhibitor of signaling through the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Levels of FHC as well as its effects on CXCR4 activation increase in cortical neurons exposed to mu-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine, an effect likely specific to neurons. Major actions of CXCR4 signaling in the mature brain include a promotion of neurogenesis, activation of pro-survival signals, and modulation of excitotoxic pathways; thus FHC up-regulation may contribute to the neuronal dysfunction often associated with opiate drug abuse. This review summarizes our knowledge of neuronal CXCR4 function, its regulation by opiates and the role of FHC in this process, and known mechanisms controlling FHC production. We speculate on the mechanism involved in FHC regulation by opiates, and offer FHC as a new target in opioid-induced neuropathology. PMID:21465240

  1. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation. PMID:27078093

  2. Serum iron status of under-five children with sickle cell anaemia in lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akodu, S O; Diaku-Akinwumi, I N; Kehinde, O A; Njokanma, O F

    2013-01-01

    Background. Iron status in patients with sickle cell anaemia is a matter of continuing investigation. Objective. This paper aims to determine the serum iron status of under-five, sickle cell anaemia patients. Methods. The study spanned from December 2009 to February 2010 at the Consultant Outpatient Clinics involving 97 HbSS subjects and 97 age- and sex-matched HbAA controls. Biochemical iron status was assayed in subjects and controls. Results. Age range of the children was seven months to five years, with a mean of 30.6 (±15.97) months. Irrespective of gender, mean serum iron values were higher in HbAA controls than their HbSS counterparts but the observed difference was not significant (P = 0.299 and 0.111, resp.). The mean total iron binding capacity values of males and females were also not significantly different for sickle cell anaemia subjects and controls (P > 0.05). Males and females with HbAA had significantly lower serum ferritin when compared with their HbSS counterparts. Irrespective of gender, mean transferrin saturation was lower in HbSS subjects but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Children with sickle cell anaemia have higher serum ferritin than controls, implying relatively higher iron content in the reticuloendothelial cells.

  3. Serum transferrin receptor levels in the evaluation of iron deficiency in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Rusia, U; Flowers, C; Madan, N; Agarwal, N; Sood, S K; Sikka, M

    1996-10-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major global problem. Early onset of iron deficiency in developing countries makes it imperative to identify iron deficiency in neonates. Most conventional laboratory parameters of iron status fail to distinguish neonates with iron deficient erythropoiesis. Serum transferrin receptor (STFR) levels are a recent sensitive measure of iron deficiency and the present study was carried out to evaluate the usefulness of cord serum transferrin receptors in identifying iron deficient erythropoiesis in neonates. A complete hemogram, red cell indices, iron profile: serum iron (SI), percent transferrin saturation (TS%) and serum ferritin (SF) was carried out in 100 full-term neonates and their mothers at parturition. Cord and maternal STFR levels were estimated using a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. Anemic women had a significantly lower SI, their TS% and high STFR levels suggesting that iron deficiency was responsible for the anemia. In the neonates of iron deficient mothers, cord SI, TS% and cord ferritin were not significantly different from those of neonates born to non-anemic mothers. Cord STFR level correlated well with hemoglobin (Hb) and laboratory parameters of iron status, and its level was significantly higher in neonates born to anemic mothers than in those born to non-anemic mothers. It was the only laboratory parameter to differentiate between neonates born to anemic and non-anemic mothers. Therefore, STFR is a sensitive index of iron status in neonates and identifies neonates with iron deficient erythropoiesis.

  4. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia: pre-transplant conditioning and peripheral blood are associated with improved engraftment: an observational study on behalf of the Severe Aplastic Anemia and Pediatric Diseases Working Parties of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane; Beelen, Dietrich; Brinch, Lorentz; Bunjes, Donald; Butler, Andrew; Ganser, Arnold; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Koh, Mickey B; Komarnicki, Mieczyslaw; Kröger, Nicolaus; Maertens, Johan; Maschan, Alexei; Peters, Christina; Rovira, Montserrat; Sengeløv, Henrik; Socié, Gerard; Tischer, Johanna; Oneto, Rosi; Passweg, Jakob; Marsh, Judith

    2013-11-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin. About half of transplants with data available (39 of 86) were followed by posttransplant immunosuppression. Graft source was bone marrow in the majority of cases (n=77). Transplant practice changed over time with more transplants with conditioning and anti-thymocyte globulin as well as peripheral blood stem cells performed in later years. Ten year overall survival was 93% with 5 transplant-related deaths. Graft failure occurred in 32% of transplants. Risk of graft failure was significantly increased in transplants without conditioning, and with bone marrow as graft source. Lack of posttransplant immunosuppression also showed a trend towards increased risk of graft failure, while anti-thymocyte globulin did not have an influence. In summary, syngeneic transplant is associated with a significant risk of graft failure when no conditioning is given, but has an excellent long-term outcome. Furthermore, our comparatively large series enables us to recommend the use of pre-transplant conditioning rather than not and possibly to prefer peripheral blood as a stem cell source.

  5. Two distinct ferritin-like molecules in P. aeruginosa: The product of the bfrA gene is a bacterial ferritin (FtnA) not a bacterioferritin (Bfr)†€

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huili; Jepkorir, Grace; Lovell, Scott; Nama, Pavithra V.; Weeratunga, Saroja; Battaile, Kevin P.; Rivera, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Two distinct types of ferritin-like molecules often coexist in bacteria, the heme binding bacterioferritins (Bfr) and the non-heme binding bacterial ferritins (Ftn). The early isolation of a ferritin-like molecule from P. aeruginosa suggested the possibility of a bacterioferritin assembled from two different subunits [Moore, G. R., Kadir, F. H., Al-Massad, F. K., Le Brun, N. E., Thomson, A. J., Greenwood, C., Keen, J. N. and Findlay, J. B. C. (1994) Biochem. J. 304, 493–497]. Subsequent studies demonstrated the presence of two genes coding for ferritin-like molecules in P. aeruginosa, designated bfrA and bfrB, and suggested that two distinct bacterioferritins may coexist [Ma, J.-F., Ochsner, U. A., Klotz, M. G, Nanayakkara, V. K., Howell, M. L., Johnson, Z., Posey, J. E., Vasil, M. L., Monaco, J. J., and Hassett, D. J. (1999) J. Bacteriol. 181, 3730–3742]. In this report we present structural evidence demonstrating that the product of the bfrA gene is a ferritin-like molecule not capable of binding heme which harbors a catalytically active ferroxidase center with structural properties similar to those characteristic of bacterial and archaeal Ftns and clearly distinct from the ferroxidase center typical of Bfrs. Consequently, the product of the bfrA gene in P. aeruginosa is a bacterial ferritin, which we propose should be termed Pa FtnA. These results, together with the previous characterization of the product of the bfrB gene as a genuine bacterioferritin (Pa BfrB) [Weeratunga, S. J., Lovell, S., Yao, H., Battaile, K. P., Fischer, C. J., Gee, C. E., and Rivera, M. (2010) Biochemistry 49. 1160–1175] indicate the coexistence of a bacterial ferritin (Pa FtnA) and a bacterioferritin (Pa BfrB) in P. aeruginosa. In agreement with this idea, we also obtained evidence demonstrating that release of iron from Pa BfrB and Pa FtnA is likely subject to different regulation in P. aerugionsa: Whereas the efficient release of iron stored in Pa FtnA requires only the input of

  6. Characterization of a Novel Monoclonal Antibody against Human Mitochondrial Ferritin and Its Immunohistochemical Application in Human and Monkey Substantia Nigra

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingchun; Yang, Hongkuan; Guan, Hongpeng; Kato, Tomoko; Mukaisho, Kenichi; Sugihara, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Terada, Tomohiro; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is a novel iron storage protein with high homology to H-ferritin. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed H- and L-ferritin, FtMt is expressed in specific tissues such as the testis, heart, and brain. The function of FtMt is not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that it has a neuroprotective role in neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously reported that FtMt is expressed in catecholaminergic neurons of the monkey brainstem. To explore FtMt expression in human dopaminergic neurons, we designed a novel monoclonal antibody, C65-2, directed against human FtMt. Here, we report the properties of our C65-2 antibody. Western blots analysis and immunoabsorption tests demonstrated that the C65-2 antibody specifically recognized FtMt with no cross-reactivity to H-ferritin. Immunohistochemistry showed that the C65-2 antibody detected FtMt in neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in humans and monkeys. We confirmed that FtMt is expressed in dopaminergic neurons of the human SNc. Our results suggest that FtMt is involved in various physiological and pathological mechanisms in human dopaminergic neurons, and the C65-2 monoclonal antibody promises to be a useful tool for determining the localization and biological functions of FtMt in the brain. PMID:28386150

  7. Dopamine mediated iron release from ferritin is enhanced at higher temperatures: Possible implications for fever-induced Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babincová, Melánia; Babinec, Peter

    2005-05-01

    A new molecular mechanism is proposed to explain the pathogenesis of fever-induced Parkinson's disease. This proposal is based on dopamine and 6-hydroxydopamine-mediated free iron release from ferritin magnetic nanoparticles, which is enhanced at higher temperatures, and which may lead to substantial peroxidation and injury of lipid biomembranes of the substantia nigra in the brain.

  8. "Opening" the ferritin pore for iron release by mutation of conserved amino acids at interhelix and loop sites.

    PubMed

    Jin, W; Takagi, H; Pancorbo, B; Theil, E C

    2001-06-26

    Ferritin concentrates, stores, and detoxifies iron in most organisms. The iron is a solid, ferric oxide mineral (< or =4500 Fe) inside the protein shell. Eight pores are formed by subunit trimers of the 24 subunit protein. A role for the protein in controlling reduction and dissolution of the iron mineral was suggested in preliminary experiments [Takagi et al. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 18685-18688] with a proline/leucine substitution near the pore. Localized pore disorder in frog L134P crystals coincided with enhanced iron exit, triggered by reduction. In this report, nine additional substitutions of conserved amino acids near L134 were studied for effects on iron release. Alterations of a conserved hydrophobic pair, a conserved ion pair, and a loop at the ferritin pores all increased iron exit (3-30-fold). Protein assembly was unchanged, except for a slight decrease in volume (measured by gel filtration); ferroxidase activity was still in the millisecond range, but a small decrease indicates slight alteration of the channel from the pore to the oxidation site. The sensitivity of reductive iron exit rates to changes in conserved residues near the ferritin pores, associated with localized unfolding, suggests that the structure around the ferritin pores is a target for regulated protein unfolding and iron release.

  9. Adsorption behavior of ferritin and buffer components, buffer agents and salts, onto silane-coupled silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Megumi; Yamashita, Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Fixation of ferritin using amino-silane modified substrates is effective, but salt and alkali ions of the buffer can contaminate substrates, inhibiting the sensing and fabrication of nano-electronic devices. To avoid adsorption of salts and alkali ions, buffer solutions have been replaced by pure water or alkali-metal-ion-free buffer. However, proteins in such solutions are sometimes denatured. Therefore, we developed a substrate which adsorbs ferritin but does not adsorb contaminants such as salts and alkali metal-ions contained in the buffer. Adsorption of ferritin was achieved by using a buffer with a high ion strength, such as PBS buffer, because the Debye length becomes shorter with increased ion strength due to intermolecular force even when the substrate has no positive charge. The combination of high coverage methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS)-coupled silicon substrate and PBS buffer solution is effective for adsorption of ferritin while not adsorbing buffer components such as contaminants and/or salts on the silicon substrate.

  10. A ferritin gene from Procambarus clarkii, molecular characterization and in response to heavy metal stress and lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Xin, Zhao-Zhe; Liu, Yu; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Chen, Yi-Jing; Zhang, Dai-Zhen; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Chai, Xin-Yue; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2017-02-20

    Ferritin plays important roles in iron storage, detoxification, and immune response. Here, a ferritin gene (PcFer) was identified in Procambarus clarkii, an economically important freshwater crayfish. Full-length PcFer cDNA was 1022-bp, including a 135-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR) with a typical iron responsive element, a 374-bp 3'-UTR, and a 513-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 170 amino acids which contained the Ferritin domain. PcFer has ion binding sites, a ferrihydrite nucleation center, and an iron ion channel. PcFer is phylogenetically closely-related to Pacifastacus leniusculus and Eriocheir sinensis ferritins. Real-time quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analysis showed that PcFer was expressed in all tested P. clarkii tissues, and expressed most in hepatopancreas. After challenge with various heavy metals and lipopolysaccharide, respectively, the hepatopancreatic expression levels of PcFer were markedly upregulated. These results suggest that expression of PcFer might be involved in immune defense and protection of P. clarkii against heavy metal stress.

  11. Mössbauer studies of iron uptake, ferritin and hemoglobin synthesis and denaturation in erythroid cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Fibach, E.; Konijn, A. M.; Ofer, S.; Rachmilewitz, E. A.

    1991-11-01

    Mössbauer studies in murine (MEL) and human K-562 erythroleukemia cell lines have been utilized to study the fate of iron during intracellular Hb synthesis and denaturation. The results showed that ferritin can serve as an intermediate iron pool for Hb synthesis and for storage of iron released during intracellular Hb denaturation.

  12. Non-native Co-, Mn-, and Ti-oxyhydroxide nanocrystals in ferritin for high efficiency solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Erickson, S D; Smith, T J; Moses, L M; Watt, R K; Colton, J S

    2015-01-09

    Quantum dot solar cells seek to surpass the solar energy conversion efficiencies achieved by bulk semiconductors. This new field requires a broad selection of materials to achieve its full potential. The 12 nm spherical protein ferritin can be used as a template for uniform and controlled nanocrystal growth, and to then house the nanocrystals for use in solar energy conversion. In this study, precise band gaps of titanium, cobalt, and manganese oxyhydroxide nanocrystals within ferritin were measured, and a change in band gap due to quantum confinement effects was observed. The range of band gaps obtainable from these three types of nanocrystals is 2.19-2.29 eV, 1.93-2.15 eV, and 1.60-1.65 eV respectively. From these measured band gaps, theoretical efficiency limits for a multi-junction solar cell using these ferritin-enclosed nanocrystals are calculated and found to be 38.0% for unconcentrated sunlight and 44.9% for maximally concentrated sunlight. If a ferritin-based nanocrystal with a band gap similar to silicon can be found (i.e. 1.12 eV), the theoretical efficiency limits are raised to 51.3% and 63.1%, respectively. For a current matched cell, these latter efficiencies become 41.6% (with an operating voltage of 5.49 V), and 50.0% (with an operating voltage of 6.59 V), for unconcentrated and maximally concentrated sunlight respectively.

  13. Spectroscopic evidence for and characterization of a trinuclear ferroxidase center in bacterial ferritin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alice S; Timóteo, Cristina G; Guilherme, Márcia; Folgosa, Filipe; Naik, Sunil G; Duarte, Américo G; Huynh, Boi Hanh; Tavares, Pedro

    2012-07-04

    Ferritins are ubiquitous and can be found in practically all organisms that utilize Fe. They are composed of 24 subunits forming a hollow sphere with an inner cavity of ~80 Å in diameter. The main function of ferritin is to oxidize the cytotoxic Fe(2+) ions and store the oxidized Fe in the inner cavity. It has been established that the initial step of rapid oxidation of Fe(2+) (ferroxidation) by H-type ferritins, found in vertebrates, occurs at a diiron binding center, termed the ferroxidase center. In bacterial ferritins, however, X-ray crystallographic evidence and amino acid sequence analysis revealed a trinuclear Fe binding center comprising a binuclear Fe binding center (sites A and B), homologous to the ferroxidase center of H-type ferritin, and an adjacent mononuclear Fe binding site (site C). In an effort to obtain further evidence supporting the presence of a trinuclear Fe binding center in bacterial ferritins and to gain information on the states of the iron bound to the trinuclear center, bacterial ferritin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris (DvFtn) and its E130A variant was loaded with substoichiometric amounts of Fe(2+), and the products were characterized by Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopy. Four distinct Fe species were identified: a paramagnetic diferrous species, a diamagnetic diferrous species, a mixed valence Fe(2+)Fe(3+) species, and a mononuclear Fe(2+) species. The latter three species were detected in the wild-type DvFtn, while the paramagnetic diferrous species was detected in the E130A variant. These observations can be rationally explained by the presence of a trinuclear Fe binding center, and the four Fe species can be properly assigned to the three Fe binding sites. Further, our spectroscopic data suggest that (1) the fully occupied trinuclear center supports an all ferrous state, (2) sites B and C are bridged by a μ-OH group forming a diiron subcenter within the trinuclear center, and (3) this subcenter can afford both a mixed valence Fe(2

  14. Artesunate induces cell death in human cancer cells via enhancing lysosomal function and lysosomal degradation of ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nai-Di; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Wong, Wai-Shiu Fred; Shen, Han-Ming

    2014-11-28

    Artesunate (ART) is an anti-malaria drug that has been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity, and functional lysosomes are reported to be required for ART-induced cancer cell death, whereas the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying ART-induced cell death. We first confirmed that ART induces apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Interestingly, we found that ART preferably accumulates in the lysosomes and is able to activate lysosomal function via promotion of lysosomal V-ATPase assembly. Furthermore, we found that lysosomes function upstream of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species production. Importantly, we provided evidence showing that lysosomal iron is required for the lysosomal activation and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production induced by ART. Finally, we showed that ART-induced cell death is mediated by the release of iron in the lysosomes, which results from the lysosomal degradation of ferritin, an iron storage protein. Meanwhile, overexpression of ferritin heavy chain significantly protected cells from ART-induced cell death. In addition, knockdown of nuclear receptor coactivator 4, the adaptor protein for ferritin degradation, was able to block ART-mediated ferritin degradation and rescue the ART-induced cell death. In summary, our study demonstrates that ART treatment activates lysosomal function and then promotes ferritin degradation, subsequently leading to the increase of lysosomal iron that is utilized by ART for its cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. Thus, our data reveal a new mechanistic action underlying ART-induced cell death in cancer cells.

  15. Influence of magnetic field on aqueous two-phase extraction of horse ferritin in the polyethylene glycol/hydroxyethyl starch system.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Dawidziak, Magdalena; Błaszak, Roman; Piasecka-Kwiatkowska, Dorota

    2012-02-24

    The presented experiments show the model of expectation of equine spleen ferritin extraction in a new aqueous two-phase system which was formed by mixing polyethylene glycol (PEG) and hydroxyethyl starch (HES). The tendency of the protein to migrate in the analyzed systems was dependent on the concentrations of HES and PEG as well as PEG molecular weight. The highest concentration of ferritin in the top phase (rich in PEG) was recorded in the system composed of 6% PEG 3000 and 3% HES. The obtained concentration was 0.88 mg mL(-1). The lowest concentration was 0.42 mg mL(-1) in the system composed of 5% PEG 6000 and 1% HES. Next the influence of the magnetic field on ferritin accumulation was analyzed. Selected samples were placed between homogeneous (S/S) or heterogeneous magnetic poles (N/S and S/N). It was observed that after the application of the magnetic field the extraction of ferritin into the PEG rich phase increased in every examined system. That increase was as high as 1.67-fold ferritin concentration in the PEG phase as compared with the total concentration of ferritin in the system before separation. Introduction of the magnetic field to two-phase extraction systems is shown as an effective method of changing the partition coefficient of ferritin.

  16. Structure of dual function iron regulatory protein 1 complexed with ferritin IRE-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, William E.; Selezneva, Anna I.; Dupuy, Jérôme; Volbeda, Anne; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C.; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Volz1, Karl

    2011-07-27

    Iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) binds iron-responsive elements (IREs) in messenger RNAs (mRNAs), to repress translation or degradation, or binds an iron-sulfur cluster, to become a cytosolic aconitase enzyme. The 2.8 angstrom resolution crystal structure of the IRP1:ferritin H IRE complex shows an open protein conformation compared with that of cytosolic aconitase. The extended, L-shaped IRP1 molecule embraces the IRE stem-loop through interactions at two sites separated by {approx}30 angstroms, each involving about a dozen protein:RNA bonds. Extensive conformational changes related to binding the IRE or an iron-sulfur cluster explain the alternate functions of IRP1 as an mRNA regulator or enzyme.

  17. Vascular Damage in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Possible Role of Iron and Ferritin.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Giuseppina; Lombardi, Rosa; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica

    2016-05-05

    Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in Western countries. Recent data indicated that NAFLD is a risk factor by itself contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease independently of classical known risk factors. Hyperferritinemia and mild increased iron stores are frequently observed in patients with NAFLD and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the role of iron, through oxidative stress and interaction with insulin metabolism, in the development of vascular damage. Moreover, iron depletion has been shown to decrease atherogenesis in experimental models and in humans. This review presents the recent evidence on epidemiology, pathogenesis, and the possible explanation of the role of iron and ferritin in the development of cardiovascular damage in patients with NAFLD, and discusses the possible interplay between metabolic disorders associated with NAFLD and iron in the development of cardiovascular disease.

  18. Percutaneous excretion of iron and ferritin (through Al-hijamah) as a novel treatment for iron overload in beta-thalassemia major, hemochromatosis and sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Salah Mohamed; Abou-Taleb, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Hany Salah; Baghdadi, Hussam; Maria, Reham A; Ahmed, Nagwa Sayed; Nabo, Manal Mohamed Helmy

    2014-08-01

    RBCs, WBCs and platelets). That fluid mixture does not contain intact blood cells (having diameters in microns) that are too big to pass through pores of skin capillaries (6-12nm in diameter) and cannot be filtered. Puncturing skin upliftings and applying second cupping step excrete collected fluids. Skin scarifications (shartat mihjam in Arabic) should be small, superficial (0.1mm in depth), short (1-2mm in length), multiple, evenly distributed and confined to skin upliftings. Sucking pressure inside cups (-150 to -420mmHg) applied to skin is transmitted to around skin capillaries to be added to capillary hydrostatic pressure (-33mmHg at arterial end of capillaries and -13mmHg at venous end of capillaries) against capillary osmotic pressure (+20mmHg). This creates a pressure gradient and a traction force across skin and capillaries and increases filtration at arterial end of capillaries at net pressure of -163 to -433mmHg and at venous end of capillaries at net pressure of -143 to -413mmHg resulting in clearance of blood from CPS (iron, ferritin and hemolyzed blood cells). Net filtration pressure at renal glomeruli is 10mmHg i.e. Al-hijamah exerts a more pressure-dependent filtration than renal glomeruli. Al-hijamah may benefit patients through inducing negative iron balance. Interestingly, Al-hijamah was reported to decrease serum ferritin significantly (by about 22%) in healthy subjects while excessive traditional WCT was reported to cause iron deficiency anemia. Al-hijamah is a highly recommended treatment in prophetic medicine. In conclusion, Al-hijamah may be a promising adjuvant treatment for iron overload in TM, hemochromatosis and sideroblastic anemia.

  19. Serum Hepcidin Levels, Iron Dyshomeostasis and Cognitive Loss in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Zohara; Hu, Zihua; Sternberg, Daniel; Waseh, Shayan; Quinn, Joseph F.; Wild, Katharine; Jeffrey, Kaye; Zhao, Lin; Garrick, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study examined the status of the master iron regulatory peptide, hepcidin, and peripheral related iron parameters in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment patients, and evaluated the relationship between iron dyshomeostasis and amyloid-beta (Aβ), cognitive assessment tests, neuroimaging and clinical data. Frozen serum samples from the Oregon Tissue Bank were used to measure serum levels of hepcidin, ferritin, Aβ40, Aβ42 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serum transferrin levels were determined indirectly as total iron binding capacity, serum iron was measured and the percent saturation of transferrin calculated. The study variables were correlated with the patients’ existing cognitive assessment tests, neuroimaging, and clinical data. Hepcidin, and iron-related proteins tended to be higher in AD patients than controls, reaching statistical significance for ferritin, whereas Aβ40, Aβ42 serum levels tended to be lower. Patients with pure AD had three times higher serum hepcidin levels than controls; gender differences in hepcidin and iron-related proteins were observed. Patient stratification based on clinical dementia rating-sum of boxes revealed significantly higher levels of iron and iron-related proteins in AD patients in the upper 50% as compared to controls, suggesting that iron dyshomeostasis worsens as cognitive impairment increases. Unlike Aβ peptides, iron and iron-related proteins showed significant association with cognitive assessment tests, neuroimaging, and clinical data. Hepcidin and iron-related proteins comprise a group of serum biomarkers that relate to AD diagnosis and AD disease progression. Future studies should determine whether strategies targeted to diminishing hepcidin synthesis/secretion and improving iron homeostasis could have a beneficial impact on AD progression.

  20. Antibody Targeting the Ferritin-Like Protein Controls Listeria Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Walid; Sethi, Shneh; Darji, Ayub; Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Hain, Torsten; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of iron during the infection process is essential for the growth of pathogenic microorganisms (S. C. Andrews, Adv. Microb. Physiol. 40:281-351, 1998; H. M. Baker, B. F. Anderson, and E. N. Baker, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 100:3579-3583, 2003). Since the solubility of iron is low and it is toxic at low concentrations, following uptake, iron is stored in subcellular microenvironments in the iron storage protein ferritin (C. Cheers and M. Ho, J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 34:299-309, 1983). Here, we show that ferritin-like proteins (Frl) are highly conserved in the genus Listeria and demonstrate that these proteins are present in both the cytoplasm and cell wall fractions of these bacteria. Even though Frl is expressed under different growth conditions, transcriptional mapping revealed that its regulation is complex. When bacteria are grown in brain heart infusion medium, extracellular expression involves both sigma A (SigA)- and sigma B (SigB)-dependent promoters; however, during intracellular growth, initiation of transcription is additionally SigB dependent. The expression of Frl is greatly enhanced in bacteria grown in the presence of blood, and a mutant strain lacking the frl gene was defective for growth in this medium. Using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for Frl, we demonstrate that administration of anti-Frl MAb prior to infection confers antilisterial resistance in vivo, evidenced in reduced bacterial load and increased survival rates, thereby demonstrating the in vivo significance of upregulated cell surface-associated Frl expression. In vitro studies revealed that the antilisterial resistance is due to increased listerial phagocytosis. PMID:20439472

  1. Low-frequency low-field magnetic susceptibility of ferritin and hemosiderin.

    PubMed

    Allen, P D; St Pierre, T G; Chua-anusorn, W; Ström, V; Rao, K V

    2000-02-21

    Low-frequency low-field magnetic susceptibility measurements were made on four samples of mammalian tissue iron oxide deposits. The samples comprised: (1) horse spleen ferritin; (2) dugong liver hemosiderin; (3) thalassemic human spleen ferritin; and (4) crude thalassemic human spleen hemosiderin. These samples were chosen because Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements on the samples indicated that they exemplified the variation in magnetic and mineral structure found in mammalian tissue iron oxide deposits. The AC-magnetic susceptometry yielded information on the magnetization kinetics of the four samples indicating samples 1, 2, and 3 to be superparamagnetic with values of around 10(11) s(-1) for the pre-exponential frequency factor in the Néel-Arrhenius equation and values for characteristic magnetic anisotropy energy barriers in the range 250-400 K. Sample 4 was indicated to be paramagnetic at all temperatures above 1.3 K. The AC-magnetic susceptometry data also indicated a larger magnetic anisotropy energy distribution in the dugong liver sample compared with samples 1 and 3 in agreement with previous Mössbauer spectroscopic data on these samples. At temperatures below 200 K, samples 1-3 exhibited Curie-Weiss law behavior, indicating weak particle-particle interactions tending to favor antiparallel alignment of the particle magnetic moments. These interactions were strongest for the dugong liver hemosiderin, possibly reflecting the smaller separation between mineral particles in this sample. This is the first magnetic susceptometry study of hemosiderin iron deposits and demonstrates that the AC-magnetic susceptometry technique is a fast and informative method of studying such tissue iron oxide deposits.

  2. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolysis Hyperimmunization Immunoelectrophoresis - blood Immunofixation blood test Liver disease Malignancy Malnutrition Nephrotic syndrome Rheumatoid arthritis Serum globulin electrophoresis Serum iron test Systemic lupus erythematosus ...

  3. Regulation of LIP level and ROS formation through interaction of H-ferritin with G-CSF receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoling; Cong, Yuwen; Hao, Jing; Shan, Yajun; Zhao, Zhenhu; Wang, Shengqi; Chen, Jiapei

    2004-05-21

    A variety of hematopoietic factors including granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin 3 (IL-3) and thrombopoietin (TPO) induce a rapid increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS induces the activation of many signaling molecules, including Shc, Lck, syk, PKC, MAPK, STAT3, through inhibition of protein phosphatase. Each growth factor has a specific cell-surface receptor, which activates both unique and shared signal transduction pathways. The processes of signal transduction linking cell-surface receptor to the formation of intracellular ROS have not been elucidated fully. Ferritins are composed of two subunit types, H and L, and made of 24 subunits that sequester up to 4500 atoms of iron. When the stored iron atoms are released from H-ferritin, through iron-catalyzed reaction, they have the capacity to promote the formation of ROS. Here, the interaction of G-CSFR and H-ferritin was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid screen, mammalian two-hybrid assays, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation studies in vitro and in vivo. Additional immunofluorescence assay showed that the two proteins colocalized along the plasma membrane and partly in the cytoplasm. The binding site for H-ferritin was demonstrated to locate to the box3 motif on the C-terminal region of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR). Furthermore, we found the interaction of full-length G-CSFR with H-ferritin was dissociated at 30 minutes after G-CSF induction and then began to assemble at 45 minutes. The labile iron pool (LIP) is a pool of redox-active iron complexes, which is regulated tightly by the expression of H-ferritin. Experiments showed that the level of LIP increased significantly at 30 minutes after G-CSF stimulation and intracellular ROS formation changed in a pattern similar to LIP response to G-CSF in bone-marrow hematopoietic cells. G

  4. Heme Oxygenase Activity Correlates with Serum Indices of Iron Homeostasis in Healthy Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Andrew J.; Schreinemachers, Dina M.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirmed such participation of HO in iron homeostasis of humans. Carbon monoxide produced through HO activity will bind to hemoglobin in circulating erythrocytes, and therefore, blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) can be used as an index of HO activity. Using the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we tested the postulate that HO activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers. The investigation included 844 lifetime nonsmokers (586 females) 18 years of age and older in the study population. Significant correlations were demonstrated between COHb and several indices of iron homeostasis including serum levels of both ferritin and iron and percentage iron saturation of transferrin. There was no significant association between COHb and hemoglobin, the largest repository of heme in the human body, which functions as the substrate for HO. We conclude that HO activity contributes to human iron homeostasis with significant correlations between COHb and serum ferritin and iron levels and percentage iron saturation of transferrin. PMID:27199547

  5. Serum levels of the hepcidin-20 isoform in a large general population: The Val Borbera study☆

    PubMed Central

    Campostrini, Natascia; Traglia, Michela; Martinelli, Nicola; Corbella, Michela; Cocca, Massimiliano; Manna, Daniele; Castagna, Annalisa; Masciullo, Corrado; Silvestri, Laura; Olivieri, Oliviero; Toniolo, Daniela; Camaschella, Clara; Girelli, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Hepcidin, a 25 amino-acid liver hormone, has recently emerged as the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Proteomic studies in limited number of subjects have shown that biological fluids can also contain truncated isoforms, whose role remains to be elucidated. We report, for the first time, data about serum levels of the hepcidin-20 isoform (hep-20) in a general population, taking advantage of the Val Borbera (VB) study where hepcidin-25 (hep-25) was measured by SELDI-TOF-MS. Detectable amount of hep-20 were found in sera from 854 out of 1577 subjects (54.2%), and its levels were about 14% of hep-25 levels. A small fraction of subjects (n = 30, 1.9%) had detectable hep-20 but undetectable hep-25. In multivariate regression models, significant predictors of hep-20 were hep-25 and age in males, and hep-25, age, serum ferritin and body mass index in females. Of note, the hep-25:hep-20 ratio was not constant in the VB population, but increased progressively with increasing ferritin levels. This is not consistent with the simplistic view of hep-20 as a mere catabolic byproduct of hep-25. Although a possible active regulation of hep-20 production needs further confirmation, our results may also have implications for immunoassays for serum hepcidin based on antibodies lacking specificity for hep-25. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. PMID:22951294

  6. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia: pre-transplant conditioning and peripheral blood are associated with improved engraftment: an observational study on behalf of the Severe Aplastic Anemia and Pediatric Diseases Working Parties of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane; Beelen, Dietrich; Brinch, Lorentz; Bunjes, Donald; Butler, Andrew; Ganser, Arnold; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Koh, Mickey B; Komarnicki, Mieczyslaw; Kröger, Nicolaus; Maertens, Johan; Maschan, Alexei; Peters, Christina; Rovira, Montserrat; Sengeløv, Henrik; Socié, Gerard; Tischer, Johanna; Oneto, Rosi; Passweg, Jakob; Marsh, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin. About half of transplants with data available (39 of 86) were followed by posttransplant immunosuppression. Graft source was bone marrow in the majority of cases (n=77). Transplant practice changed over time with more transplants with conditioning and anti-thymocyte globulin as well as peripheral blood stem cells performed in later years. Ten year overall survival was 93% with 5 transplant-related deaths. Graft failure occurred in 32% of transplants. Risk of graft failure was significantly increased in transplants without conditioning, and with bone marrow as graft source. Lack of posttransplant immunosuppression also showed a trend towards increased risk of graft failure, while anti-thymocyte globulin did not have an influence. In summary, syngeneic transplant is associated with a significant risk of graft failure when no conditioning is given, but has an excellent long-term outcome. Furthermore, our comparatively large series enables us to recommend the use of pre-transplant conditioning rather than not and possibly to prefer peripheral blood as a stem cell source. PMID:23894010

  7. Ferritin administration effectively enhances immunity, physiological responses, and survival of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) challenged with white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Yuan-Hwa; Kuo, Ching-Ming; Lo, Chu-Fang; Lee, Min-Hsien; Lian, Juang-Lin; Hsieh, Shu-Ling

    2010-04-01

    We examined the physiological (hemolymph glucose, lactate, and lipid) and innate non-specific immune responses (total hemocyte count (THC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (release of superoxide anion, O(2)(-)) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity) to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) that were individually injected with 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ng g(-1) ferritin. Results showed that the THC, PO activity, and respiratory bursts of L. vannamei obviously increased (p < 0.05) 12 h after being injected with any dose of ferritin. However, the THC, PO activity, and respiratory bursts of L. vannamei that had received 0.5 and 1 ng g(-1) ferritin were significant higher than those of the other groups at 36-60, 60-72, and 36-60 h, respectively. SOD activities of L. vannamei 12 h after receiving 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ng g(-1) ferritin were significantly higher than those receiving saline. L. vannamei injected with ferritin at any dose maintained lower glucose, lactate, and lipid levels in response to WSSV challenge after 12-36, 24-48, and 36-60 h, respectively. The survival of shrimp that had received 0.5 and 1 ng g(-1) ferritin was significantly higher than that of shrimp that received saline and of control shrimp after 72 h. The ferritin messenger RNA transcripts of shrimp that had received 0.5 and 1 ng g(-1) ferritin were significantly higher than that of shrimp that received saline after 36 h. It was, therefore, concluded that the immune ability and resistance against WSSV infection increased in L. vannamei that had received > 0.5 ng g(-1) ferritin. Ferritin does play important roles in the innate immunity of the white shrimp. We observed higher SOD activities of L. vannamei that had received 0.1, 0.5, and 1 ng ferritin after 12 h than those that had received only saline (control), and the high SOD expression remained at the same levels even after 72 h of treatment.

  8. Reduced serum hepcidin levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Domenico; Pasino, Michela; Goodnough, Julia B.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Guido, Maria; Castagna, Annalisa; Busti, Fabiana; Campostrini, Natascia; Martinelli, Nicola; Vantini, Italo; Corrocher, Roberto; Ganz, Tomas; Fattovich, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) often have increased liver iron, a condition associated with reduced sustained response to antiviral therapy, more rapid progression to cirrhosis, and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The hepatic hormone hepcidin is the major regulator of iron metabolism and inhibits iron absorption and recycling from erythrophagocytosis. Hepcidin decrease is a possible pathophysiological mechanism of iron overload in CHC, but studies in humans have been hampered so far by the lack of reliable quantitative assays for the 25-amino acid bioactive peptide in serum (s-hepcidin). Methods Using a recently validated immunoassay, we measured s-hepcidin levels in 81 untreated CHC patients and 57 controls with rigorous definition of normal iron status. All CHC patients underwent liver biopsy with histological iron score. Results S-hepcidin was significantly lower in CHC patients than in controls (geometric means with 95% confidence intervals: 33.7, 21.5–52.9 vs. 90.9, 76.1–108.4 ng/mL, respectively; p < 0.001). In CHC patients, s-hepcidin significantly correlated with serum ferritin and histological total iron score, but not with s-interleukin-6. After stratification for ferritin quartiles, s-hepcidin increased significantly across quartiles in both controls and CHC patients (chi for trend, p < 0.001). However, in CHC patients, s-hepcidin was significantly lower than in controls for each corresponding quartile (analysis of variance, p < 0.001). Conclusions These results, together with very recent studies in animal and cellular models, indicate that although hepcidin regulation by iron stores is maintained in CHC, the suppression of this hormone by hepatitis C virus is likely an important factor in liver iron accumulation in this condition. PMID:19729219

  9. FTH1P3, a Novel H-Ferritin Pseudogene Transcriptionally Active, Is Ubiquitously Expressed and Regulated during Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Aversa, Ilenia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Gagliardi, Monica; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Faniello, Maria Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin, the major iron storage protein, performs its essential functions in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria. The variable assembly of 24 subunits of the Heavy (H) and Light (L) type composes the cytoplasmic molecule. In humans, two distinct genes code these subunits, both belonging to complex multigene families. Until now, one H gene has been identified with the coding sequence interrupted by three introns and more than 20 intronless copies widely dispersed on different chromosomes. Two of the intronless genes are actively transcribed in a tissue-specific manner. Herein, we report that FTH1P3, another intronless pseudogene, is transcribed. FTH1P3 transcript was detected in several cell lines and tissues, suggesting that its transcription is ubiquitary, as it happens for the parental ferritin H gene. Moreover, FTH1P3 expression is positively regulated during the cell differentiation process. PMID:26982978

  10. FTH1P3, a Novel H-Ferritin Pseudogene Transcriptionally Active, Is Ubiquitously Expressed and Regulated during Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Di Sanzo, Maddalena; Aversa, Ilenia; Santamaria, Gianluca; Gagliardi, Monica; Panebianco, Mariafranca; Biamonte, Flavia; Zolea, Fabiana; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin, the major iron storage protein, performs its essential functions in the cytoplasm, nucleus and mitochondria. The variable assembly of 24 subunits of the Heavy (H) and Light (L) type composes the cytoplasmic molecule. In humans, two distinct genes code these subunits, both belonging to complex multigene families. Until now, one H gene has been identified with the coding sequence interrupted by three introns and more than 20 intronless copies widely dispersed on different chromosomes. Two of the intronless genes are actively transcribed in a tissue-specific manner. Herein, we report that FTH1P3, another intronless pseudogene, is transcribed. FTH1P3 transcript was detected in several cell lines and tissues, suggesting that its transcription is ubiquitary, as it happens for the parental ferritin H gene. Moreover, FTH1P3 expression is positively regulated during the cell differentiation process.

  11. Use of the confined spaces of apo-ferritin and virus capsids as nanoreactors for catalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Maity, Basudev; Fujita, Kenta; Ueno, Takafumi

    2015-04-01

    Self-assembled protein cages providing nanosized internal spaces which are capable of encapsulating metal ions/complexes, enzymes/proteins have great potential for use as catalytic nanoreactors in efforts to mimic confined cellular environments for synthetic applications. Despite many uses in biomineralization, drug delivery, bio-imaging and so on, applications in catalysis are relatively rare. Because of their restricted size, protein cages are excellent candidates for use as vessels to exert control over reaction kinetics and product selectivity. Virus capsids with larger internal spaces can encapsulate multiple enzymes and can mimic natural enzymatic reactions. The apo-ferritin cage is known to accommodate various metal ions/complexes and suitable for organic transformation reactions in an aqueous medium. This review highlights the importance, prospects and recent significant research on catalytic reactions using the apo-ferritin cage and virus capsids.

  12. Nanoscale device architectures derived from biological assemblies: The case of tobacco mosaic virus and (apo)ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Annalisa; Eiben, Sabine; Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-03-01

    Virus particles and proteins are excellent examples of naturally occurring structures with well-defined nanoscale architectures, for example, cages and tubes. These structures can be employed in a bottom-up assembly strategy to fabricate repetitive patterns of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. In this paper, we review methods of assembly that make use of protein and virus scaffolds to fabricate patterned nanostructures with very high spatial control. We chose (apo)ferritin and tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as model examples that have already been applied successfully in nanobiotechnology. Their interior space and their exterior surfaces can be mineralized with inorganic layers or nanoparticles. Furthermore, their native assembly abilities can be exploited to generate periodic architectures for integration in electrical and magnetic devices. We introduce the state of the art and describe recent advances in biomineralization techniques, patterning and device production with (apo)ferritin and TMV.

  13. Fe3O4 magnetic core coated by silver and functionalized with N-acetyl cysteine as novel nanoparticles in ferritin adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akduman, Begüm; Uygun, Murat; Uygun, Deniz Aktaş; Antalík, Marián

    2013-04-01

    A novel metal-chelate affinity matrix utilizing N-acetyl cysteine as a metal chelating agent was synthesized. For this, magnetic Fe3O4 core was coated with silver by chemical reduction. Then, these magnetic silver nanoparticles were covered with N-acetyl cysteine, and Fe3+ was chelated to this modified magnetic silver nanoparticle. These magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, AFM, EDX, and ESR analysis. Synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and average size is found to be 69 nm. Fe3+ chelated magnetic silver nanoparticles were used for the adsorption of ferritin from its aqueous solution. Optimum conditions for the ferritin adsorption experiments were performed at pH 6.0 phosphate buffer and 25 °C of medium temperature and the maximum ferritin adsorption capacity is found to be 89.57 mg/g nanoparticle. Ferritin adsorption onto magnetic silver nanoparticles was increased with increasing ferritin concentration while adsorption capacity was decreased with increasing ionic strength. Affinity of the magnetic silver nanoparticles to the ferritin molecule was shown with SPR analysis. It was also observed that the adsorption capacity of the magnetic silver nanoparticles was not significantly changed after the five adsorption/desorption cycles.

  14. Do High Blood Hepcidin Concentrations Contribute to Low Ferritin Levels in Young Tennis Players at the End of Tournament Season?

    PubMed Central

    Ziemann, Ewa; Kasprowicz, Katarzyna; Kasperska, Anna; Zembroń-Lacny, Agnieszka; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej; Laskowski, Radoslaw

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify whether impaired iron metabolism in young athletes is a consequence of an excessive workload during the tournament season. Low levels of ferritin (under 25 µg·L-1) have been frequently observed in young tennis players. We considered this finding to be related to the high-intensity workload or to insufficient rest, which both trigger a strong immune response. Groups of male, well-trained young tennis players (16 ± 0.9 years old, average of 10-year training experience) and a control peer group participated in this study. The research consisted of two examination sessions (March and September 2010). Blood samples were collected to determine haematological and immunological parameters. Additionally, body composition and physical capacity were assessed. In both periods of the study, the trained groups were characterised by low levels of ferritin, but also elevated levels of pro- inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. Moreover, an inverse correlation between IL-1β and blood ferritin was observed. Additionally, an increased concentration of the iron homeostasis regulator hepcidin was found in blood samples (mean 71 ng·ml-1; range from 48 to 100 ng·ml-1). We concluded that the pro- inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, most likely induced by an extensive workload during the tournament season, was responsible for the low level of ferritin in young, professional athletes. Key Points The first research demonstrating low grade inflammation-induced iron deficiency to be associated with elevated blood hepcidin levels in young tennis athletes. Evaluation of immunological response after the complete tournament season in young male tennis players. Conclusion to introduce the assessment of hepcidin to monitor trainings as well as symptoms of overreaching more effectively. Research providing practical information for coaches that changes in diet and modifications in workloads applied in physical training could be more effective than iron

  15. The up-regulation of ferritin expression using a small-molecule ligand to the native mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Tibodeau, Jennifer D.; Fox, Paige M.; Ropp, Patricia A.; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Thorp, H. Holden

    2006-01-01

    The binding of small molecules to distinctive three-dimensional structures in mRNA provides a new dimension in RNA control, previously limited to the targeting of secondary structures with antisense and RNA interference; such targeting can modulate mRNA function and rates of protein biosynthesis. Small molecules that selectively bind the iron-responsive element (IRE), a specific three-dimensional structure in the noncoding region of the ferritin mRNA model that is recognized by the iron-regulatory protein repressor, were identified by using chemical footprinting. The assay used involved an oxoruthenium(IV) complex that oxidizes guanine bases in RNA sequences. Small molecules that blocked oxidation of guanines in the internal loop region were expected to selectively increase the rate of ferritin synthesis, because the internal loop region of the ferritin IRE is distinctive from those of other IREs. The natural product yohimbine was found (based on gel mobility shifts) to block cleavage of the internal loop RNA site by >50% and seemed to inhibit protein binding. In the presence of yohimbine, the rate of biosynthesis of ferritin in a cell-free expression system (rabbit reticulocyte lysate) increased by 40%. Assignment of the IRE–yohimbine interaction as the origin of this effect was supported by a similar increase in synthesis of luciferase protein in a chimera of the IRE and luciferase gene. The identification of a small, drug-like molecule that recognizes a naturally occurring three-dimensional mRNA structure and regulates protein biosynthesis rates raises the possibility that small molecules can regulate protein biosynthesis by selectively binding to mRNA. PMID:16381820

  16. Moving Iron through Ferritin Protein Nanocages Depends on Residues throughout Each Four α-Helix Bundle Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Suranjana; Bevers, Loes E.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic H ferritins move iron through protein cages to form biologically required, iron mineral concentrates. The biominerals are synthesized during protein-based Fe2+/O2 oxidoreduction and formation of [Fe3+O]n multimers within the protein cage, en route to the cavity, at sites distributed over ∼50 Å. Recent NMR and Co2+-protein x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies identified the entire iron path and new metal-protein interactions: (i) lines of metal ions in 8 Fe2+ ion entry channels with three-way metal distribution points at channel exits and (ii) interior Fe3+O nucleation channels. To obtain functional information on the newly identified metal-protein interactions, we analyzed effects of amino acid substitution on formation of the earliest catalytic intermediate (diferric peroxo-A650 nm) and on mineral growth (Fe3+O-A350 nm), in A26S, V42G, D127A, E130A, and T149C. The results show that all of the residues influenced catalysis significantly (p < 0.01), with effects on four functions: (i) Fe2+ access/selectivity to the active sites (Glu130), (ii) distribution of Fe2+ to each of the three active sites near each ion channel (Asp127), (iii) product (diferric oxo) release into the Fe3+O nucleation channels (Ala26), and (iv) [Fe3+O]n transit through subunits (Val42, Thr149). Synthesis of ferritin biominerals depends on residues along the entire length of H subunits from Fe2+ substrate entry at 3-fold cage axes at one subunit end through active sites and nucleation channels, at the other subunit end, inside the cage at 4-fold cage axes. Ferritin subunit-subunit geometry contributes to mineral order and explains the physiological impact of ferritin H and L subunits. PMID:21592958

  17. Prevalence of blood donor iron deficiency and feasibility ferritin-based iron replacement: a blood collection agency-based study.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, J; Katz, L; Elsmore, D; Kirbach, K; Erickson, Y; Hove, A; Black, C; Walsh-Jahnke, R

    2016-08-01

    Iron depletion is high in frequent whole-blood donors. It is of interest to blood centres to develop ways to mitigate this risk while maintaining the current blood supply. Our feasibility study shows that blood collection agencies can measure iron stores and safely offer iron replacement in frequent blood donors with low ferritin to reduce the risk of iron depletion and future donor deferrals for low haemoglobin.

  18. Antioxidant capacity of parsley cells (Petroselinum crispum L.) in relation to iron-induced ferritin levels and static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Rajabbeigi, Elham; Ghanati, Faezeh; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Payez, Atefeh

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate antioxidant response of parsley cells to 21 ppm iron and static magnetic field (SMF; 30 mT). The activity of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and the contents of malonyldialdehyde, iron and ferritin were measured at 6 and 12 h after treatments. Exposure to SMF increased the activity of CAT in treated cells, while combination of iron and SMF treatments as well as iron supply alone decreased CAT activity, compared to that of control cells. Combination of SMF with iron treatment reduced iron content of the cells and ameliorated mal effect of iron on CAT activity. All treatments reduced APX activity; however, the content of total ascorbate increased in response to iron and SMF+iron. The results showed that among the components of antioxidant system of parsley cells, enhanced activity of CAT in SMF-treated cells and increase of ascorbate in SMF+Fe-treated ones were responsible for the maintenance of membranes integrity. Ferritin contents of SMF- and SMF+Fe-treated cells also decreased significantly 12 h after treatments, compared to those of the control cells. These results cast doubt on the proposed functions of ferritin as a putative reactive oxygen species detoxifying molecule.

  19. Antibody-drug conjugates: targeting melanoma with cisplatin encapsulated in protein-cage nanoparticles based on human ferritin.

    PubMed

    Falvo, Elisabetta; Tremante, Elisa; Fraioli, Rocco; Leonetti, Carlo; Zamparelli, Carlotta; Boffi, Alberto; Morea, Veronica; Ceci, Pierpaolo; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2013-12-21

    A novel antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) was synthesized incorporating ferritin-based nanoparticles. An average of three molecules of monoclonal antibody (mAb) Ep1 to the human melanoma-specific antigen CSPG4 were conjugated to a single ferritin cage encapsulating about 50 cisplatin molecules (HFt-Pt-Ep1). The HFt-Pt-Ep1 nanoparticle had an estimated molecular size of about 900 kD and 33 nm, and flow cytometry demonstrated specific binding to a CSPG4(+) melanoma cell line, but not to a CSPG4(-) breast carcinoma cell line. As compared to the cisplatin-containing ferritin nanoparticle alone (HFt-Pt), which inhibited thymidine incorporation more efficiently in breast carcinoma than melanoma cells, the mAb-derivatized HFt-Pt-Ep1 nanoparticle had a 25-fold preference for the latter. A similar preference for melanoma was observed upon systemic intravenous administration of HFt-Pt-Ep1 to nude mice xenotransplanted with pre-established, palpable melanoma and breast carcinoma tumors. Thus, we have been able to determine precise combinations and stoichiometric relationships between mAbs and nanoparticle protein cages, whereby the latter lose their tropism for ubiquitously distributed cellular receptors, and acquire instead remarkably lineage-selective binding. HFt-Pt-Ep1 is therefore an interesting model to improve the therapeutic index of antiblastic therapy in a tumor such as melanoma, which at its advanced stages is totally refractory to mono- and combination-chemotherapy.

  20. Anaerobic iron deposition into horse spleen, recombinant human heavy and light and bacteria ferritins by large oxidants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Gerald D

    2007-11-01

    Large-molecule oxidants oxidize Fe(II) to form Fe(III) cores in the interior of ferritins at rates comparable to or faster than the iron deposition reaction using O(2) as oxidant. Iron deposition into horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) occurs using ferricyanide ion, 2,6-dichlorophenol-indophenol, and several redox proteins: cytochrome c, stellacyanin, and ceruloplasmin. Cytochrome c also loads iron into recombinant human H-chain (rHF), human L-chain (rLF), and A. vinelandii bacterioferritin (AvBF). The enzymatic activities of ferritins were monitored anaerobically using stopped-flow kinetic spectrophotometry. The reactions exhibit saturation kinetics with respect to the large oxidant concentrations, giving apparent Michaelis constants for cytochrome c as oxidant: K(m)=39.6 microM for HoSF and 6.9 microM for AvBF. Comparison of the kinetic parameters with that of iron deposition by O(2) shows that large oxidants load iron into HoSF and AvBF more effectively than O(2) and may use a mechanism different than the ferroxidase center. Large oxidants did not deposit iron as efficiently with rHF and rLF. The results suggest that the heme groups in AvBF and the protein redox centers present in heteropolymers may assist in anaerobic iron deposition by large oxidants. The physiological relevance of iron deposition by large molecules, including protein oxidants is discussed.

  1. Reticulocyte haemoglobin content vs. soluble transferrin receptor and ferritin index in iron deficiency anaemia accompanied with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marković, M; Majkić-Singh, N; Ignjatović, S; Singh, S

    2007-10-01

    Ferritin concentration, as a parameter of iron status that is commonly used in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), often has limited values if the iron deficiency is accompanied by inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the value of reticulocyte haemoglobin content (CHr) and soluble transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/F) in the diagnosis of IDA and differential diagnosis of IDA and anaemia of chronic disease. The study included 66 nonanaemic individuals as controls, 86 patients with IDA divided into noninflammatory and inflammatory subgroups, and 32 patients with anaemia of chronic disease. Blood count, iron, transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, ferritin, C-reactive protein, sTfR and CHr were determined. Receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed very high discriminating power for CHr, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) and sTfR/F in the diagnosis of IDA. In patients with anaemia of chronic disease these parameters showed no significant difference from the control. CHr and sTfR enabled recognition of iron deficiency and were not affected by acute phase reaction. They are sensitive markers of body iron status with additional value to conventional tests for the detection of iron deficiency.

  2. IlsA, a unique surface protein of Bacillus cereus required for iron acquisition from heme, hemoglobin and ferritin.

    PubMed

    Daou, Nadine; Buisson, Christophe; Gohar, Michel; Vidic, Jasmina; Bierne, Hélène; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina

    2009-11-01

    The human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus belongs to the B. cereus group that includes bacteria with a broad host spectrum. The ability of these bacteria to colonize diverse hosts is reliant on the presence of adaptation factors. Previously, an IVET strategy led to the identification of a novel B. cereus protein (IlsA, Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein), which is specifically expressed in the insect host or under iron restrictive conditions in vitro. Here, we show that IlsA is localized on the surface of B. cereus and hence has the potential to interact with host proteins. We report that B. cereus uses hemoglobin, heme and ferritin, but not transferrin and lactoferrin. In addition, affinity tests revealed that IlsA interacts with both hemoglobin and ferritin. Furthermore, IlsA directly binds heme probably through the NEAT domain. Inactivation of ilsA drastically decreases the ability of B. cereus to grow in the presence of hemoglobin, heme and ferritin, indicating that IlsA is essential for iron acquisition from these iron sources. In addition, the ilsA mutant displays a reduction in growth and virulence in an insect model. Hence, our results indicate that IlsA is a key factor within a new iron acquisition system, playing an important role in the general virulence strategy adapted by B. cereus to colonize susceptible hosts.

  3. Fabrication of Ordered Mesoporous Silica with Encapsulated Iron Oxide Particles using Ferritin-Doped Block Copolymer Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, D.; Watkins, J.; Naik, R.

    2006-03-01

    Recently, two-dimensional arrays of iron oxide clusters were fabricated by dip-coating a silica substrate into an aqueous solution. Here we report the encapsulation of ferritin in 3D mesoporous silica structures by the replication of block copolymer templates in supercritical CO2. In our approach, preparation of the highly ordered, doped template via spincasting and microphase separation and silica network formation occur in discreet steps. A solution of an amphiphilic PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer (Pluronic) template, horse spleen ferritin and a low concentration of PTSA acid was prepared and spin-coated onto a Si wafer. Upon drying the block copolymer microphase separates resulting in partitioning of the acid catalyst and ferritin to the hydrophilic domain. The polymer template was then exposed to a solution of supercritical carbon dioxide and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) at 125 bar and 40^oC. Equilibrium limited CO2 sorption in the block copolymer template resulted in modest dialation of the microphase segregated structure. Under these conditions, the precursor was readily infused into the copolymer and reacted within the hydrophilic domain containing the acid catalyst. The resultant film was calcined in air at 400^oC for 6 hours producing a well-ordered iron oxide-doped mesoporous silica film. TEM and XRD revealed crystalline iron oxide structures within the mesoporous silica supports. Magnetic properties were analyzed using a superconducting quantum intereference device (SQUID).

  4. Tolerance of broccoli cultivars to pre-transplanting clomazone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clomazone has been used for weed management in cabbage (Brassica oleracea L., capitata group) production in the U.S. for over 20 years; however, the herbicide is not currently registered for other crop groups within B. oleracea. The U.S. specialty crop pesticide registration program (The IR-4 Proje...

  5. Labile iron pool and ferritin content in developing rat brain gamma-irradiated in utero.

    PubMed

    Robello, Elizabeth; Galatro, Andrea; Puntarulo, Susana

    2009-05-01

    This study was aimed to assess the content of total Fe, Ferritin (Ft) and labile Fe pool (LIP) in developing rat brain exposed in utero to 1 Gy of gamma-irradiation. A significant increase (2.3-fold) in the total Fe content of the fetal rat brain irradiated in utero was observed from 1 to 4h post-irradiation, as compared to the content in non-irradiated brain. Ft was analyzed by immunoblotting. The Ft protein was composed by 20 kDa subunits. According to the analysis of the band density in the Western blot, the Ft content decreased by 77+/-15% 2h after gamma-irradiation, as compared to the values in non-irradiated samples. The effect of gamma-irradiation on the LIP was studied by both electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and by a fluorescence technique employing calcein (CA). A reduction on the LIP was detected at 2h post-irradiation, independently of the methodology employed for the assay. Since NO content increased in the same time frame of LIP decreasing, a protective role for NO is suggested in fetal rat brain exposed to gamma-irradiation. The data presented in this work are the first experimental evidence suggesting that, as part of the network of the cellular response to limit irradiation-dependent injury, a complex interaction between Fe and NO could be triggered.

  6. Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles for Direct Delivery of Tumor Antigens to Lymph Node and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Ram; Ko, Ho Kyung; Ryu, Ju Hee; Ahn, Keum Young; Lee, Young-Ho; Oh, Se Jin; Na, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Woo; Byun, Youngro; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-01-01

    Efficient delivery of tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) to lymph nodes (LNs) is essential to eliciting robust immune response for cancer immunotherapy but still remains unsolved. Herein, we evaluated the direct LN-targeting performance of four different protein nanoparticles with different size, shape, and origin [Escherichia coli DNA binding protein (DPS), Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome (PTS), hepatitis B virus capsid (HBVC), and human ferritin heavy chain (hFTN)] in live mice, using an optical fluorescence imaging system. Based on the imaging results, hFTN that shows rapid LN targeting and prolonged retention in LNs was chosen as a carrier of the model TSA [red fluorescence protein (RFP)], and the flexible surface architecture of hFTN was engineered to densely present RFPs on the hFTN surface through genetic modification of subunit protein of hFTN. The RFP-modified hFTN rapidly targeted LNs, sufficiently exposed RFPs to LN immune cells during prolonged period of retention in LNs, induced strong RFP-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response, and notably inhibited RFP-expressing melanoma tumor growth in live mice. This suggests that the strategy using protein nanoparticles as both TSA-carrying scaffold and anti-cancer vaccine holds promise for clinically effective immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:27725782

  7. Iron homeostasis and fire blight susceptibility in transgenic pear plants overexpressing a pea ferritin gene.

    PubMed

    Djennane, Samia; Cesbron, Colette; Sourice, Sophie; Cournol, Raphael; Dupuis, Fabrice; Eychenne, Magali; Loridon, Karine; Chevreau, Elisabeth

    2011-05-01

    The bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora causes the devastating disease known as fire blight in some rosaceous plants including apple and pear. One of the pathogenicity factors affecting fire blight development is the production of a siderophore, desferrioxamine, which overcomes the limiting conditions in plant tissues and also protects bacteria against active oxygen species. In this paper we examine the effect of an iron chelator protein encoded by the pea ferritin gene on the fire blight susceptibility of pear (Pyrus communis). Transgenic pear clones expressing this gene controlled either by the constitutive promoter CaMV 35S or by the inducible promoter sgd24 promoter were produced. The transgenic clones produced were analysed by Q-RT-PCR to determine the level of expression of the pea transgene. A pathogen-inducible pattern of expression of the pea transgene was observed in sgd24-promoter transformants. Adaptation to iron deficiency in vitro was tested in some transgenic clones and different iron metabolism parameters were measured. No strong effect on iron and chlorophyll content, root reductase activity and fire blight susceptibility was detected in the transgenic lines tested. No transformants showed a significant reduction in susceptibility to fire blight in greenhouse conditions when inoculated with E. amylovora.

  8. Ferroportin mediates the intestinal absorption of iron from a nanoparticulate ferritin core mimetic in mice.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Mohamad F; Frazer, David M; Faria, Nuno; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F A; Wilkins, Sarah J; Mirciov, Cornel; Powell, Jonathan J; Anderson, Greg J; Pereira, Dora I A

    2014-08-01

    The ferritin core is composed of fine nanoparticulate Fe(3+) oxohydroxide, and we have developed a synthetic mimetic, nanoparticulate Fe(3+) polyoxohydroxide (nanoFe(3+)). The aim of this study was to determine how dietary iron derived in this fashion is absorbed in the duodenum. Following a 4 wk run-in on an Fe-deficient diet, mice with intestinal-specific disruption of the Fpn-1 gene (Fpn-KO), or littermate wild-type (WT) controls, were supplemented with Fe(2+) sulfate (FeSO4), nanoFe(3+), or no added Fe for a further 4 wk. A control group was Fe sufficient throughout. Direct intestinal absorption of nanoFe(3+) was investigated using isolated duodenal loops. Our data show that FeSO4 and nanoFe(3+) are equally bioavailable in WT mice, and at wk 8 the mean ± SEM hemoglobin increase was 18 ± 7 g/L in the FeSO4 group and 30 ± 5 g/L in the nanoFe(3+) group. Oral iron failed to be utilized by Fpn-KO mice and was retained in enterocytes, irrespective of the iron source. In summary, although nanoFe(3+) is taken up directly by the duodenum its homeostasis is under the normal regulatory control of dietary iron absorption, namely via ferroportin-dependent efflux from enterocytes, and thus offers potential as a novel oral iron supplement.

  9. Chickpea Ferritin CaFer1 Participates in Oxidative Stress Response, and Promotes Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Shaista; Gupta, Deepti Bhushan; Dass, Suchismita; Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Aarti; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins store and sequester iron, and regulate iron homeostasis. The cDNA for a stress-responsive phytoferritin, previously identified in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of chickpea (Cicer arietinum), was cloned and designated CaFer1. The CaFer1 transcript was strongly induced in chickpea exposed to dehydration, hypersalinity and ABA treatment. Additionally, it has role in the defense against Fusarium oxysporum infection. Functional complementation of the yeast frataxin-deficient mutant, Δyfh1, indicates that CaFer1 functions in oxidative stress. The presence of CaFer1 in the extracellular space besides chloroplast establishes its inimitable nature from that of other phytoferritins. Furthermore, CaFer1 expression in response to iron suggests its differential mechanism of accumulation at two different iron conditions. CaFer1-overexpressing transgenic plants conferred improved growth and development, accompanied by altered expression of iron-responsive genes. Together, these results suggest that the phytoferritin, CaFer1, might play a key role in maintenance of iron buffering and adaptation to environmental challenges. PMID:27503257

  10. Narrowing SWNT diameter distribution using size-separated ferritin-based Fe catalysts.

    PubMed

    Durrer, Lukas; Greenwald, Jason; Helbling, Thomas; Muoth, Matthias; Riek, Roland; Hierold, Christofer

    2009-09-02

    Sensors and devices made from single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are most often electrically probed through metal leads contacting the semiconducting SWNTs (s-SWNTs). Contact barriers in general and Schottky barriers (SBs) in particular are usually obtained at a metal-semiconductor interface. The unique one-dimensional structure (1D) of SWNTs allows tailoring of the SB heights through the contact metal type and the size of the s-SWNT bandgap. A large workfunction reduces the SB height (e.g. using Pd as the metal contact material). The bandgap of an SWNT is inversely proportional to its diameter. Ohmic contacts--the preferable choice--are achieved for s-SWNTs with diameters greater than 2 nm on Pd metal leads. SWNT device reproducibility, on the other hand, requires a narrow distribution of the SWNT diameters. Here, we present a method to fabricate SWNTs with a large and adjustable mean diameter (1.9-2.4 nm) and very narrow diameter distribution (+/- 0.27 nm at mean diameter 1.9 nm). The results are achieved through a size separation of the ferritin catalyst particles by sedimentation velocity centrifugation prior to their use in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) formation of SWNTs.

  11. Mitochondrial ferritin protects the murine myocardium from acute exhaustive exercise injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenyue; Chang, Shiyang